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Sample records for abundance increased dramatically

  1. Dramatic increase in the relative abundance of large male dungeness crabs Cancer magister following closure of commercial fishing in Glacier Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S.J.; Shirley, T.C.; O'Clair, C. E.; Mondragon, J.

    2004-01-01

    The size structure of the population of the Dungeness crab Cancer magister was studied at six sites in or near Glacier Bay, Alaska, before and after the closure of commercial fishing. Seven years of preclosure and 4 years of postclosure data are presented. After the closure of Glacier Bay to commercial fishing, the number and size of legal-sized male Dungeness crabs increased dramatically at the experimental sites. Female and sublegal-sized male crabs, the portions of the population not directly targeted by commercial fishing, did not increase in size or abundance following the closure. There was not a large shift in the size-abundance distribution of male crabs at the control site that is still open to commercial fishing. Marine protected areas are being widely promoted as effective tools for managing fisheries while simultaneously meeting marine conservation goals and maintaining marine biodiversity. Our data demonstrate that the size of male Dungeness crabs can markedly increase in a marine reserve, which supports the concept that marine reserves could help maintain genetic diversity in Dungeness crabs and other crab species subjected to size-limit fisheries and possibly increase the fertility of females. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  2. Dramatic increase in fatigue life in hierarchical graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Yavari, F; Rafiee, M A; Rafiee, J; Yu, Z-Z; Koratkar, N

    2010-10-01

    We report the synthesis and fatigue characterization of fiberglass/epoxy composites with various weight fractions of graphene platelets infiltrated into the epoxy resin as well as directly spray-coated on to the glass microfibers. Remarkably only ∼0.2% (with respect to the epoxy resin weight and ∼0.02% with respect to the entire laminate weight) of graphene additives enhanced the fatigue life of the composite in the flexural bending mode by up to 1200-fold. By contrast, under uniaxial tensile fatigue conditions, the graphene fillers resulted in ∼3-5-fold increase in fatigue life. The fatigue life increase (in the flexural bending mode) with graphene additives was ∼1-2 orders of magnitude superior to those obtained using carbon nanotubes. In situ ultrasound analysis of the nanocomposite during the cyclic fatigue test suggests that the graphene network toughens the fiberglass/epoxy-matrix interface and prevents the delamination/buckling of the glass microfibers under compressive stress. Such fatigue-resistant hierarchical materials show potential to improve the safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of fiber-reinforced composites that are increasingly the material of choice in the aerospace, automotive, marine, sports, biomedical, and wind energy industries. PMID:20863061

  3. A Dramatic Increase of C1q Protein in the CNS during Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Daniel V.; Mateos, José María; Fraser, Deborah A.; Lovelett, Emilie A.; Coutellier, Laurence; Kim, Leo; Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Huang, Eric J.; Rowitch, David H.; Berns, Dominic S.; Tenner, Andrea J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Barres, Ben A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of cognitive function has emerged as one of the greatest health threats of old age. Age-related cognitive decline is caused by an impacted neuronal circuitry, yet the molecular mechanisms responsible are unknown. C1q, the initiating protein of the classical complement cascade and powerful effector of the peripheral immune response, mediates synapse elimination in the developing CNS. Here we show that C1q protein levels dramatically increase in the normal aging mouse and human brain, by as much as 300-fold. This increase was predominantly localized in close proximity to synapses and occurred earliest and most dramatically in certain regions of the brain, including some but not all regions known to be selectively vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., the hippocampus, substantia nigra, and piriform cortex. C1q-deficient mice exhibited enhanced synaptic plasticity in the adult and reorganization of the circuitry in the aging hippocampal dentate gyrus. Moreover, aged C1q-deficient mice exhibited significantly less cognitive and memory decline in certain hippocampus-dependent behavior tests compared with their wild-type littermates. Unlike in the developing CNS, the complement cascade effector C3 was only present at very low levels in the adult and aging brain. In addition, the aging-dependent effect of C1q on the hippocampal circuitry was independent of C3 and unaccompanied by detectable synapse loss, providing evidence for a novel, complement- and synapse elimination-independent role for C1q in CNS aging. PMID:23946404

  4. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used. PMID:27035152

  5. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500–2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  6. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  7. Dramatic increase in sea otter mortality from white sharks in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M. Tim; Hatfield, Brian B.; Harris, Michael D.; Ames, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Although southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) are not considered prey for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias), sharks do nonetheless bite sea otters. We analyzed spatial and temporal trends in shark bites on sea otters in California, assessing the frequency of shark bite wounds in 1,870 carcasses collected since 1985. The proportion of stranded sea otters having shark bites has increased sharply since 2003, and white shark bites now account for >50% of recovered carcasses. The trend was most pronounced in the southern part of the range, from Estero Bay to Point Conception, where shark bite frequency has increased eightfold. Seasonal trends were also evident: most shark-bitten carcasses are recovered in late summer and fall; however, the period of elevated shark bite frequency has lengthened. The causes of these trends are unclear, but possible contributing factors include increased white shark abundance and/or changes in white shark behavior and distribution. In particular, the spatiotemporal patterns of shark-bitten sea otters match increases in pinniped populations, and the increased availability of marine mammal prey for white sharks may have led to more sharks spending more time in nearshore waters utilized by both sea otters and pinnipeds.

  8. Constitutive Expression of GATA4 Dramatically Increases the Cardiogenic Potential of D3 Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laemmle, Lillian L.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4) is a vital regulator of cardiac programming that acts by inducing the expression of many different genes involved in cardiomyogenesis. Here we generated a D3 mouse embryonic stem cell line that constitutively expresses high levels of GATA4 and show that these cells have dramatically increased cardiogenic potential compared to an eGFP-expressing control cell line. Embryoid bodies (EB) derived from the D3-GATA4 line displayed increased levels of cardiac gene expression and showed more abundant cardiomyocyte differentiation than control eGFP EB. These cells and two additional lines expressing lower levels of GATA4 provide a platform to screen previously untested cardiac genes and gene combinations for their ability to further increase the efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation beyond that achieved by transgenic GATA4 alone. Non-integrative delivery of identified gene combinations will aid in the production of differentiated cells for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27441042

  9. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-An; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  10. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-an; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  11. Permeability Enhancers Dramatically Increase Zanamivir Absolute Bioavailability in Rats: Implications for an Orally Bioavailable Influenza Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Eric H.; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Li, Libin; Perdue, Michael L.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol) was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (tmax of 5 min) and a Cmax of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted Cmax for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results are being utilized

  12. Increased natural mortality at low abundance can generate an Allee effect in a marine fish

    PubMed Central

    Kuparinen, Anna; Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density-dependent regulation of population dynamics promotes population growth at low abundance and is therefore vital for recovery following depletion. Inversely, any process that reduces the compensatory density-dependence of population growth can negatively affect recovery. Here, we show that increased adult mortality at low abundance can reverse compensatory population dynamics into its opposite—a demographic Allee effect. Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks collapsed dramatically in the early 1990s and have since shown little sign of recovery. Many experienced dramatic increases in natural mortality, ostensibly attributable in some populations to increased predation by seals. Our findings show that increased natural mortality of a magnitude observed for overfished cod stocks has been more than sufficient to fundamentally alter the dynamics of density-dependent population regulation. The demographic Allee effect generated by these changes can slow down or even impede the recovery of depleted populations even in the absence of fishing. PMID:26064531

  13. Increased natural mortality at low abundance can generate an Allee effect in a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Negative density-dependent regulation of population dynamics promotes population growth at low abundance and is therefore vital for recovery following depletion. Inversely, any process that reduces the compensatory density-dependence of population growth can negatively affect recovery. Here, we show that increased adult mortality at low abundance can reverse compensatory population dynamics into its opposite-a demographic Allee effect. Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks collapsed dramatically in the early 1990s and have since shown little sign of recovery. Many experienced dramatic increases in natural mortality, ostensibly attributable in some populations to increased predation by seals. Our findings show that increased natural mortality of a magnitude observed for overfished cod stocks has been more than sufficient to fundamentally alter the dynamics of density-dependent population regulation. The demographic Allee effect generated by these changes can slow down or even impede the recovery of depleted populations even in the absence of fishing. PMID:26064531

  14. Dam removal increases American eel abundance in distant headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Eyler, Sheila; Wofford, John E.B.

    2012-01-01

    American eel Anguilla rostrata abundances have undergone significant declines over the last 50 years, and migration barriers have been recognized as a contributing cause. We evaluated eel abundances in headwater streams of Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, to compare sites before and after the removal of a large downstream dam in 2004 (Embrey Dam, Rappahannock River). Eel abundances in headwater streams increased significantly after the removal of Embrey Dam. Observed eel abundances after dam removal exceeded predictions derived from autoregressive models parameterized with data prior to dam removal. Mann–Kendall analyses also revealed consistent increases in eel abundances from 2004 to 2010 but inconsistent temporal trends before dam removal. Increasing eel numbers could not be attributed to changes in local physical habitat (i.e., mean stream depth or substrate size) or regional population dynamics (i.e., abundances in Maryland streams or Virginia estuaries). Dam removal was associated with decreasing minimum eel lengths in headwater streams, suggesting that the dam previously impeded migration of many small-bodied individuals (<300 mm TL). We hypothesize that restoring connectivity to headwater streams could increase eel population growth rates by increasing female eel numbers and fecundity. This study demonstrated that dams may influence eel abundances in headwater streams up to 150 river kilometers distant, and that dam removal may provide benefits for eel management and conservation at the landscape scale.

  15. The Mixmasters: A Smart Marketing Mix Helps a Small College Dramatically Increase Student Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, R. Dana; Stark, Ken

    1983-01-01

    Adrian College's steady increase and confidence in enrollment projections stem from a research-based, thoughtfully planned, carefully implemented, highly controlled marketing programs. Four major elements of a successful marketing mix are identified: product, price, place, promotion. (MLW)

  16. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2-3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  17. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F.; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S.; Ralph, Peter J.; Seymour, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2–3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2–3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  18. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  19. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A. D.; Rhile, Erika C.; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915–1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  20. Dramatic increase of the near-IR flux of the young source V2492 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkharov, A. A.; Lorenzetti, D.; Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Di Paola, A.; Vitali, F.; Larionov, V. M.

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of our EXor monitoring program dubbed EXORCISM (EXOR OptiCal and Infrared Systematic Monitoring - Antoniucci et al. 2013 PPVI, Lorenzetti et al. 2007 ApJ 665, 1182; Lorenzetti et al. 2009 ApJ 693, 1056), we are now observing a new increase of the near-IR brightness of the protostar V2492 Cyg, based on data taken at the AZT24 1m IR telescope (Campo Imperatore, Italy).

  1. Induced polyploidy dramatically increases the size and alters the shape of fruit in Actinidia chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Hu; Ferguson, A. Ross; Murray, Brian G.; Jia, Yilin; Datson, Paul M.; Zhang, Jingli

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Some otherwise promising selections of Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit) have fruit that are too small for successful commercialization. We have therefore made the first detailed study in diploid kiwifruit of the effects of chromosome doubling induced by colchicine on fruit size, shape and crop loading. Methods Flow cytometric analysis of young leaves and chromosome analysis of flower buds and root tips was used to confirm the stability of induced autotetraploids. Fruit weight, size and crop load were measured in the third year after planting in the field and for three consecutive years. DNA fingerprinting was used to confirm the origin of the material. Key Results There was a very significant increase in fruit size in induced autotetraploids of different genotypes of A. chinensis. With the commercially important diploid cultivar ‘Hort16A’, most regenerants, Type A plants, had fruit which were much the same shape as fruit of the diploid but, at the same fruit load, were much larger and heavier. Some regenerants, Type B plants, produced fruit similar to ‘fasciated’ fruit. Fruit of the autotetraploids induced from three female red-fleshed A. chinensis selections were also 50–60 % larger than fruit of their diploid progenitors. The main increase in fruit dimensions was in their diameters. These improved fruit characteristics were stable over several seasons. Conclusions Chromosome doubling has been shown to increase significantly fruit size in autotetraploid A. chinensis, highlighting the considerable potential of this technique to produce new cultivars with fruit of adequate size. Other variants with differently shaped fruit were also produced but the genetic basis of this variation remains to be elucidated. Autoploids of other Actinidia species with commercial potential may also show improved fruit characteristics, opening up many new possibilities for commercial development. PMID:21980192

  2. Sideromimic Modification of Lactivicin Dramatically Increases Potency against Extensively Drug-Resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Karina; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Rydzik, Anna M; Hinchliffe, Philip; Brem, Jürgen; Spencer, James; Schofield, Christopher J; Avison, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Acetamido derivatives of the naturally antibacterial non-β-lactam lactivicin (LTV) have improved activity against their penicillin binding protein targets and reduced hydrolysis by β-lactamases, but penetration into Gram-negative bacteria is still relatively poor. Here we report that modification of the LTV lactone with a catechol-type siderophore increases potency 1,000-fold against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a species renowned for its insusceptibility to antimicrobials. The MIC90 of modified lactone compound 17 (LTV17) against a global collection of extensively drug-resistant clinical S. maltophilia isolates was 0.063 μg · ml(-1) Sideromimic modification does not reduce the ability of LTVs to induce production of the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in S. maltophilia and does not reduce the rate at which LTVs are hydrolyzed by L1 or L2. We conclude, therefore, that lactivicin modification with a siderophore known to be preferentially used by S. maltophilia substantially increases penetration via siderophore uptake. LTV17 has the potential to be developed as a novel antimicrobial for treatment of infections by S. maltophilia More generally, our work shows that sideromimic modification in a species-targeted manner might prove useful for the development of narrow-spectrum antimicrobials that have reduced collateral effects. PMID:27139464

  3. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohen, Joel E.

    2016-02-01

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from `outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related.

  4. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohen, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from ‘outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954–2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related. PMID:26923210

  5. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  6. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  7. Tornado outbreak variability follows Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling and increases dramatically with severity.

    PubMed

    Tippett, Michael K; Cohen, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    Tornadoes cause loss of life and damage to property each year in the United States and around the world. The largest impacts come from 'outbreaks' consisting of multiple tornadoes closely spaced in time. Here we find an upward trend in the annual mean number of tornadoes per US tornado outbreak for the period 1954-2014. Moreover, the variance of this quantity is increasing more than four times as fast as the mean. The mean and variance of the number of tornadoes per outbreak vary according to Taylor's power law of fluctuation scaling (TL), with parameters that are consistent with multiplicative growth. Tornado-related atmospheric proxies show similar power-law scaling and multiplicative growth. Path-length-integrated tornado outbreak intensity also follows TL, but with parameters consistent with sampling variability. The observed TL power-law scaling of outbreak severity means that extreme outbreaks are more frequent than would be expected if mean and variance were independent or linearly related. PMID:26923210

  8. Increased iron abundances in slope avalanches of certain lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ya.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    2012-07-01

    On the basis of the first images of certain areas of Lunar surface obtained by the Chang'e-2 spacecraft and materials of large-scale image acquisition from the LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter) spacecraft, supplemented with remote spectral measurements performed from the Clementine spacecraft, the slope movements of material have been studied in lunar craters Daniell, Burg and Mauri A. It is established that despite a significantly different age of formation of these craters, the slope formations are of similar structure and differ by increased iron abundance in the soil surface layer. All objects are characterized with by increase in FeO abundance to 20 wt % at depths of several hundred meters from the surface. The material of the slope structures is distinguished by a low maturity rate. According to preliminary assessments using the optical maturity index and spectropolarimetric maturity index, the fresher slope formations can have an exposure age from several tens of years to several years.

  9. Severe plant invasions can increase mycorrhizal fungal abundance and diversity

    PubMed Central

    Lekberg, Ylva; Gibbons, Sean M; Rosendahl, Søren; Ramsey, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Invasions by non-native plants can alter ecosystem functions and reduce native plant diversity, but relatively little is known about their effect on belowground microbial communities. We show that invasions by knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) and leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula, hereafter spurge)—but not cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum)—support a higher abundance and diversity of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) than multi-species native plant communities. The higher AMF richness associated with knapweed and spurge is unlikely due to a co-invasion by AMF, because a separate sampling showed that individual native forbs hosted a similar AMF abundance and richness as exotic forbs. Native grasses associated with fewer AMF taxa, which could explain the reduced AMF richness in native, grass-dominated communities. The three invasive plant species harbored distinct AMF communities, and analyses of co-occurring native and invasive plants indicate that differences were partly driven by the invasive plants and were not the result of pre-invasion conditions. Our results suggest that invasions by mycotrophic plants that replace poorer hosts can increase AMF abundance and richness. The high AMF richness in monodominant plant invasions also indicates that the proposed positive relationship between above and belowground diversity is not always strong. Finally, the disparate responses among exotic plants and consistent results between grasses and forbs suggest that AMF respond more to plant functional group than plant provenance. PMID:23486251

  10. Bison grazing increases arthropod abundance and diversity in a tallgrass prairie.

    PubMed

    Moran, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    How grazing-induced ecosystem changes by ungulates indirectly affect other consumers is a question of great interest. I investigated the effect of grazing by American Bison (Bos bison L.) on an arthropod community in tallgrass prairie. Grazing increased the abundance of arthropods, an increase that was present in both herbivorous and carnivorous assemblages, but not in detritivores. The increase in herbivores and reduction in plant biomass from grazing resulted in an arthropod herbivore load almost three times higher in grazed plots compared with controls. Among herbivores, the sap-feeding insect guild was dramatically more abundant, while chewing herbivores were not affected. Herbivorous and carnivorous arthropod richness was higher in grazed plots, although the response was strongest among herbivores. Arthropod abundance on individual grasses and forbs was significantly higher in grazed areas, while plant type had no effect on abundance, indicating that the change was ecosystem-wide and not simply in response to a reduction in grass biomass from grazing. The response of arthropods to grazing was strongest in the early part of the growing season. Published research shows that ungulate grazing, although decreasing available biomass to other consumers, enhances plant quality by increasing nitrogen level in plants. The arthropod results of this study suggest higher plant quality outweighs the potential negative competitive effects of plant biomass removal, although other activities of bison could not be ruled out as the causative mechanism. Because arthropods are extremely abundant organisms in grasslands and a food source for other consumers, bison may represent valuable management tools for maintaining biodiversity. PMID:25198902

  11. Dramatic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Precious, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The setting: the science classroom. The characters: you and your students. The scene: Your students acting out scientific discoveries, modeling a frog's life cycle, mimicking the transition from liquid to solid. This is "dramatic science", a teaching approach that uses acting techniques to explore and develop young children's ideas about science.…

  12. Dramatic increase in late Cenozoic alpine erosion rates recorded by cave sediment in the southern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.

    2010-09-01

    Apparent increases in sedimentation rates during the past 5 Ma have been inferred at sites around the globe to document increased terrestrial erosion rates, but direct erosion rate records spanning this period are sparse. Modern and paleo-erosion rates for a small alpine catchment (3108 m above sea level) in the Southern Rocky Mountains are measured using the cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs) 10Be and 26Al in cave sediment, bedrock on the overlying landscape surface, and coarse bedload in a modern fluvial drainage. The unique setting of the Marble Mountain cave system allows the inherited erosion rates to be interpreted as basin-averaged erosion rates, resulting in the first CRN-based erosion rate record from the Rocky Mountains spanning 5 Myr. Pliocene erosion rates, derived from the oldest cave sample (4.9 ± 0.4 Ma), for the landscape above the cave are 4.9 ± 1.1 m Myr - 1 . Mid Pleistocene erosion rates are nearly an order of magnitude higher (33.1 ± 2.7 to 41.3 ± 3.9 m Myr - 1 ), and modern erosion rates are similar; due to the effects of snow shielding, these erosion rate estimates are likely higher than actual rates by 10-15%. The most likely explanation for this dramatic increase in erosion rates, which likely occurred shortly before 1.2 Ma, is an increase in the effectiveness of periglacial weathering processes at high elevations related to a cooler and wetter climate during the Pleistocene, providing support for the hypothesis that changes in late Cenozoic climate are responsible for increased continental erosion.

  13. Dramatic Teaching for Dramatic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Ressler's "Dramatic Changes" is a powerful guide for anyone brave enough to create a space for young people to discuss sexual orientation and gender identity. Her accessible style and tangible suggestions describe a creative and educationally sound approach to supporting youth in thoughtfully wrestling with one of the most controversial social…

  14. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    PubMed Central

    Genung, Mark A.; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Claire B.; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; Reynolds, Wm. Nicholas; Felker-Quinn, Emmi; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot) of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1) plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2) plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. Conclusions/Significance These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:20090850

  15. Pathbreaking CBO Study Shows Dramatic Increases in Income Disparities in 1980s and 1990s: An Analysis of the CBO Data. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Isaac; Greenstein, Robert; Primus, Wendell

    A study by the Congressional Budget Office of income and tax trends since 1979 showed dramatic increases in income disparities, especially between the wealthiest one percent of Americans and the rest of society, in the 1980s and 1990s. The percentage of income Americans paid in federal taxes declined for every income group between 1979-97. The…

  16. Climate warming increases biodiversity of small rodents by favoring rare or less abundant species in a grassland ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangshun; Liu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Yu, Guirui; He, Honglin; Zhang, Zhibin

    2013-06-01

    Our Earth is facing the challenge of accelerating climate change, which imposes a great threat to biodiversity. Many published studies suggest that climate warming may cause a dramatic decline in biodiversity, especially in colder and drier regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature, precipitation and a normalized difference vegetation index on biodiversity indices of rodent communities in the current or previous year for both detrended and nondetrended data in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia during 1982-2006. Our results demonstrate that temperature showed predominantly positive effects on the biodiversity of small rodents; precipitation showed both positive and negative effects; a normalized difference vegetation index showed positive effects; and cross-correlation function values between rodent abundance and temperature were negatively correlated with rodent abundance. Our results suggest that recent climate warming increased the biodiversity of small rodents by providing more benefits to population growth of rare or less abundant species than that of more abundant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, which does not support the popular view that global warming would decrease biodiversity in colder and drier regions. We hypothesized that higher temperatures might benefit rare or less abundant species (with smaller populations and more folivorous diets) by reducing the probability of local extinction and/or by increasing herbaceous food resources. PMID:23731812

  17. Mitochondria Increase Three-Fold and Mitochondrial Proteins and Lipid Change Dramatically in Postmeristematic Cells in Young Wheat Leaves Grown in Elevated CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E. J.; Williams, M.; Harwood, J. L.; Lindsay, J. G.; Leaver, C. J.; Leech, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    A dramatic stimulation in mitochondrial biogenesis during the very early stages of leaf development was observed in young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) grown in elevated CO2 (650 [mu]L L-1). An almost 3-fold increase in the number of mitochondria was observed in the very young leaf cells at the base of the first leaf of a 7-d-old wheat plant. In the same cells large increases in the accumulation of a mitochondrial chaperonin protein and the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex were detected by immunolabeling. Furthermore, the basal segment also shows a large increase in the rate of radiolabeling of diphosphatidylglycerol, a lipid confined to the inner mitochondrial membrane. This dramatic response in very young leaf cells to elevated CO2 suggests that the numerous documented positive effects of elevated CO2 on wheat leaf development are initiated as early as 12 h postmitosis. PMID:12228485

  18. Using expert knowledge to increase realism in environmental system models can dramatically reduce the need for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharari, S.; Hrachowitz, M.; Fenicia, F.; Gao, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2014-12-01

    Conceptual environmental system models, such as rainfall runoff models, generally rely on calibration for parameter identification. Increasing complexity of this type of models for better representation of hydrological process heterogeneity, typically makes parameter identification more difficult. Although various, potentially valuable, approaches for better parameter estimation have been developed, strategies to impose general conceptual understanding of how a catchment works into the process of parameter estimation has not been fully explored. In this study we assess the effects of imposing semi-quantitative, relational inequality constraints, based on expert-knowledge, for model development and parameter specification, efficiently exploiting the complexity of a semi-distributed model formulation. Making use of a topography driven rainfall-runoff modeling (FLEX-TOPO) approach, a catchment was delineated into three functional units, i.e., wetland, hillslope and plateau. Ranging from simple to complex, three model setups, FLEXA, FLEXB and FLEXC were developed based on these functional units, where FLEXA is a lumped representation of the study catchment, and the semi-distributed formulations FLEXB and FLEXC progressively introduce more complexity. In spite of increased complexity, FLEXB and FLEXC allow modelers to compare parameters, as well as states and fluxes, of their different functional units to each other, allowing the formulation of constraints that limit the feasible parameter space. We show that by allowing for more landscape-related process heterogeneity in a model, e.g., FLEXC, the performance increases even without traditional calibration. The additional introduction of relational constraints further improved the performance of these models.

  19. Calcium isotope evidence for dramatic increase of continental weathering during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Jean-Michel; Suan, Guillaume; Tacail, Théo; Simon, Laurent; Martin, Jeremy E.; Mattioli, Emanuela; Balter, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The early Toarcian was punctuated by pulses of massive carbon injection that are thought to have triggered, through increased greenhouse conditions, elevated continental discharge and nutrient input, marine anoxia, seawater acidification and species extinctions. Nevertheless, the mode and tempo of changes in continental weathering across this interval remains highly debated, leading to considerable uncertainty about the main causes of these perturbations. In this study we present calcium isotope measurements (δ44/40Ca) of well-preserved brachiopods and bulk rock samples from the hemipelagic strata of Pliensbachian-Toarcian age of Peniche in Portugal in order to constrain changes in the calcium cycle and hence changes in continental weathering during the early Toarcian. The data reveal a similar trend as carbon isotope data from the same section and show negative excursions of about 0.5‰ at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) interval. The comparison of δ44/40Ca ratios recorded in brachiopods and bulk rock corrected for variable dolomite contribution indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global isotopic composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms or in hydrological budget of the considered basin. Box modeling results suggest that the Pl-To and T-OAE δ44/40Ca excursions can be explained by a transient 90% decrease of carbonate accumulation due to seawater acidification followed by a 500% increase in continental weathering rates. The sharp increases in continental weathering inferred from the δ44/40Ca ratios seem overall consistent with lower Toarcian sedimentological and biotic records that document rapid crises in carbonate production followed by episodes of increased calcium carbonate burial. Nevertheless, the maximum of carbonate burial recorded by most NW European basinal successions occurs several hundreds of kyrs after

  20. Using expert knowledge to increase realism in environmental system models can dramatically reduce the need for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharari, S.; Hrachowitz, M.; Fenicia, F.; Gao, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2013-12-01

    Conceptual environmental systems models, such as rainfall runoff models, generally rely on calibration for parameter identification. Increasing complexity of this type of model for better representation of hydrological process heterogeneity typically makes parameter identification more difficult. Although various, potentially valuable, strategies for better parameter identification were developed in the past, strategies to impose general conceptual understanding regarding how a catchment works into the process of parameterizing a conceptual model has still not been fully explored. In this study we assess the effect of imposing semi-quantitative, relational expert knowledge into the model development and parameter selection, efficiently exploiting the complexity of a semi-distributed model formulation. Making use of a topography driven rainfall-runoff modeling (FLEX-TOPO) approach, a catchment was delineated into three functional units, i.e. wetland, hillslope and plateau. Ranging from simplicity to complexity, three model set-ups, FLEXA, FLEXB and FLEXC have been developed based on these functional units. While FLEXA is a lumped representation of the study catchment, the semi-distributed formulations FLEXB and FLEXC introduce increasingly more complexity by distinguishing 2 and 3 functional units, respectively. In spite of increased complexity, FLEXB and FLEXC allow modelers to compare parameters as well as states and fluxes of their different functional units to each other. Based on these comparisons, expert knowledge based, semi-quantitative relational constraints have been imposed on three models structures. More complexity of models allows more imposed constraints. It was shown that a constrained but uncalibrated semi-distributed model, FLEXC, can predict runoff with similar performance than a calibrated lumped model, FLEXA. In addition, when constrained and calibrated, the semi-distributed model FLEXC exhibits not only higher performance but also reduced

  1. Dramatic increase in negative superhelicity of plasmid DNA in the forespore compartment of sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, W L; Setlow, P

    1990-01-01

    Plasmid pUB110, isolated from vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis, has an average of 34 negative supertwists (tau av = -34). This value falls to -30 early in sporulation, and the plasmid in the mother cell compartment maintains a tau av of -30. However, the plasmid within the developing forespore becomes much more negatively supercoiled, reaching a tau av of -47 in the dormant spore. This increased negative supercoiling in the forespore plasmid takes place in parallel with the synthesis of small, acid-soluble spore proteins, alpha and beta; and the plasmid from spores lacking small, acid-soluble proteins alpha and beta has a tau av of -40. The large increase in negative supercoiling of spore plasmid was also observed with Bacillus megaterium and in B. subtilis containing a plasmid with an origin different from that of pUB110. During spore germination plasmid pUB110 rapidly relaxed back to the tau av value characteristic of vegetative cells. It is possible that the observed changes in forespore plasmid topology are involved in modulating gene expression, DNA photochemistry, or both of these parameters in this compartment. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:2104613

  2. Elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] can dramatically increase wheat yields in semi-arid environments and buffer against heat waves.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Glenn J; Tausz, Michael; O'Leary, Garry; Mollah, Mahabubur R; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Seneweera, Saman; Mock, Ivan; Löw, Markus; Partington, Debra L; McNeil, David; Norton, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Wheat production will be impacted by increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 [CO2 ], which is expected to rise from about 400 μmol mol(-1) in 2015 to 550 μmol mol(-1) by 2050. Changes to plant physiology and crop responses from elevated [CO2 ] (e[CO2 ]) are well documented for some environments, but field-level responses in dryland Mediterranean environments with terminal drought and heat waves are scarce. The Australian Grains Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility was established to compare wheat (Triticum aestivum) growth and yield under ambient (~370 μmol(-1) in 2007) and e[CO2 ] (550 μmol(-1) ) in semi-arid environments. Experiments were undertaken at two dryland sites (Horsham and Walpeup) across three years with two cultivars, two sowing times and two irrigation treatments. Mean yield stimulation due to e[CO2 ] was 24% at Horsham and 53% at Walpeup, with some treatment responses greater than 70%, depending on environment. Under supplemental irrigation, e[CO2 ] stimulated yields at Horsham by 37% compared to 13% under rainfed conditions, showing that water limited growth and yield response to e[CO2 ]. Heat wave effects were ameliorated under e[CO2 ] as shown by reductions of 31% and 54% in screenings and 10% and 12% larger kernels (Horsham and Walpeup). Greatest yield stimulations occurred in the e[CO2 ] late sowing and heat stressed treatments, when supplied with more water. There were no clear differences in cultivar response due to e[CO2 ]. Multiple regression showed that yield response to e[CO2 ] depended on temperatures and water availability before and after anthesis. Thus, timing of temperature and water and the crop's ability to translocate carbohydrates to the grain postanthesis were all important in determining the e[CO2 ] response. The large responses to e[CO2 ] under dryland conditions have not been previously reported and underscore the need for field level research to provide mechanistic understanding for adapting crops to a changing

  3. Long-term increase in Karenia brevis abundance along the Southwest Florida Coast

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Larry E.; Compton, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Data collected along the southwest coast of Florida between Tampa Bay and Sanibel Island on the abundance of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis from 1954 to 2002 were examined for spatial and temporal patterns. K. brevis was found to be approximately 20-fold more abundant within 5 km of the shoreline than 20-30 km offshore. Overall, K. brevis was approximately 13-18-fold more abundant in 1994-2002 than in 1954-1963. In 1954-1963, K. brevis occurred primarily in the fall months. In 1994-2002, it was more abundant not only in the fall, but also in the winter and spring months. It is hypothesized that greater nutrient availability in the ecosystem is the most likely cause of this increase in K. brevis biomass, and the large increase in the human population and its activities in South Florida over the past half century is a major factor. PMID:18437245

  4. Long-term increase in Karenia brevis abundance along the Southwest Florida Coast.

    PubMed

    Brand, Larry E; Compton, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Data collected along the southwest coast of Florida between Tampa Bay and Sanibel Island on the abundance of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis from 1954 to 2002 were examined for spatial and temporal patterns. K. brevis was found to be approximately 20-fold more abundant within 5 km of the shoreline than 20-30 km offshore. Overall, K. brevis was approximately 13-18-fold more abundant in 1994-2002 than in 1954-1963. In 1954-1963, K. brevis occurred primarily in the fall months. In 1994-2002, it was more abundant not only in the fall, but also in the winter and spring months. It is hypothesized that greater nutrient availability in the ecosystem is the most likely cause of this increase in K. brevis biomass, and the large increase in the human population and its activities in South Florida over the past half century is a major factor. PMID:18437245

  5. On the Dramatic Increase ofDitrupa arietina O.F. Müller (Annelida: Polychaeta) Along Both the French and the Spanish Catalan Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grémare, A.; Sardá, R.; Medernach, L.; Jordana, E.; Pinedo, S.; Amouroux, J. M.; Martin, D.; Nozais, C.; Charles, F.

    1998-10-01

    The distribution and population structure of the serpulid polychaete Ditrupa arietinawere assessed along the section of the Mediterranean coast between Barcelona and Montpellier. The study combined: (1) the analysis of the existing historical data referring to the period before the 1970s; (2) the results of impact assessment surveys carried out in the late 1980s and the 1990s; and (3) the results of two surveys carried out in the Bay of Blanes and along the coast between Cape Cerbère and Port-la-Nouvelle during 1996. The results of the surveys carried out in the 1990s show the occurrence of high densities (i.e. >1000 ind m -2) of Ditrupa arietinaat all the sites sampled. These results can be compared with the few reports of this species before 1970, leading to the conclusion that D. arietinahas recently increased all along the Catalan coast. Ditrupa arietinais preferentially found between 20 and 30 m depth, which mostly corresponds to well-sorted fine sands and muddy sands. Both the results of population monitoring and the heterogeneity of population structure at small spatial scale show that the dynamics of this species is unstable. The observed distribution pattern is therefore interpreted as resulting from a response to both wide-scale environmental parameters (accounting for the dramatic increase of the species at a wide geographical scale), and to local environmental factors (accounting for small-scale heterogeneity in population structure). Analysis of the relationship between sedimentary data and densities of D. arietinasuggests that this species is highly sensitive to the presence of fine sediments. However, because of the regional importance of the phenomenon, it is concluded that the dramatic increase of D. arietinaalong both the Spanish and the French Catalan coast does not result from sediment instability.

  6. Streptomycin use in apple orchards did not increase abundance of mobile resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Brion; Holliger, Eduard; Walsh, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycin is used as a first-line defense and tetracycline as a second-line defense, in the fight against fire blight disease in apple and pear orchards. We have performed the first study to quantitatively analyze the influence of streptomycin use in agriculture on the abundance of streptomycin and tetracycline resistance genes in apple orchards. Flowers, leaves, and soil were collected from three orchard sites in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Gene abundance distribution was analyzed using two-way anova and principal component analysis to investigate relationships between gene abundance data over time and treatment. The mobile antibiotic resistance genes, strA, strB, tetB, tetM, tetW, and the insertion sequence IS1133, were detected prior to streptomycin treatment in almost all samples, indicating the natural presence of these resistance genes in nature. Statistically significant increases in the resistance gene abundances were occasional, inconsistent, and not reproducible from one year to the next. We conclude that the application of streptomycin in these orchards was not associated with sustained increases in streptomycin or tetracycline resistance gene abundances. PMID:24164283

  7. Hydrophobic derivatization of N-linked glycans for increased ion abundance in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walker, S Hunter; Lilley, Laura M; Enamorado, Monica F; Comins, Daniel L; Muddiman, David C

    2011-08-01

    A library of neutral, hydrophobic reagents was synthesized for use as derivatizing agents in order to increase the ion abundance of N-linked glycans in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). The glycans are derivatized via hydrazone formation and are shown to increase the ion abundance of a glycan standard more than 4-fold. Additionally, the data show that the systematic addition of hydrophobic surface area to the reagent increases the glycan ion abundance, a property that can be further exploited in the analysis of glycans. The results of this study will direct the future synthesis of hydrophobic reagents for glycan analysis using the correlation between hydrophobicity and theoretical non-polar surface area calculation to facilitate the development of an optimum tag for glycan derivatization. The compatibility and advantages of this method are demonstrated by cleaving and derivatizing N-linked glycans from human plasma proteins. The ESI-MS signal for the tagged glycans are shown to be significantly more abundant, and the detection of negatively charged sialylated glycans is enhanced. PMID:21953184

  8. Hydrophobic Derivatization of N-linked Glycans for Increased Ion Abundance in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Lilley, Laura M.; Enamorado, Monica F.; Comins, Daniel L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2011-08-01

    A library of neutral, hydrophobic reagents was synthesized for use as derivatizing agents in order to increase the ion abundance of N-linked glycans in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). The glycans are derivatized via hydrazone formation and are shown to increase the ion abundance of a glycan standard more than 4-fold. Additionally, the data show that the systematic addition of hydrophobic surface area to the reagent increases the glycan ion abundance, a property that can be further exploited in the analysis of glycans. The results of this study will direct the future synthesis of hydrophobic reagents for glycan analysis using the correlation between hydrophobicity and theoretical non-polar surface area calculation to facilitate the development of an optimum tag for glycan derivatization. The compatibility and advantages of this method are demonstrated by cleaving and derivatizing N-linked glycans from human plasma proteins. The ESI-MS signal for the tagged glycans are shown to be significantly more abundant, and the detection of negatively charged sialylated glycans is enhanced.

  9. Amine-functionalized task-specific ionic liquids: a mechanistic explanation for the dramatic increase in viscosity upon complexation with CO{sub 2} from molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, K.E.; Maginn, E.J.

    2008-11-15

    The capture of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion, particularly in coal-fired power plants, represents a critical component of efforts aimed at stabilizing greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Recently, a series of second-generation task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) containing amine functional groups have been synthesized and demonstrated to have much higher capacities for CO{sub 2} due to their reactivity with CO{sub 2}, as well unusually high viscosities in both the neat and complexed states. The current work extends the seminal studies of CO{sub 2} capture with ionic liquids (ILs) by providing insight from simulations into the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increase in viscosity upon complexation. Simulations conclusively demonstrate that the slow translational and rotational dynamics, which are manifest in the high viscosity, may be attributable to the formation of a strong, pervasive hydrogen-bonded network. Semiquantitative estimates of the cation and anion self-diffusion coefficients and rotational time constants, as well as detailed hydrogen bond analysis, are consistent with the experimentally observed formation of glassy or gel-like materials upon contact with CO{sub 2}. This has significant implications for the design of new approaches or materials involving ILs that take advantage of these preconceived limitations, in the synthesis or manipulation of new TSIL frameworks for CO{sub 2} capture, and in novel experimental studies of chemistries and dynamics in persistent heterogeneous environments.

  10. Soil nutrient additions increase invertebrate herbivore abundances, but not herbivory, across three grassland systems.

    PubMed

    La Pierre, Kimberly J; Smith, Melinda D

    2016-02-01

    Resource availability may influence invertebrate communities, with important consequences for ecosystem function, such as biomass production. We assessed: (1) the effects of experimental soil nutrient additions on invertebrate abundances and feeding rates and (2) the resultant changes in the effects of invertebrates on aboveground plant biomass at three grassland sites spanning the North American Central Plains, across which plant tissue chemistry and biomass vary. Invertebrate communities and rates of herbivory were sampled within a long-term nutrient-addition experiment established at each site along the broad Central Plains precipitation gradient. Additionally, the effects of invertebrates on aboveground plant biomass were determined under ambient and elevated nutrient conditions. At the more mesic sites, invertebrate herbivore abundances increased and their per capita rate of herbivory decreased with nutrient additions. In contrast, at the semi-arid site where plant biomass is low and plant nutrient concentrations are high, invertebrate herbivore abundances did not vary and per capita rates of herbivory increased with nutrient additions. No change in the effect of invertebrate herbivores on aboveground plant biomass was observed at any of the sites. In sum, nutrient additions induced shifts in both plant biomass and leaf nutrient content, which altered invertebrate abundances and feeding rate. However, due to the inverse relationship between changes in herbivore abundance and per capita rates of herbivory, nutrient additions did not alter the effect of invertebrates on aboveground biomass. Overall, we suggest that this inverse response of herbivore abundance and per capita feeding rate may buffer ecosystems against changes in invertebrate damage in response to fluctuations in nutrient levels. PMID:26474567

  11. Decreasing Abundance, Increasing Diversity and Changing Structure of the Wild Bee Community (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) along an Urbanization Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortel, Laura; Henry, Mickaël; Guilbaud, Laurent; Guirao, Anne Laure; Kuhlmann, Michael; Mouret, Hugues; Rollin, Orianne; Vaissière, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild bees are important pollinators that have declined in diversity and abundance during the last decades. Habitat destruction and fragmentation associated with urbanization are reported as part of the main causes of this decline. Urbanization involves dramatic changes of the landscape, increasing the proportion of impervious surface while decreasing that of green areas. Few studies have investigated the effects of urbanization on bee communities. We assessed changes in the abundance, species richness, and composition of wild bee community along an urbanization gradient. Methodology/Principal Findings Over two years and on a monthly basis, bees were sampled with colored pan traps and insect nets at 24 sites located along an urbanization gradient. Landscape structure within three different radii was measured at each study site. We captured 291 wild bee species. The abundance of wild bees was negatively correlated with the proportion of impervious surface, while species richness reached a maximum at an intermediate (50%) proportion of impervious surface. The structure of the community changed along the urbanization gradient with more parasitic species in sites with an intermediate proportion of impervious surface. There were also greater numbers of cavity-nesting species and long-tongued species in sites with intermediate or higher proportion of impervious surface. However, urbanization had no effect on the occurrence of species depending on their social behavior or body size. Conclusions/Significance We found nearly a third of the wild bee fauna known from France in our study sites. Indeed, urban areas supported a diverse bee community, but sites with an intermediate level of urbanization were the most speciose ones, including greater proportion of parasitic species. The presence of a diverse array of bee species even in the most urbanized area makes these pollinators worthy of being a flagship group to raise the awareness of urban citizens about

  12. Increased energy expenditure by a seabird in response to higher food abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Roby, D.D.; Suryan, R.M.; Irons, D.B.; Turco, K.R.; Brown, E.D.; Thedinga, J.F.; Visser, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Variability in forage fish abundance strongly affects seabird behavior and reproductive success, although details of this relationship are unclear. During 1997 and 1998, we measured (1) daily energy expenditure (DEE) of 80 parent black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla at 2 colonies in Prince William Sound, Alaska (North Icy Bay and Shoup Bay), (2) abundance of surface-schooling forage fishes within the foraging range of each colony, and (3) diet composition, energy delivery rates to nestlings, and reproductive success of kittiwakes at these same colonies. Female DEE was highest at North Icy Bay in 1998, while male DEE did not differ by colony year. Abundances of Pacific herring Clupea pallasi and sand lance Ammodytes hexapterus were highest near North Icy Bay in 1998 and nearly egual in density, although Age 1+ herring comprised the majority of the diet there. Energy delivery rates to nestlings, nestling growth rates, and productivity were also highest at North Icy Bay in 1998. We suggest that female kittiwakes responded to the increased abundance of Age 1+ herring near North Icy Bay in 1998 by increasing their DEE, which in turn positively affected reproductive success. Given that adult kittiwakes have been shown to suffer decreased survival as a response to increased energy expenditure during brood rearing, the positive correlation we observed between increased abundance of a high quality food source, parental effort, and productivity is consistent with maximizing lifetime reproductive success. The lack of a response in male DEE suggests that brood-rearing roles in kittiwakes differ between genders. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  13. Effects of an increasing filter feeder stock on larval abundance in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Karin; Gelderman, Edzard; Kamermans, Pauline; Smaal, Aad C.; Wolff, Wim J.

    2009-02-01

    Predation by adult bivalves on bivalve larvae has been suggested to reduce larval abundance in areas with high bivalve filter-feeder biomass. Although the occurrence of larviphagy is well-studied in the laboratory, its effects in the field have scarcely been studied. We studied larviphagy at different spatial scales in the Oosterschelde estuary. On the scale of individuals, we confirmed that larviphagy occurs in Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus edulis in the Oosterschelde estuary, by examining stomach contents of adult bivalves. On a local scale, we studied effects of larviphagy by a Pacific oyster ( C. gigas) bed on presence of larvae in the overlying water column by sampling larvae with fixed plankton nets. Abundance of blue mussel ( M. edulis) larvae was significantly reduced by the oyster. Abundance of C. gigas larvae did not seem to be reduced by the oyster bed, but spawning by the adult oysters during the sampling period may have affected the results. On estuary-scale, the effect of larviphagy on larval abundance of C. gigas and M. edulis was studied using existing monitoring data over 6 years for M. edulis and 13 years for C. gigas. Numbers of M. edulis larvae showed no significant trend over the 6 years studied. Abundance of C. gigas larvae declined with an increasing filter feeder stock (that was mainly caused by an increase in C. gigas stock). This decline may be due to direct effects of larviphagy or indirect effects such as lowered food levels, and was not compensated by an increased larval production. All results combined, complemented with a theoretical estimate of the effect of larviphagy on estuary-scale, strongly suggest that larviphagy is major source of mortality for bivalve larvae in the Oosterschelde estuary.

  14. Targeted disruption of BMP signaling through type IA receptor (BMPR1A) in osteocyte suppresses SOST and RANKL, leading to dramatic increase in bone mass, bone mineral density and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shuxian, Lin; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Phipps, Matthew; Aruwajoye, Olumide; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Yuan, Hui; Kim, Harry K W; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest a critical role of osteocytes in controlling skeletal development and bone remodeling although the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. This study investigated BMP signaling in osteocytes by disrupting Bmpr1a under the Dmp1-promoter. The conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed a striking osteosclerotic phenotype with increased trabecular bone volume, thickness, number, and mineral density as assessed by X-ray and micro-CT. The bone histomorphometry, H&E, and TRAP staining revealed a dramatic increase in trabecular and cortical bone masses but a sharp reduction in osteoclast number. Moreover, there was an increase in BrdU positive osteocytes (2-5-fold) and osteoid volume (~4-fold) but a decrease in the bone formation rate (~85%) in the cKO bones, indicating a defective mineralization. The SEM analysis revealed poorly formed osteocytes: a sharp increase in cell numbers, a great reduction in cell dendrites, and a remarkable change in the cell distribution pattern. Molecular studies demonstrated a significant decrease in the Sost mRNA levels in bone (>95%), and the SOST protein levels in serum (~85%) and bone matrices. There was a significant increase in the β-catenin (>3-fold) mRNA levels as well as its target genes Tcf1 (>6-fold) and Tcf3 (~2-fold) in the cKO bones. We also showed a significant decrease in the RANKL levels of serum proteins (~65%) and bone mRNA (~57%), and a significant increase in the Opg mRNA levels (>20-fold) together with a significant reduction in the Rankl/Opg ratio (>95%), which are responsible for a sharp reduction in the cKO osteoclasts. The values of mechanical strength were higher in cKO femora (i.e. max force, displacement, and work failure). These results suggest that loss of BMP signaling specifically in osteocytes dramatically increases bone mass presumably through simultaneous inhibition of RANKL and SOST, leading to osteoclast inhibition and Wnt activation together. Finally, a working hypothesis is

  15. Greater deciduous shrub abundance extends tundra peak season and increases modeled net CO2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shannan K; Griffin, Kevin L; Steltzer, Heidi; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie T

    2015-06-01

    Satellite studies of the terrestrial Arctic report increased summer greening and longer overall growing and peak seasons since the 1980s, which increases productivity and the period of carbon uptake. These trends are attributed to increasing air temperatures and reduced snow cover duration in spring and fall. Concurrently, deciduous shrubs are becoming increasingly abundant in tundra landscapes, which may also impact canopy phenology and productivity. Our aim was to determine the influence of greater deciduous shrub abundance on tundra canopy phenology and subsequent impacts on net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) during the growing and peak seasons in the arctic foothills region of Alaska. We compared deciduous shrub-dominated and evergreen/graminoid-dominated community-level canopy phenology throughout the growing season using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). We used a tundra plant-community-specific leaf area index (LAI) model to estimate LAI throughout the green season and a tundra-specific NEE model to estimate the impact of greater deciduous shrub abundance and associated shifts in both leaf area and canopy phenology on tundra carbon flux. We found that deciduous shrub canopies reached the onset of peak greenness 13 days earlier and the onset of senescence 3 days earlier compared to evergreen/graminoid canopies, resulting in a 10-day extension of the peak season. The combined effect of the longer peak season and greater leaf area of deciduous shrub canopies almost tripled the modeled net carbon uptake of deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities, while the longer peak season alone resulted in 84% greater carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities. These results suggest that greater deciduous shrub abundance increases carbon uptake not only due to greater leaf area, but also due to an extension of the period of peak greenness, which extends the period of maximum carbon uptake. PMID:25556338

  16. Increasing aridity reduces soil microbial diversity and abundance in global drylands

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C.; Eldridge, David J.; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Quero, José Luis; García-Gómez, Miguel; Gallardo, Antonio; Ulrich, Werner; Bowker, Matthew A.; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Gutiérrez, Julio R.; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L.; Miriti, Maria; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Stavi, Ilan; Wang, Deli; Woods, Natasha N.; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria and fungi play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of their responses to climate change lags significantly behind that of other organisms. This gap in our understanding is particularly true for drylands, which occupy ∼41% of Earth´s surface, because no global, systematic assessments of the joint diversity of soil bacteria and fungi have been conducted in these environments to date. Here we present results from a study conducted across 80 dryland sites from all continents, except Antarctica, to assess how changes in aridity affect the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil bacteria and fungi. The diversity and abundance of soil bacteria and fungi was reduced as aridity increased. These results were largely driven by the negative impacts of aridity on soil organic carbon content, which positively affected the abundance and diversity of both bacteria and fungi. Aridity promoted shifts in the composition of soil bacteria, with increases in the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and α-Proteobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Contrary to what has been reported by previous continental and global-scale studies, soil pH was not a major driver of bacterial diversity, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota. Our results fill a critical gap in our understanding of soil microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They suggest that changes in aridity, such as those predicted by climate-change models, may reduce microbial abundance and diversity, a response that will likely impact the provision of key ecosystem services by global drylands. PMID:26647180

  17. Increasing aridity reduces soil microbial diversity and abundance in global drylands.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Fernando T; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C; Eldridge, David J; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Quero, José Luis; García-Gómez, Miguel; Gallardo, Antonio; Ulrich, Werner; Bowker, Matthew A; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Gutiérrez, Julio R; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L; Miriti, Maria; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Stavi, Ilan; Wang, Deli; Woods, Natasha N; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-12-22

    Soil bacteria and fungi play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of their responses to climate change lags significantly behind that of other organisms. This gap in our understanding is particularly true for drylands, which occupy ∼41% of Earth´s surface, because no global, systematic assessments of the joint diversity of soil bacteria and fungi have been conducted in these environments to date. Here we present results from a study conducted across 80 dryland sites from all continents, except Antarctica, to assess how changes in aridity affect the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil bacteria and fungi. The diversity and abundance of soil bacteria and fungi was reduced as aridity increased. These results were largely driven by the negative impacts of aridity on soil organic carbon content, which positively affected the abundance and diversity of both bacteria and fungi. Aridity promoted shifts in the composition of soil bacteria, with increases in the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and α-Proteobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Contrary to what has been reported by previous continental and global-scale studies, soil pH was not a major driver of bacterial diversity, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota. Our results fill a critical gap in our understanding of soil microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They suggest that changes in aridity, such as those predicted by climate-change models, may reduce microbial abundance and diversity, a response that will likely impact the provision of key ecosystem services by global drylands. PMID:26647180

  18. Apparent increase in coccolithophore abundance in the subtropical North Atlantic from 1990 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhardt, Kristen M.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.; Freeman, Natalie M.; Bates, Nicholas R.

    2016-02-01

    As environmental conditions evolve with rapidly increasing atmospheric CO2, biological communities will change as species reorient their distributions, adapt, or alter their abundance. In the surface ocean, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) has been increasing over the past several decades as anthropogenic CO2 dissolves into seawater, causing acidification (decreases in pH and carbonate ion concentration). Calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores, are thought to be especially vulnerable to ocean acidification. How coccolithophores will respond to increasing carbon input has been a subject of much speculation and inspired numerous laboratory and mesocosm experiments, but how they are currently responding in situ is less well documented. In this study, we use coccolithophore (haptophyte) pigment data collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site together with satellite estimates (1998-2014) of surface chlorophyll and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) as a proxy for coccolithophore abundance to show that coccolithophore populations in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre have been increasing significantly over the past 2 decades. Over 1990-2012, we observe a 37 % increase in euphotic zone-integrated coccolithophore pigment abundance at BATS, though we note that this is sensitive to the period being analyzed. We further demonstrate that variability in coccolithophore chlorophyll a here is positively correlated with variability in nitrate and DIC (and especially the bicarbonate ion) in the upper 30 m of the water column. Previous studies have suggested that coccolithophore photosynthesis may benefit from increasing CO2, but calcification may eventually be hindered by low pHT (< 7.7). Given that DIC has been increasing at BATS by ˜ 1.4 µmol kg-1 yr-1 over the period of 1991-2012, we speculate that coccolithophore photosynthesis and perhaps calcification may have increased in response to anthropogenic CO2 input.

  19. Increasing coccolithophore abundance in the subtropical North Atlantic from 1990 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhardt, K. M.; Lovenduski, N. S.; Freeman, N. M.; Bates, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    As environmental conditions evolve with rapidly increasing atmospheric CO2, biological communities will change as species reorient their distributions, adapt, or alter their abundance. In the surface ocean, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) has been increasing over the past several decades as anthropogenic CO2 dissolves into seawater, causing acidification (decreases in pH and carbonate ion concentration). Calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores, are thought to be especially vulnerable to ocean acidification. How coccolithophores will respond to increasing carbon input has been a subject of much speculation and inspired numerous laboratory and mesocosm experiments, but how they are currently responding in situ is less well documented. In this study, we use coccolithophore pigment data collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site together with satellite estimates (1998-2014) of surface chlorophyll and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) to show that coccolithophore populations in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre have been increasing significantly over the past two decades. Over 1991-2012, we observe a 37 % increase in euphotic zone-integrated coccolithophore abundance at BATS. We further demonstrate that variability in coccolithophore abundance here is positively correlated with variability in DIC (and especially the bicarbonate ion) in the upper 30 m of the water column. Previous studies have suggested that coccolithophore photosynthesis may benefit from increasing CO2, but calcification may eventually be hindered by low pHT (< 7.7). Given that DIC has been increasing at BATS by ∼ 1.4 μmol kg-1 yr-1 over 1991 to 2012, we speculate that coccolithophore photosynthesis and perhaps calcification may have increased in response to anthropogenic CO2 input.

  20. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All Children" (Kirsten Haugen); and (5) "Helping…

  1. Creative Dramatics Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia School District, PA. Office of Early Childhood Programs.

    This handbook on creative dramatics at the elementary school level is primarily intended to assist the teacher who already has some training in creative dramatics. The handbook contains sections on (1) the philosophy and objectives of the program, including a discussion of an affective curriculum; (2) definitions of key concepts, including general…

  2. Evidence of increasing antibiotic resistance gene abundances in archived soils since 1940.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Charles W; Dolfing, Jan; Ehlert, Phillip A I; Graham, David W

    2010-01-15

    Mass production and use of antibiotics and antimicrobials in medicine and agriculture have existed for over 60 years, and has substantially benefited public health and agricultural productivity throughout the world. However, there is growing evidence that resistance to antibiotics (AR) is increasing both in benign and pathogenic bacteria, posing an emerging threat to public and environmental health in the future. Although evidence has existed for years from clinical data of increasing AR, almost no quantitative environmental data exist that span increased industrial antibiotic production in the 1950s to the present; i.e., data that might delineate trends in AR potentially valuable for epidemiological studies. To address this critical knowledge gap, we speculated that AR levels might be apparent in historic soil archives as evidenced by antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) abundances over time. Accordingly, DNA was extracted from five long-term soil-series from different locations in The Netherlands that spanned 1940 to 2008, and 16S rRNA gene and 18 ARG abundances from different major antibiotic classes were quantified. Results show that ARG from all classes of antibiotics tested have significantly increased since 1940, but especially within the tetracyclines, with some individual ARG being >15 times more abundant now than in the 1970s. This is noteworthy because waste management procedures have broadly improved and stricter rules on nontherapeutic antibiotic use in agriculture are being promulgated. Although these data are local to The Netherlands, they suggest basal environmental levels of ARG still might be increasing, which has implications to similar locations around the world. PMID:20025282

  3. Habitat alteration increases invasive fire ant abundance to the detriment of amphibians and reptiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, B.D.; Rothermel, B.B.; Reed, R.N.; Luhring, T.M.; Schlatter, K.; Trenkamp, L.; Gibbons, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Altered habitats have been suggested to facilitate red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) colonization and dispersal, possibly compounding effects of habitat alteration on native wildlife. In this study, we compared colonization intensity of wood cover boards by S. invicta among four forest management treatments in South Carolina, USA: an unharvested control (>30 years old); a partially thinned stand; a clearcut with coarse woody debris retained; and a clearcut with coarse woody debris removed. Additionally, we compared dehydration rates and survival of recently metamorphosed salamanders (marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum, and mole salamanders, A. talpoideum) among treatments. We found that the number of wood cover boards colonized by S. invicta differed significantly among treatments, being lowest in the unharvested forest treatments and increasing with the degree of habitat alteration. Salamanders that were maintained in experimental field enclosures to study water loss were unexpectedly subjected to high levels of S. invicta predation that differed among forest treatments. All known predation by S. invicta was restricted to salamanders in clearcuts. The amount of vegetative ground cover was inversely related to the likelihood of S. invicta predation of salamanders. Our results show that S. invicta abundance increases with habitat disturbance and that this increased abundance has negative consequences for amphibians that remain in altered habitats. Our findings also suggest that the presence of invasive S. invicta may compromise the utility of cover boards and other techniques commonly used in herpetological studies in the Southeast. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Parasite predators exhibit a rapid numerical response to increased parasite abundance and reduce transmission to hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Skylar R; Wyderko, Jennie A; Sheehy, Robert R; Belden, Lisa K; Wojdak, Jeremy M

    2013-01-01

    Predators of parasites have recently gained attention as important parts of food webs and ecosystems. In aquatic systems, many taxa consume free-living stages of parasites, and can thus reduce parasite transmission to hosts. However, the importance of the functional and numerical responses of parasite predators to disease dynamics is not well understood. We collected host–parasite–predator cooccurrence data from the field, and then experimentally manipulated predator abundance, parasite abundance, and the presence of alternative prey to determine the consequences for parasite transmission. The parasite predator of interest was a ubiquitous symbiotic oligochaete of mollusks, Chaetogaster limnaei limnaei, which inhabits host shells and consumes larval trematode parasites. Predators exhibited a rapid numerical response, where predator populations increased or decreased by as much as 60% in just 5 days, depending on the parasite:predator ratio. Furthermore, snail infection decreased substantially with increasing parasite predator densities, where the highest predator densities reduced infection by up to 89%. Predators of parasites can play an important role in regulating parasite transmission, even when infection risk is high, and especially when predators can rapidly respond numerically to resource pulses. We suggest that these types of interactions might have cascading effects on entire disease systems, and emphasize the importance of considering disease dynamics at the community level. PMID:24340184

  5. Pepino (Solanum muricatum) planting increased diversity and abundance of bacterial communities in karst area.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hui; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    Soil nutrients and microbial communities are the two key factors in revegetation of barren environments. Ecological stoichiometry plays an important role in ecosystem function and limitation, but the relationships between above- and belowground stoichiometry and the bacterial communities in a typical karst region are poorly understood. We used pepino (Solanum muricatum) to examine the stoichiometric traits between soil and foliage, and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the karst soil. The soil had a relatively high pH, low fertility, and coarse texture. Foliar N:P ratio and the correlations with soil nitrogen and phosphorus suggested nitrogen limitation. The planting of pepino increased soil urease activity and decreased catalase activity. Higher diversity of bacteria was determined in the pepino rhizosphere than bulk soil using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in all samples, accounting for more than 80% of the reads. On a genus level, all 625 detected genera were found in all rhizosphere and bulk soils, and 63 genera showed significant differences among samples. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices in the rhizosphere than bulk soil indicated that planting of pepino increased diversity and abundance of bacterial communities in karst area. PMID:26902649

  6. Pepino (Solanum muricatum) planting increased diversity and abundance of bacterial communities in karst area

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hui; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    Soil nutrients and microbial communities are the two key factors in revegetation of barren environments. Ecological stoichiometry plays an important role in ecosystem function and limitation, but the relationships between above- and belowground stoichiometry and the bacterial communities in a typical karst region are poorly understood. We used pepino (Solanum muricatum) to examine the stoichiometric traits between soil and foliage, and determine diversity and abundance of bacteria in the karst soil. The soil had a relatively high pH, low fertility, and coarse texture. Foliar N:P ratio and the correlations with soil nitrogen and phosphorus suggested nitrogen limitation. The planting of pepino increased soil urease activity and decreased catalase activity. Higher diversity of bacteria was determined in the pepino rhizosphere than bulk soil using a next-generation, Illumina-based sequencing approach. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in all samples, accounting for more than 80% of the reads. On a genus level, all 625 detected genera were found in all rhizosphere and bulk soils, and 63 genera showed significant differences among samples. Higher Shannon and Chao 1 indices in the rhizosphere than bulk soil indicated that planting of pepino increased diversity and abundance of bacterial communities in karst area. PMID:26902649

  7. Projections of climate conditions that increase coral disease susceptibility and pathogen abundance and virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Jeffrey; van Hooidonk, Ruben; Eakin, C. Mark; Puotinen, Marjetta; Garren, Melissa; Williams, Gareth; Heron, Scott F.; Lamb, Joleah; Weil, Ernesto; Willis, Bette; Harvell, C. Drew

    2015-07-01

    Rising sea temperatures are likely to increase the frequency of disease outbreaks affecting reef-building corals through impacts on coral hosts and pathogens. We present and compare climate model projections of temperature conditions that will increase coral susceptibility to disease, pathogen abundance and pathogen virulence. Both moderate (RCP 4.5) and fossil fuel aggressive (RCP 8.5) emissions scenarios are examined. We also compare projections for the onset of disease-conducive conditions and severe annual coral bleaching, and produce a disease risk summary that combines climate stress with stress caused by local human activities. There is great spatial variation in the projections, both among and within the major ocean basins, in conditions favouring disease development. Our results indicate that disease is as likely to cause coral mortality as bleaching in the coming decades. These projections identify priority locations to reduce stress caused by local human activities and test management interventions to reduce disease impacts.

  8. Wastewater Irrigation Increases the Abundance of Potentially Harmful Gammaproteobacteria in Soils in Mezquital Valley, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Broszat, Melanie; Nacke, Heiko; Blasi, Ronja; Siebe, Christina; Huebner, Johannes; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater contains large amounts of pharmaceuticals, pathogens, and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Only a little is known about the dissemination of resistance determinants and changes in soil microbial communities affected by wastewater irrigation. Community DNAs from Mezquital Valley soils under irrigation with untreated wastewater for 0 to 100 years were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR for the presence of sul genes, encoding resistance to sulfonamides. Amplicon sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from community DNAs from soils irrigated for 0, 8, 10, 85, and 100 years was performed and revealed a 14% increase of the relative abundance of Proteobacteria in rainy season soils and a 26.7% increase in dry season soils for soils irrigated for 100 years with wastewater. In particular, Gammaproteobacteria, including potential pathogens, such as Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Acinetobacter spp., were found in wastewater-irrigated fields. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 96 isolates from soils irrigated with wastewater for 100 years (48 from dry and 48 from rainy season soils) revealed that 46% were affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria (mainly potentially pathogenic Stenotrophomonas strains) and 50% with the Bacilli, whereas all 96 isolates from rain-fed soils (48 from dry and 48 from rainy season soils) were affiliated with the Bacilli. Up to six types of antibiotic resistance were found in isolates from wastewater-irrigated soils; sulfamethoxazole resistance was the most abundant (33.3% of the isolates), followed by oxacillin resistance (21.9% of the isolates). In summary, we detected an increase of potentially harmful bacteria and a larger incidence of resistance determinants in wastewater-irrigated soils, which might result in health risks for farm workers and consumers of wastewater-irrigated crops. PMID:24951788

  9. Dietary fucoidan modulates the gut microbiota in mice by increasing the abundance of Lactobacillus and Ruminococcaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qingsen; Shan, Xindi; Cai, Chao; Hao, Jiejie; Li, Guoyun; Yu, Guangli

    2016-07-13

    Recently, fucoidan has been proposed as a potential prebiotic agent for functional food and pharmaceutical development. However, while previous studies illustrated favorable modulations of gut microbiota by fucoidan, changes in the overall microbial structure remain elusive. In the present study, modulations of gut microbiota by different fucoidans were studied using high throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. We found that at the expense of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria such as Peptococcus, the abundance of beneficial bacteria including Lactobacillus and Ruminococcaceae was significantly increased in response to fucoidan treatment. Besides, by maintaining a more balanced composition of gut microbiota, dietary fucoidan also significantly reduced the antigen load and the inflammatory response in the host as evidenced by the decreased serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein levels. Collectively, our results indicate that fucoidan can be used as a gut microbiota modulator for health promotion and treatment of intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:27334000

  10. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  11. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  12. Altered rainfall patterns increase forb abundance and richness in native tallgrass prairie

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sydney K.; Collins, Scott L.; Blair, John M.; Smith, Melinda D.; Knapp, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Models predict that precipitation variability will increase with climate change. We used a 15-year precipitation manipulation experiment to determine if altering the timing and amount of growing season rainfall will impact plant community structure in annually burned, native tallgrass prairie. The altered precipitation treatment maintained the same total growing season precipitation as the ambient precipitation treatment, but received a rainfall regime of fewer, larger rain events, and longer intervals between events each growing season. Although this change in precipitation regime significantly lowered mean soil water content, overall this plant community was remarkably resistant to altered precipitation with species composition relatively stable over time. However, we found significantly higher forb cover and richness and slightly lower grass cover on average with altered precipitation, but the forb responses were manifest only after a ten-year lag period. Thus, although community structure in this grassland is relatively resistant to this type of altered precipitation regime, forb abundance in native tallgrass prairie may increase in a future characterized by increased growing season precipitation variability. PMID:26830847

  13. Dietary flavonoid fisetin increases abundance of high-molecular-mass hyaluronan conferring resistance to prostate oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lall, Rahul K; Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Adhami, Vaqar M; Gong, Yuansheng; Lucey, John A; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-09-01

    We and others have shown previously that fisetin, a plant flavonoid, has therapeutic potential against many cancer types. Here, we examined the probable mechanism of its action in prostate cancer (PCa) using a global metabolomics approach. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis of tumor xenografts from fisetin-treated animals identified several metabolic targets with hyaluronan (HA) as the most affected. Efficacy of fisetin on HA was then evaluated in vitro and also in vivo in the transgenic TRAMP mouse model of PCa. Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS) was performed to analyze the molar mass (Mw) distribution of HA. Fisetin treatment downregulated intracellular and secreted HA levels both in vitro and in vivo Fisetin inhibited HA synthesis and degradation enzymes, which led to cessation of HA synthesis and also repressed the degradation of the available high-molecular-mass (HMM)-HA. SEC-MALS analysis of intact HA fragment size revealed that cells and animals have more abundance of HMM-HA and less of low-molecular-mass (LMM)-HA upon fisetin treatment. Elevated HA levels have been shown to be associated with disease progression in certain cancer types. Biological responses triggered by HA mainly depend on the HA polymer length where HMM-HA represses mitogenic signaling and has anti-inflammatory properties whereas LMM-HA promotes proliferation and inflammation. Similarly, Mw analysis of secreted HA fragment size revealed less HMM-HA is secreted that allowed more HMM-HA to be retained within the cells and tissues. Our findings establish that fisetin is an effective, non-toxic, potent HA synthesis inhibitor, which increases abundance of antiangiogenic HMM-HA and could be used for the management of PCa. PMID:27335141

  14. Developmental expression of chicken antithrombin III is regulated by increased RNA abundance and intracellular processing.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Rosenberg, J; Samad, F; Bergtrom, G; Banfield, D K

    1993-01-23

    We isolated and sequenced a 432 bp cDNA to cAT-III, that encoded 115 nucleotides of 5' untranslated sequence, a 17 amino acid long signal peptide and residues 1-88 of the mature protein, and used it to prepare a probe for measuring and correlating the developmental changes of steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels with known changes in antigen levels. Densitometric analysis of nuclease protection (n = 2), Northern blot (n = 4), and slot blots (n = 3) of total RNA from chick livers of 16-day-old embryos to 6-day-old chicks showed a 2.6 +/- 0.5-fold increase in steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels. Assay of functional mRNA levels by in vitro translation of poly(A)+ RNA and specific immunoprecipitation of 35S-Met-labelled cAT-III was comparable to RNA analysis (16-day-old embryos vs. 10-day-old hatchlings). We evaluated whether there were developmental differences in post-translational secretion which may also contribute to the regulation of the circulating level of this protein. Pulse-chase studies of freshly-isolated hepatocytes from 16-day-old embryos and 10-day-old hatchlings maintained in suspension demonstrated a approx. 5.0-5.5-fold increase in cAT-III levels at steady-state secretion. The above findings indicate that changes in circulating cAT-III levels during late embryonic development are primarily due to increased abundance of cAT-III mRNA. In addition, we postulate that post-translational intracellular processing may account for further differences in circulating protein levels. PMID:8424948

  15. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  16. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  17. Dramatic increases in obesity and overweight prevalence and body mass index among ethnic-immigrant and social class groups in the United States, 1976-2008.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gopal K; Siahpush, Mohammad; Hiatt, Robert A; Timsina, Lava R

    2011-02-01

    This study examined trends in US obesity and overweight prevalence and body mass index (BMI) among 30 immigrant groups, stratified by race/ethnicity and length of immigration, and among detailed education, occupation, and income/poverty groups from 1976 to 2008. Using 1976-2008 National Health Interview Surveys, differentials in obesity, overweight, and BMI, based on self-reported height and weight, were analyzed by using disparity indices, logistic, and linear regression. The obesity prevalence for the US population aged ≥18 tripled from 8.7% in 1976 to 27.4% in 2008. Overweight prevalence increased from 36.9% in 1976 to 62.0% in 2008. During 1991-2008, obesity prevalence for US-born adults increased from 13.9 to 28.7%, while prevalence for immigrants increased from 9.5 to 20.7%. While immigrants in each ethnic group and time period had lower obesity and overweight prevalence and BMI than the US-born, immigrants' risk of obesity and overweight increased with increasing duration of residence. In 2003-2008, obesity prevalence ranged from 2.3% for recent Chinese immigrants to 31-39% for American Indians, US-born blacks, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans, and long-term Mexican and Puerto Rican immigrants. Between 1976 and 2008, the obesity prevalence more than quadrupled for those with a college education or sales occupation. Although higher prevalence was observed for lower education, income, and occupation levels in each period, socioeconomic gradients in obesity and overweight decreased over time because of more rapid increases in prevalence among higher socioeconomic groups. Continued immigrant and socioeconomic disparities in prevalence will likely have substantial impacts on future obesity trends in the US. PMID:20549318

  18. A Single Mutation at PB1 Residue 319 Dramatically Increases the Safety of PR8 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in a Murine Model without Compromising Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is preferentially recommended for use in most children yet remains unsafe for the groups most at risk. Here we have improved the safety of a mouse-adapted live attenuated influenza vaccine containing the same attenuating amino acid mutations as in human LAIV by adding an additional mutation at PB1 residue 319. This results in a vaccine with a 20-fold decrease in protective efficacy and a 10,000-fold increase in safety. PMID:26676793

  19. Dramatic increase of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli in German intensive care units: secular trends in antibiotic drug use and bacterial resistance, 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective of the present study was to analyse secular trends in antibiotic consumption and resistance data from a network of 53 intensive care units (ICUs). Methods The study involved prospective unit and laboratory-based surveillance in 53 German ICUs from 2001 through 2008. Data were calculated on the basis of proportions of nonduplicate resistant isolates, resistance densities (that is, the number of resistant isolates of a species per 1,000 patient-days) and an antimicrobial usage density (AD) expressed as daily defined doses (DDD) and normalised per 1,000 patient-days. Results Total mean antibiotic use remained stable over time and amounted to 1,172 DDD/1,000 patient-days (range 531 to 2,471). Carbapenem use almost doubled to an AD of 151 in 2008. Significant increases were also calculated for quinolone (AD of 163 in 2008) and third-generation and fourth-generation cephalosporin use (AD of 117 in 2008). Aminoglycoside consumption decreased substantially (AD of 86 in 2001 and 24 in 2008). Resistance proportions were as follows in 2001 and 2008, respectively: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 26% and 20% (P = 0.006; trend test showed a significant decrease), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) faecium 2.3% and 8.2% (P = 0.008), third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Escherichia. coli 1.2% and 19.7% (P < 0.001), 3GC-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae 3.8% and 25.5% (P < 0.001), imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii 1.1% and 4.5% (P = 0.002), and imipenem-resistant K. pneumoniae 0.4% and 1.1%. The resistance densities did not change for MRSA but increased significantly for VRE faecium and 3GC-resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae. In 2008, the resistance density for MRSA was 3.73, 0.48 for VRE, 1.39 for 3GC-resistant E. coli and 0.82 for K. pneumoniae. Conclusions Although total antibiotic use did not change over time in German ICUs, carbapenem use doubled. This is probably due to the rise in 3GC-resistant E. coli and

  20. High rates of off-label use in antibiotic prescriptions in a context of dramatic resistance increase: a prospective study in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Davido, Benjamin; Bouchand, Frédérique; Calin, Ruxandra; Makhloufi, Sabrina; Lagrange, Aurore; Senard, Olivia; Perronne, Christian; Villart, Maryvonne; Salomon, Jérome; Dinh, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    The use of antibiotics, as any other drug, is regulated by the terms of its marketing authorisation, notified in the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC). If a prescription is not in accordance with the SPC, the physician prescribes off-label. There is very little literature regarding off-label use of antibiotics in adult healthcare facilities. A prospective monocentric study was conducted during 11 days from February to June 2015 in hospitalised patients from a tertiary teaching hospital with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant organism colonisation to evaluate off-label use of antibiotics. Two independent experts assessed whether prescriptions complied with the latest guidelines in infectious diseases and whether off-label use of antibiotics was associated with an increased risk of adverse events. In total, 160 antibiotic prescriptions were analysed, of which 76 (47.5%) were off-label. Of the 76 off-label prescriptions, 50 (65.8%) were off-label regarding indications and 26 (34.2%) regarding doses. Nevertheless, 46/50 off-label indications (92.0%) and only 14/26 off-label doses (53.8%) were approved by experts, especially because of dose adjustment requirements. During follow-up, the rate of reported adverse events was not statistically different between patients with (n = 76) and without (n = 84) off-label prescriptions (P = 0.35). In a context of multidrug resistance and a lack of new drugs, high rates (47.5%) of antibiotic off-label use were observed in our hospital, but without an increased rate of adverse events. Moreover, 78.9% of off-label uses were in accordance with guidelines. Therefore, the SPC is not the warrant of an appropriate use of antibiotics. PMID:27208900

  1. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  2. Increasing shrub abundance and N addition in Arctic tundra affect leaf and root litter decomposition differently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, J.; van de Weg, M. J.; Shaver, G. R.; Gough, L.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in global climate have resulted in a ';greening' of the Arctic as the abundance of deciduous shrub species increases. Consequently, not only the living plant community, but also the litter composition changes, which in turn can affect carbon turnover patterns in the Arctic. We examined effects of changing litter composition (both root and leaf litter) on decomposition rates with a litter bag study, and specifically focused on the impact of deciduous shrub Betula nana litter on litter decomposition from two evergreen shrubs (Ledum palustre, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and one graminoid (Eriophorum vaginatum) species. Additionally, we investigated how decomposition was affected by nutrient availability by placing the litterbags in an ambient and a fertilized moist acidic tundra environment. Measurements were carried out seasonally over 2 years (after snow melt, mid-growing season, end growing season). We measured litter mass loss over time, as well as the respiration rates (standardized for temperature and moisture) and temperature sensitivity of litter respiration at the time of harvesting the litter bags. For leaves, Betula litter decomposed faster than the other three species, with Eriophorum leaves decomposing the slowest. This pattern was observed for both mass loss and litter respiration rates, although the differences in respiration became smaller over time. Surprisingly, combining Betula with any other species resulted in slower overall weight loss rates than would be predicted based on monoculture weight loss rates. This contrasted with litter respiration at the time of sampling, which showed a positive mixing effect of adding Betula leaf liter to the other species. Apparently, during the first winter months (September - May) Betula litter decomposition is negatively affected by mixing the species and this legacy can still be observed in the total mass loss results later in the year. For root litter there were fewer effects of species identity on root

  3. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s Increasing Atomic Sulfur Abundance Observed by Rosetta Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    Alice, NASA’s lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA’s comet orbiting spacecraft Rosetta (Stern et al. 2007), is continuing its characterization of the nucleus and coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) as it approaches and recedes from perihelion. With a spectral range from 700-2050 Å, Alice has the ability to detect the atomic sulfur multiplets at 1429 Å, 1479 Å and 1814 Å. Sulfur in C-G’s coma is most likely a dissociation product of CS2 and OCS, but could also be produced after a secondary dissociation from H2S and SO2, all molecular species measured in C-G’s coma by ROSINA, the Rosetta orbiter’s mass spectrometer.Due to low abundances, Alice did not detect sulfur atoms at C-G until May 2015 when the comet was at ~1.7 AU and still 3 months from perihelion. Now, sulfur is ubiquitous in Alice observations above the limb of the nucleus. There is evidence that there is not a strong dependence of the abundance of sulfur on the distance from the nucleus in the pre-perihelion radial profiles of the gas, which may be indicative of the parent molecule and its distribution. This will be investigated further. The evolution of the presence of the three sulfur multiplets, their relative abundances and excitation processes, and behavior pre- and post-perihelion will be presented.

  4. Obesity-Dependent Increases in Oocyte mRNAs Are Associated With Increases in Proinflammatory Signaling and Gut Microbial Abundance of Lachnospiraceae in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Anderson, Christopher L; Timme, Kelsey R; Kurz, Scott G; Fernando, Samodha C; Wood, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    RNAs stored in the metaphase II-arrested oocyte play important roles in successful embryonic development. Their abundance is defined by transcriptional activity during oocyte growth and selective degradation of transcripts during LH-induced oocyte maturation. Our previous studies demonstrated that mRNA abundance is increased in mature ovulated oocytes collected from obese humans and mice and therefore may contribute to reduced oocyte developmental competence associated with metabolic dysfunction. In the current study mouse models of diet-induced obesity were used to determine whether obesity-dependent increases in proinflammatory signaling regulate ovarian abundance of oocyte-specific mRNAs. The abundance of oocyte-specific Bnc1, Dppa3, and Pou5f1 mRNAs as well as markers of proinflammatory signaling were significantly increased in ovaries of obese compared with lean mice which were depleted of fully grown preovulatory follicles. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses also demonstrated increased association of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 with the Pou5f1 promoter in ovaries of obese mice suggesting that proinflammatory signaling regulates transcription of this gene in the oocyte. The cecum microbial content of lean and obese female mice was subsequently examined to identify potential relationships between microbial composition and proinflammatory signaling in the ovary. Multivariate Association with Linear Models identified significant positive correlations between cecum abundance of the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae and ovarian abundance of Tnfa as well as Dppa3, Bnc1, and Pou5f1 mRNAs. Together, these data suggest that diet-induced changes in gut microbial composition may be contributing to ovarian inflammation which in turn alters ovarian gene expression and ultimately contributes to obesity-dependent reduction in oocyte quality and development of infertility in obese patients. PMID:26881311

  5. Increased abundance of proteins involved in phytosiderophore production in boron-tolerant barley.

    PubMed

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-07-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a 'Clipper' x 'Sahara' doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  6. Greater deciduous shrub abundance extends the annual period of maximum tundra greenness and increases modeled net CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, S. K.; Griffin, K. L.; Steltzer, H.; Gough, L.; Boelman, N.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite studies of the terrestrial Arctic report increased summer greening and longer green seasons over the past several decades, which may increase productivity and lengthen the period of carbon uptake. These trends have been attributed largely to increasing air temperatures and reduced snow cover duration. However, deciduous shrubs are concurrently becoming increasingly abundant in tundra landscapes, which may also impact canopy phenology and productivity. Our aim in this research was to determine the influence of greater deciduous shrub abundance on tundra canopy phenology and subsequent impacts on net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) over the growing season in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska (68º38' N, 149º34' W). We compared deciduous shrub-dominated and evergreen/graminoid-dominated community-level canopy phenology using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and piecewise linear regression modeling. We used a tundra plant-community specific leaf area index (LAI) model to estimate LAI throughout the season. We then used a tundra specific NEE model to estimate the impact of greater deciduous shrub abundance and associated shifts in leaf area and canopy phenology on tundra carbon flux. We found that deciduous shrub canopies reached the onset of maximum greenness significantly earlier than evergreen/graminoid canopies, but both communities reached the onset of senescence at similar times, resulting in a net extension of the peak green season in deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities. The combined effect of a longer peak green season and greater leaf area of deciduous shrub canopies increased the net carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities. However, the longer peak season alone significantly increased carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities, suggesting that greater deciduous shrub abundance increases carbon uptake not only due to greater leaf

  7. The rainy season increases the abundance and richness of the aquatic insect community in a Neotropical reservoir.

    PubMed

    Santana, H S; Silva, L C F; Pereira, C L; Simião-Ferreira, J; Angelini, R

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in aquatic systems and changes in water levels, whether due to rains or dam-mediated control can cause changes in community structure, forcing the community to readjust to the new environment. This study tested the hypothesis that there is an increase in the richness and abundance of aquatic insects during the rainy season in the Serra da Mesa Reservoir, with the premise that increasing the reservoir level provides greater external material input and habitat diversity, and, therefore, conditions that promote colonization by more species. We used the paired t test to test the differences in richness, beta diversity, and abundance, and a Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) was performed to identify patterns in the community under study. Additionally, Pearson correlations were analyzed between the richness, abundance, and beta diversity and the level of the reservoir. We collected 35,028 aquatic insect larvae (9,513 in dry period and 25,515 in the rainy season), predominantly of the Chironomidae family, followed by orders Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Odonata. Among the 33 families collected, only 12 occurred in the dry season, while all occurred in the rainy season. These families are common in lentic environments, and the dominance of Chironomidae was associated with its fast colonization, their behavior of living at high densities and the great tolerance to low levels of oxygen in the environment. The hypothesis was confirmed, as the richness, beta diversity, and abundance were positively affected by the increase in water levels due to the rainy season, which most likely led to greater external material input, greater heterogeneity of habitat, and better conditions for colonization by several families. PMID:25945631

  8. Increasing thiamine concentrations in lake trout eggs from Lakes Huron and Michigan coincide with low alewife abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Rinchard, Jacques; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Evans, Allison N.; Begnoche, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in the Laurentian Great Lakes suffer from thiamine deficiency as a result of adult lake trout consuming prey containing thiaminase, a thiamine-degrading enzyme. Sufficiently low egg thiamine concentrations result in direct mortality of or sublethal effects on newly hatched lake trout fry. To determine the prevalence and severity of low thiamine in lake trout eggs, we monitored thiamine concentrations in lake trout eggs from 15 sites in Lakes Huron and Michigan from 2001 to 2009. Lake trout egg thiamine concentrations at most sites in both lakes were initially low and increased over time at 11 of 15 sites, and the proportion of females with egg thiamine concentrations lower than the recommended management objective of 4 nmol/g decreased over time at eight sites. Egg thiamine concentrations at five of six sites in Lakes Huron and Michigan were significantly inversely related to site-specific estimates of mean abundance of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus, and successful natural reproduction of lake trout has been observed in Lake Huron since the alewife population crashed. These results support the hypothesis that low egg thiamine in Great Lakes lake trout is associated with increased alewife abundance and that low alewife abundance may currently be a prerequisite for successful reproduction by lake trout in the Great Lakes.

  9. CO2 enrichment increases element concentrations in grass mixtures by changing species abundances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration may increase plant growth relatively more than the uptake of soil-derived chemical elements that are essential for herbivores. Rising CO2 also may alter the nutritional quality of forage or fodder derived from multi-species veget...

  10. Increased Abundance and Transferability of Resistance Genes after Field Application of Manure from Sulfadiazine-Treated Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Groeneweg, Joost; Weichelt, Viola; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Brandes, Nikola; Nordwig, Mathias; Ding, Guo-Chun; Siemens, Jan; Heuer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Spreading manure containing antibiotics in agriculture is assumed to stimulate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in soil bacterial populations. Plant roots influencing the soil environment and its microflora by exudation of growth substrates might considerably increase this effect. In this study, the effects of manure from pigs treated with sulfadiazine (SDZ), here called SDZ manure, on the abundance and transferability of sulfonamide resistance genes sul1 and sul2 in the rhizosphere of maize and grass were compared to the effects in bulk soil in a field experiment. In plots that repeatedly received SDZ manure, a significantly higher abundance of both sul genes was detected compared to that in plots where manure from untreated pigs was applied. Significantly lower abundances of sul genes relative to bacterial ribosomal genes were encountered in the rhizosphere than in bulk soil. However, in contrast to results for bulk soil, the sul gene abundance in the SDZ manure-treated rhizosphere constantly deviated from control treatments over a period of 6 weeks after manuring, suggesting ongoing antibiotic selection over this period. Transferability of sulfonamide resistance was analyzed by capturing resistance plasmids from soil communities into Escherichia coli. Increased rates of plasmid capture were observed in samples from SDZ manure-treated bulk soil and the rhizosphere of maize and grass. More than 97% of the captured plasmids belonged to the LowGC type (having low G+C content), giving further evidence for their important contribution to the environmental spread of antibiotic resistance. In conclusion, differences between bulk soil and rhizosphere need to be considered when assessing the risks associated with the spreading of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23315733

  11. A Long-term Perspective on Recent Increases in Atmospheric Methane Abundance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P.; Masarie, K.; Crotwell, A. M.; Bruhwiler, L.

    2010-12-01

    After CO2, methane (CH4) is the most important greenhouse gas influenced by human activities. Its chemistry results in additional indirect climate effects from production of tropospheric O3, which also affects air quality, and stratospheric H2O. Natural emissions of CH4 from Arctic permafrost and hydrates are susceptible to changing climate. These sources recently received attention in the media because of their potential to cause strong positive climate feedbacks. But how much of this attention is warranted? From 1999 through 2006, the global burden of atmospheric CH4 remained nearly constant. During 2007 and 2008, globally averaged CH4 increased by ~13 ppb. Do these increases signal the start of increased emissions in the Arctic from permafrost or hydrates because of warming climate? We found that the likely drivers of these increases are greater than average wetland CH4 emissions at high northern latitudes during 2007 because of exceptionally warm temperatures and in the tropics during 2007 and 2008 because of greater than normal precipitation in wetland regions during a La Niña. These increases result from interannual variations in temperature and precipitation (i.e., weather), which may be in part the result of long-term climate change, but there is yet no evidence for large permanent increases in CH4 emissions. For 2009, our preliminary estimate of the global increase is ~5 ppb. When evaluating these recent changes in atmospheric CH4 burden, it is useful to consider the long-term behavior of CH4. We previously showed that, if OH concentrations had been constant over the period of our observations, then total global CH4 emissions had been constant. The observed decrease in CH4 growth rate is consistent with a system approaching steady state, where the time constant of that approach is the CH4 atmospheric lifetime (τ). Is this model of long-term behavior still consistent with the data today? The approach to steady state for this system, with zeroth

  12. Increased microRNA-34c abundance in Alzheimer's disease circulating blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Chertkow, Howard; Schipper, Hyman M.; Yuan, Zongfei; Shetty, Vikranth; Jenkins, Samantha; Jones, Timothy; Wang, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs, present either in the cellular component, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), or in cell-free plasma, have emerged as biomarkers for age-dependent systemic, disease-associated changes in many organs. Previously, we have shown that microRNA (miR)-34a is increased in circulating PBMC of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In the present study, we show that this microRNA's sister, miR-34c, exhibits even greater increase in both cellular and plasma components of AD circulating blood samples, compared to normal age-matched controls. Statistical analysis shows the accuracy of levels of miR-34c assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis: the area under the curve is 0.99 (p < 0.0001) and the 95% confidence level extends from 0.97 to 1. Pearson correlation between miR-34c levels and mild and moderate AD, as defined by the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), shows an r-value of −0.7, suggesting a relatively strong inverse relationship between the two parameters. These data show that plasma levels of microRNA 34c are much more prominent in AD than those of its sister, miR-34a, or than its own level in PBMC. Transfection studies show that miR-34c, as does its sister miR-34a, represses the expression of several selected genes involved in cell survival and oxidative defense pathways, such as Bcl2, SIRT1, and others, in cultured cells. Taken together, our results indicate that increased levels of miR-34c in both PBMC and plasma may reflect changes in circulating blood samples in AD patients, compared to age-matched normal controls. PMID:24550773

  13. Fermentable non-starch polysaccharides increases the abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas in ileal microbial community of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, E; Roos, S; Liu, H Y; Lindberg, J E

    2014-11-01

    Most plant-origin fiber sources used in pig production contains a mixture of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharides (NSP). The knowledge about effects of these sources of NSP on the gut microbiota and its fermentation products is still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of feeding diets with native sources of NSP on the ileal and fecal microbial composition and the dietary impact on the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid. The experiment comprised four diets and four periods in a change-over design with seven post valve t-cecum cannulated growing pigs. The four diets were balanced to be similar in NSP content and included one of four fiber sources, two diets were rich in pectins, through inclusion of chicory forage (CFO) and sugar beet pulp, and two were rich in arabinoxylan, through inclusion of wheat bran (WB) and grass meal. The gut microbial composition was assessed with terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism and the abundance of Lactobacillus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and the β-xylosidase gene, xynB, were assessed with quantitative PCR. The gut microbiota did not cluster based on NSP structure (arabinoxylan or pectin) rather, the effect was to a high degree ingredient specific. In pigs fed diet CFO, three TRFs related to Prevotellaceae together consisted of more than 25% of the fecal microbiota, which is about 3 to 23 times higher (P<0.05) than in pigs fed the other diets. Whereas pigs fed diet WB had about 2 to 22 times higher abundance (P<0.05) of Megasphaera elsdenii in feces and about six times higher abundance (P<0.05) of Lactobacillus reuteri in ileal digesta than pigs fed the other diets. The total amount of digested NSP (r=0.57; P=0.002), xylose (r=0.53; P=0.004) and dietary fiber (r=0.60; P=0.001) in ileal digesta were positively correlated with an increased abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas. The effect on SCFA was

  14. Creative Dramatics in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandelbaum, Jean

    1975-01-01

    Offers suggestions as to how teachers of nursery through second grade children might develop a creative dramatics program from elements that are already in the curriculum and in the children themselves. (Author/SDH)

  15. Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinglin; An, Xinli; Li, Hu; Su, Jianqiang; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge and manure are common soil amendments in crop production; however, their impact on the abundance and diversity of the antibiotic resistome in soil remains elusive. In this study, by using high-throughput sequencing and high-throughput quantitative PCR, the patterns of bacterial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in a long-term field experiment were investigated to gain insights into these impacts. A total of 130 unique ARGs and 5 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected and the long-term application of sewage sludge and chicken manure significantly increased the abundance and diversity of ARGs in the soil. Genes conferring resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines, and multiple drugs were dominant in the samples. Sewage sludge or chicken manure applications caused significant enrichment of 108 unique ARGs and MGEs with a maximum enrichment of up to 3845 folds for mexF. The enrichment of MGEs suggested that the application of sewage sludge or manure may accelerate the dissemination of ARGs in soil through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Based on the co-occurrence pattern of ARGs subtypes revealed by network analysis, aacC, oprD and mphA-02, were proposed to be potential indicators for quantitative estimation of the co-occurring ARGs subtypes abundance by power functions. The application of sewage sludge and manure resulted in significant increase of bacterial diversity in soil, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were the dominant phyla (>10% in each sample). Five bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Bacteroidetes) were found to be significantly correlated with the ARGs in soil. Mantel test and variation partitioning analysis (VPA) suggested that bacterial community shifts, rather than MGEs, is the major driver shaping the antibiotic resistome. Additionally, the co-occurrence pattern between ARGs and microbial taxa revealed by network analysis indicated that four

  16. Children's Voices through Dramatic Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Zayda

    Dramatic play provides children an excellent way to express their feelings and perceptions of the world that surrounds them. It is also an alternative way for researchers and teachers to capture, understand, and interpret children's voices because of the difficulties that children have in expressing ideas through oral and written language. While…

  17. Dramatic Techniques in ESL Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radin, Barbara

    Three techniques have been found to be helpful in using dramatic techniques to provide motivation, self-confidence, and self-esteem to students of English as a second language at Hostos Community College. Strategic interaction is a technique based on the open-ended scenario, in which students are free to respond to the problem presented in the…

  18. Kenneth Burke's Discovery of Dramatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feehan, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how "Twelve Propositions by Kenneth Burke on the Relation between Economics and Psychology" generates a new synthesis of Marx and Freud and foreshadows Burke's system of dramatism. His conception of self, the community, and communication come together in a serious argument for drama as a model of human relations. (JMF)

  19. Learning through Dramatic Story Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Evie

    2012-01-01

    The use of story with dramatic presentation approaches produces an engaging and powerful instructional choice for today's adult ESL educators. Two engaging and timed-tested approaches are Reader's Theater and Tableau Vivant. Both provide English language learners with content tailored to their abilities in addition to numerable opportunities to…

  20. Increased waterborne blaNDM-1 resistance gene abundances associated with seasonal human pilgrimages to the upper ganges river.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, Z S; Sreekrishnan, T R; Hands, C L; Knapp, C W; Graham, D W

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is often rooted in inappropriate antibiotic use, but poor water quality and inadequate sanitation exacerbate the problem, especially in emerging countries. An example is increasing multi-AR due to mobile carbapenemases, such as NDM-1 protein (coded by blaNDM-1 genes), which can produce extreme drug-resistant phenotypes. In 2010, NDM-1 positive isolates and blaNDM-1 genes were detected in surface waters across Delhi and have since been detected across the urban world. However, little is known about blaNDM-1 levels in more pristine locations, such as the headwaters of the Upper Ganges River. This area is of particular interest because it receives massive numbers of visitors during seasonal pilgrimages in May/June, including visitors from urban India. Here we quantified blaNDM-1 abundances, other AR genes (ARG), and coliform bacteria in sediments and water column samples from seven sites in the Rishikesh-Haridwar region of the Upper Ganges and five sites on the Yamuna River in Delhi to contrast blaNDM-1 levels and water quality conditions between season and region. Water quality in the Yamuna was very poor (e.g., anoxia at all sites), and blaNDM-1 abundances were high across sites in water (5.4 ± 0.4 log(blaNDM-1·mL(-1)); 95% confidence interval) and sediment (6.3 ± 0.7 log(blaNDM-1·mg(-1))) samples from both seasons. In contrast, water column blaNDM-1 abundances were very low across all sites in the Upper Ganges in February (2.1 ± 0.6 log(blaNDM-1·mL(-1))), and water quality was good (e.g., near saturation oxygen). However, per capita blaNDM-1 levels were 20 times greater in June in the Ganges water column relative to February, and blaNDM-1 levels significantly correlated with fecal coliform levels (r = 0.61; p = 0.007). Given that waste management infrastructure is limited in Rishikesh-Haridwar, data imply blaNDM-1 levels are higher in visitor's wastes than local residents, which results in seasonally higher blaNDM-1 levels in the

  1. Increased Waterborne blaNDM-1 Resistance Gene Abundances Associated with Seasonal Human Pilgrimages to the Upper Ganges River

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is often rooted in inappropriate antibiotic use, but poor water quality and inadequate sanitation exacerbate the problem, especially in emerging countries. An example is increasing multi-AR due to mobile carbapenemases, such as NDM-1 protein (coded by blaNDM-1 genes), which can produce extreme drug-resistant phenotypes. In 2010, NDM-1 positive isolates and blaNDM-1 genes were detected in surface waters across Delhi and have since been detected across the urban world. However, little is known about blaNDM-1 levels in more pristine locations, such as the headwaters of the Upper Ganges River. This area is of particular interest because it receives massive numbers of visitors during seasonal pilgrimages in May/June, including visitors from urban India. Here we quantified blaNDM-1 abundances, other AR genes (ARG), and coliform bacteria in sediments and water column samples from seven sites in the Rishikesh-Haridwar region of the Upper Ganges and five sites on the Yamuna River in Delhi to contrast blaNDM-1 levels and water quality conditions between season and region. Water quality in the Yamuna was very poor (e.g., anoxia at all sites), and blaNDM-1 abundances were high across sites in water (5.4 ± 0.4 log(blaNDM-1·mL–1); 95% confidence interval) and sediment (6.3 ± 0.7 log(blaNDM-1·mg–1)) samples from both seasons. In contrast, water column blaNDM-1 abundances were very low across all sites in the Upper Ganges in February (2.1 ± 0.6 log(blaNDM-1·mL–1)), and water quality was good (e.g., near saturation oxygen). However, per capita blaNDM-1 levels were 20 times greater in June in the Ganges water column relative to February, and blaNDM-1 levels significantly correlated with fecal coliform levels (r = 0.61; p = 0.007). Given that waste management infrastructure is limited in Rishikesh-Haridwar, data imply blaNDM-1 levels are higher in visitor’s wastes than local residents, which results in seasonally higher blaNDM-1 levels in the

  2. Yeast hydrolysate supplementation increases field abundance and persistence of sexually mature sterile Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O L; Orchard, B A; Collins, S R; Taylor, P W

    2014-04-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a non-chemical approach used to control major pests from several insect families, including Tephritidae, and entails the mass-release of sterile insects that reduce fertility of wild populations. For SIT to succeed, released sterile males must mature and compete with wild males to mate with wild females. To reach sexual maturity, the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) (Diptera: Tephritidae), must obtain adequate nutrition after adult emergence; however, in current SIT programs sterile B. tryoni receive a pre-release diet that lacks key nutrients required to sustain sexual development. The chief objective of this study was to determine whether pre-release yeast hydrolysate (YH) supplements affect the persistence and abundance of sexually mature sterile male B. tryoni under field conditions. Experiments were run in outdoor cages under conditions of low and high environmental stress that differed markedly in temperature and humidity, and in the field. Under low environmental stress conditions, survival of sterile B. tryoni was monitored in cages under three diet treatments: (i) sugar only, (ii) sugar plus YH or (iii) sugar plus YH for 48 h and sugar only thereafter. Under high environmental stress conditions survival of sterile B. tryoni was monitored in cages under four diet treatments: (i) white sugar only, (ii) brown sugar only, (iii) white sugar plus YH and (iv) brown sugar plus YH. In a replicated field study, we released colour-marked sterile B. tryoni from two diet regimes, YH-supplemented or YH-deprived, and monitored abundance of sexually mature males. In the low-stress cage study, there was no effect of diet, although overall females lived longer than males. In the high stress cage study, mortality was lower for YH-fed flies than YH-deprived flies and females lived longer than males. In the field, YH supplementation resulted in higher abundance of sexually mature sterile males, with 1.2 YH-fed flies

  3. Is increased calcarinid (foraminifera) abundance indicating a larger role for macro-algae in Indonesian Plio-Pleistocene coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renema, W.

    2010-03-01

    An important question in coral reef ecology is whether algal abundance in coral reef eco-systems is a natural phenomenon, or has increased as a result of coral reef degradation ultimately resulting in coral-algal regime shifts. Regime shifts, from coral to macro-algae dominated, alter the three-dimensional habitat structure in coral reef ecosystems. Surprisingly, few studies have looked at the effects for species that inhabit the reefs without being the architects of the three-dimensional structure. In this study the effects of a change in habitat characteristics on the community structure of large benthic foraminifera (LBF) is compared between an area with high (Kepulauan Seribu) and lower (Spermonde Archipelago) anthropogenic influence. The results indicate a general relationship between habitat and LBF assemblage structure. The largest difference was observed in shallow habitats. Habitats dominated by algae are inhabited by a specific group of LBF, the Calcarinidae, and domination of this group increases with higher algal prevalence. The fossil record of this group indicates that they evolved following a major change in settings of the central Indo-West-Pacific coral reefs from land detached platforms to fringing reefs, about 5 million years ago. Understanding the biotic response to this transition in reef morphology and the associated increase in terrestrially derived nutrients forms an excellent challenge to gain insights in present-day threats to coral reef ecosystems.

  4. The Dramatic Methods of Hans van Dam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1994-01-01

    Interprets for the American reader the untranslated dramatic methods of Hans van Dam, a leading drama theorist in the Netherlands. Discusses the functions of drama as a method, closed dramatic methods, open dramatic methods, and applying van Dam's methods. (SR)

  5. A doubling of microphytobenthos biomass coincides with a tenfold increase in denitrifier and total bacterial abundances in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary.

    PubMed

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Tytgat, Bjorn; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Surface sediments are important systems for the removal of anthropogenically derived inorganic nitrogen in estuaries. They are often characterized by the presence of a microphytobenthos (MPB) biofilm, which can impact bacterial communities in underlying sediments for example by secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and competition for nutrients (including nitrogen). Pyrosequencing and qPCR was performed on two intertidal surface sediments of the Westerschelde estuary characterized by a two-fold difference in MPB biomass but no difference in MPB composition. Doubling of MPB biomass was accompanied by a disproportionately (ten-fold) increase in total bacterial abundances while, unexpectedly, no difference in general community structure was observed, despite significantly lower bacterial richness and distinct community membership, mostly for non-abundant taxa. Denitrifier abundances corresponded likewise while community structure, both for nirS and nirK denitrifiers, remained unchanged, suggesting that competition with diatoms for nitrate is negligible at concentrations in the investigated sediments (appr. 1 mg/l NO3-). This study indicates that MPB biomass increase has a general, significantly positive effect on total bacterial and denitrifier abundances, with stimulation or inhibition of specific bacterial groups that however do not result in a re-structured community. PMID:25961719

  6. Association of Anthropogenic Land Use Change and Increased Abundance of the Chagas Disease Vector Rhodnius pallescens in a Rural Landscape of Panama

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azäel; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is associated with increased vector-borne infectious disease transmission in wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate how disturbance of a tropical forest landscape impacts abundance of the triatomine bug Rhodnius pallescens, a vector of Chagas disease, in the region of the Panama Canal in Panama. Rhodnius pallescens was collected (n = 1,186) from its primary habitat, the palm Attalea butyracea, in five habitat types reflecting a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. There was a high proportion of palms infested with R. pallescens across all habitat types (range = 77.1–91.4%). Results show that disturbed habitats are associated with increased vector abundance compared with relatively undisturbed habitats. Bugs collected in disturbed sites, although in higher abundance, tended to be in poor body condition compared with bugs captured in protected forest sites. Abundance data suggests that forest remnants may be sources for R. pallescens populations within highly disturbed areas of the landscape. PMID:21212205

  7. A Doubling of Microphytobenthos Biomass Coincides with a Tenfold Increase in Denitrifier and Total Bacterial Abundances in Intertidal Sediments of a Temperate Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Tytgat, Bjorn; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Surface sediments are important systems for the removal of anthropogenically derived inorganic nitrogen in estuaries. They are often characterized by the presence of a microphytobenthos (MPB) biofilm, which can impact bacterial communities in underlying sediments for example by secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and competition for nutrients (including nitrogen). Pyrosequencing and qPCR was performed on two intertidal surface sediments of the Westerschelde estuary characterized by a two-fold difference in MPB biomass but no difference in MPB composition. Doubling of MPB biomass was accompanied by a disproportionately (ten-fold) increase in total bacterial abundances while, unexpectedly, no difference in general community structure was observed, despite significantly lower bacterial richness and distinct community membership, mostly for non-abundant taxa. Denitrifier abundances corresponded likewise while community structure, both for nirS and nirK denitrifiers, remained unchanged, suggesting that competition with diatoms for nitrate is negligible at concentrations in the investigated sediments (appr. 1 mg/l NO3-). This study indicates that MPB biomass increase has a general, significantly positive effect on total bacterial and denitrifier abundances, with stimulation or inhibition of specific bacterial groups that however do not result in a re-structured community. PMID:25961719

  8. Association of anthropogenic land use change and increased abundance of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in a rural landscape of Panama.

    PubMed

    Gottdenker, Nicole L; Calzada, José E; Saldaña, Azäel; Carroll, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is associated with increased vector-borne infectious disease transmission in wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate how disturbance of a tropical forest landscape impacts abundance of the triatomine bug Rhodnius pallescens, a vector of Chagas disease, in the region of the Panama Canal in Panama. Rhodnius pallescens was collected (n = 1,186) from its primary habitat, the palm Attalea butyracea, in five habitat types reflecting a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. There was a high proportion of palms infested with R. pallescens across all habitat types (range = 77.1-91.4%). Results show that disturbed habitats are associated with increased vector abundance compared with relatively undisturbed habitats. Bugs collected in disturbed sites, although in higher abundance, tended to be in poor body condition compared with bugs captured in protected forest sites. Abundance data suggests that forest remnants may be sources for R. pallescens populations within highly disturbed areas of the landscape. PMID:21212205

  9. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans. PMID:26385990

  10. Detection of non-CLL-like monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis increases dramatically in the very elderly, while detection of CLL-like populations varies by race: findings in a multiethnic population-based cohort of elderly women.

    PubMed

    Edlefsen, Kerstin L; Cherian, Sindhu; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Getaneh, Asqual; Lessin, Lawrence; Li, Wenjun; Wood, Brent L; Reiner, Alexander P

    2016-10-01

    Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is both a marker of immune senescence and a potential precursor of B cell malignancy. Most MBL populations have a chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (CLL-like) immunophenotype, but those that are CD5-negative (non-CLL-like) are also recognized and may represent a distinct diagnostic entity. To date, MBL studies have taken place in relatively homogenous populations, although risk of CLL varies across racial groups and geographic regions. We report flow cytometry data from 597 ethnically diverse 64-94-year-old women from across the USA who are participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Long-Life Study (LLS). Overall, MBL was detected in 26 % of the participants and included 20.9 % with a CLL-like immunophenotype, 5 % with a non-CLL-like immunophenotype, and 1.3 % with both. White and Hispanic women were more than twice as likely to have a CLL-like MBL population detected than African American women, corrected for age (P = 0.003). By contrast, detection of non-CLL-like MBL did not vary significantly by race, but did increase markedly with advancing age, being present in 12.7 % of those aged 85 and older. We provide new evidence that rates of detection of CLL-like MBL are lower in African Americans, and further suggest that non-CLL-like clonal expansions should be regarded as distinct from CLL-like MBL. PMID:27468854

  11. Increased abundance of translation machinery in stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from four schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Topol, A; English, J A; Flaherty, E; Rajarajan, P; Hartley, B J; Gupta, S; Desland, F; Zhu, S; Goff, T; Friedman, L; Rapoport, J; Felsenfeld, D; Cagney, G; Mackay-Sim, A; Savas, J N; Aronow, B; Fang, G; Zhang, B; Cotter, D; Brennand, K J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and epigenetic factors contributing to risk for schizophrenia (SZ) remain unresolved. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, perturbed global protein translation in human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived forebrain neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from four SZ patients relative to six unaffected controls. We report increased total protein levels and protein synthesis, together with two independent sets of quantitative mass spectrometry evidence indicating markedly increased levels of ribosomal and translation initiation and elongation factor proteins, in SZ hiPSC NPCs. We posit that perturbed levels of global protein synthesis in SZ hiPSC NPCs represent a novel post-transcriptional mechanism that might contribute to disease progression. PMID:26485546

  12. Increased abundance of translation machinery in stem cell–derived neural progenitor cells from four schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Topol, A; English, J A; Flaherty, E; Rajarajan, P; Hartley, B J; Gupta, S; Desland, F; Zhu, S; Goff, T; Friedman, L; Rapoport, J; Felsenfeld, D; Cagney, G; Mackay-Sim, A; Savas, J N; Aronow, B; Fang, G; Zhang, B; Cotter, D; Brennand, K J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and epigenetic factors contributing to risk for schizophrenia (SZ) remain unresolved. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, perturbed global protein translation in human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived forebrain neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from four SZ patients relative to six unaffected controls. We report increased total protein levels and protein synthesis, together with two independent sets of quantitative mass spectrometry evidence indicating markedly increased levels of ribosomal and translation initiation and elongation factor proteins, in SZ hiPSC NPCs. We posit that perturbed levels of global protein synthesis in SZ hiPSC NPCs represent a novel post-transcriptional mechanism that might contribute to disease progression. PMID:26485546

  13. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon - Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  14. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon – Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning. PMID:26396042

  15. 13C natural abundance in serum retinol acts as a biomarker for increases in dietary provitamin A.

    PubMed

    Howe, Julie A; Valentine, Ashley R; Hull, Angela K; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-02-01

    The natural isotopic composition of 13C and 12C in tissues is largely determined by the diet. Sources of provitamin A carotenoids (e.g., vegetables) typically have a lower 13C to 12C ratio (13C:12C) than preformed vitamin A sources (i.e., dairy and meat) from corn-fed animals, which are prevalent in the US. The 13C:12C of serum retinol (13C:12C-retinol) was evaluated as a biomarker for vegetable intake in a 3-mo dietary intervention designed to promote weight-loss by increased vegetable consumption or reduced calorie and fat intake. Subjects were 21-50 y of age with a BMI between 30-40 kg/m2 and were enrolled from one geographic area in the US. The high vegetable group (n=20) was encouraged to increase daily vegetable and fruit consumption to 0.95 liter vegetables and 0.24-0.35 liter fruits. The caloric reduction group (n=17) was encouraged to lower caloric intake by 500 kcal and consumeincreases in dietary provitamin A vegetable intake. PMID:19116317

  16. Dramatic Play in Childhood: Rehearsal for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The purpose of this book is to help parents and teachers recognize and understand dramatic play in childhood as a process whereby the child acts out human experience in an attempt to order, clarify, and understand it. Written by a person experienced in theatre and drama, the book considers the following aspects of dramatic play: the importance of…

  17. Fifth Graders' Story Dramatizations during Literature Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddall, Jeffery L.

    Dramatizations as a response activity during literature study provide a vehicle for students to use language, both verbal and nonverbal, in an educational context. A study focused on a group of five students who chose to use story dramatizations as one way to create their interpretations of the book, "The Slave Dancer" (Fox, 1973). The study,…

  18. Dramatic Developments in the Neurosciences Challenge Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Recent dramatic developments in brain research and technology suggest that a comprehensive understanding of how the human brain works may soon be within reach. Just as the ability of the medical profession to treat patients improved dramatically with the advent of effective research skills and technology concerning the structure, biochemistry, and…

  19. 13C Natural Abundance in Serum Retinol Acts as a Biomarker for Increases in Dietary Provitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Julie A; Valentine, Ashley R; Hull, Angela K; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-01-01

    The natural isotopic composition of 13C and 12C in tissues is largely determined by the diet. Sources of provitamin A carotenoids (e.g., vegetables) typically have a lower 13C to 12C ratio (13C:12C) than preformed vitamin A sources (i.e., dairy and meat) from corn-fed animals, which are prevalent in the US. The 13C:12C of serum retinol (13C:12C-retinol) was evaluated as a biomarker for vegetable intake in a 3-mo dietary intervention designed to promote weight-loss by increased vegetable consumption or reduced calorie and fat intake. Subjects were 21–50 y of age with a BMI between 30–40 kg/m2 and were enrolled from one geographic area in the US. The high vegetable group (n = 20) was encouraged to increase daily vegetable and fruit consumption to 0.95 liter vegetables and 0.24–0.35 liter fruits. The caloric reduction group (n = 17) was encouraged to lower caloric intake by 500 kcal and consume ≤25% kcal from fat daily. Provided meals supplied 75–100% vegetable and fruit goals and 50–67% kcal and fat g per day. Carotenoid supplementation was discontinued by subjects during the study. Serum retinol and provitamin A carotenoid concentrations; intake of preformed vitamin A, provitamin A, and fat; and body weight, fat mass, and lean mass were analyzed for correlations to 13C:12C-retinol. 13C:12C-Retinol decreased in the vegetable group after intervention (P = 0.050) and the correlation with provitamin A intake was approaching significance (P = 0.079). 13C:12C-Retinol did not change in the caloric reduction group (P = 0.43). 13C:12C-Retinol changes with the vitamin A source in the diet and can be used as a biomarker for increases in dietary provitamin A vegetable intake. PMID:19116317

  20. ASCA Observation of the Poor Cluster of Galaxies AWM 7: Evidence of an Abundance Increase in the Intra-Cluster Medium at the Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiguang; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Ohashi, Takaya; Tamura, Takayuki

    1997-02-01

    We present the results of the ASCA central-pointing observation of the poor cD cluster AWM 7. The Performance Verification phase data of GIS 2, GIS 3, SIS 0 chip 1, and SIS 1 chip 3 were used to study the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) within 16' around the X-ray centroid. We found that, compared with the outer regions, the equivalent width of the Fe-K lines increases in the central 4' ( ~ 123 h(-1_{50) kpc)} region by a factor of ~ 1.5. Although the ICM temperature tends to decrease in the same region, the observed increase in the Fe-K line equivalent width cannot be explained away by a possible temperature drop. The model fitting indicates that the abundance increases from ~ 0.4 solar outside 4' to ~ 0.6 solar at the center. Thus, after the Centaurus cluster and the Virgo cluster, AWM 7 is the third poor cD cluster confirmed to show an abundance increase in the central region. The 0.5--3 keV flux of the cool emission within 4' is constrained to be <8*E(42) h(-2}_{50) erg s(-1) , or <21% of the total 0.5--3 keV flux from the same spatial region. We discuss possible relations of these phenomena to the cD galaxy.

  1. Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA ( ... Monitoring the Future 2015 Survey Results Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2014 View ...

  2. Moderate temperature increase leads to disintegration of floating sludge and lower abundance of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Lienen, T; Kleyböcker, A; Verstraete, W; Würdemann, H

    2014-11-15

    Filamentous bacteria such as Microthrix parvicella can cause serious foaming and floating sludge problems in anaerobic digesters fed with sewage sludge. The sewage sludge and oil co-fermenting laboratory-scale biogas digesters in this study were fed with substrates from a foaming-prone full-scale biogas plant containing the filamentous bacterium M. parvicella. At 37 °C, in both pneumatically mixed digesters a highly viscous and approximately 3 cm thick floating sludge was observed. A gradual increase of the temperature from 37 °C to 56 °C led to a significant decrease in the floating sludge thickness, which correlated with a strong decrease in the abundance of M. parvicella in the digestate. Furthermore, the stepwise temperature increase allowed for an adaption of the microbial community and prevented process failure. The study indicates that already a moderate temperature increase from 37 °C to 41 °C might help to control the M. parvicella abundance in full-scale biogas plants. PMID:25117937

  3. The pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) reduces tumor growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma in mice associated with increased protein carbonyl, tubulin abundance, and aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Carmona-Cortés, Javier; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Banegas, Inmaculada; Quesada, Andrés; García-Lora, Angel M; Vargas, Félix

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and of the interaction between BSO and TETRAC, an antagonist of αvß3 integrin, on tumor development and aminopeptidase (AP) activity in a murine model of implanted Lewis's carcinoma. Male CBA-C57 mice were untreated (controls) or treated with BSO (222 mg/100 mL in drinking water), TETRAC (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), or BSO + TETRAC. BSO for 28 days and TETRAC were given for the last 20 days. Mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 × 10(6) Lewis carcinoma 3LL cells into the dorsum. Study variables were tumor weight (TW); Hb, as index of tumor-mediated angiogenesis; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein abundance; protein carbonyl content; α-tubulin abundance; and GluAp, AlaAp, and AspAp activities. BSO produced a major decrease in TW (203 ± 18 mg) with respect to controls (365 ± 26) and a reduction in Hb content. The TETRAC group also showed marked reductions in TW (129 ± 15) and Hb concentration associated with a reduced VEGF content. The BSO + TETRAC group showed a major TW reduction (125 ± 13); although, the difference with the TETRAC group was not significant. BSO treatment increased protein carbonyl and tubulin abundance in comparison to controls. The activity of all APs was increased in the three experimental groups and was strongly and negatively correlated with TW. In conclusion, administration of BSO reduced the TW, which inversely correlated with protein carbonyl content, suggesting a loss of microtubule polymerization. The finding of a negative correlation between TW and AP activity opens up new perspectives for the study of APs as tumor growth modulators. PMID:24816945

  4. Episodic sucrose intake during food restriction increases synaptic abundance of AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens and augments intake of sucrose following restoration of ad libitum feeding.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-X; Lister, A; Rabinowitsch, A; Kolaric, R; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Ziff, E B; Carr, K D

    2015-06-01

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic "breakthrough" intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for 10 occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-h chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR

  5. Creative Drama: More Than Story Dramatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that creative drama, including story dramatization, must include components such as rhythmic movement, pantomime, story improvisation, minimal situations, and teaching-in-role in order to produce educational benefits from a cohesive learning sequence. (MH)

  6. Dramatic Cataplexy Improvement Following Right Parietal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fam, David J.; Shammi, Prathiba; Mainprize, Todd G.; Murray, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy who experienced a dramatic reduction in cataplexy symptoms after resection of a right parietal astrocytoma. The patient underwent detailed neurological exam, neuropsychological testing, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing following surgery. Citation: Fam DJ, Shammi P, Mainprize TG, Murray BJ. Dramatic cataplexy improvement following right parietal surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):829–830. PMID:25902819

  7. Increased abundance and growth of the suspension-feeding bivalve corbula gibba in a shallow part of the eutrophic Limfjord, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jørgen Nørrevang

    The abundance, growth and production of Corbula gibba have been studied by intensive sampling over a 2-year period in a shallow part of the eutrophied Limfjord (Denmark). Size-frequency distributions and growth marks on the shells were used to follow successive cohorts over time. The abundance of Corbula gibba was high, the highest density found in 1-mm sieve samples (≈53 000) being one order of magnitude higher than previously recorded. The analysis of samples sieved through 250-μm sieves revealed that settling took place in August. The mortality of newly settled individuals was high, followed by low and constant mortality during the following winter. The growth of C. gibba was fast compared with records from the Irish Sea and the Sound and the specimens reached a mean size of 6 to 7 mm one year after settlement. It is suggested that the between-year-variation in growth rate was caused by variable frequences of wind-induced resuspension of settled organic matter. The production of C. gibba varied between stations but was generally high (mean: 26.8 g AFDW·y -1·m -2) compared with previous records from subtidal areas. The P/B ratio is among the highest recorded (mean: 4.2 y -1). Growth seems to be higher at present than during the first part of this century, probably due to the increased eutrophication of the Limfjord. It is suggested that growth rate may be a good complement to the use of total abundance and biomass in monitoring, as the latter parameters are more variable due to stochastic events such as sampling variance and inter- seasonal variations in settlement succes caused by physical factors.

  8. Knockout of the abundant Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal membrane protein TvHMP23 increases hydrogenosome size but induces no compensatory up-regulation of paralogous copies.

    PubMed

    Brás, Xavier Pereira; Zimorski, Verena; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-05-01

    The Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes up to 60000 genes, many of which stem from genome duplication events. Paralogous copies thus accompany most T. vaginalis genes, a phenomenon that limits genetic manipulation. We characterized one of the parasite's most abundant hydrogenosomal membrane proteins, TvHMP23, which is phylogenetically distinct from canonical metabolite carriers, and which localizes to the inner hydrogenosomal membrane as shown through sub-organellar fractionation and protease protection assays. Knockout of Tvhmp23 through insertion of the selectable neomycin marker led to a size increase of hydrogenosomes, the first knockout-induced phenotypes reported for Trichomonas, but no growth impairment. The transcriptional response of its four paralogous copies then analyzed revealed that they are not up-regulated, and hence do not compensate for the Tvhmp23 knockout. PMID:23499435

  9. Maverick Comet Splits during Dramatic Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    New ESO Observations of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 A few months ago, Periodic Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 underwent a dramatic and completely unexpected, thousand-fold brightening. At that time, the cause for this interesting event was unknown. However, observations with the two largest ESO telescopes have now shown that the ``dirty snowball'' nucleus of this comet has recently split into at least four individual pieces [1]. There is little doubt that the outburst and the splitting event(s) are closely related and that the greatly increased dust and gas production is due to ``fresh'' material of the icy cometary nucleus becoming exposed to the surrounding space for the first time. A Comet with a Troubled History Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 was discovered on May 2, 1930, on a photographic plate obtained at the Hamburg Observatory (Germany) by two astronomers at this institution, Arnold Schwassmann and Arthur Arno Wachmann. The subsequent observations showed that the comet moved in an elliptical orbit with a revolution period of somewhat more than 5 years. Great efforts were expended to observe the comet during the next returns, but it was not recovered until nearly 50 years and eight revolutions later, when its faint image was found of a plate obtained in August 1979 with a telescope at the Perth Observatory in Western Australia. It was missed in 1984, but was sighted again in 1989 and most recently in 1994. Thus this comet has only been observed during four out of thirteen approaches since 1930. While this may be partly due to a less advantageous location in the sky at some returns, it is also a strong indication that the comet behaves unpredictably and must have a quite variable brightness. For the sake of convenience this comet is often referred to as ``SW-3'' by professional astronomers. Recent orbital calculations have shown that it was inserted into the present, short-period orbit by the strong gravitational pull of Jupiter during several, relatively close

  10. Use of Dramatic Enquiry to Explore Controversies in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Neil; Poad, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing prominence of "How science works" in science courses in England and the imperative of equipping students to engage with the controversies thrown up by the advance of science, science departments need new teaching strategies. Here we describe the application of "Dramatic Enquiry" to GCSE science. The project, developed by…

  11. Dramatically Improve How and Where Academic Content Is Taught

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2007-01-01

    The fourth recommendation in ACTE's high school reform position statement is to dramatically improve how and where academic content is taught. Even as advanced academic course-taking and high school graduation requirements have increased, student achievement on national benchmarks has remained flat, and college remediation rates continue to…

  12. Windows into Children's Thinking: A Guide to Storytelling and Dramatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Cheryl; Bacigalupa, Chiara; Black, Tyler; Burton, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telling and dramatizing stories is an increasingly popular addition to the preschool curriculum, largely due to the attention this activity has received through the writings of Vivian Paley (Bad guys don't have birthdays: fantasy play at four. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1988; The boy who would be a helicopter: the uses of…

  13. Dramatizing Poetry in the Second Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elting, Stephen; Firkins, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Poetry performance is an approach to learning where students can use theatrical techniques to develop a response to the poem. This paper argues that ELL students can explore the aesthetic function of language and, more widely, develop confidence in using English as a communicative tool through the dramatization of poetry. We describe the process…

  14. Nietzsche contra Burke: The Melodrama in Dramatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desilet, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Examines Kenneth Burke's and Friedrich Nietzsche's similar understanding of the hortatory nature of language-using, weighed against their radically differing conceptions of the negative, which allows a distinction between two genres of dramatism, and illustrates contrasting orientations toward symbolic activity in general. (SR)

  15. The Psychodrama-Social Dramatics Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepac, Richard L.

    Social dramatics is a therapeutic and educational program that can act as a mirror to reflect images of the self in action with others. It is the modality for experiential learning to correct social dysfunction by providing models for imitation, opportunities to practice and develop individual forms from that model, and risk free environments for…

  16. Introductory Dramatics Guide for Grade 9. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Board of Education, Rockville, MD.

    Based on the experiences of classroom teachers of theatre, the elective dramatics course described in this guide is designed to enhance ninth grade students' aesthetic awareness, social development, intellectual growth, and technical knowledge. Following a brief course description and overview, the guide presents complete instructions for seven…

  17. Dramatic Ways to Engage Every Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Edmond J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of all teaching should be to help students make neural connections--the basis for all learning. To do that, however, the student has to have engagement and cognition around the material to be learned. At its core, dramatic activities, even when they have nothing to do with performance, have a tremendous ability to foster these…

  18. Back to Basics through Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Janet E.

    In the back to basics era, creative dramatics should still be used in the English classroom because it helps to develop the entire child. For some time, teaching strategies have been directed at the left brain, the hemisphere that deals with logical and linear functions. Recently, however, attention has been given to the right side of the brain,…

  19. Increases in soil aggregation following phosphorus additions in a tropical premontane forest are not driven by root and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenzind, Tessa; Papathanasiou, Helena; Foerster, Antje; Dietrich, Karla; Hertel, Dietrich; Homeier, Juergen; Oelmann, Yvonne; Olsson, Pål Axel; Suárez, Juan; Rillig, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Tropical ecosystems have an important role in global change scenarios, in part because they serve as a large terrestrial carbon pool. Carbon protection is mediated by soil aggregation processes, whereby biotic and abiotic factors influence the formation and stability of aggregates. Nutrient additions may affect soil structure indirectly by simultaneous shifts in biotic factors, mainly roots and fungal hyphae, but also via impacts on abiotic soil properties. Here, we tested the hypothesis that soil aggregation will be affected by nutrient additions primarily via changes in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) hyphae and root length in a pristine tropical forest system. Therefore, the percentage of water-stable macroaggregates (> 250µm) (WSA) and the soil mean weight diameter (MWD) was analyzed, as well as nutrient contents, pH, root length and AMF abundance. Phosphorus additions significantly increased the amount of WSA, which was consistent across two different sampling times. Despite a positive effect of phosphorus additions on extraradical AMF biomass, no relationship between WSA and extra-radical AMF nor roots was revealed by regression analyses, contrary to the proposed hypothesis. These findings emphasize the importance of analyzing soil structure in understudied tropical systems, since it might be affected by increasing nutrient deposition expected in the future.

  20. An Increased Abundance of Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells Is Correlated with the Progression and Prognosis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yichen; Xu, Xuejun; Guo, Shixiang; Zhang, Chaobin; Tang, Yan; Tian, Yi; Ni, Bing; Lu, Binfeng; Wang, Huaizhi

    2014-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can inhibit cytotoxic responses. Though several studies have analyzed Treg frequency in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patients using flow cytometry (FCM), few studies have examined how intratumoral Tregs might contribute to immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the potential role of intratumoral Tregs in PDA patients remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that the percentages of Tregs, CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were all increased significantly in tumor tissue compared to control pancreatic tissue, as assessed via FCM, whereas the percentages of these cell types in PBMCs did not differ between PDA patients and healthy volunteers. The percentages of CD8+ T cells in tumors were significantly lower than in PDA patient PBMCs. In addition, the relative numbers of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs and CD8+ T cells were negatively correlated in the tissue of PDA patients, and the abundance of Tregs was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation. Additionally, Foxp3+ T cells were observed more frequently in juxtatumoral stroma (immediately adjacent to the tumor epithelial cells). Patients showing an increased prevalence of Foxp3+ T cells had a poorer prognosis, which was an independent factor for patient survival. These results suggest that Tregs may promote PDA progression by inhibiting the antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells at local intratumoral sites. Moreover, a high proportion of Tregs in tumor tissues may reflect suppressed antitumor immunity. PMID:24637664

  1. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested. PMID:19275059

  2. Dramatic Improvements to Feature Based Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyansky, V. N.; Morris, R. D.; Kuehnel, F. O.; Maluf, D. A.; Cheeseman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The camera registration extracted from feature based stereo is usually considered sufficient to accurately localize the 3D points. However, for natural scenes the feature localization is not as precise as in man-made environments. This results in small camera registration errors. We show that even very small registration errors result in large errors in dense surface reconstruction. We describe a method for registering entire images to the inaccurate surface model. This gives small, but crucially important improvements to the camera parameters. The new registration gives dramatically better dense surface reconstruction.

  3. The Influence of the Physical Design of the Dramatic Play Center on Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrakos, Harriet; Howe, Nina

    1996-01-01

    Observed the effects of dramatic play center variations on children's social and cognitive play behaviors. Found that solitary-designed centers facilitated more solitary play than group-designed centers; dramatic play increased in the intervention and follow-up housekeeping centers compared to the baseline housekeeping center; and thematic centers…

  4. Insulin increases mRNA abundance of the amino acid transporter SLC7A5/LAT1 via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Dillon K.; Drummond, Micah J.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Borack, Michael S.; Jennings, Kristofer; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Amino acid transporters (AATs) provide a link between amino acid availability and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation although the direct relationship remains unclear. Previous studies in various cell types have used high insulin concentrations to determine the role of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and AAT mRNA abundance. However, this approach may limit applicability to human physiology. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and whether lower insulin concentrations stimulate AAT mRNA abundance in muscle cells. We hypothesized that lower insulin concentrations would increase mRNA abundance of select AAT via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in C2C12 myotubes. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) significantly increased phosphorylation of the mTORC1 downstream effectors p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and ribosomal protein S6 (S6). A low rapamycin dose (2.5 nmol/L) significantly reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated S6K1 and S6 phosphorylation. A high rapamycin dose (50 nmol/L) further reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated phosphorylation of S6K1 and S6. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) increased mRNA abundance of SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P ≤ 0.043) and SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≤ 0.021) at 240 min and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P = 0.039) at 30 min. High rapamycin prevented an increase in SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P = 0.075) and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P ≥ 0.06) mRNA abundance whereas both rapamycin doses prevented an increase in SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≥ 0.902) mRNA abundance. We conclude that a low insulin concentration increases SLC7A5/LAT1 mRNA abundance in an mTORC1‐dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:24760501

  5. Abundance of the Multiheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcB Increases in Outer Biofilm Layers of Electrode-Grown Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Camille S.; LaBelle, Edward V.; Brantley, Susan L.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    When Geobacter sulfurreducens utilizes an electrode as its electron acceptor, cells embed themselves in a conductive biofilm tens of microns thick. While environmental conditions such as pH or redox potential have been shown to change close to the electrode, less is known about the response of G. sulfurreducens to growth in this biofilm environment. To investigate whether respiratory protein abundance varies with distance from the electrode, antibodies against an outer membrane multiheme cytochrome (OmcB) and cytoplasmic acetate kinase (AckA) were used to determine protein localization in slices spanning ∼25 µm-thick G. sulfurreducens biofilms growing on polished electrodes poised at +0.24 V (vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode). Slices were immunogold labeled post-fixing, imaged via transmission electron microscopy, and digitally reassembled to create continuous images allowing subcellular location and abundance per cell to be quantified across an entire biofilm. OmcB was predominantly localized on cell membranes, and 3.6-fold more OmcB was detected on cells 10–20 µm distant from the electrode surface compared to inner layers (0–10 µm). In contrast, acetate kinase remained constant throughout the biofilm, and was always associated with the cell interior. This method for detecting proteins in intact conductive biofilms supports a model where the utilization of redox proteins changes with depth. PMID:25090411

  6. "Play for Real": Understanding Middle School Children's Dramatic Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Zayda

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes a dissertation that examines the theory and practice of dramatic play among middle school children. Finds that they are still adept and interested in dramatic play. Discusses four components describing the nature and product of the dramatic process (social interactions, metacognitive strategies, ideational processes, and content of…

  7. How To Use Creative Dramatics in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    1998-01-01

    Provides specific steps and techniques for teaching and using creative dramatics in elementary school classrooms. Notes that creative dramatics address children's powerful emotions and imaginations, which children rely on to explore and understand the world. Discusses four necessary components of creative dramatics--structure, open-endedness, a…

  8. Creative Dramatics: The Perfect Tool for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the use of creative dramatics with gifted students considers the value of creative dramatics; components of creative dramatics (structure, open-endedness, a safe environment, and feedback); the actor's elements (voice, body, character or imagination, and group work). Specific exercises to develop the actor's elements are described.…

  9. Food intake inhibition in rainbow trout induced by activation of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors is associated with increases in POMC, CART and CRF mRNA abundance in hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maceira, Jorge J; Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Mancebo, María J; Soengas, José L; Aldegunde, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    In rainbow trout, the food intake inhibition induced by serotonin occurs through 5-HT2C and 5-HT1A receptors, though the mechanisms involved are still unknown. Therefore, we assessed if a direct stimulation of 5-HT2C and 5-HT1A serotonin receptors (resulting in decreased food intake in rainbow trout), affects gene expression of neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake, such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), and agouti-related peptide (AgRP). In a first set of experiments, the injection of the 5-HT2C receptor agonists MK212 (60 μg kg(-1) icv) and WAY 161503 (1 mg kg(-1) ip), and of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg kg(-1) ip and 30 μg kg(-1) icv) induced food intake inhibition. In a second set of experiments, we observed that the injection of MK212 or WAY 161503 (1 and 3 mg kg(-1)) significantly increased hypothalamic POMC mRNA abundance. CART mRNA abundance in hypothalamus was enhanced by treatment with MK212 and unaffected by WAY 161503. The administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not induce any significant variation in the hypothalamic POMC or CART mRNA levels. CRF mRNA abundance was only affected by MK212 that increased hypothalamic values. Finally, hypothalamic AgRP mRNA abundance was only evaluated with the agonist 5-HT2C MK212 resulting in no significant effects. The results show that the reduction in food intake mediated by 5-HT2C receptors is associated with increases in hypothalamic POMC, CART and CRF mRNA abundance. PMID:26832922

  10. Effects of Experimental High Flow Releases and Increased Fluctuations in Flow from Glen Canyon Dam on Abundance, Growth, and Survival Rates of Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout in the Lee's Ferry Reach of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Josh

    2010-05-01

    The abundance of adult fish populations is controlled by the growth and survival rates of early life stages. Evaluating the effects of flow regimes on early life stages is therefore critical to determine how these regimes affect the abundance of adult populations. Experimental high flow releases from Glen Canyon Dam, primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, AZ, have been conducted in 1996, 2004, and 2008. These flows potentially affect the Lee's Ferry reach rainbow trout population, located immediately downstream of the dam, which supports a highly valued fishery and likely influences the abundance of rainbow trout in Grand Canyon. Due to concerns about negative effects of high trout abundance on endangered native fish, hourly variation in flow from Glen Canyon Dam was experimentally increased between 2003 and 2005 to reduce trout abundance. This study reports on the effects of experimental high flow releases and fluctuating flows on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lee's Ferry reach based on monthly sampling of redds (egg nests) and the abundance and growth of age-0 trout between 2003 and 2009. Data on spawn timing, spawning elevations, and intergravel temperatures were integrated in a model to estimate the magnitude and seasonal trend in incubation mortality resulting from redd dewatering due to fluctuations in flow. Experimental fluctuations from January through March promoted spawning at higher elevations where the duration of dewatering was longer and intergravel temperatures exceeded lethal thresholds. Flow-dependent incubation mortality rates were 24% (2003) and 50% (2004) in years with higher flow fluctuations, compared to 5-11% under normal operations (2006-2009). Spatial and temporal predictions of mortality were consistent with direct observations of egg mortality determined from the excavation of 125 redds. The amount of variation in backcalculated hatch

  11. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Scientists have discovered the closest black hole yet, a mere 1,600 light years from Earth. Its discovery was heralded by four of the most dramatic rapid X-ray intensity changes ever seen from one star. Astronomers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Atlanta. The black hole in the constellation Sagittarius, along with a normal star dubbed V4641 Sgr, form a violent system that briefly flooded part of our Milky Way Galaxy with X-rays and ejected subatomic particles moving at nearly the speed of light one day last September. At the peak of its X-ray output, V4641 Sgr was the brightest X-ray emitter in the sky. Astronomers call this type of system an X-ray nova because it suddenly becomes a bright source of X-rays, but this object shows characteristics never seen in an X-ray nova. "V4641 Sgr turns on and off so fast that it seems to represent a new subclass of X-ray novae," said Donald A. Smith, postdoctoral associate in MIT's Center for Space Research. Smith worked on data from this object with MIT principal research scientist Ronald Remillard and NRAO astronomer Robert Hjellming. "In X-rays, the intensity rose by a factor of more than 1,000 in seven hours, then dropped by a factor of 100 in two hours," Remillard said. The radio emission was seen as an image of an expanding "jet" of particles shooting out from the binary system. After reaching a maximum, the radio intensity dropped by a factor of nearly 40 within two days. "Radio telescopes give us a quick glimpse of something moving at a fantastically high velocity," Hjellming said. Black holes harbor enormous gravitational force that can literally rip the gas away from a nearby star. This transfer of gas is visible in many forms of radiation. Both orbiting X-ray telescopes and ground-based radio and optical telescopes saw the outburst of V4641

  12. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant concentrations less than 1% of saturated vapor. In addition, maps of activated glomeruli changed dramatically as odorant concentration was reduced. Thus perceptual stability exists in the face of dramatic changes in both the amplitude and the maps of the input to the olfactory bulb. The data for the concentration dependence of the response of the most sensitive glomeruli for each of five odorants was fitted with a Michaelis-Menten (Hill) equation. The fitted curves were extrapolated to odorant concentrations several orders of magnitude lower the smallest observed signals and suggest that the calcium response at low odorant concentrations is more than 1000 times smaller than the response at saturating odorant concentrations. We speculate that only a few spikes in olfactory sensory neurons may be sufficient for correct odorant identification. PMID:19291227

  13. AVP-Induced Increase in AQP2 and p-AQP2 Is Blunted in Heart Failure during Cardiac Remodeling and Is Associated with Decreased AT1R Abundance in Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lütken, Sophie Constantin; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective was to examine the renal effects of long-term increased angiotensin II and vasopressin plasma levels in early-stage heart failure (HF). We investigated the regulations of the V2 vasopressin receptor, the type 1A angiotensin II receptor, the (pro)renin receptor, and the water channels AQP2, AQP1, AQP3, and AQP4 in the inner medulla of rat kidney. Methods HF was induced by coronary artery ligation. Sixty-eight rats were allocated to six groups: Sham (N = 11), HF (N = 11), sodium restricted sham (N = 11), sodium restricted HF (N = 11), sodium restricted sham + DDAVP (N = 12), and sodium restricted HF + DDAVP (N = 12). 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (0.5 ng h-1 for 7 days) or vehicle was administered. Pre- and post-treatment echocardiographic evaluation was performed. The rats were sacrificed at day 17 after surgery, before cardiac remodeling in rat is known to be completed. Results HF rats on standard sodium diet and sodium restriction displayed biochemical markers of HF. These rats developed hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, and decreased fractional excretion of sodium. Increase of AQP2 and p(Ser256)-AQP2 abundance in all HF groups was blunted compared with control groups even when infused with DDAVP and despite increased vasopressin V2 receptor and Gsα abundance. This was associated with decreased protein abundance of the AT1A receptor in HF groups vs. controls. Conclusion Early-stage HF is associated with blunted increase in AQP2 and p(Ser256)-AQP2 despite of hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, and increased inner medullary vasopressin V2 receptor expression. Decreased type 1A angiotensin II receptor abundance likely plays a role in the transduction of these effects. PMID:25658446

  14. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  15. Dramatic rigidification of a peptide-decorated lamellar phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapis, N.; Urbach, W.; Ober, R.

    2001-04-01

    We have performed small-angle x-ray scattering on a lamellar (Lα) phase made of a nonionic surfactant (C12E4), decane, and water, after the insertion of a triblock peptide. The hydrophilic part of the peptide is rigid and organized in an α helix in the presence of membranes. Surface tension measurements and spectrofluorometry show that the peptide lies on the membrane surface. The Caillé parameter η and the smectic compressibility modulus B¯ decrease with peptide concentration, whereas the membrane bending rigidity κ increases threefold for mole ratio of peptide to surfactant as low as 5.2×10-4. The published models for rigid inclusions in membranes cannot account for this dramatic rigidification. However, experimental results are well fitted by a Heuristic renormalization of the membrane thickness.

  16. Using Dramatic Events and Visualization Technology to Teach About Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A. K.; Hall, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a GIS-based, two-unit module about dynamic watersheds that uses spatial visualization tools, inquiry-based questioning, and eyewitness accounts of historical, dramatic events to teach students about the natural phenomenon of watershed evolution. The module puts into context the relationship between watersheds and human behavior. The centerpiece of Unit 1 is the Big Thompson watershed in Colorado and the flash flood that killed 145 people in 1976. Unit 2 is a case history of the Sabino Canyon watershed in Arizona, which was ravaged by wildfires in 2002 and 2003, as well as destructive debris flows in 2006. Students examine the causes and magnitude of each of these events, and how they changed landscapes and people. Both units use MyWorld GIS and Google Earth visualization software tools. A teacher workshop in summer 2008 revealed an increased understanding of watersheds and an improved comfort level using spatial visualization software after working with the module. Prior to the workshop, a survey demonstrated that fewer than 50 percent of the workshop participants knew the name of the watershed in which they lived. After the workshop, all teachers were able to conceptually define a watershed, identify the watershed in which they live, and describe hazards that would put a watershed and its communities at risk for dramatic changes. They also showed an increased awareness of seasonal variations in streamflow and made connections between these variations and the sources that generate streamflow in different watersheds. We expect similar results among high-school students who will field test these materials during the Fall 2008 semester.

  17. Elevated CO2 decreases the response of the ethylene signaling pathway in Medicago truncatula and increases the abundance of the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Wenhao; Ge, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The performance of herbivorous insects is greatly affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance, which are likely to be altered by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 . We previously reported that elevated CO2 enhanced biological nitrogen (N) fixation of Medicago truncatula, which could result in an increased supply of amino acids to the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). The current study examined the N nutritional quality and aphid resistance of sickle, an ethylene-insensitive mutant of M. truncatula with supernodulation, and its wild-type control A17 under elevated CO2 in open-top field chambers. Regardless of CO2 concentration, growth and amino acid content were greater and aphid resistance was lower in sickle than in A17. Elevated CO2 up-regulated N assimilation and transamination-related enzymes activities and increased phloem amino acids in both genotypes. Furthermore, elevated CO2 down-regulated expression of 1-amino-cyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACC), sickle gene (SKL) and ethylene response transcription factors (ERF) genes in the ethylene signaling pathway of A17 when infested by aphids and decreased resistance against aphids in terms of lower activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Our results suggest that elevated CO2 suppresses the ethylene signaling pathway in M. truncatula, which results in an increase in plant nutritional quality for aphids and a decrease in plant resistance against aphids. PMID:24015892

  18. Infrared measurements of HF and HCl total column abundances above Kitt Peak, 1977-1990 - Seasonal cycles, long-term increases, and comparisons with model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Levine, J. S.; Goldman, A.; Sze, N. D.; Ko, M. K. W.; Johnson, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen-chloride and hydrogen-fluoride total column measurements, their estimated long-term rates of increase, seasonal cycles, and variability, deduced from the analysis of a set of high-resolution infrared solar spectra recorded at Kitt Peak. The Kitt Peak observations and methods of analysis are described, the results are presented and compared with previously reported measurements and trends. The data is analyzed by using a multilayer nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure and a consistent set of spectroscopic line parameters. Model-calculated hydrogen-chloride and hydrogen-fluoride total columns obtained with a two-dimensional model are discussed, and the model results are compared with the measured hydrogen-chloride and hydrogen-fluoride total columns, seasonal cycles, and trends. It is pointed out that the observed trends of both molecules are in satisfactory agreement with the model results calculated from emission histories and photooxidation rates for the source molecules.

  19. Making History Come Alive: Dramatization in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Frederick D.; Corbin, Denee

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that people of all ages love a story that involves heroes and villains and that a teacher can bridge the gap between political and social history through dramatization. Describes procedures for identifying appropriate topics for dramatization and encouraging student involvement. (CFR)

  20. Cognitive Psychology and Audience-Oriented Dramatic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, David

    Cognitive psychology's most useful contribution to dramatic theory is the concept of schemata, or the mental structures that make up part of the perceptual cycle. In regard to an audience-oriented dramatic theory, this suggests that analysis of a script ought to identify the sorts of schemata that are to be aroused in the audience's minds and the…

  1. Dramatic Activities in Language Arts Classrooms: Resource Summary. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Sibel

    This digest reviews some of the related literature about the benefits of classroom drama activities and introduces a variety of resources to help educators incorporate dramatic activities in their language arts classrooms. The digest notes that although several terms have been used to refer to "classroom drama" such as creative dramatics,…

  2. Dramatic Arts in the Secondary School, MSA Curriculum Guide 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Deldee M., Ed.; Ratliffe, Sharon A., Ed.

    This volume of the Michigan Speech Association curriculum guide is a revision of the 1968 edition (ED 026 389). The first eight units comprise a first semester course that emphasizes theatre history, dramatic structure, and dramatic criticism and theory. There are also units on presenting a one-act play, music in the theatre, and children's…

  3. Chemical Abundances of Solar-Type Dwarfs in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Open clusters present homogeneous samples of stars that are of the same age, distance, and initial chemical composition, making open clusters valuable observational targets for studies of stellar evolution, stellar structure, exoplanetary systems, and Galactic chemical evolution. I present an overview of my graduate dissertation research on LTE abundances of solar-type dwarfs (4200 ≲ T eff ≲ 6400 ; {K}) in the open clusters Pleiades, M34, and Hyades, as well as in the Ursa Major moving group. For the dwarfs of intermediate T eff (5500 ≲ T eff ≲ 6100 ; {K}), intracluster metal abundances are in good agreement. Conversely, we have identified excitation/ionization-related abundance anomalies among the cool dwarfs (T eff ≤ 5500 ; {K}) of all three clusters and UMa; for example, O abundances derived from the high-excitation, near-IR \\ion{O}{1} triplet show a dramatic increase with decreasing T eff, a behavior that is not predicted by current non-LTE calculations. Intercluster comparisons are suggestive of an age-related diminution of the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend, and possible causes of these observed abundance anomalies, i.e., chromospheric activity, surface inhomogeneities, etc., are explored. Using multi-component ``toy model'' stellar atmospheres, we demonstrate that the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend may be due to inhomogeneous temperature structure, possibly resulting from spots or plages, in the photospheres of cool open cluster dwarfs. I gratefully acknowledge the following agencies that have provided support during this research: NSF (through grants AST 00-86576 and AST 02-39518 to Prof. J.R. King), South Carolina Space Grant Consortium (through the Graduate Student Research Fellowship program), and the Charles Curry Foundation (through a generous grant to Clemson University).

  4. Improvements in proteomic metrics of low abundance proteins through proteome equalization using ProteoMiner prior to MudPIT

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Carvalho, Paulo C.; Academia, Katrina; Freeby, Steve; Xu, Tao; Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Paulus, Aran; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Ideally shotgun proteomics would facilitate the identification of an entire proteome with 100% protein sequence coverage. In reality, the large dynamic range and complexity of cellular proteomes results in oversampling of abundant proteins, while peptides from low abundance proteins are undersampled or remain undetected. We tested the proteome equalization technology, ProteoMiner, in conjunction with Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to determine how the equalization of protein dynamic range could improve shotgun proteomics methods for the analysis of cellular proteomes. Our results suggest low abundance protein identifications were improved by two mechanisms: (1) depletion of high abundance proteins freed ion trap sampling space usually occupied by high abundance peptides and (2) enrichment of low abundance proteins increased the probability of sampling their corresponding more abundant peptides. Both mechanisms also contributed to dramatic increases in the quantity of peptides identified and the quality of MS/MS spectra acquired due to increases in precursor intensity of peptides from low abundance proteins. From our large data set of identified proteins, we categorized the dominant physicochemical factors which facilitate proteome equalization with a hexapeptide library. These results illustrate that equalization of the dynamic range of the cellular proteome is a promising methodology to improve low abundance protein identification confidence, reproducibility, and sequence coverage in shotgun proteomics experiments, opening a new avenue of research for improving proteome coverage. PMID:21702434

  5. [A mixed germ cell tumor that underwent dramatic size changes].

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Takai, Hiroki; Nishiyama, Akira; Hirai, Satoshi; Yokosuka, Kimihiko; Toi, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Shunji; Uno, Masaaki; Nishimura, Hirotake

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a mixed germ cell tumor that underwent dramatic size changes. A 12-year-old boy presented to our hospital with a headache that had persisted for two months. Initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pineal tumor and hydrocephalus. The patient required external ventricular drainage and underwent two endoscopic biopsies. His evaluation involved a total of nine computed tomography (CT) scans prior to the second biopsy;the tumor size had decreased before the second endoscopic biopsy. The tumor consisted of both a germinoma and a teratoma component. The patient was treated with three courses of carboplatin-etoposide (CBDCA-VP) chemotherapy and whole-ventricle radiotherapy (32.1 Gy). However, during the adjuvant therapy, the tumor size increased, necessitating total tumor resection. We speculate that the tumor's initial size reduction was caused by leakage of the cyst component and exposure to the brain CT irradiation. The tumor's subsequent increase in size was due to the recollection of the cystic components and intracranial growing teratoma syndrome (iGTS). Therefore, frequent brain CTs and angiography should be avoided before definitive pathological diagnosis is achieved. Further, the tumor size should be considered, with surgical resection being performed at the optimal time. PMID:25179200

  6. Chemical abundances of solar-type dwarfs in open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.

    Open clusters have proven continuously to be invaluable tools to the studies of stellar physics and Galactic evolution. Until recently, however, the chemical abundances of the populous and astrophysically important late-F, G, and K open cluster dwarfs have gone largely unanalyzed. In this thesis I report on the study of the chemical abundances derived from high-resolution, moderate-to-high signal-to-noise echelle spectra obtained with the 10-m Keck I, 9.2-m Hobby- Eberly, 8.2-m VLT, 4.0-m KPNO, 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith, and the 2.1-m Otto Struve telescopes of cool dwarfs in the Pleiades, Hyades, and M34 open clusters. The main result of the study is the identification of excitation-related abundance trends found among cool open cluster dwarfs ( T eff <= 5500 K), as well as an overionization of Fe- abundances derived from singly ionized lines are greater than those derived from neutral lines- among the cool Hyades dwarfs; the trends are such that abundances derived from high-excitation (h >= 4.0 eV) spectral lines and using atmospheric models assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) increase with decreasing T eff . Particular attention is given to the high-excitation (h = 9.15 eV) near-IR ll7774 O I triplet, a line used often in the derivation of stellar O abundances and known to be susceptible to non-LTE (NLTE) effects. The O I triplet-based abundances show a dramatic increase with decreasing T eff in all three clusters, behavior that is in stark contrast to expectations from canonical NLTE calculations. Other elements with lines of various excitation potentials are also analyzed and are found to exhibit abundance trends that are qualitatively similar to those of the O I triplet. Possible explanations for the observed cool open cluster dwarf abundance anomalies are investigated, and photospheric surface temperature inhomogeneities possibly due to spots, faculae, and/or plages are found to be a plausible culprit. Indeed, multi-component LTE model atmospheres are

  7. Intravenous maternal -arginine administration to twin-bearing ewes, during late pregnancy, is associated with increased fetal muscle mTOR abundance and postnatal growth in twin female lambs.

    PubMed

    Sales, F; Sciascia, Q; van der Linden, D S; Wards, N J; Oliver, M H; McCoard, S A

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether parenteral Arg administered to well-fed twin-bearing ewes from 100 to 140 d of pregnancy influences fetal skeletal muscle growth, the abundance and activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein, and postnatal muscle growth of the offspring. Ewes fed 100% of NRC-recommended nutrient requirements for twin-bearing ewes were administered an intravenous bolus of either 345 μmol Arg HCl/kg BW or saline solution (Control) 3 times per day. At 140 d of pregnancy (P140), a group of 11 Control and 9 Arg-treated ewes were euthanized and hind leg muscles and longissimus dorsi (LD) were excised and weighed. A sample of LD was snap frozen in liquid nitrogen for later analysis of free AA (FAA) concentration, mTOR abundance and phosphorylation, and biochemical indices (DNA, RNA, and protein content). For the remaining 25 ewes (Arg, = 13, and Control, = 12), Arg administration was continued until the initiation of parturition and ewes were allowed to lamb. Lambs were weaned at postnatal Day 82 and grazed on pasture until postnatal day 153 (PN153), when a subset of 20 lambs ( = 10 per group) was euthanized. At P140, only the psoas major was heavier in the Arg-administered group compared with the Control group. Female lambs from ewes supplemented with Arg (Arg-F) had increased abundance of total mTOR, RNA concentration, and RNA:DNA ratio in LD compared with female lambs from Control ewes (Con-F), whereas males did not differ. At PN153, Arg-F were heavier than Con-F and had heavier LD and plantaris and a trend for heavier psoas major muscles compared with Con-F. In contrast, BW and individual muscle weights did not differ in male lambs. Lambs from Arg-treated ewes had heavier semimembranosus and tended to have heavier biceps femoris compared with Control lambs. The RNA concentration in LD was greater in Arg-F compared with Con-F, and DNA concentration was greater in the Arg group compared with the Control group. In

  8. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  9. Writing a Book about Dorothy Heathcote's Dramatic Approach to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gavin

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of a book about Dorothy Heathcote's dramatic approach to education. Describes a lesson on "bullying" that illustrates an attempt to implement Heathcote's "Mantle of the Expert" method. (RS)

  10. Anions dramatically enhance proton transfer through aqueous interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Himanshu; Enami, Shinichi; Nielsen, Robert J.; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Colussi, Agustín J.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) through and across aqueous interfaces is a fundamental process in chemistry and biology. Notwithstanding its importance, it is not generally realized that interfacial PT is quite different from conventional PT in bulk water. Here we show that, in contrast with the behavior of strong nitric acid in aqueous solution, gas-phase HNO3 does not dissociate upon collision with the surface of water unless a few ions (> 1 per 106 H2O) are present. By applying online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor in situ the surface of aqueous jets exposed to HNO3(g) beams we found that production increases dramatically on > 30-μM inert electrolyte solutions. We also performed quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the sizable barrier hindering HNO3 dissociation on the surface of small water clusters is drastically lowered in the presence of anions. Anions electrostatically assist in drawing the proton away from lingering outside the cluster, whose incorporation is hampered by the energetic cost of opening a cavity therein. Present results provide both direct experimental evidence and mechanistic insights on the counterintuitive slowness of PT at water-hydrophobe boundaries and its remarkable sensitivity to electrostatic effects. PMID:22689964

  11. Unusual Dramatic Surface Restructuring of Silicon Substrate during Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tanya; Steingart, Daniel; Hannon, James; Princeton University Collaboration; IBM Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Interfacial strain is unavoidable in heteroepitaxial growth and can have a profound impact on the morphology and properties of thin films. In fact, ``engineering'' thin-film strain is a critical component in many advanced technologies. For example, straining the silicon in advanced CMOS devices can increase the device speed by as much as 90 percent.order to control interfacial strain, its effects on growth must be understood. The common picture is that the growth substrate is essentially passive: its role is to provide the lattice mismatch that the growing film must respond to. As the film grows thicker, the stress in the film evolves, which can lead to morphological changes in the film, e.g. dislocations, or a change in growth mode from 2D, planar growth to 3D, quantum dot growth., in both of these examples, the action is in the growing film. In this work we describe a growth system that behaves in a completely unexpected manner that does not fit into this conventional picture. Interfacial strain that accompanies the growth of SiC nanoparticles is relieved by a dramatic restructuring of the *substrate* rather than the nanoparticles. The growth of nanoparticles induces a massive change in the substrate. In situ measurements of the Si mound formation was done with the use of LEEM. Using a simple, illustrative model with parameters taken from the literature, we show that the shapes and heights of the mounds are consistent with a strain-driven formation mechanism.

  12. Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic X-ray and optical variability on ˜ 10 year timescales has been discovered recently in a handful of quasars, which may provide important new insight into the issue of how luminous AGNs are fueled. We have assembled a new sample of extremely variable X-ray sources from archival Einstein and ROSAT data that could increase substantially the number of such objects known. The sources in our sample varied in X-ray flux by at least a factor of 7-8 over a 10-year span, and most exhibited significantly larger variability amplitudes (10 to over 100). We present the details of how our sample was assembled and preliminary results regarding the identifications, properties, and X-ray histories of the objects. Although a heterogeneous population is expected, some sources in the sample are associated with broad-line AGNs, including a radio-quiet quasar at z = 1.3 that decreased in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 40.

  13. A Dramatic Change in the Polarization of V Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. J.

    1993-12-01

    The unusual carbon star, V Hydrae, is a semiregular variable with a period of 530 days superimposed on a longer, large amplitude period of 6500 days. It has been observed to have bipolar CO outflow (Kahane et al., 1988), and is believed to be an early precursor of a bipolar planetary nebula (Tsuji et al., 1988). In an earlier program (Johnson and Jones, 1991), we observed V Hya with a broad-band polarimeter. We found that it was intrinsically polarized with P on the order of 0.7% at V. We re-observed V Hya at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory using a spectropolarimeter, and found that the polarization has increased dramatically to 10% at V, with a near 90 degree rotation in position angle from the earlier observation. Near the epoch when we observed V Hya for the second time, it was reported by T. L. Evans that V Hya was experiencing a decline in visible light. The infrared colors have also become redder, suggesting a possible dust ejection episode. V Hya is expected to reach a deep minimum sometime in 1994. We combine our polarimetric observations with our infrared and optical photometry and optical spectroscopy to propose a possible explanation for the polarimetric variations.

  14. Anions dramatically enhance proton transfer through aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Enami, Shinichi; Nielsen, Robert J; Hoffmann, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Colussi, Agustín J

    2012-06-26

    Proton transfer (PT) through and across aqueous interfaces is a fundamental process in chemistry and biology. Notwithstanding its importance, it is not generally realized that interfacial PT is quite different from conventional PT in bulk water. Here we show that, in contrast with the behavior of strong nitric acid in aqueous solution, gas-phase HNO(3) does not dissociate upon collision with the surface of water unless a few ions (> 1 per 10(6) H(2)O) are present. By applying online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor in situ the surface of aqueous jets exposed to HNO(3(g)) beams we found that NO(3)(-) production increases dramatically on > 30-μM inert electrolyte solutions. We also performed quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the sizable barrier hindering HNO(3) dissociation on the surface of small water clusters is drastically lowered in the presence of anions. Anions electrostatically assist in drawing the proton away from NO(3)(-) lingering outside the cluster, whose incorporation is hampered by the energetic cost of opening a cavity therein. Present results provide both direct experimental evidence and mechanistic insights on the counterintuitive slowness of PT at water-hydrophobe boundaries and its remarkable sensitivity to electrostatic effects. PMID:22689964

  15. Dramatic inhibition of amiodarone metabolism induced by grapefruit juice

    PubMed Central

    Libersa, Christian C; Brique, Serge A; Motte, Kokou B; Caron, Jacques F; Guédon-Moreau, Laurence M; Humbert, Luc; Vincent, A; Devos, Patrick; Lhermitte, Michel A

    2000-01-01

    Aims Grapefruit juice increases blood concentrations of many drugs metabolized by CYP3A. Amiodarone is metabolized by CYP3A to N-desethylamiodarone (N-DEA). The aim of this study was to determine amiodarone kinetics when administrated with and without grapefruit juice. Methods Eleven healthy adult volunteers took part in a single sequence, repeated-measures design study. Each subject, who had been evaluated 6 months previously for amiodarone pharmacokinetics, was given a single oral dose of amiodarone (17 mg kg−1) with three glasses of 300 ml of grapefruit juice on the same day. Results Grapefruit juice completely inhibited the production of N-DEA, the major metabolite of amiodarone, in all subjects and increased the area-under-the-curve (AUC) and maximum concentration of amiodarone (Cmax) by 50% and 84%, respectively, as compared with the control period during which water had been administrated instead of grapefruit juice (AUC: 35.9 ± 14.3 vs 23.9 ± 11.2 µg ml−1 h, P < 0.005 and Cmax: 3.45 ± 1.7 vs 1.87 ± 0.6 µg ml−1, P < 0. 02, respectively) (means ± s.d.). This inhibition of N-DEA production led to a decrease in the alterations caused by amiodarone on PR and QTc intervals. Conclusions Grapefruit juice dramatically alters the metabolism of amiodarone with complete inhibition of N-DEA production. These results are in agreement with in vitro data pointing to the involvement of CYP3 A in the metabolism of amiodarone and suggests that this interaction should be taken into account when prescribing this antiarrhythmic drug. PMID:10759694

  16. Dorsal Raphe Neuroinflammation Promotes Dramatic Behavioral Stress Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Howerton, Alexis R.; Roland, Alison V.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, and elevated stress responsivity are prominent symptoms of mania, a behavioral state common to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Though inflammatory processes activated within the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of both disorders, the specific mechanisms by which neuroinflammation drives manic behavior are not well understood. Serotonin cell bodies originating within the dorsal raphe (DR) play a major role in the regulation of behavioral features characteristic of mania. Therefore, we hypothesized that the link between neuroinflammation and manic behavior may be mediated by actions on serotonergic neurocircuitry. To examine this, we induced local neuroinflammation in the DR by viral delivery of Cre recombinase into interleukin (IL)-1βXAT transgenic male and female mice, resulting in overexpressing of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For assertion of brain-region specificity of these outcomes, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as a downstream target of DR serotonergic projections, was also infused. Inflammation within the DR, but not the PFC, resulted in a profound display of manic-like behavior, characterized by increased stress-induced locomotion and responsivity, and reduced risk-aversion/fearfulness. Microarray analysis of the DR revealed a dramatic increase in immune-related genes, and dysregulation of genes important in GABAergic, glutamatergic, and serotonergic neurotransmission. Behavioral and physiological changes were driven by a loss of serotonergic neurons and reduced output as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating inflammation-induced serotonergic hypofunction. Behavioral changes were rescued by acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment, supporting the hypothesis that serotonin dysregulation stemming from neuroinflammation in the DR underlies manic-like behaviors. PMID:24849347

  17. Increased abundance of aromatase and follicle stimulating hormone receptor mRNA and decreased insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor mRNA in small ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin births.

    PubMed

    Echternkamp, S E; Aad, P Y; Eborn, D R; Spicer, L J

    2012-07-01

    Cattle genetically selected for twin ovulations and births (Twinner) exhibit increased ovarian follicular development, increased ovulation rate, and greater blood and follicular fluid IGF-1 concentrations compared with contemporary cattle not selected for twins (Control). Experimental objectives were to 1) assess relationships among aromatase (CYP19A1), IGF-1 (IGF1), IGF-2 receptor (IGF2R), and FSH receptor (FSHR) mRNA expression in small (≤5 mm) antral follicles and 2) determine their association with increased numbers of developing follicles in ovaries of Twinner females. Ovaries were collected from mature, cyclic (d 3 to 6) Twinner (n = 11), and Control (n = 12) cows at slaughter and pieces of cortical tissue were fixed and embedded in paraffin. Expression of mRNA was evaluated by in situ hybridization using (35)S-UTP-labeled antisense and sense probes for CYP19A1, FSHR, IGF1, and IGF2R mRNA. Silver grain density was quantified within the granulosa and theca cells of individual follicles (2 to 7 follicles/cow) by Bioquant image analysis. Follicles of Twinners tended to be smaller in diameter than Controls (1.9 ± 0.1 vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 mm; P = 0.08), but thickness of granulosa layer did not differ (P > 0.1) by genotype. Relative abundance of CYP19A1 (P < 0.01) and FSHR (P < 0.05) mRNA was greater in granulosa cells of Twinners vs. Controls, respectively, whereas IGF2R mRNA expression was less in both granulosa (P < 0.01) and theca (P < 0.05) cells in follicles of Twinners vs. Controls, respectively. Abundance of CYP19A1 mRNA in granulosa cells was correlated negatively with IGF2R mRNA expression in both granulosa (r = -0.33; P < 0.01) and theca (r = -0.21; P = 0.05) cells. Expression of IGF1 mRNA was primarily in granulosa cells, including cumulus cells, and its expression did not differ between Twinners vs. Controls (P > 0.10). Detected increases in CYP19A1 and FSHR, but not IGF1, mRNA expression along with decreases in IGF2R mRNA expression in individual

  18. Examining Young Children's Perception toward Augmented Reality-Infused Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jeonghye; Jo, Miheon; Hyun, Eunja; So, Hyo-jeong

    2015-01-01

    Amid the increasing interest in applying augmented reality (AR) in educational settings, this study explores the design and enactment of an AR-infused robot system to enhance children's satisfaction and sensory engagement with dramatic play activities. In particular, we conducted an exploratory study to empirically examine children's perceptions…

  19. Collaborative College Playwriting and Performance: A Core Course "Trespassing" onto the Dramatic Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedetti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is relevant in the context of the increased demand for creative thinkers in a global economy. However, reaching across disciplinary boundaries is less common in higher education. Arts integration is one way that a literature class can "trespass" onto the dramatic arts. This paper reports on a study of integrating the…

  20. Cotton domestication: Dramatic changes in a single cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the nature of genetic changes underpinning plant domestication is critical for untangling the evolutionary history of crops and for improving modern cultivars. A recent study in cotton provides information about the effects of domestication, showing that dramatic genome-wide changes i...

  1. Dramatic Play: Root Meaning of Drama/Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The processes involved in drama and the dramatic play of children are essentially the same in that they rely on an imitation of nature, involve a transformation of reality through imagination, connect seemingly irrelevant elements creatively, and bring a temporary, limited order to an emotional experience. When child's play is used as a basis for…

  2. Assessment to Make "Dramatic Advance;" Coherency, Comprehensiveness Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    2010-01-01

    Assessment in America's high schools is about to undergo its most dramatic advance in decades, according to a policy brief released in February by the Alliance for Excellent Education (AEE), a Washington, DC, based organization devoted to promoting high school transformation. "There is widespread concern that the most prominent assessments…

  3. Piaget in Performance: The Role of "Games" in Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    Jean Piaget's theories of child development and the nature of intelligence are adapted to creative dramatics in this description of two games for children aged 6 through 12. The first game discussed incorporates a "touchy-feely box," a cardboard construction with openings on two sides so that a child may reach inside, select, and describe an…

  4. Building Family and Community Demand for Dramatic Change in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Dana; Steiner, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    District-led, dramatic change efforts in failing schools--including turnarounds and school closures--often face strong resistance from families and communities. Resistance may be based on years of tension and distrust between districts and communities, failed past school improvement efforts, or a lack of understanding about the chasm between a…

  5. Burke Bingo: Using Active Learning to Introduce Dramatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Kenneth Burke is typically regarded as the single most significant figure in 20th-century rhetorical studies. Undergraduate textbooks in rhetorical criticism, rhetorical theory, and communication theory typically include coverage of Burke's theory of dramatism. In this article, the author describes a classroom activity dubbed "Burke Bingo" that…

  6. Celebrating Diversity through Northeastern Asian Children's Literature and Dramatic Productions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Maurine V.; And Others

    At the University of South Dakota, as part of a campus-wide celebration of diversity focused on northeastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea), undergraduate and graduate Children's Literature classes participated by locating relevant literature and presenting them dramatically. Students were divided into six small cooperative groups. Each group chose a…

  7. Astronaut to Zoologist: Changing the Dramatic Play Area!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouette, Scott J.

    Changing the dramatic play area in a child care setting promotes creativity and gives children the chance to experience a place they may never experience in real life. Whenever possible, the children should be involved in the process of changing the area, by moving furniture and exchanging props, as well as brainstorming ideas for changes. The…

  8. Frost Bite: A Dramatic Tale of Research in Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article follows the author's research on the integration of an aesthetic arts initiative in a private elementary school with an established traditional arts program. The narrative describes the sequence of events, interpersonal interactions, and learning experiences in the format of a full-length dramatic performance. Informed by Ben Peretz's…

  9. Soaps and Suspicious Activity: Dramatic Experiences in British Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers examples of dramatic experiences (student produced soap operas) in two classrooms in British comprehensive secondary schools. Concludes that students in other countries would find such experiences as meaningful and enjoyable as their British counterparts. Notes that the two teachers managed to be flexible, appropriating effective…

  10. Synbiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and cellobiose does not affect human gut bacterial diversity but increases abundance of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and branched-chain fatty acids: a randomized, double-blinded cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Gabriella C; Krych, Lukasz; Röytiö, Henna; Forssten, Sofia; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren; Svensson, Birte; Jespersen, Lene; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics, prebiotics, and combinations thereof, that is synbiotics, have been reported to modulate gut microbiota of humans. In this study, effects of a novel synbiotic on the composition and metabolic activity of human gut microbiota were investigated. Healthy volunteers (n = 18) were enrolled in a double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled cross-over study and received synbiotic [Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (10(9) CFU) and cellobiose (5 g)] or placebo daily for 3 weeks. Fecal samples were collected and lactobacilli numbers were quantified by qPCR. Furthermore, 454 tag-encoded amplicon pyrosequencing was used to monitor the effect of synbiotic on the composition of the microbiota. The synbiotic increased levels of Lactobacillus spp. and relative abundances of the genera Bifidobacterium, Collinsella, and Eubacterium while the genus Dialister was decreased (P < 0.05). No other effects were found on microbiota composition. Remarkably, however, the synbiotic increased concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids, measured by gas chromatography, while short-chain fatty acids were not affected. PMID:25098489

  11. Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by dramatic changes in phospholipid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; Fieuws, Steffen; Bordel, Sergio; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Van de Plas, Raf; Dehairs, Jonas; Wouters, Jens; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death globally. To develop better diagnostics and more effective treatments, research in the past decades has focused on identification of molecular changes in the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and more recently also the metabolome. Phospholipids, which nevertheless play a central role in cell functioning, remain poorly explored. Here, using a mass spectrometry (MS)-based phospholipidomics approach, we profiled 179 phospholipid species in malignant and matched non-malignant lung tissue of 162 NSCLC patients (73 in a discovery cohort and 89 in a validation cohort). We identified 91 phospholipid species that were differentially expressed in cancer versus non-malignant tissues. Most prominent changes included a decrease in sphingomyelins (SMs) and an increase in specific phosphatidylinositols (PIs). Also a decrease in multiple phosphatidylserines (PSs) was observed, along with an increase in several phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, particularly those with 40 or 42 carbon atoms in both fatty acyl chains together. 2D-imaging MS of the most differentially expressed phospholipids confirmed their differential abundance in cancer cells. We identified lipid markers that can discriminate tumor versus normal tissue and different NSCLC subtypes with an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.999 and 0.885, respectively. In conclusion, using both shotgun and 2D-imaging lipidomics analysis, we uncovered a hitherto unrecognized alteration in phospholipid profiles in NSCLC. These changes may have important biological implications and may have significant potential for biomarker development. What’s new? Cellular membranes are subject to extensive modification in cancer, often with marked alterations in phospholipid metabolism. The extent and nature of those changes are not fully known, however, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, lipidomics analysis

  12. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  13. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  14. A Dramatic Increase in Seismic Observations in the Central and Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, R.; Busby, R.; Simpson, D.; Alvarez, M.; Vernon, F.

    2009-05-01

    The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is a network of 400 seismograph stations that is systematically moving west-to-east across the contiguous United States. The TA is part of the National Science Foundation's multi- disciplinary EarthScope program. The TA has already occupied over 700 stations in the western US, and is continuing its multi-year migration towards the Atlantic coast before heading for Alaska. The stations use a grid-like deployment with 70 km separation between stations. At any given time there are approximately 400 stations operational, occupying a nominal 800 km by 2000 km "footprint." Each station is operated for two years. TA stations consist of three component broadband seismometers, with a few sites in the westernmost United States also including three component strong motion instruments. The instruments are installed about two meters below the surface, in thermally stable vaults. All stations transmit continuous data in near-real-time, and the data are freely distributed through the IRIS Data Management Center. TA stations can be upgraded to incorporate high frequency or strong motion instrument. Organizations can also "adopt" stations after installation by reimbursing the cost of the hardware, so that the stations become permanent. The TA is presently operating in the swath of the country extending from Texas to Montana. From 2010 to 2013 the TA will occupy ~800 sites in the central and eastern US. The array will be centered on the New Madrid, MO region during the bicentennial of the 1811-1812 earthquakes. During the TA deployment every existing or planned nuclear plant in the eastern US will be within 70 km of at least four new seismic stations. Thus, this station deployment in the eastern half of the US presents an unprecedented opportunity for improving source characterization, modeling the regional velocity and attenuation structure, and mapping seismic zones down to low magnitude thresholds. We will provide an overview of TA installation plans, instrumentation, and data so that scientists and decision makers are better prepared to capitalize on the unique opportunity presented by the TA moving through the central and eastern US. We will provide examples of TA station performance, as well as examples of data quality and seismic detection thresholds observed in the western US.

  15. Biosolids amendment dramatically increases sequestration of crop residue-carbon in agricultural soils in western Illinois

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of carbon dioxide through microbial respiration from the world’s crop residues (non-edible plant parts left in the field after harvest) represents an important form of carbon transfer from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. We hypothesized that alleviation of environmental stress (moi...

  16. Dramatic increase in the oxygen reduction reaction for platinum cathodes from tuning the solvent dielectric constant.

    PubMed

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A; Sha, Yao; Yu, Ted H; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Andreussi, Oliviero

    2014-06-23

    Hydrogen fuel cells (FC) are considered essential for a sustainable economy based on carbon-free energy sources, but a major impediment are the costs. First-principles quantum mechanics (density functional theory including solvation) is used to predict how the energies and barriers for the mechanistic steps of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over the fcc(111) platinum surface depend on the dielectric constant of the solvent. The ORR kinetics can be strongly accelerated by decreasing the effective medium polarizability from the high value it has in water. Possible ways to realize this experimentally are suggested. The calculated volcano structure for the dependence of rate on solvent polarization is considered to be general, and should be observed in other electrochemical systems. PMID:24828005

  17. Increasing Marriage Will Dramatically Reduce Child Poverty. A Report of the Heritage Center for Data Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Robert E.; Johnson, Kirk A.; Fagan, Patrick F.; Noyes, Lauren R.

    This report uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (a nationwide survey that collects data on married and non-married parents at the time of the child's birth) to determine how much marriage could reduce poverty among couples who are not married at the time of birth. To determine the impact of marriage on children's and…

  18. Increased temperatures have dramatic effects on growth and grain yield of three maize hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising temperatures under climate change are projected to have negative impacts on crop growth and production. These conclusions have been reached based on the analysis of historical data with no direct observations of projected temperatures for the end of the 21st century. A study conducted compari...

  19. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  20. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  1. Multiple nontuberculous scrofulodermas showing dramatic response to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Parimalam, Kumar; Senthil, G; Vinnarasan, M; Arumugakani, V; Amutha, B M; Lalitha, S; Swarna, S

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are distinct from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium chelonae, a non-pigment producing rapid grower, can be found in many cutaneous sites; infection occurs most commonly after skin trauma from surgery, injections, or minor injuries. In immune competent patients, the infection is more frequently localized as a cellulitis or a nodule, whereas, in the immunocompromised patient, dissemination (more than five lesions) can occur. Because the organism is resistant to antituberculous therapy, abscess can develop and follow a chronic, indolent course. We report a case of multiple scrofuloderma due to nontuberculous infection caused by M. chelonae showing dramatic response to clarithromycin. PMID:25657914

  2. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. RESULTS NADH- and FADH2-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-dl-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20682693

  3. "Shadows of the heart": a dramatic video for the treatment resistance of spouse abusers.

    PubMed

    Stosny, S

    1994-11-01

    Successful intervention with spouse abusers, most of whom are ordered into treatment by the courts, must overcome formidable anger and resistance, often expressed by high attrition and scant participation in the group treatment process. The dramatic video "Shadows of the Heart" dissipates client resistance by providing internal motivation to control violent behavior. The video dramatizes spouse abuse from the viewpoint of a young boy, who as a man has become a spouse abuser. As clients experience compassion for the child witness to family violence, they learn to convert their habitual anger response into nonviolent actions. Developed to combat treatment resistance, the video presentation was tested in a randomized experiment with 106 male spouse abusers drawn from seven public and private agencies. Results indicate that the video presentation significantly increased attendance and participation in the group treatment process. PMID:7992138

  4. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  5. The Relationship between Dramatic Play and Self-Concept in Middle Class Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gootman, Marilyn Eisenstadt

    This study attempted to determine the relationships between the dramatic play of children aged three to seven and their self-concept; between dramatic play and two components of self-concept--self-esteem and identification with friends; between dramatic play ability and self-concept; and between dramatic play and the teacher's attitude toward…

  6. Loop chiller plant design dramatically lowers chilled water costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, T.

    1999-07-01

    Recent improvements in HVAC networking and speed control technologies, together with an improved understanding of the nature of cooling loads in buildings offer exciting opportunities for improving the energy efficiency of chiller plants. A new Loop chiller plant design has been developed that incorporates variable speed control on all plant components. Operation of this cooling plant is coordinated with the load it serves through a control network. This new approach has enormous advantages over traditional optimized plants. The two key advantages of these new Loop design chiller plants designs are: (1) Annual operating energy requirements are reduced by as much as 50% or more when compared to present state-of-the-art optimized chiller plants, and (2) A smaller sized and therefore less costly chiller plant can be designed to serve HVAC loads. The term Loop is employed to describe the technologies employed because the concept employs closed loop control by providing operational feedback from each point of use to the plant. The Loop concept also employs a single, series coupled chilled water loop for higher pumping and distribution efficiencies. This paper presents background and design theory and follows with a case study to introduce the new Loop design and operations concept. Specifics of an actual design are presented along with an explanation of how the principles can be applied economically to all new or existing chiller plant designs to achieve dramatic reductions in both construction costs and energy costs.

  7. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  8. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms.

    PubMed

    Binnebose, Andrea M; Haughney, Shannon L; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  9. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  10. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years. PMID:18206518

  11. Taming Self-Organization Dynamics to Dramatically Control Porous Architectures.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ronan; Sader, John E; Boland, John J

    2016-03-22

    We demonstrate templating of functional materials with unexpected and intricate micro- and nanostructures by controlling the condensation, packing, and evaporation of water droplets on a polymer solution. Spontaneous evaporation of a polymer solution induces cooling of the liquid surface and water microdroplet condensation from the ambient vapor. These droplets pack together and act as a template to imprint an entangled polymer film. This breath figure (BF) phenomenon is an example of self-organization that involves the long-range ordering of droplets. Equilibrium-based analysis provides many insights into contact angles and drop stability of individual drops, but the BF phenomenon remains poorly understood thus far, preventing translation to real applications. Here we investigate the dynamics of this phenomenon to separate out the competing influences and then introduce a modulation scheme to ultimately manipulate the water vapor-liquid equilibrium independently from the solvent evaporation. This approach to BF control provides insights into the mechanism, a rationale for microstructure design, and evidence for the benefits of dynamical control of self-organization systems. We finally present dramatically different porous architectures from this approach reminiscent of microscale Petri dishes, conical flasks, and test tubes. PMID:26828573

  12. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  13. Impacts on Coralligenous Outcrop Biodiversity of a Dramatic Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006–2008) and after the impact (2009–2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change. PMID:23326496

  14. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  15. Dramatic improvements in toughness in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Raychowdhury, Subhendu; Jiang, David D; Retsos, Haris; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2008-05-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, is dramatically toughened by adding small amounts of surface modified clay nanoparticles. The elongation during tensile tests increases from 7% for the pure polymer to 210% for the nanocomposite, accompanied with a modest increase in modulus. In contrast, PLG nanocomposites based on fumed silica treated with hexamethyldisilazane show only modest improvements in toughness. Electron microscopy, X-ray scattering, rheometry, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy are used to investigate the toughening mechanism. Multiple crazing occurs in the clay nanocomposite after yielding. Small angle X-ray scattering studies show significant orientation of the clay nanoparticles along the tensile stress direction during deformation. The clay nanocomposites show a new, slow relaxation mode, most likely due to interfacial adsorbption of PLG chains on the surface of the clay nanoparticles. The dramatic increase in toughness is attributed to physical crosslinks introduced by the clay nanoparticles, a mechanism absent in the PLG/silica nanocomposites. The physical crosslinks increase the brittle fracture strength of the polymer and, consequently, trigger a toughening mechanism via multiple crazing and shear yielding. PMID:18398925

  16. Boron Abundances Across the "Li-Be Dip" in the Hyades Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; King, Jeremy R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2015-08-01

    Dramatic deficiencies of Li in the mid-F dwarf stars of the Hyades cluster were discovered by Boesgaard and Tripicco in 1986. Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra from the Keck 10-m telescope, Boesgaard and King discovered the corresponding, but smaller, deficiencies in Be in the same narrow temperature region in the Hyades. With the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST we investigate B abundances in the Hyades F stars to look for a potential B dip. We use the resonance line of B I at 2497 A. These three elements are destroyed inside stars at increasingly hotter temperatures: 2.5 x 10$^6$, 3.5 x 10$^6$, and 5 x 10$^6$ K for Li, Be, B respectively. Consequently, these elements survive to increasingly greater depths in a star and their surface abundances act as a report on the depth and thoroughness of mixing in the star. We have used updated photometry from Hipparcos to find stellar parameters for the Hyades stars and have redetermined Li abundances (or upper limits) for 79 Hyades dwarfs, Be for 34 stars, and B in five stars. We find evidence for a small dip in the B abundance across the Li-Be dip. We have compared our nLTE B abundances for the three high B stars on either side of the Li-Be dip with those found by Duncan for the Hyades giants. This confirms the factor of ten decline in the B abundance in the Hyades giants as predicted by dilution due to the deepening of the surface convection zone.

  17. Dramatic effect of superfluidity on the collapse of 4He vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, An; Trimeche, A.; Jacquier, Ph.; Grucker, J.

    2016-05-01

    The lifetime of cavitation bubbles produced by an acoustic wave focused in liquid helium-4 is investigated. This lifetime is found to be different by orders of magnitude depending on whether the liquid is superfluid or not. We show that if the liquid is in the superfluid state, the bubble lifetime is well explained by a purely mechanical model, corresponding to the so-called Rayleigh regime. In the normal state, the Rayleigh-Plesset regime applies, in which heat diffusion plays a crucial role and dramatically increases the bubble lifetime.

  18. A dramatic effect of oxygen on protection of human cells against γ-radiation by lycopene.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, Terence George; Witt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Reducing radiation damage is important and dietary antioxidants that can protect cells from such damage are of value. Dietary lycopene, a carotenoid found in tomatoes, protects human lymphoid cell membranes from damage by γ-radiation. We report that such protective effects are remarkably reduced as the oxygen concentration increases - near zero at 100% oxygen from fivefold protection at 20% oxygen and, dramatically, from 50-fold protection at 0% oxygen. Such huge differences imply that under higher oxygen concentrations lycopene could lead to improved cancer therapy using γ-radiation. The cells are not efficiently protected from the superoxide radical by lycopene. Noncellular studies suggest molecular mechanisms for the oxygen effect. PMID:26991327

  19. Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allow Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Clifford Russell

    The PASADENA effect is a method for transient high-sensitivity proton spin-labelling by molecular addition of dihydrogen. When the parahydrogen mole fraction differs from the high-temperature limit of 1/4, this population difference constitutes a form of spin order which can be converted to magnetization observable by NMR. Large NMR signals are observed, if subsequent to the hydrogen addition, the two protons experience magnetic inequivalence and spin -spin coupling and if observation is made before spin-lattice relaxation restores the equilibrium spin order. The analogous effect for D_2 is also possible. The kinetic mechanisms of the homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts which permit the realization of the PASADENA effect have been the target of the experimental applications. Rates determined in PASADENA studies pertain to the active catalytic species, since only these molecules can contribute to the enhanced signals from which all kinetic inferences are made. The sensitivity enhancement has also led to the identification of a novel intermediate in the mechanism for the Rh(DIPHOS)^+ catalyzed hydrogenation of styrene. The rate of conversion of this species into product and starting material has been studied using two -dimensional NMR. The dramatically improved sensitivity should make it possible to observe key catalytic intermediates which do not build up in sufficient quantity to allow detection by conventional NMR arising from Curie-Law magnetization. The study of surface sites which bind pairwise with H_2 is also a potentially fruitful area for future experimental work. The ambient temperature NMR spectroscopy of surfaces is not often feasible due to sensitivity limitations. Simulations have been performed using typical shift and coupling parameters in an effort to characterize the enhanced lineshapes which can be expected. The inverse of the PASADENA effect has also been proposed, whereby the spin order of a molecule containing hydrogen is probed by measuring

  20. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  1. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  2. Ion-retarding lens improves the abundance sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, K. A.; Stevens, C. M.

    1969-01-01

    Ion-retarding lens which increases the abundance sensitivity of tandem magnetic-analyzer mass spectrometers measures isotopes of low abundance in mass positions adjacent to isotopes of high abundance. The lens increases the abundance sensitivity for isotopes lying farther from high abundance isotopes than the energy cutoff of the lens.

  3. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  4. Dramatic decrease of carnitine esters after interruption of exogenous carnitine supply in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bene, Judit; Csiky, Botond; Wittmann, Istvan; Sulyok, Endre; Melegh, Bela

    2012-01-01

    L-carnitine supplementation is extensively used in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) to improve dialysis-related clinical symptoms. In a series of studies, we investigated the dynamics of carnitine pool in carnitine-supplemented HD patients; here we report dramatic decrease with special changes of the ester profile due to interruption of the exogenous intake after the last HD session. Serum samples were collected from 18 L-carnitine-repleted end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients before the L-carnitine supplementation, after completion of a carnitine supplementation period treatment (12 weeks, 1 g/IV/HD), right before the HD session, and 44 h after the dialysis. Levels of free carnitine (FC) and the individual esters were determined using electrospray MS/MS technique. Normally, L-carnitine supplementation causes significant elevation of all carnitine compounds to supraphysiological levels, which reaches a standard steady-state-like profile. In this study we found a dramatic decrease in the level of FC, and in short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines (ACs) 44 h after the last dialysis. At the end of this interdialytic period, FC levels increased to only 65% of the predialysis level, whereas the amounts of C2 and C3 esters recovered to only 50%. The level of C6 was 65% of the predialysis level, whereas the amount of C8 chain length ACs returned to 72% of the predialysis level. No significant change was seen in AC concentrations above C10 chain length. Omission of one single dosage of supplemental carnitine in long-term administration schemes results in dramatic decrease and reprofiling of carnitine esters even after the usual 44 h of interdialytic period. PMID:22417076

  5. Increased abundance of aromatase and follicle stimulating hormone receptor mRNA and decreased insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor mRNA in small ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin births

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle genetically selected for twin ovulations and births (Twinner) exhibit increased ovarian follicular development, increased ovulation rate, and greater blood and follicular fluid IGF 1 concentrations compared with contemporary cattle not selected for twins (Control). Experimental objectives wer...

  6. World-Wide Effort Produces Dramatic "Movie" of Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Astronomers using a world-wide collection of radio telescopes, including the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have made a dramatic "movie" of a voracious, superdense neutron star repeatedly spitting out subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light into two narrow jets as it pulls material from a companion star. The movie shows these jets ejecting clouds of hot plasma that are then "zapped" by pulses of energy in the jets as they move away from the neutron star. Frame from Radio-Telescope 'Movie' of Scorpius X-1 "We have directly measured the speed of energy flow in a cosmic jet for the first time," said Ed Fomalont, an astronomer at the NRAO in Charlottesville, Virginia. Fomalont worked with Barry Geldzahler and Charles Bradshaw of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. The astronomers used the VLBA, the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) and the Green Bank 140-foot telescope, along with radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network, Australia, Japan and South Africa to record the double-star system's eruptions continuously for 56 hours. "This study is going to be extremely valuable in helping us understand a phenomenon that we see throughout the universe," Fomalont said. Cosmic jets of superfast particles are ejected from the cores of numerous galaxies. On a smaller scale, similar jets are ejected from binary-star systems closer to home, in our own Milky Way Galaxy. While the jets from galaxy cores are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes millions of times more massive than the Sun, the closer "microquasars" are powered by much smaller black holes or by neutron stars only a few times more massive than the sun. "Studying one of the closer, smaller examples will help us understand how they all work, including the bigger ones," Geldzahler said. "The jets coming from distant galaxies are harder to study because of their much greater distance and the slowness of their

  7. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot from Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; de Pater, Imke; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Carlson, Robert W.; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  8. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot from Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; de Pater, Imke; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Carlson, Robert W.; Marcus, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nanometers, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nanometers. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  9. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500 nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630 nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2 day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  10. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  11. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  12. Distribution and abundance of zooplankton populations in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; McIntire, C.D.; Buktenica, M.W.; Girdner, S.F.; Truitt, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The zooplankton assemblages in Crater Lake exhibited consistency in species richness and general taxonomic composition, but varied in density and biomass during the period between 1988 and 2000. Collectively, the assemblages included 2 cladoceran taxa and 10 rotifer taxa (excluding rare taxa). Vertical habitat partitioning of the water column to a depth of 200 m was observed for most species with similar food habits and/or feeding mechanisms. No congeneric replacement was observed. The dominant species in the assemblages were variable, switching primarily between periods of dominance of Polyarthra-Keratella cochlearis and Daphnia. The unexpected occurrence and dominance of Asplanchna in 1991 and 1992 resulted in a major change in this typical temporal shift between Polyarthra-K. cochlearis and Daphnia. Following a collapse of the zooplankton biomass in 1993 that was probably caused by predation from Asplanchna, Kellicottia dominated the zooplankton assemblage biomass between 1994 and 1997. The decline in biomass of Kellicottia by 1998 coincided with a dramatic increase in Daphnia biomass. When Daphnia biomass declined by 2000, Keratella biomass increased again. Thus, by 1998 the assemblage returned to the typical shift between Keratella-Polyarthra and Daphnia. Although these observations provided considerable insight about the interannual variability of the zooplankton assemblages in Crater Lake, little was discovered about mechanisms behind the variability. When abundant, kokanee salmon may have played an important role in the disappearance of Daphnia in 1990 and 2000 either through predation, inducing diapause, or both. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. Morphine withdrawal dramatically reduces lymphocytes in morphine-dependent macaques.

    PubMed

    Weed, Michael R; Carruth, Lucy M; Adams, Robert J; Ator, Nancy A; Hienz, Robert D

    2006-09-01

    The immune effects of chronic opiate exposure and/or opiate withdrawal are not well understood. The results of human studies with opiate abusers are variable and may not be able to control for important factors such as subjects' drug histories, health and nutritional status. Nonhuman primate models are necessary to control these important factors. A model of opiate dependence in macaques was developed to study the effects of opiate dependence and withdrawal on measures of immune function. Four pigtailed macaques drank a mixture of morphine (20 mg/kg/session) and orange-flavored drink every 6 h for several months. During stable morphine dependence, absolute numbers of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes did not change relative to pre-morphine levels. However, there was a significant decrease in the absolute number and percentage of natural killer (NK) cells in morphine dependence. Either precipitated withdrawal or abstinence for 24 h resulted in behavioral withdrawal signs in all animals. Absolute lymphocyte counts decreased and absolute netrophil counts increased significantly in withdrawal, relative to levels during morphine dependence. Lymphocyte subset (CD4+, CD8+, CD20+) cells were also decreased in absolute numbers with little change in their percentage distributions. There was, however, a significant increase in the percentage of NK cells in withdrawal relative to levels during morphine dependence. This study demonstrates the usefulness of voluntary oral self-dosing procedures for maintaining morphine dependence in nonhuman primates and demonstrates that the morphine withdrawal syndrome includes large alterations in blood parameters of immune system function, including nearly 50% reduction in numbers of CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells. PMID:18040802

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Ablation of the Stimulatory G Protein α-Subunit in Renal Proximal Tubules Leads to Parathyroid Hormone-Resistance With Increased Renal Cyp24a1 mRNA Abundance and Reduced Serum 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; He, Qing; Aydin, Cumhur; Rubera, Isabelle; Tauc, Michel; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Marshansky, Vladimir; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat

    2016-02-01

    PTH regulates serum calcium, phosphate, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) levels by acting on bone and kidney. In renal proximal tubules (PTs), PTH inhibits reabsorption of phosphate and stimulates the synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. The PTH receptor couples to multiple G proteins. We here ablated the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in mouse PTs by using Cre recombinase driven by the promoter of type-2 sodium-glucose cotransporter (Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice were normophosphatemic but displayed, relative to controls, hypocalcemia (1.19 ±0.01 vs 1.23 ±0.01 mmol/L; P < .05), reduced serum 1,25(OH)2D (59.3 ±7.0 vs 102.5 ±12.2 pmol/L; P < .05), and elevated serum PTH (834 ±133 vs 438 ±59 pg/mL; P < .05). PTH-induced elevation in urinary cAMP excretion was blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (2- vs 4-fold over baseline in controls; P < .05). Relative to baseline in controls, PTH-induced reduction in serum phosphate tended to be blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (-0.39 ±0.33 vs -1.34 ±0.36 mg/dL; P = .07). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice showed elevated renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase and bone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) mRNA abundance (∼3.4- and ∼11-fold over controls, respectively; P < .05) and tended to have elevated serum FGF23 (829 ±76 vs 632 ±60 pg/mL in controls; P = .07). Heterozygous mice having constitutive ablation of the maternal Gsα allele (E1(m-/+)) (model of pseudohypoparathyroidism type-Ia), in which Gsα levels in PT are reduced, also exhibited elevated serum FGF23 (474 ±20 vs 374 ±27 pg/mL in controls; P < .05). Our findings indicate that Gsα is required in PTs for suppressing renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and for maintaining normal serum 1,25(OH)2D. PMID:26671181

  16. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket.

  17. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability.

    PubMed

    Levatić, I; Popčević, P; Šurija, V; Kruchkov, A; Berger, H; Magrez, A; White, J S; Rønnow, H M; Živković, I

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  18. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    PubMed Central

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  19. Dramatic performance gains of a novel circular vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Tao; Lai, Qinzhi; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2015-03-01

    Vanadium flow battery (VFB) holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, one major issue that limits the battery performance is the energy storage capacity loss due to insufficient use of electrolyte. The battery structure design is flexible and acceptable to solve the issue. Based on the mass transport limitation of the conventional rectangular vanadium flow battery (RFB), a novel circular vanadium flow battery (CFB) was firstly proposed in the research. Without increasing pump consumption, the new structure of CFB is effective to achieve mass transport enhancement and concentration polarization reduction. The charge-discharge test confirmed the performance advantage of CFB, presenting a significant increment of 10.52% at 40 mA cm-2 and 30.46% at 160 mA cm-2 in the utilization of electrolyte and improved energy storage capacity by 12.56% at 40 mA cm-2 and a 2.55 times of that for RFB at 160 mA cm-2. The performance advantage of CFB becomes exceptionally evident at high current densities.

  20. [Tracheal rupture--a rare and dramatic emergency].

    PubMed

    Sobiegalla, M; von Hintzenstern, U; Weidenbecher, M; Rupprecht, H

    2003-01-01

    A tracheal tear requires fast and proper treatment. A 55-year-old man working in a sewage pipe slipped and hit his neck on the edge of a concrete ring. The patient showed the following symptoms: cervical bruising, neck emphysema and increasing dyspnea. After several unsuccessful attempts to intubate the patient, a necklace incision was made immediately at the scene, under the suspected diagnosis of a torn trachea. A finger was used to look for the lower tracheal stump lying in the mediastinum. The lower stump was then intubated. In the hospital, an end-to-end anastomosis of the trachea as well as tracheotomy were performed on the patient. Because of the fracture of the larynx, an endolaryngeal stent was used to stabilize the lumen. Due to an injury to both laryngeal nerves, the patient suffered from dysphagea, whispered speech and dyspnea on minimal exertion as long-term side-effects. A lateralization of the vocal cord was made eight months later. Because of the quick assessment of the situation and proper treatment of the patient at the site of the accident, the patient was able to survive the injury. PMID:12872541

  1. Origin of cosmic chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Umberto; Tescari, Edoardo

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, D, D+, H2, H_2^+, HD, HeH+), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman α absorbers at redshift z ≳ 2. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below ˜ 104 K, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/H] at redshifts z ˜ 2-7. Correlations between H I and H2 abundances show temporal and local variations and large spreads as a result of the increasing cosmic star formation activity from z ˜ 6 to 3. The scatter we find in the abundance ratios is compatible with the observational data and is explained by simultaneous enrichment by sources from different stellar phases or belonging to different stellar populations. Simulated synthetic spectra support the existence of metal-poor cold clumps with large optical depth at z ˜ 6 that could be potential Population III sites at low or intermediate redshift. The expected dust content is in line with recent determinations.

  2. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  3. Zinc Abundances in Galactic Bulge Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, C. R.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is overabundant in metal-poor stars (Cayrel et al. 2004), being partially produced by neutron addition. It decreases with increasing metallicity, similarly to alpha-elements. In order to trace its abundance, the derivation of Zn abundance in different stellar populations, and varying metallicities, helps understanding its nucleosynthesis processes. Zn is also the main element of reference to derive the metallicity from absorption lines in quasars (QSOs), which allows to compare their evolution as a function of redshift and metallicity in metal-poor stars. In the present work, we derive Zn abundances for a sample of 56 bulge field stars, observed at high resolution with the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph. The mean wavelength coverage is 4800-6800 Å, at a resolution R ˜ 45000. The atmospheric parameters effective temperature, gravity and metallicity were derived in Zoccali et al. (2008) and Hill et al. (2011). Recently we have analysed the manganese abundances of this sample (Barbuy et al. 2013). To compute the Zn abundances we use spectrum synthesis, for the lines ZnI 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. The analysis of our data shows that the abundance of [Zn/Fe] decreases with increasing metallicity, in agreement with the data obtained from the literature. The details of Zn behaviour for the metal-rich bulge stars of the present work are under analysis.

  4. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  5. Unique Tuft Test Facility Dramatically Reduces Brush Seal Development Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.

    1997-01-01

    tests corroborated full-scale seal test results and provided insight into previously untested combinations. As the cycle temperature for improved efficiency turbine engines increases, new brush seal materials combinations must be considered. Future brush seal tuft testing will include both metallic and ceramic bristles versus commercial and NASA-developed shaft coatings. The ultimate goal of this work is to expand the current data base so that seal designers can tailor brush seal materials to specific applications.

  6. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  7. Dramatic Changes in Sediment Discharge and Runoff From a Rapidly Urbanizing Coastal Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, J. A.; Orzech, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    The southern California landscape has undergone dramatic urbanization and population growth during the past 60 years and currently supports almost 20 million inhabitants. Here we show that these landscape changes have imparted significant decreases in suspended sediment concentrations for the region's largest river, the Santa Ana (over 10 fold decreases in sediment rating curves between 1967 and 2001). These decreases do not, however, represent alteration of the total sediment flux to the ocean (a common interpretation of sediment rating curves), but rather a dilution of sediment by increases in runoff from the urban impervious surfaces. We hypothesize that the observed decreases in sediment concentrations have changed the buoyancy of river discharge into the ocean from negative (i.e. hyperpycnal) to positive (i.e. hypopycnal). Thus, not only is landscape urbanization responsible for altering runoff patterns, but it may have also been responsible for changing the dispersal mechanisms and fate of sediment on the continental shelf.

  8. RAPID DOPAMINE TRANSMISSION WITHIN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS DRAMATICALLY DIFFERS FOLLOWING MORPHINE AND OXYCODONE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Omar S.; Lovic, Vedran; Singer, Bryan F.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    While most drugs of abuse increase dopamine neurotransmission, rapid neurochemical measurements show that different drugs evoke distinct dopamine release patterns within the nucleus accumbens. Rapid changes in dopamine concentration following psychostimulant administration have been well studied; however, such changes have never been examined following opioid delivery. Here, we provide novel measures of rapid dopamine release following intravenous infusion of two opioids, morphine and oxycodone, in drug naïve rats using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and rapid (1 min) microdialysis coupled with mass spectrometry. In addition to measuring rapid dopamine transmission, microdialysis HPLC-MS measures changes in GABA, glutamate, monoamines, monoamine metabolites, and several other neurotransmitters. Although both opioids increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, their patterns of drug-evoked dopamine transmission differed dramatically. Oxycodone evoked a robust and stable increase in dopamine concentration and a robust increase in the frequency and amplitude of phasic dopamine release events. Conversely, morphine evoked a brief (~ 1 min) increase in dopamine that was coincident with a surge in GABA concentration and then both transmitters returned to baseline levels. Thus, by providing rapid measures of neurotransmission, this study reveals previously unknown differences in opioid-induced neurotransmitter signaling. Investigating these differences may be essential for understanding how these two drugs of abuse could differentially usurp motivational circuitry and powerfully influence behavior. PMID:25208732

  9. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  10. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  11. Effect of dramatic land use change on gaseous pollutant emissions from biomass burning in Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongmei; Tong, Daniel Q.; Gao, Chuanyu; Wang, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning contributes a substantial amount of gas and particle emissions to the atmosphere. As China's breadbasket, northeast China has experienced dramatic land use change in the past century, converting approximately 55 × 104 ha of wetland into farmland to feed a rapidly growing population. This study combines measured emission factors of dominant crops (rice and soybean) and wetland plants (Calamagrostis angu-stifolia, Carex lasiocarpa, Carex pseudo-curaica) and remote sensing land use data to estimate the effect of the unprecedented land use change on gaseous pollutants emissions from biomass burning. Our biomass burning emission estimates resulting from land use changes have increased because of increased post-harvest crop residue burning and decreased burning of wetland plants. From 1986 to 2005, the total emissions of CO2, CO, CXHY, SO2 and NO have increased by 18.6%, 35.7%, 26.8%, 66.2% and 33.2%, respectively. We have found two trends in agricultural burning: increased dryland crop residue burning and decreased wetland (rice paddy) burning. Our results revealed that the large scale land use change in northeastern China has induced more active biomass-burning emissions. The regional emission inventory of gaseous pollutants derived from this work may be used to support further examination of the subsequent effects on regional climate and air quality simulations with numerical atmospheric models.

  12. Dramatic Photosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Presents a creative way to teach photosynthesis. Revolves around the growth of a lily planted and stored in the classroom. Combines the concepts of particle theory, transformation, and changes of phase and mass in a holistic approach. The six-step teaching sequence is founded on the notions of challenge, variation, and drama. (Author/NB)

  13. Linking potential denitrification rates to microbial gene abundances in multiple boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D. G.; Blazewicz, S.; Herman, D. J.; Firestone, M. K.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and functioning of boreal ecosystems are vulnerable to changes in climate, leading to changes in season length, fire regimes, and soil moisture status. To investigate the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on microbial nitrogen cycling several disparate boreal ecosystems was studied. The two primary objectives were to: (1) determine whether process rates could be predicted solely from soil physical and chemical characteristics and (2) determine if the abundance of functional genes could be an additional explanatory variable. Surface soils were sampled along an elevation-driven hydrologic gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER that corresponds with five plant communities typical of interior Alaska. The plant communities included a black spruce stand, a deciduous stand, a tussock grassland, an emergent fen, and a rich fen. We examined the chemical composition of the surface organic moss and soil, measured gross N-mineralization, potential rates of nitrification and denitrification (DEA), and abundances of several functional groups of microorganisms from soil cores collected in mid summer. We used quantitative PCR to assess the gene abundances of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers based on a functional gene approach. Here, we focus on potential denitrification rates (PDR), and abundance of denitrifyers carrying NirS and NirK genes (nitrate reductase) and NosZ genes (nitrous oxide reductase). PDR increased dramatically with increasing soil moisture along the gradient, from 1 mg N/m2/h at the dry black spruce site to 300 mg N/m2/h in the rich fen, which is very high compared to other poorly drained soil environments. PDR were linearly related to the abundance of functional genes from the microorganisms responsible for this process. Abundances of NirS, NirK and NosZ genes correlated significantly to PDR (r2 = 0.61 p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.45 p < 0.0003, r2 = 0.81 p < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, PDR were better explained by functional gene abundances

  14. Guiding the Noticing: Using a Dramatic Performance Experience to Promote Tellability in Narrative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shanetia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her use of dramatic performance to promote tellability in narrative writing within a seventh and eighth grade English and language arts classroom. By experiencing dramatic performance, the students were able to actively and physically perform the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.…

  15. Using Creative Dramatics to Teach Conflict Resolution: Exploiting the Drama/Conflict Dialectic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Will; DiMenna, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the dialectic between creative dramatics and conflict resolution and its exploration by the Conflict Resolution Project (CRP). Outlines the CRP's perspectives and general approach as a prelude to a more indepth review about how creative dramatics are used by the CRP. (Author/NB)

  16. "I Did Not Wash My Feet with that Woman": Using Dramatic Performance to Teach Biblical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbett, David

    2010-01-01

    The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the…

  17. The Ecology of Dramatic Play Centers and Children's Social and Cognitive Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Nina; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used traditional housekeeping and novel dramatic play centers to compare the effects of theme, novelty, and duration on the social and cognitive play of two- to five-year olds. More dramatic play was observed in centers that used familiar rather than unfamiliar themes. Girls preferred traditional to novel centers; boys preferred novel to…

  18. Use of Dramatization to Teach Cardiac Cycle Physiology to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowlati, Ehsan; Musick, David W.; Zhang, Lin; Thornton, Katherine; Carvalho, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Part of the educator's mission is to develop new methodologies that promote active learning. This study examines the use of dramatization of the cardiac cycle in medical school. Two groups (n = 42, 21 each) of first-year medical students participated. Group A was initially taught through dramatization alone, while Group B was taught through…

  19. Enhancing Creative Dramatic Play and Story Reenactments in a Primary Grade Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schierholt, Carla G.

    A classroom research project in Alaska explored what role dramatic play and story reenactments have as a teaching/learning method for young childrens' development. A review of the literature identified several common elements that helped teachers elicit successful dramatic story reenactments: choosing a familiar book or story; encouraging…

  20. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  1. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  2. Anthropogenic and meteorological factors influence vector abundance and prevalence of bluetongue virus infection of dairy cattle in California.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Christie E; Gardner, Ian A; Mullens, Bradley A; Barker, Christopher M; Gerry, Alec C; Guthrie, Alan J; MacLachlan, N James

    2012-03-23

    Bluetongue is an economically important arboviral disease of ruminants that is transmitted by hematophagous Culicoides midges. In light of dramatic recent changes in the global distribution of bluetongue virus (BTV), the goals of this study were to re-evaluate the prevalence of BTV infection of cattle and abundance of Culicoides midges on individual dairy farms in California. A serosurvey of adult dairy cattle confirmed that BTV infection is prevalent throughout much of the state, although the coastal northwestern region remains free of infection and prevalence varies markedly among farms in the remainder of the state. Intensive sampling for one year of 4 farms in the northern Central Valley of California showed that the abundance of Culicoides midges was markedly different and coincided with the prevalence of BTV infection of sentinel cattle on each farm. Mean maximum and minimum temperatures and other meteorological parameters were similar on all 4 farms, thus we speculate that particular management practices were responsible for both the increased midge abundance and prevalence of BTV infection of cattle at individual farms. Specifically, it is concluded that variation in vector abundance at individual farms most likely is the result of waste-water lagoon and irrigation management practices, leading to higher BTV infection rates among livestock held on farms with more waste-water lagoons and greater acreage of land for waste-water irrigation. PMID:21930352

  3. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  4. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  5. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months) the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative. PMID:20515511

  6. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M

    2015-10-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 10(12) parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 10(10) parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 10(17) parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  7. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  8. Biodiversity and native plant abundance decline with increasing abundance of exotic annual grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic plants are generally considered a serious problem in wildlands around the world. However, some argue that the impacts of exotic plants have been exaggerated and that biodiversity and other important plant community characteristics are commonly improved with invasion. Thus, disagreement exis...

  9. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  10. Investigation of the dramatic changes in lake level of the Bosten Lake in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengjing; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaode; Chen, Yongmin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Bosten Lake, located in the arid region of northwest China, is the largest inland freshwater lake in China. Water resources in Bosten Lake are of great importance for the regional drinking water supply, agricultural irrigation, and economic development of Xinjiang province. In this study, the dynamics of the lake level in Bosten Lake were investigated from 1956 to 2010. We found that the lake level experienced three different periods of change due to the combined influences of climate variation and human activities. Generally, the lake level has shown a significant downward trend since the first observation started in 1956 and dropped to its lowest level in 1987. Thereafter, the lake level presented a continuous upward trend and rose to its highest value in 2002. Then, the level decreased dramatically from 2002 to 2010. A water balance model and the climate elasticity method were used to estimate the reasons for the lake level changes of Bosten Lake. The results showed that an increase in lake evaporation led to the continuous decrease in lake level from 1958 to 1987. Then, human-controlled lake outflow and increasing lake inflow together led to the increase in lake level from 1988 to 2002. During 2003 to 2010, the emergency project of transferring water to Tarim River led to the increase in lake outflow, while the lake inflow obviously decreased because of a decrease in precipitation. These factors resulted in a sharp decrease in the lake level from 2003 to 2010. The changes in lake level indicate changes in available water resources from Bosten Lake. This reason for the analysis of the change in lake level in this study is to support the water resources management of Bosten Lake.

  11. Seasonal and interannual dynamics of microzooplankton abundances in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Marina; Minocci, Marco; Milani, Luisella; Fonda Umani, Serena

    2012-12-01

    Abundance and composition of microzooplankton were studied over a 15 years period (from March 1986 to December 1990 and from July 1998 to December 2010) in the Gulf of Trieste (Adriatic Sea, NE Mediterranean Sea). Sampling was conducted biweekly-monthly at the surface at the historical station C1, 200 m offshore (bottom depth 17.5 m). Aloricate ciliates dominated in both periods (median 117 and 243 ind. L-1 in the first and second period respectively) while tintinnids were more abundant in the first period (median 55 ind. L-1vs 16 ind. L-1). For heterotrophic dinoflagellates there are no data during the first period and in the second one they represented the second major group. Micrometazoans remained almost constant over time. In the first period all microzooplankton groups showed a maximum in April, while in the last period the peak has shifted to September. This is particularly evident for both aloricate ciliates and micrometazoans. Tintinnids, that in the past had the absolute maximum in spring, in the second period maintained the only, lower peak in October. Tintinnids in the first period were constituted by 27 species and dominated by the genera Tintinnopsis, Stenosemella and Salpingella. In the last 10 years we registered a dramatic decrease in abundance, paralleling an increase in species (40) with some "new entries" as well as the almost complete disappearance of genera Helicostomella, Favella, Coxiella and Steenstrupiella. The observed changes of the seasonal dynamics of microzooplankton abundance, as well as of the tintinnids composition over the long period considered in our study, might suggest a climatic forcing together with the known anthropogenic oligotrophication of the entire North Adriatic.

  12. Metabolic engineering of hydroxy fatty acid production in plants: rcdgat2 drives dramatic increases in ricinoleate levels in seed oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A central goal of green chemistry is to produce industrially-useful fatty acids in oilseed crops. Although genes encoding suitable modification enzymes are available from many wild species, progress has been stymied because expression of these in transgenic plants produces poor yields of the desire...

  13. A Case Report of Dramatically Increased Thyroglobulin after Lymph Node Biopsy in Thyroid Carcinoma after Total Thyroidectomy and Radioiodine

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is an important modality for monitoring patients with thyroid cancers, especially after thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI). It is also used as a marker for burden of thyroid tissue whether malignant or benign. Although there have been several reports of rising serum Tg transiently after thyroid biopsy in intact glands and following palpation or trauma, there are no reports in the literature of elevation in Tg after biopsy of suspicious lesions in thyroidectomized patients. In this paper we report a fascinating case of a considerable and initially worrying, although ultimately transient, rise in Tg in a patient 2 years after total thyroidectomy and RAI ablation after fine needle aspiration (FNA) of a suspicious thyroid bed nodule that was proven positive. PMID:27034856

  14. A Case Report of Dramatically Increased Thyroglobulin after Lymph Node Biopsy in Thyroid Carcinoma after Total Thyroidectomy and Radioiodine.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is an important modality for monitoring patients with thyroid cancers, especially after thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI). It is also used as a marker for burden of thyroid tissue whether malignant or benign. Although there have been several reports of rising serum Tg transiently after thyroid biopsy in intact glands and following palpation or trauma, there are no reports in the literature of elevation in Tg after biopsy of suspicious lesions in thyroidectomized patients. In this paper we report a fascinating case of a considerable and initially worrying, although ultimately transient, rise in Tg in a patient 2 years after total thyroidectomy and RAI ablation after fine needle aspiration (FNA) of a suspicious thyroid bed nodule that was proven positive. PMID:27034856

  15. Delivery of Cas9 Protein into Mouse Zygotes through a Series of Electroporation Dramatically Increases the Efficiency of Model Creation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Kutny, Peter M; Byers, Shannon L; Longstaff, Charles J; DaCosta, Michael J; Pang, Changhong; Zhang, Yingfan; Taft, Robert A; Buaas, Frank W; Wang, Haoyi

    2016-05-20

    Previously we established Zygote Electroporation of Nucleases (ZEN) technology as an efficient and high-throughput way to generate genetically modified mouse models. However, there were significant variations of the targeting efficiency among different genomic loci using our previously published protocol. In this study, we improved the ZEN technology by delivering Cas9 protein into mouse zygotes through a series of electroporation. Using this approach, we were able to introduce precise nucleotide substitutions, large segment deletion and short segment insertion into targeted loci with high efficiency. PMID:27210041

  16. Shrub encroachment affects mammalian carnivore abundance and species richness in semiarid rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, Niels; Rossmanith, Eva; Popp, Alexander; Jeltsch, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Shrub encroachment due to overgrazing has led to dramatic changes of savanna landscapes and is considered to be one of the most threatening forms of rangeland degradation e.g. via habitat fragmentation. Mammalian carnivores are particularly vulnerable to local extinction in fragmented landscapes. However, our understanding of how shrub encroachment affects mammalian carnivores is poor. Here we investigated the relative sensitivities of ten native carnivores to different levels of shrub cover ranging from low (<5%) to high shrub cover (>25%) in 20 southern Kalahari rangeland sites. Relative abundance of carnivores was monitored along 40 sand transects (5 m × 250 m) for each site. Our results show that increasing shrub cover affects carnivore species differently. African wild cats, striped polecats, cape foxes and suricates were negatively affected, whereas we found hump-shaped responses for yellow mongooses, bat-eared foxes and small-spotted genets with maximum abundance at shrub covers between 10 and 18%. In contrast, black-backed jackals, slender mongooses and small spotted cats were not significantly affected by increasing shrub cover. However, a negative impact of high shrub cover above 18% was congruent for all species. We conclude that intermediate shrub cover (10-18%) in savanna landscapes sustain viable populations of small carnivores.

  17. Microbial abundance and community composition influence production performance in a low-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Gao, Peike; Wu, Yunqiang; Tian, Huimei; Dai, Xuecheng; Wang, Yansen; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongzuo; Pan, Xiaoxuan; Dong, Hanping; Ma, Ting

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced oil recovery using indigenous microorganisms has been successfully applied in the petroleum industry, but the role of microorganisms remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the relationship between microbial population dynamics and oil production performance during a water flooding process coupled with nutrient injection in a low-temperature petroleum reservoir. Samples were collected monthly over a two-year period. The microbial composition of samples was determined using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. Our results indicated that the microbial community structure in each production well microhabitat was dramatically altered during flooding with eutrophic water. As well as an increase in the density of microorganisms, biosurfactant producers, such as Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Rhodococcus, and Rhizobium, were detected in abundance. Furthermore, the density of these microorganisms was closely related to the incremental oil production. Oil emulsification and changes in the fluid-production profile were also observed. In addition, we found that microbial community structure was strongly correlated with environmental factors, such as water content and total nitrogen. These results suggest that injected nutrients increase the abundance of microorganisms, particularly biosurfactant producers. These bacteria and their metabolic products subsequently emulsify oil and alter fluid-production profiles to enhance oil recovery. PMID:24730445

  18. Comment and Response: A Relation of Agency to Act in Dramatism: A Comment on "Burke's Act."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College English, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a criticism of Clayton W. Lewis's analysis of Burke's "A Rhetoric of Motives" arguing that Lewis risks overstressing act and neglecting the necessary connection between agency and act in Burke's theory of dramatism. Includes Lewis's response. (HTH)

  19. The Interview: Dramatization Techniques in Dance--A New Approach to Teaching Modern Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Gwendolyn Croom; Snygg, Fran

    1979-01-01

    The use of the interview dramatization as a teaching technique for presenting historical and chronological background information in the field of modern dance is described. Samples of the interviews are included. (JMF)

  20. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPtmore » for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.« less

  1. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner 'bulk' contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  2. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Favier, V; Verfaillie, D; Berthier, E; Menegoz, M; Jomelli, V; Kay, J E; Ducret, L; Malbéteau, Y; Brunstein, D; Gallée, H; Park, Y-H; Rinterknecht, V

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  3. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be asmore » large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.« less

  4. STABILIZING CLOUD FEEDBACK DRAMATICALLY EXPANDS THE HABITABLE ZONE OF TIDALLY LOCKED PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-07-10

    The habitable zone (HZ) is the circumstellar region where a planet can sustain surface liquid water. Searching for terrestrial planets in the HZ of nearby stars is the stated goal of ongoing and planned extrasolar planet surveys. Previous estimates of the inner edge of the HZ were based on one-dimensional radiative-convective models. The most serious limitation of these models is the inability to predict cloud behavior. Here we use global climate models with sophisticated cloud schemes to show that due to a stabilizing cloud feedback, tidally locked planets can be habitable at twice the stellar flux found by previous studies. This dramatically expands the HZ and roughly doubles the frequency of habitable planets orbiting red dwarf stars. At high stellar flux, strong convection produces thick water clouds near the substellar location that greatly increase the planetary albedo and reduce surface temperatures. Higher insolation produces stronger substellar convection and therefore higher albedo, making this phenomenon a stabilizing climate feedback. Substellar clouds also effectively block outgoing radiation from the surface, reducing or even completely reversing the thermal emission contrast between dayside and nightside. The presence of substellar water clouds and the resulting clement surface conditions will therefore be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  5. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPt for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.

  6. A Poorly Known High-Latitude Parasitoid Wasp Community: Unexpected Diversity and Dramatic Changes through Time

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Caroline; Goulet, Henri; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Smith, Adam C.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change will have profound and unanticipated effects on species distributions. The pace and nature of this change is largely unstudied, especially for the most diverse elements of terrestrial communities – the arthropods – here we have only limited knowledge concerning the taxonomy and the ecology of these groups. Because Arctic ecosystems have already experienced significant increases in temperature over the past half century, shifts in community structure may already be in progress. Here we utilise collections of a particularly hyperdiverse insect group – parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera; Braconidae; Microgastrinae) – at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada in the early and mid-twentieth century to compare the composition of the contemporary community to that present 50–70 years ago. Morphological and DNA barcoding results revealed the presence of 79 species of microgastrine wasps in collections from Churchill, but we estimate that 20% of the local fauna awaits detection. Species composition and diversity between the two time periods differ significantly; species that were most common in historic collections were not found in contemporary collections and vice versa. Using barcodes we compared these collections to others from across North America; contemporary Churchill species are most affiliated with more south-western collections, while historic collections were more affiliated with eastern collections. The past five decades has clearly seen a dramatic change of species composition within the area studied coincident with rising temperature. PMID:21897854

  7. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Favier, V.; Verfaillie, D.; Berthier, E.; Menegoz, M.; Jomelli, V.; Kay, J. E.; Ducret, L.; Malbéteau, Y.; Brunstein, D.; Gallée, H.; Park, Y.-H.; Rinterknecht, V.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  8. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner ‘bulk’ contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  9. mTOR inhibition elicits a dramatic response in PI3K-dependent colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Deming, Dustin A; Leystra, Alyssa A; Farhoud, Mohammed; Nettekoven, Laura; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn; Washington, Mary Kay; Sullivan, Ruth; Weichert, Jamey P; Halberg, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is critical for multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, and is the most commonly altered pathway in human cancers. Recently, we developed a novel mouse model of colon cancer in which tumors are initiated by a dominant active PI3K (FC PIK3ca). The cancers in these mice are moderately differentiated invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas of the proximal colon that develop by 50 days of age. Interestingly, these cancers form without a benign intermediary or aberrant WNT signaling, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumorigenesis. Since these tumors are dependent upon the PI3K pathway, we investigated the potential for tumor response by the targeting of this pathway with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor. A cohort of FC PIK3ca mice were treated with rapamycin at a dose of 6 mg/kg/day or placebo for 14 days. FDG dual hybrid PET/CT imaging demonstrated a dramatic tumor response in the rapamycin arm and this was confirmed on necropsy. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment with rapamycin demonstrated increased pERK1/2 or persistent phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (pS6), indicating potential resistance mechanisms. This unique model will further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification. PMID:23593290

  10. Dramatic vapor-phase modulation of the characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Worley, Barrett C; Kim, Seohee; Park, Saungeun; Rossky, Peter J; Akinwande, Deji; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-07-28

    Here we report on dramatic and favorable changes to the operating characteristics in monolayer graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) exposed to vapor-phase, polar organic molecules in ambient. These changes include significant reduction of the Dirac voltage, accompanied by both an increase in electron and hole mobility, μ, and a decrease in residual carrier density, N0, to < 3 × 10(11) cm(-2). In contrast to graphene FET modulation with various liquid- and solid-phase dielectric media present in the literature, we attribute these changes to screening by polar vapor-phase molecules of fields induced by charged impurities and defects, n(imp), in or near the active layer. The magnitude of the changes produced in the graphene FET parameters scales remarkably well with the dipole moment of the delivered molecules. These effects are reversible, a unique advantage of working in the vapor phase. The changes observed upon polar molecule delivery are analogous to those produced by depositing and annealing fluoropolymer coatings on graphene that have been reported previously, and we attribute these changes to similar charge screening or neutralization phenomena. PMID:26107384

  11. Reaction of amines with 8-methylthioBODIPY: dramatic optical and laser response to amine substitution.

    PubMed

    Esnal, Ixone; Urías-Benavides, Arlette; Gómez-Durán, C F Azael; Osorio-Martínez, Carlos A; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Costela, Angel; Bañuelos, Jorge; Epelde, Nerea; López Arbeloa, Iñigo; Hu, Rongrong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    A thorough study of the photophysical and laser properties of 8-aminoboron dipyrromethene dyes was undertaken to determine the role of amine substitution and spatial disposition on the properties of the dyes. It was found that the fluorescent and laser response varied significantly. Although primary amines give rise to highly fluorescent products at the blue edge of the visible region, secondary amines yield nonfluorescent analogues in polar media. The crystal structures of two analogues are reported and described. Steric hindrance and the higher electron-releasing ability of the amine favor the formation of a quenching intramolecular charge-transfer state. Accordingly, boron dipyrromethene derivatives with primary amines exhibited laser emission with efficiencies of up to 44%. Besides, the more efficient derivative was also the most photostable, leading to a significant improvement in the lasing performance with regard to previously reported 8-aminoboron dipyrromethene derivatives. An increase in the solvent polarity, and mainly the presence of tertiary cyclic amines, led to a dramatic decrease or even the loss of the laser action. PMID:23956141

  12. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. The partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.

  13. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  14. Forest Structure and Roe Deer Abundance Predict Tick-Borne Encephalitis Risk in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, Annapaola; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Tagliapietra, Valentina; Neteler, Markus; Rosà, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background The Western Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus often causes devastating or lethal disease. In Europe, the number of human TBE cases has increased dramatically over the last decade, risk areas are expanding and new foci are being discovered every year. The early localisation of new TBE foci and the identification of the main risk factors associated with disease emergence represent a priority for the public health community. Although a number of socio-economic parameters have been suggested to explain TBE upsurges in eastern Europe, the principal driving factors in relatively stable western European countries have not been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we analyse the correlation between the upsurge of TBE in 17 alpine provinces in northern Italy from 1992 to 2006 with climatic variables, forest structure (as a proxy for small mammal reservoir host abundance), and abundance of the principal large vertebrate tick host (roe deer), using datasets available for the last 40 years. No significant differences between the pattern of changes in climatic variables in provinces where TBE has emerged compared to provinces were no clinical TBE cases have been observed to date. Instead, the best model for explaining the increase in TBE incidence in humans in this area include changes in forest structure, in particular the ratio of coppice to high stand forest, and the density of roe deer. Conclusion/Significance Substantial changes in vegetation structure that improve habitat suitability for the main TBE reservoir hosts (small mammals), as well as an increase in roe deer abundance due to changes in land and wildlife management practices, are likely to be among the most crucial factors affecting the circulation potential of Western TBE virus and, consequently, the risk of TBE emergence in humans in western Europe. We believe our approach will be useful in predicting TBE risk on a wider scale. PMID:19183811

  15. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, Julie A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5x106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by their mass to be in a mass range of 0.9 to 1.1 solar masses as determined by Lambert & Reddy (2004). They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H] -0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken over several nights, with forty-six spectra taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and six spectra on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) using the Gecko spectrograph. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis, fitting a 4Å region around the resonance lines of Be II. The data were then analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, and metallicity and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to increase with metallicity and the linear relationship evident when extended to metallicities down to -4.0 dex with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread 1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K. This research was conducted through the Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy and was funded by the NSF.

  16. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  17. Column abundance measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl at 45 deg S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. W.; Keep, D. J.; Burnett, C. R.; Burnett, E. B.

    1994-01-01

    The first Southern Hemisphere measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been obtained at Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S) with a PEPSIOS instrument measuring the absorption of sunlight at 308 nm. The variation of column OH with solar zenith angle is similar to that measured at other sites. However average annual abundances of OH are about 20% higher than those found by similar measurements at 40 deg N. Minimum OH abundances about 10% less than average levels at 40 deg N, are observed during austral spring. The OH abundance abruptly increases by 30% in early summer and remains at the elevated level until late the following winter.

  18. On the radial abundance gradients in discs of irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilyugin, L. S.; Grebel, E. K.; Zinchenko, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    We determine the radial abundance distributions across the discs of 14 irregular galaxies of the types Sm and Im (morphological T types 9 and 10) as traced by their H II regions. The oxygen and nitrogen abundances in H II regions are estimated through the Te method or/and with the counterpart method (C method). Moreover, we examine the correspondence between the radial abundance gradient and the surface brightness profile. We find that irregular galaxies with a flat inner profile (flat or outwardly increasing surface brightness in the central region) show shallow (if any) radial abundance gradients. On the other hand, irregular galaxies with a steep inner profile (with or without a bulge or central star cluster) usually show rather steep radial abundance gradients. This is in contrast to the widely held belief that irregular galaxies do not usually show a radial abundance gradient.

  19. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism. PMID:26563752

  20. Correcting Inadequate Model Snow Process Descriptions Dramatically Improves Mountain Hydrology Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The vast effort in hydrology devoted to parameter calibration as a means to improve model performance assumes that the models concerned are not fundamentally wrong. By focussing on finding optimal parameter sets and ascribing poor model performance to parameter or data uncertainty, these efforts may fail to consider the need to improve models with more intelligent descriptions of hydrological processes. To test this hypothesis, a flexible physically based hydrological model including a full suite of snow hydrology processes as well as warm season, hillslope and groundwater hydrology was applied to Marmot Creek Research Basin, Canadian Rocky Mountains where excellent driving meteorology and basin biophysical descriptions exist. Model parameters were set from values found in the basin or from similar environments; no parameters were calibrated. The model was tested against snow surveys and streamflow observations. The model used algorithms that describe snow redistribution, sublimation and forest canopy effects on snowmelt and evaporative processes that are rarely implemented in hydrological models. To investigate the contribution of these processes to model predictive capability, the model was "falsified" by deleting parameterisations for forest canopy snow mass and energy, blowing snow, intercepted rain evaporation, and sublimation. Model falsification by ignoring forest canopy processes contributed to a large increase in SWE errors for forested portions of the research basin with RMSE increasing from 19 to 55 mm and mean bias (MB) increasing from 0.004 to 0.62. In the alpine tundra portion, removing blowing processes resulted in an increase in model SWE MB from 0.04 to 2.55 on north-facing slopes and -0.006 to -0.48 on south-facing slopes. Eliminating these algorithms degraded streamflow prediction with the Nash Sutcliffe efficiency dropping from 0.58 to 0.22 and MB increasing from 0.01 to 0.09. These results show dramatic model improvements by including snow

  1. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by dramatic changes in phospholipid profiles.

    PubMed

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; Fieuws, Steffen; Bordel, Sergio; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Van de Plas, Raf; Dehairs, Jonas; Wouters, Jens; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death globally. To develop better diagnostics and more effective treatments, research in the past decades has focused on identification of molecular changes in the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and more recently also the metabolome. Phospholipids, which nevertheless play a central role in cell functioning, remain poorly explored. Here, using a mass spectrometry (MS)-based phospholipidomics approach, we profiled 179 phospholipid species in malignant and matched non-malignant lung tissue of 162 NSCLC patients (73 in a discovery cohort and 89 in a validation cohort). We identified 91 phospholipid species that were differentially expressed in cancer versus non-malignant tissues. Most prominent changes included a decrease in sphingomyelins (SMs) and an increase in specific phosphatidylinositols (PIs). Also a decrease in multiple phosphatidylserines (PSs) was observed, along with an increase in several phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, particularly those with 40 or 42 carbon atoms in both fatty acyl chains together. 2D-imaging MS of the most differentially expressed phospholipids confirmed their differential abundance in cancer cells. We identified lipid markers that can discriminate tumor versus normal tissue and different NSCLC subtypes with an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.999 and 0.885, respectively. In conclusion, using both shotgun and 2D-imaging lipidomics analysis, we uncovered a hitherto unrecognized alteration in phospholipid profiles in NSCLC. These changes may have important biological implications and may have significant potential for biomarker development. PMID:25784292

  3. Fluorine Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Gibson, Brad K.

    2008-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) abundances are derived in a sample of six bulge red giants in Baade's window. These giants span a factor of 10 in metallicity, and this is the first study to define the behavior of 19F with metallicity in the bulge. The bulge results show an increase in F/O with increasing oxygen. This trend overlaps what is found in the disk at comparable metallicities, with the most oxygen-rich bulge target extending the disk trend. The increase in F/O in the disk arises from 19F synthesis in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars through stellar winds. The lack of an s-process enhancement in the most fluorine-rich bulge giant in this study suggests that WR stars represented a larger contribution than did AGB stars to 19F production in the bulge, when compared to the disk. If this result for fluorine is combined with the previously published overall decline in the O/Mg abundance ratios in metal-rich bulge stars, it suggests that WR winds played a role in shaping chemical evolution in the bulge. One star in this study exhibits a very low value of F/O while having a large O abundance; this chemical mixture can be understood if this star formed from gas that was enriched by metal-poor core-collapse supernovae, and it may indicate that chemical evolution in the bulge was inhomogeneous.

  4. Forest Thinning Dramatically Enhances Ozone Flux due to Reactions With Elevated Emissions of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; McKay, M.; Kurpius, M. R.; Schade, G. W.

    2003-12-01

    Forests are routinely managed for timber production and fire suppression by thinning and harvesting. The impact of these activities on biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases is profound, but has rarely been studied in the field. Here we present simultaneous observations of ozone and terpene fluxes before, during, and after pre-commercial thinning of a ponderosa pine plantation at Blodgett Forest (1300 m elevation on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA). We previously reported that monoterpene emissions increased by an order of magnitude during and following forest thinning (Schade and Goldstein, GRL 2003). We also previously reported that half the daytime ozone flux to this ecosystem under normal summertime conditions (no disturbance) was due to gas-phase chemical loss, and we suggested that this ozone loss was occurring by reactions with biogenically emitted terpenes whose lifetime was short enough that they reacted before escaping the forest canopy (Kurpius and Goldstein, GRL 2003). Here we report that ozone loss was also dramatically enhanced during and following thinning, and we link these observations to confirm that the chemical ozone loss in the canopy was indeed due to reaction with biogenically emitted compounds whose emission was enhanced by disturbance. Based on the magnitudes of ozone flux due to chemical loss and the measured terpene fluxes, we infer that the emissions of previously undetected short-lived terpenes are approximately 15-20 times those of a-pinene during thinning, and 30-50 times those of a-pinene during summer and fall. Since a-pinene accounts for approximately 25% of the total monoterpenes we routinely measure with our automated in-situ GC instrumentation, we conclude that emissions of highly reactive terpenoid compounds could have been drastically under measured in previous field campaigns and that emissions of unidentified reactive terpenes could be 5-10 times larger than emissions of total terpenes

  5. Dramatic velocity range changes in the OH spectra of 19566+3423

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    1999-12-01

    Many color-selected IRAS sources have 1612 MHz masers. That in 19566+3423 was a little unusual, in having the appearance of emanating from a double shell, each with a more or less normal aspect. It was first detected by Galt et al. (AJ 98, 2182), who monitored it for two years as a variable source of circularly polarised emission, though the general morphology of the spectrum was stable. It has mainline masers, and a strong water maser, but no detected SiO or CO. However, new Arecibo 1612, 1665 and 1667 MHz spectra taken in April and September 1999 are dramatically different. The 1612 MHz intensity is about a factor of three larger now. Moreover this is dwarfed by a factor of { }30 increase in its 1665 MHz intensity. But the unprecedented changes are in the velocity range of its emission, which has expanded from 16 to 42 km/s in the 1612 MHz line, and from 28 to 80 km/s in the 1667 MHz. Much of the extra OH emission is reminiscent of the gently rounded morphology seen in the 1667 MHz spectrum of the proto planetary nebula, 18095+2704 (ApJ, 362, 634). But the original range of the 1612 MHz emission is still characterized by 6-10 discrete features, only two of which coincide in velocity with ones from the discovery epoch. These spectra can be found at ftp://www.naic.edu/pub/publications/bml/19566.ps.Z The 1667 MHz velocity range rivals that from the hypergiant, IRC+10420, which has, however, always exhibited the same velocity range throughout the 24 years since it was discovered. 19566+3423 is probably a hypergiant or supergiant too, which may well have lost its present circumstellar shell in a sudden mass ejection event, rather than in a wind.

  6. On the Dramatic Spin-up/Spin-Down Torque Reversals in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Mathew; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    Dramatic torque reversals between spin-up and spin-down have been observed in half of the persistent X-ray pulsars monitored by the Burst and Transient Space Experiment (BATSE) all-sky monitor on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Theoretical models developed to explain early pulsar timing data can explain spin-down torques via a disk-magnetosphere interaction if the star nearly corotates with the inner accretion disk. To produce the observed BATSE torque reversals, however, these equilibrium models require the disk to alternate between two mass accretion rates, with M+/- producing accretion torques of similar magnitude but always of opposite sign. Moreover, in at least one pulsar (GX 1+4) undergoing secular spin-down, the neutron star spins down faster during brief (approximately 20 day) hard X-ray flares-this is opposite the correlation expected from standard theory, assuming that BATSE pulsed flux increases with mass accretion rate. The 10 day to 10 yr intervals between torque reversals in these systems are much longer than any characteristic magnetic or viscous timescale near the inner disk boundary and are more suggestive of a global disk phenomenon. We discuss possible explanations of the observed torque behavior. Despite the preferred sense of rotation defined by the binary orbit, the BATSE observations are surprisingly consistent with an earlier suggestion for GX 1+4: the disks in these systems somehow alternate between episodes of prograde and retrograde rotation. We are unaware of any mechanism that could produce a stable retrograde disk in a binary undergoing Roche lobe overflow, but such flip-flop behavior does occur in numerical simulations of wind-fed systems. One possibility is that the disks in some of these binaries are fed by an X-ray-excited wind.

  7. [A case of progressive supranuclear palsy dramatically improved with L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Tamaru, F; Yamagisawa, N

    1992-06-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) who dramatically improved when given L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (L-DOPS). This patient developed dysarthria, lack of facial expression, and slowness at age 64. She was admitted to a local hospital, diagnosed as having parkinsonism and treated with antiparkinsonian drugs. Despite this treatment, she had difficulty in turning over in bed and standing up from a seat, and began to fall backward at age 65. One year later, she had trouble in walking due to frequent falls and became bedridden. The patient was admitted to our hospital in July 1991 under treatment with 20 mg/200 mg of carbidopa/L-dopa and 4 mg of trihexyphenydyl hydrochloride per day. Neurological examination revealed masked face, pseudobulbar palsy, and dystonic rigidity of the neck and upper trunk. Eye movements were normal except for impaired vertical saccades and convergence inability. Deep tendon reflexes were generally brisk and the plantar responses were flexor bilaterally. Tests of pulsion showed that her postural reflex was markedly disturbed, especially in retropulsion. Her gait showed severe unsteadiness. Neuropsychological tests showed intellectual impairment, frontal lobe dysfunction, and memory disturbance. Computed tomography showed an atrophic midbrain with prominent enlargement of ambient and quadrigeminal plate cisterns. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 123-I-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine demonstrated marked frontal hypoperfusion. L-DOPS was administered at a dose of 100 mg per day and gradually increased up to 600 mg per day over a period of five weeks, while carbidopa/L-dopa and trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride were continued as on admission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1424339

  8. Dramatic decline of unionid bivalves in offshore waters of western Lake Erie after infestation by the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Unionid bivalves and attached epizoic zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected at one index station in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and at 17 stations in 1991 in offshore waters of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Sampling at the index station revealed that the proportion of live unionids declined from 53% in September 1989 to 17% in May–June 1990 and to 0% in September 1990: this 100% mortality coincided with heavy infestation by zebra mussels. Quantitative sampling with a Ponar grab at the 17 stations in 1991 revealed a widespread and dramatic reduction in unionid populations. In 1982, five unionid species occurred at 35% of the stations at a density of 4/m2, whereas in 1991, no live unionid species were found. Qualitative sampling with an epibenthic sled at the 17 stations in 1991 yielded only 4 live specimens of 2 species (Amblema plicata plicata and Fusconaia flava) and 187 dead specimens of 10 species. These and other results indicate that unionid populations are being negatively affected by zebra mussels in the Great Lakes. Similar impacts on unionids are expected to occur where zebra mussels become abundant throughout North America.

  9. VLT spectroscopy of low-metallicity emission-line galaxies: abundance patterns and abundance discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Stasińska, G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.; Papaderos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Context. We present deep spectroscopy of a large sample of low-metallicity emission-line galaxies. Aims: The main goal of this study is to derive element abundances in these low-metallicity galaxies. Methods: We analyze 121 VLT spectra of H ii regions in 46 low-metallicity emission-line galaxies. Of these spectra 83 are archival VLT/FORS1+UVES spectra of H ii regions in 31 low-metallicity emission-line galaxies that are studied for the first time with standard direct methods to determine the electron temperatures, the electron number densities, and the chemical abundances. Results: The oxygen abundance of the sample lies in the range 12 + log O/H = 7.2-8.4. We confirm previous findings that Ne/O increases with increasing oxygen abundance, likely because of a higher depletion of oxygen in higher-metallicity galaxies. The Fe/O ratio decreases from roughly solar at the lowest metallicities to about one tenth of solar, indicating that the degree of depletion of iron into dust grains depends on metallicity. The N/O ratio in extremely low-metallicity galaxies with 12 + log O/H < 7.5 shows a slight increase with decreasing oxygen abundance, which could be the signature of enhanced production of primary nitrogen by rapidly rotating stars at low metallicity. We present the first empirical relation between the electron temperature derived from [S iii]λ6312/λ9069 or [N ii]λ5755/λ6583 and the one derived from [O iii]λ4363/λ(4959+5007) in low-metallicity galaxies. We also present an empirical relation between te derived from [O ii]λ3727/(λ7320 + λ7330) or [S ii]λ4068/(λ6717 + λ6730) and [O iii]λ4363/λ(4959+5007). The electron number densities Ne(Cl iii) and Ne(Ar iv) were derived in a number of objects and are found to be higher than Ne(O ii) and Ne(S ii). This has potential implications for the derivation of the pregalactic helium abundance. In a number of objects, the abundances of C++ and O++ could be derived from recombination lines. Our study confirms the

  10. Hydrographic structure and zooplankton abundance and diversity off Paita, northern Peru (1994 to 2004) — ENSO effects, trends and changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronés, Katia; Ayón, Patricia; Hirche, Hans-Jürgen; Schwamborn, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    diel variability occurred after 1999, probably due to changes in vertical migration patterns. The considerable increase in zooplankton abundance over the study period, the ENSO effect, and the 1999-2000 transition are discussed with regard to synchronicity with other zooplankton time series. The present study contributes with the first evidence from an important area located in the Humboldt Current for synchronous trends and changes that were previously observed elsewhere in the Pacific. Our results demonstrated the importance of long-term zooplankton monitoring studies in upwelling areas, and confirms the idea of dramatic changes in pelagic ecosystem structure occurring in the East Pacific.

  11. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  12. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  13. Climatic effects on mosquito abundance in Mediterranean wetlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases is highly controversial. One of the principal points of debate is whether or not climate influences mosquito abundance, a key factor in disease transmission. Methods To test this hypothesis, we analysed ten years of data (2003–2012) from biweekly surveys to assess inter-annual and seasonal relationships between the abundance of seven mosquito species known to be pathogen vectors (West Nile virus, Usutu virus, dirofilariasis and Plasmodium sp.) and several climatic variables in two wetlands in SW Spain. Results Within-season abundance patterns were related to climatic variables (i.e. temperature, rainfall, tide heights, relative humidity and photoperiod) that varied according to the mosquito species in question. Rainfall during winter months was positively related to Culex pipiens and Ochlerotatus detritus annual abundances. Annual maximum temperatures were non-linearly related to annual Cx. pipiens abundance, while annual mean temperatures were positively related to annual Ochlerotatus caspius abundance. Finally, we modelled shifts in mosquito abundances using the A2 and B2 temperature and rainfall climate change scenarios for the period 2011–2100. While Oc. caspius, an important anthropophilic species, may increase in abundance, no changes are expected for Cx. pipiens or the salt-marsh mosquito Oc. detritus. Conclusions Our results highlight that the effects of climate are species-specific, place-specific and non-linear and that linear approaches will therefore overestimate the effect of climate change on mosquito abundances at high temperatures. Climate warming does not necessarily lead to an increase in mosquito abundance in natural Mediterranean wetlands and will affect, above all, species such as Oc. caspius whose numbers are not closely linked to rainfall and are influenced, rather, by local tidal patterns and temperatures. The final impact of changes in vector abundance on disease frequency

  14. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1995-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of 15 April 1994 to 15 April 1995.

  15. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  16. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  17. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  18. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  19. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    SciTech Connect

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Porter, R.L. E-mail: olive@umn.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  20. Abundance Patterns and the Chemical Enrichment of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, V.; DART Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    I review here the chemical abundances of individual stars in the nearest classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, that have become available in increasing numbers (sample size and galaxies probed) in the last decade.

  1. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  2. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  3. The Impact of Presence Versus Absence of Negative Consequences in Dramatic Portrayals of Alcohol Drinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahk, C. Mo.

    1997-01-01

    Using dramatic media presentations, explores issues surrounding the absence of negative consequences in alcohol consumption. Results based on 211 participants indicate that exposure to portrayals of alcohol drinking with negative consequences elicits the least favorable attitudes toward drinking. Exposure to the same presentation, without the…

  4. Occupational Awareness through Dramatic Play: A Curriculum Guide for Primary Grades: Parts 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Loretta

    Designed for grades K-3, the career education curriculum guide focuses on dramatic play to create an environment which will stimulate children to explore various occupations within the community. At the beginning of the program, the community includes only a few structures. As the students realize the need for more buildings and services, the…

  5. Playing around with Improvisation: An Analysis of the Text Creation Processes Used within Preadolescent Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Julie

    2008-01-01

    When children come together to play dramatically they are involved in the creation of an improvised text. This text emerges spontaneously via the moment-by-moment contributions of individual players who must operate in a highly collaborative way in order to achieve cohesion. This paper reports on a research project involving several groups of 11-…

  6. Athenian and Shakespearean Tragedies in Oceania: Teaching Dramatic Literatures in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anae, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theorised classroom-based narrative discussing the author's interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of English dramatic literatures--in particular, Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" and Shakespeare's "Macbeth"--to i-Taukei, Indo-Fijian and Pacific Islander tertiary students at a South Pacific…

  7. Art-House Cinema, Avant-Garde Film, and Dramatic Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardullo, Bert

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about art-house cinema, avant-garde film, and dramatic modernism. He believes that the most important modes of film practice are art-house cinema and the avant-garde, both of which contrast with the classical Hollywood mode of film practice. While the latter is characterized by its commercial imperative, corporate…

  8. Teenagers' Significant Experiences in Aesthetic Areas: Some Empirical Observations Regarding the Role of Dramatic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnas, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen sixteen-year-old Fenno-Swedish compulsory school pupils' descriptions and evaluations of significant, i.e. more or less "strong", experiences relating to dramatic art (film, theatre) were analysed and compared with reported experiences in other aesthetic areas (music, nature etc.). The drama area was represented in many experiences, but…

  9. Effects of Dramatized Depictions of Accidents on Grade School Children's Reception of Safety Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omdahl, Becky L.; Cantor, Joanne

    A study examined a format for fear appeal messages that introduced a threat through one medium (i.e., a segment of dramatic television programming) and the recommended action through another medium (i.e., the verbal presentation of safety guidelines by an adult to a child). Subjects, 138 elementary school children from a middle-class elementary…

  10. "Welcome to Philadelphia": An Original Dramatization of Life in the 1780s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakes, Mary E.

    Teachers can create an interest in the founding period of U.S. history and present students with an authentic view of this time period through the presentation of this play. The dramatic pretense of the play is that the audience, by their presence, is part of the drama. The audience plays the part of travelers visiting a Philadelphia home in the…

  11. "Emergent Literacy and Dramatic Play in Early Education" by Jane Davidson. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Marilyn L.

    2000-01-01

    Notes that Davidson's book provides an in-depth exploration of the contribution of dramatic play to emergent literacy and ways that teachers can implement play-based literacy learning. Maintains that the book has a balanced theoretical orientation, provides a sensitive treatment of intervention, presents a thoughtful treatment of oral and written…

  12. Some Therapeutic Uses of Dramatic Play with the Aggressive Child in the Preschool Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnane, Patrick

    The primary purpose of this master's thesis is to describe some therapeutic uses of dramatic play with the mildly aggressive preschool child. The child for whom the suggested play interventions are considered appropriate is characterized by sociality and attachment to both peers and adults, and is not chronically aggressive. After the first…

  13. Engaging in Dramatic Activities in English as a Foreign Language Classes at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algarra Carrasco, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss how, through dramatic activities, fiction and reality can work together to help the English as a Foreign language learner communicate in a more personal and meaningful way. The kind of activities proposed are designed to help engender a space where students can personally engage with each other in an atmosphere that is…

  14. Architectural Images through the Dual Lens of Picture Books and Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Betty P.; And Others

    Introducing architectural concepts to children is a relatively new area of the curriculum for schools, whether elementary schools or high schools. The use of picture books and creative dramatics to encourage children to think about architecture is explored. In a few hours, a fourth-grade class considered the destruction and rebuilding of a…

  15. Erotic Language as Dramatic Action in Plays by Lyly and Shakespeare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    This study closely examines the language of desire in the dramatic works of John Lyly and William Shakespeare, and argues that contemplative and analytical speeches about desire function as modes of action in their plays. Erotic speeches do more than express desire in a purely descriptive or perlocutionary capacity distinct from the action of the…

  16. Mantle of the Expert: Integrating Dramatic Inquiry and Visual Arts in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edric C.; Liu, Katrina; Goble, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the social studies field to Dorothy Heatchote's Mantle of Expert (MOE). MOE is a dramatic inquiry approach used in several subject areas and can work at all levels in the social studies curriculum. The authors go into the development of using this approach in an elementary and middle teacher education program. After sharing…

  17. Dramatic Science at Key Stage 1: Modelling Ideas within an Olympics Theme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Deb; Precious, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic Science is an approach to teaching science that purposely places the children in thought-provoking situations where they need to apply their scientific understanding to decide how to act. Teachers can then apply drama techniques to help children develop and communicate their ideas. In this article, the authors share how modelling through…

  18. How to Know when Dramatic Change Is on Track: Leading Indicators of School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Ableidinger, Joe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, national policymakers have placed new emphasis on "school turnarounds" as a strategy for rapid, dramatic improvement in chronically failing schools, calling on education leaders to turn around performance in the 5,000 lowest-achieving schools nationwide. This goal may seem daunting, given the dismal success rates of school…

  19. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art; Tecihman, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    Presents a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place at the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872 among Sir William Thomson, T.H. Huxley, Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  20. National Lighting Bureau Reports Dramatic Energy Savings Possible through Minor Lighting Modifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Store Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Dramatic savings are possible by implementing minor modifications including: energy efficient light bulbs and tubes, ballasts, luminaires (fixtures), controls, operating practices, and revised maintenance. Many different changes can be made without affecting productivity, safety and security, visual comfort, aesthetic appeal, consumer discretion,…

  1. Fire, grazing history, lichen abundance, and winter distribution of caribou in Alaska's taiga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, W.B.; Dale, B.W.; Adams, L.G.; McElwain, D.E.; Joly, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1990s the Nelchina Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) Herd (NCH) began a dramatic shift to its current winter range, migrating at least an additional 100 km beyond its historic range. We evaluated the impacts of fire and grazing history on lichen abundance and subsequent use and distribution by the NCH. Historic (prior to 1990) and current (2002) winter ranges of the NCH had similar vascular vegetation, lichen cover (P = 0.491), and fire histories (P = 0.535), but the former range had significantly less forage lichen biomass as a result of grazing by caribou. Biomass of forage lichens was twice as great overall (P = 0.031) and 4 times greater in caribou selected sites on the current range than in the historic range, greatly increasing availability to caribou. Caribou on the current range selected for stands with >20% lichen cover (P < 0.001), greater than 1,250 kg/ha (P < 0.001) forage lichen biomass and stands older than 80 yr postfire (P < 0.001). After fires, forage lichen cover and biomass seldom recovered sufficiently to attract caribou grazing until after ???60 yr, and, as a group, primary forage lichen species did not reach maximum abundance until 180 yr postfire. Recovery following overgrazing can occur much more quickly because lichen cover, albeit mostly fragments, and organic substrates remain present. Our results provide benchmarks for wildlife managers assessing condition of caribou winter range and predicting effects of fires on lichen abundance and caribou distribution. Of our measurements of cover and biomass by species, densities and heights of trees, elevation, slope and aspect, only percentage cover by Cladonia amaurocraea, Cladina rangiferina, Flavocetraria cuculata, and lowbush cranberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) were necessary for predicting caribou use of winter range. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  2. Dramatic Declines of Montane Frogs in a Central African Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Mareike; Blackburn, David C.; Doherty-Bone, Thomas M.; Gonwouo, LeGrand Nono; Ghose, Sonia; Rödel, Mark-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian populations are vanishing worldwide. Declines and extinctions of many populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease induced by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In Africa, however, changes in amphibian assemblages were typically attributed to habitat change. We conducted a retrospective study utilizing field surveys from 2004–2012 of the anuran faunas on two mountains in western Cameroon, a hotspot of African amphibian diversity. The number of species detected was negatively influenced by year, habitat degradation, and elevation, and we detected a decline of certain species. Because another study in this region revealed an emergence of Bd in 2008, we screened additional recent field-collected samples and also pre-decline preserved museum specimens for the presence of Bd supporting emergence before 2008. When comparing the years before and after Bd detection, we found significantly diminished frog species richness and abundance on both mountains after Bd emergence. Our analyses suggest that this may be the first disease-driven community-level decline in anuran biodiversity in Central Africa. The disappearance of several species known to tolerate habitat degradation, and a trend of stronger declines at higher elevations, are consistent with Bd-induced declines in other regions. Not all species decreased; populations of some species remained constant, and others increased after the emergence of Bd. This variation might be explained by species-specific differences in infection probability. Increased habitat protection and Bd-mitigation strategies are needed for sustaining diverse amphibian communities such as those on Mt. Manengouba, which contains nearly half of Cameroon’s frog diversity. PMID:27149624

  3. Dramatic Declines of Montane Frogs in a Central African Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Mareike; Blackburn, David C; Doherty-Bone, Thomas M; Gonwouo, LeGrand Nono; Ghose, Sonia; Rödel, Mark-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian populations are vanishing worldwide. Declines and extinctions of many populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease induced by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In Africa, however, changes in amphibian assemblages were typically attributed to habitat change. We conducted a retrospective study utilizing field surveys from 2004-2012 of the anuran faunas on two mountains in western Cameroon, a hotspot of African amphibian diversity. The number of species detected was negatively influenced by year, habitat degradation, and elevation, and we detected a decline of certain species. Because another study in this region revealed an emergence of Bd in 2008, we screened additional recent field-collected samples and also pre-decline preserved museum specimens for the presence of Bd supporting emergence before 2008. When comparing the years before and after Bd detection, we found significantly diminished frog species richness and abundance on both mountains after Bd emergence. Our analyses suggest that this may be the first disease-driven community-level decline in anuran biodiversity in Central Africa. The disappearance of several species known to tolerate habitat degradation, and a trend of stronger declines at higher elevations, are consistent with Bd-induced declines in other regions. Not all species decreased; populations of some species remained constant, and others increased after the emergence of Bd. This variation might be explained by species-specific differences in infection probability. Increased habitat protection and Bd-mitigation strategies are needed for sustaining diverse amphibian communities such as those on Mt. Manengouba, which contains nearly half of Cameroon's frog diversity. PMID:27149624

  4. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  5. Neon and Oxygen Abundances and Abundance Ratio in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Testa, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we determine the Ne/O abundance ratio from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) off-disk observations of quiescent streamers over the 1996-2008 period. We find that the Ne/O ratio is approximately constant over solar cycle 23 from 1996 to 2005, at a value of 0.099 ± 0.017 this value is lower than the transition region determinations from the quiet Sun used to infer the neon photospheric abundance from the oxygen photospheric abundance. Also, the Ne/O ratio we determined from SUMER is in excellent agreement with in situ determinations from ACE/SWICS. In 2005-2008, the Ne/O abundance ratio increased with time and reached 0.25 ± 0.05, following the same trend found in the slowest wind analyzed by ACE/SWICS. Further, we measure the absolute abundance in the corona for both oxygen and neon from the data set of 1996 November 22, obtaining A o = 8.99 ± 0.04 and A Ne = 7.92 ± 0.03, and we find that both elements are affected by the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, with oxygen being enhanced by a factor of 1.4-2.1 over its photospheric abundance, and neon being changed by a factor of 0.75-1.20. We conclude that the Ne/O ratio is not constant in the solar atmosphere, both in time and at different heights, and that it cannot be reliably used to infer the neon abundance in the photosphere. Also, we argue that the FIP effect was less effective during the minimum of solar cycle 24, and that the Ne/O = 0.25 ± 0.05 value measured at that time is closer to the true photospheric value, leading to a neon photospheric abundance larger than assumed by ≈40%. We discuss the implications of these results for the solar abundance problem, for the FIP effect, and for the identification of the source regions of the solar wind.

  6. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  8. Seasonal Abundance of Aphids and Aphidophagous Insects in Pecan.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, James D; Karar, Haider; Abbas, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal occurrence of aphids and aphidophagous insects was monitored for six years (2006-2011) from full leaf expansion in May to leaf fall in October in "Desirable" variety pecan trees that were not treated with insecticides. Aphid outbreaks occurred two times per season, once in the spring and again in the late summer. Yellow pecan and blackmargined aphids exceeded the recommended treatment thresholds one time and black pecan aphids exceeded the recommended treatment levels three times over the six seasons. Increases in aphidophagous insect abundance coincided with aphid outbreaks in five of the six seasons. Among aphidophagous insects Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum were frequently collected in both the tree canopy and at the ground level, whereas, Coccinella septempunctata, Hippodamia convergens were rarely found in the tree canopy and commonly found at the ground level. Green lacewing abundance was higher in the ground level than in the tree canopy. Brown lacewings were more abundant in the tree canopy than at the ground level. Dolichopodid and syrphid fly abundance, at the ground level increased during peak aphid abundance in the tree canopy. Application of an aqueous solution of fermenting molasses to the pecan foliage during an aphid outbreak significantly increased the abundance of ladybeetles and lacewings and significantly reduced the abundance of yellow pecan, blackmargined and black pecan aphids. PMID:26466738

  9. Environmental factors shaping ungulate abundances in Poland.

    PubMed

    Borowik, Tomasz; Cornulier, Thomas; Jędrzejewska, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Population densities of large herbivores are determined by the diverse effects of density-dependent and independent environmental factors. In this study, we used the official 1998-2003 inventory data on ungulate numbers from 462 forest districts and 23 national parks across Poland to determine the roles of various environmental factors in shaping country-wide spatial patterns of ungulate abundances. Spatially explicit generalized additive mixed models showed that different sets of environmental variables explained 39 to 50 % of the variation in red deer Cervus elaphus, wild boar Sus scrofa, and roe deer Capreolus capreolus abundances. For all of the studied species, low forest cover and the mean January temperature were the most important factors limiting their numbers. Woodland cover above 40-50 % held the highest densities for these species. Wild boar and roe deer were more numerous in deciduous or mixed woodlands within a matrix of arable land. Furthermore, we found significant positive effects of marshes and water bodies on wild boar abundances. A juxtaposition of obtained results with ongoing environmental changes (global warming, increase in forest cover) may indicate future growth in ungulate distributions and numbers. PMID:24244044

  10. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiajia; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of multiresistant bacteria has lead to an urgent need for novel antimicrobials. Based on single-point substitutions, we generated a series of mutants of micasin, a dermatophytic defensin, with enhanced activities against multiple clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species, including 4 antibiotic-resistant strains. We first mapped the functional surface of micasin by alanine-scanning mutational analysis of its highly exposed residues, through which we found that substitution of site 8 (acidic Glu) dramatically enhanced bacterial killing of this peptide. Structural analysis indicates that this single point mutation could result in a functional local amphipathic architecture. Four different types of side chains (hydrophobic, cationic polar, neutral polar, and acidic polar) were introduced at site 8 to clarify the role of this local architecture in micasin function. The results show that all mutants displayed increased antibacterial activity with the exception of the acidic replacement. These mutants with enhanced activity exhibited low hemolysis and cytotoxicity and showed high serum stability, indicating their therapeutic potential. Our work represents the first example of structural fine-tuning to largely improve the antibacterial potency of a dermatophytic defensin.-Wu, J., Gao, B., Zhu, S. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin. PMID:27084888

  11. DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENTS IN CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF CESIUM THROUGH MORE EFFICIENT STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Gorbunova, Maryna; Haverlock, Tamara; Moyer, Bruce A; Ensor, Dale; Meadors, Viola M; Harmon, Ben; Bartsch, Richard A.; Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Zhou, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Dramatic potential improvements to the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process are presented as related to enhancement of cesium stripping. The current process for removing cesium from the alkaline high-level waste (HLW) at the USDOE Savannah River Site employs acidic scrub and strip stages and shows remarkable extraction and selectivity properties for cesium. It was determined that cesium stripping can be greatly improved with caustic or near-neutral stages using sodium hydroxide and boric acid as scrub and strip solutions, respectively. Improvements can also be achieved by appending pH-sensitive functional groups to the calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant. Addition of a proton-ionizable group to the calixarene frame leads to a dramatic "pH swing" of up to 6 orders of magnitude change in cesium distribution ratio.

  12. [I was born a woman, the life of Mame: the dramatization of intergenerational inclusion].

    PubMed

    Lasheras Amat, M del Pilar; Muriel Fernández, Rafael; Llamas Martínez, M Victoria; Hallaga Messari, Asmaa; Bitoden Yaka, Albert; Ndour, Mame Awa; Dieng, Ousseynou; Márquez Bernal, Victoriano; Sevillano, Manuel Garrido

    2010-01-01

    I was born a woman, the life of Mame is the dramatization a fictitious intergenerational story. However, the story is based on true events and the feelings of real immigrant women. The dramatization narrates the life of a woman, from the time her parents-who had recently emigrated from Senegal-settled in Andalusia, up to the adolescence of Mame's own daughter. The story is told with one person on stage who, through the use of three costume changes, plays three different generations of women: mother, daughter and granddaughter, with the video-recorded testimonies of other characters (a teacher and a midwife), who express their views of the host society against a background of African music and pictures of their native country. The present article describes their goals, such as communication in conferences, and includes a concise summary of the script, reflections on the process of integrating, and the evaluation made after a performance. PMID:20022142

  13. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  14. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  15. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  16. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  17. Surface abundances of OC supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Foschino, S.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.; Howarth, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Some O and B stars show unusually strong or weak lines of carbon and/or nitrogen. These objects are classified as OBN or OBC stars. It has recently been shown that nitrogen enrichment and carbon depletion are the most likely explanations for the existence of the ON class. Aims: We investigate OC stars (all being supergiants) to check that surface abundances are responsible for the observed anomalous line strengths. Methods: We perform a spectroscopic analysis of three OC supergiants using atmosphere models. A fourth star was previously studied by us. Our sample thus comprises all OC stars known to date in the Galaxy. We determine the stellar parameters and He, C, N, and O surface abundances. Results: We show that all stars have effective temperatures and surface gravities fully consistent with morphologically normal O supergiants. However, OC stars show little, if any, nitrogen enrichment and carbon surface abundances consistent with the initial composition. OC supergiants are thus barely chemically evolved, unlike morphologically normal O supergiants. Based on observations obtained at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 089.D-0975.

  18. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression. PMID:24826823

  19. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  20. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  1. FGF-21, a novel metabolic regulator, has a robust neuroprotective role and is dramatically elevated in neurons by mood stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yan; Wang, Zhifei; Tsai, Li-Kai; Leeds, Peter; Fessler, Emily Bame; Wang, Junyu; Chuang, De-Maw

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) is a new member of the FGF super-family and an important endogenous regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism. It has been proposed as a therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity. Its function in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that aging primary neurons are more vulnerable to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, and that co-treatment with the mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) induces synergistic neuroprotective effects. This study sought to identify molecule(s) involved in these synergistic effects. We found that FGF-21 mRNA was selectively and dramatically elevated by co-treatment with lithium and VPA in primary rat brain neurons. FGF-21 protein levels were also robustly increased in neuronal lysates and culture medium following lithium-VPA co-treatment. Combining glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitors with VPA or histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with lithium synergistically increased FGF-21 mRNA levels, supporting that synergistic effects of lithium and VPA are mediated via GSK-3 and HDAC inhibition, respectively. Exogenous FGF-21 protein completely protected aging neurons from glutamate challenge. This neuroprotection was associated with enhanced Akt-1 activation and GSK-3 inhibition. Lithium-VPA co-treatment dramatically prolonged lithium-induced Akt-1 activation and augmented GSK-3 inhibition. Akt-1 knockdown markedly decreased FGF-21 mRNA levels, and reduced the neuroprotection induced by FGF-21 or lithium-VPA co-treatment. In addition, FGF-21 knockdown reduced lithium-VPA co-treatment-induced Akt-1 activation and neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. Together, our novel results suggest that FGF-21 is a key mediator of the effects of these mood stabilizers, and a potential new therapeutic target for CNS disorders. PMID:24468826

  2. Bumble Bees (Bombus spp) along a Gradient of Increasing Urbanization

    PubMed Central

    Ahrné, Karin; Bengtsson, Jan; Elmqvist, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Bumble bees and other wild bees are important pollinators of wild flowers and several cultivated crop plants, and have declined in diversity and abundance during the last decades. The main cause of the decline is believed to be habitat destruction and fragmentation associated with urbanization and agricultural intensification. Urbanization is a process that involves dramatic and persistent changes of the landscape, increasing the amount of built-up areas while decreasing the amount of green areas. However, urban green areas can also provide suitable alternative habitats for wild bees. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied bumble bees in allotment gardens, i.e. intensively managed flower rich green areas, along a gradient of urbanization from the inner city of Stockholm towards more rural (periurban) areas. Keeping habitat quality similar along the urbanization gradient allowed us to separate the effect of landscape change (e.g. proportion impervious surface) from variation in habitat quality. Bumble bee diversity (after rarefaction to 25 individuals) decreased with increasing urbanization, from around eight species on sites in more rural areas to between five and six species in urban allotment gardens. Bumble bee abundance and species composition were most affected by qualities related to the management of the allotment areas, such as local flower abundance. The variability in bumble bee visits between allotment gardens was higher in an urban than in a periurban context, particularly among small and long-tongued bumble bee species. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that allotment gardens and other urban green areas can serve as important alternatives to natural habitats for many bumble bee species, but that the surrounding urban landscape influences how many species that will be present. The higher variability in abundance of certain species in the most urban areas may indicate a weaker reliability of the ecosystem service pollination in

  3. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  4. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  5. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  6. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  7. OH Column Abundance Apparent Response to Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, C. R.; Minschwaner, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    The 33-year series of high spectral resolution measurements of absorption of sunlight by OH at 308 nm has exhibited temporary decreases of column abundances in 1986, 1997, and 2008 near the times of minimum solar activity. These observations and analyses are of significance as they encompass three complete solar cycles for comparison. During solar cycle 23, the annual average abundances increased approximately 20% from the minimum abundance in 1997 to high-sun enhanced values in 2000-2006, then dropped approximately 15% in 2008. The abundances exhibited a pronounced reduction at solar minimum in August-October 2008, similar to that seen in fall 1986 and fall 1997. The average morning abundances on those occasions were 13% smaller than the 1980-88 corresponding average, about 0.9 x 1013 cm-2, with minimum values broadly consistent with model results. In contrast, high-sun OH abundances observed during periods of solar maximum are approximately 33% larger than modeled abundances. This discrepancy cannot be explained by reasonable adjustments of reaction rates or modeled constituent concentrations in the stratosphere or mesosphere. However, the observed responses to a tropopause fold event in 1988 and to the Pinatubo aerosol in 1991 do suggest an important contribution to the total OH column from the lower stratosphere. In addition to the apparent variations with solar activity, this OH column database contains a number of other effects such as diurnal and seasonal patterns, and geographic differences between observations from Colorado, Florida, Alaska, Micronesia, New Zealand, and New Mexico.

  8. Abundance Inequality in Freshwater Communities Has an Ecological Origin.

    PubMed

    Passy, Sophia I

    2016-04-01

    The hollow-shaped species abundance distribution (SAD) and its allied rank abundance distribution (RAD)-showing that abundance is unevenly distributed among species-are some of the most studied patterns in ecology. To explain the nature of abundance inequality, I developed a novel framework identifying environmental favorability, which controls the balance between reproduction and immigration, as the ultimate source and species stress tolerance as a proximate factor. Thus, under harsh conditions, only a few tolerant species can reproduce, while some sensitive species can be present in low numbers due to chance immigration. This would lead to high abundance inequality between the two groups of species. Under benign conditions, both groups can reproduce and give rise to higher abundance equality. To test these ideas, I examined the variability in the parameters of a Poisson lognormal fit of the SAD and a square root fit of the RAD in diatom and fish communities across US streams. Indeed, as environmental favorability increased, more sensitive forms were able to establish large populations, diminishing the abundance disparity between locally common and rare species. Finally, it was demonstrated that in diatoms, the RAD belonged to the same family of relationships as those of population density with body size and regional distribution. PMID:27028078

  9. Dietary supplementation with lactose or artificial sweetener enhances swine gut Lactobacillus population abundance.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Nau, Alexandra; Bravo, David; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-06-01

    The commensal bacteria Lactobacillus are widely used as probiotic organisms conferring a heath benefit on the host. They have been implicated in promoting gut health via the stimulation of host immunity and anti-inflammatory responses, as well as protecting the intestinalmucosa against pathogen invasion. Lactobacilli grow by fermenting sugars and starches and produce lactic acid as their primary metabolic product. For efficient utilisation of varied carbohydrates, lactobacilli have evolved diverse sugar transport and metabolic systems, which are specifically induced by their own substrates. Many bacteria are also capable of sensing and responding to changes in their environment. These sensory responses are often independent of transport or metabolism and are mediated through membrane-spanning receptor proteins. We employed DNA-based pyrosequencing technology to investigate the changes in the intestinal microbiota of piglets weaned to a diet supplemented with either a natural sugar, lactose or an artificial sweetener (SUCRAM®, consisting of saccharin and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC); Pancosma SA). The addition of either lactose or saccharin/NHDC to the piglets' feed dramatically increased the caecal population abundance of Lactobacillus, with concomitant increases in intraluminal lactic acid concentrations. This is the first report of the prebiotic-like effects of saccharin/NHDC, an artificial sweetener, being able to influence the commensal gut microbiota. The identification of the underlying mechanism(s) will assist in designing nutritional strategies for enhancing gut immunity and maintaining gut health. PMID:24382146

  10. Li-7 abundances in halo stars: Testing stellar evolution models and the primordial Li-7 abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaboyer, Brian; Demarque, P.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with (Fe/H) = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial Li-7 abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of accurate Li abundances in extremely metal-poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models with gray atmospheres do a very good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than approximately 5600 K. They predict a primordial. Li-7 abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24 +/- 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the Li-7 destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of Li-7 from the surface of the star. Rotational mixing inhibits the microscopic diffusion and the (Fe/H) = -2.28 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the mean trend in T(sub eff) which is present in the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable Li-7 depletion in these models and the primordial Li-7 abundance inferred from these models is log N(Li) = 3.08 +/- 0.1. However, the (Fe/H) = -3.28 isochrones reveal problems with the combined models. These isochrones predict a trend of decreasing log N(Li) with increasing T(sub eff) which is not present in the observations. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  11. Li-7 abundances in halo stars: Testing stellar evolution models and the primordial Li-7 abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboyer, Brian; Demarque, P.

    1994-10-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with (Fe/H) = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial Li-7 abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of accurate Li abundances in extremely metal-poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models with gray atmospheres do a very good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than approximately 5600 K. They predict a primordial. Li-7 abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24 +/- 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the Li-7 destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of Li-7 from the surface of the star. Rotational mixing inhibits the microscopic diffusion and the (Fe/H) = -2.28 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the mean trend in Teff which is present in the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable Li-7 depletion in these models and the primordial Li-7 abundance inferred from these models is log N(Li) = 3.08 +/- 0.1. However, the (Fe/H) = -3.28 isochrones reveal problems with the combined models. These isochrones predict a trend of decreasing log N(Li) with increasing Teff which is not present in the observations. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  12. Elemental Abundances of Mercury-Manganese Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    We propose to obtain a carefully planned set of multiple high dispersion exposures of three MercuryManganese stars in both the SWP and LWP cameras. These observations will be coadded to increase the S/N ratio so that accurate elemental abundances can be derived for these examples of HgMn stars, each of which represents some extreme class aspect. This will increase of sample of HgMn stars from four to seven. Of particular interest are the abundances of N and Co in which some HgMn stars have shown remarkable underabundances. Comparison of the UV and optical spectra features due to light elements such as N (and C and 0) provide an observational framework to test NLTE models such as those of Takada (1993). This work has already shed some light on some of earlier findings for normal stars. The ability to accurately determine the surface chemical composition of the late B stars through such studies will lead to better tests for theories purporting to explain the origin of the chemical peculiarities seen in this temperature domain.

  13. Recent increases in the large glacial-relict calanoid Limnocalanus macrurus in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbiero, R.P.; Bunnell, D.B.; Rockwell, D.C.; Tuchman, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004, population density of the large hypolimnetic calanoid Limnocalanus macrurus Sars. has increased dramatically in Lake Michigan. The average summer biomass of this species between 2004 and 2006 was roughly three times that of the period 1984–2003, and at levels unprecedented in our 22-year dataset, making L. macrurus the dominant zooplankter in the lake in terms of biomass. These increases have been accentuated by coincident population declines of the main daphnid, Daphnia mendotae, in the lake with the result that in 2006, L. macrurus accounted for 75% and 50% of the large (> 0.9 mm) crustacean biomass in the northern and southern basins of Lake Michigan, respectively. The increases in L. macrurus populations have closely coincided with equally dramatic increases in summer water clarity. Recent extinction coefficients are among the lowest recorded for the lake, and deepening light penetration has permitted increases in the size of the deep chlorophyll layer. In addition, planktivorous fish populations have declined coincidently with the increases in L. macrurus. It seems likely that an increase in sub-epilimnetic production has resulted in increased food resources for the deep-living L. macrurus, while low planktivore abundances have reduced predation loss, permitting L. macrurus to respond to these increases in sub-epilimnetic production.

  14. Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse photo sequence to monitor the active volcanos on Jupiter's moon Io following the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. This picture is one of about 200 images that will be used to generate a time lapse motion picture to illustrate Io's volcanic activity. On the bright limb, two of the plumes (P-5 & P-6) discovered in March by Voyager 1 are again visible. The plumes are spewing materials to a height of about 100 kilometers.

  15. Unexpected, dramatic improvement in atrioventricular conduction during pacemaker implantation for apparent complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Jose'; Wang, Huijian; Biviano, Angelo; Garan, Hasan

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old man with complete heart block after aortic and mitral valve surgery for bacterial endocarditis. Prior to pacemaker implantation, the patient had sinus bradycardia with third degree atrioventricular (AV) block. During testing of the atrial lead, the patient manifested intact AV conduction with a constant PR interval, which was robust up to 120 beats/min. This case represents a dramatic example of unexpected, improved AV conduction, perhaps a result of loss of Phase IV block. PMID:17725759

  16. Gorham-Stout Disease of the Skull Base With Hearing Loss: Dramatic Recovery and Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Akifumi; Ozeki, Michio; Kuze, Bunya; Asano, Takahiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. We present a 6-year-old male with GSD involving the skull base who presented with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, severe hearing loss, and facial palsy secondary to cerebellar herniation into the internal auditory canal. After 2 months of treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b (50 μg/week), his hearing recovered dramatically. Two years later, new bone formation appeared radiologically and IFN was switched to sirolimus. One year after the switch, CSF rhinorrhea disappeared. Antiangiogenic therapy might inhibit proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in osteolytic lesions and lead to new bone formation. PMID:26713883

  17. Shoshin Beriberi With Low Cardiac Output and Hemodynamic Deterioration Treated Dramatically by Thiamine Administration.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    "Shoshin beriberi", which is a fulminant form of cardiovascular beriberi accompanied by hemodynamic deterioration with high cardiac output and decreased systemic blood pressure, caused by thiamine deficiency due to alcoholic abuse or malnutrition, is often difficult to address because of its rarity and non-specific symptoms. We here present a patient with a history of alcoholic abuse who had suffered hemodynamic deterioration with extremely low cardiac output refractory to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and intravenous catecholamine support, which was improved dramatically by bolus intravenous thiamine administration. Such a type with low cardiac output would be the most severe form of Shoshin beriberi, and cannot be rescued without diagnostic administration of thiamine. PMID:26346515

  18. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  19. How Ants Drop Out: Ant Abundance on Tropical Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Longino, John T.; Branstetter, Michael G.; Colwell, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    In tropical wet forests, ants are a large proportion of the animal biomass, but the factors determining abundance are not well understood. We characterized ant abundance in the litter layer of 41 mature wet forest sites spread throughout Central America (Chiapas, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica) and examined the impact of elevation (as a proxy for temperature) and community species richness. Sites were intentionally chosen to minimize variation in precipitation and seasonality. From sea level to 1500 m ant abundance very gradually declined, community richness declined more rapidly than abundance, and the local frequency of the locally most common species increased. These results suggest that within this elevational zone, density compensation is acting, maintaining high ant abundance as richness declines. In contrast, in sites above 1500 m, ant abundance dropped abruptly to much lower levels. Among these high montane sites, community richness explained much more of the variation in abundance than elevation, and there was no evidence of density compensation. The relative stability of abundance below 1500 m may be caused by opposing effects of temperature on productivity and metabolism. Lower temperatures may decrease productivity and thus the amount of food available for consumers, but slower metabolisms of consumers may allow maintenance of higher biomass at lower resource supply rates. Ant communities at these lower elevations may be highly interactive, the result of continuous habitat presence over geological time. High montane sites may be ephemeral in geological time, resulting in non-interactive communities dominated by historical and stochastic processes. Abundance in these sites may be determined by the number of species that manage to colonize and/or avoid extinction on mountaintops. PMID:25098722

  20. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  1. Photoerosion and the abundances of the light elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Richard N.; Ferland, Gary J.; Schramm, David N.

    1988-01-01

    The abundances of the rare light elements H-2, He-3, Li-7, and B-11 are shown to be potentially affected by photoerosion. That process, involving the interaction of high energy photons from galactic centers with atomic nuclei, will increase the abundances of H-2, He-3, and B-11 while lowering slightly those of Li-7 and He-4. In some regions of galaxies the effects may be large enough to impact their chemical evolution. In particular this process may have enhanced the H-2 and He-3 abundances near the center of our galaxy over and above those from the big bang, as well as the galactic B-11 abundance over that from cosmic-ray spallation.

  2. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra,more » and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.« less

  3. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.

  4. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our findings therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions. PMID:26658882

  5. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our findings therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions. PMID:26658882

  6. Dramatic Intracerebral Hemorrhagic Presentations of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Joel M.; Wang, Bonnie H.; Moon, Seong-Jin; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) refers to a number of disorders characterized by severe and sudden-onset (“thunderclap”) headaches and angiographic features of reversible, segmental, multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. Although RCVS generally resolves without significant sequelae, a rare and possibly underrecognized hemorrhagic presentation has a worse potential course. We report three cases of hemorrhagic RCVS and review the literature. Three females (42, 54, and 33 years old, resp.) presented with severe headache, neurological deficits, and dramatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patient 1 presented comatose with a 9 × 4 × 6.6 cm left deep intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and 1 cm midline shift. She underwent emergent surgical intervention. Patient 2 had a 3.3 × 1.5 cm left superior frontal IPH that enlarged to 4 × 2.5 cm within 12 hours with worsening headache and neurological deficits. She was successfully managed nonoperatively. Patient 3, after uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery, presented with a 1.5 cm left superior parietal IPH on postpartum day 7. Two days later, she acutely developed right hemiplegia. Repeat CT demonstrated a new 3.3 × 1.7 cm left frontal IPH. She was also successfully managed nonoperatively. Many diverse conditions are grouped within the category of RCVS. Dramatic ICH remains a rare and possibly underrecognized presenting feature. Prompt diagnosis and management are essential for obtaining the best outcome. PMID:24707417

  7. Socio-Dramatic Affective-Relational Intervention for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome & High Functioning Autism: Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called "socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention" (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit…

  8. Abundance patterns in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard B. C.

    1990-06-01

    Abundances of He, N, O, and Ne have been uniformly calculated for 192 planetary nebulas residing in the Galactic disk and halo, the LMC, the SMC, and M31. Direct correlations appear to exist for type I as well as non-type I objects for the following pairs of parameters: N/O-He/H, N/O-N/H, and Ne/H-O/H. Separately, type I planetaries show a weak anticorrelation between N/O and O/H, while non-type I's exhibit direct correlations between N/H and O/H and between N/O and O/H. From these patterns, it is inferred that non-type I's synthesize N via the CN cycle. Type I planetaries, on the other hand, manufacture N at least partially via the ON cycle, destroying O in the process. Neither type appears to synthesize O or Ne.

  9. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.; Chen, Y. Q.; Carigi, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stars are important in many fields of astrophysics including nucleosynthesis, stellar structure, evolution of galaxies, and formation of planetary systems. Still, our knowledge of the abundances of these elements in different stellar populations is uncertain because of difficulties in observing and analyzing atomic and molecular lines of C and O. Aims: Abundances of C, O, and Fe are determined for F and G main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood with metallicities in the range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.4 in order to study trends and possible systematic differences in the C/Fe, O/Fe, and C/O ratios for thin- and thick-disk stars as well as high- and low-alpha halo stars. In addition, we investigate if there is any connection between C and O abundances in stellar atmospheres and the occurrence of planets. Methods: Carbon abundances are determined from the λλ 5052,5380 C i lines and oxygen abundances from the λ7774 O i triplet and the forbidden [O i] line at 6300 Å. MARCS model atmospheres are applied and non-LTE corrections for the O i triplet are included. Results: Systematic differences between high- and low-alpha halo stars and between thin- and thick-disk stars are seen in the trends of [C/Fe] and [O/Fe]. The two halo populations and thick-disk stars show the same trend of [C/O] versus [O/H], whereas the thin-disk stars are shifted to higher [C/O] values. Furthermore, we find some evidence of higher C/O and C/Fe ratios in stars hosting planets than in stars for which no planets have been detected. Conclusions: The results suggest that C and O in both high- and low-alpha halo stars and in thick-disk stars are made mainly in massive (M> 8 M⊙) stars, whereas thin-disk stars have an additional carbon contribution from low-mass AGB and massive stars of high metallicity causing a rising trend of the C/O ratio with increasing metallicity. However, at the highest metallicities investigated ([Fe/H] ≃ + 0.4), C/O does not

  10. Higher plant Ca(2+)-ATPase: primary structure and regulation of mRNA abundance by salt.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmers, L E; Ewing, N N; Bennett, A B

    1992-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulatory mechanisms participate in diverse developmentally, hormonally, and environmentally regulated processes, with the precise control of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration being critical to such mechanisms. In plant cells, P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases localized in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum are thought to play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity has been identified in isolated plant cell membranes, but the protein has not been characterized at the molecular level. We have isolated a partial-length cDNA (LCA1) and a complete genomic clone (gLCA13) encoding a putative endoplasmic reticulum-localized Ca(2+)-ATPase in tomato. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a protein (Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase) of 1048 amino acids with a molecular mass of 116 kDa, eight probable transmembrane domains, and all of the highly conserved functional domains common to P-type cation-translocating ATPases. In addition, the protein shares approximately 50% amino acid sequence identify with animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases but less than 30% identity with other P-type ATPases. Genomic DNA blot hybridization analysis indicates that the Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase is encoded by a single gene. RNA blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of three transcript sizes in root tissue and a single, much less abundant, transcript in leaves. Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels increase dramatically upon a 1-day exposure to 50 mM NaCl. Thus this report describes the primary structure of a higher-plant Ca(2+)-ATPase and the regulation of its mRNA abundance by salt stress. Images PMID:1384045

  11. Dramatic remission of anemia after thymectomy in a patient of idiopathic myelofibrosis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Yih; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Yang, Ching-Fen; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is one of the characteristics of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), and malignant thymoma is usually associated with various hematologic disorders, including anemia, pancytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, the relationship between IMF and malignant thymoma has not been published before. Here, we report a 48-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed of IMF with severe anemia and transfusion dependent. Five years later, malignant thymoma was found when she was examined for chronic cough. After performing extended thymectomy, her anemia dramatically recovered to normal and sustained for 2 years till last follow-up. Her splenomegaly and myelofibrosis were also improved. We hypothesized that her malignant thymoma induced the progression of IMF, especially in anemia. PMID:18224414

  12. Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species

    PubMed Central

    Alström, Per; Jønsson, Knud A.; Fjeldså, Jon; Ödeen, Anders; Ericson, Per G. P.; Irestedt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage. PMID:26064613

  13. Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lareu, Ricky R.; Harve, Karthik S.; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-11-09

    The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

  14. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  15. Dramatic Transcriptional Changes in an Intracellular Parasite Enable Host Switching between Plant and Insect

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Sugawara, Kyoko; Neriya, Yutaro; Himeno, Misako; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that have devastating effects on the yields of crops and plants worldwide. They are intracellular parasites of both plants and insects, and are spread among plants by insects. How phytoplasmas can adapt to two diverse environments is of considerable interest; however, the mechanisms enabling the “host switching” between plant and insect hosts are poorly understood. Here, we report that phytoplasmas dramatically alter their gene expression in response to “host switching” between plant and insect. We performed a detailed characterization of the dramatic change that occurs in the gene expression profile of Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris OY-M strain (approximately 33% of the genes change) upon host switching between plant and insect. The phytoplasma may use transporters, secreted proteins, and metabolic enzymes in a host-specific manner. As phytoplasmas reside within the host cell, the proteins secreted from phytoplasmas are thought to play crucial roles in the interplay between phytoplasmas and host cells. Our microarray analysis revealed that the expression of the gene encoding the secreted protein PAM486 was highly upregulated in the plant host, which is also observed by immunohistochemical analysis, suggesting that this protein functions mainly when the phytoplasma grows in the plant host. Additionally, phytoplasma growth in planta was partially suppressed by an inhibitor of the MscL osmotic channel that is highly expressed in the plant host, suggesting that the osmotic channel might play an important role in survival in the plant host. These results also suggest that the elucidation of “host switching” mechanism may contribute to the development of novel pest controls. PMID:21858041

  16. Polypeptone induces dramatic cell lysis in ura4 deletion mutants of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Nishino, Kouhei; Mizuno, Kouhei; Akihiro, Takashi; Toda, Takashi; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kaino, Tomohiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Polypeptone is widely excluded from Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth medium. However, the reasons why polypeptone should be avoided have not been documented. Polypeptone dramatically induced cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant when cells approached the stationary growth phase, and this phenotype was suppressed by supplementation of uracil. To determine the specificity of this cell lysis phenotype, we created deletion mutants of other genes involved in de novo biosynthesis of uridine monophosphate (ura1, ura2, ura3, and ura5). Cell lysis was not observed in these gene deletion mutants. In addition, concomitant disruption of ura1, ura2, ura3, or ura5 in the ura4 deletion mutant suppressed cell lysis, indicating that cell lysis induced by polypeptone is specific to the ura4 deletion mutant. Furthermore, cell lysis was also suppressed when the gene involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis was deleted. This is likely because Ura3 requires coenzyme Q for its activity. The ura4 deletion mutant was sensitive to zymolyase, which mainly degrades (1,3)-beta-D glucan, when grown in the presence of polypeptone, and cell lysis was suppressed by the osmotic stabiliser, sorbitol. Finally, the induction of cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant was due to the accumulation of orotidine-5-monophosphate. Cell wall integrity was dramatically impaired in the ura4 deletion mutant when grown in the presence of polypeptone. Because ura4 is widely used as a selection marker in S. pombe, caution needs to be taken when evaluating phenotypes of ura4 mutants. PMID:23555823

  17. SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF DUST ABUNDANCES ACROSS THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Paradis, Deborah; Reach, William T.; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Chad W.; Gordon, Karl; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Meade, Marilyn; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Vijh, Uma P.; Volk, Kevin

    2009-07-15

    Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many H I shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.

  18. Improved Yttrium and Zirconium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, Renata; Biemont, E.; Cowan, J. J.; Sneden, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present new abundances of the lighter n-capture elements, Yttrium (Z=39) and Zirconium (Z=40) in the very metal poor, r-process rich stars BD+17 3248 and HD 221170. Very accurate abundances were obtained by use of the new transition probabilities for Y II published by Biémont et al. 2011, and Zr II by Malcheva et al. 2006, and by expanding the number of transitions employed for each element. For example, in BD+17 3248, we find log ɛπσιλον=-0.03 +/- 0.03 (σιγμα=0.15, from 23 lines) for Y II. As for Zr II, log ɛπσιλον = 0.65 +/- 0.03 (σɛγμα = 0.1, from 13 lines). The resulting abundance ratio is log ɛπσιλον [Y/Zr] = -0.68 +/- 0.05. The results for HD 221170 are in accord with those of BD+17 3248. The quantity of lines used to form the abundance means has increased significantly since the original studies of these stars, resulting in more trustworthy abundances. These observed abundance ratios are in agreement with an r-process-only value predicted from stellar models, but is under-abundant compared to an empirical model derived from direct analyses of meteoritic material. This ambiguity should stimulate further nucleosynthetic analysis to explain this abundance ratio. We would like to extend our gratitude to NSF grant AST-0908978 and the University of Texas Astronomy Department Rex G. Baker, Jr. Endowment for their financial support in this project.

  19. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  20. Prickly business: abundance of sea urchins on breakwaters and coral reefs in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Andrew G; Dunshea, Glenn; Feary, David A; Hoey, Andrew S

    2016-04-30

    Echinometra mathaei is a common echinoid on tropical reefs and where abundant plays an important role in the control of algal communities. Despite high prevalence of E. mathaei on southern Persian/Arabian Gulf reefs, their abundance and distribution is poorly known. Spatial and temporal patterns in population abundance were examined at 12 sites between breakwater and natural reef habitats in Dubai (UAE) every 3 months from 2008 to 2010. Within the breakwater habitat, densities were greatest at shallow wave-exposed sites, and reduced with both decreasing wave-exposure and increasing depth. Interestingly, E. mathaei were significantly more abundant on exposed breakwaters than natural reef sites, presumably due to differences in habitat structure and benthic cover. Population abundances differed seasonally, with peak abundances during summer (July-September) and lower abundances in winter (December-February). Seasonal fluctuations are likely the result of peak annual recruitment pulses coupled with increased fish predation from summer to winter. PMID:26563547

  1. New evidence for a dramatic rise in atmosphere oxygen ca. 1,900 m.y. ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, H. D.; Macfarlane, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of geologic evidence have pointed to a significant increase in P sub O2 about 2,000 m.y. ago, but the magnitude of P sub O2 before and after that time has been quite uncertain. The data that we have recently accumulated suggest that P sub O2 was approximately less than 2 x 10 (exp -3) atm more than 2,000 m.y. ago, and approximately greater than 0.03 atm more recently than ca. 1,900 m.y. ago. These estimates are based on the behavior of iron in Precambrian weathering horizons. More than ca. 2,000 m.y. ago, Fe(+2), released during the weathering of basalts was not oxidized to Fe(+3), and was removed in ground water from the upper layers of soil horizons. More recently than ca. 1,850 m.y. ago, Fe(+2) was oxidized to Fe(+3) and precipitated as iron oxides and hydroxides in such soil horizons and in the weathering products of a carbonate facies banded iron formation in Griqualand West, South Africa. The O2 content of the atmosphere must have increased dramatically about 1,900 m.y. ago to explain these observations. The reasons for the increase are still obscure, but are probably related to changes in the biologic productivity of the oceans. Eukaryotes appear to have developed shortly after the increase in P sub O2, perhaps in response to the subsequent increase in the supply of nitrate from the atmosphere to the oceans.

  2. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  3. A Model for Abundances in Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y.-Z.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2001-10-01

    A model is presented that seeks to explain quantitatively the stellar abundances of r-process elements and other elements associated with the r-process sites. It is argued that the abundances of all these elements in stars with -3<~[Fe/H]<-1 can be explained by the contributions of three sources. The sources are the first generations of very massive (>~100 Msolar) stars that are formed from big bang debris and are distinct from Type II supernovae (SNe II) and two types of SNe II, the H and L events, which can occur only at [Fe/H]>~-3. The H events are of high frequency and produce dominantly heavy (A>130) r-elements but no Fe (presumably leaving behind black holes). The L events are of low frequency and produce Fe and dominantly light (A<~130) r-elements (essentially none above Ba). By using the observed abundances in two ultra-metal-poor stars and the solar r-abundances, the initial or prompt inventory of elements produced by the first generations of very massive stars and the yields of H and L events can be determined. The abundances of a large number of elements in a star can then be calculated from the model by using only the observed Eu and Fe abundances. To match the model results and the observational data for stars with -3<[Fe/H]<-1 requires that the solar r-abundances for Sr, Y, Zr, and Ba must be significantly increased from the standard values. No such changes appear to be required for all other elements. If the changes in the solar r-abundances for Sr, Y, Zr, and Ba are not permitted, the model fails at -3<[Fe/H]<-1 but still works at [Fe/H]~-3 for these four elements. By using the corrected solar r-abundances for these elements, good agreement is obtained between the model results and data over the range -3<[Fe/H]<-1. No evidence of s-process contributions is found in this region, but all the observational data in this region now show regular increases of Ba/Eu above the standard solar r-process value. Whether the solar r-components of Sr, Y, Zr, and

  4. Change in avian abundance predicted from regional forest inventory data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Tirpak, John M.; Jones-Farrand, D. Todd; Thompson, Frank R., III; Uihlein, William B.; Fitzgerald, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    An inability to predict population response to future habitat projections is a shortcoming in bird conservation planning. We sought to predict avian response to projections of future forest conditions that were developed from nationwide forest surveys within the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. To accomplish this, we evaluated the historical relationship between silvicolous bird populations and FIA-derived forest conditions within 25 ecoregions that comprise the southeastern United States. We aggregated forest area by forest ownership, forest type, and tree size-class categories in county-based ecoregions for 5 time periods spanning 1963-2008. We assessed the relationship of forest data with contemporaneous indices of abundance for 24 silvicolous bird species that were obtained from Breeding Bird Surveys. Relationships between bird abundance and forest inventory data for 18 species were deemed sufficient as predictive models. We used these empirically derived relationships between regional forest conditions and bird populations to predict relative changes in abundance of these species within ecoregions that are anticipated to coincide with projected changes in forest variables through 2040. Predicted abundances of these 18 species are expected to remain relatively stable in over a quarter (27%) of the ecoregions. However, change in forest area and redistribution of forest types will likely result in changed abundance of some species within many ecosystems. For example, abundances of 11 species, including pine warbler (Dendroica pinus), brown-headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla), and chuckwills- widow (Caprimulgus carolinensis), are projected to increase within more ecoregions than ecoregions where they will decrease. For 6 other species, such as blue-winged warbler (Vermivora pinus), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), and indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), we projected abundances will decrease within more ecoregions than ecoregions where they will

  5. Songbird abundance and parasitism differ between urban and rural shrublands.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Dirk E; Thompson, Frank R

    2006-02-01

    Many studies have examined differences in avian community composition between urban and rural habitats, but few, if any, have looked at nesting success of urban shrubland birds in a replicated fashion while controlling for habitat. We tested factors affecting nest survival, parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), and species abundance in shrubland habitat in rural and urban landscapes. We found no support for our hypothesis that nest survival was lower in urban landscapes, but strong support for the hypothesis that survival increased with nest height. We found strong support for our hypothesis that cowbird parasitism was greater in urban than rural landscapes; parasitism in urban sites was at least twice that of rural sites. We found strong support for an urban landscape effect on abundance for several species; Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) and Brown-headed Cowbirds were more abundant in urban landscapes, whereas Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) and Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora pinus) were more abundant in rural sites. There was support for lower abundances of Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) and Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) with increased housing density. For six other species, edge and trail density or vegetation parameters best explained abundance. Lower abundances and greater parasitism in habitat patches in urban landscapes are evidence that, for some species, these urban landscapes do not fulfill the same role as comparable habitats in rural landscapes. Regional bird conservation planning and local habitat management in urban landscapes may need to consider these effects in efforts to sustain bird populations at regional and local scales. PMID:16705988

  6. The Significance of Myriophyllum elatinoides for Swine Wastewater Treatment: Abundance and Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Liu, Feng; Li, Yong; He, Yang; Zhang, Shunan; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-01-01

    Myriophyllum elatinoides was reported to effectively treat wastewater by removing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, little is known about the abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms associated with M. elatinoides purification systems. The objective of this research was to characterize the abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in swine wastewater and determine the main nitrogen removal pathways. In this study, five different waters were treated by M. elatinoides in microcosms for one month. The five waters included tap water (Control), swine wastewater (SW), 50% diluted swine wastewater (50% SW), and two synthetic wastewaters: 200 mg NH4+-N L−1 (200 NH4+-N) and 400 mg NH4+-N L−1 (400 NH4+-N). The most dramatic changes were in NH4+-N and total N (TN) concentrations, with average removal rates of 84% and 90%, respectively, in the treatments containing swine wastewater. On days 7, 14, and 28, the dissolved oxygen (DO) increased by 81.8%, 210.4% and 136.5%, respectively, compared with on day 0, in the swine wastewater. The results also showed that the bacterial amoA (AOB) copy numbers in the sediments of the treatments were significantly higher than those of archaeal amoA (AOA) copy numbers (p = 0.015). In addition, the high DO concentrations in swine wastewater responded well to the high abundance of AOB. The AOA and AOB community distributions were positively related with NO3-N and were negatively related with DO in swine wastewater treatments. In summary, our experimental results suggested that the M. elatinoides purification system could improve the activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and consequently might contribute to the significant N removal from the swine wastewater. PMID:26444015

  7. Effects of urbanization on the distribution and abundance of amphibians and invasive species in southern California streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, S.P.D.; Busteed, G.T.; Kats, L.B.; Vandergon, T.L.; Lee, L.F.S.; Dagit, R.G.; Kerby, J.L.; Fisher, R.N.; Sauvajot, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Urbanization negatively affects natural ecosystems in many ways, and aquatic systems in particular. Urbanization is also cited as one of the potential contributors to recent dramatic declines in amphibian populations. From 2000 to 2002 we determined the distribution and abundance of native amphibians and exotic predators and characterized stream habitat and invertebratecommunities in 35 streams in an urbanized landscape north of Los Angeles (U.S.A.). We measured watershed development as the percentage of area within each watershed occupied by urban land uses. Streams in more developed watersheds often had exotic crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and fish, and had fewer native species such as California newts (Taricha torosa) and California treefrogs (Hyla cadaverina). These effects seemed particularly evident above 8% development, a result coincident with other urban stream studies that show negative impacts beginning at 10-15% urbanization. For Pacific treefrogs (H. regilla), the most widespread native amphibian, abundance was lower in the presence of exotic crayfish, although direct urbanization effects were not found. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities were also less diverse in urban streams, especially for sensitive species. Faunal community changes in urban streams may be related to changes in physical stream habitat, such as fewer pool and more run habitats and increased water depth and flow, leading to more permanent streams. Variation in stream permanence was particularly evident in 2002, a dry year when many natural streams were dry but urban streams were relatively unchanged. Urbanization has significantly altered stream habitat in this region and may enhance invasion by exotic species and negatively affect diversity and abundance of native amphibians. ??2005 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Abundance anomalies of carbon and nitrogen in the IUE spectra of Algol-type interacting binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, Carolina P. S.

    1990-01-01

    There are two primary ways in which the products of nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors may appear at the surface of a star. These are mixing and/or loss of the original unburned stellar envelope. In interacting binaries, overflow can contribute dramatically to envelope loss. The simplest abundance anomalies to be expected from nuclear burning of hydrogen, helium, or carbon would be under or over abundances H, He, C, O, Ne, and Mg. In addition, it is expected that carbon is initially severely depleted, while nitrogen is enhanced during hydrogen burning via the CNO cycle in stars above two solar masses. Other, more subtle anomalies are also expected, and elements heavier than magnesium can be created during very late evolution by nuclear burning in massive stars. Consequently, it is expected that abundance anomalies of various kinds should occur in interacting binaries where one or both stars have lost significant amounts of mass.

  9. Hierarchical distance-sampling models to estimate population size and habitat-specific abundance of an island endemic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sillett, Scott T.; Chandler, Richard B.; Royle, J. Andrew; Kéry, Marc; Morrison, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Population size and habitat-specific abundance estimates are essential for conservation management. A major impediment to obtaining such estimates is that few statistical models are able to simultaneously account for both spatial variation in abundance and heterogeneity in detection probability, and still be amenable to large-scale applications. The hierarchical distance-sampling model of J. A. Royle, D. K. Dawson, and S. Bates provides a practical solution. Here, we extend this model to estimate habitat-specific abundance and rangewide population size of a bird species of management concern, the Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis), which occurs solely on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA. We surveyed 307 randomly selected, 300 m diameter, point locations throughout the 250-km2 island during October 2008 and April 2009. Population size was estimated to be 2267 (95% CI 1613-3007) and 1705 (1212-2369) during the fall and spring respectively, considerably lower than a previously published but statistically problematic estimate of 12 500. This large discrepancy emphasizes the importance of proper survey design and analysis for obtaining reliable information for management decisions. Jays were most abundant in low-elevation chaparral habitat; the detection function depended primarily on the percent cover of chaparral and forest within count circles. Vegetation change on the island has been dramatic in recent decades, due to release from herbivory following the eradication of feral sheep (Ovis aries) from the majority of the island in the mid-1980s. We applied best-fit fall and spring models of habitat-specific jay abundance to a vegetation map from 1985, and estimated the population size of A. insularis was 1400-1500 at that time. The 20-30% increase in the jay population suggests that the species has benefited from the recovery of native vegetation since sheep removal. Nevertheless, this jay's tiny range and small population size make it vulnerable to natural

  10. Hierarchical distance-sampling models to estimate population size and habitat-specific abundance of an island endemic.

    PubMed

    Sillett, T Scott; Chandler, Richard B; Royle, J Andrew; Kery, Marc; Morrison, Scott A

    2012-10-01

    Population size and habitat-specific abundance estimates are essential for conservation management. A major impediment to obtaining such estimates is that few statistical models are able to simultaneously account for both spatial variation in abundance and heterogeneity in detection probability, and still be amenable to large-scale applications. The hierarchical distance-sampling model of J. A. Royle, D. K. Dawson, and S. Bates provides a practical solution. Here, we extend this model to estimate habitat-specific abundance and rangewide population size of a bird species of management concern, the Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis), which occurs solely on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA. We surveyed 307 randomly selected, 300 m diameter, point locations throughout the 250-km2 island during October 2008 and April 2009. Population size was estimated to be 2267 (95% CI 1613-3007) and 1705 (1212-2369) during the fall and spring respectively, considerably lower than a previously published but statistically problematic estimate of 12 500. This large discrepancy emphasizes the importance of proper survey design and analysis for obtaining reliable information for management decisions. Jays were most abundant in low-elevation chaparral habitat; the detection function depended primarily on the percent cover of chaparral and forest within count circles. Vegetation change on the island has been dramatic in recent decades, due to release from herbivory following the eradication of feral sheep (Ovis aries) from the majority of the island in the mid-1980s. We applied best-fit fall and spring models of habitat-specific jay abundance to a vegetation map from 1985, and estimated the population size of A. insularis was 1400-1500 at that time. The 20-30% increase in the jay population suggests that the species has benefited from the recovery of native vegetation since sheep removal. Nevertheless, this jay's tiny range and small population size make it vulnerable to natural

  11. Microbial abundance and community in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms: role of plant presence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xie, Huijun; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Yang, Zhongchen; Zhao, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    In this research, the role of plants in improving microorganism growth conditions in subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) microcosms was determined. In particular, microbial abundance and community were investigated during summer and winter in Phragmites australis-planted CW microcosms (PA) and unplanted CW microcosms (control, CT). Results revealed that the removal efficiencies of pollutants and microbial community structure varied in winter with variable microbial abundance. During summer, PA comprised more dominant phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), whereas CT contained more Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria. During winter, the abundance of Proteobacteria was >40 % in PA but dramatically decreased in CT. Moreover, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacterial dominance in CT decreased. In both seasons, bacteria were more abundant in root surfaces than in sand. Plant presence positively affected microbial abundance and community. The potential removal ability of CT, in which Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria were abundant during summer, was more significantly affected by temperature reduction than that of PA with plant presence. PMID:25772872

  12. Condom use increasing.

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1998-01-01

    Condom use is central to the prevention of AIDS among people at risk for contracting HIV. As such, condom use is increasing dramatically even though many men say that they do not like using them. Condom sales through social marketing campaigns have increased dramatically in some countries, where tens of millions of condoms are sold annually. For example, during the period 1991-96, annual social marketing sales increased about five-fold in Ethiopia to 21 million, and nine-fold in Brazil to 27 million. These sales reflect the success of condom social marketing campaigns in making condoms accessible and largely affordable. There is also a greater general awareness of AIDS than there used to be, and communication campaigns have shown that condoms are an effective solution. More condoms still need to be used in the ongoing struggle against HIV/AIDS. The author discusses the factors which affect the limited acceptance of condoms, condom use outside of marriage, social marketing, and family planning programs. PMID:12293530

  13. Dramatic Resolution of an Unresectable Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wandrey, Narine; Chen, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with an unresectable bulky giant basal cell carcinoma on his upper back. A trial of chemotherapy did not help relieve his symptoms or reduce the tumor. He was referred for and received definitive radiation therapy via IMRT with dramatic regression. The patient had been unable to lie on his back for many years but currently can sleep comfortably on his back without pain, which has dramatically improved his quality of life. PMID:26848409

  14. Dramatic reduction of crop-to-crop gene flow within a short distance from transgenic rice fields.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jun; Lu, Bao-Rong; Song, Zhiping; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Zhang, Xinsheng; Sun, Shuguang; Chen, Rui; Wang, Feng

    2007-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) rice with enhanced agronomic traits and pharmaceutical uses are ready for widespread adoption. Little is known about isolation requirements for achieving stringent transgene confinement in rice. To investigate the extent of pollen-mediated crop-to-crop transgene flow, we conducted a field experiment with four plot-size treatments of adjacent GM and nonGM rice (Oryza sativa) in China. Three insect-resistant GM rice (Bt/CpTI) and nonGM isogenic lines were used in the study. The hygromycin-resistance transgene (hpt) marker was used to screen seeds from the nonGM rice rows at different distance intervals from GM rice plots. Based on the examination of > 2.1 million germinated seeds, we found a dramatic reduction in transgene frequencies with increasing distance from the GM crop, ranging from c. 0.28% at 0.2 m to < 0.01% at 6.2 m. In addition, different plot size did not significantly affect the frequencies of gene flow. In conclusion, pollen-mediated crop-to-crop transgene flow in rice can be maintained at negligible levels with short spatial isolation. The model can also be applied to other crops with self- and wind-pollination. PMID:17204081

  15. Integration Strategy Is a Key Step in Network-Based Analysis and Dramatically Affects Network Topological Properties and Inferring Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Wu, Deng; Gong, Yonghui; Bi, Xiaoman; Jiang, Hong; Li, Kongning; Wang, Qianghu

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of experiments have been designed to detect intracellular and intercellular molecular interactions. Based on these molecular interactions (especially protein interactions), molecular networks have been built for using in several typical applications, such as the discovery of new disease genes and the identification of drug targets and molecular complexes. Because the data are incomplete and a considerable number of false-positive interactions exist, protein interactions from different sources are commonly integrated in network analyses to build a stable molecular network. Although various types of integration strategies are being applied in current studies, the topological properties of the networks from these different integration strategies, especially typical applications based on these network integration strategies, have not been rigorously evaluated. In this paper, systematic analyses were performed to evaluate 11 frequently used methods using two types of integration strategies: empirical and machine learning methods. The topological properties of the networks of these different integration strategies were found to significantly differ. Moreover, these networks were found to dramatically affect the outcomes of typical applications, such as disease gene predictions, drug target detections, and molecular complex identifications. The analysis presented in this paper could provide an important basis for future network-based biological researches. PMID:25243127

  16. Linkage between Three Gorges Dam impacts and the dramatic recessions in China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Du, Jinzhou; Chen, Jiyu

    2015-12-01

    Despite comprising a small portion of the earth’s surface, lakes are vitally important for global ecosystem cycling. However, lake systems worldwide are extremely fragile, and many are shrinking due to changing climate and anthropogenic activities. Here, we show that Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced a dramatic and prolonged recession, which began in late September of 2003. We further demonstrate that abnormally low levels appear during October, 28 days ahead of the normal initiation of the dry season, which greatly imperiled the lake’s wetland areas and function as an ecosystem for wintering waterbirds. An increase in the river-lake water level gradient induced by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) altered the lake balance by inducing greater discharge into the Changjiang River, which is probably responsible for the current lake shrinkage. Occasional episodes of arid climate, as well as local sand mining, will aggravate the lake recession crisis. Although impacts of TGD on the Poyang Lake recession can be overruled by episodic extreme droughts, we argue that the average contributions of precipitation variation, human activities in the Poyang Lake catchment and TGD regulation to the Poyang Lake recession can be quantified as 39.1%, 4.6% and 56.3%, respectively.

  17. Linkage between Three Gorges Dam impacts and the dramatic recessions in China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Du, Jinzhou; Chen, Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite comprising a small portion of the earth’s surface, lakes are vitally important for global ecosystem cycling. However, lake systems worldwide are extremely fragile, and many are shrinking due to changing climate and anthropogenic activities. Here, we show that Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced a dramatic and prolonged recession, which began in late September of 2003. We further demonstrate that abnormally low levels appear during October, 28 days ahead of the normal initiation of the dry season, which greatly imperiled the lake’s wetland areas and function as an ecosystem for wintering waterbirds. An increase in the river-lake water level gradient induced by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) altered the lake balance by inducing greater discharge into the Changjiang River, which is probably responsible for the current lake shrinkage. Occasional episodes of arid climate, as well as local sand mining, will aggravate the lake recession crisis. Although impacts of TGD on the Poyang Lake recession can be overruled by episodic extreme droughts, we argue that the average contributions of precipitation variation, human activities in the Poyang Lake catchment and TGD regulation to the Poyang Lake recession can be quantified as 39.1%, 4.6% and 56.3%, respectively. PMID:26657816

  18. Patterns and potential drivers of dramatic changes in Tibetan lakes, 1972-2010.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia. PMID:25372787

  19. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  20. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li'an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  1. Patterns and Potential Drivers of Dramatic Changes in Tibetan Lakes, 1972–2010

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia. PMID:25372787

  2. Dramatic improvement of anti-SS-A/Ro-associated interstitial lung disease after immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Paola, Caramaschi; Giuliana, Festi; Giovanni, Orsolini; Cristian, Caimmi; Domenico, Biasi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to report three patients affected by interstitial lung disease associated with positive anti-SS-A/Ro autoantibody who showed a dramatic improvement after immunosuppressive treatment. Medical charts were reviewed to obtain clinical data, laboratory parameters, lung function tests, high-resolution computed tomography results and response to immunosuppressive treatment. The three patients showed a clinical picture of a lung-dominant connective tissue disease characterized by a sudden onset with dyspnea, cough and subtle extrathoracic features together with positive anti-SS-A/Ro antibody and weak titer antinuclear antibodies. All three patients responded favorably to immunosuppressive therapy: Two cases were treated with a combination of corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide followed by mycophenolate mofetil; in the third patient, clinical benefit was obtained after rituximab was added to corticosteroid and immunosuppressant drug. In spite of an abrupt onset with significant lung function impairment, all three patients had a favorable clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy. This report may be useful in making therapeutic decisions in case of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-SS-A antibody. PMID:27021338

  3. Safety Improves Dramatically In Fluor Hanford Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.L.; Gerber, M.S.; VonBargen, B.H.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walk-downs, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site. (authors)

  4. Dramatic improvement of crystals of large RNAs by cation replacement and dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D’Amare, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Compared to globular proteins, RNAs with complex three-dimensional folds are characterized by poorly differentiated molecular surfaces dominated by backbone phosphates, sparse tertiary contacts stabilizing global architecture, and conformational flexibility. The resulting generally poor order of crystals of large RNAs and their complexes frequently hampers crystallographic structure determination. We describe and rationalize a post-crystallization treatment strategy that exploits the importance of solvation and counterions for RNA folding. Replacement of Li+ and Mg2+ needed for growth of crystals of a tRNA-riboswitch-protein co-crystal with Sr2+, coupled with dehydration, dramatically improved the resolution limit (8.5 to 3.2 Å) and data quality, enabling structure determination. The soft Sr2+ ion forms numerous stabilizing intermolecular contacts. Comparison of pre- and post-treatment structures reveals how RNA assemblies redistribute as quasi-rigid bodies to yield improved crystal packing. Cation exchange complements previously reported post-crystallization dehydration of protein crystals, and represents a potentially general strategy for improving crystals of large RNAs. PMID:25185828

  5. Dramatic improvement of crystals of large RNAs by cation replacement and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-09-01

    Compared to globular proteins, RNAs with complex 3D folds are characterized by poorly differentiated molecular surfaces dominated by backbone phosphates, sparse tertiary contacts stabilizing global architecture, and conformational flexibility. The resulting generally poor order of crystals of large RNAs and their complexes frequently hampers crystallographic structure determination. We describe and rationalize a postcrystallization treatment strategy that exploits the importance of solvation and counterions for RNA folding. Replacement of Li(+) and Mg(2+) needed for growth of crystals of a tRNA-riboswitch-protein complex with Sr(2+), coupled with dehydration, dramatically improved the resolution limit (8.5-3.2 Å) and data quality, enabling structure determination. The soft Sr(2+) ion forms numerous stabilizing intermolecular contacts. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment structures reveals how RNA assemblies redistribute as quasi-rigid bodies to yield improved crystal packing. Cation exchange complements previously reported postcrystallization dehydration of protein crystals and represents a potentially general strategy for improving crystals of large RNAs. PMID:25185828

  6. Regulated Breathing Effect of Silicon Negative Electrode for Dramatically Enhanced Performance of Li-Ion Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xingcheng; Zhou, Weidong; Kim, Youngnam; Ryu, Ill; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Gao; Liu, Zhongyi; Gao, Huajian

    2015-03-01

    Si is an attractive negative electrode material for lithium ion batteries due to its high specifi c capacity (≈3600 mAh g –1 ). However, the huge volume swelling and shrinking during cycling, which mimics a breathing effect at the material/electrode/cell level, leads to several coupled issues including fracture of Si particles, unstable solid electrolyte interphase, and low Coulombic effi ciency. In this work, the regulation of the breathing effect is reported by using Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite which has been well-developed by other researchers. The focus is on understanding how the nanoscaled materials design impacts the mechanical and electrochemical response at electrode level. For the fi rst time, it is possible to observe one order of magnitude of reduction on breathing effect at the electrode level during cycling: the electrode thickness variation reduced down to 10%, comparing with 100% in the electrode with Si nanoparticles as active materials. The Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite electrode exhibits excellent capacity retention and high cycle effi ciency. In situ transmission electron microscopy and fi nite element simulations consistently reveals that the dramatically enhanced performance is associated with the regulated breathing of the Si in the new composite, therefore the suppression of the overall electrode expansion.

  7. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV (208)Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  8. SWIFT J195509+261406: Dramatic Flaring Activity from a New Galactic Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Sokolov, V. V.; Jelínek, M.; Sluse, D.; Ferrero, P.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; Nurenberger, D.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Guerrero, M. A.; French, J.; Melady, G.; Hanlon, L.; McBreen, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Kubánek, P.; Vitek, S.; Schulze, S.; Wilson, A. C.; Hudec, R.; González-Pérez, J. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Guziy, S.; Pavlenko, L.; Sonbas, E.; Trushkin, S.; Bursov, N.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Sabau-Graziati, L.

    Most of the transient sources that are detected in the gamma-ray sky are produced by extragalactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, it is known that there are some other astronomical objects that can produce high-energy bursts within the Milky Way. SWIFT J195509+261406, just one degree off the Galactic plane, is one of them. It was discovered on the 10th July 2007 by the Swift satellite and was since then observable for a period of a fortnight. During this time SWIFT J195509+261406 experimented dramatic flaring activity that could be observed in near infrared, optical and X-rays. We gathered multi-wavelength observations of SWIFT J195509+261406 including optical, near infrared, millimeter and radio observations. Our dataset covers the time from 1 min after the burst onset to more than 4 months later. Following the initial burst in the gamma-ray band, we recorded more than 40 flaring episodes in the optical bands (reaching up to I c ˜ 15) over a time span of 3 days, plus a faint infrared flare that was observed at late times. After this time, the source slowly faded away until it became undetectable. Using the observations compiled in this work we propose that this source is part of the magnetar family, linking soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars to dim isolated neutron stars.

  9. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  10. Dramatically Enhanced Flux Pinning Properties of Cation Composition Controlled Bi(Pb)2212 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Jun-Ichi; Makise, Takanori; Horii, Shigeru; Kishio, Kohji

    2006-06-01

    Single crystals of Bi2212 and Bi(Pb)2212 having various cation compositions were grown by the floating zone method and evaluated their Jc characteristics after control of oxygen content by post-annealing. Jc characteristics of Bi2212 and Bi(Pb)2212 were found to be improved by control of cation compositions towards stoichiometric, Bi:Sr:Ca:Cu = 2:2:1:2. This means that nonstoichiometric cation composition in these systems suppresses inherent superconductivity possibly due to considerably disordered crystal lattice, resulting in poor Jc characteristics. Dramatically enhanced Jc were achieved for cation stoichiometric and small amount of Y or Lu-doped Bi(Pb)2212 single crystals. The highest Jc at 20 K observed were ~0.85 MAcm-2 in self-field and ~0.1 MAcm-2 under 5 T with H // c. The dilute Y and Ludoping is considered to introduce locally lattice-distorted regions acting as effective pinning sites up to high fields.

  11. Leaks can dramatically decrease FiO2 on home ventilators: a bench study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long term oxygen therapy improves survival in hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because pressure support ventilation with a home care ventilator is largely unsupervised, there is considerable risk of leakage occurring, which could affect delivered FiO2. We have therefore conducted a bench study in order to measure the effect of different levels of O2 supply and degrees of leakage on delivered FiO2. Ventilator tested: Legendair® (Airox™, Pau, France). Thirty-six measures were performed in each four ventilators with zero, 5 and 10 l.min-1 leakage and 1,2,4 and 8 l O2 flow. Findings FiO2 decreased significantly with 5 l.min-1 leakage for all O2 flow rates, and with 10 l.min-1 at 4 and 8 l.min-1 O2. Conclusion During application of NIV on home ventilators, leakage can dramatically decrease inspired FiO2 making it less effective. It is important to know the FiO2 dispensed when NIV is used for COPD at home. We would encourage industry to develop methods for FiO2 regulation Chronic use of NIV for COPD with controlled FiO2 or SpO2 requires further studys. PMID:23870165

  12. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., "Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology"] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140mm and maximum current from 3.5to5MA. 700to800ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3TW radial total power, 100-300kJ total yield, and 20-30kJ energy above 1keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima ˜10kA and 50μs. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  13. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-15

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima {approx}10 kA and 50 {mu}s. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  14. Dramatic Expression in Opera, and Its Implications for Conversational Agents. Chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This article has discussed principles, techniques, and methods of dramatic portrayal in opera, and their application to the development of embodied conversational agents. Investigations such as this complement studies of natural human behavior, and offer insights as to how to make such behavior understandable and interesting when adapted for use by embodied conversational agents. However, one should use caution in applying such lessons. The unique characteristics of computer-based media are still being identified and explored. In any case, one must always be careful about applying principles blindly to any artistic form. Such principles are post-hoc analysis of the intuitive skill of great artists; this was as true in Aristotle's day as it is today. We should not let structural principles stand in the way of injecting creativity into the design of ECAs. Opera at its best possesses an element of magic that is difficult to describe, much less analytically reconstruct. We can only hope to achieve a similar result with conversational agents.

  15. Dramatic changes in DNA conductance with stretching: structural polymorphism at a critical extension.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Mogurampelly, Santosh; Goddard Iii, William A; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-21

    In order to interpret recent experimental studies of the dependence of conductance of ds-DNA as the DNA is pulled from the 3'end1-3'end2 ends, which find a sharp conductance jump for a very short (4.5%) stretching length, we carried out multiscale modeling to predict the conductance of dsDNA as it is mechanically stretched to promote various structural polymorphisms. We calculate the current along the stretched DNA using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, non-equilibrium pulling simulations, quantum mechanics calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For 5'end1-5'end2 attachments we find an abrupt jump in the current within a very short stretching length (6 Å or 17%) leading to a melted DNA state. In contrast, for 3'end1-3'end2 pulling it takes almost 32 Å (84%) of stretching to cause a similar jump in the current. Thus, we demonstrate that charge transport in DNA can occur over stretching lengths of several nanometers. We find that this unexpected behaviour in the B to S conformational DNA transition arises from highly inclined base pair geometries that result from this pulling protocol. We found that the dramatically different conductance behaviors for two different pulling protocols arise from how the hydrogen bonds of DNA base pairs break. PMID:27545499

  16. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1‑x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  17. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  18. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1−x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  19. The temperature of flash-cooling has dramatic effects on the diffraction quality of nucleosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Edayathumangalam, Rajeswari S; Luger, Karolin

    2005-07-01

    Nucleosome core-particle crystals are routinely flash-cooled in liquid propane at temperatures of approximately 153 K, followed by transfer into a cold nitrogen-gas stream (approximately 93 K). Analysis of diffraction data from crystals flash-cooled at different temperatures shows that the optimal temperature is approximately 153 K. The data quality worsens, with a concomitant reduction in the diffraction limit, at temperatures both higher and lower than 153 K. With some batches of crystals, significant shrinkage of the unit-cell volume is also observed at temperatures of 138 K and lower. The lattice shrinkage is always restricted to the c axis, concurrent with closer packing of two nucleosomes. Direct plunge-cooling of crystals in liquid nitrogen leads to loss of diffraction quality and resolution limit. Thus, in cases where flash-cooling into liquid nitrogen is detrimental to diffraction, optimizing cooling protocols at higher temperatures using liquid propane or other cryogens with similar properties may lead to dramatically improved results. In a related study, it is shown that a nucleosome crystal transported under 'cryocooled' conditions has higher mosaicity and yields inferior data quality in comparison to a crystal cryocooled at the synchrotron. For fragile crystals, transport in mother liquor and/or cryoprotectant followed by subsequent flash-cooling at the synchrotron may be the best procedure. PMID:15983411

  20. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry; Leprieur, Etienne Giroux

    2016-03-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  1. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  2. A DRAMATICALLY REDUCED SIZE IN THE GANTRY DESIGN FOR THE PROTON-CARBON THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2006-06-23

    Gantries in the proton/carbon cancer therapy machines represent the major cost and are of the largest size. This report explains a new way to the gantry design. The size and cost of the gantries are reduced and their use is simplified by using the fixed magnetic field. The ''new'' gantry is made of a very large momentum acceptance non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) quarter and half arc beam lines. The gantry is made of combined function magnets with a very strong focusing and small dispersion function. Additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow adjustments of the beam position for different energies at the beginning of the gantry. Additional strong focusing magnets following the gantry have also to be adjustable to provide required spot size and radial scanning above the patients. The fixed field combined function magnets could be made of small permanent magnets for the proton machine, or of the high temperature superconductors or superconductors for the carbon machine, reducing dramatically the size.

  3. Optimal temperature for malaria transmission is dramatically lower than previously predicted

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Johnson, Leah R.; Balzer, Christian; Ben-Horin, Tal; de Moor, Emily; McNally, Amy; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.; Smith, Thomas C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of mosquito vectors and malaria parasites affect the incidence, seasonal transmission and geographical range of malaria. Most malaria models to date assume constant or linear responses of mosquito and parasite life-history traits to temperature, predicting optimal transmission at 31 °C. These models are at odds with field observations of transmission dating back nearly a century. We build a model with more realistic ecological assumptions about the thermal physiology of insects. Our model, which includes empirically derived nonlinear thermal responses, predicts optimal malaria transmission at 25 °C (6 °C lower than previous models). Moreover, the model predicts that transmission decreases dramatically at temperatures > 28 °C, altering predictions about how climate change will affect malaria. A large data set on malaria transmission risk in Africa validates both the 25 °C optimum and the decline above 28 °C. Using these more accurate nonlinear thermal-response models will aid in understanding the effects of current and future temperature regimes on disease transmission.

  4. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Art; Teichmann, Jürgen

    This is a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place in the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872. The debate is among Sir William Thomson (later Kelvin), T.H. Huxley (Darwin's Bulldog), Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. In 1862 Thomson published his celebrated and widely studied The Secular Cooling of the Earth that raised the post-Darwinian debate of the age of the earth above the level of popular controversy. He entered the debate with all the arrogance of a newly established science of the century, namely the recently drafted laws of thermodynamics. The debate is partly based on a lively exchange of comments and arguments that occurred between T.H. Huxley and William Thomson, starting in 1868, when Thomson addressed the Glasgow Geological Society. This long public discussion also involved the ideas and the work of geologist Charles Lyell and those of the celebrated German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz. The confrontation is between the unyielding physicists and the insecure biologists and geologists who required a much longer time for the age of the earth than the physicists were prepared to give them. However, the debate ends on a conciliatory note, suggesting that perhaps Sir William's storehouse of creation may contain a hereto undiscovered source of energy that is more bountiful than gravitational energy.

  5. ZIRCONIUM, BARIUM, LANTHANUM, AND EUROPIUM ABUNDANCES IN OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Heather R.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight increase with increasing cluster age, although with marginal statistical significance. Ratios of [s/r]-process abundances, [Ba/Eu] and [La/Eu], however, show more clearly the increasing efficiency of s-process relative to r-process enrichment in open cluster chemical evolution, with significant increases among younger clusters. Last, cluster neutron-capture element abundances appear to be independent of Galactocentric distance. We conclude that a homogeneous analysis of a larger sample of open clusters is needed to resolve the apparent discrepant conclusions between different studies regarding s-process element abundance trends with age to better inform models of galactic chemical evolution.

  6. Dramatic effects of speech task on motor and linguistic planning in severely dysfluent parkinsonian speech

    PubMed Central

    Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana; Cameron, Krista; Sidtis, John J.

    2015-01-01

    In motor speech disorders, dysarthric features impacting intelligibility, articulation, fluency, and voice emerge more saliently in conversation than in repetition, reading, or singing. A role of the basal ganglia in these task discrepancies has been identified. Further, more recent studies of naturalistic speech in basal ganglia dysfunction have revealed that formulaic language is more impaired than novel language. This descriptive study extends these observations to a case of severely dysfluent dysarthria due to a parkinsonian syndrome. Dysfluencies were quantified and compared for conversation, two forms of repetition, reading, recited speech, and singing. Other measures examined phonetic inventories, word forms, and formulaic language. Phonetic, syllabic, and lexical dysfluencies were more abundant in conversation than in other task conditions. Formulaic expressions in conversation were reduced compared to normal speakers. A proposed explanation supports the notion that the basal ganglia contribute to formulation of internal models for execution of speech. PMID:22774929

  7. Urban Warming Drives Insect Pest Abundance on Street Trees

    PubMed Central

    Meineke, Emily K.; Dunn, Robert R.; Sexton, Joseph O.; Frank, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within cities. Here we show that the abundance of a common insect pest is positively related to temperature even when controlling for other habitat characteristics. The scale insect Parthenolecanium quercifex was 13 times more abundant on willow oak trees in the hottest parts of Raleigh, NC, in the southeastern United States, than in cooler areas, though parasitism rates were similar. We further separated the effects of heat from those of natural enemies and plant quality in a greenhouse reciprocal transplant experiment. P. quercifex collected from hot urban trees became more abundant in hot greenhouses than in cool greenhouses, whereas the abundance of P. quercifex collected from cooler urban trees remained low in hot and cool greenhouses. Parthenolecanium quercifex living in urban hot spots succeed with warming, and they do so because some demes have either acclimatized or adapted to high temperatures. Our results provide the first evidence that heat can be a key driver of insect pest outbreaks on urban trees. Since urban warming is similar in magnitude to global warming predicted in the next 50 years, pest abundance on city trees may foreshadow widespread outbreaks as natural forests also grow warmer. PMID:23544087

  8. Urban warming drives insect pest abundance on street trees.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Emily K; Dunn, Robert R; Sexton, Joseph O; Frank, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within cities. Here we show that the abundance of a common insect pest is positively related to temperature even when controlling for other habitat characteristics. The scale insect Parthenolecanium quercifex was 13 times more abundant on willow oak trees in the hottest parts of Raleigh, NC, in the southeastern United States, than in cooler areas, though parasitism rates were similar. We further separated the effects of heat from those of natural enemies and plant quality in a greenhouse reciprocal transplant experiment. P. quercifex collected from hot urban trees became more abundant in hot greenhouses than in cool greenhouses, whereas the abundance of P. quercifex collected from cooler urban trees remained low in hot and cool greenhouses. Parthenolecanium quercifex living in urban hot spots succeed with warming, and they do so because some demes have either acclimatized or adapted to high temperatures. Our results provide the first evidence that heat can be a key driver of insect pest outbreaks on urban trees. Since urban warming is similar in magnitude to global warming predicted in the next 50 years, pest abundance on city trees may foreshadow widespread outbreaks as natural forests also grow warmer. PMID:23544087

  9. Abundance Gradients in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato De Alencar

    This dissertation presents the analysis of spatially resolved ASCA satellite X-ray spectra for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, Abell 2199, Abell 3571 and Abell 1060). The abundance distributions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571 are shown to be centrally enhanced. The distribution of elemental abundance ratios, combined with calculations of supernovae rates, shows that the central abundance enhancement in these galaxy clusters is dominated by supernova, Type 1a iron, while the outer parts are dominated by supernovae Type II iron and the most likely mechanism proposed to produce this central iron is ram-pressure stripping, rather than accumulated stellar mass loss from the central dominant galaxy. At least 50% (by mass) of the iron in the central regions is from supernovae Type Ia, varying slightly from cluster to cluster. Although the analysis of Abell 1060 reveals no significant central abundance enhancement, supernovae Type Ia are shown to contribute significantly to the iron content of the central regions. However, accumulated stellar mass loss from the two central dominant galaxies in this cluster can account for all of the supernovae Type la iron in the central regions. The nickel to iron abundance ratio shows that delayed detonation explosion models for supernovae Type la are inconsistent with the observed abundance ratios in the inner regions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571. A comparison of the distributions of iron mass and the luminosity of early type galaxies in four clusters, three of them having central abundance enhancements (Virgo, Abell 496 and Centaurus) and one having a flat abundance distribution (Coma), indicates that the iron mass traces the luminosity of early type galaxies in abundance gradient clusters better than in flat abundance clusters. This suggests that abundance gradients can be washed out by cluster mergers.

  10. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2012-03-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 ± 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  11. Minimum Dust Abundances for Planetesimal Formation via Secular Gravitational Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Taku; Ida, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    We estimate minimum dust abundances required for secular gravitational instability (SGI) to operate at the midplane dust layer of protoplanetary disks. For SGI to be a viable process, the growth time of the instability T grow must be shorter than the radial drift time of the dust T drift. The growth time depends on the turbulent diffusion parameter α because the modes with short wavelengths are stabilized by turbulent diffusion. Assuming that turbulence is excited via the Kelvin-Helmholtz or streaming instabilities in the dust layer, and that its strength is controlled by the energy supply rate from dust accretion, we estimate the diffusion parameter and the growth time of the instability. The condition T grow < T drift requires that the dust abundance must be greater than a critical abundance Z min, which is a function of the Toomre parameter Qg and the aspect ratio hg /r of the gas disk. For a wide range of parameter space, the required dust abundance is less than 0.1. A slight increase in dust abundance opens a possible route for the dust to directly collapse to planetesimals.

  12. ENHANCED ABUNDANCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES OF THE PEGASUS I CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-03-20

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 {+-} 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  13. The Dramatic Effects of C-S-O-H-Cl on the Melt-Fluid Partitioning of Cl and the Challenge of Accurately Modeling Cl Concentrations of Evolving Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. D.; Sintoni, M. F.; de Vivo, B.

    2007-12-01

    New experimental constraints on the distribution of Cl between Vesuvius phonolite melt and H2O-, CO2-, SO2-, and Cl-bearing vapor, vapor plus saline liquid, or saline liquid have been determined at 200 MPa and 900°C. Some experiments involve melts saturated in all four volatile components. The addition of small quantities of SO2, CO2, and SO2 plus CO2 to fluids dominated by water and alkali chlorides causes dramatic reductions in DXCl (mole fraction Cl in fluid(s)/mole fraction Cl in silicate melt). Experiments with XCO2fluid of 0.15 or XSO2fluid of 0.15 are characterized by values of DXCl that are an order of magnitude lower than those of S- and C-free runs. This observation has important consequences for open systems that exsolve CO2- and/or SO2-enriched fluids "early" in the chemical differentiation of magma. Extrapolation of our experimental results to other pressures and for other melt compositions indicates that CO2- and/or SO2-bearing fluids will not sequester significant abundances of Cl from magma. Thus, CO2- and/or SO2-enriched fluids that exsolve and escape "early" from magma will not dramatically alter the magmatic Cl content. This is consistent with the oft-quoted, general degassing order of: C (first), S, Cl, and H2O (last) associated with decreasing pressure. To apply these new partitioning data to models of the exsolution and chemical evolution of magmatic fluids, they must be integrated with experimental constraints on other parameters that also strongly influence the distribution of Cl between melts and fluids (e.g., pressure, temperature, melt composition, and the Cl content of the bulk system). Expressed as DXCl, published values for Cl partitioning range from 20 (with felsic melts) to ca. 0.4 (with mafic melts), but DXCl is a complex function of these parameters. For example, DXCl increases by an order of magnitude as temperature decreases from 1000° to 800°C with vapor-saturated felsic melts at 200 MPa. Conversely, DXCl decreases by an

  14. New Radar Altimeter Missions are Providing a Dramatically Sharper Image of Global Marine Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Müller, D.; Garcia, E.; Matthews, K. J.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zaron, E.; Zhang, S.; Bassett, D.; Francis, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine gravity, derived from satellite radar altimetry, is a powerful tool for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. The ability to infer seafloor tectonics from space was first demonstrated in 1978 using Seasat altimeter data but the spatial coverage was incomplete because of the short three-month lifetime of the satellite. Most ocean altimeters have repeat ground tracks with spacings of hundreds of kilometers so they do not resolve tectonic structures. Adequate altimeter coverage became available in 1995 when the United States Navy declassified the Geosat radar altimeter data and the ERS-1 altimeter completed a 1-year mapping phase. These mid-1990's altimeter-derived images of the ocean basins remained static for 15 years because there were no new non-repeat altimeter missions. This situation changed dramatically in 2010 when CryoSat-2, with its advanced radar altimeter, was launched into a non-repeat orbit and continues to collect data until perhaps 2020. In addition the Jason-1 altimeter was placed into a 14-month geodetic phase at the end of its lifetime. More recently the 1.5 times higher precision measurements from the AltiKa altimeter aboard the SARAL spacecraft began to drift away from its 35-day repeat trackline. The Chinese HY-2 altimeter is scheduled to begin a dense mapping phase in early 2016. Moreover in 2020 we may enjoy significantly higher resolution maps of the ocean basins from the planned SWOT altimeter mission with its advanced swath mapping ability. All of this new data will provide a much sharper image of the tectonics of the deep ocean basins and continental margins. During this talk we will tour of the new tectonic structures revealed by CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 and speculate on the tectonic views of the ocean basins in 2020 and beyond.

  15. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  16. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  17. Response of rare, common and abundant bacterioplankton to anthropogenic perturbations in a Mediterranean coastal site.

    PubMed

    Baltar, Federico; Palovaara, Joakim; Vila-Costa, Maria; Salazar, Guillem; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Marrasé, Cèlia; Gasol, Josep M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-06-01

    Bacterioplankton communities are made up of a small set of abundant taxa and a large number of low-abundant organisms (i.e. 'rare biosphere'). Despite the critical role played by bacteria in marine ecosystems, it remains unknown how this large diversity of organisms are affected by human-induced perturbations, or what controls the responsiveness of rare compared to abundant bacteria. We studied the response of a Mediterranean bacterioplankton community to two anthropogenic perturbations (i.e. nutrient enrichment and/or acidification) in two mesocosm experiments (in winter and summer). Nutrient enrichment increased the relative abundance of some operational taxonomic units (OTUs), e.g. Polaribacter, Tenacibaculum, Rhodobacteraceae and caused a relative decrease in others (e.g. Croceibacter). Interestingly, a synergistic effect of acidification and nutrient enrichment was observed on specific OTUs (e.g. SAR86). We analyzed the OTUs that became abundant at the end of the experiments and whether they belonged to the rare (<0.1% of relative abundance), the common (0.1-1.0% of relative abundance) or the abundant (>1% relative abundance) fractions. Most of the abundant OTUs at the end of the experiments were abundant, or at least common, in the original community of both experiments, suggesting that ecosystem alterations do not necessarily call for rare members to grow. PMID:26032602

  18. Dramatic variability of the carbonate system of the coastal ocean is regulated by physical and biogeochemical processes on multiple timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Z. I.; Hunt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from anthropogenic sources is acidifying marine environments with potentially dramatic implications for the physical, chemical and biological functioning of these ecosystems. If current trends continue, mean ocean pH is expected to decrease by ~0.2 units over the next ~50 years. Yet, at the same time there is substantial spatial and temporal variability in pH and other carbon system parameters in the ocean resulting in regions that already exceed long term projected pH changes, suggesting that short-term variability is an important layer of complexity on top of long term acidification. Thus, in order to develop predictions of future climate change impacts including ocean acidification, there is a critical need to characterize the natural range and variability of the marine CO2 system and the mechanisms responsible for this variability. Here we examine pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) variability at time intervals spanning 1 hour to >1 year in a dynamic coastal marine system to quantify variability of the carbon system at multiple time scales. Daily and seasonal variability of the carbon system is largely driven by temperature, alkalinity and the balance between primary production and respiration, but high frequency variability (hours to days) is further influenced by water mass movement (e.g. tides) and stochastic events (e.g. storms). Both annual variability (~0.3 units) and diurnal variability (~0.1 units) in coastal ocean acidity are similar in magnitude to long term projections associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 and their drivers highlight the importance of characterizing the complete carbonate system (and not just pH). Short term variability of ocean carbon parameters may already exert significant pressure on some coastal marine ecosystems with implications for ecology, biogeochemistry and evolution and this shorter term variability layers additive effects and complexity, including extreme values, on

  19. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  20. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  1. Trends in nutrient concentrations in Latvian rivers and the response to the dramatic change in agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålnacke, P.; Grimvall, A.; Libiseller, C.; Laznik, M.; Kokorite, I.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years, the use of fertilisers in the Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) has decreased at an unprecedented rate. The import of mineral fertilisers and feed stuff became almost non-existent, and extensive slaughtering of livestock reduced the amount of manure. In Latvia, the purchase of mineral fertilisers decreased by a factor of 15 between 1987 and 1996 and the number of livestock decreased with a factor of almost 4 during the same time period. Such abrupt and comprehensive changes in land use have never before occurred in the history of modern European agriculture. Here, the impact that this dramatic reduction has had on concentrations of nutrients in Latvian rivers is examined. To discern temporal changes, statistical analyses were undertaken on time series of nutrient concentrations and relationships between concentrations and runoff at 12 sampling sites in ten Latvian rivers covering drainage areas from 334 to 64,000 km 2. Considering the study period 1987-1998, only four of the 12 sites showed statistically significant downward trends (one-sided test at the 5% level) in the dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN=NO 3-N+NO 2-N+NH 4-N) data. There are probably two main explanations for the weak DIN trends. Firstly, long water-transit times in the soilwater and groundwater may have caused substantial time lag between changes in input and output of nitrate in the studied catchments. Secondly, the loss of DIN might have been dominated by mineralisation of large pools of organic nitrogen that have accumulated over several years. These inferences are supported by (i) a hydrograph recession analysis and (ii) indications of DIN transformation processes, presumably denitrification, in smaller streams and channels, based on measurements in small agricultural catchments (1-4 km 2) in Estonia and Latvia. Formal testing of trends in phosphorus data revealed that marked drops occurred in riverine concentrations at six sites in 1987-1998. A joint analysis

  2. Brown carbon aerosol in the North American continental troposphere: sources, abundance, and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Scheuer, E.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Ziemba, L. D.; Thornhill, K. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Devi, J. J.; Bergin, M.; Perring, A. E.; Markovic, M. Z.; Schwarz, J. P.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical components of organic aerosol (OA) selectively absorb light at short wavelengths. In this study, the prevalence, sources, and optical importance of this so-called brown carbon (BrC) aerosol component are investigated throughout the North American continental tropospheric column during a summer of extensive biomass burning. Spectrophotometric absorption measurements on extracts of bulk aerosol samples collected from an aircraft over the central USA were analyzed to directly quantify BrC abundance. BrC was found to be prevalent throughout the 1 to 12 km altitude measurement range, with dramatic enhancements in biomass-burning plumes. BrC to black carbon (BC) ratios, under background tropospheric conditions, increased with altitude, consistent with a corresponding increase in the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) determined from a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The sum of inferred BC absorption and measured BrC absorption at 365 nm was within 3 % of the measured PSAP absorption for background conditions and 22 % for biomass burning. A radiative transfer model showed that BrC absorption reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) aerosol forcing by ~ 20 % in the background troposphere. Extensive radiative model simulations applying this study background tropospheric conditions provided a look-up chart for determining radiative forcing efficiencies of BrC as a function of a surface-measured BrC : BC ratio and single scattering albedo (SSA). The chart is a first attempt to provide a tool for better assessment of brown carbon's forcing effect when one is limited to only surface data. These results indicate that BrC is an important contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  3. Bumble bee nest abundance, foraging distance, and host-plant reproduction: implications for management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Geib, Jennifer C; Strange, James P; Galenj, Candace

    2015-04-01

    here (nest abundance, forager abundance, and foraging distance) could increase the usefulness of foraging worker inventories in nionitoring, managing, and conserving pollinator populations. PMID:26214921

  4. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide is an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance and protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yossan-Var; Abad, Catalina; Lopez, Robert; Dong, Hongmei; Liu, Shen; Lee, Alice; Gomariz, Rosa P; Leceta, Javier; Waschek, James A

    2009-02-10

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely expressed neuropeptide originally discovered in the hypothalamus. It closely resembles vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide well known to inhibit macrophage activity, promote Th2-type responses, and enhance regulatory T cell (Treg) production. Recent studies have shown that administration of PACAP, like VIP, can attenuate dramatically the clinical and pathological features of murine models of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and collagen-induced arthritis. However, specific roles (if any) of endogenous VIP and PACAP in the protection against autoimmune diseases have not been explored. Here, we subjected PACAP-deficient mice to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(35-55))-induced EAE. MOG immunization of PACAP-deficient mice triggered heightened clinical and pathological manifestations of EAE compared to wild-type mice. The increased sensitivity was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6, IFN-gamma, IL-12p35, IL-23p19, and IL-17), chemokines (MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1alpha/CCL3, and RANTES/CCL5), and chemotactic factor receptors (CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5), but downregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta) in the spinal cord. Moreover, the abundance of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in lymph nodes and levels of FoxP3 mRNA in the spinal cord were also diminished. The reduction in Tregs was associated with increased proliferation and decreased TGF-beta secretion in lymph node cultures stimulated with MOG. These results demonstrate that endogenous PACAP provides protection in EAE and identify PACAP as an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance after inflammation. PMID:19190179

  5. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  6. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly reflect population sizes and trends. This study compares capture-mark-recapture (absolute abundance) and count-index (relative abundance) monitoring methods in three species (Maculinea nausithous and Iolana iolas: Lycaenidae; Minois dryas: Satyridae) in contrasted habitat types. We demonstrate that intraspecific variability in individual detectability under standard monitoring conditions is probably the rule rather than the exception, which questions the reliability of count-based indices to estimate and compare specific population abundance. Our results suggest that the accuracy of count-based methods depends heavily on the ecology and behavior of the target species, as well as on the type of habitat in which surveys take place. Monitoring programs designed to assess the abundance and trends in butterfly populations should incorporate a measure of detectability. We discuss the relative advantages and inconveniences of current monitoring methods and analytical approaches with respect to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability. PMID:22859980

  7. Assessing introduction risk using species' rank-abundance distributions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Farrah T; Bradie, Johanna; Briski, Elizabeta; Bailey, Sarah A; Simard, Nathalie; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2015-01-22

    Mixed-species assemblages are often unintentionally introduced into new ecosystems. Analysing how assemblage structure varies during transport may provide insights into how introduction risk changes before propagules are released. Characterization of introduction risk is typically based on assessments of colonization pressure (CP, the number of species transported) and total propagule pressure (total PP, the total abundance of propagules released) associated with an invasion vector. Generally, invasion potential following introduction increases with greater CP or total PP. Here, we extend these assessments using rank-abundance distributions to examine how CP : total PP relationships change temporally in ballast water of ocean-going ships. Rank-abundance distributions and CP : total PP patterns varied widely between trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific voyages, with the latter appearing to pose a much lower risk than the former. Responses also differed by taxonomic group, with invertebrates experiencing losses mainly in total PP, while diatoms and dinoflagellates sustained losses mainly in CP. In certain cases, open-ocean ballast water exchange appeared to increase introduction risk by uptake of new species or supplementation of existing ones. Our study demonstrates that rank-abundance distributions provide new insights into the utility of CP and PP in characterizing introduction risk. PMID:25473007

  8. Assessing introduction risk using species’ rank-abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Farrah T.; Bradie, Johanna; Briski, Elizabeta; Bailey, Sarah A.; Simard, Nathalie; MacIsaac, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species assemblages are often unintentionally introduced into new ecosystems. Analysing how assemblage structure varies during transport may provide insights into how introduction risk changes before propagules are released. Characterization of introduction risk is typically based on assessments of colonization pressure (CP, the number of species transported) and total propagule pressure (total PP, the total abundance of propagules released) associated with an invasion vector. Generally, invasion potential following introduction increases with greater CP or total PP. Here, we extend these assessments using rank-abundance distributions to examine how CP : total PP relationships change temporally in ballast water of ocean-going ships. Rank-abundance distributions and CP : total PP patterns varied widely between trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific voyages, with the latter appearing to pose a much lower risk than the former. Responses also differed by taxonomic group, with invertebrates experiencing losses mainly in total PP, while diatoms and dinoflagellates sustained losses mainly in CP. In certain cases, open-ocean ballast water exchange appeared to increase introduction risk by uptake of new species or supplementation of existing ones. Our study demonstrates that rank-abundance distributions provide new insights into the utility of CP and PP in characterizing introduction risk. PMID:25473007

  9. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  10. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  11. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrnakis, A.; Almpanis, E.; Constantoudis, V.; Papanikolaou, N.; Gogolides, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min-1) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices.

  12. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance.

    PubMed

    Smyrnakis, A; Almpanis, E; Constantoudis, V; Papanikolaou, N; Gogolides, E

    2015-02-27

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min(-1)) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices. PMID:25648611

  13. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona’nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74–2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74–1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90–2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona’nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately −0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from −0.01 ± 0.15 to −0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  14. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona'nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74-2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74-1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90-2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona'nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately -0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from -0.01 ± 0.15 to -0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  15. Correlation between lithium abundances and ages of solar twin stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Marília; Nissen, Poul E.; Meléndez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We want to determine the lithium abundances of solar twin stars as a function of stellar age to provide constraints for stellar evolutions models and to investigate whether there is a connection between low Li abundance and the occurrence of planets. Methods: For a sample of 21 solar twins observed with the HARPS spectrograph at high spectral resolution (R ≃ 115.000) and very high signal-to-noise ratio (600 ≤ S/N ≤ 2400), precise lithium abundances were obtained by spectral synthesis of the Li i 6707.8 Å line and compared to stellar ages, masses, and metallicities determined from a spectroscopic analysis of the same set of HARPS spectra. Results: We show that for the large majority of the solar twins there is a strong correlation between lithium abundance and stellar age. As the age increases from 1 to 9 Gyr, the Li abundance decreases by a factor of ~50. The relation agrees fairly well with predictions from non-standard stellar evolution models of Li destruction at the bottom of the upper convection zone. Two stars deviate from the relation by having Li abundances enhanced by a factor of ~10, which may be due to planet engulfment. On the other hand, we find no indication of a link between planet hosting stars and enhanced lithium depletion. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory, (observing programs 072.C-0488, 183.C-0972, 188.C-0265, and 0.88.C-0323).

  16. Mangroves Enhance Reef Fish Abundance at the Caribbean Regional Scale

    PubMed Central

    Serafy, Joseph E.; Shideler, Geoffrey S.; Araújo, Rafael J.; Nagelkerken, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies conducted at the scale of islands, or small sections of continental coastlines, have suggested that mangrove habitats serve to enhance fish abundances on coral reefs, mainly by providing nursery grounds for several ontogenetically-migrating species. However, evidence of such enhancement at a regional scale has not been reported, and recently, some researchers have questioned the mangrove-reef subsidy effect. In the present study, using two different regression approaches, we pursued two questions related to mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale: (1) Are reef fish abundances limited by mangrove forest area?; and (2) Are mean reef fish abundances proportional to mangrove forest area after taking human population density and latitude into account? Specifically, we tested for Caribbean-wide mangrove forest area effects on the abundances of 12 reef fishes that have been previously characterized as “mangrove-dependent”. Analyzed were data from an ongoing, long-term (20-year) citizen-scientist fish monitoring program; coastal human population censuses; and several wetland forest information sources. Quantile regression results supported the notion that mangrove forest area limits the abundance of eight of the 12 fishes examined. Linear mixed-effects regression results, which considered potential human (fishing and habitat degradation) and latitudinal influences, suggested that average reef fish densities of at least six of the 12 focal fishes were directly proportional to mangrove forest area. Recent work questioning the mangrove-reef fish subsidy effect likely reflects a failure to: (1) focus analyses on species that use mangroves as nurseries, (2) consider more than the mean fish abundance response to mangrove forest extent; and/or (3) quantitatively account for potentially confounding human impacts, such as fishing pressure and habitat degradation. Our study is the first to demonstrate at a large regional scale (i.e., the Wider

  17. Mangroves Enhance Reef Fish Abundance at the Caribbean Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Serafy, Joseph E; Shideler, Geoffrey S; Araújo, Rafael J; Nagelkerken, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies conducted at the scale of islands, or small sections of continental coastlines, have suggested that mangrove habitats serve to enhance fish abundances on coral reefs, mainly by providing nursery grounds for several ontogenetically-migrating species. However, evidence of such enhancement at a regional scale has not been reported, and recently, some researchers have questioned the mangrove-reef subsidy effect. In the present study, using two different regression approaches, we pursued two questions related to mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale: (1) Are reef fish abundances limited by mangrove forest area?; and (2) Are mean reef fish abundances proportional to mangrove forest area after taking human population density and latitude into account? Specifically, we tested for Caribbean-wide mangrove forest area effects on the abundances of 12 reef fishes that have been previously characterized as "mangrove-dependent". Analyzed were data from an ongoing, long-term (20-year) citizen-scientist fish monitoring program; coastal human population censuses; and several wetland forest information sources. Quantile regression results supported the notion that mangrove forest area limits the abundance of eight of the 12 fishes examined. Linear mixed-effects regression results, which considered potential human (fishing and habitat degradation) and latitudinal influences, suggested that average reef fish densities of at least six of the 12 focal fishes were directly proportional to mangrove forest area. Recent work questioning the mangrove-reef fish subsidy effect likely reflects a failure to: (1) focus analyses on species that use mangroves as nurseries, (2) consider more than the mean fish abundance response to mangrove forest extent; and/or (3) quantitatively account for potentially confounding human impacts, such as fishing pressure and habitat degradation. Our study is the first to demonstrate at a large regional scale (i.e., the Wider

  18. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  19. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of O, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  20. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  1. Abundance variations in solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    Abundance variations are examined in a large number of events including smaller nonimpulsive events not previously considered. Whereas a comparison at equal energy per nucleon is appropriate for heavy ions this is not the case when including H. The best representation is either in terms of rigidity or energy per charge depending on the type of event under consideration. For the majority of large events, where particles are primarily accelerated at interplanetary shocks, if abundances relative to H are evaluated at equal energy per charge then abundance ratios are compatible with solar wind values and spectral shapes agree. Furthermore the behavior of H is then compatible with that of other high FIP elements.

  2. Energetic particle abundances in solar electron events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive search of the ISEE 3 energetic particle data for solar electron events with associated increases in elements with atomic number Z = 6 or greater are reported. A sample of 90 such events was obtained. The events support earlier evidence of a bimodal distribution in Fe/O or, more clearly, in Fe/C. Most of the electron events belong to the group that is Fe-rich in comparison with the coronal abundance. The Fe-rich events are frequently also He-3-rich and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts and impulsive solar flares. Fe-poor events are associated with type IV bursts and with interplanetary shocks. With some exceptions, event-to-event enhancements in the heavier elements vary smoothly with Z and with Fe/C. In fact, these variations extend across the full range of events despite inferred differences in acceleration mechanism. The origin of source material in all events appears to be coronal and not photospheric.

  3. Numerical resolution limits on subhalo abundance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; White, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) inserts galaxies into dark matter only simulations of the growth of cosmic structure in a way that requires minimal assumptions about galaxy formation. A galaxy is placed at the potential minimum of each distinct self-bound subhalo with a luminosity which is a monotonically increasing function of the maximum mass (or circular velocity) attained over the subhalo's earlier history. Galaxy and subhalo properties are linked by matching model and observed luminosity functions. Simulated structures can then be compared in detail with observation, for example, through galaxy correlation statistics, group catalogues or galaxy-galaxy lensing. Robust astrophysical conclusions can be drawn from such a comparison only on scales which are unaffected by the numerical limitations of the simulation. Here, we compare results for the Millennium Simulation (MS) with subhaloes defined using the SUBFIND to those obtained applying identical analysis to the much higher resolution Millennium-II. Correlation statistics on scales between 200 and 2 Mpc converge to within 20 per cent only for subhaloes with masses at infall corresponding to at least 1000 simulation particles in the MS. Numerically converged results can be obtained to much lower infall particle number, if galaxies are followed even after their associated subhaloes have been tidally disrupted, as in most recent semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations. This allows robust comparison between simulation and observation over a wider dynamic range in mass than for a SHAM analysis which ignores such `orphan' galaxies.

  4. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Proteomics-Based Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins from Human Keratinocytes Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tackett, Alan J; Byrum, Stephanie; Avaritt, Nathan L; Sengupta, Deepanwita; Moreland, Linley W; Tchounwou, Paul B; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Arsenic is a widely distributed environmental toxicant that can cause multi-tissue pathologies. Proteomic assays allow for the identification of biological processes modulated by arsenic in diverse tissue types. Method The altered abundance of proteins from HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line exposed to arsenic was quantified using a label-free LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry workflow. Selected proteomics results were validated using western blot and RT-PCR. A functional annotation analytics strategy that included visual analytical integration of heterogeneous data sets was developed to elucidate functional categories. The annotations integrated were mainly tissue localization, biological process and gene family. Result The abundance of 173 proteins was altered in keratinocytes exposed to arsenic; in which 96 proteins had increased abundance while 77 proteins had decreased abundance. These proteins were also classified into 69 Gene Ontology biological process terms. The increased abundance of transferrin receptor protein (TFRC) was validated and also annotated to participate in response to hypoxia. A total of 33 proteins (11 increased abundance and 22 decreased abundance) were associated with 18 metabolic process terms. The Glutamate--cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the only protein annotated with the term sulfur amino acid metabolism process, had increased abundance while succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit, mitochondrial precursor (SDHB), a tumor suppressor, had decreased abundance. Conclusion A list of 173 differentially abundant proteins in response to arsenic trioxide was grouped using three major functional annotations covering tissue localization, biological process and protein families. A possible explanation for hyperpigmentation pathologies observed in arsenic toxicity is that arsenic exposure leads to increased iron uptake in the normally hypoxic human skin. The proteins mapped to metabolic process terms and

  6. Why did watermills not have a dramatic effect on the Anthropocene sediment record of the Zwalm River, Belgium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; D'Haese, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Different studies demonstrated the dramatic effects of watermills on fluvial geomorphology in the Eastern US. Damming of floodplains and milldam lakes increased sediment deposition. Several authors attribute most of the so called post settlement legacy sediment to those milldam lakes. In Europe the role of milldams in the anthropogenic increased floodplain deposition rates during the last 1000 to 2000 years has gotten little attention until now. Therefore we studied the influence of watermills on Holocene floodplain deposition in the Zwalm catchment, Belgium. The Zwalm River is located in western part of the Belgian loess belt in an undulating landscape that had intensive agriculture for most of the last 2000 years. In total 9 watermills were present along the 17 km long main channel during the 19th century, while many were also present on tributaries. Historical records date several of the mills to the 10th century AD, although they might be older, and most of them remain to some degree active today. The influence of watermills on floodplain deposits was tested through coring transects of the Holocene deposits. Detailed transects were performed pairwise upstream and downstream 5 watermills. Samples were taken for grain size analysis using laser diffraction. A possible influence on floodplain topography was tested on a 5 m resolution DTM. Holocene floodplain architecture is similar to other floodplains in the region: a basal early to mid-Holocene peat and gyttja layer is covered by a fine grained sediment layer of more than 5 m thickness. The change between both can be attributed to increased soil erosion due to human land use, and can be considered to be the local legacy sediment. Comparison of transects upstream and downstream mills shows no significant difference in total Holocene or legacy sediment thickness. Texture analysis indicates that floodplain sediments are significant coarser downstream the mills.F Floodplains are not significant steeper around mills

  7. Dynamic simulation of vegetation abundance in a reservoir riparian zone using a sub-pixel Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhaoning; Cui, Tianxiang; Pu, Ruiliang; Lin, Chuan; Chen, Yuzhu

    2015-03-01

    Vegetation abundance is a significant indicator for measuring the coverage of plant community. It is also a fundamental data for the evaluation of a reservoir riparian zone eco-environment. In this study, a sub-pixel Markov model was introduced and applied to simulate dynamics of vegetation abundance in the Guanting Reservoir Riparian zone based on seven Landsat Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus/Operational Land Imager data acquired between 2001 and 2013. Our study extended Markov model's application from a traditional regional scale to a sub-pixel scale. Firstly, Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA) was used to obtain fractional images with a five-endmember model consisting of terrestrial plants, aquatic plants, high albedo, low albedo, and bare soil. Then, a sub-pixel transitive probability matrix was calculated. Based on the matrix, we simulated statuses of vegetation abundance in 2010 and 2013, which were compared with the results created by LSMA. Validations showed that there were only slight differences between the LSMA derived results and the simulated terrestrial plants fractional images for both 2010 and 2013, while obvious differences existed for aquatic plants fractional images, which might be attributed to a dramatically diversity of water level and water discharge between 2001 and 2013. Moreover, the sub-pixel Markov model could lead to an RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) of 0.105 and an R2 of 0.808 for terrestrial plants, and an RMSE of 0.044 and an R2 of 0.784 for aquatic plants in 2010. For the simulated results with the 2013 image, an RMSE of 0.126 and an R2 of 0.768 could be achieved for terrestrial plants, and an RMSE of 0.086 and an R2 of 0.779 could be yielded for aquatic plants. These results suggested that the sub-pixel Markov model could yield a reasonable result in a short period. Additionally, an analysis of dynamics of vegetation abundance from 2001 to 2020 indicated that there existed an increasing trend for the average

  8. Dramatical Impact Of Low Amounts of Swelling Clays On The Rheology Of Alpine Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardou, E.; Bowen, P.; Banfill, P. G.; Boivin, P.

    2004-12-01

    Field observations show that the role and amount of swelling clays in the complex hard suspensions of alpine debris flow type were underestimated (see Boivin et al., this session). This work aims at exploring to which extent the swelling clay content influences the global rheology of a flow of rock grains from which the size spectrum extends from clays to gravel. We made a sample from calibrated materials with a grain size distribution similar to that of a viscoplastic debris flow (Bardou et al., 2003). Four replicates were made with the same grading curve. The clay content of the samples was 2% dry weight only, and different 2:1 swelling clay to 1:1 clay ratio were used. The swelling clay ratio (SCR) was calculated as the percentage of 2:1 clay in the clay fraction of the bulk samples. The 1:1 clay was (industrial) kaolinite and the 2:1 clay was a natural soil smectite. The smectite content in the bulk sample ranged from 0% to 2% dry weight, corresponding to SCR ranging from 0 to 80%. The four prepared samples were sheared in the large-size apparatus fully described in Tattersall and Banfill (1983). This apparatus is based on the measure of the torque necessary to rotate an impeller immersed in the sample. The impeller has the form of an "H" and moves in a plane according to two parallel axes. The observed behaviour were very contrasted. The sample with SCR=0 was poorly sensitive to changes in the solid concentration, in contrast to the three samples with SCR>0. Moreover, a small change in the SCR of the clay fraction induced a dramatic change of the behaviour of the mixture. For SCR=0, only little changes in the rheological parameters of the bulk samples were observed with respect to changes in the solid concentration. On the contrary the rheological parameters of the bulk samples with SCR>0, apparently followed a power law according to solid concentration. These tests carried out in the laboratory accord with observations realised on natural debris flow material

  9. The solar system abundance of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, R. D.; Rosman, K. K. R.; de Laeter, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    The elemental abundance of tin has been determined by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique for four carbonaceous chondrites, including the Cl chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna. A solar system abundance of 3.98 (normalized to Si = 10 to the 6th atoms) can be derived from these data, which is in excellent agreement with the presently accepted value. Recently, a theoretical value of 2.82 + or - 0.21 (Si = 10 to the 6th atoms) has been proposed for the abundance of tin based on an s-process nucleosynthesis model. This value is 26 percent lower than the presently accepted solar system abundance. The present data confirm the higher value for tin and indicate that a reexamination of the assumptions on which the nucleosynthetic value is based is required.

  10. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  11. SAGA: Stellar Abundances for Galatic Archeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, T.

    A tutorial for the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database is presented. This paper describes the outline of the database, reports the current status of the data compilation and known problems, and presents plans for future updates and extensions.

  12. GALA: Stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Pancino, E.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lapenna, E.

    2013-02-01

    GALA is a freely distributed Fortran code to derive the atmospheric parameters (temperature, gravity, microturbulent velocity and overall metallicity) and abundances for individual species of stellar spectra using the classical method based on the equivalent widths of metallic lines. The abundances of individual spectral lines are derived by using the WIDTH9 code developed by R. L. Kurucz. GALA is designed to obtain the best model atmosphere, by optimizing temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity, after rejecting the discrepant lines. Finally, it computes accurate internal errors for each atmospheric parameter and abundance. The code obtains chemical abundances and atmospheric parameters for large stellar samples quickly, thus making GALA an useful tool in the epoch of the multi-object spectrographs and large surveys.

  13. Abundances of Elements in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Interest in stellar coronal abundances was piqued several years ago by the launch of satellites that were able to study the compositions of coronae on stars other than the sun. Motivated by the possibility that other stellar coronae might share the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect solar abundance anomaly, we have in recent years been attempting to determine coronal element abundances in other stars. I will review these results, together with similar results reported in the literature, from a critical perspective of understanding the true uncertainties involved in the measurements. The importance of element abundances for coronal physics will be highlighted, and it will be shown that the differences in the chemical compositions of active stars allow us to draw new conclusions regarding the nature of stellar coronae and coronal heating.

  14. The abundant elements in interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the incorporation of the cosmically abundant species O, C, N, Mg, Si, Fe, and S into interstellar dust. Column densities based on Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph 3.5 km/s resolution measurements from the literature for eight individual absorbing regions toward five lines of sight are used. Corrections are applied as needed in order to account for recent improvements in oscillator strengths. In order to acquire the most accurate column densities, and check on the accuracy of the oscillator strengths, we compare column densities based on the very strong Lorentzian damped lines of C II, O I, N I, and Mg II with results for the weak lines of these species, and confirm the previously determined f-values for O I lambda 1335, C II lambda 2325, and N I lambda lambda 1159, 1160. New empirical f-values of 1.25 x 10(exp -3) and 6.25 x 10(exp -4), respectively, are derived for the Mg II weak doublet at 1239 and 1240 A. Assuming a cosmic reference abundance based on solar and B star values, we derive depletions and dust-phase abundances which suggest that more than 70% of the available Mg and Fe is incorporated into dust-grain cores, whereas only 35% of the silicon is. This implies that oxides are important constituents of the grain core population. Mg and Fe atoms are mantled onto grain cores in a ratio of 1.8 to 1, whereas approximately 4.0 Si atoms are in the mantle per Fe atom. Since Si is not expected to accrete onto silicate or graphite grains, other grain cores, perhaps oxides and/or metallic Fe, may provide mantling sites for this species. The abundances of Fe and Mg in mantles would imply that graphite grains must have a substantial coating unless oxides provide significant mantling sites for these species. The abundance of O and N in the dust phase as implied by the solar reference abundance values are difficult to reconcile with the fact that these elements are not expected to participate in mantle formation, and the 3.1 micrometer H2O ice feature is

  15. Elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy are discussed. Relative abundances of spectroscopically accessible elements of four major shower meteors and one sporadic meteor are presented. A sporadic meteor with dominant sodium radiation and an iron-deficient sporadic meteor are analyzed. Empirical and theoretical tests for self-absorption in optical meteor plasmas have been conducted. Both ionization and incomplete dissociation are found to severely deplete certain neutral atoms from meteor plasmas.

  16. Species Abundance Patterns in Complex Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Kei

    2004-10-01

    An analytic theory of species abundance patterns (SAPs) in biological networks is presented. The theory is based on multispecies replicator dynamics equivalent to the Lotka-Volterra equation, with diverse interspecies interactions. Various SAPs observed in nature are derived from a single parameter. The abundance distribution is formed like a widely observed left-skewed lognormal distribution. As the model has a general form, the result can be applied to similar patterns in other complex biological networks, e.g., gene expression.

  17. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  18. Coronae of stars with supersolar elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-05-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, ι Hor, HR 7291, τ Boo, and α Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and τ Boo no FIP effect is present, while ι Hor, HR 7291, and α Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  19. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund–Grevesse–Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  20. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.