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Sample records for abundance patterns observed

  1. Abundance patterns in the interstellar medium of early-type galaxies observed with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Konami, Saori; Matsushita, Kyoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Nagino, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 early-type galaxies, 13 ellipticals and 4 S0 galaxies, observed with Suzaku, and investigated metal abundances (O, Mg, Si, and Fe) and abundance ratios (O/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Si/Fe) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The emission from each on-source region, which is four times the effective radius, r {sub e}, is reproduced with one-temperature (1T) or two-temperature (2T) thermal plasma models as well as a multi-temperature model, using APEC plasma code version 2.0.1. The multi-temperature model gave almost the same abundances and abundance ratios with the 1T or 2T models. The weighted averages of the O, Mg, Si, and Fe abundances of all the sample galaxies derived from the multi-temperature model fits are 0.83 ± 0.04, 0.93 ± 0.03, 0.80 ± 0.02, and 0.80 ± 0.02 solar, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table by Lodders in 2003. These abundances show no significant dependence on the morphology and environment. The systematic differences in the derived metal abundances between versions 2.0.1 and 1.3.1 of the APEC plasma codes were investigated. The derived O and Mg abundances in the ISM agree with the stellar metallicity within an aperture with a radius of one r {sub e} derived from optical spectroscopy. From these results, we discuss the past and present Type Ia supernova rates and star formation histories in early-type galaxies.

  2. The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved Atomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay Cowley, Charles; Ayres, Thomas; Wahlgren, Glenn; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved atomic data. We determine abundances or upper limits for the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) from the ASTRAL project (Ayres 2010, ApJS, 187, 149). We have also used archival material from COPERNICUS (retrieved from the MAST) and from HST/GHRS, as well as the ground-based Furenlid, Westin, and Kurucz Sirius Atlas (FWK). The GHRS observations were described by Wahlgren, et al. (1993, Bull. AAS, 25, 1321). We also used the monumental study of Sirius by Klaus Kohl (1964, Zs. f. Ap. 60, 115, 1964, see also 1964, Das Spektrum des Sirius, 3100 - 8863A, Kiel thesis). Abundance determinations are based on the photospheric model of Landstreet (2011, A&A, 528, 132). The atomic data base is significantly improved since the pioneering work by Sadakane (1988, PASP, 100, 811; 1991, 103, 355). The basic source was VALD3 (http://vald.inasan.ru/~vald3/php/vald.php), supplemented for all species by the essential NIST bibliographic data base (http://physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/ASBib1/TransProbBib.cgi). We determine abundances and upper limits by synthesizing short wavelength regions around strong lines. Virtually all of the abundance/upper limit results show excesses over the solar composition of between 1 and 2 dex. This result is in general agreement with overall results for metallic line stars, though we have no information on possible severe depletions for most elements. We conclude that the mechanisms causing abundance anomalies in Sirius have not acted to produce the extreme excesses of 4 or more dex (Pt, Hg), or deficiencies (Zn) seen in many HgMn stars.CRC thanks Stefano Bagnulo for the UVESPOP Sirius spectrum. Robert Kurucz was most helpful with older Sirius UV and visual spectra.

  3. Species Abundance Patterns in Complex Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Kei

    2004-10-01

    An analytic theory of species abundance patterns (SAPs) in biological networks is presented. The theory is based on multispecies replicator dynamics equivalent to the Lotka-Volterra equation, with diverse interspecies interactions. Various SAPs observed in nature are derived from a single parameter. The abundance distribution is formed like a widely observed left-skewed lognormal distribution. As the model has a general form, the result can be applied to similar patterns in other complex biological networks, e.g., gene expression.

  4. Observing chemical abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic resonance lines of the major elements were observed in the atmospheres of a few comets, by using vacuum ultraviolet spectrographs on board rockets or orbiting observatories. Dust-to-gas ratios were also deduced for two comets through a Finson-Probstein's analysis of their dust-tail isophotes. The geometric albedo of the dust for the phase angle alpha of the observations is not accurately known but, the dust-to-gas ratio is not overly sensitive to the actual value of this albedo. Infrared observations of the dust head of some comets show that the bulk of cometary dust must be silicates, although a minor component (5-10 percent) of carbon compounds is rather likely, because of poor dielectric properties of the grains. This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that interplanetary dust probably of cometary origin, that was collected in the stratosphere by NASA-U2 Spacecraft, is chondritic in nature. Metal abundances in the head of a sungrazing comet support the chondritic hypothesis.

  5. The Abundance Ratio Pattern in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, Guy

    1995-12-01

    Non-solar abundance ratios in elliptical galaxies are readily detectable in a qualitative sense. The elements Mg, Na, and N appear overabundant compared to Ca and Fe. There is a probable variation of (Sc + V)/Ti. Abundance ratio effects are the single most serious barrier to the estimation of mean stellar ages: even more serious than the 35% model-to-model uncertainty. Isochrone grids allowing for the variation of many individual elements (He, O, C, and N at least, in addition to overall Z and alpha elements) are needed to quantitatively estimate the overabundances and mean ages of ellipticals. The tolerances for relative shifts in isochrone temperatures are tight: about 7 K if we hope for 5% accurate ages. The abundance pattern in elliptical galaxies matches neither the disk, nor the halo, nor the bulge our own Galaxy, although the bulge appears to provide the best match. This research was funded by NASA through grant HF-1066.01-94A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS AND THE EARLY ENVIRONMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Corlies, Lauren; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bryan, Greg; Tumlinson, Jason

    2013-08-20

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z = 10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can help to explain observed differences in abundance patterns today. Conversely, these differences are a signature of the inhomogeneity of metal enrichment at early times.

  7. Iridium abundance patterns across extinction boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Oliver, P.Q.; Quintana, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are measuring elemental abundances, with emphasis on high sensitivity Ir assay, across biological crisis zones in the fossil record. Samples are measured in an automated neutron activation analysis system, with radiochemical separations for the heavy Pt-group elements and Au. They are collaborating with paleontologic and stratigraphic experts to home-in on the boundaries, and to date they have performed at least one set of measurements across the following transition and extinction boundaries: Precambrian/Cambrian(Pc/C); 2 U. Cambrian biomere boundaries; the basal Ordovician; Ordovician;/Silurian; U. Devonian Frasnian/Famennian (F/F); Devonian/Miss.; Miss./Penn.; Permian/Triassic (P/Tr); Triassic/Jurassic; L. Jurassic Toarcian; Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T); and the U. Eocene. The authors work on K/T sequences that were deposited under freshwater conditions in the western interior of North America supports the Alvarez asteroid impact hypothesis. The Earth has been struck many times in the Phanerozoic by large impactors that probably have done tremendous damage to the local environment. However, to day scientists have not found any firm chemical evidence for the association of impacts with global extinctions older than the massive terminal Cretaceous event, which might have been unique in the Phanerozoic. Although they have measured a moderate Ir and Pt anomaly in the F/F boundary zone in NW Australia, their evidence indicates that these and several other elements were enriched from seawater by bacteria. Although the authors data, except for the U. Eocene, do not support the periodic comet swarm-global extinction arguments, much more work is needed to resolve this issue.

  8. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-02-23

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance-ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  9. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance–ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  10. Investigating Detailed Abundance Patterns in the Hyades Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Drake; Schuler, Simon C.

    2016-01-01

    We have derived the paramters and abundances of up to 17 elements for seven stars within the Hyades open star cluster, through an analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained via the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the 2dcoude cross-dispersed echelle spectrometer at the McDonald Observatory. Four of the stars are solar-type dwarves while three giants were also analyzed to better calculate an overall metallicity of the entire cluster. In addition, we investigated whether there are differences in various stellar abundance trends across the open cluster. Here we present the results of our abundance analysis and stellar parameter derivations of the seven stars and discuss the implications of stellar abundance patterns across star clusters. We acknowledge support provided by grant NNX12AD19G to S.C.S. from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as part of the Kepler Participating Scientist Program.

  11. Fish and Phytoplankton Exhibit Contrasting Temporal Species Abundance Patterns in a Dynamic North Temperate Lake

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Carey, Cayelan C.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of “core” (common occurrence and high abundance) and “occasional” (rare occurrence and low abundance) species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions. PMID:25651399

  12. Fish and phytoplankton exhibit contrasting temporal species abundance patterns in a dynamic north temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Carey, Cayelan C

    2015-01-01

    Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of "core" (common occurrence and high abundance) and "occasional" (rare occurrence and low abundance) species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions. PMID:25651399

  13. Helium abundance variations in the solar wind: Observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Mccomas, D.J.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1995-06-01

    The abundance of helium in the solar wind averages approximately 4% but has been observed to vary by more than two orders of magnitude from 0.1 to 30%. Physical processes responsible for this variability are still not clearly understood. Previous work has shown a correlation between low He abundance and coronal streamer plasma and between high He abundance and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The authors now have out-of-ecliptic data on helium in the solar wind from the plasma experiment aboard Ulysses. Tentative results show that the average high-latitude helium concentration is comparable to the in-ecliptic value for the present phase of the solar cycle, that excursions of the hour-averaged abundance very seldom fall outside the range 2.5 to 6.5%, and that there seems to be very little abundance enhancement associated with CMEs encountered at latitudes greater than 30 deg as opposed to the situation commonly encountered with in-ecliptic CMEs. In addition, preliminary observations of a single CME by both ISEE (in-ecliptic) and Ulysses (out-of-ecliptic) show a considerable He enhancement at ISEE with little or no perturbation of the average value at Ulysses` location. This paper will first present new results from the Ulysses mission up to the time of the meeting on the average abundance of helium in the solar wind as a function of spacecraft position, and will then focus on the out-of-ecliptic results including latitudinal abundance variations and observations of abundance enhancements (or lack thereof) in high-latitude CMEs.

  14. Weak Coherence in Abundance Patterns Between Bacterial Classes and Their Constituent OTUs Along a Regulated River

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Salazar, Guillem; Logares, Ramiro; Proia, Lorenzo; Gasol, Josep M.; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Deductions about the ecology of high taxonomic bacterial ranks (i.e., phylum, class, order) are often based on their abundance patterns, yet few studies have quantified how accurately variations in abundance of these bacterial groups represent the dynamics of the taxa within them. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we investigated whether the changes in abundance of six dominant bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Beta-/Alpha-/Gamma-proteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria) along a large dam-regulated river are reflected by those of their constituent Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs; 97% similarity level). The environmental impact generated by the reservoirs promoted clear compositional shifts in all bacterial classes that resulted from changes in the abundance of individual OTUs rather than from the appearance of new taxa along the river. Abundance patterns at the class level represented the dynamics of only a small but variable proportion of their constituting OTUs, which were not necessarily the most abundant ones. Within most classes, we detected sub-groups of OTUs showing contrasting responses to reservoir-induced environmental changes. Overall, we show that the patterns observed at the class level fail to capture the dynamics of a significant fraction of their constituent members, calling for caution when the ecological attributes of high-ranks are to be interpreted. PMID:26635761

  15. Lithium abundances in sunspots from observations made in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskii, E. A.; Tarashchuk, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    Spectra of sunspots in the regions of the Li I 6708 Å line and certain Fe I and Ca I lines are presented. The observations wee carried out in August 2014 using a CCD array mounted at the BST-2 telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Sunspot models based on the observed Fe I and Ca I line profiles have been computed, and used together with the observed Li I 6708 Å profiles to determine the lithium abundances. The mean lithium abundance for the sunspots observed on August 26, 2014 is log A(Li) = 1.2 (on a scale for which log A(H) = 12.0). Sunspot spectra obtained on October 8, 2011 were also analyzed, yielding log A(Li) = 1.02.

  16. Using landscape ecology to test hypotheses about large-scale abundance patterns in migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flather, C.H.; Sauer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that Neotropical migrant birds may be undergoing widespread declines due to land use activities on the breeding grounds has been examined primarily by synthesizing results from local studies. Growing concern for the cumulative influence of land use activities on ecological systems has heightened the need for large-scale studies to complement what has been observed at local scales. We investigated possible landscape effects on Neotropical migrant bird populations for the eastern United States by linking two large-scale inventories designed to monitor breeding-bird abundances and land use patterns. The null hypothesis of no relation between landscape structure and Neotropical migrant abundance was tested by correlating measures of landscape structure with bird abundance, while controlling for the geographic distance among samples. Neotropical migrants as a group were more 'sensitive' to landscape structure than either temperate migrants or permanent residents. Neotropical migrants tended to be more abundant in landscapes with a greater proportion of forest and wetland habitats, fewer edge habitats, large forest patches, and with forest habitats well dispersed throughout the scene. Permanent residents showed few correlations with landscape structure and temperate migrants were associated with habitat diversity and edge attributes rather than with the amount, size, and dispersion of forest habitats. The association between Neotropical migrant abundance and forest fragmentation differed among physiographic strata, suggesting that land-scape context affects observed relations between bird abundance and landscape structure. Finally, associations between landscape structure and temporal trends in Neotropical migrant abundance were negatively correlated with forest habitats. These results suggest that extrapolation of patterns observed in some landscapes is not likely to hold regionally, and that conservation policies must consider the variation in landscape

  17. Eternal observers and bubble abundances in the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2006-08-01

    We study a class of “landscape” models in which all vacua have positive energy density, so that inflation never ends and bubbles of different vacua are endlessly “recycled.” In such models, each geodesic observer passes through an infinite sequence of bubbles, visiting all possible kinds of vacua. The bubble abundance pj can then be defined as the frequency at which bubbles of type j are visited along the worldline of an observer. We compare this definition with the recently proposed general prescription for pj and show that they give identical results.

  18. Characterizing Abundances of Volatiles in Comets Through Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Coulson, Iain; Haynes, Lillian; Stenborg, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there have been complimentary observations from multiple facilities to try to unravel the chemical complexity of comets. Incorporating results from various techniques, including: single-dish millimeter wavelength observations, interferometers, and/or IR spectroscopy, one can gain further insight into the abundances, production rates, distributions, and formation mechanisms of molecules in these objects [I]. Such studies have provided great detail towards molecules with a-typical chemistries, such as H2CO [2]. We report spectral observations of C/2007 N3 (Lulin), C/2009 R1 (McNaught), 103P/Hartley 2, and C/2009 P1 (Garradd) with the Arizona Radio Observatory's SMT and 12-m telescopes, as well as the NRAO Greenbank telescope and IRTF-CSHELL. Multiple parent volatiles (HCN, CH3OH, CO, CH4, C2H6, and H2O) as well as a number of daughter products (CS and OH) have been detected in these objects. We will present a comparison of molecular abundances in these comets to those observed in others, supporting a long-term effort of building a comet taxonomy based on composition. Previous work has revealed a range of abundances of parent species (from "organics-poor" to "organics-rich") with respect to water among comets [3,4,5], however the statistics are still poorly constrained and interpretations of the observed compositional diversity are uncertain. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program, NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, and the NASA Astrobiology Program.

  19. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS REVEAL ANOMALOUS MOLECULAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnentrucker, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Indriolo, N.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Lis, D. C.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2013-01-20

    We report the Herschel detections of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and para-water (p-H{sub 2}O) in gas intercepting the sight lines to two well-studied molecular clouds in the vicinity of the Sgr A complex: G-0.02-0.07 (the {sup +}50 km s{sup -1} cloud{sup )} and G-0.13-0.08 (the {sup +}20 km s{sup -1} cloud{sup )}. Toward both sight lines, HF and water absorption components are detected over a wide range of velocities covering {approx}250 km s{sup -1}. For all velocity components with V{sub LSR} > -85 km s{sup -1}, we find that the HF and water abundances are consistent with those measured toward other sight lines probing the Galactic disk gas. The velocity components with V{sub LSR} {<=} -85 km s{sup -1}, which are known to trace gas residing within {approx}200 pc of the Galactic center, however, exhibit water vapor abundances with respect to HF at least a factor three higher than those found in the Galactic disk gas. Comparison with CH data indicates that our observations are consistent with a picture where HF and a fraction of the H{sub 2}O absorption arise in diffuse molecular clouds showing Galactic disk-like abundances while the bulk of the water absorption arises in warmer (T {>=} 400 K) diffuse molecular gas for V{sub LSR} {<=} -85 km s{sup -1}. This diffuse Interstellar Medium (ISM) phase has also been recently revealed through observations of CO, HF, H{sup +}{sub 3}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} absorption toward other sight lines probing the Galactic center inner region.

  20. Spatial patterns in the abundance of the coastal horned lizard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, R.N.; Suarez, A.V.; Case, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Coastal horned lizards (Phrynosoma coronatum) have undergone severe declines in southern California and are a candidate species for state and federal listing tender the Endangered Species Act. Quantitative data on their habitat use, abundance, and distribution are lacking, however. We investigated the determinants of abundance for coastal horned lizards at multiple spatial scales throughout southern California. Specifically, we estimated lizard distribution and abundance by establishing 256 pitfall trap arrays clustered within 21 sites across four counties. These arrays were sampled bimonthly for 2-3 years. At each array we measured 26 "local" site descriptors and averaged these values with other "regional" measures to determine site characteristics. Our analyses were successful at identifying factors within and among sites correlated with the presence and abundance of coastal horned lizards. These factors included the absence of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) (and presence of native ant species eaten by the lizards), the presence of chaparral community plants, and the presence of sandy substrates. At a regional scale the relative abundance of Argentine ants was correlated with the relative amount of developed edge around a site. There was no evidence for spatial autocorrelation, even at the scale of the arrays within sites, suggesting that the determinants of the presence or absence and abundance of horned lizard can vary over relatively small spatial scales (hundreds of meters). Our results suggest that a gap-type approach may miss some of the fine-scale determinants of species abundance in fragmented habitats.

  1. The elemental abundance pattern in a galaxy at z = 2.626.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Jason X; Howk, J Christopher; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2003-05-01

    The discovery of metal-poor stars (where metal is any element more massive than helium) has enabled astronomers to probe the chemical enrichment history of the Milky Way. More recently, element abundances in gas inside high-redshift galaxies has been probed through the absorption lines imprinted on the spectra of background quasars, but these have typically yielded measurements of only a few elements. Furthermore, interpretation of these abundances is complicated by the fact that differential incorporation of metals into dust can produce an abundance pattern similar to that expected from nucleosynthesis by massive stars. Here we report the observation of over 25 elements in a galaxy at redshift z = 2.626. With these data, we can examine nucleosynthetic processes independent of the uncertainty arising from depletion. We find that the galaxy was enriched mainly by massive stars (M > 15 solar masses) and propose that it is the progenitor of a massive elliptical galaxy. The detailed abundance patterns suggest that boron is produced through processes that act independently of metallicity, and may require alternative mechanisms for the nucleosynthesis of germanium.

  2. Global Patterns of Abundance, Diversity and Community Structure of the Aminicenantes (Candidate Phylum OP8)

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ibrahim F.; Davis, James P.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the global patterns of abundance, diversity, and community structure of members of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Our aim was to identify the putative ecological role(s) played by members of this poorly characterized bacterial lineages in various ecosystems. Analysis of near full-length 16S rRNA genes identified four classes and eight orders within the Aminicenantes. Within 3,134 datasets comprising ∼1.8 billion high throughput-generated partial 16S rRNA genes, 47,351 Aminicenantes-affiliated sequences were identified in 913 datasets. The Aminicenantes exhibited the highest relative abundance in hydrocarbon-impacted environments, followed by marine habitats (especially hydrothermal vents and coral-associated microbiome samples), and aquatic, non-marine habitats (especially in terrestrial springs and groundwater samples). While the overall abundance of the Aminicenantes was higher in low oxygen tension as well as non-saline and low salinity habitats, it was encountered in a wide range of oxygen tension, salinities, and temperatures. Analysis of the community structure of the Aminicenantes showed distinct patterns across various datasets that appear to be, mostly, driven by habitat variations rather than prevalent environmental parameters. We argue that the detection of the Aminicenantes across environmental extremes and the observed distinct community structure patterns reflect a high level of intraphylum metabolic diversity and adaptive capabilities that enable its survival and growth in a wide range of habitats and environmental conditions. PMID:24637619

  3. Seasonal patterns of horse fly richness and abundance in the Pampa biome of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Rodrigo Ferreira; Krolow, Tiago Kütter

    2015-12-01

    Fluctuations in seasonal patterns of horse fly populations were examined in rainforests of tropical South America, where the climate is seasonal. These patterns were evaluated with robust analytical models rather than identifying the main factors that influenced the fluctuations. We examined the seasonality of populations of horse flies in fields and lowland areas of the Pampa biome of southern Brazil with generalized linear models. We also investigated the diversity of these flies and the sampling effort of Malaise traps in this biome over two years. All of the 29 species had clear seasonality with regard to occurrence and abundance, but only seven species were identified as being influenced by temperature and humidity. The sampling was sufficient and the estimated diversity was 10% more than observed. Seasonal trends were synchronized across species and the populations were most abundant between September and March and nearly zero in other months. While previous studies demonstrated that seasonal patterns in population fluctuations are correlated with climatic conditions in horse fly assemblages in South America rainforests, we show a clear effect of each factor on richness and abundance and the seasonality in the prevalence of horse fly assemblages in localities of the Pampa biome.

  4. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS IN THE INNER GALAXY: THE SCUTUM RED SUPERGIANT CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Ben; Origlia, Livia; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Figer, Don F.; Rich, R. Michael; Najarro, Francisco; Negueruela, Ignacio; Clark, J. Simon

    2009-05-10

    The location of the Scutum Red Supergiant (RSG) clusters at the end of the Galactic Bar makes them an excellent probe of the Galaxy's secular evolution, while the clusters themselves are ideal testbeds in which to study the predictions of stellar evolutionary theory. To this end, we present a study of the RSG's surface abundances using a combination of high-resolution Keck/NIRSPEC H-band spectroscopy and spectral synthesis analysis. We provide abundance measurements for elements C, O, Si, Mg, Ti, and Fe. We find that the surface abundances of the stars studied are consistent with CNO burning and deep, rotationally enhanced mixing. The average {alpha}/Fe ratios of the clusters are solar, consistent with a thin-disk population. However, we find significantly subsolar Fe/H ratios for each cluster, a result which strongly contradicts a simple extrapolation of the Galactic metallicity gradient to lower Galactocentric distances. We suggest that a simple one-dimensional parameterization of the Galaxy's abundance patterns is insufficient at low Galactocentric distances, as large azimuthal variations may be present. Indeed, we show that the abundances of O, Si, and Mg are consistent with independent measurements of objects in similar locations in the Galaxy. In combining our results with other data in the literature, we present evidence for large-scale ({approx} kpc) azimuthal variations in abundances at Galactocentric distances of 3-5 kpc. While we cannot rule out that this observed behavior is due to systematic offsets between different measurement techniques, we do find evidence for similar behavior in a study of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 4736 which uses homogeneous methodology. We suggest that these azimuthal abundance variations could result from the intense but patchy star formation driven by the potential of the central bar.

  5. Spatial patterns in the abundance of the coastal horned lizard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Suarez, Andrew V.; Case, Ted J.

    2002-01-01

    Coastal horned lizards (   Phrynosoma coronatum) have undergone severe declines in southern California and are a candidate species for state and federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. Quantitative data on their habitat use, abundance, and distribution are lacking, however. We investigated the determinants of abundance for coastal horned lizards at multiple spatial scales throughout southern California. Specifically, we estimated lizard distribution and abundance by establishing 256 pitfall trap arrays clustered within 21 sites across four counties. These arrays were sampled bimonthly for 2–3 years. At each array we measured 26 “local” site descriptors and averaged these values with other “regional” measures to determine site characteristics. Our analyses were successful at identifying factors within and among sites correlated with the presence and abundance of coastal horned lizards. These factors included the absence of the invasive Argentine ant (  Linepithema humile) (and presence of native ant species eaten by the lizards), the presence of chaparral community plants, and the presence of sandy substrates. At a regional scale the relative abundance of Argentine ants was correlated with the relative amount of developed edge around a site. There was no evidence for spatial autocorrelation, even at the scale of the arrays within sites, suggesting that the determinants of the presence or absence and abundance of horned lizard can vary over relatively small spatial scales ( hundreds of meters). Our results suggest that a gap-type approach may miss some of the fine-scale determinants of species abundance in fragmented habitats.

  6. Diversity of abundance patterns of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Misa; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Aoki, Wako; Wanajo, Shinya

    2014-05-02

    Observations of Very Metal-Poor stars indicate that there are at least two sites to r-process; “weak r-process” and “main r-process”. A question is whether these two are well separated or there exists a variation in the r-process. We present the results of abundance analysis of neutron-capture elements in the two Very Metal-Poor stars HD107752 and HD110184 in the Milky Way halo observed with the Subaru Telescope HDS. The abundance patterns show overabundace at light n-capture elements (e.g. Sr, Y), inferring the element yielding of weak r-process, while heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g. Ba, Eu) are deficient; however, the overabundance of light ones is not as significant as that previously found in stars representing the weak r-process (e.g. HD122563; Honda et al. 2006). Our study show diversity in the abundance patterns from light to heavy neutron-capture elements in VMP stars, suggesting a variation in r-process, which may depend on electron fraction of environment.

  7. He abundance variations in the solar wind: Observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.; McComas, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Ulysses mission is providing the first opportunity to observe variations in solar wind plasma parameters at heliographic latitudes far removed from the ecliptic plane. We present an overview of the solar wind speed and the variability in helium abundance, [He] data on [He] in six high latitude coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and a superposed epoch analysis of [He] variations at the seven heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings made during the rapid-latitude-scan portion of the mission. The differences in the variability of the solar wind speed and [He] in high latitude and equatorial regions are quite striking. Solar wind speed is generally low but highly variable near the solar equator, while at higher latitudes the average speed is quite high with little variability. [He] can vary over nearly two decades at low solar latitudes, while at high latitudes it varies only slightly. In contrast to the high [He] that is commonly associated with CMEs observed in the ecliptic, none of the six high-speed CMEs encountered at high southern heliographic latitudes showed any significant variation in helium content. A superposed epoch analysis of the [He] during all seven HCS crossings made as Ulysses passed from the southern to northern solar hemisphere shows the expected [He] minimum near the crossing and a broad region of low [He] around the crossing time. We discuss how our solar wind [He] observations may provide an accurate measure of the helium composition for the entire convective zone of the Sun.

  8. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  9. Do abundance distributions and species aggregation correctly predict macroecological biodiversity patterns in tropical forests?

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Thorsten; Lehmann, Sebastian; Huth, Andreas; Fortin, Marie‐Josée

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim It has been recently suggested that different ‘unified theories of biodiversity and biogeography’ can be characterized by three common ‘minimal sufficient rules’: (1) species abundance distributions follow a hollow curve, (2) species show intraspecific aggregation, and (3) species are independently placed with respect to other species. Here, we translate these qualitative rules into a quantitative framework and assess if these minimal rules are indeed sufficient to predict multiple macroecological biodiversity patterns simultaneously. Location Tropical forest plots in Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, and in Sinharaja, Sri Lanka. Methods We assess the predictive power of the three rules using dynamic and spatial simulation models in combination with census data from the two forest plots. We use two different versions of the model: (1) a neutral model and (2) an extended model that allowed for species differences in dispersal distances. In a first step we derive model parameterizations that correctly represent the three minimal rules (i.e. the model quantitatively matches the observed species abundance distribution and the distribution of intraspecific aggregation). In a second step we applied the parameterized models to predict four additional spatial biodiversity patterns. Results Species‐specific dispersal was needed to quantitatively fulfil the three minimal rules. The model with species‐specific dispersal correctly predicted the species–area relationship, but failed to predict the distance decay, the relationship between species abundances and aggregations, and the distribution of a spatial co‐occurrence index of all abundant species pairs. These results were consistent over the two forest plots. Main conclusions The three ‘minimal sufficient’ rules only provide an incomplete approximation of the stochastic spatial geometry of biodiversity in tropical forests. The assumption of independent interspecific placements is most

  10. He abundance variations in the solar wind: Observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B.L.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses mission is providing the first opportunity to observe variations in solar wind plasma parameters at heliographic latitudes far removed from the ecliptic plane. We present here an overview of the solar wind speed and the variability in helium abundance, [He], for the entire mission to date, data on [He] in six high-latitude coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and a superposed epoch analysis of [He] variations at the seven heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings made during the rapid-latitude-scan portion of the mission. The differences in the variability of the solar wind speed and [He] in high-latitude and equatorial regions are quite striking. Solar wind speed is generally low but highly variable near the solar equator, while at higher latitudes the average speed is quite high (average speed around 760 km/s) with little variability. [He] can vary over nearly two decades at low solar latitudes, while at high latitudes it varies only slightly around an average value of {approximately}4.3{percent}. In contrast to the high [He] that is often associated with CMEs observed near the ecliptic, none of the six high-speed CMEs encountered at high southern heliographic latitudes showed any significant variation in helium content from average values. Reasons for this difference between high and low latitude CME observations are not yet understood. A superposed epoch analysis of the [He] during all seven HCS crossings made as Ulysses passed from the southern to northern solar hemisphere shows the expected [He] minimum near the crossing and a broad ({plus_minus}3day) period of low [He] around the crossing time. We briefly discuss how our solar wind [He] observations may provide an accurate measure of the helium composition for all regions of the sun lying above the helium ionization zone. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Chemical abundance analysis of symbiotic giants - III. Metallicity and CNO abundance patterns in 24 southern systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, Cezary; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants are essential to address the role of chemical composition in the evolution of symbiotic binaries, to map their parent population, and to trace their mass transfer history. However, the number of symbiotic giants with fairly well determined photospheric composition is still insufficient for statistical analyses. This is the third in a series of papers on the chemical composition of symbiotic giants determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000), near-infrared spectra. Here we present results for 24 S-type systems. Spectrum synthesis methods employing standard local thermal equilibrium analysis and atmosphere models were used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Fe, Ti, Ni, and Sc). Our analysis reveals metallicities distributed in a wide range from slightly supersolar ([Fe/H] ˜ +0.35 dex) to significantly subsolar ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.8 dex) but principally with near-solar and slightly subsolar metallicity ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.4 to -0.3 dex). The enrichment in 14N isotope, found in all these objects, indicates that the giants have experienced the first dredge-up. This was confirmed in a number of objects by the low 12C/13C ratio (5-23). We found that the relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  12. Observations of interstellar HOCO+: abundance enhancements toward the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Irvine, W M; Ziurys, L M

    1988-11-01

    A survey of the 4(04)-3(03) and 1(01)-0(00) transitions of HOCO+ has been made toward several molecular clouds. The HOCO+ molecule was not observed in any sources except Sgr B2 and Sgr A. The 5(05)-4(04) and 4(14)-3(13) transitions were also detected toward Sgr B2. The results indicate that gas phase CO2 is not a major carbon reservoir in typical molecular clouds. In Sgr B2, the HOCO+ antenna temperature exhibits a peak approximately 2' north of the Sgr B2 central position (Sgr B2[M]) and the 4(04)-3(03) line emission is extended over a approximately 10' x 10' region. The column density of HOCO+ at the northern peak in Sgr B2 is approximately 3 x 10(14) cm-2, and the fractional abundance relative to H2 > or = 3 x 10(-10), which is about 2 orders of magnitude greater than recent predictions of quiescent cloud ion-molecule chemistry.

  13. LAMBDA BOO ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: ACCRETION FROM ORBITING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Jura, M.

    2015-12-15

    The abundance anomalies in λ Boo stars are popularly explained by element-specific mass inflows at rates that are much greater than empirically inferred bounds for interstellar accretion. Therefore, a λ Boo star’s thin outer envelope must derive from a companion star, planet, analogs to Kuiper Belt objects or a circumstellar disk. Because radiation pressure on gas-phase ions might selectively allow the accretion of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen and inhibit the inflow of elements such as iron, the source of the acquired matter need not contain dust. We propose that at least some λ Boo stars accrete from the winds of hot Jupiters.

  14. Lambda Boo Abundance Patterns: Accretion from Orbiting Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jura, M.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance anomalies in λ Boo stars are popularly explained by element-specific mass inflows at rates that are much greater than empirically inferred bounds for interstellar accretion. Therefore, a λ Boo star’s thin outer envelope must derive from a companion star, planet, analogs to Kuiper Belt objects or a circumstellar disk. Because radiation pressure on gas-phase ions might selectively allow the accretion of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen and inhibit the inflow of elements such as iron, the source of the acquired matter need not contain dust. We propose that at least some λ Boo stars accrete from the winds of hot Jupiters.

  15. Abundance and reproductive patterns of the excavating sponge Cliona vermifera: a threat to Pacific coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista-Guerrero, Eric; Carballo, José Luis; Maldonado, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Cliona vermifera is a common excavating sponge in coral reefs from the East Pacific. Abundance and reproductive patterns of the sponge in a Mexican Pacific coral reef over a 4-year period are herein described. Sponge abundance was estimated along three transects 50 m long which were randomly placed on the reef, and along each one, a piece of coral rubble and a branch of a live coral from the Pocillopora spp. coral colony closest to the transect were collected at random, approximately every 2 m, yielding 25 pieces of each category per transect (and 75 pieces total of each category). A 2-way ANOVA revealed that invasion was significantly higher in living coral colonies (34.8 %) than in rubble (13.7 %). It also indicated that the abundance in both coralline substrates showed a temporal variation without a clear pattern of increase over the years. It was estimated that 60-85 % of sponges in the population reproduced sexually every year. The sponge proved gonochoristic, with a sex ratio strongly departing from parity (1 male: 3 females). Over the 4-year study period, at least two cohorts of oocytes with densities of up to 3.5 oocytes per mm2 tissue were observed. Spermatogenesis lasted about a month, but often producing more than a pulse from July to November, coupled with peaks of oocyte maturation. Fertilization occurred internally to produce encapsulated zygotes that were released in one or more spawning events from July to November. In the following months (December to February), which were the periods of lowest temperature (~18.5-20 °C), no gametic activity occurred in the sponges. Because anomalous temperature rises that are detrimental to corals do not appear to negatively affect the reproduction and abundance of C. vermifera, it is likely that the excavating activity of this sponge may be compromising the health of those coral reefs that are recurrently affected by episodes of thermal stress.

  16. Moving beyond abundance distributions: neutral theory and spatial patterns in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    May, Felix; Huth, Andreas; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Assessing the relative importance of different processes that determine the spatial distribution of species and the dynamics in highly diverse plant communities remains a challenging question in ecology. Previous modelling approaches often focused on single aggregated forest diversity patterns that convey limited information on the underlying dynamic processes. Here, we use recent advances in inference for stochastic simulation models to evaluate the ability of a spatially explicit and spatially continuous neutral model to quantitatively predict six spatial and non-spatial patterns observed at the 50 ha tropical forest plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The patterns capture different aspects of forest dynamics and biodiversity structure, such as annual mortality rate, species richness, species abundance distribution, beta-diversity and the species-area relationship (SAR). The model correctly predicted each pattern independently and up to five patterns simultaneously. However, the model was unable to match the SAR and beta-diversity simultaneously. Our study moves previous theory towards a dynamic spatial theory of biodiversity and demonstrates the value of spatial data to identify ecological processes. This opens up new avenues to evaluate the consequences of additional process for community assembly and dynamics.

  17. Geographic patterns in relative abundances and population trends of breeding and wintering loggerhead shrikes in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Orsillo, S.; Peterjohn, B.G.; Yosef, Reuven; Lohrer, Fred E.

    1995-01-01

    In North America, the Breeding Bird Survey and the Christmas Bird Count provide data that are collected at sites visited each year, and the site-specific data can be placed in a Geographic Information System and smoothed to produce contour maps of relative abundance and trend for the United States and southern Canada. We develop these contour maps for Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) data from both surveys, and compare the patterns derived from each survey to evaluate the consistency of trends and relative abundances within physiographic strata. Patterns in relative abundance seem to be associated with strata, especially in the breeding season, but trends are often heterogeneous within strata. Because of limitations of the surveys and observed geographic patterns of shrike trends in the survey data, we suggest that there is no natural scale for the analysis of shrike-habitat associations.

  18. Effects of Large-Scale Flows on Coronal Abundances: Multispecies Models and TRACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, D. D.

    2003-05-01

    Understanding coronal abundances is crucial for interpreting coronal observations and for understanding coronal physical processes and heating. Bulk flows and gravity, both unmistakably present in the corona, significantly affect abundances. We present multispecies simulations of long-lived coronal structures and compare model results with TRACE observations, focusing on abundance variations and flows.

  19. Modeling the near-ultraviolet band of GK stars. III. Dependence on abundance pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Short, C. Ian; Campbell, Eamonn A.

    2013-06-01

    We extend the grid of non-LTE (NLTE) models presented in Paper II to explore variations in abundance pattern in two ways: (1) the adoption of the Asplund et al. (GASS10) abundances, (2) for stars of metallicity, [M/H], of –0.5, the adoption of a non-solar enhancement of α-elements by +0.3 dex. Moreover, our grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is interpolated to a finer numerical resolution in both T {sub eff} (ΔT {sub eff} = 25 K) and log g (Δlog g = 0.25). We compare the values of T {sub eff} and log g inferred from fitting LTE and NLTE SEDs to observed SEDs throughout the entire visible band, and in an ad hoc 'blue' band. We compare our spectrophotometrically derived T {sub eff} values to a variety of T {sub eff} calibrations, including more empirical ones, drawn from the literature. For stars of solar metallicity, we find that the adoption of the GASS10 abundances lowers the inferred T {sub eff} value by 25-50 K for late-type giants, and NLTE models computed with the GASS10 abundances give T {sub eff} results that are marginally in better agreement with other T {sub eff} calibrations. For stars of [M/H] = –0.5 there is marginal evidence that adoption of α-enhancement further lowers the derived T {sub eff} value by 50 K. Stellar parameters inferred from fitting NLTE models to SEDs are more dependent than LTE models on the wavelength region being fitted, and we find that the effect depends on how heavily line blanketed the fitting region is, whether the fitting region is to the blue of the Wien peak of the star's SED, or both.

  20. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN HIGH-ENTROPY HOT BUBBLES OF SUPERNOVAE AND ABUNDANCE PATTERNS OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Izutani, Natsuko; Umeda, Hideyuki E-mail: umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.j

    2010-09-01

    There have been suggestions that the abundance of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be reproduced by hypernovae (HNe), not by normal supernovae (SNe). However, recently it was also suggested that if the innermost neutron-rich or proton-rich matter is ejected, the abundance patterns of ejected matter are changed, and normal SNe may also reproduce the observations of EMP stars. In this Letter, we calculate explosive nucleosynthesis with various Y {sub e} and entropy, and investigate whether normal SNe with this innermost matter, which we call the 'hot-bubble' component, can reproduce the abundance of EMP stars. We find that neutron-rich (Y {sub e} = 0.45-0.49) and proton-rich (Y {sub e} = 0.51-0.55) matter can increase Zn/Fe and Co/Fe ratios as observed, but tend to overproduce other Fe-peak elements. In addition, we find that if slightly proton-rich matter with 0.50 {<=} Y {sub e} < 0.501 with s/k {sub b} {approx} 15-40 is ejected as much as {approx}0.06 M {sub sun}, even normal SNe can reproduce the abundance of EMP stars, though it requires fine-tuning of Y {sub e}. On the other hand, HNe can more easily reproduce the observations of EMP stars without fine-tuning. Our results imply that HNe are the most likely origin of the abundance pattern of EMP stars.

  1. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  2. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S.; Crump, Byron C.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  3. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  4. [Mammals' camera-trapping in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico: relative abundance and activity patterns].

    PubMed

    Monroy-Vilchis, Octavio; Zarco-González, Martha M; Rodríguez-Soto, Clarita; Soria-Díaz, Leroy; Urios, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Species conservation and their management depend on the availability of their population behavior and changes in time. This way, population studies include aspects such as species abundance and activity pattern, among others, with the advantage that nowadays new technologies can be applied, in addition to common methods. In this study, we used camera-traps to obtain the index of relative abundance and to establish activity pattern of medium and large mammals in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico. The study was conducted from December 2003 to May 2006, with a total sampling effort of 4 305 trap-days. We obtained 897 photographs of 19 different species. Nasua narica, Sylvilagus floridanus and Urocyon cinereoargenteus were the most abundant, in agreement with the relative abundance index (RAI, number of independent records/100 trap-days), and according to previous studies with indirect methods in the area. The activity patterns of the species showed that 67% of them are nocturnal, except Odocoileus virginianus, Nasua narica and others. Some species showed differences with previously reported patterns, which are related with seasonality, resources availability, organism sex, principally. The applied method contributed with reliable data about relative abundance and activity patterns. PMID:21516657

  5. Species-abundance--seed-size patterns within a plant community affected by grazing disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gao-lin; Shang, Zhan-huan; Zhu, Yuan-jun; Ding, Lu-ming; Wang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Seed size has been advanced as a key factor that influences the dynamics of plant communities, but there are few empirical or theoretical predictions of how community dynamics progress based on seed size patterns. Information on the abundance of adults, seedlings, soil seed banks, seed rains, and the seed mass of 96 species was collected in alpine meadows of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (China), which had different levels of grazing disturbance. The relationships between seed-mass-abundance patterns for adults, seedlings, the soil seed bank, and seed rain in the plant community were evaluated using regression models. Results showed that grazing levels affected the relationship between seed size and abundance properties of adult species, seedlings, and the soil seed bank, suggesting that there is a shift in seed-size--species-abundance relationships as a response to the grazing gradient. Grazing had no effect on the pattern of seed-size-seed-rain-abundance at four grazing levels. Grazing also had little effect on the pattern of seed-size--species-abundance and pattern of seed-size--soil-seed-bank-abundance in meadows with no grazing, light grazing, and moderate grazing), but there was a significant negative effect in meadows with heavy grazing. Grazing had little effect on the pattern of seed-size--seedling-abundance with no grazing, but had significant negative effects with light, moderate, and heavy grazing, and the |r| values increased with grazing levels. This indicated that increasing grazing pressure enhanced the advantage of smaller-seeded species in terms of the abundances of adult species, seedlings, and soil seed banks, whereas only the light grazing level promoted the seed rain abundance of larger-seeded species in the plant communities. This study suggests that grazing disturbances are favorable for increasing the species abundance for smaller-seeded species but not for the larger-seeded species in an alpine meadow community. Hence, there is a clear

  6. Future rainfall patterns will reduce arthropod abundance in model arable agroecosystems with different soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann; Simmer, Laura; Tabi Tataw, James; Formayer, Herbert; Hösch, Johannes; Baumgarten, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Climate change scenarios for eastern Austria predict a seasonal shift in precipitation patterns with fewer but heavier rainfall events and longer drought periods during the growing season and more precipitation during winter. This is expected to alter arthropods living in natural and agricultural ecosystems with consequences for several ecosystem functions and services. In order to better understand the effects of future rainfall patterns on aboveground arthropods inhabiting an agroecosystem, we conducted an experiment where we simulated rainfall patterns in model arable systems with three different soil types. Experiments were conducted in winter wheat cultivated in a lysimeter facility near Vienna, Austria, where three different soil types (calcaric phaeozem, calcic chernozem and gleyic phaeozem) were subjected to long-term current vs. predicted rainfall patterns according to regionalized climate change projections for 2071-2100. Aboveground arthropods were assessed by suction sampling in April, May and June 2012. We found significant differences in mean total arthropod abundances between the sampling dates with 20 ± 2 m-2, 90 ± 20 m-2 and 289 ± 54 m-2 in April, May and June, respectively. Across all three sampling dates, future rainfall patterns significantly reduced the abundance of Araneae (-43%), Auchenorrhyncha (-39%), Coleoptera (-48%), Carabidae (-41%), Chrysomelidae (-64%), Collembola (-58%), Diptera (-75%) and Neuroptera (-73%). Generally, different soil types had no effect on the abundance of arthropods. The diversity of arthropod communities was unaffected by rainfall patterns or soil types. Correlation analyses of arthropod abundances with crop biomass, weed density and abundance suggest that rainfall effects indirectly affected arthropods via changes on crops and weeds. In conclusion, these results show that future rainfall patterns will have detrimental effects on the abundance of a variety of aboveground arthropods in winter wheat with potential

  7. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  8. Regular Patterns for Proteome-Wide Distribution of Protein Abundance across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Wu, Songfeng; Zhu, Yunping; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2012-01-01

    A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category) are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category). Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function. PMID:22427835

  9. Global patterns in sandy beach macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton

    2013-10-01

    Global patterns in species richness in sandy beach ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy beaches around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the beach: in gentle slope beaches, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope beaches it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of beach slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective beaches. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in beach macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective beaches, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat beach slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy beach macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative beaches harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy beaches (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary

  10. Interstellar abundances in dense, moderately reddened lines of sight. I - Observational evidence for density-dependent depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.; Snow, Theodore P., Jr.; Seab, C. Gregory; Crutcher, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of dust-gas interactions, which are capable of modifying the size distribution of interstellar grains and thus causing changes in the selective extinction curve, are investigated through depletion studies. The gaseous abundances of 15 elements have been determined for several lines of sight toward moderately reddened stars, each having an anomalous extinction curve and a large abundance of cyanogen (CN). The basic result of this study is that certain elements appear to deplete preferentially in interstellar clouds having a large abundance of CN. Since CN is a sensitive indicator of the interstellar spatial density, the data might suggest that the unique pattern of enhanced depletion observed here represents the best observational evidence of accretion.

  11. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S POLAR TRACE GAS ABUNDANCE OBSERVED BY CASSINI

    SciTech Connect

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; De Kok, R.; Nixon, C. A.

    2010-11-20

    We use a six-year data set (2004-2010) of mid-infrared spectra measured by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer to search for seasonal variations in Titan's atmospheric temperature and composition. During most of Cassini's mission Titan's northern hemisphere has been in winter, with an intense stratospheric polar vortex highly enriched in trace gases, and a single south-to-north circulation cell. Following northern spring equinox in mid-2009, dramatic changes in atmospheric temperature and composition were expected, but until now the temporal coverage of polar latitudes has been too sparse to discern trends. Here, we show that during equinox and post-equinox periods, abundances of trace gases at both poles have begun to increase. We propose that increases in north polar trace gases are due to a seasonal reduction in gas depletion by horizontal mixing across the vortex boundary. A simultaneous south polar abundance increase suggests that Titan is now entering, or is about to enter, a transitional circulation regime with two branches, rather than the single branch circulation pattern previously observed.

  12. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebola, Luís M.; Emmanuel-Costa, David; Felipe, Ricardo González

    2016-03-01

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the 3\\upsigma confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and for the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given.

  13. Patterns of food abundance for breeding waterbirds in the san luis valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammonley, J.H.; Laubhan, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    We measured the amount and distribution of macroinvertebrates and seeds in four wetland habitats (short emergent, seasonal open water, semipermanent/permanent open water, and saltgrass [Distichlis spicata]) used by breeding ducks and shorebirds at a wetland complex in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA. Density of macroinvertebrates did not differ among habitats or sampling periods (P = 0.45), but dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy production were greater (P < 0.05) in short emergent than in other habitats. These differences were largely due to the greater dry mass of gastropods in short emergent than in other habitats. Total seed density, dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy differed among habitats and periods with interaction effects (P <0.01). Although seed abundance varied among habitats and sampling periods, abundance was greatest in short emergent during all sampling periods. Breeding waterbirds consumed a variety of macroinvertebrates and seeds on the study area. Patterns of abundance among habitats of macroinvertebrates and seeds consumed by six waterbird species were not consistent with patterns of foraging habitat use by most ducks and shorebirds at this wetland complex. Our results indicate that estimates of food or nutrient abundance are useful in assessing the functional role of broad habitat types, but factors other than food abundance also influence avian selection of wetland foraging habitats. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  14. The Abundance Pattern in the Hot ISM of NGC 4472: Insights and Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael; Davis, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Important clues to the chemical and dynamical history of elliptical galaxies are encoded in the abundances of heavy elements in the X-ray emitting plasma. We derive the hot ISM abundance pattern in inner (0.2.3R(sub e)) and outer (2.3.4.6R(sub e)) regions of NGC 4472 from analysis of Suzaku spectra, supported by analysis of co- spatial XMM-Newton spectra. The low background and relatively sharp spectral resolution of the Suzaku XIS detectors, combined with the high luminosity and temperature in NGC 4472, enable us to derive a particularly extensive abundance pattern that encompasses O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni in both regions. We apply simple chemical evolution models to these data, and conclude that the abundances are best explained by a combination of alpha-element enhanced stellar mass loss and direct injection of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) ejecta. We thus confirm the inference, based on optical data, that the stars in elliptical galaxies have supersolar [alpha/Fe] ratios, but find that that the present-day SNIa rate is approximately 4.6 times lower than the standard value. We find SNIa yield sets that reproduce Ca and Ar, or Ni, but not all three simultaneously. The low abundance of O relative to Ne and Mg implies that standard core collapse nucleosynthesis models overproduce O by approximately 2.

  15. Effects of advection on the seasonal abundance patterns of three species of planktonic calanoid copepods in Dabob Bay, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Kenric E.; Frost, Bruce W.

    1996-08-01

    The copepodid stage abundances of Calanus marshallae, Calanus pacificus and Metridia pacifica in Dabob Bay, Washington were followed through two years. Based on the species' life histories, vertical distributions, abundances inside and outside the bay, and the hydrographic setting, times when advection was important were explored. During the first study-year, 1973, advection acted to keep the copepod concentrations inside and outside Dabob Bay similar through the early summer. During the summer, a period of very little advective exchange, the copepod concentrations diverged at the two stations. In the fall, when advection picked up again, the copepod concentrations at the two stations once again became similar. During the summer of the other study-year, 1982, flow of deep water into Dabob Bay occurred. This may have caused some of the differences observed in the abundances of the copepods during the summer of 1982 vs 1973. Due in part to the advective events, the seasonal abundance patterns of the copepods could not be predicted based upon their locally expressed life history patterns. The most striking example of this was C. pacificus. Its population decreased during the spring and increased during the fall, despite having its major reproductive peak in the spring. Advective effects clearly contributed to this.

  16. Spatial patterns in the tropical forest reveal connections between negative feedback, aggregation and abundance.

    PubMed

    Seri, Efrat; Shnerb, Nadav

    2015-09-01

    The spatial arrangement of trees in a tropical forest reflects the interplay between aggregating processes, like dispersal limitation, and negative feedback that induces effective repulsion among individuals. Monitoring the variance-mean ratio for conspecific individuals along length-scales, we show that the effect of negative feedback is dominant at short scales, while aggregation characterizes the large-scale patterns. A comparison of different species indicates, surprisingly, that both aggregation and negative feedback scales are related to the overall abundance of the species. This suggests a bottom-up control mechanism, in which the negative feedback dictates the dispersal kernel and the overall abundance.

  17. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  18. Abundance patterns of multiple populations in globular clusters: a chemical evolution model based on yields from AGB ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ercole, Annibale; D'Antona, Francesca; Ventura, Paolo; Vesperini, Enrico; McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2010-09-01

    A large number of spectroscopic studies have provided evidence of the presence of multiple populations in globular clusters by revealing patterns in the stellar chemical abundances. This paper is aimed at studying the origin of these abundance patterns. We explore a model in which second generation (SG) stars form out of a mix of pristine gas and ejecta of the first generation of asymptotic giant branch stars. We first study the constraints imposed by the spectroscopic data of SG stars in globular clusters on the chemical properties of the asymptotic and super asymptotic giant branch ejecta. With a simple one-zone chemical model, we then explore the formation of the SG population abundance patterns focusing our attention on the Na-O, Al-Mg anticorrelations and on the helium distribution function (HDF). We carry out a survey of models and explore the dependence of the final SG chemical properties on the key parameters affecting the gas dynamics and the SG formation process. Finally, we use our chemical evolution framework to build specific models for NGC 2808 and M4, two Galactic globular clusters which show different patterns in the Na-O and Mg-Al anticorrelation and have different helium distributions. We find that the amount of pristine gas involved in the formation of SG stars is a key parameter to fit the observed O-Na and Mg-Al patterns. The HDF for these models is in general good agreement with the observed one. Our models, by shedding light on the role of different parameters and their interplay in determining the final SG chemical properties, illustrate the basic ingredients, constraints and problems encountered in this self-enrichment scenario which must be addressed by more sophisticated chemical and hydrodynamic simulations.

  19. Searching for GC-like abundance patterns in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Lardo, C.; Davies, B.; Bastian, N.; Beccari, G.; Larsen, S. S.; Hernandez, S.

    2016-08-01

    Studies during the last decade have revealed that nearly all globular clusters (GCs) host multiple populations (MPs) of stars with a distinctive chemical patterns in light elements. No evidence of such MPs has been found so far in lower mass (<˜ 104 M⊙) open clusters nor in intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) massive (>105 M⊙) clusters in the Local Group. Young massive clusters (YMCs) have masses and densities similar to those expected of young GCs in the early Universe, and their near-infrared spectra are dominated by the light of red super giants (RSGs). The spectra of these stars may be used to determine the cluster's abundances, even though the individual stars cannot be spatially resolved from one another. We carry out a differential analysis between the Al lines of YMC NGC 1705: 1 and field Small Magellanic Cloud RSGs with similar metallicities. We exclude at high confidence extreme [Al/Fe] enhancements similar to those observed in GCs like NGC 2808 or NGC 6752. However, smaller variations cannot be excluded.

  20. Comparing Population Patterns to Processes: Abundance and Survival of a Forest Salamander following Habitat Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Clint R. V.; Roloff, Gary J.; Thames, Rachael E.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat degradation resulting from anthropogenic activities poses immediate and prolonged threats to biodiversity, particularly among declining amphibians. Many studies infer amphibian response to habitat degradation by correlating patterns in species occupancy or abundance with environmental effects, often without regard to the demographic processes underlying these patterns. We evaluated how retention of vertical green trees (CANOPY) and coarse woody debris (CWD) influenced terrestrial salamander abundance and apparent survival in recently clearcut forests. Estimated abundance of unmarked salamanders was positively related to CANOPY (Canopy  = 0.21 (0.02–1.19; 95% CI), but not CWD (CWD  = 0.11 (−0.13–0.35) within 3,600 m2 sites, whereas estimated abundance of unmarked salamanders was not related to CANOPY (Canopy  = −0.01 (−0.21–0.18) or CWD (CWD  = −0.02 (−0.23–0.19) for 9 m2 enclosures. In contrast, apparent survival of marked salamanders within our enclosures over 1 month was positively influenced by both CANOPY and CWD retention (Canopy  = 0.73 (0.27–1.19; 95% CI) and CWD  = 1.01 (0.53–1.50). Our results indicate that environmental correlates to abundance are scale dependent reflecting habitat selection processes and organism movements after a habitat disturbance event. Our study also provides a cautionary example of how scientific inference is conditional on the response variable(s), and scale(s) of measure chosen by the investigator, which can have important implications for species conservation and management. Our research highlights the need for joint evaluation of population state variables, such as abundance, and population-level process, such as survival, when assessing anthropogenic impacts on forest biodiversity. PMID:24718498

  1. Evolutionary patterns of range size, abundance and species richness in Amazonian angiosperm trees

    PubMed Central

    Chave, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian tree species vary enormously in their total abundance and range size, while Amazonian tree genera vary greatly in species richness. The drivers of this variation are not well understood. Here, we construct a phylogenetic hypothesis that represents half of Amazonian tree genera in order to contribute to explaining the variation. We find several clear, broad-scale patterns. Firstly, there is significant phylogenetic signal for all three characteristics; closely related genera tend to have similar numbers of species and similar mean range size and abundance. Additionally, the species richness of genera shows a significant, negative relationship with the mean range size and abundance of their constituent species. Our results suggest that phylogenetically correlated intrinsic factors, namely traits of the genera themselves, shape among lineage variation in range size, abundance and species richness. We postulate that tree stature may be one particularly relevant trait. However, other traits may also be relevant, and our study reinforces the need for ambitious compilations of trait data for Amazonian trees. In the meantime, our study shows how large-scale phylogenies can help to elucidate, and contribute to explaining, macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns in hyperdiverse, yet poorly understood regions like the Amazon Basin.

  2. Evolutionary patterns of range size, abundance and species richness in Amazonian angiosperm trees

    PubMed Central

    Chave, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian tree species vary enormously in their total abundance and range size, while Amazonian tree genera vary greatly in species richness. The drivers of this variation are not well understood. Here, we construct a phylogenetic hypothesis that represents half of Amazonian tree genera in order to contribute to explaining the variation. We find several clear, broad-scale patterns. Firstly, there is significant phylogenetic signal for all three characteristics; closely related genera tend to have similar numbers of species and similar mean range size and abundance. Additionally, the species richness of genera shows a significant, negative relationship with the mean range size and abundance of their constituent species. Our results suggest that phylogenetically correlated intrinsic factors, namely traits of the genera themselves, shape among lineage variation in range size, abundance and species richness. We postulate that tree stature may be one particularly relevant trait. However, other traits may also be relevant, and our study reinforces the need for ambitious compilations of trait data for Amazonian trees. In the meantime, our study shows how large-scale phylogenies can help to elucidate, and contribute to explaining, macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns in hyperdiverse, yet poorly understood regions like the Amazon Basin. PMID:27651991

  3. Evolutionary patterns of range size, abundance and species richness in Amazonian angiosperm trees.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Kyle; Chave, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian tree species vary enormously in their total abundance and range size, while Amazonian tree genera vary greatly in species richness. The drivers of this variation are not well understood. Here, we construct a phylogenetic hypothesis that represents half of Amazonian tree genera in order to contribute to explaining the variation. We find several clear, broad-scale patterns. Firstly, there is significant phylogenetic signal for all three characteristics; closely related genera tend to have similar numbers of species and similar mean range size and abundance. Additionally, the species richness of genera shows a significant, negative relationship with the mean range size and abundance of their constituent species. Our results suggest that phylogenetically correlated intrinsic factors, namely traits of the genera themselves, shape among lineage variation in range size, abundance and species richness. We postulate that tree stature may be one particularly relevant trait. However, other traits may also be relevant, and our study reinforces the need for ambitious compilations of trait data for Amazonian trees. In the meantime, our study shows how large-scale phylogenies can help to elucidate, and contribute to explaining, macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns in hyperdiverse, yet poorly understood regions like the Amazon Basin.

  4. Evolutionary patterns of range size, abundance and species richness in Amazonian angiosperm trees.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Kyle; Chave, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Amazonian tree species vary enormously in their total abundance and range size, while Amazonian tree genera vary greatly in species richness. The drivers of this variation are not well understood. Here, we construct a phylogenetic hypothesis that represents half of Amazonian tree genera in order to contribute to explaining the variation. We find several clear, broad-scale patterns. Firstly, there is significant phylogenetic signal for all three characteristics; closely related genera tend to have similar numbers of species and similar mean range size and abundance. Additionally, the species richness of genera shows a significant, negative relationship with the mean range size and abundance of their constituent species. Our results suggest that phylogenetically correlated intrinsic factors, namely traits of the genera themselves, shape among lineage variation in range size, abundance and species richness. We postulate that tree stature may be one particularly relevant trait. However, other traits may also be relevant, and our study reinforces the need for ambitious compilations of trait data for Amazonian trees. In the meantime, our study shows how large-scale phylogenies can help to elucidate, and contribute to explaining, macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns in hyperdiverse, yet poorly understood regions like the Amazon Basin. PMID:27651991

  5. Patterns in abundance and seasonality of insects in the siruvani forest of Western ghats, nilgiri biosphere reserve, southern India.

    PubMed

    Arun, P R; Vijayan, V S

    2004-06-01

    The seasonal abundance patterns of insects inhabiting the understory vegetation of a mixed deciduous forest were examined with the help of the sweep-net sampling method. During the study period of 2 years, insects were sampled regularly from the understory vegetation of the three selected habitats (moist-deciduous, riverine, and teak plantation) of the mixed deciduous forest. Insect abundance was maximum in the moist-deciduous habitat and minimum in the teak plantation. Generally, insect abundance was the highest during the southwest monsoon in all habitats. The temporal pattern of fluctuations in the insect abundance followed more or less the same pattern in all the three habitats studied. The insect abundance of the understory vegetation varied among the habitats studied, while the pattern of seasonal fluctuations in insect abundance was comparable among habitats. Composition of the insect community also indicated prominent seasonal changes within habitats than interhabitat changes within a season.

  6. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Brian L; Allen, Andrew E; Carpenter, Edward J; Coles, Victoria J; Crump, Byron C; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A; Goes, Joaquim I; Gomes, Helga R; Hood, Raleigh R; McCrow, John P; Montoya, Joseph P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B; Yager, Patricia L; Paul, John H

    2016-01-01

    silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function. PMID:27598790

  7. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Brian L; Allen, Andrew E; Carpenter, Edward J; Coles, Victoria J; Crump, Byron C; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A; Goes, Joaquim I; Gomes, Helga R; Hood, Raleigh R; McCrow, John P; Montoya, Joseph P; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B; Yager, Patricia L; Paul, John H

    2016-01-01

    silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function.

  8. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew E.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Coles, Victoria J.; Crump, Byron C.; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A.; Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga R.; Hood, Raleigh R.; McCrow, John P.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Yager, Patricia L.; Paul, John H.

    2016-01-01

    silicon became limiting. Expression of these genes, including carbonic anhydrase and transporters for nitrate and phosphate, were found to reflect the physiological status and biogeochemistry of river plume environments. These relatively stable patterns of eukaryotic transcript abundance occurred over modest spatiotemporal scales, with similarity observed in sample duplicates collected up to 2.45 km in space and 120 minutes in time. These results confirm the use of metatranscriptomics as a valuable tool to understand and predict microbial community function. PMID:27598790

  9. Habitat Characteristics Predicting Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Scallops in D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Mendo, Tania; Lyle, Jeremy M.; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A.; Tracey, Sean R.; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat characteristics greatly influence the patterns of distribution and abundance in scallops, providing structure for the settlement of spat and influencing predation risk and rates of survival. Establishing scallop-habitat relationships is relevant to understanding the ecological processes that regulate scallop populations and to managing critical habitats. This information is particularly relevant for the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, south-eastern Tasmania (147.335 W, 43.220 S), a region that has supported significant but highly variable scallop production over many years, including protracted periods of stock collapse. Three species of scallops are present in the region; the commercial scallop Pecten fumatus, the queen scallop Equichlamys bifrons, and the doughboy scallop Mimachlamys asperrima. We used dive surveys and Generalized Additive Modelling to examine the relationship between the distribution and abundance patterns of each species and associated habitat characteristics. The aggregated distribution of each species could be predicted as a function of sediment type and species-specific habitat structural components. While P. fumatus was strongly associated with finer sediments and E. bifrons with coarse grain sediments, M. asperrima had a less selective association, possibly related to its ability to attach on a wide range of substrates. Other habitat characteristics explaining P. fumatus abundance were depth, Asterias amurensis abundance, shell and macroalgae cover. Equichlamys bifrons was strongly associated with macroalgae and seagrass cover, whereas M. asperrima abundance was greatly explained by sponge cover. The models define a set of relationships from which plausible hypotheses can be developed. We propose that these relationships are mediated by predation pressure as well as the specific behavioural characteristics of each species. The findings also highlight the specific habitat characteristics that are relevant for spatial management and

  10. Synoptic patterns of meiofaunal and macrofaunal abundances and specific composition in littoral sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armonies, Werner; Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1987-03-01

    During recent years, many investigations on small zoobenthos have been performed at the island of Sylt. As these studies were carried out sporadically over many years and as different extraction methods were used, comparisons of the results have been hampered. Therefore, in August/September 1986, 24 sites were sampled and evaluated using one quantitative method throughout. Sites range from mud to exposed sand and from the sublittoral to the supralittoral. Macrofauna and the taxa Plathelminthes, Polychaeta, and Oligochaeta are determined to species level. Macrofaunal (>0.5 mm) abundance is highest in mud and continuously decreases with increasing exposure to wave action. Meiofaunal (<0.5 mm) abundance is less variable. Nematoda dominate in mud and muddy sand, Copepoda in sheltered and exposed sand, other taxa only intermittently. Related to surface area, no correlation between macro-and meiofaunal abundance is apparent. Plathelminthes and Copepoda reach highest abundance per surface area in sand but their per volume density is higher in mud and muddy sand. Related to sediment volume instead of surface area, the meiofaunal abundance pattern is very similar to the macrofaunal pattern. The faunal composition changes gradually along the tidal gradient without general faunal boundaries. On an averange, the faunal similarity of neighbouring sites is highest in Oligochaeta and lowest in Plathelminthes. Presumably, Oligochaeta tolerate wider ranges of environmental factors. This may explain the low number of oligochaete species. On the other hand, Plathelminthes seem to adapt to relatively narrow ranges of factors and their species richness is highest. Because of macrofaunameiofauna interaction it is suggested that the meiofaunal assemblage will be least stable in mud and muddy sand, and most stable in exposed sand.

  11. The interstellar N2 abundance towards HD 124314 from far-ultraviolet observations.

    PubMed

    Knauth, David C; Andersson, B-G; McCandliss, Stephan R; Moos, H Warren

    2004-06-10

    The abundance of interstellar molecular nitrogen (N2) is of considerable importance: models of steady-state gas-phase interstellar chemistry, together with millimetre-wavelength observations of interstellar N2H+ in dense molecular clouds predict that N2 should be the most abundant nitrogen-bearing molecule in the interstellar medium. Previous attempts to detect N2 absorption in the far-ultraviolet or infrared (ice features) have hitherto been unsuccessful. Here we report the detection of interstellar N2 at far-ultraviolet wavelengths towards the moderately reddened star HD 124314 in the constellation of Centaurus. The N2 column density is larger than expected from models of diffuse clouds and significantly smaller than expected for dense molecular clouds. Moreover, the N2 abundance does not explain the observed variations in the abundance of atomic nitrogen (N I) towards high-column-density sightlines, implying that the models of nitrogen chemistry in the interstellar medium are incomplete.

  12. Effect of habitat complexity on richness, abundance and distributional pattern of forest birds.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri Khanaposhtani, Maryam; Kaboli, Mohammad; Karami, Mahmoud; Etemad, Vahid

    2012-08-01

    Structurally complex forests provide more diverse conditions in comparison to homogenous forests because of greater variety of microhabitats and trees. This study assesses the association of bird species richness, abundance, and distributional pattern with habitat complexity (HC) in Kheyrud Forest in the north of Iran. Birds were surveyed during spring 2009 by 100 point counts. In each point count six habitat features related to the index of HC were computed and scored from 0 to 3. Then the scores were summed and divided into two groups of low and high complexity, HC ≤ 6 and HC > 6, respectively. To compare bird richness and abundance in different HCs, a two sample t-test was used. Presence and absence of bird species at each plot as a dependent variable were compared with the vegetation characteristics as an independent variable by means of the Canonical Correspondence Analysis. The results revealed bird species richness and abundance were significantly higher in more complex habitats. Bird species can be divided into two groups, the first group including species which associated with late successional stages and the second group, species belonging to early successional stages. Numbers of birds belonging to the first group declined in less complex forests, whereas the numbers of birds belonging to the second group increased. At the stand scale, our results reveal that bird abundance and richness are strongly associated with the complexity of vegetation structure in the study area.

  13. Effect of Habitat Complexity on Richness, Abundance and Distributional Pattern of Forest Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri Khanaposhtani, Maryam; Kaboli, Mohammad; Karami, Mahmoud; Etemad, Vahid

    2012-08-01

    Structurally complex forests provide more diverse conditions in comparison to homogenous forests because of greater variety of microhabitats and trees. This study assesses the association of bird species richness, abundance, and distributional pattern with habitat complexity (HC) in Kheyrud Forest in the north of Iran. Birds were surveyed during spring 2009 by 100 point counts. In each point count six habitat features related to the index of HC were computed and scored from 0 to 3. Then the scores were summed and divided into two groups of low and high complexity, HC ≤ 6 and HC > 6, respectively. To compare bird richness and abundance in different HCs, a two sample t-test was used. Presence and absence of bird species at each plot as a dependent variable were compared with the vegetation characteristics as an independent variable by means of the Canonical Correspondence Analysis. The results revealed bird species richness and abundance were significantly higher in more complex habitats. Bird species can be divided into two groups, the first group including species which associated with late successional stages and the second group, species belonging to early successional stages. Numbers of birds belonging to the first group declined in less complex forests, whereas the numbers of birds belonging to the second group increased. At the stand scale, our results reveal that bird abundance and richness are strongly associated with the complexity of vegetation structure in the study area.

  14. Effect of habitat complexity on richness, abundance and distributional pattern of forest birds.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri Khanaposhtani, Maryam; Kaboli, Mohammad; Karami, Mahmoud; Etemad, Vahid

    2012-08-01

    Structurally complex forests provide more diverse conditions in comparison to homogenous forests because of greater variety of microhabitats and trees. This study assesses the association of bird species richness, abundance, and distributional pattern with habitat complexity (HC) in Kheyrud Forest in the north of Iran. Birds were surveyed during spring 2009 by 100 point counts. In each point count six habitat features related to the index of HC were computed and scored from 0 to 3. Then the scores were summed and divided into two groups of low and high complexity, HC ≤ 6 and HC > 6, respectively. To compare bird richness and abundance in different HCs, a two sample t-test was used. Presence and absence of bird species at each plot as a dependent variable were compared with the vegetation characteristics as an independent variable by means of the Canonical Correspondence Analysis. The results revealed bird species richness and abundance were significantly higher in more complex habitats. Bird species can be divided into two groups, the first group including species which associated with late successional stages and the second group, species belonging to early successional stages. Numbers of birds belonging to the first group declined in less complex forests, whereas the numbers of birds belonging to the second group increased. At the stand scale, our results reveal that bird abundance and richness are strongly associated with the complexity of vegetation structure in the study area. PMID:22661015

  15. Observations and Measurements Design Patterns within INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleidt, K.; Cox, S.; Grellet, S.; Lowe, D.; Lutz, M.; Portele, C.; Sarretta, A.; Ventouras, S.

    2012-04-01

    Several INSPIRE spatial data themes have been specified so that their scope, in addition to classical geographic information, includes measured, modelled or simulated data. The FprEN ISO 19156 standard on Observations and Measurements (O&M) was designed for the explicit purpose of creating application schemas for such data, and thus shall be used in INSPIRE as a basis for developing data models for these themes. The following INSPIRE themes have identified O&M as integrally relevant to their thematic domain and are including elements of O&M in their data specifications: • Geology • Oceanographic geographical features • Atmospheric conditions and Meteorological geographical features • Environmental monitoring facilities • Soil In addition to these themes, several other INSPIRE themes have been identified to which observational information, while not at the core of the data specification, is relevant. Some examples of this are the INSPIRE theme "Species distribution", where primary occurrence data could be provided together with the aggregate distribution, as well as "Industrial and production facilities", where the provision of emissions data on such facilities would be useful for various environmental reporting obligations. While the O&M standard provides a generic framework for the provision of measurement data, it is also kept very abstract, and there are many ways of implementing the core structures in specific application schemas. In order to assure the consistent application of the O&M classes and properties across different INSPIRE themes, a cross-thematic working group on the use of O&M in INSPIRE has been convened. This group has analysed the requirements towards O&M within INSPIRE, identified the types of O&M design patterns required in INSPIRE and developed both additional classes identified as necessary within INSPIRE as well as guidelines detailing how this standard is to be used within INSPIRE. Some examples for these additional classes are

  16. Measurement of the Elemental Abundances in Four Rich Clusters of Galaxies. I. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Loewenstein, M.; Arnaud, K. A.; Tamura, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Matsushita, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Hatsukade, I.

    1996-08-01

    The elemental abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Ar, and Fe for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, 1060, 2199, and AWM 7) are determined from X-ray spectra derived from Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics performance verification phase observations. Since the gas in the outer parts of the cluster is optically thin and virtually isothermal, the abundance analysis is very straightforward compared to the analysis of stellar or H II region spectra. We find that the abundance ratios of all four clusters are very similar. The mean abundances of O, Ne, Si, S, and Fe are 0.48, 0.62, 0.65, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, relative to solar. The abundances of Si, S, and Fe are unaffected by the uncertainties in the atomic physics of the Fe L shell. The abundances of Ne and Mg and to a lesser extent O are affected by the present uncertainties in Fe L physics and are thus somewhat more uncertain. The Fe abundances derived from the Fe L lines agree well with those derived from the Fe K lines for these clusters. The observed ratio of the relative abundance of elements is consistent with an origin of all the metals in Type II supernovae. The presence of large numbers of Type II supernovae during the early stages of evolution of cluster galaxies is a very strong constraint on all models of galaxy and chemical evolution and implies either a very flat initial mass function or bimodal star formation during the period when most of the metals were created.

  17. Physical properties (particle size, rock abundance) from thermal infrared remote observations: Implications for Mars landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    1994-01-01

    Critical to the assessment of potential sites for the 1997 Pathfinder landing is estimation of general physical properties of the martian surface. Surface properties have been studied using a variety of spacecraft and earth-based remote sensing observations, plus in situ studies at the Viking lander sites. Because of their value in identifying landing hazards and defining scientific objectives, we focus this discussion on thermal inertia and rock abundance derived from middle-infrared (6 to 30 microns) observations. Used in conjunction with other datasets, particularly albedo and Viking orbiter images, thermal inertia and rock abundance provide clues about the properties of potential Mars landing sites.

  18. The Ne-to-O abundance ratio of the interstellar medium from IBEX-Lo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on a two-year study to estimate the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Based on the first two years of observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, we determined the fluxes of interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne atoms at the Earth's orbit in spring 2009 and 2010. A temporal variation of the Ne/O abundance ratio at the Earth's orbit could be expected due to solar cycle-related effects such as changes of ionization. However, this study shows that there is no significant change in the Ne/O ratio at the Earths orbit from 2009 to 2010. We used time-dependent survival probabilities of the ISNs to calculate the Ne/O abundance ratio at the termination shock. Then we estimated the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the LIC with the use of filtration factors and the ionization fractions. From our analysis, the Ne/O abundance ratio in the LIC is 0.33 ± 0.07, which is in agreement with the abundance ratio inferred from pickup-ion measurements.

  19. Temporal patterns of protozooplankton abundance in the Clyde and Loch Striven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Rogerson, Andrew; Crawford, David W.

    1992-11-01

    The ciliate and flagellate protozooplankton of the Clyde Estuary and Loch Striven were investigated over a 12 month period in 1990. There were distinct differences in the patterns of occurrence and numbers of the Protozoa in the two brackish locations, attributable to different physical and chemical conditions. Phototrophic flagellate numbers were higher in Loch Striven, where overall chlorophyll a concentrations were also higher. In contrast heterotrophic flagellate densities were higher in the Clyde and were abundant throughout the year, while in Loch Striven they showed a distinct seasonal pattern with peak numbers occurring in the summer. Heterotrophic dinoflagellates were periodically very abundant, particularly in Loch Striven and the lower Clyde. The ciliate communities showed marked differences in species composition and higher numbers occurred in the Clyde compared to Loch Striven. Tintinnid ciliates formed a regular component of the community in Loch Striven, but were less common in the Clyde. However, aloricate ciliates, particularly oligotrichs and very small bactivorous ciliates (< 20 μm) dominated the ciliate assemblage. Apart from Laboea very few of the oligotrichs contained plastids, and were therefore not practising mixotrophy. In both systems the microbial plankton is largely dependent on allochthonous carbon. High turbidity, particularly in the Clyde resulted in low concentrations of chlorophyll a and a low incidence of mixotrophy among ciliates.

  20. Endogenous and exogenous factors controlling temporal abundance patterns of tropical mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Brook, Barry W; Whelan, Peter I; Cleland, Sam; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2008-12-01

    patterns. This work also indicates that climate change, via continued increases in rainfall and higher expected frequencies and intensities of high tide events with sea level rise, will alter mosquito abundance trends in northern Australia.

  1. A double-observer approach for estimating detection probability and abundance from point counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Fallon, F.W.; Fallon, J.E.; Heglund, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Although point counts are frequently used in ornithological studies, basic assumptions about detection probabilities often are untested. We apply a double-observer approach developed to estimate detection probabilities for aerial surveys (Cook and Jacobson 1979) to avian point counts. At each point count, a designated 'primary' observer indicates to another ('secondary') observer all birds detected. The secondary observer records all detections of the primary observer as well as any birds not detected by the primary observer. Observers alternate primary and secondary roles during the course of the survey. The approach permits estimation of observer-specific detection probabilities and bird abundance. We developed a set of models that incorporate different assumptions about sources of variation (e.g. observer, bird species) in detection probability. Seventeen field trials were conducted, and models were fit to the resulting data using program SURVIV. Single-observer point counts generally miss varying proportions of the birds actually present, and observer and bird species were found to be relevant sources of variation in detection probabilities. Overall detection probabilities (probability of being detected by at least one of the two observers) estimated using the double-observer approach were very high (>0.95), yielding precise estimates of avian abundance. We consider problems with the approach and recommend possible solutions, including restriction of the approach to fixed-radius counts to reduce the effect of variation in the effective radius of detection among various observers and to provide a basis for using spatial sampling to estimate bird abundance on large areas of interest. We believe that most questions meriting the effort required to carry out point counts also merit serious attempts to estimate detection probabilities associated with the counts. The double-observer approach is a method that can be used for this purpose.

  2. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  3. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  4. First-generation black-hole-forming supernovae and the metal abundance pattern of a very iron-poor star.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2003-04-24

    It has been proposed theoretically that the first generation of stars in the Universe (population III) would be as massive as 100 solar masses (100 M(O)), because of inefficient cooling of the precursor gas clouds. Recently, the most iron-deficient (but still carbon-rich) low-mass star--HE0107-5240--was discovered. If this is a population III star that gained its metals (elements heavier than helium) after its formation, it would challenge the theoretical picture of the formation of the first stars. Here we report that the patterns of elemental abundance in HE0107-5240 (and other extremely metal-poor stars) are in good accord with the nucleosynthesis that occurs in stars with masses of 20-130 M(O) when they become supernovae if, during the explosions, the ejecta undergo substantial mixing and fallback to form massive black holes. Such supernovae have been observed. The abundance patterns are not, however, consistent with enrichment by supernovae from stars in the range 130-300 M(O). We accordingly infer that the first-generation supernovae came mostly from explosions of approximately 20-130 M(O) stars; some of these produced iron-poor but carbon- and oxygen-rich ejecta. Low-mass second-generation stars, like HE0107-5240, could form because the carbon and oxygen provided pathways for the gas to cool.

  5. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Smithwick, Erica A H; Naithani, Kusum J; Balser, Teri C; Romme, William H; Turner, Monica G

    2012-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2) determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa) forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m). Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R²<0.29). Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21(st) Century. PMID:23226324

  6. Post-Fire Spatial Patterns of Soil Nitrogen Mineralization and Microbial Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Smithwick, Erica A. H.; Naithani, Kusum J.; Balser, Teri C.; Romme, William H.; Turner, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2) determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa) forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m). Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R2<0.29). Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21st Century. PMID:23226324

  7. Abundance Variations and Flows in Plage Regions Observed with CDS/SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rank, G.; Bagalá, L. G.; Czaykowska, A.; Haerendel, G.

    1999-10-01

    We present results from CDS/SOHO observations of the spotless active region NOAA-8208, obtained on 28th April 1998 near disk center. MDI images show a bipolar magnetic configuration. The regions of enhanced He I emission correspond to the areas with strong magnetic flux and also with bright plage areas seen in Ca II and H-alpha images. A high correlation is found between intensity maps of the transition region lines He I (logTmax = 4.3), O III (logTmax = 5.0), and O V (logTmax = 5.4). The line-of-sight velocities of He I reveal a strong downflow in the plage areas. Further, the line-of-sight velocities of He I, O III, and O V are well correlated, showing that the downflow pattern exists up to temperatures of about 0.25 MK. At higher temperatures (Mg VIII at logTmax = 5.8) this flow is not detected, suggesting that material streams into the plage region from sideways in the high transition region. Maps of the electron density in the transition region have been constructed from several line ratios yielding densities of about 9.0 cm-3 in the plage regions, about dex 0.5 cm-3 higher compared to the surrounding. To study the spatial variation of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the abundance ratio has been mapped for the ion ratio MgVI/NeVI. The ratio is highly variable on spatial scales down to a few arcsec from photospheric values to enhancements of a factor of 10. The strongest FIP enhancements are not correlated with transition region line emission, but are found outside of the plage regions. Some areas of strong FIP enhancement appear stretched and elongated, suggesting that the material is confined in loop-like structures.

  8. Element Abundances in High-temperature Solar Flare Plasma from MESSENGER SAX Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Kenneth; Schwartz, Richard A.; Starr, Richard D.; Tolbert, Anne K

    2014-06-01

    X-ray spectral measurements of many solar flares made with the MESSENGER SAX instrument have been used to determine the abundances of Fe, Ca, Ar, S, and Si in the high temperature plasma. All available data from launch in 2004 to date have been used to obtain spectral fits to the SAX data from 2.3 to 8.5 keV for all time intervals with a detectable count rate in the Fe-line complex at 6.7 keV. For each time interval, OSPEX, our object-oriented IDL spectral analysis program, is used to obtain values of the emission measure, temperature distribution, and abundances that give the best-fit of the corresponding CHIANTI photon spectrum folded through the instrument response matrix to the measured count-rate spectrum above background. Distributions will be presented of element abundances for each flare and for all flares detected during each year of observations. Variations in measured abundances will be discussed as to whether they reflect real differences from the mean or differences due to statistical and/or systematic uncertainties. Comparisons will be made with abundance measurements made from other data sets, in particular by Phillips and Dennis (2012) using data from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and by Warren et al. (2013) using data from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).Phillips, K. J. H. and Dennis, B. R., “The Solar Flare Iron Abundance,” 2012, ApJ, 748, 52.Warren, H. “Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares,” 2013, arXiv, 2013arXiv1310.4765W

  9. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  10. Fish assemblage in a semi-arid Neotropical reservoir: composition, structure and patterns of diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Novaes, J L C; Moreira, S I L; Freire, C E C; Sousa, M M O; Costa, R S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the composition, structure and spatial and temporal patterns of diversity and abundance of the ichthyofauna of the Santa Cruz Reservoir in semi-arid Brazil. Data were collected quarterly at eight sampling locations on the reservoir between February 2010 and November 2011 using gillnets from 12- to 70-mm mesh that were left in the water for 12h00min during the night. We evaluated the composition, structure and assemblage descriptors (Shannon-Wiener diversity index and equitability, respectively) and catch per unit effort by the number (CPUEn) and biomass (CPUEb) of the ichthyofauna. The 6,047 individuals (399,211.6 g) captured represented three orders, ten families and 20 species, of which four belonged to introduced species. The family Characidae was the most abundant with a total of 2,772 (45.8%) individuals captured. The species-abundance curve fit the log-normal model. In the spatial analysis of diversity, there were significant differences between sampling sites in the lacustrine and fluvial regions, and the highest values were found in the lacustrine region. In the temporal analysis of diversity, significant differences were also observed between the rainy and dry seasons, and the higher values were found during the dry season. Equitability followed the same spatiotemporal pattern as diversity. The Spearman correlation was significantly negative between diversity and rainfall. A cluster analysis spatially separated the ichthyofauna into two groups: one group formed by sampling sites in the fluvial region and another group formed by the remainder of the points in the lacustrine region. Both the CPUEn and CPUEb values were higher at point 8 (fluvial region) and during the rainy season. A two-way ANOVA showed that the CPUEn and CPUEb values were spatially and temporally significant. We conclude that the spatial and temporal trends of diversity in the Santa Cruz reservoir differ from those of other Brazilian reservoirs but that

  11. Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Hocking, Daniel J; Conner, Christopher A; Earl, Julia E; Harper, Elizabeth B; Osbourn, Michael S; Peterman, William E; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-03-01

    Phenology often determines the outcome of interspecific interactions, where early-arriving species often dominate interactions over those arriving later. The effects of phenology on species interactions are especially pronounced in aquatic systems, but the evidence is largely derived from experimental studies. We examined whether differences in breeding phenology between two pond-breeding salamanders (Ambystoma annulatum and A. maculatum) affected metamorph recruitment and demographic traits within natural populations, with the expectation that the fall-breeding A. annulatum would negatively affect the spring-breeding A. maculatum. We monitored populations of each species at five ponds over 4 years using drift fences. Metamorph abundance and survival of A. annulatum were affected by intra- and interspecific processes, whereas metamorph size and date of emigration were primarily influenced by intraspecific effects. Metamorph abundance, snout-vent length, date of emigration and survival for A. maculatum were all predicted by combinations of intra- and interspecific effects, but often showed negative relationships with A. annulatum metamorph traits and abundance. Size and date of metamorphosis were strongly correlated within each species, but in opposite patterns (negative for A. annulatum and positive for A. maculatum), suggesting that the two species use alternative strategies to enhance terrestrial survival and that these factors may influence their interactions. Our results match predictions from experimental studies that suggest recruitment is influenced by intra- and interspecific processes which are determined by phenological differences between species. Incorporating spatiotemporal variability when modeling population dynamics is necessary to understand the importance of phenology in species interactions, especially as shifts in phenology occur under climate change.

  12. Constraining Stellar Population Models. I. Age, Metallicity and Abundance Pattern Compilation for Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane; Graves, Genevieve; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive literature compilation of age, metallicity, and chemical abundance pattern information for the 41 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) studied by Schiavon et al. Our compilation constitutes a notable improvement over previous similar work, particularly in terms of chemical abundances. Its primary purpose is to enable detailed evaluations of and refinements to stellar population synthesis models designed to recover the above information for unresolved stellar systems based on their integrated spectra. However, since the Schiavon sample spans a wide range of the known GGC parameter space, our compilation may also benefit investigations related to a variety of astrophysical endeavors, such as the early formation of the Milky Way, the chemical evolution of GGCs, and stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. For instance, we confirm with our compiled data that the GGC system has a bimodal metallicity distribution and is uniformly enhanced in the α elements. When paired with the ages of our clusters, we find evidence that supports a scenario whereby the Milky Way obtained its globular clusters through two channels: in situ formation and accretion of satellite galaxies. The distributions of C, N, O, and Na abundances and the dispersions thereof per cluster corroborate the known fact that all GGCs studied so far with respect to multiple stellar populations have been found to harbor them. Finally, using data on individual stars, we verify that stellar atmospheres become progressively polluted by CN(O)-processed material after they leave the main sequence. We also uncover evidence which suggests that the α elements Mg and Ca may originate from more than one nucleosynthetic production site. We estimate that our compilation incorporates all relevant analyses from the literature up to mid-2012. As an aid to investigators in the fields named above, we provide detailed electronic tables of the data upon which our work is based at http

  13. Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Hocking, Daniel J; Conner, Christopher A; Earl, Julia E; Harper, Elizabeth B; Osbourn, Michael S; Peterman, William E; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-03-01

    Phenology often determines the outcome of interspecific interactions, where early-arriving species often dominate interactions over those arriving later. The effects of phenology on species interactions are especially pronounced in aquatic systems, but the evidence is largely derived from experimental studies. We examined whether differences in breeding phenology between two pond-breeding salamanders (Ambystoma annulatum and A. maculatum) affected metamorph recruitment and demographic traits within natural populations, with the expectation that the fall-breeding A. annulatum would negatively affect the spring-breeding A. maculatum. We monitored populations of each species at five ponds over 4 years using drift fences. Metamorph abundance and survival of A. annulatum were affected by intra- and interspecific processes, whereas metamorph size and date of emigration were primarily influenced by intraspecific effects. Metamorph abundance, snout-vent length, date of emigration and survival for A. maculatum were all predicted by combinations of intra- and interspecific effects, but often showed negative relationships with A. annulatum metamorph traits and abundance. Size and date of metamorphosis were strongly correlated within each species, but in opposite patterns (negative for A. annulatum and positive for A. maculatum), suggesting that the two species use alternative strategies to enhance terrestrial survival and that these factors may influence their interactions. Our results match predictions from experimental studies that suggest recruitment is influenced by intra- and interspecific processes which are determined by phenological differences between species. Incorporating spatiotemporal variability when modeling population dynamics is necessary to understand the importance of phenology in species interactions, especially as shifts in phenology occur under climate change. PMID:25413866

  14. Ocean Net Heat Flux Influences Seasonal to Interannual Patterns of Plankton Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Tim J.; Allen, Icarus; Atkinson, Angus; Bruun, John T.; Harmer, Rachel A.; Pingree, Robin D.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Somerfield, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the net heat flux (NHF) into the ocean have profound impacts on global climate. We analyse a long-term plankton time-series and show that the NHF is a critical indicator of ecosystem dynamics. We show that phytoplankton abundance and diversity patterns are tightly bounded by the switches between negative and positive NHF over an annual cycle. Zooplankton increase before the transition to positive NHF in the spring but are constrained by the negative NHF switch in autumn. By contrast bacterial diversity is decoupled from either NHF switch, but is inversely correlated (r = −0.920) with the magnitude of the NHF. We show that the NHF is a robust mechanistic tool for predicting climate change indicators such as spring phytoplankton bloom timing and length of the growing season. PMID:24918906

  15. Can the source–sink hypothesis explain macrofaunal abundance patterns in the abyss? A modelling test

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Sarah M.; Smith, Craig R.; Thurnherr, Andreas M.

    2015-01-01

    Low food availability is a major structuring force in deep-sea benthic communities, sustaining only very low densities of organisms in parts of the abyss. These low population densities may result in an Allee effect, whereby local reproductive success is inhibited, and populations are maintained by larval dispersal from bathyal slopes. This slope–abyss source–sink (SASS) hypothesis suggests that the abyssal seafloor constitutes a vast sink habitat with macrofaunal populations sustained only by an influx of larval ‘refugees' from source areas on continental slopes, where higher productivity sustains greater population densities. Abyssal macrofaunal population densities would thus be directly related to larval inputs from bathyal source populations. We evaluate three predictions derived from the SASS hypothesis: (i) slope-derived larvae can be passively transported to central abyssal regions within a single larval period, (ii) projected larval export from slopes to the abyss reproduces global patterns of macrofaunal abundance and (iii) macrofaunal abundance decreases with distance from the continental slope. We find that abyssal macrofaunal populations are unlikely to be sustained solely through influx of larvae from slope sources. Rather, local reproduction probably sustains macrofaunal populations in relatively high-productivity abyssal areas, which must also be considered as potential larval source areas for more food-poor abyssal regions. PMID:25948686

  16. Can the source-sink hypothesis explain macrofaunal abundance patterns in the abyss? A modelling test.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sarah M; Smith, Craig R; Thurnherr, Andreas M

    2015-06-01

    Low food availability is a major structuring force in deep-sea benthic communities, sustaining only very low densities of organisms in parts of the abyss. These low population densities may result in an Allee effect, whereby local reproductive success is inhibited, and populations are maintained by larval dispersal from bathyal slopes. This slope-abyss source-sink (SASS) hypothesis suggests that the abyssal seafloor constitutes a vast sink habitat with macrofaunal populations sustained only by an influx of larval 'refugees' from source areas on continental slopes, where higher productivity sustains greater population densities. Abyssal macrofaunal population densities would thus be directly related to larval inputs from bathyal source populations. We evaluate three predictions derived from the SASS hypothesis: (i) slope-derived larvae can be passively transported to central abyssal regions within a single larval period, (ii) projected larval export from slopes to the abyss reproduces global patterns of macrofaunal abundance and (iii) macrofaunal abundance decreases with distance from the continental slope. We find that abyssal macrofaunal populations are unlikely to be sustained solely through influx of larvae from slope sources. Rather, local reproduction probably sustains macrofaunal populations in relatively high-productivity abyssal areas, which must also be considered as potential larval source areas for more food-poor abyssal regions. PMID:25948686

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE PUZZLING ABUNDANCE PATTERN IN THE STARS OF THE FORNAX DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongjie; Cui Wenyuan; Zhang Bo

    2013-09-20

    Many works have found unusual characteristics of elemental abundances in nearby dwarf galaxies. This implies that there is a key factor of galactic evolution that is different from that of the Milky Way (MW). The chemical abundances of the stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Fornax dSph) provide excellent information for setting constraints on the models of galactic chemical evolution. In this work, adopting the five-component approach, we fit the abundances of the Fornax dSph stars, including {alpha} elements, iron group elements, and neutron-capture elements. For most sample stars, the relative contributions from the various processes to the elemental abundances are not usually in the MW proportions. We find that the contributions from massive stars to the primary {alpha} elements and iron group elements increase monotonically with increasing [Fe/H]. This means that the effect of the galactic wind is not strong enough to halt star formation and the contributions from the massive stars to {alpha} elements did not halt for [Fe/H] {approx}< -0.5. The average contribution ratios of various processes between the dSph stars and the MW stars monotonically decrease with increasing progenitor mass. This is important evidence of a bottom-heavy initial mass function (IMF) for the Fornax dSph, compared to the MW. Considering a bottom-heavy IMF for the dSph, the observed relations of [{alpha}/Fe] versus [Fe/H], [iron group/Fe] versus [Fe/H], and [neutron-capture/Fe] versus [Fe/H] for the dSph stars can be explained.

  18. Using cm observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains in Galactic cold cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stevenson, M. A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Ysard, N.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rumsey, C.; Villadsen, J.

    2016-03-01

    In this analysis, we illustrate how the relatively new emission mechanism, known as spinning dust, can be used to characterize dust grains in the interstellar medium. We demonstrate this by using spinning dust emission observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains (a ≲ 10 nm) in a sample of Galactic cold cores. Using the physical properties of the cores in our sample as inputs to a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of emission at a wavelength of 1 cm for four different very small dust grain abundances, which we constrain by comparing to 1 cm CARMA observations. For all of our cores, we find a depletion of very small grains, which we suggest is due to the process of grain growth. This work represents the first time that spinning dust emission has been used to constrain the physical properties of interstellar dust grains.

  19. How within field abundance and spatial distribution patterns of earthworms and macropores depend on soil tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaik, Loes; Palm, Juliane; Schröder, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms play a key role in soil systems. They are ecosystem engineers affecting soil structure as well as the transport and availability of water and solutes through their burrowing behaviour. There are three different ecological earthworm types with different burrowing behaviour that can result in varying local infiltration patterns: from rapid deep vertical infiltration to a stronger diffuse distribution of water and solutes in the upper soil layers. The small scale variation in earthworm abundance is often very high and within fields earthworm population processes might result in an aggregated pattern. The question arises how the local distribution of earthworms affects spatial distributions of macroporosity and how both are influenced by soil tillage. Therefore we performed a total number of 430 earthworm samplings on four differently tilled agricultural fields in the Weiherbach catchment (South East Germany). Additionally, at a limited amount of 32 locations on two of the fields we performed sprinkling experiments with brilliant blue and excavated the soil to count macropores at different soil depths (10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm) to compare macropore distributions to the earthworm distributions.

  20. Molecular abundance profiles characterization of Jupiter'satmosphere using ground-based observations at 5 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doriann, Blain; Fouchet, Thierry; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Drossart, Pierre; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on early results of an observational campaign to support the Juno mission. At the beginning of this year, using TEXES (Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained maps of Jupiter in several spectral ranges between 1800 and 2200 cm-1 which probes the atmosphere in the 1-4 bar region, with a spectral resolution of R ≈ 7000 and an angular resolution of ≈ 1.5''. This dataset is analyzed by a code which combines a line-by-line radiative transfer model with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. The inversion takes into account the abundance profiles of AsH3 , CO, GeH4 and H2O, as well as clouds contribution, in addtion to the abundance profiles of NH3 and PH3 . We will present the inverted abundance profiles, their significance for the understanding of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics, and how they will be useful for the determination of water abundance up to 200 bars, which is one of the main objectives of the instrument MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) mounted on the Juno spacecraft. This work will also be useful to prepare the analysis of the JIRAM (Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper) 5-microns data aboard Juno.

  1. Numerical simulations of barnacle larval dispersion coupled with field observations on larval abundance, settlement and recruitment in a tropical monsoon influenced coastal marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Chetan A.; Samiksha, S. V.; George, Grinson; Aboobacker, V. M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2012-06-01

    Larval abundance in an area depends on various factors which operate over different spatial and temporal scales. Identifying the factors responsible for variations in larval supply and abundance is important to understand the settlement and recruitment variability of their population in a particular area. In view of this, observations were carried out to monitor the larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles on a regular basis for a period of two years. The results were then compared with the numerical modelling studies carried out along the west coast of India. Field observations of larval abundance showed temporal variations. The least abundance of larvae was mostly observed during the monsoon season and the peak in abundance was mostly observed during the pre-monsoon season. Numerical simulations also showed a seasonal change in larval dispersion and retention patterns. During pre-monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards south and the larvae released from the northern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuaries, whereas during the monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards north and the larvae released from southern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuary. During post-monsoon season, the larval movement was found towards the north in the beginning of the season and is shifted towards the south at the end of the season, but the movement was mostly restricted near to the release sites. Larval supply from the adjacent rocky sites to the estuaries was higher during the pre-monsoon season and the retention of larvae released from different sites within the estuaries was found to be highest during the late post-monsoon and early pre-monsoon season. Maximum larval supply and retention during the pre-monsoon season coincided with maximum larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles observed in the field studies. These observations showed that the pattern of

  2. Water abundances in high-mass protostellar envelopes: Herschel observations with HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marseille, M. G.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Herpin, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Chavarría, L.; Pietropaoli, B.; Baudry, A.; Bontemps, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Jacq, T.; Frieswijk, W.; Shipman, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bachiller, R.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Caselli, P.; Caux, E.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; Dieleman, P.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Gaier, T.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jackson, B.; Javadi, H.; Jellema, W.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kester, D.; Kristensen, L. E.; Larsson, B.; Laauwen, W.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; Luinge, W.; McCoey, C.; Megej, A.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Nisini, B.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Roelfsema, P.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Siegel, P.; Stutzki, J.; Tafalla, M.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: We derive the dense core structure and the water abundance in four massive star-forming regions in the hope of understanding the earliest stages of massive star formation. Methods: We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the para-H2O 111-000 and 202-111 and the para-H_218O 111-000 transitions. The envelope contribution to the line profiles is separated from contributions by outflows and foreground clouds. The envelope contribution is modeled with Monte-Carlo radiative transfer codes for dust and molecular lines (MC3D and RATRAN), and the water abundance and the turbulent velocity width as free parameters. Results: While the outflows are mostly seen in emission in high-J lines, envelopes are seen in absorption in ground-state lines, which are almost saturated. The derived water abundances range from 5×10-10 to 4×10-8 in the outer envelopes. We detect cold clouds surrounding the protostar envelope, thanks to the very high quality of the Herschel/HIFI data and the unique ability of water to probe them. Several foreground clouds are also detected along the line of sight. Conclusions: The low H2O abundances in massive dense cores are in accordance with the expectation that high densities and low temperatures lead to freeze-out of water on dust grains. The spread in abundance values is not clearly linked to physical properties of the sources. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation of NASA.Appendix (pages 6 to 7) is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Accurate fundamental parameters and detailed abundance patterns from spectroscopy of 93 solar-type Kepler targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntt, H.; Basu, S.; Smalley, B.; Chaplin, W. J.; Verner, G. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Catala, C.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Thygesen, A. O.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Karoff, C.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Appourchaux, T.; Campante, T. L.; Elsworth, Y.; García, R. A.; Handberg, R.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Régulo, C.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Morris, R. L.; Quintana, E. V.; Sanderfer, D. T.

    2012-06-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic study of 93 solar-type stars that are targets of the NASA/Kepler mission and provide detailed chemical composition of each target. We find that the overall metallicity is well represented by Fe lines. Relative abundances of light elements (CNO) and α elements are generally higher for low-metallicity stars. Our spectroscopic analysis benefits from the accurately measured surface gravity from the asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler light curves. The accuracy on the log g parameter is better than 0.03 dex and is held fixed in the analysis. We compare our Teff determination with a recent colour calibration of VT-KS [TYCHO V magnitude minus Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) KS magnitude] and find very good agreement and a scatter of only 80 K, showing that for other nearby Kepler targets, this index can be used. The asteroseismic log g values agree very well with the classical determination using Fe I-Fe II balance, although we find a small systematic offset of 0.08 dex (asteroseismic log g values are lower). The abundance patterns of metals, α elements and the light elements (CNO) show that a simple scaling by [Fe/H] is adequate to represent the metallicity of the stars, except for the stars with metallicity below -0.3, where α-enhancement becomes important. However, this is only important for a very small fraction of the Kepler sample. We therefore recommend that a simple scaling with [Fe/H] be employed in the asteroseismic analyses of large ensembles of solar-type stars.

  4. Relative coronal abundances derived from X-ray observations 3: The effect of cascades on the relative intensity of Fe (XVII) line fluxes, and a revised iron abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.; Rugge, H. R.; Weiss, K.

    1974-01-01

    Permitted lines in the optically thin coronal X-ray spectrum were analyzed to find the distribution of coronal material, as a function of temperature, without special assumptions concerning coronal conditions. The resonance lines of N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Ar which dominate the quiet coronal spectrum below 25A were observed. Coronal models were constructed and the relative abundances of these elements were determined. The intensity in the lines of the 2p-3d transitions near 15A was used in conjunction with these coronal models, with the assumption of coronal excitation, to determine the Fe XVII abundance. The relative intensities of the 2p-3d Fe XVII lines observed in the corona agreed with theoretical prediction. Using a more complete theoretical model, and higher resolution observations, a revised calculation of iron abundance relative to hydrogen of 0.000026 was made.

  5. [Relative abundance, population structure, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae), in Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lira-Torres, Iván; Briones-Salas, Miguel; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) is endangered primarily because of habitat loss and fragmentation, and overhunting throughout its distribution range. One of the priority land areas for the conservation of this species is the Northern part of its range in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca. The aim of this research was to determine the relative abundance, population struc- ture, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico, through the non-invasive technique of camera-trap sampling. A total of five sampling sessions were undertaken among 2009-2013, and used a total of 30 camera-traps in each period. The determinant factor of the sampling design was the hunting between two study areas. A total sampling effort of 9000 trap-days allowed to estimate an index of relative abundance (IRA) of 6.77 tapir photographs/1,000 trap-days (n = 61). IRA varied significantly between sampling stations (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.01). The frequency of Baird's tapir photos was higher in the dry season in tropical rain forest without hunting (χ2, p < 0.5). In the rainy season, the tropical rain forest and secondary vegetation habitats showed higher photo frequency than expected from random (χ2, p < 0.5). Considering population structure, a 95.08% of adult animals was obtained in photographic records (n = 58). Three types of activity pattern were observed, with more nocturnal records (88.33%; Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.05). The Chimalapas forest appears to be the second most important terrestrial priority ecoregion, just after the Mayan Forest (Campeche, Chiapas, Quintana Roo), for the conservation of tapir populations, not only for Mexico but also for Central America. PMID:25720176

  6. [Relative abundance, population structure, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae), in Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lira-Torres, Iván; Briones-Salas, Miguel; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) is endangered primarily because of habitat loss and fragmentation, and overhunting throughout its distribution range. One of the priority land areas for the conservation of this species is the Northern part of its range in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca. The aim of this research was to determine the relative abundance, population struc- ture, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico, through the non-invasive technique of camera-trap sampling. A total of five sampling sessions were undertaken among 2009-2013, and used a total of 30 camera-traps in each period. The determinant factor of the sampling design was the hunting between two study areas. A total sampling effort of 9000 trap-days allowed to estimate an index of relative abundance (IRA) of 6.77 tapir photographs/1,000 trap-days (n = 61). IRA varied significantly between sampling stations (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.01). The frequency of Baird's tapir photos was higher in the dry season in tropical rain forest without hunting (χ2, p < 0.5). In the rainy season, the tropical rain forest and secondary vegetation habitats showed higher photo frequency than expected from random (χ2, p < 0.5). Considering population structure, a 95.08% of adult animals was obtained in photographic records (n = 58). Three types of activity pattern were observed, with more nocturnal records (88.33%; Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.05). The Chimalapas forest appears to be the second most important terrestrial priority ecoregion, just after the Mayan Forest (Campeche, Chiapas, Quintana Roo), for the conservation of tapir populations, not only for Mexico but also for Central America.

  7. HHSMT observations of the Venusian mesospheric temperature, winds, and CO abundance around the MESSENGER flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Miriam; Hartogh, Paul; Jarchow, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    We present submillimeter observations of 12CO J=3-2 and 2-1, and 13CO J=2-1 lines of the Venusian mesosphere and lower thermosphere with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT) taken around the second MESSENGER flyby of Venus on 5 June 2007. The observations cover a range of Venus solar elongations with different fractional disk illuminations. Preliminary results like temperature and CO abundance profiles are presented. These data are part of a coordinated observational campaign in support of the ESA Venus Express mission. Furthermore, this study attempts to contribute to cross-calibrate space- and ground-based observations, to constrain radiative transfer and retrieval algorithms for planetary atmospheres, and to a more thorough understanding of the global patters of circulation of the Venusian atmosphere.

  8. The planetary nebulae populations in five galaxies: abundance patterns and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasińska, G.; Richer, M. G.; McCall, M. L.

    1998-08-01

    We have collected photometric and spectroscopic data on planetary nebulae (PNe) in 5 galaxies: the Milky Way (bulge), M 31 (bulge), M 32, the LMC and the SMC. We have computed the abundances of O, Ne and N and compared them from one galaxy to another. In each Galaxy, the distribution of oxygen abundances has a large dispersion. The average O/H ratio is larger in the M 31 and the Galactic bulge PNe than in those in the Magellanic Clouds. In a given galaxy, it is also larger for PNe with [O III] luminosities greater than 100 L_⊙, which are likely to probe more recent epochs in the galaxy history. We find that the M 31 and the Galactic bulge PNe extend the very tight Ne/H-O/H correlation observed in the Galactic disk and Magellanic Clouds PNe towards higher metallicities. We note that the anticorrelation between N/O and O/H that was known to occur in the Magellanic Clouds and in the disk PNe is also marginally found in the PNe of the Galactic bulge. Furthermore, we find that high N/O ratios are higher for less luminous PNe. In M 32, all PNe have a large N/O ratio, indicating that the stellar nitrogen abundance is enhanced in this galaxy. We have also compared the PN evolution in the different galactic systems by constructing diagrams that are independent of abundances, and have found strikingly different behaviours of the various samples. In order to help in the interpretation of these data, we have constructed a grid of expanding, PN photoionization models in which the central stars evolve according to the evolutionary tracks of Bl{öcker (1995). These models show that the apparent spectroscopic properties of PNe are extremely dependent, not only on the central stars, but also on the masses and expansion velocities of the nebular envelopes. The main conclusion of the confrontation of the observed samples with the model grids is that the PN populations are indeed not the same in the various parent galaxies. Both stars and nebulae are different. In particular, the

  9. On the abundance and activity pattern of zoobenthos inhabiting a tropical reef area, Cebu, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, A.

    1984-12-01

    A benthic faunal study was carried out in the tidal area of Mactan Island (Cebu, Philippines). The area was subdivided along a transect from the beach to the reef according to benthic assemblages. The sediments are largely composed of calcareous skeletal remains of the indigenous biota and surrounding calcareous rocks. The content of protein and carbohydrates of the sediment was estimated, providing an approximation of organic matter in terms of feeding efficiency. Total number of zoobenthos, both as regards the sediment samples and as to the epifaunal communities associated with seaweeds, is rather uniformly distributed justifying the 95% confidence level ( P>0.05). Distinct differences are apparent in abundance values of individual taxa. Although the study area showed the expected distribution pattern, with dominance of Nematoda (39%) living in sediment and Harpacticoida (36 66%) dwelling on Thalassia and algae, Polychaeta reveal a dominant attraction to both these habitats. The reasons for this phenomenon are discussed in relation to the absolute lack of macrofaunal predators The zoobenthos adjust their distribution and activity to fluctuating conditions of the environment. Light is mainly suggested as stimulating diel migration activities of the benthic fauna, moving upwards from the sediment to the algae and Thalassia during daytime. In a field experiment the zoobenthos was investigated for digestion activity over a diurnal cycle. The results reveal that feeding activity of zoobenthos follows a diel cycle showing maximum activity during the morning and evening obviously influenced by changes of light.

  10. Periodic behaviors in the observed vertical column abundances of atmospheric hydroxyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Elizabeth Beaver; Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The data base for the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) for Fritz Peak Observatory, Colorado (40 N, 105 W), now extends from 1976 through 1988 and is composed of 8849 independent data sets, averaging about 15 percent uncertainty and 20-minute time resolution each. The dominant solar zenith angle (chi) dependence of the OH abundance is characterized by an empirical curve, N(88), which has been updated from N(82) to include all valid data from 1980 through 1988. The chi-dependence of the OH abundance has been, to a first order, removed from the data base by a normalization procedure in which each data point is divided by the N(88,AM) value for the corresponding solar zenith angle. The resulting normalized OH values may then be examined for other systematic effects, particularly for periodic variations. Observations have also been made at Boca Raton, Florida (26 N, 80 W) and at Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 N, 152 E). These data bases are much less extensive and, as such, are less amenable to analysis for periodic behaviors. Some comparisons with the Colorado data may be made, however.

  11. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s Increasing Atomic Sulfur Abundance Observed by Rosetta Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    Alice, NASA’s lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA’s comet orbiting spacecraft Rosetta (Stern et al. 2007), is continuing its characterization of the nucleus and coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) as it approaches and recedes from perihelion. With a spectral range from 700-2050 Å, Alice has the ability to detect the atomic sulfur multiplets at 1429 Å, 1479 Å and 1814 Å. Sulfur in C-G’s coma is most likely a dissociation product of CS2 and OCS, but could also be produced after a secondary dissociation from H2S and SO2, all molecular species measured in C-G’s coma by ROSINA, the Rosetta orbiter’s mass spectrometer.Due to low abundances, Alice did not detect sulfur atoms at C-G until May 2015 when the comet was at ~1.7 AU and still 3 months from perihelion. Now, sulfur is ubiquitous in Alice observations above the limb of the nucleus. There is evidence that there is not a strong dependence of the abundance of sulfur on the distance from the nucleus in the pre-perihelion radial profiles of the gas, which may be indicative of the parent molecule and its distribution. This will be investigated further. The evolution of the presence of the three sulfur multiplets, their relative abundances and excitation processes, and behavior pre- and post-perihelion will be presented.

  12. Water abundance variations around high-mass protostars: HIFI observations of the DR21 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Marseille, M. G.; Herpin, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Baudry, A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Doty, S.; Frieswijk, W.; Melnick, G.; Shipman, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Benz, A. O.; Caselli, P.; Hogerheijde, M.; Johnstone, D.; Liseau, R.; Bachiller, R.; Benedettini, M.; Bergin, E.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G.; Bruderer, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G.; Jørgensen, J.; Kristensen, L.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; McCoey, C.; Neufeld, D.; Nisini, B.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago, J.; Saraceno, P.; Tafalla, M.; van Kempen, T.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S.; Yıldız, U.; Ravera, L.; Roelfsema, P.; Siebertz, O.; Teyssier, D.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Water is a key molecule in the star formation process, but its spatial distribution in star-forming regions is not well known. Aims: We study the distribution of dust continuum and H2O and 13CO line emission in DR21, a luminous star-forming region with a powerful outflow and a compact H ii region. Methods: Herschel-HIFI spectra near 1100 GHz show narrow 13CO 10-9 emission and H2O 111-000 absorption from the dense core and broad emission from the outflow in both lines. The H2O line also shows absorption by a foreground cloud known from ground-based observations of low-J CO lines. Results: The dust continuum emission is extended over 36” FWHM, while the 13CO and H2O lines are confined to ≈24” or less. The foreground absorption appears to peak further North than the other components. Radiative transfer models indicate very low abundances of ~2×10-10 for H2O and ~8×10-7 for 13CO in the dense core, and higher H2O abundances of ~4×10-9 in the foreground cloud and ~7×10-7 in the outflow. Conclusions: The high H2O abundance in the warm outflow is probably due to the evaporation of water-rich icy grain mantles, while the H2O abundance is kept down by freeze-out in the dense core and by photodissociation in the foreground cloud. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. Does light explain damselfish Chromis viridis abundances observed over coral colonies?

    PubMed

    Ponton, D; Loiseau, N; Chabanet, P

    2012-06-01

    A single autonomous video camera was used to record the abundances of Chromis viridis over a branching Acropora sp. colony eight times per day over a period of 50 days. The poor explanatory power of global radiation suggests the need for recording the light really available to the fish, especially in the UV range. The increasing number of C. viridis observed with increasing wind along shore and water level may correspond to individuals swimming further from their shelter in order to get closer to the food carried by the water currents.

  14. Changes in seasonal nearshore zooplankton abundance patterns in Lake Ontario following establishment of the exotic predator Cercopagis pengoi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, David M.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Benoit, Hugues; Mills, Edward L.; Johannsson, Ora E.

    2006-01-01

    Cercopagis pengoi, a zooplanktivore first discovered in Lake Ontario in 1998, may reduce availability of prey for planktivorous fish. Cercoapgis pengoi is most abundant in late summer and fall. Therefore, we hypothesized that abundance of small zooplankton (bosminids and cyclopoids) species would decrease at that time. To determine if the establishment of C. pengoi was followed by changes in the zooplankton community, seasonal patterns in nearshore zooplankton collected from May to October 1995–2000 were examined. Early summer density of small zooplankton was similar in all years while late summer and fall densities were significantly lower in 1998–2000 than in 1995–1997. The declines of small zooplankton coincided seasonally with the peak in C. pengoidensity. Other possible causes for the observed changes in small zooplankton are less likely. High levels of fish predation should have resulted in smaller zooplankton in 1998–2000 than in 1995–1997 and larger declines in Daphnia than other groups. This was not observed. There was no significant decline in chlorophyll-a concentrations or changes in temperature between 1995–1997 and 1998–2000. Therefore, the declines in density of small zooplankton were most likely the result of C. pengoi predation. The effect of C. pengoi establishment on alewives is increased competition for zooplankton prey but C. pengoi has replaced a portion of the zooplankton biomass and adult alewife diet formerly dominated by Diacyclops thomasi and Bosmina longirostris.

  15. Patterns in Abundance, Cell Size and Pigment Content of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria along Environmental Gradients in Northern Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, Lisa; Cottrell, Matthew T.; Kirchman, David L.; Borrego, Carles M.; Garcia-Chaves, Maria Carolina; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    There is now evidence that aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are widespread across aquatic systems, yet the factors that determine their abundance and activity are still not well understood, particularly in freshwaters. Here we describe the patterns in AAP abundance, cell size and pigment content across wide environmental gradients in 43 temperate and boreal lakes of Québec. AAP bacterial abundance varied from 1.51 to 5.49 x 105 cells mL-1, representing <1 to 37% of total bacterial abundance. AAP bacteria were present year-round, including the ice-cover period, but their abundance relative to total bacterial abundance was significantly lower in winter than in summer (2.6% and 7.7%, respectively). AAP bacterial cells were on average two-fold larger than the average bacterial cell size, thus AAP cells made a greater relative contribution to biomass than to abundance. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) concentration varied widely across lakes, and was not related to AAP bacterial abundance, suggesting a large intrinsic variability in the cellular pigment content. Absolute and relative AAP bacterial abundance increased with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas cell-specific BChla content was negatively related to chlorophyll a (Chla). As a result, both the contribution of AAP bacteria to total prokaryotic abundance, and the cell-specific BChla pigment content were positively correlated with the DOC:Chla ratio, both peaking in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes. Our results suggest that photoheterotrophy might represent a significant ecological advantage in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes, where DOC pool is chemically and structurally more complex. PMID:25927833

  16. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  17. Suzaku Observations of AWM 7 Cluster of Galaxies: Temperatures, Abundances, and Bulk Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kosuke; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ishida, Manabu; Sasaki, Shin; Ohashi, Takaya

    2008-01-01

    We carried out 3 observations of the cluster of galaxies AWM 7, for the central region and 20'-east and 20'-west offset regions, with Suzaku. Temperature and abundance profiles were measured out to 27' simeq 570 h70-1kpc, which corresponded to ˜0.35r180. The temperature of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) slightly decreased from 3.8keV at the center to 3.4keV in the ˜0.35 r180 region, indicating a flatter profile than those in other nearby clusters. The abundance ratio of Si to Fe was almost constant in our observations, while the Mg-to-Fe ratio increased with radius from the cluster center. The O to Fe ratio in the west region showed an increase with radius, while that in the east region was almost flat, though the errors were relatively large. These features suggest that the enrichment process is significantly different between products of type II supernovae (O and Mg) and those by type Ia supernovae (Si and Fe). We also examined the positional shift of the central energy of a He-like Fe-Kα line, in search of possible rotation of the ICM. The 90% upper limit for the line-of-sight velocity difference was derived to be Δ v lesssim 2000kms-1, suggesting that the ellipticity of AWM 7 is rather caused by a recent directional infall of gas along the large-scale filament.

  18. Evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of avian influenza virus subtypes in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; González-Reiche, Ana S.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Carter, Deborah L.; Newsome, George M.; Müller, Maria L.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Perez, Daniel R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of influenza A viruses (IAVs) are driven by host density and population immunity. Through an analysis of subtypic data for IAVs isolated from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), we present evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of viral subtypes in spring and summer/autumn.

  19. Observations of the Nighttime Abundance of OClO in the Winter Stratosphere Above Thule, Greenland.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; Mount, G H; Sanders, R W; Jakoubek, R O; Schmeltekopf, A L

    1988-10-28

    Observations at Thule, Greenland, that made use of direct light from the moon on 2,3, 4,5, and 7 February 1988 revealed nighttime chlorine dioxide (OClO) abundances that were less than those obtained in Antarctica by about a factor of 5, but that exceeded model predictions based on homogeneous (gas-phase) photochemistry by about a factor of 10. The observed time scale for the formation of OClO after sunset strongly supports the current understanding of the diurnal chemistry of OClO. These data suggest that heterogeneous (surface) reactions due to polar stratospheric clouds can occur in the Arctic, providing a mechanism for possible Arctic ozone depletion.

  20. Fitting a Serial Correlation Pattern to Repeated Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lynne K.

    1991-01-01

    When repeated observations are taken at equal time intervals, a simple form of a stationary time series structure may be fitted to the observations. Use of correction factors is discussed. A computer simulation method is used to investigate power advantages of fitting a serial correlation pattern to repeated observations. (TJH)

  1. [Species-abundance distribution patterns along succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-min; Fan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Qing-pei; Fang, Kai; Fan, Fang-li; Yang, Guang-yao

    2015-12-01

    To detect the ecological process of the succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain, five niche models, i.e., broken stick model (BSM), niche preemption model (NPM), dominance preemption model (DPM), random assortment model (RAM) and overlap- ping niche model (ONM) were employed to describe the species-abundance distribution patterns (SDPs) of 15 samples. χ² test and Akaike information criterion (AIC) were used to test the fitting effects of the five models. The results showed that the optimal SDP models for P. glauca forest, bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broadleaved forest were DPM (χ² = 35.86, AIC = -69.77), NPM (χ² = 1.60, AIC = -94.68) and NPM (χ² = 0.35, AIC = -364.61), respectively. BSM also well fitted the SDP of bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broad-leaved forest, while it was unsuitable to describe the SDP of P. glauca forest. The fittings of RAM and ONM in the three forest types were all rejected by the χ² test and AIC. With the development of community succession from P. glauca forest to broadleaved forest, the species richness and evenness increased, and the optimal SDP model changed from DPM to NPM. It was inferred that the change of ecological process from habitat filtration to interspecific competition was the main driving force of the forest succession. The results also indicated that the application of multiple SDP models and test methods would be beneficial to select the best model and deeply understand the ecological process of community succession. PMID:27111994

  2. [Species-abundance distribution patterns along succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-min; Fan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Qing-pei; Fang, Kai; Fan, Fang-li; Yang, Guang-yao

    2015-12-01

    To detect the ecological process of the succession series of Phyllostachys glauca forest in a limestone mountain, five niche models, i.e., broken stick model (BSM), niche preemption model (NPM), dominance preemption model (DPM), random assortment model (RAM) and overlap- ping niche model (ONM) were employed to describe the species-abundance distribution patterns (SDPs) of 15 samples. χ² test and Akaike information criterion (AIC) were used to test the fitting effects of the five models. The results showed that the optimal SDP models for P. glauca forest, bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broadleaved forest were DPM (χ² = 35.86, AIC = -69.77), NPM (χ² = 1.60, AIC = -94.68) and NPM (χ² = 0.35, AIC = -364.61), respectively. BSM also well fitted the SDP of bamboo-broadleaved mixed forest and broad-leaved forest, while it was unsuitable to describe the SDP of P. glauca forest. The fittings of RAM and ONM in the three forest types were all rejected by the χ² test and AIC. With the development of community succession from P. glauca forest to broadleaved forest, the species richness and evenness increased, and the optimal SDP model changed from DPM to NPM. It was inferred that the change of ecological process from habitat filtration to interspecific competition was the main driving force of the forest succession. The results also indicated that the application of multiple SDP models and test methods would be beneficial to select the best model and deeply understand the ecological process of community succession.

  3. Limits on the Natural Oxygen-18 Abundance of Cellulose: Intra-molecular Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, L.; Jahren, H.; Anderson, W.; Pinzon, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose is an often-invoked quantitative proxy for multiple environmental factors, including paleotemperature, paleohumidity and paleoprecipitation patterns. A broad survey of aerial and aquatic plants reveals an upper limit to the 18O enrichment of cellulose relative to water at the site of cellulose synthesis, which we explain via the comparison of individual oxygen atoms within the cellulose molecule. We collected stems from various geographical regions, extracted stem water and cellulose and determined the oxygen isotope ratios of these two components. The cellulose was hydrolyzed to its glucose moieties and derivatized to determine the oxygen isotope ratios of the oxygens attached to carbon 3, 4, 5, 6 of the glucose moieties, which allowed us to calculate the oxygen isotope ratios of the oxygen attached to the carbon 2 of the glucose moieties. A compilation of results from our collection and from previous publications shows that δ18O values of cellulose increase with δ18O values of stem water only for samples having stem water with δ18O values below -10‰ (SMOW). However, the δ18O values of stem cellulose levels off and remains constant for stems having water with δ18O values greater than -10‰. This pattern suggests a limit on the enrichment of stem (and by inference tree ring) cellulose. This limitation had previously been ascribed to environmental factors affecting leaf water (e.g., humidity, stomatal conductance, solute potential). A compilation of the δ18O values of cellulose from aquatic plants versus that of their ambient water, however, shows the same general pattern which has been previously explained on the basis of evaporation rates and heterogeneities of lake water. We disprove the previous explanations by demonstrating differential isotopic effects on the oxygen atoms of the cellulose molecule. Our observation on the δ18O values of oxygen attached to carbon 2 versus those attached to carbon 3

  4. Spatial distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing archaea abundance in subtropical forests at early and late successional stages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Wei; Lian, Juyu; Ye, Wanhui; Shen, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution patterns of soil microorganisms is helpful in understanding the biogeochemical processes they perform, but has been less studied relative to those of macroorganisms. In this study, we investigated and compared the spatially explicit distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) abundance and the influential factors between an early (ES) and a late successional (LS) subtropical forest stand. The average AOA abundance, vegetational attributes, and soil nutrient contents were mostly greater in the LS than the ES stand (P = 0.085 or smaller), but their spatial variations were more pronounced in the ES than the LS stand. The spatial distribution patches of AOA abundance were smaller and more irregular in the ES stand (patch size <50 m) than in the LS stand (patch size about 120 m). Edaphic and vegetational variables contributed more to the spatial variations of AOA abundance for the ES (9.3%) stand than for LS stand, whereas spatial variables (MEMs) were the main contributors (62%) for the LS stand. These results suggest that environmental filtering likely influence the spatial distribution of AOA abundance at early successional stage more than that at late successional stage, while spatial dispersal is dominant at late successional stage. PMID:26565069

  5. Spatial distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing archaea abundance in subtropical forests at early and late successional stages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Wei; Lian, Juyu; Ye, Wanhui; Shen, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution patterns of soil microorganisms is helpful in understanding the biogeochemical processes they perform, but has been less studied relative to those of macroorganisms. In this study, we investigated and compared the spatially explicit distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) abundance and the influential factors between an early (ES) and a late successional (LS) subtropical forest stand. The average AOA abundance, vegetational attributes, and soil nutrient contents were mostly greater in the LS than the ES stand (P = 0.085 or smaller), but their spatial variations were more pronounced in the ES than the LS stand. The spatial distribution patches of AOA abundance were smaller and more irregular in the ES stand (patch size <50 m) than in the LS stand (patch size about 120 m). Edaphic and vegetational variables contributed more to the spatial variations of AOA abundance for the ES (9.3%) stand than for LS stand, whereas spatial variables (MEMs) were the main contributors (62%) for the LS stand. These results suggest that environmental filtering likely influence the spatial distribution of AOA abundance at early successional stage more than that at late successional stage, while spatial dispersal is dominant at late successional stage.

  6. Changes in protein abundance are observed in bacterial isolates from a natural host

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Megan A.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Coppel, Ross L.; Smith, Alexander I.; Kleifeld, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteomic studies frequently use strains cultured in synthetic liquid media over many generations. It is uncertain whether bacterial proteins expressed under these conditions will be the same as the repertoire found in natural environments, or when bacteria are infecting a host organism. Thus, genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteria derived from the host environment in comparison to reference strains grown in the lab, should aid understanding of pathogenesis. Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were obtained from the lymph nodes of three naturally infected sheep and compared to a laboratory reference strain using bottom-up proteomics, after whole genome sequencing of each of the field isolates. These comparisons were performed following growth in liquid media that allowed us to reach the required protein amount for proteomic analysis. Over 1350 proteins were identified in the isolated strains, from which unique proteome features were revealed. Several of the identified proteins demonstrated a significant abundance difference in the field isolates compared to the reference strain even though there were no obvious differences in the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene or in nearby non-coding DNA. Higher abundance in the field isolates was observed for proteins related to hypoxia and nutrient deficiency responses as well as to thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26528441

  7. Helium abundance and ionization structure in the Orion nebula: radio recombination lines observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppi, S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Sorochenko, R. L.

    2007-03-01

    Results of the Ori A HII region mapping based on hydrogen (H), helium (He) and carbon (C) Radio Recombination lines (RRL) are presented. Observations were made with the same angular resolution (2') using the 32 m VLBI dish of Medicina (Italy, 22.4 GHz) and the Pushchino RT-22 dish (Russia, 36.5 GHz). The behaviour of the ionized helium abundance, y^+, with distance from the center shows that the He+ zone size is smaller than that of H^+. Such a behaviour is different for the core and for the envelope, as well as for different directions from the center. The helium abundance, N(He)/N(H)=10.0(± 0.8)%, is measured. Derived line radial velocities, their widths and y+ data support the well-known "blister-type" structure of this HII region. LTE electron temperatures (7800-9600 K) are also measured. Appendices (Figs. 15, 16 and Sect. 4.1 "Carbon RRLs") are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Abundance pattern of wedge clam Donax cuneatus (L.) in different spatial scale in the vicinity of a coastal nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Hussain, K Jahir; Mohanty, A K; Satpathy, K K; Prasad, M V R

    2010-04-01

    Impact of thermal discharge from a coastal power station (Madras Atomic Power Station, southeast coast of India) on the spatial variability of Donax cuneatus abundance was assessed to determine the impact boundary. Totally, 20 sites were selected both on south and north side in increasing spatial scale from mixing zone, 12 locations were selected toward south side at a distance from 0 (near mixing point) to 2,000 m and eight location were selected toward north from the effluent mixing zone. Mean water temperature along the coast ranged from 29.1 +/-0.15 degrees C to 31.2 +/- 0.15 degrees C. Total organic carbon content in the sediment ranged from 0.27% to 0.70%. D. cuneatus population on the swash zone was ranged between 1.3 +/- 1.5 and 88.3 +/- 9.6 m(-2). Meager population of wedge clam was observed up to 100 m (S100) south from mixing point and abundance gradually increased in different spatial scale. Comparatively high abundance was observed from S400 and reached maximum at S1000 (64.0 +/- 3.6 m(-2)). Similar pattern was observed on north side too but less abundance was observed only up to 80 m (N80). Maximum abundance was observed at control location C3-N500 (88.3 +/- 9.6 m(-2)). Forty meters on either side of discharge point was highly impacted, 80 to 100 m toward plume flow (south) was moderately impacted, and 80 m north of mixing point also witnessed moderate impact. After 100 m (N100), north was not affected by effluents, whereas between 100 and 400 m, south was influenced slightly. Multivariate clustering pattern on the environmental variables of all sampling locations and population trend of D. cuneatus at those stations showed similarity. Present investigation unambiguously showed that the abundance pattern of D. cuneatus on the sandy beach of east coast of Kalpakkam is not governed by single major factor but due to the result of multiple interacting factors. The population size of the wedge clam with reference to the effect of power plant effluents and

  9. Spatial and temporal patterns in bacterial abundance, production and viral infection in a temporarily open/closed southern African estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, E. L.; Froneman, P. W.

    2008-05-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns in bacterial abundance, biomass, production, nanoflagellate abundance and the loss of bacterial production due to viral lysis were investigated in a temporarily open/closed estuary along the eastern seaboard of southern Africa over the period May 2006 to April 2007. Bacterial abundance, biomass and production ranged between 1.00 × 10 9 and 4.93 × 10 9 cells l -1, 32.43 and 108.59 μg C l -1 and 0.01 and 1.99 μg C l -1 h -1, respectively. With a few exceptions there were no significant spatial patterns in the values ( P > 0.05). Bacterial abundance, biomass and production, however, demonstrated a distinct temporal pattern with the lowest values consistently recorded during the winter months. Bacterial dynamics showed no effect of mouth opening events. Nanoflagellate and bacterial abundances were significantly correlated to one another ( P < 0.05) suggesting a strong predator-prey relationship. The frequency of visibly infected bacterial cells and the number of virus particles within each bacterial cell during the study demonstrated no significant temporal or spatial pattern ( P > 0.05) and ranged from 0.5 to 6.1% and 12.0 to 37.5 virus particles per bacterium, respectively. Viral infection and lysis was thus a constant source of bacterial mortality throughout the year. The estimated percentage of bacterial production removed by viral lysis ranged between 7.8 and 88.9% (mean = 30.3%) of the total which suggests that viral lysis represents a very important source of bacterial mortality during the study.

  10. The Pattern of Change in the Abundances of Specific Bacterioplankton Groups Is Consistent across Different Nutrient-Enriched Habitats in Crete

    PubMed Central

    Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Pitta, Paraskevi; Kasapidis, Panagiotis; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    A common source of disturbance for coastal aquatic habitats is nutrient enrichment through anthropogenic activities. Although the water column bacterioplankton communities in these environments have been characterized in some cases, changes in α-diversity and/or the abundances of specific taxonomic groups across enriched habitats remain unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial community changes at three different nutrient-enriched and adjacent undisturbed habitats along the north coast of Crete, Greece: a fish farm, a closed bay within a town with low water renewal rates, and a city port where the level of nutrient enrichment and the trophic status of the habitat were different. Even though changes in α-diversity were different at each site, we observed across the sites a common change pattern accounting for most of the community variation for five of the most abundant bacterial groups: a decrease in the abundance of the Pelagibacteraceae and SAR86 and an increase in the abundance of the Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Cryomorphaceae in the impacted sites. The abundances of the groups that increased and decreased in the impacted sites were significantly correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the total heterotrophic bacterial counts and the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and/or dissolved nitrogen and chlorophyll α, indicating that the common change pattern was associated with nutrient enrichment. Our results provide an in situ indication concerning the association of specific bacterioplankton groups with nutrient enrichment. These groups could potentially be used as indicators for nutrient enrichment if the pattern is confirmed over a broader spatial and temporal scale by future studies. PMID:24747897

  11. The Interplay among Acorn Abundance and Rodent Behavior Drives the Spatial Pattern of Seedling Recruitment in Mature Mediterranean Oak Forests.

    PubMed

    Sunyer, Pau; Boixadera, Ester; Muñoz, Alberto; Bonal, Raúl; Espelta, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    The patterns of seedling recruitment in animal-dispersed plants result from the interactions among environmental and behavioral variables. However, we know little on the contribution and combined effect of both kinds of variables. We designed a field study to assess the interplay between environment (vegetation structure, seed abundance, rodent abundance) and behavior (seed dispersal and predation by rodents, and rooting by wild boars), and their contribution to the spatial patterns of seedling recruitment in a Mediterranean mixed-oak forest. In a spatially explicit design, we monitored intensively all environmental and behavioral variables in fixed points at a small spatial scale from autumn to spring, as well as seedling emergence and survival. Our results revealed that the spatial patterns of seedling emergence were strongly related to acorn availability on the ground, but not by a facilitation effect of vegetation cover. Rodents changed seed shadows generated by mother trees by dispersing most seeds from shrubby to open areas, but the spatial patterns of acorn dispersal/predation had no direct effect on recruitment. By contrast, rodents had a strong impact on recruitment as pilferers of cached seeds. Rooting by wild boars also reduced recruitment by reducing seed abundance, but also by changing rodent's behavior towards higher consumption of acorns in situ. Hence, seed abundance and the foraging behavior of scatter-hoarding rodents and wild boars are driving the spatial patterns of seedling recruitment in this mature oak forest, rather than vegetation features. The contribution of vegetation to seedling recruitment (e.g. facilitation by shrubs) may be context dependent, having a little role in closed forests, or being overridden by directed seed dispersal from shrubby to open areas. We warn about the need of using broad approaches that consider the combined action of environment and behavior to improve our knowledge on the dynamics of natural regeneration in

  12. The Interplay among Acorn Abundance and Rodent Behavior Drives the Spatial Pattern of Seedling Recruitment in Mature Mediterranean Oak Forests

    PubMed Central

    Boixadera, Ester; Bonal, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The patterns of seedling recruitment in animal-dispersed plants result from the interactions among environmental and behavioral variables. However, we know little on the contribution and combined effect of both kinds of variables. We designed a field study to assess the interplay between environment (vegetation structure, seed abundance, rodent abundance) and behavior (seed dispersal and predation by rodents, and rooting by wild boars), and their contribution to the spatial patterns of seedling recruitment in a Mediterranean mixed-oak forest. In a spatially explicit design, we monitored intensively all environmental and behavioral variables in fixed points at a small spatial scale from autumn to spring, as well as seedling emergence and survival. Our results revealed that the spatial patterns of seedling emergence were strongly related to acorn availability on the ground, but not by a facilitationeffect of vegetation cover. Rodents changed seed shadows generated by mother trees by dispersing most seeds from shrubby to open areas, but the spatial patterns of acorn dispersal/predation had no direct effect on recruitment. By contrast, rodents had a strong impact on recruitment as pilferers of cached seeds. Rooting by wild boars also reduced recruitment by reducing seed abundance, but also by changing rodent’s behavior towards higher consumption of acorns in situ. Hence, seed abundance and the foraging behavior of scatter-hoarding rodents and wild boars are driving the spatial patterns of seedling recruitment in this mature oak forest, rather than vegetation features. The contribution of vegetation to seedling recruitment (e.g. facilitation by shrubs) may be context dependent, having a little role in closed forests, or being overridden by directed seed dispersal from shrubby to open areas. We warn about the need of using broad approaches that consider the combined action of environment and behavior to improve our knowledge on the dynamics of natural regeneration in

  13. Flow vector, Mach number and abundance of the Warm Breeze of neutral He observed by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, Marzena A.; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Schwadron, Nathan; Sokol, Justyna M.; Bzowski, Maciej; Heirtzler, David M.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    With the velocity vector and temperature of the pristine interstellar neutral (ISN) He recently obtained with high precision from a coordinated analysis by the IBEX Science Team, we analyzed the IBEX observations of neutral He left out from this analysis. These observations were collected during the interstellar neutral observation seasons 2010---2014 and cover the region in the Earth's orbit where the Warm Breeze persists. The Warm Breeze is a newly discovered population of neutral He in the heliosphere. We search for the inflow velocity vector and the temperature of the Warm Breeze and used the same simulation model and a very similar parameter fitting method to that used for the analysis of ISN He. We approximate the parent population of the Warm Breeze in front of the heliosphere with a homogeneous Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function and find a temperature of ~9 500 K, an inflow speed of ~11.3 km/s, and an inflow longitude and latitude in the J2000 ecliptic coordinates 251.6°, 12.0°. The abundance of the Warm Breeze relative to the interstellar neutral He is 5.6% and the Mach number of the flow is 1.97. We discuss implications of this result for the heliospheric physics and an insight into the behavior of interstellar plasma in the outer heliosheath.

  14. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF AN OUTER FIELD IN OMEGA CENTAURI: A DEFINITIVE HELIUM ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    King, I. R.; Bedin, L. R.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Cordier, D. E-mail: bellini@stsci.edu E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: adriano@oa-teramo.inaf.it E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it

    2012-07-15

    We revisit the problem of the split main sequence (MS) of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri, and report the results of two-epoch Hubble Space Telescope observations of an outer field, for which proper motions give us a pure sample of cluster members, and an improved separation of the two branches of the MS. Using a new set of stellar models covering a grid of values of helium and metallicity, we find that the best possible estimate of the helium abundance of the bluer branch of the MS is Y = 0.39 {+-} 0.02. For the cluster center, we apply new techniques to old observations: we use indices of photometric quality to select a high-quality sample of stars, which we also correct for differential reddening. We then superpose the color-magnitude diagram of the outer field on that of the cluster center, and suggest a connection of the bluer branch of the MS with one of the more prominent among the many sequences in the subgiant region. We also report a group of undoubted cluster members that are well to the red of the lower MS.

  15. AKARI observations of brown dwarfs. IV. Effect of elemental abundances on near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of the CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 μm in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO{sub 2} molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis, we have constructed a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and we investigate the variations of the molecular composition and the thermal structure, and how they affect the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm. The 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI is stronger or weaker than predicted by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing the CO{sub 2} band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength is especially sensitive to O abundance, but C is also needed to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectra. This result indicates that both the C and O abundances should increase and decrease simultaneously for brown dwarfs. We find that a weaker CO{sub 2} absorption band in a spectrum can also be explained by a model with lower 'C and O' abundances.

  16. An In-Depth Study of the Abundance Pattern in the Hot Interstellar Medium in NGC 4649

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael; Davis, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present our X-ray imaging spectroscopic analysis of data from deep Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observatory exposures of the Virgo Cluster elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), focusing on the abundance pattern in the hot interstellar medium (ISM). All measured elements show a radial decline in abundance, with the possible exception of Oxygen. We construct steady state solutions to the chemical evolution equations that include infall in addition to stellar mass return and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) enrichment, and consider recently published SNIa yields. By adjusting a single model parameter to obtain a match to the global abundance pattern in NGC 4649 we infer that introduction of subsolar metallicity external gas has reduced the overall ISM metallicity and diluted the effectiveness of SNIa to skew the pattern towards low alpha/Fe ratios, and estimate the combination of SNIa rate and level of dilution. Evidently, newly-introduced gas is heated as it is integrated into, and interacts with, the hot gas that is already present. These results indicate a complex flow and enrichment history for NGC 4649, reflecting the continual evolution of elliptical galaxies beyond the formation epoch. The heating and circulation of accreted gas may help reconcile this dynamic history with the mostly passive evolution of elliptical stellar populations. In an appendix we examine the effects of the recent updated atomic database AtomDB in spectral fitting of thermal plasmas with hot ISM temperatures in the elliptical galaxy range.

  17. AN IN-DEPTH STUDY OF THE ABUNDANCE PATTERN IN THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN NGC 4649

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenstein, Michael; Davis, David S. E-mail: David.S.Davis@nasa.gov

    2012-10-01

    We present our X-ray imaging spectroscopic analysis of data from deep Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observatory exposures of the Virgo Cluster elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), focusing on the abundance pattern in the hot interstellar medium (ISM). All measured elements show a radial decline in abundance, with the possible exception of O. We construct steady-state solutions to the chemical evolution equations that include infall in addition to stellar mass return and Type Ia supernova (SNIa) enrichment, and consider recently published SNIa yields. By adjusting a single model parameter to obtain a match to the global abundance pattern in NGC 4649, we infer that introduction of subsolar metallicity external gas has reduced the overall ISM metallicity and diluted the effectiveness of SNIa to skew the pattern toward low {alpha}/Fe ratios, and estimate the combination of SNIa rate and level of dilution. Evidently, newly introduced gas is heated as it is integrated into, and interacts with, the hot gas that is already present. These results indicate a complex flow and enrichment history for NGC 4649, reflecting the continual evolution of elliptical galaxies beyond the formation epoch. The heating and circulation of accreted gas may help reconcile this dynamic history with the mostly passive evolution of elliptical stellar populations. In an Appendix, we examine the effects of the recent updated atomic database AtomDB in spectral fitting of thermal plasmas with hot ISM temperatures in the elliptical galaxy range.

  18. XMM-Newton Observations of NGC 507: Over-Density of Peripheral Sources and Metal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Brickhouse, N.

    2002-12-01

    We report the results of XMM-Newton X-ray observations of NGC 507. We have confirmed the existence of over-density of X-ray sources at the periphery of the X-ray halo in NGC 507, which was first suggested by the ROSAT PSPC data (Kim and Fabbiano 1995). Some of them appear to be extended, although this needs to be confirmed. Among the bright sources, some are extremely hard while others are very soft, possibly indicating that they consist of mixed populations. The possibly nature of these sources will be discussed. We have also confirmed the off-center 2nd peak, possibly interacting with the radio lobe and discovered a sharp discontinuity at 2' southeast from the center. We note that most of the Chandra sources are within the X-ray bright, extended halo and therefore are not individually detected in the XMM-Newton data. Also we discuss metal abundances (Fe and alpha-element separately) in the X-ray halo obtained by applying various emission models (taking into account those Chandra sources within the X-ray halo) and their implications in terms of type I/II SN rates. We acknowledge the financial support of NASA Grant NAG5-9965.

  19. Shockingly low water abundances in Herschel/PACS observations of low-mass protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Mottram, J. C.; Herczeg, G. J.; Bruderer, S.; Cabrit, S.; Evans, N. J.; Fedele, D.; Gusdorf, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kaufman, M. J.; Melnick, G. J.; Neufeld, D. A.; Nisini, B.; Santangelo, G.; Tafalla, M.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Protostars interact with their surroundings through jets and winds impinging on the envelope and creating shocks, but the nature of these shocks is still poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to survey far-infrared molecular line emission from a uniform and significant sample of deeply-embedded low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in order to characterize shocks and the possible role of ultraviolet radiation in the immediate protostellar environment. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectral maps of 22 objects in the Perseus molecular cloud were obtained as part of the William Herschel Line Legacy (WILL) survey. Line emission from H2O, CO, and OH is tested against shock models from the literature. Results: Observed line ratios are remarkably similar and do not show variations with physical parameters of the sources (luminosity, envelope mass). Most ratios are also comparable to those found at off-source outflow positions. Observations show good agreement with the shock models when line ratios of the same species are compared. Ratios of various H2O lines provide a particularly good diagnostic of pre-shock gas densities, nH ~ 105 cm-3, in agreement with typical densities obtained from observations of the post-shock gas when a compression factor on the order of 10 is applied (for non-dissociative shocks). The corresponding shock velocities, obtained from comparison with CO line ratios, are above 20 km s-1. However, the observations consistently show H2O-to-CO and H2O-to-OH line ratios that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by the existing shock models. Conclusions: The overestimated model H2O fluxes are most likely caused by an overabundance of H2O in the models since the excitation is well-reproduced. Illumination of the shocked material by ultraviolet photons produced either in the star-disk system or, more locally, in the shock, would decrease the H2O abundances and reconcile the models with observations. Detections of hot H2O and strong OH

  20. Temporal Patterns in the Abundance of a Critically Endangered Marsupial Relates to Disturbance by Roads and Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Georgina J.; Wayne, Adrian F.; Mills, Harriet R.; Prince, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how landscape disturbance associated with roads, agriculture and forestry influenced temporal patterns in woylie (Bettongia penicillata) abundance before, during and after periods of rapid population change. Data were collected from an area of approximately 140,000 ha of forest within the Upper Warren region in south-western Australia. Woylie abundance was measured using cage trapping at 22 grid and five transect locations with varying degrees of landscape disturbance between 1994 and 2012. We found evidence that the distribution and abundance of woylies over time appears to be related to the degree of fragmentation by roads and proximity to agriculture. Sites furthest from agriculture supported a greater abundance of woylies and had slower rates of population decline. Sites with fewer roads had a greater abundance of woylies generally and a greater rate of increase in abundance after the implementation of invasive predator control. The results of this study suggest that landscape disturbance is less important at peak population densities, but during times of environmental and population change, sites less dissected by roads and agriculture better support woylie populations. This may be due to the role these factors play in increasing the vulnerability of woylies to introduced predators, population fragmentation, weed species invasion, mortality from road collisions or a reduction in available habitat. Strategies that reduce the impact of disturbance on woylie populations could include the rationalisation of forest tracks and consolidation of contiguous habitat through the acquisition of private property. Reducing the impact of disturbance in the Upper Warren region could improve the resilience of this critically important woylie population during future environmental change. PMID:27501320

  1. Temporal Patterns in the Abundance of a Critically Endangered Marsupial Relates to Disturbance by Roads and Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Georgina J; Wayne, Adrian F; Mills, Harriet R; Prince, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how landscape disturbance associated with roads, agriculture and forestry influenced temporal patterns in woylie (Bettongia penicillata) abundance before, during and after periods of rapid population change. Data were collected from an area of approximately 140,000 ha of forest within the Upper Warren region in south-western Australia. Woylie abundance was measured using cage trapping at 22 grid and five transect locations with varying degrees of landscape disturbance between 1994 and 2012. We found evidence that the distribution and abundance of woylies over time appears to be related to the degree of fragmentation by roads and proximity to agriculture. Sites furthest from agriculture supported a greater abundance of woylies and had slower rates of population decline. Sites with fewer roads had a greater abundance of woylies generally and a greater rate of increase in abundance after the implementation of invasive predator control. The results of this study suggest that landscape disturbance is less important at peak population densities, but during times of environmental and population change, sites less dissected by roads and agriculture better support woylie populations. This may be due to the role these factors play in increasing the vulnerability of woylies to introduced predators, population fragmentation, weed species invasion, mortality from road collisions or a reduction in available habitat. Strategies that reduce the impact of disturbance on woylie populations could include the rationalisation of forest tracks and consolidation of contiguous habitat through the acquisition of private property. Reducing the impact of disturbance in the Upper Warren region could improve the resilience of this critically important woylie population during future environmental change. PMID:27501320

  2. Patterns of variability in ichthyoplankton occurrence and abundance in Biscayne Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houde, Edward D.; Alpern Lovdal, Jamie D.

    1985-01-01

    Within-day variability in ichthyoplankton and microzooplankton abundances was examined at a single station in Biscayne Bay using replicate tows of 61-cm bongo nets and Niskin bottles to determine if patchiness occurred on the 10-1000 m scale and on the minutes to hours time scale. Fish eggs and larvae often were patchy but copepod nauplii, the predominant food of larvae, usually were randomly distributed at the scales examined and over the 3.15 m-depth water column. Mean patchiness index values were of similar magnitude for fish eggs and larvae but fish eggs were patchy more often than were larvae. Individual taxa of larvae had extremely high patchiness index values on some dates. Variability in fish egg catches often reflected increasing or decreasing abundance trends during the 2.5h sampling period while fish larvae catches often appeared to be clumped within the repetitive series of tows. There was no tendency for patchiness to be correlated among taxa on collection dates nor was it correlated with abundances or wind speeds. Patchiness indices of bay anchovy Anchoa mitchilli eggs and larvae were not significantly correlated, indicating little concordance in tendency to be aggregated, suggesting that distributions were influenced by biological processes related to spawning of adults and behaviour of larvae, in addition to physical processes. Although ichthyoplankton patchiness often did exist at the 10-1000 m scale, on many days ichthyoplankton was uniformly or randomly distributed. Copepod nauplii were abundant ( overlinex=90.41 -1), randomly distributed on most dates, and apparently readily available as fish larvae food in Biscayne Bay.

  3. Vertical distribution and diel patterns of zooplankton abundance and biomass at Conch Reef, Florida Keys (USA).

    PubMed

    Heidelberg, Karla B; O'Neil, Keri L; Bythell, John C; Sebens, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton play an important role in the trophic dynamics of coral reef ecosystems. Detailed vertical and temporal distribution and biomass of zooplankton were evaluated at four heights off the bottom and at six times throughout the diel cycle over a coral reef in the Florida Keys (USA). Zooplankton abundance averaged 4396 +/- 1949 SD individuals m(-3), but temporal and spatial distributions varied for individual zooplankton taxa by time of day and by height off the bottom. Copepods comprised 93-96% of the abundance in the samples. Taxon-based zooplankton CHN values paired with abundance data were used to estimate biomass. Average daily biomass ranged from 3.1 to 21.4 mg C m(-3) and differed by both height off the bottom and by time of day. While copepods were the numerically dominant organisms, their contribution to biomass was only 35% of the total zooplankton biomass. Our findings provide important support for the new emerging paradigm of how zooplankton are distributed over reefs.

  4. Vertical distribution and diel patterns of zooplankton abundance and biomass at Conch Reef, Florida Keys (USA).

    PubMed

    Heidelberg, Karla B; O'Neil, Keri L; Bythell, John C; Sebens, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton play an important role in the trophic dynamics of coral reef ecosystems. Detailed vertical and temporal distribution and biomass of zooplankton were evaluated at four heights off the bottom and at six times throughout the diel cycle over a coral reef in the Florida Keys (USA). Zooplankton abundance averaged 4396 +/- 1949 SD individuals m(-3), but temporal and spatial distributions varied for individual zooplankton taxa by time of day and by height off the bottom. Copepods comprised 93-96% of the abundance in the samples. Taxon-based zooplankton CHN values paired with abundance data were used to estimate biomass. Average daily biomass ranged from 3.1 to 21.4 mg C m(-3) and differed by both height off the bottom and by time of day. While copepods were the numerically dominant organisms, their contribution to biomass was only 35% of the total zooplankton biomass. Our findings provide important support for the new emerging paradigm of how zooplankton are distributed over reefs. PMID:20046854

  5. Longitudinal patterns in abundance of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Bartsch, M.R.; Hayden, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    We assessed the abundance of zebra mussels in the upper Mississippi River during 1995, four years after they were first found in the river. Samplers were deployed from May 30 to October 19, 1995, at 19 lock and dam facilities in the upper Mississippi River from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Muscatine, Iowa. Zebra mussels were found at every lock and dam except the two sites farthest upstream (Minneapolis). Generally, densities of zebra mussels were greatest at sites 161 km and farther downstream of the Minneapolis area. The greatest mean mussel density was 11,432/m(2) at Fulton, Illinois.

  6. Characterization of SO2 abundance in Venus' night-side mesosphere from SPICAV/VEX observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Denis; Fedorova, Anna; Piccialli, Arianna; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Evdokimova, Daria

    Sulfur dioxide (SO _{2}) is a key component of Venus’ atmosphere since the planet is totally covered by H _{2}SO _{4} droplets clouds at altitudes 50-70 km. Any significant change in the SO _{x} oxides above and within the clouds affects the photochemistry in the mesosphere (70-120 km). Recent continuous observations from the Venus Express orbiter (Belyaev et al., 2012; Marcq et al., 2013) and ground-based telescopes (Sandor et al., 2010; Krasnopolsky, 2010; Encrenaz et al., 2012) showed high variability of SO _{2} abundance with years, diurnal time and latitude on the day-side and terminators (commonly from 20 to 500 ppbv above the clouds). In the night-side mesosphere SO _{2} is not photo dissociative but, so far, its behavior has never been explored in details. In this paper we present first results from sulfur dioxide observations made by SPICAV UV spectrometer onboard Venus Express orbiter in regime of stellar occultation (Bertaux et al., 2007). In this mode the instrument observes night-side mesosphere and can register SO _{2} absorption bands in 190-220 nm and CO _{2} bands in 120-200 nm at altitudes from 85 to 110 km (spectral resolution is ˜2 nm). As a result, vertical distribution of SO _{2} and CO _{2} concentrations has been retrieved in observation period from June 2006 to April 2012, at latitude range 60(°) S-60(°) N and Venus local time 20:00-04:00. On the average, mixing ratio of sulfur dioxide fluctuates around ˜100 ppbv along altitude range 90-100 km. Our work is supported by the Program №22 of RAS and grant of the Russian Government to MIPT. References: Belyaev D. et al., 2012. Vertical profiling of SO _{2} and SO above Venus' clouds by SPICAV/SOIR solar occultations. Icarus 217, 740-751. Bertaux J.-L. et al., 2007. SPICAV on Venus Express: three spectrometers to study the global structure and composition of Venus atmosphere. Planet. Space Sci. 55, 1673-1700. Encrenaz T. et al., 2012. HDO and SO _{2} thermal mapping on Venus: evidence for

  7. Determining the Diversity and Species Abundance Patterns in Arctic Soils using Rational Methods for Exploring Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovreas, L.; Quince, C.; Sloan, W.; Lanzen, A.; Davenport, R.; Green, J.; Coulson, S.; Curtis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic microbial soil communities are intrinsically interesting and poorly characterised. We have inferred the diversity and species abundance distribution of 6 Arctic soils: new and mature soil at the foot of a receding glacier, Arctic Semi Desert, the foot of bird cliffs and soil underlying Arctic Tundra Heath: all near Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen. Diversity, distribution and sample sizes were estimated using the rational method of Quince et al., (Isme Journal 2 2008:997-1006) to determine the most plausible underlying species abundance distribution. A log-normal species abundance curve was found to give a slightly better fit than an inverse Gaussian curve if, and only if, sequencing error was removed. The median estimates of diversity of operational taxonomic units (at the 3% level) were 3600-5600 (lognormal assumed) and 2825-4100 (inverse Gaussian assumed). The nature and origins of species abundance distributions are poorly understood but may yet be grasped by observing and analysing such distributions in the microbial world. The sample size required to observe the distribution (by sequencing 90% of the taxa) varied between ~ 106 and ~105 for the lognormal and inverse Gaussian respectively. We infer that between 5 and 50 GB of sequencing would be required to capture 90% or the metagenome. Though a principle components analysis clearly divided the sites into three groups there was a high (20-45%) degree of overlap in between locations irrespective of geographical proximity. Interestingly, the nearest relatives of the most abundant taxa at a number of most sites were of alpine or polar origin. Samples plotted on first two principal components together with arbitrary discriminatory OTUs

  8. Statistical Characteristics of Elemental Abundance Ratios: Observations from the ACE Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    2015-05-01

    We statistically analyze the elemental galactic cosmic ray (GCR) composition measurements of elements 5 ≤ Z ≤ 28 within the energy range 30-500 MeV/nucleon from the CRIS instrument on board the ACE spacecraft in orbit about the L1 Lagrange point during the period from 1997 to 2014. Similarly to the last unusual solar minimum, the elevated elemental intensities of all heavy nuclei during the current weak solar maximum in 2014 are ˜40% higher than that of the previous solar maximum in 2002, which has been attributed to the weak modulation associated with low solar activity levels during the ongoing weakest solar maximum since the dawn of space age. In addition, the abundance ratios of heavy nuclei with respect to elemental oxygen are generally independent of kinetic energy per nucleon in the energy region 60-200 MeV/nuc, in good agreement with previous experiments. Furthermore, the abundance ratios of most relatively abundant species, except carbon, exhibit considerable solar-cycle variation, which are obviously positively correlated with the sunspot numbers with about one-year time lag. We also find that the percentage variation of abundance ratios for most elements are approximately identical. These preliminary results provide valuable insights into the characteristics of elemental heavy nuclei composition and place new and significant constraints on future GCR heavy nuclei propagation and modulation models.

  9. Observed and predicted effects of climate change on species abundance in protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Alison; Ausden, Malcolm; Dodd, Andrew M.; Bradbury, Richard B.; Chamberlain, Dan E.; Jiguet, Frédéric; Thomas, Chris D.; Cook, Aonghais S. C. P.; Newson, Stuart E.; Ockendon, Nancy; Rehfisch, Mark M.; Roos, Staffan; Thaxter, Chris B.; Brown, Andy; Crick, Humphrey Q. P.; Douse, Andrew; McCall, Rob A.; Pontier, Helen; Stroud, David A.; Cadiou, Bernard; Crowe, Olivia; Deceuninck, Bernard; Hornman, Menno; Pearce-Higgins, James W.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamic nature and diversity of species' responses to climate change poses significant difficulties for developing robust, long-term conservation strategies. One key question is whether existing protected area networks will remain effective in a changing climate. To test this, we developed statistical models that link climate to the abundance of internationally important bird populations in northwestern Europe. Spatial climate-abundance models were able to predict 56% of the variation in recent 30-year population trends. Using these models, future climate change resulting in 4.0°C global warming was projected to cause declines of at least 25% for more than half of the internationally important populations considered. Nonetheless, most EU Special Protection Areas in the UK were projected to retain species in sufficient abundances to maintain their legal status, and generally sites that are important now were projected to be important in the future. The biological and legal resilience of this network of protected areas is derived from the capacity for turnover in the important species at each site as species' distributions and abundances alter in response to climate. Current protected areas are therefore predicted to remain important for future conservation in a changing climate.

  10. Observations on traffic flow patterns and traffic engineering practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Lixin

    2002-07-01

    Border Gateway Protocol allows ASs to apply diverse routing policies for selecting routes and propagating reachability information to other ASs. This enables network operators to configure routing policies so as to control traffic flows between ASs. However, BGP is not designed for the inter-AS traffic engineering. This makes it difficult to implement effective routing policies to address network performance and utilization problems. Network operators usually tweak routing policies to influence the inter-domain traffic among the available links. This can lead to undesirable traffic flow patterns across the Internet and degrade the Internet traffic performance. In this paper, we show several observations on Internet traffic flow patterns and derive routing policies that give rise to the traffic flow patterns. Our results show that an AS can reach as much as 20% of the prefixes via a peer link even though there is a path via a customer link. In addition, an AS can reach as much as 80% of the prefixes via a provider link even though there is a path via a peer link. Second, we analyze the cause of the prevalence of these traffic patterns. Our analysis shows that an AS typically does not receive the potential route from its customers or peers. Third, we find that alternate routes have with lower propagation delay than the chosen routes for some prefixes. This shows that some traffic engineering practices might adversely affect Internet performance.

  11. Diel and distributional abundance patterns of fish embryos and larvae in the lower Columbia and Deschutes rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Barfoot, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Diel and distributional abundance patterns of free embryos and larvae of fishes in the lower Columbia River Basin were investigated. Ichthyoplankton samples were collected in 1993 during day and night in the main-channel and a backwater of the lower Columbia River, and in a tributary, the Deschutes River. Fish embryos and larvae collected in the main-channel Columbia River were primarily (85.6%) of native taxa (peamouth Mylocheilus caurinus, northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis, suckers Catostomus spp., and sculpins Cottus spp.), with two introduced species (American shad Alosa sapidissima and common carp Cyprinus carpio) comprising a smaller percentage of the catch (13.3%). Similarly, in the Deschutes River native taxa [lampreys (Petromyzontidae), minnows (Cyprinidae), and suckers Catostomus spp.] dominated collections (99.5% of the catch). In contrast, 83.5% of embryos and larvae in the Columbia River backwater were of introduced taxa [American shad, common carp, and sunfishes (Centrarchidae)]. In all locations, all dominant taxa except sculpins were collected in significantly greater proportions at night. Taxon-specific differences in proportions of embryos and larvae collected at night can in some instances be related to life history styles. In the main-channel Columbia River, northern squawfish and peamouth were strongly nocturnal and high proportions still had yolksacs, suggesting that they had recently hatched and were drifting downriver to rearing areas. In contrast, sculpin abundances were similar during day and night, and sculpins mostly had depleted yolksacs, indicating sculpins were feeding and rearing in offshore limnetic habitats. Taxon-specific diel abundance patterns and their causes must be considered when designing effective sampling programs for fish embryos and larvae.

  12. Patterns of fish use and piscivore abundance within a reconnected saltmarsh impoundment in the northern Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Philip W.; Montague, C.L.; Sulak, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all saltmarshes in east-central, Florida were impounded for mosquito control during the 1960s. The majority of these marshes have since been reconnected to the estuary by culverts, providing an opportunity to effectively measure exchange of aquatic organisms. A multi-gear approach was used monthly to simultaneously estimate fish standing stock (cast net), fish exchange with the estuary (culvert traps), and piscivore abundance (gill nets and bird counts) to document patterns of fish use in a reconnected saltmarsh impoundment. Changes in saltmarsh fish abundance, and exchange of fish with the estuary reflected the seasonal pattern of marsh flooding in the northern Indian River Lagoon system. During a 6-month period of marsh flooding, resident fish had continuous access to the marsh surface. Large piscivorous fish regularly entered the impoundment via creeks and ditches to prey upon small resident fish, and piscivorous birds aggregated following major fish movements to the marsh surface or to deep habitats. As water levels receded in winter, saltmarsh fish concentrated into deep habitats and emigration to the estuary ensued (200% greater biomass left the impoundment than entered). Fish abundance and community structure along the estuary shoreline (although fringed with marsh vegetation) were not analogous to marsh creeks and ditches. Perimeter ditches provided deep-water habitat for large estuarine predators, and shallow creeks served as an alternative habitat for resident fish when the marsh surface was dry. Use of the impoundment as nursery by transients was limited to Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, but large juvenile and adult piscivorous fish used the impoundment for feeding. In conclusion, the saltmarsh impoundment was a feeding site for piscivorous fish and birds, and functioned as a net exporter of forage fish to adjacent estuarine waters. ?? Springer 2006.

  13. Altered rainfall patterns increase forb abundance and richness in native tallgrass prairie

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sydney K.; Collins, Scott L.; Blair, John M.; Smith, Melinda D.; Knapp, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Models predict that precipitation variability will increase with climate change. We used a 15-year precipitation manipulation experiment to determine if altering the timing and amount of growing season rainfall will impact plant community structure in annually burned, native tallgrass prairie. The altered precipitation treatment maintained the same total growing season precipitation as the ambient precipitation treatment, but received a rainfall regime of fewer, larger rain events, and longer intervals between events each growing season. Although this change in precipitation regime significantly lowered mean soil water content, overall this plant community was remarkably resistant to altered precipitation with species composition relatively stable over time. However, we found significantly higher forb cover and richness and slightly lower grass cover on average with altered precipitation, but the forb responses were manifest only after a ten-year lag period. Thus, although community structure in this grassland is relatively resistant to this type of altered precipitation regime, forb abundance in native tallgrass prairie may increase in a future characterized by increased growing season precipitation variability. PMID:26830847

  14. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: KMOS OBSERVATIONS IN NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, L. R.; Evans, C. J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R-P.; Gazak, J. Z.; Bergemann, M.; Plez, B.

    2015-04-10

    We present near-IR spectroscopy of red supergiant (RSG) stars in NGC 6822, obtained with the new K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph Very Large Telescope, Chile. From comparisons with model spectra in the J-band we determine the metallicity of 11 RSGs, finding a mean value of [Z] = −0.52 ± 0.21, which agrees well with previous abundance studies of young stars and H ii regions. We also find an indication for a low-significance abundance gradient within the central 1 kpc. We compare our results with those derived from older stellar populations and investigate the difference using a simple chemical evolution model. By comparing the physical properties determined for RSGs in NGC 6822 with those derived using the same technique in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, we show that there appears to be no significant temperature variation of RSGs with respect to metallicity, in contrast to recent evolutionary models.

  15. Temporal Patterns of Protozooplankton Abundance and Their Food in Ellis Fjord, Princess Elizabeth Land, Eastern Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, J.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Leakey, R. J. G.; McMinn, A.

    1997-07-01

    The abundance and biomass of ciliates, dinoflagellates and heterotrophic and phototrophic nanoflagellates were determined at three sites along an ice-covered Antarctic fjord between January and November 1993. The water column showed little in the way of temperature and salinity gradients during the study period. In general, the protozooplankton exhibited a seasonal variation which closely mirrored that of chlorophyllaand bacterioplankton. The fjord mouth, which was affected by the greatest marine influences, consistently had the highest densities of ciliates and the most diverse community, with up to 18 species during the sampling period. Small aloricate ciliates were present throughout the year withStrobilidiumspp. being dominant during the winter. Larger loricate and aloricate ciliates became more prominent during January and November, along with the autotrophic ciliateMesodinium rubrumand two mixotrophic species (Strombidium wulffiand a type resemblingTontonia) suggesting evidence of species successions. Data on dinoflagellates were less extensive, but these protists showed greatest species diversity in the middle reaches of the fjord. A total of 13 species of dinoflagellate was recorded. Ciliates made a significant contribution to the biomass of the microbial community in summer, particularly in the middle and at the seaward end of the fjord. In winter, heterotrophic flagellates (HNAN) and phototrophic nanoflagellates (PNAN) were the dominant component of protistan biomass. In terms of percentage contribution to the microbial carbon pool, bacteria dominated during winter and spring. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first seasonal study of an Antarctic fjord. The Ellis Fjord is very unproductive compared to lower latitude systems, and supports low biomass of phytoplankton and microbial plankton during most of the year. This relates to severe climatic and seasonal conditions, and the lack of allochthonous carbon inputs to the system. Thus, high latitude

  16. Nature's starships. I. Observed abundances and relative frequencies of amino acids in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-10

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. These two trends (total abundance and relative frequencies) can be used to constrain formation parameters of amino acids within planetesimals. Our organization of the data supports an onion shell model for the temperature structure of planetesimals. The least altered meteorites (type 3) and their amino acids originated near cooler surface regions. The most active amino acid synthesis likely took place at intermediate depths (type 2). The most altered materials (type 1) originated furthest toward parent body cores. This region is likely too hot to either favor amino acid synthesis or for amino acids to be retained after synthesis.

  17. ANOMALOUS RELATIVE AR/CA CORONAL ABUNDANCES OBSERVED BY THE HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER NEAR SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Feldman, U.

    2015-07-20

    In determining the element abundance of argon (a high first ionization potential; FIP element) relative to calcium (a low FIP element) in flares, unexpectedly high intensities of two Ar xiv lines (194.40, 187.96 Å) relative to a Ca xiv line (193.87 Å) intensity were found in small (a few arcseconds) regions near sunspots in flare spectra recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. In the most extreme case the Ar xiv line intensity relative to the Ca xiv intensity was 7 times the value expected from the photospheric abundance ratio, which is about 30 times the abundance of argon relative to calcium in active regions, i.e., the measured Ar/Ca abundance ratio is about 10 instead of 0.37 as in active regions. The Ar xiv and Ca xiv lines are formed near 3.4 MK and have very similar contribution functions. This is the first observation of the inverse FIP effect in the Sun. Other regions show increases of 2–3 over photospheric abundances, or just photospheric abundances. This phenomenon appears to occur rarely and only over small areas of flares away from the regions containing multi-million degree plasma, but more work is needed to quantify the occurrences and their locations. In the bright hot regions of flares the Ar/Ca abundance ratio is coronal, i.e., the same as in active regions. In this Letter we show three examples of the inverse FIP effect.

  18. Pan-Arctic patterns of planktonic heterotrophic microbial abundance and processes: Controlling factors and potential impacts of warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranger, Roxane; Vaqué, Dolors; Nguyen, Dan; Hébert, Marie-Pier; Lara, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing where increasing water temperatures and rapid loss of summer sea-ice will likely influence the structure and functioning of the entire ecosystem. The aim of this study was to synthesize the current state of knowledge on microbial abundances and processes from a regional Pan-Arctic perspective, characterize regulating factors and attempt to predict how patterns may change under a warming scenario. Here we identify some generalized patterns of different microbial variables between the Pacific-fed and the Atlantic-fed sectors of the Arctic Ocean. Bacterial production (BP), abundance and grazing rates by protists (GT) were all higher in the Atlantic-fed region. Bacterial loss by viral lyses (VL) was proportionally more important in the Pacific-fed sector, suggesting a reduced C transfer efficiency within the microbial loop of that region. Using a cross-comparative approach and all available data to build Arrhenius plots, we found a differential response to warming temperatures among various microbial processes. BP and GT responded similarly and more strongly to increases in temperature than VL did, suggesting a shift in the overall influence of viral mortality under a warming scenario. However, together with temperature, resource-related factors also exerted an influence in regulating these rates. We identified large information gaps for more classically studied microbial variable from several Arctic seas. Furthermore, there is limited information on less conventional pathways such as grazing by mixotrophic species, which may be playing a significant role in Arctic microbial trophodynamics. Although generalized patterns could be elucidated, more information is needed to predict and understand how a changing Arctic will alter microbial C pathways and major biogeochemical cycles on regional and seasonal scales.

  19. Technique and Observation of Angular Gait Patterns in Running

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, K.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for the biomechanical analysis of running is described with specific reference to the angular displacement patterns of the lower limb. From high speed cine film recording profile views of the running gait, the Thigh, Knee and Ankle angles are measured during one complete cycle. Results are presented in the form of vector-space diagrams, namely Thigh-Knee angle and Knee-Ankle angle cyclograms. The diagrams are interpreted and some experimental observations are presented and discussed. The technique provides a useful research tool and a very good `teaching asset' for biomechanical studies of movement.

  20. Element abundances, patterns, and mobility in Nakhlite Miller Range 03346 and implications for aqueous alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopar, Julie D.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Velbel, Michael A.; Norman, Marc D.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Hallis, Lydia J.

    2013-07-01

    Nakhlite Miller Range (MIL) 03346 contains many secondary phases resulting from aqueous processes, including formation of poorly crystalline iddingsite-like veins in olivine, the precipitation of Ca-sulfates and Fe,K-sulfates from evaporating fluids, alteration of titanomagnetite to secondary Fe-oxides, and the dissolution of magmatic Ca-phosphates and residual glass in the mesostasis. A surprising variety of alteration products occur in association with olivine in MIL 03346, including: patches of incipiently-altered olivine, large Si-enriched olivine-hosted veins (up to 10 μm across) some of which are complex in morphology and are composed of several phases, small Fe,S(±K)-rich veinlets that crosscut the Si-enriched veins, Ca-sulfates filling cracks in olivine, and secondary Ca-phosphates. Elemental abundances and distributions in these alteration products are consistent with the mobilization of elements from readily dissolved phases in the mesostasis such as phosphates and residual glass. Under favorable weathering conditions, these phases dissolve more readily than pyroxenes, plagioclase, and even olivine at low pH. The occurrence (crosscut and devolatilized by the fusion crust) and composition of Si-enriched alteration veins in olivine are consistent with their formation on Mars. Si-enriched, poorly crystalline alteration products and secondary Ca-sulfates commonly occur in nakhlites, but the habit and composition of these alteration products differ between meteorites. Elemental distributions in these secondary phases suggest at least two episodes of alteration have affected MIL 03346, and subtle differences in secondary minerals and chemistry indicate that each nakhlite experienced its own unique alteration history either on Mars, Earth, or both. The variable Al content and range of morphologies of the olivine-hosted Si-enriched veins suggest variable alteration conditions consistent with a water-limited regime. If the secondary phases in MIL 03346 can be

  1. Big-bang nucleosynthesis in comparison with observed helium and deuterium abundances: Possibility of a nonstandard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimasa, R.; Nakamura, R.; Hashimoto, M.; Arai, K.

    2014-07-01

    Comparing the latest observed abundances of He4 and D, we make a χ2 analysis to see whether it is possible to reconcile primordial nucleosynthesis using the up-to-date nuclear data of NACRE II and the mean life of neutrons. If we adopt the observational data of He4 by Izotov et al. [Astron. Astrophys. 558, A57 (2013)], we find that it is impossible to get a reasonable agreement with the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis. However, by including degenerate neutrinos, we succeed in obtaining consistent constraints between the neutrino degeneracy and the baryon-to-photon ratio from a detailed comparison of calculated abundances with the observational data of He4 and D: the baryon-to-photon ratio in units of 10-10 is found to be in the range 6.02≲η10≲6.54 for the specified parameters of neutrino degeneracy.

  2. Distribution and abundance patterns of the palila on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Riper, C.; Scott, J.M.; Woodside, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    Censuses of the known geographical range of the rare and endangered Palila were conducted in January (nonbreeding season) and September (breeding season) 1975. The habitat (mamane and naio forest of Mauna Kea, Hawaii) was divided into five major areas, with each analyzed for vegetational composition, phenology of the predominant tree species, and Palila density. Using a line transect census technique, we determined that: 1) the Palila occupied 5,560 ha, approximately 10% of its former range; 2) Palila populations were more restricted in the nonbreeding season, possibly reflecting their flocking tendency; 3) Palila densities were 38 birds per km2 i n the breedings easona nd 36 birdsp er km2 in the nonbreedinsge ason4;) Palila population movements were small, and apparently were correlated with patterns of food availability; and 5) all methods of analysis yielded a projected population of approximately 1,600 birds. These low numbers, coupled with its restricted range, make the Palila one of the most vulnerable endangered species.

  3. Observations on abundance of bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, in an urban waterway in Puget Sound, 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    Griffing, Denise; Larson, Shawn; Hollander, Joel; Carpenter, Tim; Christiansen, Jeff; Doss, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The bluntnose sixgill shark, Hexanchus griseus, is a widely distributed but poorly understood large, apex predator. Anecdotal reports of diver-shark encounters in the late 1990's and early 2000's in the Pacific Northwest stimulated interest in the normally deep-dwelling shark and its presence in the shallow waters of Puget Sound. Analysis of underwater video documenting sharks at the Seattle Aquarium's sixgill research site in Elliott Bay and mark-resight techniques were used to answer research questions about abundance and seasonality. Seasonal changes in relative abundance in Puget Sound from 2003-2005 are reported here. At the Seattle Aquarium study site, 45 sixgills were tagged with modified Floy visual marker tags, along with an estimated 197 observations of untagged sharks plus 31 returning tagged sharks, for a total of 273 sixgill observations recorded. A mark-resight statistical model based on analysis of underwater video estimated a range of abundance from a high of 98 sharks seen in July of 2004 to a low of 32 sharks seen in March of 2004. Both analyses found sixgills significantly more abundant in the summer months at the Seattle Aquarium's research station.

  4. Observations on Abundance of Bluntnose Sixgill Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, in an Urban Waterway in Puget Sound, 2003-2005

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, Denise; Larson, Shawn; Hollander, Joel; Carpenter, Tim; Christiansen, Jeff; Doss, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The bluntnose sixgill shark, Hexanchus griseus, is a widely distributed but poorly understood large, apex predator. Anecdotal reports of diver-shark encounters in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s in the Pacific Northwest stimulated interest in the normally deep-dwelling shark and its presence in the shallow waters of Puget Sound. Analysis of underwater video documenting sharks at the Seattle Aquarium’s sixgill research site in Elliott Bay and mark-resight techniques were used to answer research questions about abundance and seasonality. Seasonal changes in relative abundance in Puget Sound from 2003–2005 are reported here. At the Seattle Aquarium study site, 45 sixgills were tagged with modified Floy visual marker tags, along with an estimated 197 observations of untagged sharks plus 31 returning tagged sharks, for a total of 273 sixgill observations recorded. A mark-resight statistical model based on analysis of underwater video estimated a range of abundance from a high of 98 sharks seen in July of 2004 to a low of 32 sharks seen in March of 2004. Both analyses found sixgills significantly more abundant in the summer months at the Seattle Aquarium’s research station. PMID:24475229

  5. Patterns in composition, abundance and scarring of whale sharks Rhincodon typus near Holbox Island, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Macías, D; Meekan, M; De La Parra-Venegas, R; Remolina-Suárez, F; Trigo-Mendoza, M; Vázquez-Juárez, R

    2012-04-01

    Photo-identification and conventional tagging were used to estimate population size and structure of the whale shark Rhincodon typus near Holbox Island, Mexico. From 2005 to 2008, photographs of spot patterns behind the last gill slit and in a lateral view on the left side of each animal were used to identify individuals. Additionally, 578 R. typus were tagged using conventional marker tags. Of these and the 350 R. typus that were identified from 1184 photographs, 65% were male; 27%, female and 8%, indeterminate sex. Photographed R. typus ranged in size from 2·5 to 9·5 m total length. Size was bimodal with a large peak at 6 m and a smaller peak at 7 m. Photo-identification showed that there was considerable loss of marker tags. Few of these remained on the animals for more than a year, so that interannual re-sights using tagging could not be used in population modelling. Forty six interannual re-sightings were found in the photographic library; the interval between these re-sightings was typically 1 year. It was estimated that the R. typus aggregation near Holbox Island ranged from 521 to 809 individuals, based on mark-recapture models. From 13 to 33% of R. typus photographed had scars that were attributable to boat strikes. This study provides a baseline for assessing the status of R. typus near Holbox Island. This information is useful to understand drivers of local population size and distribution and potential concerns about increasing effects of tourism on R. typus in this area and for designing better management programmes for R. typus conservation.

  6. Vascular plant abundance and diversity in an alpine heath under observed and simulated global change

    PubMed Central

    Alatalo, Juha M.; Little, Chelsea J.; Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Molau, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Global change is predicted to cause shifts in species distributions and biodiversity in arctic tundra. We applied factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to a nutrient and species poor alpine/arctic heath community for seven years. Vascular plant abundance in control plots increased by 31%. There were also notable changes in cover in the nutrient and combined nutrient and warming treatments, with deciduous and evergreen shrubs declining, grasses overgrowing these plots. Sedge abundance initially increased significantly with nutrient amendment and then declined, going below initial values in the combined nutrient and warming treatment. Nutrient addition resulted in a change in dominance hierarchy from deciduous shrubs to grasses. We found significant declines in vascular plant diversity and evenness in the warming treatment and a decline in diversity in the combined warming and nutrient addition treatment, while nutrient addition caused a decline in species richness. The results give some experimental support that species poor plant communities with low diversity may be more vulnerable to loss of species diversity than communities with higher initial diversity. The projected increase in nutrient deposition and warming may therefore have negative impacts on ecosystem processes, functioning and services due to loss of species diversity in an already impoverished environment. PMID:25950370

  7. Vascular plant abundance and diversity in an alpine heath under observed and simulated global change.

    PubMed

    Alatalo, Juha M; Little, Chelsea J; Jägerbrand, Annika K; Molau, Ulf

    2015-05-07

    Global change is predicted to cause shifts in species distributions and biodiversity in arctic tundra. We applied factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to a nutrient and species poor alpine/arctic heath community for seven years. Vascular plant abundance in control plots increased by 31%. There were also notable changes in cover in the nutrient and combined nutrient and warming treatments, with deciduous and evergreen shrubs declining, grasses overgrowing these plots. Sedge abundance initially increased significantly with nutrient amendment and then declined, going below initial values in the combined nutrient and warming treatment. Nutrient addition resulted in a change in dominance hierarchy from deciduous shrubs to grasses. We found significant declines in vascular plant diversity and evenness in the warming treatment and a decline in diversity in the combined warming and nutrient addition treatment, while nutrient addition caused a decline in species richness. The results give some experimental support that species poor plant communities with low diversity may be more vulnerable to loss of species diversity than communities with higher initial diversity. The projected increase in nutrient deposition and warming may therefore have negative impacts on ecosystem processes, functioning and services due to loss of species diversity in an already impoverished environment.

  8. Patterns in abundance and diversity of faecally dispersed parasites of tiger in Tadoba National Park, central India

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Rahul R; Goel, Shantanu S; Ranade, Sachin P; Jog, Maithili M; Watve, Milind G

    2002-01-01

    Background Importance of parasites in ecological and evolutionary interactions is being increasingly recognized. However, ecological data on parasites of important host species is still scanty. We analyze the patterns seen in the faecal parasites of tigers in the Tadoba National Park, India, and speculate on the factors and processes shaping the parasite community and the possible implications for tiger ecology. Results The prevalence and intensities were high and the parasite community was dominated by indirect life cycle parasites. Across all genera of parasites variance scaled with the square of the mean and there was a significant positive correlation between prevalence and abundance. There was no significant association between different types of parasites. Conclusions The 70 samples analyzed formed 14 distinct clusters. If we assume each of the clusters to represent individual tigers that were sampled repeatedly and that resident tigers are more likely to be sampled repeatedly, the presumed transient tigers had significantly greater parasite loads than the presumed resident ones. PMID:12000685

  9. Annual trend patterns of phytoplankton species abundance belie homogeneous taxonomical group responses to climate in the NE Atlantic upwelling.

    PubMed

    Bode, Antonio; Estévez, M Graciela; Varela, Manuel; Vilar, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton is a sentinel of marine ecosystem change. Composed by many species with different life-history strategies, it rapidly responds to environment changes. An analysis of the abundance of 54 phytoplankton species in Galicia (NW Spain) between 1989 and 2008 to determine the main components of temporal variability in relation to climate and upwelling showed that most of this variability was stochastic, as seasonality and long term trends contributed to relatively small fractions of the series. In general, trends appeared as non linear, and species clustered in 4 groups according to the trend pattern but there was no defined pattern for diatoms, dinoflagellates or other groups. While, in general, total abundance increased, no clear trend was found for 23 species, 14 species decreased, 4 species increased during the early 1990s, and only 13 species showed a general increase through the series. In contrast, series of local environmental conditions (temperature, stratification, nutrients) and climate-related variables (atmospheric pressure indices, upwelling winds) showed a high fraction of their variability in deterministic seasonality and trends. As a result, each species responded independently to environmental and climate variability, measured by generalized additive models. Most species showed a positive relationship with nutrient concentrations but only a few showed a direct relationship with stratification and upwelling. Climate variables had only measurable effects on some species but no common response emerged. Because its adaptation to frequent disturbances, phytoplankton communities in upwelling ecosystems appear less sensitive to changes in regional climate than other communities characterized by short and well defined productive periods.

  10. Annual trend patterns of phytoplankton species abundance belie homogeneous taxonomical group responses to climate in the NE Atlantic upwelling.

    PubMed

    Bode, Antonio; Estévez, M Graciela; Varela, Manuel; Vilar, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton is a sentinel of marine ecosystem change. Composed by many species with different life-history strategies, it rapidly responds to environment changes. An analysis of the abundance of 54 phytoplankton species in Galicia (NW Spain) between 1989 and 2008 to determine the main components of temporal variability in relation to climate and upwelling showed that most of this variability was stochastic, as seasonality and long term trends contributed to relatively small fractions of the series. In general, trends appeared as non linear, and species clustered in 4 groups according to the trend pattern but there was no defined pattern for diatoms, dinoflagellates or other groups. While, in general, total abundance increased, no clear trend was found for 23 species, 14 species decreased, 4 species increased during the early 1990s, and only 13 species showed a general increase through the series. In contrast, series of local environmental conditions (temperature, stratification, nutrients) and climate-related variables (atmospheric pressure indices, upwelling winds) showed a high fraction of their variability in deterministic seasonality and trends. As a result, each species responded independently to environmental and climate variability, measured by generalized additive models. Most species showed a positive relationship with nutrient concentrations but only a few showed a direct relationship with stratification and upwelling. Climate variables had only measurable effects on some species but no common response emerged. Because its adaptation to frequent disturbances, phytoplankton communities in upwelling ecosystems appear less sensitive to changes in regional climate than other communities characterized by short and well defined productive periods. PMID:26283032

  11. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlhepp, R.; Ruhnke, R.; Chipperfield, M. P.; De Mazière, M.; Notholt, J.; Barthlott, S.; Batchelor, R. L.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Blumenstock, Th.; Coffey, M. T.; Demoulin, P.; Fast, H.; Feng, W.; Goldman, A.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hamann, K.; Hannigan, J. W.; Hase, F.; Jones, N. B.; Kagawa, A.; Kaiser, I.; Kasai, Y.; Kirner, O.; Kouker, W.; Lindenmaier, R.; Mahieu, E.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Monge-Sanz, B.; Morino, I.; Murata, I.; Nakajima, H.; Palm, M.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Raffalski, U.; Reddmann, Th.; Rettinger, M.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rozanov, E.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Servais, C.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Smale, D.; Strong, K.; Sussmann, R.; Taylor, J. R.; Vanhaelewyn, G.; Warneke, T.; Whaley, C.; Wiehle, M.; Wood, S. W.

    2012-04-01

    Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons) were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both measurement and

  12. Patterns of distribution and abundance of the stalked barnacle (Pollicipes pollicipes) in the central and southwest coast of continental Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Alina; Jacinto, David; Penteado, Nélia; Martins, Pedro; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Teresa; Castro, João J.; Cruz, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    The stalked barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes is a cirriped crustacean that lives on very exposed rocky shores. This barnacle is the most important economical resource on intertidal rocky shores of continental Portugal. It is highly prized as food and heavily exploited (professional and recreational fishery), but fishery data are scarce and do not estimate the real pressure upon this resource. Despite its socio-economic interest, specific regulations on this fishery are recent and different along the Portuguese coast. Four regions with different regulation can be identified: the marine reserve “Reserva Natural das Berlengas” (RNB) and the marine park “Parque Marinho Prof. Luiz Saldanha” (PMLS) (both in central Portugal); the natural park located in SW Portugal (“Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina”, PNSACV); and the rest of the coast. The main objective of the present study was to study the spatial patterns of percentage cover, biomass, density and size structure of P. pollicipes in areas with different exploitation regimes, including harvested areas and no-take areas. Additionally, variability between mid shore and low shore barnacles was also analysed. Seven areas were sampled with a variable number of sites (a total of 24) randomly sampled in each area during 2011. Photographs and image analysis (percentage cover) and destructive sampling (density, biomass and size) were used. In general, percentage cover, biomass and density were higher in mid shore when compared to low shore, namely in harvested areas. Low shore barnacles had a higher proportion of adults with moderate and high commercial value, while juveniles were relatively more abundant at mid shore. There were no consistent differences in the patterns of distribution and abundance of P. pollicipes among areas subject to different exploitation regimes. The most different area was the harvested area by professional fishers in RNB, where the highest biomass within the study was

  13. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Fajemila, Olugbenga T; Langer, Martin R; Lipps, Jere H

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago). We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA). The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis) generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs

  14. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago). We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA). The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis) generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs

  15. Biological Processes Related to Serpentinization: Expected vs Observed Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization is a water-rock reaction that drives the evolution of micro- to mega-scale habitability in ultramafic rocks, through the aqueous alteration of olivine and pyroxene in parent rocks, and the production of H2, CH4, and (possibly) biologically useful organic compounds. This process may pervade extensive areas of silicate planetary bodies, in geologic settings as diverse as cratered fracture zones and fault systems in ultramafic rocks, hydrothermal flow systems operating near crust/mantle interfaces, and deep subsurface groundwater flow systems. Serpentinization causes transformations in mineralogy, rock geochemistry, and co-occurring associated water chemistry that together control the feasibilities of prominent microbial metabolisms. Changing activities of aqueous H2, CH4, CO2, CO, organic acids, H+, and other redox-sensitive dissolved species shift the metabolic landscape in serpentinites in predictable ways, providing expected patterns in community metabolic strategies. I discuss emerging patterns in observations from terrestrial sites of serpentinization, marine and continent-hosted, and consider how they may allow testing of some pertinent hypotheses in geomicrobiology in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings.

  16. PATTERNS OF FLOWS IN AN INTERMEDIATE PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-09-20

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of H{alpha} images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s{sup -1}. The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows-downward and upward-in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13{sup 0} and 39{sup 0} in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  17. Patterns of Flows in an Intermediate Prominence Observed by Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-09-01

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of Hα images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s-1. The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows—downward and upward—in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13° and 39° in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  18. Hydra observations of aluminum abundances in the red giants ofthe globular clusters M80 and NGC 6752

    SciTech Connect

    Suntzeff, N B; Cavallo, R M; Pilachowski, C A

    2004-01-05

    Aluminum and other metal abundances were determined in 21 red giants in the globular clusters NGC 6752 and M80 as part of a larger study to determine whether the aluminum distribution on the red giant branch is related to the second parameter effect that causes clusters of similar metallicity to display different horizontal branch morphologies. The observations were obtained of the Al I lines near 6700 Angstroms with the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope and Hydra multi-object spectrograph. The spectra have a resolving power of 18000 or 9400, with typical S/N ratios of 100-200. Mean [Fe/H] values obtained from the spectra are -1.58 for NGC 6751 and -1.73 for M80; this represents the spectroscopic iron abundance determination for M80. Both NGC 6752 and M80 display a spread in aluminum abundance with mean [Al/Fe] ratios of +0.51 and +0.37 respectively. No trend in the variation of the mean AI abundance with position on the giant branch is discernible in either cluster with our small sample.

  19. A sampling design and model for estimating abundance of Nile crocodiles while accounting for heterogeneity of detectability of multiple observers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shirley, Matthew H.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Abassery, Ekramy; Elhady, Amr A.; Mekki, Mohammed S.; Asran, Hosni H.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the development of a management program for Nile crocodiles in Lake Nasser, Egypt, we used a dependent double-observer sampling protocol with multiple observers to compute estimates of population size. To analyze the data, we developed a hierarchical model that allowed us to assess variation in detection probabilities among observers and survey dates, as well as account for variation in crocodile abundance among sites and habitats. We conducted surveys from July 2008-June 2009 in 15 areas of Lake Nasser that were representative of 3 main habitat categories. During these surveys, we sampled 1,086 km of lake shore wherein we detected 386 crocodiles. Analysis of the data revealed significant variability in both inter- and intra-observer detection probabilities. Our raw encounter rate was 0.355 crocodiles/km. When we accounted for observer effects and habitat, we estimated a surface population abundance of 2,581 (2,239-2,987, 95% credible intervals) crocodiles in Lake Nasser. Our results underscore the importance of well-trained, experienced monitoring personnel in order to decrease heterogeneity in intra-observer detection probability and to better detect changes in the population based on survey indices. This study will assist the Egyptian government establish a monitoring program as an integral part of future crocodile harvest activities in Lake Nasser

  20. Stellar coronal abundances. 3: The solar first ionization potential effect determined from full-disk observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laming, J. Martin; Drake, J. J.; Widing, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we reanalayze the full-disk quiet-sun spectrum of Mallinovsky & Heroux (1973) with modern atomic data. The purposes of this are to check our atomic data and methods in other investigations using data from nearby stars obtained with the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite, and to confirm that the solar first ionization potential (FIP) effect investigated by previous authors studying discrete solar regions is the same as that found in full-disk spectra. We recover the usual solar FIP effect of a coronal abundance enhancement of elements with a low FIP of a factor approximately 3-4 for lines formed at temperatures greater than approximately 10(exp 6) K. For lower temperatures, the FIP effect seems to be substantially smaller, in qualitative agreement with other data. Comparing our full-disk result with those from discrete solar structures suggest that the FIP effect is a function of altitude, with the lower temperature full-disk emission being dominated by the super-granulation network. We also compare the recent ionization balance of Arnaud & Raymond (1992) with that of Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  1. CHANDRA-LETGS X-ray observations of Capella. Temperature, density and abundance diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Drake, J. J.; Kaastra, J. S.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Porquet, D.

    2001-03-01

    We report an analysis of the X-ray spectrum of Capella from 6 to 175 Å obtained with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board of the X-ray space observatory CHANDRA. Many emission line features appear that can be resolved much better as compared to former instruments (EUVE and ASCA). Coronal electron densities (ne) and temperatures (T) of brightly emitting regions are constrained by an analysis of ratios of density- and temperature-sensitive lines of helium-like ions and highly ionized iron atoms. Lines emitted by e.g., O VII & VIII, Mg X-XII, Si XII-XIV, Fe IX, X & XV-XXIII are used to derive T. Line ratios in the helium-like triplets of C V, N VI, O VII, Mg XI, and Si XIII yield T in the range 0.5-10 MK, and ne in the range 109-1013 cm-3. The Fe IX/X ratio yields T =~ 0.9 MK, while lines from Fe XVIII to XXII give T ~ 6-10 MK. Flux ratios of Fe XX-XXII lines indicate for the electron densities an upper limit in the range ne <~ (2-5) 1012 cm-3. From line ratios of Fe XVII and Fe XVIII we derive constraints on the optical depth tau of ~ 1-1.5. An emission measure distribution is derived from Fe line intensities. Results for element abundances (relative to Fe) from a 4-T model are: O and Ne/Fe about solar, N, Mg and Si/Fe ~ 2x solar. The results for T and ne are described in terms of quasi-static coronal loop models and it is shown that the X-ray emission originates from compact structures much smaller than the stellar radii.

  2. Distribution, Abundance, and Diversity Patterns of the Thermoacidophilic “Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 2”

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Wagner, Isaac D.; Liu, Yitai; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation-independent studies have shown that taxa belonging to the “deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeota 2” (DHVE2) lineage are widespread at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. While this lineage appears to be a common and important member of the microbial community at vent environments, relatively little is known about their overall distribution and phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we examined the distribution, relative abundance, co-occurrence patterns, and phylogenetic diversity of cultivable thermoacidophilic DHVE2 in deposits from globally distributed vent fields. Results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays with primers specific for the DHVE2 and Archaea demonstrate the ubiquity of the DHVE2 at deep-sea vents and suggest that they are significant members of the archaeal communities of established vent deposit communities. Local similarity analysis of pyrosequencing data revealed that the distribution of the DHVE2 was positively correlated with 10 other Euryarchaeota phylotypes and negatively correlated with mostly Crenarchaeota phylotypes. Targeted cultivation efforts resulted in the isolation of 12 axenic strains from six different vent fields, expanding the cultivable diversity of this lineage to vents along the East Pacific Rise and Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Eleven of these isolates shared greater than 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with one another and the only described isolate of the DHVE2, Aciduliprofundum boonei T469T. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of five protein-coding loci, atpA, EF-2, radA, rpoB, and secY, revealed clustering of isolates according to geographic region of isolation. Overall, this study increases our understanding of the distribution, abundance, and phylogenetic diversity of the DHVE2. PMID:22363325

  3. Abundance, seasonal patterns and diet of the non-native jellyfish Blackfordia virginica in a Portuguese estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, F.; Chainho, P.; Costa, J. L.; Domingos, I.; Angélico, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Blackfordia virginica, a non-indigenous hydrozoan introduced in many systems around the world, has been observed in the Mira estuary, southwest of Portugal, since 1984. Monthly sampling (January 2013-January 2014) at a fixed location with high abundance of the medusae confirmed the occurrence of a seasonal cycle associated with temperature and photoperiod. The beginning of the medusa cycle occurred in May immediately after the spring zooplankton bloom during April. Examination of the gut contents of B. virginica medusae revealed that copepods, the most abundant group in the zooplankton community, were highly predated. Barnacle nauplii, decapod crustacean larvae and anchovy eggs were also identified in the guts. The medusae showed positive selection for copepods, and negative selection for barnacle nauplii, decapod crustacean larvae and anchovy eggs. The mortality rate of copepods (used as a model prey group) induced by medusae predation was estimated and showed the potential impact of this species in the ecosystem, ranging between 2.34 d-1 and 0.02 d-1, with a minimum copepod half-life of 0.30 days.

  4. Carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic: patterns and drivers of bacterial abundance, production and respiration on the Beaufort Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Retuerta, E.; Jeffrey, W. H.; Babin, M.; Bélanger, S.; Benner, R.; Marie, D.; Matsuoka, A.; Raimbault, P.; Joux, F.

    2012-05-01

    During August 2009, measurements of bacterial abundance and nucleic acid content were made along with production and respiration in coastal waters of the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), an area influenced by the Mackenzie River inflow. The main purpose was to evaluate bacterial organic carbon processing with respect to local sources, mainly primary production and river inputs. Bacterial production and abundance generally decreased from river to offshore waters and from surface to deep waters. In contrast, the percentage of high nucleic acid bacteria was higher in deep waters rather than in surface or river waters. Statistical analyses indicated that bacterial production was primarily controlled by temperature and the availability of labile organic matter, as indicated by total dissolved amino acid concentrations. Direct comparisons of bacterial carbon demand and primary production indicated net heterotrophy was common in shelf waters. Net autotrophy was observed at stations in the Mackenzie River plume, suggesting that the carbon fixed in plume waters helped fuel net heterotrophy in the Beaufort Sea margin.

  5. Carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic: patterns and drivers of bacterial abundance, production and respiration on the Beaufort Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Retuerta, E.; Jeffrey, W. H.; Babin, M.; Bélanger, S.; Benner, R.; Marie, D.; Matsuoka, A.; Raimbault, P.; Joux, F.

    2012-09-01

    During August 2009, measurements of bacterial abundance and nucleic acid content were made along with production and respiration in coastal waters of the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), an area influenced by the Mackenzie River inflow. The main purpose was to evaluate bacterial organic carbon processing with respect to local sources, mainly primary production and river inputs. Bacterial production and abundance generally decreased from river to offshore waters and from surface to deep waters. In contrast, the percentage of high nucleic acid bacteria was higher in deep waters rather than in surface or river waters. Statistical analyses indicated that bacterial production was primarily controlled by temperature and the availability of labile organic matter, as indicated by total dissolved amino acid concentrations. Direct comparisons of bacterial carbon demand and primary production indicated net heterotrophy was common in shelf waters. Net autotrophy was observed at stations in the Mackenzie River plume, suggesting that the carbon fixed in plume waters helped fuel net heterotrophy in the Beaufort Sea margin.

  6. Venus cloud structure and water vapor abundance from Mariner 10 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the Venus atmosphere with the infrared radiometer on Mariner 10 have been analyzed by Taylor (1975) in terms of the vertical distribution of opacity at wavelengths near 11 microns and 45 microns in the thermal infrared. In this paper, we discuss models of the Venus atmosphere which are consistent with the inferred opacity structure. Either a two-layer cloud structure, or a single cloud deck overlaid by a layer containing approximately 40 precipitable microns of water vapor, would have the required limb-darkening characteristics at the wavelengths of observation.

  7. Molecular abundances in comet 103P/Hartley 2 observed with the Arizona Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Lis, D. C.; Küppers, M.; Szutowicz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Comet 103P/Hartley 2 passed perihelion on October 28, 2010 at a close distance of only ˜0.12 AU from Earth. 103P/Hartley 2 has orbit characteristics of a Jupiter-family comet with an orbital period of 6.5 years and small eccentricity. On November 4, 2010 NASA's EPOXI mission made a close approach to the comet (A'Hearn M. F., et al. 2011). An observational campaign with Herschel and ground based instrumentation was coordinated during the EPOXI flyby to monitor the comet activity (Meech et al. 2011; Biver et al. 2011). Comet 103P/Hartley 2 was observed with the three instruments onboard Herschel (Pilbratt et al. 2010) in the sub-millimetre and far-infrared domain within the framework of the guaranteed time key project "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System" (Hartogh et al. 2009). We have observed this object in the mm and sub-millimeter ranges with the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12 Meter and Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescopes (HHSMT) to detect the parent volatiles HCN, CS and CH3OH and complement almost simultaneous Herschel H2O and HDO observations (Hartogh et al. 2011). The close approach to Earth provided a unique opportunity to study the molecular composition in the inner coma and the production rate variability due to the rotation of the nucleus in a Jupiter-family comet.

  8. Twenty Years of Elfin Enumeration: Abundance Patterns of Five Species of Callophrys (Lycaenidae) in Central Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Swengel, Ann B; Swengel, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    We recorded five species of elfins (Callophrys) during annual spring surveys targeting frosted elfin C. irus (state-listed as threatened) in 19 pine-oak barrens in central Wisconsin USA during 1994-2013. At the northwest end of its range here, C. irus co-varied with spring temperature, but declined significantly over time (eight sites verified extant of originally 17). Two other specialists increased significantly. The northern specialist, hoary elfin C. polios (nine sites), correlated positively with the previous year's growing season precipitation. The southern specialist, Henry's elfin C. henrici (11 sites), co-varied with winter precipitation and spring temperature and dryness. The two resident generalists had stable trends. For all species, the first observed date per year became earlier over time and varied more than the last observed date. Thus, flight period span increased with earlier first observed dates. Elfin abundance increased significantly with earlier first observed dates in the current and/or prior year. Three species (C. irus, C. henrici, a generalist) had more positive population trends in reserves than non-reserves. This suggests that C. irus declines correspond to habitat conditions. Thus, monitoring programs and habitat management specifically for C. irus appear necessary to obtain a long-term stable trend for this species in Wisconsin. PMID:26462687

  9. Twenty Years of Elfin Enumeration: Abundance Patterns of Five Species of Callophrys (Lycaenidae) in Central Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Swengel, Ann B; Swengel, Scott R

    2014-04-23

    We recorded five species of elfins (Callophrys) during annual spring surveys targeting frosted elfin C. irus (state-listed as threatened) in 19 pine-oak barrens in central Wisconsin USA during 1994-2013. At the northwest end of its range here, C. irus co-varied with spring temperature, but declined significantly over time (eight sites verified extant of originally 17). Two other specialists increased significantly. The northern specialist, hoary elfin C. polios (nine sites), correlated positively with the previous year's growing season precipitation. The southern specialist, Henry's elfin C. henrici (11 sites), co-varied with winter precipitation and spring temperature and dryness. The two resident generalists had stable trends. For all species, the first observed date per year became earlier over time and varied more than the last observed date. Thus, flight period span increased with earlier first observed dates. Elfin abundance increased significantly with earlier first observed dates in the current and/or prior year. Three species (C. irus, C. henrici, a generalist) had more positive population trends in reserves than non-reserves. This suggests that C. irus declines correspond to habitat conditions. Thus, monitoring programs and habitat management specifically for C. irus appear necessary to obtain a long-term stable trend for this species in Wisconsin.

  10. Twenty Years of Elfin Enumeration: Abundance Patterns of Five Species of Callophrys (Lycaenidae) in Central Wisconsin, USA

    PubMed Central

    Swengel, Ann B.; Swengel, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    We recorded five species of elfins (Callophrys) during annual spring surveys targeting frosted elfin C. irus (state-listed as threatened) in 19 pine-oak barrens in central Wisconsin USA during 1994–2013. At the northwest end of its range here, C. irus co-varied with spring temperature, but declined significantly over time (eight sites verified extant of originally 17). Two other specialists increased significantly. The northern specialist, hoary elfin C. polios (nine sites), correlated positively with the previous year’s growing season precipitation. The southern specialist, Henry’s elfin C. henrici (11 sites), co-varied with winter precipitation and spring temperature and dryness. The two resident generalists had stable trends. For all species, the first observed date per year became earlier over time and varied more than the last observed date. Thus, flight period span increased with earlier first observed dates. Elfin abundance increased significantly with earlier first observed dates in the current and/or prior year. Three species (C. irus, C. henrici, a generalist) had more positive population trends in reserves than non-reserves. This suggests that C. irus declines correspond to habitat conditions. Thus, monitoring programs and habitat management specifically for C. irus appear necessary to obtain a long-term stable trend for this species in Wisconsin. PMID:26462687

  11. A Stochastic Model to Study Rift Valley Fever Persistence with Different Seasonal Patterns of Vector Abundance: New Insights on the Endemicity in the Tropical Island of Mayotte.

    PubMed

    Cavalerie, Lisa; Charron, Maud V P; Ezanno, Pauline; Dommergues, Laure; Zumbo, Betty; Cardinale, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic vector-borne disease causing abortion storms in cattle and human epidemics in Africa. Our aim was to evaluate RVF persistence in a seasonal and isolated population and to apply it to Mayotte Island (Indian Ocean), where the virus was still silently circulating four years after its last known introduction in 2007. We proposed a stochastic model to estimate RVF persistence over several years and under four seasonal patterns of vector abundance. Firstly, the model predicted a wide range of virus spread patterns, from obligate persistence in a constant or tropical environment (without needing vertical transmission or reintroduction) to frequent extinctions in a drier climate. We then identified for each scenario of seasonality the parameters that most influenced prediction variations. Persistence was sensitive to vector lifespan and biting rate in a tropical climate, and to host viraemia duration and vector lifespan in a drier climate. The first epizootic peak was primarily sensitive to viraemia duration and thus likely to be controlled by vaccination, whereas subsequent peaks were sensitive to vector lifespan and biting rate in a tropical climate, and to host birth rate and viraemia duration in arid climates. Finally, we parameterized the model according to Mayotte known environment. Mosquito captures estimated the abundance of eight potential RVF vectors. Review of RVF competence studies on these species allowed adjusting transmission probabilities per bite. Ruminant serological data since 2004 and three new cross-sectional seroprevalence studies are presented. Transmission rates had to be divided by more than five to best fit observed data. Five years after introduction, RVF persisted in more than 10% of the simulations, even under this scenario of low transmission. Hence, active surveillance must be maintained to better understand the risk related to RVF persistence and to prevent new introductions. PMID:26147799

  12. Two-Point Observations of High- and Low-Frequency Variations of Helium Abundance in the Solar Win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrankova, J.; Cagas, P.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Zastenker, G. N.; Riazantseva, M.

    2014-12-01

    Variations of the abundance of heavy species observed in the solar wind are usually attributed to spacecraft encounters with streams emanating from different places and altitudes in the source region and their further evolution is considered as being negligible. These conclusions are based on an analysis of highly averaged data and much less attention was devoted to variations on the time scale of seconds. The BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft provides a high-time resolution data of the helium and proton fluxes and proton velocity, density, and temperature that suitable for investigations of rapid variations. The paper compares measurements in two points (Spektr-R and Wind) and focuses on the changes of helium abundance on this middle scale and on their correlations with variations of other parameters. We have found that only a low-frequency part of He abundance variations can be attributed to changes of the source region, whereas a significant portion of them could be generated by in-transit turbulence that is probably driven by the speed difference between the ion species.

  13. Double-observer approach to estimating egg mass abundance of vernal pool breeding amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.; Jung, R.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in seasonally flooded pools, and the status of associated amphibian populations, has initiated programs in the northeastern United States to document and monitor these habitats. Counting egg masses is an effective way to determine the population size of pool-breeding amphibians, such as wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). However, bias is associated with counts if egg masses are missed. Counts unadjusted for the proportion missed (i.e., without adjustment for detection probability) could lead to false assessments of population trends. We used a dependent double-observer method in 2002-2003 to estimate numbers of wood frog and spotted salamander egg masses at seasonal forest pools in 13 National Wildlife Refuges, 1 National Park, 1 National Seashore, and 1 State Park in the northeastern United States. We calculated detection probabilities for egg masses and examined whether detection probabilities varied by species, observers, pools, and in relation to pool characteristics (pool area, pool maximum depth, within-pool vegetation). For the 2 years, model selection indicated that no consistent set of variables explained the variation in data sets from individual Refuges and Parks. Because our results indicated that egg mass detection probabilities vary spatially and temporally, we conclude that it is essential to use estimation procedures, such as double-observer methods with egg mass surveys, to determine population sizes and trends of these species.

  14. Variations of oxygen charge state abundances in the global magnetosphere, as observed by Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. C.; Livi, S. A.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-02-01

    Geomagnetically trapped oxygen ions of solar and ionospheric origin have previously been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. Early observations from Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/CCE have studied this distribution within a limited spatial range of L shells over all magnetic local times (MLT). This study expands on these early results using observations from the Polar spacecraft. The distributions by charge state show O6+, from the solar wind, charge exchanging into O5+, O4+, and O3+ as the ion populations drift to lower L shells. Meanwhile, ionospheric O+ and O2+ are primarily seen at low L shells and may also play a role in O3+ populations. We also present here the Dst, Vsw∗Bz, and AE dependencies of oxygen charge states (O+ through O6+) in MLT and L shell in the magnetosphere of the Earth. The distributions of these charge states provide insight into the injection and energization of both ionospheric oxygen as well as solar wind ions inside the magnetosphere.

  15. Abundances, depositional fluxes, and homologue patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls in dated sediment cores from the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mai, Bixian; Zeng, Eddy Y; Luo, Xiaojun; Yang, Qingshu; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2005-01-01

    Despite the recent efforts to investigate the distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants in the tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, very little was known about the temporal change of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environmental ecosystem of China. In this study, three dated sediment cores collected from the Pearl River Delta of southern China were analyzed for a large suite of PCB congeners, from which the temporal profiles of PCB abundances, fluxes, and homologue patterns were constructed. The sedimentary inventories of total PCBs at the sampling sites ranged from 480 to 1310 ng/cm2, at the low end of the worldwide figures. Although production and use of PCBs have been banned or highly restricted in China since the early 1980s, the fluxes of total PCBs continued to increase in the Pearl River Delta sediments. There was a concurrent increase of PCB fluxes and gross domestic product per capita in the region from 1980 to 1997, and a decline of agricultural land use was evident at the same time. Apparently, large-scale land transform since the early 1980s as well as emissions from the PCB-containing electrical equipments were responsible for the sharp rise of PCB fluxes in the recent sediments. The difference in the PCB homologue patterns from 1940 to the mid-1970s was probably indicative of the different timelines of PCB usage in Macao/Hong Kong and mainland China and the differenttypes of technical PCBs commercially used. PCBs were detectable in sediments deposited well before the time frame when production of PCBs began (before 1930) and were relatively enriched in the less chlorinated homologue groups (3Cl and 4Cl PCBs), suggesting the downward mobility of lightly chlorinated PCB congeners in the sediment column.

  16. Abundance not linked to survival across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction: patterns in North American bivalves.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Rowan

    2003-03-01

    Ecological studies suggest that rare taxa are more likely to go extinct than abundant ones, but the influence of abundance on survivorship in the fossil record has received little attention. An analysis of Late Maastrichtian bivalve subgenera from the North American Coastal Plain found no evidence that survivorship is tied to abundance across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (65 million years ago), regardless of abundance metric or spatial scale examined. The fact that abundance does not promote survivorship in end-Cretaceous bivalves suggests that the factors influencing survivorship during mass extinctions in the fossil record may differ from those operating during intervals of background extinction.

  17. Lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) distribution, activity patterns and relative abundance in the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert; Ayala, Guido; Viscarra, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Lowland tapir distribution is described in northwestern Bolivia and southeastern Peru within the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape, a priority Tapir Conservation Unit, using 1255 distribution points derived from camera trapping efforts, field research and interviews with park guards from 5 national protected areas and hunters from 19 local communities. A total of 392 independent camera trapping events from 14 camera trap surveys at 11 sites demonstrated the nocturnal and crepuscular activity patterns (86%) of the lowland tapir and provide 3 indices of relative abundance for spatial and temporal comparison. Capture rates for lowland tapirs were not significantly different between camera trapping stations placed on river beaches versus those placed in the forest. Lowland tapir capture rates were significantly higher in the national protected areas of the region versus indigenous territories and unprotected portions of the landscape. Capture rates through time suggested that lowland tapir populations are recovering within the Tuichi Valley, an area currently dedicated towards ecotourism activities, following the creation (1995) and subsequent implementation (1997) of the Madidi National Park in Bolivia. Based on our distributional data and published conservative estimates of population density, we calculated that this transboundary landscape holds an overall lowland tapir population of between 14 540 and 36 351 individuals, of which at least 24.3% are under protection from national and municipal parks. As such, the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape should be considered a lowland tapir population stronghold and priority conservation efforts are discussed in order to maintain this population. PMID:23253372

  18. Lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) distribution, activity patterns and relative abundance in the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert; Ayala, Guido; Viscarra, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Lowland tapir distribution is described in northwestern Bolivia and southeastern Peru within the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape, a priority Tapir Conservation Unit, using 1255 distribution points derived from camera trapping efforts, field research and interviews with park guards from 5 national protected areas and hunters from 19 local communities. A total of 392 independent camera trapping events from 14 camera trap surveys at 11 sites demonstrated the nocturnal and crepuscular activity patterns (86%) of the lowland tapir and provide 3 indices of relative abundance for spatial and temporal comparison. Capture rates for lowland tapirs were not significantly different between camera trapping stations placed on river beaches versus those placed in the forest. Lowland tapir capture rates were significantly higher in the national protected areas of the region versus indigenous territories and unprotected portions of the landscape. Capture rates through time suggested that lowland tapir populations are recovering within the Tuichi Valley, an area currently dedicated towards ecotourism activities, following the creation (1995) and subsequent implementation (1997) of the Madidi National Park in Bolivia. Based on our distributional data and published conservative estimates of population density, we calculated that this transboundary landscape holds an overall lowland tapir population of between 14 540 and 36 351 individuals, of which at least 24.3% are under protection from national and municipal parks. As such, the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape should be considered a lowland tapir population stronghold and priority conservation efforts are discussed in order to maintain this population.

  19. Abundance of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase molecules observed to rotate via single-molecule microscopy with gold nanorod probes.

    PubMed

    York, Justin; Spetzler, David; Hornung, Tassilo; Ishmukhametov, Robert; Martin, James; Frasch, Wayne D

    2007-12-01

    The abundance of E. coli F1-ATPase molecules observed to rotate using gold nanorods attached to the gamma-subunit was quantitated. Individual F1 molecules were determined to be rotating based upon time dependent fluctuations of red and green light scattered from the nanorods when viewed through a polarizing filter. The average number of F1 molecules observed to rotate in the presence of GTP, ATP, and without nucleotide was approximately 50, approximately 25, and approximately 4% respectively. In some experiments, the fraction of molecules observed to rotate in the presence of GTP was as high as 65%. These data indicate that rotational measurements made using gold nanorods provide information of the F1-ATPase mechanism that is representative of the characteristics of the enzyme population as a whole.

  20. Infiltration pattern in a regolith-fractured bedrock profile: field observation of a dye stain pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Gyoo Ho; Lee, Jin-Soo; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Tack Hyun; Ha, Kyoochul

    2006-02-01

    We examined the infiltration pattern of water in a regolith-bedrock profile consisting of two overburdens (OB1 and OB2), a buried rice paddy soil (PS), two texturally distinctive weathered materials (WM1 and WM2) and a fractured sedimentary rock (BR), using a Brilliant Blue FCF dye tracer. A black-coloured coating in conducting fractures in WM1, WM2 and BR was analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The dye tracer penetrated to greater than 2 m depth in the profile. The macropore flow and saturated interflow were the major infiltration patterns in the profile. Macropore flow and saturated interflow were observed along fractures in WM1, WM2 and BR and at the dipping interfaces of PS-WM1, PS-WM2 and PS-BR respectively. Heterogeneous matrix flow occurred in upper overburden (OB1) and PS. Compared with OB1, the coarser textured OB2 acted as a physical barrier for vertical flow of water. The PS with low bulk density and many fine roots was another major conducting route of water in the profile. Manganese oxide and iron oxide were positively identified in the black coating material and had low crystallinity and high surface area, indicating their high reactivity with conducting contaminants.

  1. New observations of interstellar abundances and depletions of boron, vanadium, chromium, and cobalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; Weiler, W. J.; Oegerle, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    New observations of interstellar lines of boron, vanadium, chromium, and cobalt in the spectra of Zeta Oph and Xi Per have been obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Chromium has been detected for the first time toward a reddened star, and cobalt has been seen for the first time in any interstellar line of sight. New limits have been obtained for boron and vanadium. These new data, along with limits on scandium and other species from the literature, have been compared with models for the depletion process. No fully conclusive test of depletion models is yet possible, but the new data on boron appear to favor the hypothesis that the depletions are dominated by accretion of gas-phase particles onto grains, rather than being due to grain condensation under pressure equilibrium. The impact of these new data on the study of grain surface properties is described.

  2. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  3. Survey Observation of S-bearing Species toward Neptune's Atmosphere to Constrain the Origin of Abundant Volatile Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, T.; Mizuno, A.; Nagahama, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present our recent sub-mm waveband observation result of CS, CO and HCN gases on Neptune's atmosphere. Obtained abundance of both CO and HCN were comparable to previous observations. In turn, CS gas, which was produced largely after the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter in 1994 was not detected. Obtained [CS]/[CO] value was at least 300 times more lower than the case of SL9 event while the calculated lifetime of CS gas by thermo-chemical simulation is quite longer than other S-bearing species. The interpretation of the absence of CS bring the new mystery of the origin of trace gases on Neptune's atmosphere.

  4. Experimental observation of diffraction patterns from micro-specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, D.; Yun, W.B.; Kirz, J.

    1988-03-01

    Small non-periodic specimens scatter soft x-rays strongly enough to permit scattered-photon imaging. For the type of imaging principally studied here (diffraction-pattern imaging), the requirements on divergence and monochromaticity of the illumination are also moderately well understood, and appear to be capable of being sufficiently well met by undulator beamlines to permit imaging to the diffraction-limited resolution of lambda/2, provided of course that a method of phasing the diffraction pattern is available. It may be remarked that for holography the illumination requirements, while varying with the form of holography, are more severe than for diffraction-pattern imaging, while for imaging microscopy they may be considerably less severe, depending on the angular and frequency bandwidths of the imaging element. It would appear to be for this reason that imaging microscopes are currently achieving exposure times of a few seconds even on bending-magnet beamlines.

  5. Millimeter observations of CS, HCO{sup +}, and CO toward five planetary nebulae: following molecular abundances with nebular age

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M.; Cox, E. G.

    2014-08-20

    Millimeter and sub-millimeter observations of CO, CS, and HCO{sup +} have been conducted toward five planetary nebulae (PNe: K4-47, NGC 6537 (Red Spider), M2-48, NGC 6720 (Ring), and NGC 6853 (Dumbbell)), spanning an age range of 900-10,000 yr, using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. The J = 5 → 4, J = 3 → 2, and J = 2 → 1 transitions of CS at 245, 147, and 98 GHz, as well as the J = 3 → 2 and J = 1 → 0 lines of HCO{sup +} at 268 and 89 GHz, were detected toward each source. At least three rotational transitions of CO have also been observed, including the J = 6 → 5 and J = 4 → 3 lines at 691 and 461 GHz. CS had not been definitively identified previously in PNe, and new detections of HCO{sup +} were made in four of the five nebulae. From a radiative transfer analysis of the CO and CS data, kinetic temperatures of T {sub K} ∼ 10-80 K and gas densities of n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 0.1-1 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} were determined for the molecular material in these sources. Column densities for CO, CS, and HCO{sup +} were N {sub tot} ∼ 0.2-5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –2}, N {sub tot} ∼ 0.4-9 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2}, and N {sub tot} ∼ 0.3-5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2}, respectively, with fractional abundances, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 0.4-2 × 10{sup –4}, f ∼ 1-4 × 10{sup –8}, and f ∼ 1 × 10{sup –8}, with the exception of M2-48, which had f(HCO{sup +}) ∼ 10{sup –7}. Overall, the molecular abundances do not significantly vary over a duration of 10,000 yr, in contrast to predictions of chemical models. The abundances reflect the remnant asymptotic giant branch shell material, coupled with photochemistry in the early PN phase. These observations also suggest that PNe eject substantial amounts of molecular material into the diffuse interstellar medium.

  6. The tropospheric abundances of NH3 and PH3 in Jupiter's Great Red Spot, from Voyager IRIS observations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C A; Bezard, B; Owen, T; Gautier, D

    1992-01-01

    ; therefore, condensation at this level does not easily explain the low NH3 abundance in the GRS. All samples are taken at essentially the same latitude; photolysis and/or charged particle precipitation is probably not directly responsible either. The observed NH3 depletion may have a dynamical origin or result from some unidentified chemical processes at work in the GRS.

  7. Rural Migration Patterns in Norway: Some Observations concerning Recent Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Beryl

    In Norway, there has been a change from net out-migration from rural areas to net in-migration since about 1970; however, this apparent change is a manifestation of changes in occupational patterns and characteristics of certain age groups. The rise in technical and professional occupations has been dramatic, and a particularly high proportion of…

  8. Observation of microwave Cerenkov radiation as a diffraction pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, X.K.; Neighbours, J.R.; Buskirk, F.R.; Snyder, D.D.; Vujaklija, M.; Bruce, R.G.

    1986-07-15

    Measurement of microwave Cerenkov radiation in air exhibits the diffraction pattern predicted in earlier work. The radiation appears only at harmonics of the frequency of periodic electron bunches. Angular distribution power measurements are presented for frequencies of 2.86, 5.71, 8.57, and 11.42 GHz corresponding to the fundamental and the first three harmonics of an S-band rf linac.

  9. Observation of microwave Cerenkov radiation as diffraction pattern. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, X.R.; Neighbours, J.R.; Buskirk, F.R.; Snyder, D.D.; Vujaklija, M.

    1985-08-01

    Measurement of microwave Cerenkov radiation in air exhibits the diffraction pattern predicted in earlier work. The radiation appears only at harmonics of the frequency of periodic electron bunches; angular distribution power measurements are presented for frequencies of 2.86, 5.71, 8.57 and 11 and 12 GHz, corresponding to the fundamental and the first three harmonics of an S band RF linac.

  10. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BYTHOTREPHES CEDERSTROEMI AND LEPTODORA KINDTII INFERRED FROM SEASONAL POPULATION ABUNDANCE PATTERNS IN LAKE MICHIGAMME, MICHIGAN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory


    Bythotrephes cederstroemi is a non-indigenous predaceous zooplankter invading North American freshwater lakes in the Great Lakes region. We present seasonal population abundance values for both Bythotrephes and Leptodora kindtii from Lake Michigamme, Michigan for the years ...

  11. Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument: (GRIP) Programmed Review (Long Research Form) [and] Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument--Mastery Learning Form Programmed Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangano, Nancy G.

    Designed to assist the observer in the understanding of the Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument (GRIP) training manual, this programmed review contains a series of coding activities provided for the purpose of determining if each observer can differentiate between the categories and subcategories of the instrument as well as…

  12. Anthropogenic soils and land use patterns in relation to small mammal and flea abundance in plague endemic area of Western Usambara Mountains, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kimaro, Didas N; Msanya, Balthazar M; Meliyo, Joel; Hieronimo, Proches; Mwango, Sibaway; Kihupi, Nganga I; Gulinck, Hubert; Deckers, Jozef A

    2014-07-01

    Heterogeneity in the landscapes of West Usambara Mountains on land use and human activities has been reported. However, the interface of land use patterns and human modified soils with small mammal and flea abundance for possible explanation of plague has not been explored. This study was carried out to determine the link between anthropogenic soils and land use patterns on small mammal and flea abundance and the occurrence of reported plague in the Western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Standard soil survey methods were used to identify and describe soils and land use patterns on lower slopes and valley bottoms on which the surrounding villages are reported to have high and medium plague frequencies. The identified soils were characterised in terms of their morphological and physico-chemical properties and classified according to FAO-World Reference Base for Soil Resources. Small mammals were trapped on the same landscape positions and identified to genus/species level. Fleas were removed from the trapped small mammals, counted and identified to species level. In total 57 small mammals were captured from which 32 fleas were collected. Results show that human settlements and mixed cultivation on lower slopes and continuous vegetable cropping in the valley bottoms are dominant land use types. Intensive use of forest soils, manuring and irrigation on farms in the studied landscapes have contributed to the development of uniquely human modified soils namely Hortic Anthrosols in the lower slopes and Plaggic Irragric Hortic Anthrosols in valley bottoms. The identified anthropogenic soils and land use patterns are associated with high abundance of small mammals (Mastomys natalensis) and flea species (Xenopsylla brasiliensis and Dinopsyllus lypusus). This phenomenon is vividly apparent in the villages with medium to high plague frequencies. The study suggests that plague surveillance programmes should consider the existing relationship between anthropogenic soils, land

  13. Chemical abundances in the protoplanetary disc LV 2 (Orion) - II. High-dispersion VLT observations and microjet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of the LV 2 proplyd is presented taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT)/FLAMES Argus array at an angular resolution of 0.31 × 0.31 arcsec2 and velocity resolutions down to 2 km s-1 pixel-1. Following subtraction of the local M42 emission, the spectrum of LV 2 is isolated from the surrounding nebula. We measured the heliocentric velocities and widths of a number of lines detected in the intrinsic spectrum of the proplyd, as well as in the adjacent Orion nebula falling within a 6.6 × 4.2 arcsec2 field of view. It is found that far-ultraviolet to optical collisional lines with critical densities, Ncr, ranging from 103 to 109 cm-3 suffer collisional de-excitation near the rest velocity of the proplyd correlating tightly with their critical densities. Lines of low Ncr are suppressed the most. The bipolar jet arising from LV 2 is spectrally and spatially well detected in several emission lines. We compute the [O III] electron temperature profile across LV 2 in velocity space and measure steep temperature variations associated with the red-shifted lobe of the jet, possibly being due to a shock discontinuity. From the velocity-resolved analysis the ionized gas near the rest frame of LV 2 has Te= 9200 ± 800 K and Ne˜ 106 cm-3, while the red-shifted jet lobe has Te≈ 9000-104 K and Ne˜ 106-107 cm-3. The jet flow is highly ionized but contains dense semineutral clumps emitting neutral oxygen lines. The abundances of N+, O2 +, Ne2 +, Fe2 +, S+and S2 +are measured for the strong red-shifted jet lobe. Iron in the core of LV 2 is depleted by 2.54 dex with respect to solar as a result of sedimentation on dust, whereas the efficient destruction of dust grains in the fast microjet raises its Fe abundance to at least 30 per cent solar. Sulphur does not show evidence of significant depletion on dust, but its abundance both in the core and the jet is only about half solar. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory

  14. Initial observations of the 2005 Alexandrium fundyense bloom in southern New England: General patterns and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Donald M.; Keafer, Bruce A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Mickelson, Michael J.; Keay, Kenneth E.; Scott Libby, P.; Manning, James P.; Mayo, Charles A.; Whittaker, David K.; Michael Hickey, J.; He, Ruoying; Lynch, Daniel R.; Smith, Keston W.

    2005-09-01

    From May to July, 2005, an extensive bloom of Alexandrium fundyense occurred along the coast of southern New England. The outbreak eventually closed shellfish beds from central Maine to Massachusetts, including Nantucket Island and portions of Martha's Vineyard, and resulted in the closure of 40,000 km 2 of offshore federal waters as well. The coastal Alexandrium bloom was exceptional in several ways: high toxin levels were measured farther south than ever before in New England; levels of toxicity in many locations were higher than previously observed at those stations; for the first time toxicity at some locations was above quarantine levels; cell concentrations far exceeded those observed in the coastal waters of southern New England in the past; and for the first time in the region the governors of Maine and Massachusetts officially declared the red tide to be a disaster, clearing the way for federal assistance. Initial observations suggest that several factors contributed to this bloom. Abundant rainfall and heavy snowmelt substantially increased the amount of fresh water entering the Gulf of Maine. Combined with other freshwater inputs, we hypothesize that this provided macro- and micro-nutrients, a stratified water column, and a transport mechanism that led to high cell abundances and broad, region-wide dispersal of the organism. Warm temperatures in western waters also would have favored A. fundyense growth. In addition, several storms with strong winds out of the northeast occurred at times when cells were abundant and in locations where the winds could advect them into Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays and keep them there, leading to high cell concentrations and toxicity. Another contributing factor may have been the high abundance of newly deposited cysts in western Gulf of Maine sediments, as documented in a fall 2004 survey. Here, we evaluate this bloom and the patterns of toxicity in light of the conceptual models for A. fundyense dynamics developed

  15. Spatial and seasonal patterns in abundance and age-composition of Calanus finmarchicus in the Gulf of Maine and on Georges Bank: 1977 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meise, C. J.; O'Reilly, J. E.

    The mean seasonal cycle and distribution of various life history stages of C. finmarchicus throughout the Georges Bank (GB)-Gulf of Maine (GOM) region were characterized based on 5966 MARMAP zooplankton samples collected during 106 surveys over a 10-year period (autumn 1977-autumn 1987). A high degree of seasonal and spatial variability in C. finmarchicus abundance throughout the region was evident in contoured portrayals of data, grouped into standard stations and 2-month "seasons". Eight subareas of the Gulf of Maine-Georges Bank region were identified through cluster analysis of standard stations having similar seasonal patterns in mean abundance of C. finmarchicus stages C3, C4, C5 and adults. These were the northern Gulf of Maine (Northern GOM); southern Gulf of Maine (Southern GOM); Scotian Shelf-coastal Gulf of Maine (Scotian-Coastal GOM); Mass Bay; tidally mixed Georges Bank (Mixed GB); tidal front on the Bank separating mixed from seasonally stratified water (Tidal Front GB); seasonally stratified water on the Bank (Stratified GB) and the Continental Slope adjacent to Georges Bank (SLOPE). A distinct seasonal abundance cycle was present in all subareas, but, the magnitude and timing of annual maxima varied greatly among subareas. Peak abundance was reached early (March-April) in Mixed GB, Tidal Front GB and Mass Bay, and late (July-August) in Northern GOM and Scotian-Coastal GOM. Remaining subareas had maxima in May-June. Abundance increased 10-fold from January-February to March-April and decreased sharply from July-August to September-October in all areas except southern GOM and northern GOM. The amplitude of the annual cycle was weakest in northern GOM and southern GOM, where high concentrations of C. finmarchicus persisted year-round, and strongest in the tidally mixed shallow water on GB, where the sparsest densities of C. finmarchicus occurred most of the year. Abundance curves for the various areas converged in March-April, when C. finmarchicus was

  16. Spatial and temporal patterns of abundance of Aedes aegypti L. (Stegomyia aegypti) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) [Stegomyia albopictus (Skuse)] in southern Florida.

    PubMed

    Reiskind, M H; Lounibos, L P

    2013-12-01

    Invasion by mosquito vectors of disease may impact the distribution of resident mosquitoes, resulting in novel patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease. One example of such an impact is the invasion by Aedes albopictus (Skuse) [Stegomyia albopictus (Skuse)] (Diptera: Culicidae) of North America and this species' interaction with Aedes aegypti L. (Stegomyia aegypti L). We hypothesized that Ae. aegypti would be found in urban, coastal areas that experience hotter and drier conditions, whereas Ae. albopictus would be more commonly found in suburban and rural areas that are cooler and wetter. In addition, we hypothesized that Ae. aegypti would be more abundant early in the wet season, whereas Ae. albopictus would be more abundant later in the wet season. Urban areas were drier, hotter and contained more Ae. aegypti than suburban or rural areas. Aedes aegypti was relatively more abundant early in the wet season, whereas Ae. albopictus was more abundant in both the late wet season and the dry season. The spatial patterns of inter- and intraspecific encounters between these species were also described. The distribution of these mosquitoes is correlated with abiotic conditions, and with temperature, humidity and the relative availability of rain-filled containers. Understanding the ecological determinants of species distribution can provide insight into the biology of these vectors and important information for their appropriate control.

  17. Observations on changes in abundance of questing Ixodes ricinus, castor bean tick, over a 35-year period in the eastern part of its range (Russia, Tula region).

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Yu; Kozlova, T; Kozlovskaya, L

    2015-06-01

    Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) L. transmit a wide variety of pathogens to vertebrates including viruses, bacteria and protozoa. Understanding of the epidemiology of tick-borne infections requires basic knowledge of the regional and local factors influencing tick population dynamics. The present study describes the results of monitoring of a questing I. ricinus population, conducted over 35 years (1977-2011) in the eastern, poorly studied part of its range (Russia, Tula region). We have found that the multiannual average abundance of ticks is small and varies depending on the biotope and degree of urban transformation. Tick abundance for the first 14 years of observations (1977-1990) was at the lower limit of the sensitivity of our methods throughout the study area (0.1-0.9 specimens per 1-km transect). In the following 21 years (1991-2011), a manifold increase in abundance was observed, which reached 18.1 ± 1.8 individuals per 1-km transect in moist floodplain terraces, and 4.8 ± 0.9 in xerophylic hill woods. Long-term growth of tick abundance occurred in spite of a relatively constant abundance of small mammals and only minor fluctuations in the abundance of large wild animals. Climate and anthropogenic changes appear to be the main contributors to increased abundance of the tick.

  18. Longitudinal patterns in flathead catfish relative abundance and length at age within a large river: Effects of an urban gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Makinster, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the spatial variation of flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) relative abundance and growth in the 274 km long Kansas River to determine if population dynamics of catfish are related to urbanization. Electrofishing was conducted at 462 random sites throughout the river in summer, 2005-2006 to collect fish. Relative abundance of age 1 fish (???200mm), subadult (>200-400mm) and adult fish (>400 mm) ranged from 0.34 to 14.67 fish h-1, mean length at age 1 was 165 (range: 128-195) mm total length (TL) and mean length at age 3 was 376 mm TL (range: 293-419mm TL). The proportion of land use within 200 m of the river edge was between 0 and 0.54 urban. River reaches with high relative abundance of age 1 flathead catfish had high relative abundance of subadult and adult catfish. River reaches with fast flathead catfish growth to age 1 had fast growth to age 3. High urban land use and riprap in the riparian area were evident in river reaches near the heavily populated Kansas City and Topeka, Kansas, USA. Reaches with increased number of log jams and islands had decreased riparian agriculture. Areas of low urbanization had faster flathead catfish growth (r = 0.67, p = 0.005). Relative abundance of flathead catfish was higher in more agricultural areas (r = -0.57, p = 0.02). Changes in land use in riverine environments may alter population dynamics of a fish species within a river. Spatial differences in population dynamics need to be considered when evaluating riverine fish populations. Published in 2008 by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Observed Variability in CO2 Column Abundances from aircraft vertical profiles: Insight into future space-based mission requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Kooi, S. A.; Vay, S. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation discusses the use of high-resolution in-situ CO2 data to quantify the variability in tropospheric CO2 column optical depth. CO2 column abundances are derived from vertical soundings executed during several large-scale airborne campaigns over different geographic regions and seasons spanning the eastern United States (INTEX-NA summer 2004); Mexico (MILAGRO March 2006); the eastern North Pacific and Alaska (INTEX-B May 2006); the Canadian Arctic (ARCTAS spring and summer 2008); and California (CARB June 2008). Data from smaller-scale field experiments associated with the calibration/validation activities of a new active remote CO2 sensor for ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) conducted over OK, MI, NH, VA, and CA, since 2005, are also examined. Nominal weighting functions for ASCENDS measurements of CO2 in the 1.57- and 2.0-microns regions are used to convert the observed CO2 mixing ratio profiles to column optical depths. Using statistics calculated from these optical depths, we show the variability of the CO2 columns and how it relates to the measurement requirements for future space-based missions.

  20. Observations of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and Nitryl Chloride at two inland sites in North China: Abundances, Origins, and Impact on Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Q.; Xue, L.; Tham, Y. J.; Wang, W.; Yun, H.; Wang, T.; Wang, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, L.; Yao, L.; Wen, L.; Lu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) are key players in the nocturnal tropospheric chemistry, and also have potential to perturb the next-day's photochemistry. We here present the first ambient measurements of N2O5 and ClNO2 in inland regions of northern China, which is suffering from severe photochemical smog and haze pollution. A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) was deployed at a semi-rural site in Wangdu, Hebei and on the top of Mt Tai, Shandong (1500 m a.s.l.) during the summer of 2014. At Wangdu, significant levels of ClNO2 were observed persistently throughout the campaign, with the maximum concentration of up to 2.1 ppbv (1-min data). N2O5 were generally in small concentrations but on few occasions reached up to hundreds of pptv. Clear variation of ClNO2 and N2O5 from night to night suggests the variability of N2O5 heterogeneous reactivity under different conditions over the region. On the mountain-top, elevated ClNO2-laden plumes were frequently observed around mid-night with a 1-min maximum of 2.1 ppbv, whilst N2O5 was always in very low levels indicating a fast N2O5 hydrolysis. The elevated ClNO2 levels at both locations were significantly influenced by the high NOx-saturated urban plumes and non-oceanic sources of chloride like biomass burning and coal-fired power plants in the region. MCM (Master Chemical Mechanism) modeling analyses indicate the significance of ClNO2 photolysis to the daytime radical and ozone production. Our study implies that the N2O5 reactivity and chlorine activation are significant in North China, and should be also important in other non-marine regions of China where NOx and particle chloride are in great abundances.

  1. MeV He3/He4 isotope abundances in solar energetic particle events: SOHO/COSTEP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, V.:; Sierks, H.; Böhm, E.; Kunow, H.

    2001-08-01

    We present first results based on a systematic survey of 4-41 MeV/N 3He/4He isotope abundances with ratios >0.01 detected by the COmprehensive SupraThermal and Energetic Particle analyzer (COSTEP) onboard the SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) spacecraft. More than about 25% of the identified events showed 3He/4He ratios in the range 0.1-1. For events with sufficiently high detector count rates the atomic mass plots can be resolved up to a time resolution of about 1 hour. These events are most suitable for comparisons with in situ solar wind plasma and magnetic field measurements and SOHO's optical white-light and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of the Sun. The correlations show an association with passages of shock associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind that inhibit high He/H plasma overabundances. It is likely that the CMEs have been released in strong magnetic reconfiguration processes at the solar source sites. Here we present a brief overview of such an event detected on October 30, 2000. 1. Introduction The SOHO/COSTEP instrument measures solar energetic particles (SEPs) at MeV energies in the interplanetary medium. The solid state detectors are capable to detect 3 He/4 He-enrichments at these energies (Müller-Mellin et al., 1995). Usually, the 3 He/4 He-ratio in the solar wind is at the order of 10-4 , but occasionally ratios up to about values of ~1 or even above have been observed in SEP events (e.g., Mason et al., 1999). The origin of these isotope abundances has commonly been attributed to impulsive solar flares and wave-particle interaction mechanisms (Temerin and Roth, 1992). However, fully satisfying physical explanations are still lacking. Here we present first results of a systematic survey of the He-measurements taken by COSTEP since launch in 1995 until the end of the year 2000. 2. Data For this study we have analyzed SOHO/COSTEP measurements of 4.3-40.9 MeV/N helium particles as well as COSTEP data covering

  2. Soil moisture variation patterns observed in Hand County, South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.; Owe, M.; Schmugge, T. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Soil moisture data were taken during 1976 (April, June, October), 1977 (April, May, June), and 1978 (May, June, July) Hand County, South Dakota as part of the ground truth used in NASA's aircraft experiments to study the use of microwave radiometers for the remote sensing of soil moisture. The spatial variability observed on the ground during each of the sampling events was studied. The data reported are the mean gravimetric soil moisture contained in three surface horizon depths: 0 to 2.5, 0 to 5 and 0 to 10 cm. The overall moisture levels ranged from extremely dry conditions in June 1976 to very wet in May 1978, with a relatively even distribution of values within that range. It is indicated that well drained sites have to be partitioned from imperfectly drained areas when attempting to characterize the general moisture profile throughout an area of varying soil and cover type conditions. It is also found that the variability in moisture content is greatest in the 0 to 2.5 cm measurements and decreases as the measurements are integrated over a greater depth. It is also determined that the sampling intensity of 10 measurements per km is adequate to estimate the mean moisture with an uncertainty of + or - 3 percent under average moisture conditions in areas of moderate to good drainage.

  3. Regular frequency patterns in the classical δ Scuti star HD 144277 observed by the MOST satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Lenz, P.; Breger, M.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Zdravkov, T.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2011-09-01

    Context. We present high-precision time-series photometry of the classical δ Scuti star HD 144277 obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite in two consecutive years. The observed regular frequency patterns are investigated asteroseismologically. Aims: HD 144277 is a hot A-type star that is located on the blue border of the classical instability strip. While we mostly observe low radial order modes in classical δ Scuti stars, HD 144277 presents a different case. Its high observed frequencies, i.e., between 59.9 d-1 (693.9 μHz) and 71.1 d-1 (822.8 μHz), suggest higher radial orders. We examine the progression of the regular frequency spacings from the low radial order to the asymptotic frequency region. Methods: Frequency analysis was performed using Period04 and SigSpec. The results from the MOST observing runs in 2009 and 2010 were compared to each other. The resulting frequencies were submitted to asteroseismic analysis. Results: HD 144277 was discovered to be a δ Scuti star using the time-series photometry observed by the MOST satellite. Twelve independent pulsation frequencies lying in four distinct groups were identified. Two additional frequencies were found to be combination frequencies. The typical spacing of 3.6 d-1 corresponds to the spacing between subsequent radial and dipole modes, therefore the spacing between radial modes is twice this value, 7.2 d-1. Based on the assumption of slow rotation, we find evidence that the two radial modes are the sixth and seventh overtones, and the frequency with the highest amplitude can be identified as a dipole mode. Conclusions: The models required to fit the observed instability range need slightly less metallicity and a moderate enhancement of the helium abundance compared to the standard chemical composition. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 144277 is a δ Scuti star close to the ZAMS with a mass of 1.66 M⊙. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space

  4. Model and observational analysis of the Northeast's regional winter climate and its relationship to the PNA pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, Michael

    A study was performed of the winter climate in the Northeast United States and its relationship to the large-scale circulation. Temperature, radiation, precipitation, and circulation features of the La Nina winter of 1998--1999 were analyzed through observations, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis, and model simulations by SUNYA regional climate model (RCM). The relationship between the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern and regional winter climate of the Northeast was also investigated. Ten Decembers during the 1980s and 1990s were simulated, five with the most positive and five with the most negative PNA index. RCM reproduced the key climate features of the Northeast during the winter of 1998--1999. The model's circulation closely agreed with the reanalysis, particularly in the mid- and upper-troposphere, and with surface wind observations. Spatial and temporal patterns of temperature and precipitation agreed well with observations, despite a cold bias in the boundary layer (2--3°C) and dry bias in precipitation. The use of six-hourly, rather than twelve-hourly, reanalysis boundary conditions improved the diurnal cycle and increased the success at capturing fast-moving systems, such as fronts, and reproducing hourly weather variations. The relationship of the PNA pattern, and other teleconnection patterns, to the Northeast winter climate was investigated. Positive PNA pattern was associated with a stronger, southeastward shifted jet and colder, drier conditions in the Northeast, while mild surface southerlies were more frequent with negative PNA pattern. In the positive PNA simulations, there was a large air-water thermal gradient over the Great Lakes, enhancing evaporation and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. Precipitation and clouds during positive PNA pattern were less abundant across the domain, although lake-effect maxima were well defined. The PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation), PNA, and ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) teleconnections significantly influenced

  5. Utilizing observations of vegetation patterns to infer ecosystem parameters and test model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, G.; Daniels, K. E.; Thompson, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic vegetation patterns arise globally in arid and semi-arid environments, and are believed to indicate competing positive and negative feedbacks between resource availability and plant uptake at different length scales. The patterns have become the object of two separate research themes, one focusing on observation of ecosystem properties and vegetation morphology, and another focusing on the development of theoretical models and descriptions of pattern behavior. Given the growing body of work in both directions, there is a compelling need to unify both strands of research by bringing together observations of large-scale pattern morphology with predictions made by various models. Previous attempts have employed spectral analysis on pattern images and inverse modeling on one-dimensional transects of patterns images, yet have not made a concerted effort to rigorously confront predictions with observational data in two dimensions. This study makes the first steps towards unification, utilizing high resolution landscape-scale images of vegetation patterns over multiple years at five different locations, including Niger, Central Mexico, Baja California, Texas, and Australia. Initial analyses of the observed patterns reveal considerable departures from the idealized morphologies predicted by models. Pattern wavelengths, while clustered around a local average, vary through space and are frequently altered by pattern defects such as missing or broken bands. While often locally homogeneous, pattern orientation also varies through space, allowing the correlations between landscape features and changes in local pattern morphology to be explored. Stationarity of the pattern can then be examined by comparing temporal changes in morphology with local climatic fluctuations. Ultimately, by identifying homogeneous regions of coherent pattern, inversion approaches can be applied to infer model parameters and build links between observable pattern and landscape features and the

  6. Habitat traits and patterns of abundance of the purple sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816), at multiple scales along the north Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Rula; Domínguez Godino, Jorge; Freitas, Cristiano; Machado, Inês; Bertocci, Iacopo

    2015-03-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of abundance and distribution of sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus) from intertidal rockpools of the north Portuguese coast were examined in relation to physical (surface, altitude, depth, topographic complexity and exposure) and biological (substrate cover by dominant organisms) habitat traits. The methodology was based on a multi-factorial design where the total number and the abundance of urchins in each of six size classes were sampled over a range of spatial scales, from 10s of cm to kms, and a temporal scale of five months. The results highlighted three main features of the studied system: (1) the largest proportion of variability of sea urchins occurred at the smallest scale examined; (2) urchins from different size classes showed different patterns of abundance in relation to habitat traits; (3) variables normally invoked as potential drivers of distribution of urchins at a range of scales, such as hydrodynamics and shore height, were relatively less important than other abiotic (i.e. pool area, pool mean depth calculated over five replicate measures and sand cover) and biological (i.e. space occupancy by the reef-forming polychaete Sabellaria alveolata and mussels vs. availability of bare rock) variables to provide a considerable contribution to the variability of sea urchins. Intertidal populations of sea urchins are abundant on many rocky shores, where they are socially and economically important as food resource and ecologically key as habitat modelers. This study provides new clues on relatively unstudied populations, with relevant implications for possible management decisions, including the implementation of protection schemes able to preserve the main recruitment, settlement and development areas of P. lividus.

  7. Elemental abundances via X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and the InFOCmuS hard X-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.

    2004-08-01

    The first part of this dissertation deals with the oxygen abundance of the Milky Way interstellar medium. Previous measurements had shown that oxygen in the ISM was depleted compared to its abundance in the sun. This dissertation presents new measurements of the ISM oxygen abundance taken in the X-ray band by observing the oxygen 0.6 keV photoionization K-edge in absorption towards 10 galaxy clusters. These measurements show that the ISM oxygen abundance is 0.9 solar, much greater than earlier depleted values. The oxygen abundance is found to be uniform across our 10 lines of sight, showing that it is not dependent on the depth of the hydrogen column. This implies that the galactic oxygen abundance does not depend on density, and that it is the same in dense clouds and in the more diffuse ISM. The next part of the dissertation measures elemental abundances in the galaxy clusters themselves. The abundances of the elements iron, silicon, sulfur, calcium, argon, and nickel are measured using the strong resonance K-shell emission lines in the X-ray band. Over 300 clusters from the ASCA archives are analyzed with a joint fitting procedure to improve the S/N ratio and provide the first average abundance results for clusters as a function of mass. The α elements silicon, sulfur, argon and calcium are not found to have similar abundances as expected from their supposed common origin. Also, no combination of SN Ia and SN II yields can account for the cluster abundance ratios, perhaps necessitating a contribution from a cosmologically early generation of massive population III stars. The last part of this dissertation details the development of the Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors on the InFOCμS hard X-ray telescope. InFOCμS is a balloon-borne imaging spectrometer that incorporates multi-layer coated grazing-incidence optics and CZT detectors. These detectors are well suited for hard X-ray astronomy because their large bandgap and high atomic number allow for

  8. Divergent patterns of abundance and age-class structure of headwater stream tadpoles in burned and unburned watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Corn, P.S.; Fagre, D.B.

    2006-01-01

    Wildfire is a potential threat to many species with narrow environmental tolerances like the Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus Mittleman and Myers, 1949), which inhabits a region where the frequency and intensity of wildfires are expected to increase. We compared pre- and post-fire counts of tadpoles in eight streams in northwestern Montana to determine the effects of wildfire on A. montanus. All streams were initially sampled in 2001, 2 years before four of them burned in a large wildfire, and were resampled during the 2 years following the fire. Counts of tadpoles were similar in the two groups of streams before the fire. After the fire, tadpoles were almost twice as abundant in unburned streams than in burned streams. The fire seemed to have the greatest negative effect on abundance of age-1 tadpoles, which was reflected in the greater variation in same-stream age-class structure compared with those in unburned streams. Despite the apparent effect on tadpoles, we do not expect the wildfire to be an extirpation threat to populations in the streams that we sampled. Studies spanning a chronosequence of fires, as well as in other areas, are needed to assess the effects of fires on streams with A. montanus and to determine the severity and persistence of these effects.

  9. Observation and implications of sub-iron and iron abundance ratios in low energy galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgaprasad, N.; Vahia, M. N.; Biswas, S.; Ramadurai, S.; Singh, R. K.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutta, A.; Goswami, J. N.

    1995-01-01

    The Spacelab-3 cosmic ray experiment Anuradha was used to measure the sub-iron (Sc-Cr) to iron abundance ratios in the low energy galactic cosmic rays. Measurements made in four different depth of the detector yielded the (Sc-Cr)/Fe ratios of 0.8 to 1.2 in 30 to 300 MeV/N. These are in agreement with results from Skylab and Soyuz-6 experiments and establishes that this abundance ratio is about 1.0 inside the magnetosphere. It is seen that this abundance ratio is about a factor of two higher than values of about 0.5 measured in space crafts in interplanetary space. It is shown that the enhancement of the ratio is probably due to geomagnetic transmission effect and the degree of ionization of the low energy Sc to Cr and Fe ions in galactic cosmic rays. Further studies are needed to fully understand the phenomena and their implications.

  10. North American vegetation patterns observed with the NOAA-7 advanced very high resolution radiometer. [North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, S. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Dye, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral vegetation index measurements derived from remotely sensed observations show great promise as a means to improve knowledge of land vegetation patterns. The daily, global observations acquired by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, a sensor on the current series of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites, may be particularly well suited for global studies of vegetation. Preliminary results from analysis of North American observations, extending from April to November 1982, show that the vegetation index patterns observed correspond to the known seasonality of North American natural and cultivated vegetation. Integration of the observations over the growing season produced measurements that are related to net primary productivity patterns of the major North American natural vegetation formations. Regions of intense cultivation were observed as anomalous areas in the integrated growing season measurements. Significant information on seasonality, annual extent and interannual variability of vegetation photosynthetic activity at continental and global scales can be derived from these satellite observations.

  11. Abundance and patterns of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in Arctic floodplain lakes of the Mackenzie River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauvert, C. Adam; Lesack, Lance F. W.; Bothwell, Max L.

    2012-12-01

    The Mackenzie River Delta is a lake-rich arctic floodplain that receives high inputs of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and suspended particulates from allochthonous and autochthonous sources, and may transfer carbon from dissolved to particulate phase via in situ formation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP). TEP provides food for grazers, surfaces for bacteria, and increased potential for aggregation and sedimentation of organic matter. During open water 2006, we tracked TEP abundances in three Delta lakes representing gradients that include declining river-to-lake connection times, increasing levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and declining chromophoric-DOM (CDOM). Unexpectedly, TEP abundances were highest immediately after the flood, when autochthonous autotrophic production was at a seasonal low and CDOM a seasonal high. Moreover, the lake with the strongest riverine influence and lowest levels of autochthonous autotrophic production had the highest mean TEP-carbon (TEP-C) concentrations among the lakes. The mean proportion of particulate organic carbon (POC) represented by TEP-C increased with increasing river connection time, and appears to represent a substantial proportion of POC in Mackenzie Delta Lakes. Unexpectedly, the TEP gradient was most strongly related to CDOM (river water source) rather than overall DOC. Variations in CDOM accounted for 53% of TEP-C variation among the lakes, indicating allochthonous matter was the most important source of TEP. DOC release from in situ macrophytes during periods of high photosynthesis may contribute to TEP formation in the lake with lowest riverine influence, but pH levels >9.5 driven by the high photosynthetic rates complicate the interpretation of results from this lake.

  12. Species-abundance distribution patterns of soil fungi: contribution to the ecological understanding of their response to experimental fire in Mediterranean maquis (southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2013-01-01

    Experimental fires, of both low and high intensity, were lit during summer 2000 and the following 2 y in the Castel Volturno Nature Reserve, southern Italy. Soil samples were collected Jul 2000-Jul 2002 to analyze the soil fungal community dynamics. Species abundance distribution patterns (geometric, logarithmic, log normal, broken-stick) were compared. We plotted datasets with information both on species richness and abundance for total, xerotolerant and heat-stimulated soil microfungi. The xerotolerant fungi conformed to a broken-stick model for both the low- and high intensity fires at 7 and 84 d after the fire; their distribution subsequently followed logarithmic models in the 2 y following the fire. The distribution of the heat-stimulated fungi changed from broken-stick to logarithmic models and eventually to a log-normal model during the post-fire recovery. Xerotolerant and, to a far greater extent, heat-stimulated soil fungi acquire an important functional role following soil water stress and/or fire disturbance; these disturbances let them occupy unsaturated habitats and become increasingly abundant over time.

  13. Reaction-diffusion patterns: From observations in halogene chemistry to a test for implication in mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulos, E.; Hunding, A.; Boissonade, J.; de Kepper, P.

    Since the seminal paper "The chemical basis of morphogenesis" by Alan Turing, the temporal and spatial self-organization phenomena produced in chemically reacting and diffusing systems are often thought as paradigms for biological development. The basic theoretical principles on which the development of stationary concentration patterns (Turing structures) rely on are briefly presented. We review different aspects of our contribution to the experimental observation of reaction-diffusion patterns in iodine-oxychlorine systems. The experimental techniques are emphasized. Phase diagrams gathering different standing and travelling patterns are presented, analyzed and modeled. A special attention is also given to some peculiar pattern growth dynamics (spot division, finger splitting).

  14. First observations on the abundance and composition of floating debris in the North-western Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Melinte-Dobrinescu, Mihaela C; Ion, Gabriel; Aliani, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of marine litter in the Black Sea region is poorly known and even less data have been reported on the abundance of floating debris. Here we present results from a ship-based visual survey carried out in the North-Western part of the Black Sea, providing the first preliminary data on the characteristics of floating debris in Romanian waters. High litter densities peaking to 135.9 items/km(2) were found in the study area (mean 30.9 ± 7.4 items/km(2)). Probably due to the proximity of the Danube delta, natural debris were on average, much more abundant than anthropogenic litter in most surveyed locations (mean 141.4 ± 47.1 items/km(2), max 1131.3 items/km(2)). Most of the 225 objects we sighted consisted of pieces of wood and other riparian debris (75.5%), however plastic items remained undoubtedly the most abundant type of litter, representing 89.1% of all sighted man-made items. The Black Sea is not exempt from the global invasion of floating debris, however data are still lacking and a basin-wide survey is urgently needed to identify accumulation areas and develop regionally effective solutions to the problem of marine litter. PMID:25881011

  15. First observations on the abundance and composition of floating debris in the North-western Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Melinte-Dobrinescu, Mihaela C; Ion, Gabriel; Aliani, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of marine litter in the Black Sea region is poorly known and even less data have been reported on the abundance of floating debris. Here we present results from a ship-based visual survey carried out in the North-Western part of the Black Sea, providing the first preliminary data on the characteristics of floating debris in Romanian waters. High litter densities peaking to 135.9 items/km(2) were found in the study area (mean 30.9 ± 7.4 items/km(2)). Probably due to the proximity of the Danube delta, natural debris were on average, much more abundant than anthropogenic litter in most surveyed locations (mean 141.4 ± 47.1 items/km(2), max 1131.3 items/km(2)). Most of the 225 objects we sighted consisted of pieces of wood and other riparian debris (75.5%), however plastic items remained undoubtedly the most abundant type of litter, representing 89.1% of all sighted man-made items. The Black Sea is not exempt from the global invasion of floating debris, however data are still lacking and a basin-wide survey is urgently needed to identify accumulation areas and develop regionally effective solutions to the problem of marine litter.

  16. Species-area relationships in coral communities: evaluating mechanisms for a commonly observed pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, B. E.; Lirman, D.

    2012-12-01

    Landscape-scale attributes of patch size, spatial isolation, and topographic complexity are known to influence diversity and abundance in terrestrial and marine systems, but remain collectively untested for reef-building corals. To investigate the relationship between the coral assemblage and seascape variation in reef habitats, we took advantage of the distinct boundaries, spatial configurations, and topographic complexities among artificial reef patches to overcome the difficulties of manipulating natural reefs. Reef size (m2) was found to be the foremost predictor of coral richness in accordance with species-area relationship predictions. Larger reefs were also found to support significantly higher colony densities, enabling us to reject the null hypothesis of random placement (a sampling artifact) in favor of target area predictions that suggest greater rates of immigration on larger reefs. Unlike the pattern previously documented for reef fishes, topographic complexity was not a significant predictor of any coral assemblage response variable, despite the range of complexity values sampled. Lastly, coral colony density was best explained by both increasing reef size and decreasing reef spatial isolation, a pattern found exclusively among brooding species with shorter larval dispersal distances. We conclude that seascape attributes of reef size and spatial configuration within the seascape can influence the species richness and abundance of the coral community at relatively small spatial scales (<1 km). Specifically, we demonstrate how patterns in the coral communities that have naturally established on these manipulated reefs agree with the target area and island biogeography mechanisms to drive species-area relationships in reef-building corals. Based on the patterns documented in artificial reefs, habitat degradation that results in smaller, more isolated natural reefs may compromise coral diversity.

  17. Experimental and Temporal Observations on the Occurrence and Abundance of Pyrogenic PAH Relative to Atmospheric Oxygen Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuneman, P. J.; Uhle, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Phanerozoic record of atmospheric O2 is based on a global mass balance of several dynamic geochemical cycles, with error margins reflecting such complexity. The potential for accurately determining the record of atmospheric O2 may significantly improve with the proposed method, which relies on a direct relationship between atmospheric oxygen, fuels, and fire products. The interaction between combustion and atmospheric-oxygen level during biomass burning events is investigated by comparing the occurrence and abundance of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from experimentally-produced, modern, Triassic, and Carboniferous chars. The combustion process consumes O2 directly from the atmosphere and thermally alters organic matter to produce chars. PAH that develop through combustion, and are preserved within chars, are expected to be more abundant at times of elevated atmospheric O2, which facilitates biomass burning efficiency. To investigate the hypothesized relationship in the geologic record, PAH have been extracted from chars of three periods - modern, Triassic, and Carboniferous - relating to 21%, 15%, and 35% atmospheric O2, respectively (Berner and Canfield, 1989). Surface samples of modern chars that developed in controlled burns set by National Park Service personnel in a mixed conifer-deciduous forest were collected at Zion National Park, Utah. Triassic fusain from Petrified Forest National Park, AZ, and Carboniferous fusain from Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, were collected from floodplain- and coastal plain-deposited mudstone and sandstone. Target PAH shown to be uniquely pyrogenic include: phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and benzo(ghi)perylene. The abundance of PAH from modern chars at Zion National Park, Triassic fusain from Petrified Forest National Park, and Carboniferous fusain from Joggins Fossil Cliffs

  18. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Knowledge of Observable Moon Phases and Pattern of Change in Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Atwood, Ronald K.; Christopher, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe selected content knowledge held by 52 preservice elementary teachers about the observable phases of the moon and the monthly pattern of change in observable phases. Data were obtained from participants in a physics course before and after they received inquiry-based instruction designed to promote…

  19. Direct observation of thermionic emission pattern of hemispherical single-crystal LaB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, R.; Onoda, H.; Hagiwara, H.; Ishii, S.

    1981-10-01

    Thermionic emission pattern from a hemispherical LaB6 cathode of <110> orientation was made using an experimental setup similar to Martin's experiment. The emission pattern from a clean surface has clearly indicated that the bright region consists of (100) spot surrounded by four (210) spots. This suggests that the bright spots (except for the center spot in the cross-over images observed for <100>, <110>, and <111> LaB6 cathodes correspond to (210) spots as deduced by Oshima et al. Emission patterns at different vacuum conditions are also observed to find that a specific emission pattern appears with good reproducibility corresponding to the change of vacuum condition, leading to existence of enhanced thermionic emission.

  20. Observation of harmonically related solar radio zebra patterns in the 1-4 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlický, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A unique case of two zebra patterns related harmonically with ratio of ~ 1:2 was observed by distant radio telescopes at São José dos Campos and Ondřejov Observatories. Accompanied zebras show that the ratio of frequencies of the neighboring zebra lines is in the range of 1.009-1.037. There is a tendency of a decrease of this ratio with decreasing frequency within the specific zebra pattern. Both facts speak in favour of plasma emission models for the zebra pattern fine structure in radio burst continua.

  1. Origin of Stellar Abundances in the early Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, F.; Beers, T. C.; Cowan, J.; Elliot, T.; Schatz, H.; Farouqi, K.; Gallino, R.; Heil, M.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Pignatari, M.

    2007-10-26

    Observations of metal-poor stars in the last decade have revealed an abundance pattern that have recently been explained as the result of two nucleosynthesis processes, a strong r-process that creates most of the Z{>=}56 and some 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and a light element primary process (LEPP) responsible for creating the remaining 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and some small contribution to heavier elements. We review some of the current literature on the LEPP and show a derived abundance pattern as a function of mass number.

  2. Remote sensing of anophelines in rice-cropping villages in Mali: Patterns of vector abundance and malaria transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diuk Wasser, Maria Ana

    The explosive population growth and widespread urbanization in Africa requires a significant increase in food production. Crop irrigation is therefore expected to increase in the future, although it is often blamed for aggravating the health risk of local communities---by providing habitats suitable for mosquitoes vectors of malaria (Anopheles gambiae s.l. and An. funestus in our study area) and other diseases. An epidemiological paradox sometimes occurs, however, when an increase in vector numbers is accompanied by a reduction of the risk of infection, due to a reduction in mosquito longevity and of their tendency to bite human (vs. animals). The objective of this dissertation was to determine how agricultural patterns mapped using satellite data affected vector densities and malaria transmission parameters in 18 rice-cropping villages in Mali. I used a combination of optical (Landsat ETM+) and synthetic aperture radar (ERS-2 SAR). Using Landsat data, rice was distinguished from other land uses with 98% accuracy and rice cohorts were discriminated with 84% accuracy (three classes) or 94% (two classes). ERS-2 SAR backscatter was correlated with the height and biomass of rice plants and was therefore useful to distinguish among rice growth stages. As in previous studies, the early vegetative stage was associated with higher larval production. SAR was further able to distinguish between agronomic practices linked to high and low-production within those early stages. The landcover maps were integrated with archived data on adult and larval anopheline densities and malaria transmission parameters. The area of several landcovers explained up to 89% of the variability in mosquito numbers. The maximum correlation was obtained when landcover was measured in a 1-km buffer area. Vector density was negatively associated to parity and anthropophilic rates. An. gambiae showed higher vectorial capacity (VC) than An. funestus , with seasonal variations. Peak VC for both species

  3. Patterns in abundance and size of two deep-water gorgonian octocorals, in relation to depth and substrate features off Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shana; Metaxas, Anna; Sameoto, Jessica; Lawton, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Deep-water corals form unique ecosystems, yet very little is known about factors that regulate their distribution and growth. The abundance and size of two deep-water gorgonian coral species, Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis, and their relationship with depth and substratum cover, were investigated at Northeast Channel, off Nova Scotia, in July 2006. This is the first study to measure abundance and size of these two coral species at depths >500 m in the Canadian Atlantic region. A total of 5 transects between 500 and 1000 m depth were examined using video collected by the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS. Abundance of both species was patchy, but higher at these deeper depths than at <500 m. Abundance generally declined with depth, and was moderately correlated with cover of hard substratum (cobble, boulder, bedrock). These relationships were stronger and less variable for P. resedaeformis than for P. arborea, suggesting that factors such as topographic relief may play an additional role in regulating distributions of P. arborea. Maximum colony height was 125 and 240 cm for P. resedaeformis and P. arborea, respectively, and much greater than recorded for depths <500 m. Overall, colony height and depth relationships were strong for both species, but variable among transects. P. resedaeformis showed a negative relationship with depth, while the opposite was observed for P. arborea, suggesting that the two species are affected differently by factors that vary with depth (e.g. temperature, fishing disturbance). Relationships between colony size and size of attachment stone were stronger for P. arborea, especially for overturned colonies, than for P. resedaeformis, suggesting that availability of suitably coarse substrate may be more important for the long-term persistence of P. arborea colonies.

  4. A system for simulating aerial or orbital TV observations of geographic patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A system which simulates observation of the earth surface by aerial or orbiting television devices has been developed. By projecting color slides of photographs taken by aircraft and orbiting sensors upon a rear screen system, and altering scale of projected image, screen position, or TV camera position, it is possible to simulate alternatives of altitude, or optical systems. By altering scan line patterns in COHU 3200 series camera from 525 to 945 scan lines, it is possible to study implications of scan line resolution upon the detection and analysis of geographic patterns observed by orbiting TV systems.

  5. [Diversity, relative abundance and activity patterns of medium and large mammals in a tropical deciduous forest in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Cortés-Marcial, Malinalli; Briones-Salas, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    The use of camera traps and mammal track search are complementary methods to monitoring species of which is not well documented their natural history, as in the case of medium and large mammals. To ensure its conservation and good management, it is necessary to generate information about the structure of the community and their populations. The objective of the present study was to estimate the diversity, relative abundance and activity patterns of medium and large mammals in a tropical deciduous forest located in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. Samplings were conducted in three month intervals, from September 2011 to May 2013. We used photographic-sampling and track search, two complementary sampling methods. For photographic-sampling, 12 camera traps were placed covering an area of 60 km2, while for the tracks search a monthly tour of four line-transect surveys of three kilometers length each was undertaken. We obtained a total of 344 pictures with 5292 trap-days total sampling effort; in addition, 187 track records in a total of 144 km. With both methods we registered 21 species of mammals, in 13 families and seven orders, and five species resulted in new records to the area. The diversity index of Shannon-Wiener obtained with the method of tracks was H' = 2.41, while the most abundant species were Urocyon cinereoargen- teus (IAR = 0.23) and Pecari tajacu (IAR = 0.20). By the method of trap the most abundant species were P. tajacu (IAR = 2.62) and Nasua narica (IAR = 1.28). In terms of patterns of activity P. tajacu, N. narica and Odocoileus virginianus were primarily diurnal species; Canis latrans and Leopardus pardalis did not show preference for any schedule in particular, and Didelphis virginiana and Dasypus novemcinctus preferred to have nocturnal activity. This information can be of help to the creation of programs of management and conservation of mam- mals of medium and large in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, México.

  6. Anomalous abundance and redistribution patterns of rare earth elements in soils of a mining area in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    The Bayan Obo Mine, the largest rare earth element (REE) deposit ever found in the world, has been mined for nearly 60 years for iron and rare earth elements. To assess the influences of mining activities on geochemical behavior of REEs in soils, 27 surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different directions in the vicinity of the mine area. The total concentrations of REEs in surface soils varied from 149.75 to 18,891.81 mg kg(-1) with an average value of 1906.12 mg kg(-1), which was apparently higher than the average values in China (181 mg kg(-1)). The order of the average concentrations of individual REEs in surface soils was similar to that in Bayan Obo ores, which confirmed that the concentration and distribution of REEs in the soils was influenced by the mining activities. The concentrations of single REE in the soil profiles showed a similar trend with depth with an increase at 0-25 cm section, then decreased and remained relatively stable in the deep part. The normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light and heavy REEs, which supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La N /Yb N , La N /Sm N , Gd N /Yb N ). Slight positive Ce anomaly and negative Eu anomaly were also observed.

  7. Anomalous abundance and redistribution patterns of rare earth elements in soils of a mining area in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    The Bayan Obo Mine, the largest rare earth element (REE) deposit ever found in the world, has been mined for nearly 60 years for iron and rare earth elements. To assess the influences of mining activities on geochemical behavior of REEs in soils, 27 surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different directions in the vicinity of the mine area. The total concentrations of REEs in surface soils varied from 149.75 to 18,891.81 mg kg(-1) with an average value of 1906.12 mg kg(-1), which was apparently higher than the average values in China (181 mg kg(-1)). The order of the average concentrations of individual REEs in surface soils was similar to that in Bayan Obo ores, which confirmed that the concentration and distribution of REEs in the soils was influenced by the mining activities. The concentrations of single REE in the soil profiles showed a similar trend with depth with an increase at 0-25 cm section, then decreased and remained relatively stable in the deep part. The normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light and heavy REEs, which supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La N /Yb N , La N /Sm N , Gd N /Yb N ). Slight positive Ce anomaly and negative Eu anomaly were also observed. PMID:26931660

  8. Chemical abundances in Hg-Mn stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    An abundance analysis has been conducted of 21 elements in 21 Hg-Mn, two Si-Cr, and six normal stars using model atmospheres and high-dispersion spectroscopy in the visible and UV. Manganese line strengths imply abundances that correlate well with stellar effective temperature. Within the studied sample of Hg-Mn stars there appears to be no correlation of abundances of any element with projected rotational velocity. Abundances in several Hg-Mn stars show patterns that are probably consistent with diffusion but difficult to reconcile with equilibrium nucleosynthesis. In general, no combination of gross stellar physical parameters is sufficient to characterize the patterns of line strengths observed in Hg-Mb Hg-Mn stars.

  9. Note: Experimental observation of nano-channel pattern in light sheet laser interference nanolithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally observed nano-channel-like pattern in a light-sheet based interference nanolithography system. The optical system created nano-channel-like patterned illumination. Coherent counter-propagating light sheets are made to interfere at and near geometrical focus along the propagation z-axis. This results in the formation of nano-channel-like pattern (of size ≈ 300 nm and inter-channel periodicity of ≈337.5 nm) inside the sample due to constructive and destructive interference. In addition, the technique has the ability to generate large area patterning using larger light-sheets. Exciting applications are in the broad field of nanotechnology (nano-electronics and nano-fluidics).

  10. IMAGE-EUV Observation of Large Scale Standing Wave Pattern in the Nightside Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor); Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Sandel, B. R.

    2002-01-01

    We present analyses of a nightside plasmaspheric pattern of bifurcated, filamentary He(+) 30.4-nm emission enhancements observed by IMAGE EUV between approximately 19:40-22:13 UT on 28 June 2000 that indicate the presence of a large-scale, global ULF standing wave pattern. Analysis of coincident IMAGE magnetometer chain data reveals that these ULF waves extend across the magnetic latitude-longitude range of the chain and possess multiple spectral features between 0.6-5-mHz (3-30 minute period). Additionally, analysis of ACE SWE data reveals similarly structured spectral components in the solar wind. Collectively, these analyses lead to the conclusion that the observed large-scale ULF wave pattern is the result of solar wind pressure pulses 'ringing' the inner-magnetosphere.

  11. Dietary patterns are associated with disease risk among participants in the women's health initiative observational study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women. A nested case-control study tested whether dietary patterns predicted CHD events among 1224 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative-Observational Study (WHI-OS) with centrally confirmed CHD, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infar...

  12. Influence of observers and stream flow on northern two-lined salamander (Eurycea bislineata bislineata) relative abundance estimates in Acadia and Shenandoah National Parks, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, J.B.; Bank, M.S.; Loftin, C.S.; Jung Brown, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated effects of observers and stream flow on Northern Two-Lined Salamander (Eurycea bislineata bislineata) counts in streams in Acadia (ANP) and Shenandoah National Parks (SNP). We counted salamanders in 22 ANP streams during high flow (May to June 2002) and during low flow (July 2002). We also counted salamanders in SNP in nine streams during high flow (summer 2003) and 11 streams during low flow (summers 2001?02, 2004). In 2002, we used a modified cover-controlled active search method with a first and second observer. In succession, observers turned over 100 rocks along five 1-m belt transects across the streambed. The difference between observers in total salamander counts was not significant. We counted fewer E. b. bislineata during high flow conditions, confirming that detection of this species is reduced during high flow periods and that assessment of stream salamander relative abundance is likely more reliable during low or base flow conditions.

  13. The effect of contrast in camouflage patterns on detectability by human observers and CAMAELEON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Daniela H.; Selj, Gorm K.

    2015-05-01

    Evaluation of signature properties of military equipment is very important. It is crucial to apply the proper method out of many possible approaches, based on amongst others ranking by probability of detection, detection time, and distance to target, which have been carried out by various countries. In this paper we present results from camouflage pattern assessments utilising two different approaches, based on human observers (detection time) and simulations (CAMAELEON). CAMAELEON ranks camouflaged targets by their local contrast, orientation and spatial frequency, mimicking the human eye's response, and is a rapid and low cost method for signature assessment. In our camouflage tests, human observers were asked to search for targets (in a natural setting) presented on a high resolution pc screen, and the corresponding detection times were recorded. In our study we find a good correspondence between the camouflage properties of the targets in most of our unique tests (scenes), but in some particular cases there is an interesting deviation. Two similar camouflage patterns (both were random samples of the pattern) were tested, and it seemed that the results depended on the way the pattern is attached to the test subject. More precisely, it may seem that high-contrast coloured patches of the pattern in the target outline were significantly different detected by humans compared to CAMAELEON. In this paper we discuss this deviation in the two signature evaluation methods and look at potential risks.

  14. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-08-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterizes spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterizes spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  15. Solar-system abundances and processes of nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, Dorothy S.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of the elements is studied. The average elemental composition of the solar system is examined and used to infer the primordial solar system abundances of the individual nuclides. Patterns in these nuclide abundances are used as clues to their origin. The possible cosmic significance of the patterns are considered. The astrophysical settings for nucleosynthesis and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and information based on observed isotopic anomalies in meteorites are taken into account.

  16. The abundance, vertical distribution and origin of H2O in Titan’s atmosphere: Herschel observations and photochemical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Raphael; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lara, Luisa M.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Rengel, Miriam; Hartogh, Paul; Courtin, Régis

    2012-11-01

    Disk-averaged observations of water vapor in Titan’s atmosphere acquired with the Herschel satellite are reported. We use a combination of unresolved measurements of three H2O rotational lines at 66.4, 75.4 and 108.0 μm with the PACS instrument, and spectrally-resolved observations of two other transitions at 557 GHz (538 μm) and 1097 GHz (273 μm) with the HIFI instrument, to infer the vertical profile of H2O over the 100-450 km altitude range. Monitoring of the 66.4 μm line indicates no variation between Titan leading and trailing sides, nor variation over a ∼1 year interval. Both the narrow (2-4 MHz) widths of the HIFI-observed lines, and the relative contrasts of the five H2O lines indicate that the H2O mole fraction strongly increases with altitude, with a best fit mole fraction of q0 = (2.3 ± 0.6) × 10-11 at a pressure p = 12.1 mbar, a slope -d(ln q)/d(ln p) = 0.49 ± 0.07, and a H2O column density of (1.2+/-0.2) × 1014 cm-2. This H2O profile also matches the original ISO observations of Titan H2O. Water vertical profiles previously proposed on the basis of 1-D photochemical models are too water-rich, and none of them have the adequate slope; in particular, the water profiles of Lara et al. (Lara, L.M., Lellouch, E., López-Moreno, J.J., Rodrigo, R. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res. E 101, 23261-23283) and Hörst et al. (Hörst, S.M., Vuitton, V., Yelle, R.V. [2008]. J. Geophys. Res. E 113, E10006) are too steep and too shallow, respectively, in the lower stratosphere. Photochemical models of oxygen species in Titan’s atmosphere are reconsidered, updating the Lara et al. model for oxygen chemistry, and adjusting the eddy diffusion coefficient in order to match both our H2O observations and the C2H6 and C2H2 vertical profiles determined from Cassini/CIRS. We find that the H2O profile can be reproduced by invoking a OH/H2O influx of (2.7-3.4) × 105 mol cm-2 s-1, referred to the surface. This is essentially one order of magnitude lower than invoked by

  17. P-MaNGA Galaxies: emission-lines properties - gas ionization and chemical abundances from prototype observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.; Bundy, K.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Bershady, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Bothwell, M.; Cales, S. L.; Coccato, L.; Drory, N.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, H.; Gelfand, J.; Law, D.; Masters, K.; Parejko, J.; Tremonti, C.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Yan, R.; Xiao, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Kinemuchi, K.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2015-05-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-yr Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 to 10 300 Å for a representative sample of over 10 000 nearby galaxies. In this paper, we present the analysis of nebular emission-line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams, we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterizations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended low ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER)-like emission (up to 1Re) in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the Hα equivalent width [EW(Hα)] to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionization from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between Dn(4000) and EW(HδA) and the position in the ionization diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionized by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal-rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionized gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate surface density. We further study the relation between N/O versus O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan 3-arcsec fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.

  18. Ground-based near-infrared observations of the Venus nightside: The thermal structure and water abundance near the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, V. S.; Crisp, D.

    We used ground-based near-infrared (NIR) observations of thermal emission from the Venus nightside to determine the temperature structure and water vapor distribution between the surface and the 6-km level. We show that emission from spectral windows near 1.0, 1.1, and 1.18 μm originates primarily from the surface and lowest scale height (~16 km). These windows include absorption by weak H2O and CO2 lines and by the far wings of lines in strong nearby CO2 bands. Rayleigh scattering by the 90-bar CO2 atmosphere and Mie scattering by the H2SO4 clouds attenuate this emission, but add little to its spectral dependence. Surface topography also modulates this NIR thermal emission because high-elevation regions are substantially cooler and emit less thermal radiation than the surrounding plains. These contributions to the emission are clearly resolved in moderate-resolution (λ/Δλ~400) spectral image cubes of the Venus nightside acquired with the infrared imaging spectrometer (IRIS) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in 1991. To analyze these observations, we used a radiative transfer model that includes all of the radiative processes listed above. Synthetic spectra for several topographic elevations were combined with Pioneer Venus altimetry data to generate spatially resolved maps of the NIR thermal emission. Comparisons between these synthetic radiance maps and the IRIS observations indicate no near-infrared signature of the surface emissivity differences seen at microwave wavelengths by the Magellan orbiter. Assuming constant surface emissivity in the near-infrared, we derive nightside averaged temperature lapse rates of -7 to -7.5 K/km in the lowest 6 km. These lapse rates are smaller and indicate much greater static stability than those inferred from earlier measurements and greenhouse models (-8 to -8.5 K/km) [Seiff, 1983]. An acceptable fit to the data was obtained with an H2O mixing ratio profile which increases from 20 ppmv at the cloud base to 45 ppmv

  19. Sulfuric acid vapor and other cloud-related gases in the Venus atmosphere - Abundances inferred from observed radio opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile what had been thought to be an inconsistency among measurements and deductions regarding the constituents of the Venus atmosphere and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. Laboratory measurements of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are used to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height in a way that is consistent with observations of the constituents and absorbing properties of the atmosphere. It is concluded that sulfuric acid vapor is likely to be the principal microwave absorber in the 30-50 km altitude range of the middle atmosphere of Venus.

  20. Observation of repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse patterns in microchip self-Q-switched laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jun; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2006-05-15

    Repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse pattern formation in a plane-parallel microchip Cr,Nd: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) self-Q-switched laser was investigated. The complex point-symmetric transverse patterns were observed by varying the pump beam diameter incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. The gain guiding effect and the thermal effect induced by the pump power in microchip Cr,Nd:YAG laser control the oscillating transverse modes. These transverse pattern formations were due to the variation of the saturated inversion population and the thermal induced index profile along radial and longitudinal direction in the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal induced by the pump power incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. These were intrinsic properties of such a microchip self-Q-switched laser. The longitudinal distribution of the saturated inversion population inside the gain medium plays an important role on the transverse pattern formation. Different sets of the transverse patterns corresponds to the different saturated inversion population distribution inside microchip Cr,Nd:YAG crystal.

  1. Observation of adsorption behavior of biomolecules on ferroelectric crystal surfaces with polarization domain patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoaki; Isobe, Akiko; Ogino, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    Lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) is one of the ferroelectric crystals that exhibit spontaneous polarization domain patterns on its surface. We observed the polarization-dependent adsorption of avidin molecules, which are positively charged in a buffer solution at pH 7.0, on LiTaO3 surfaces caused by electrostatic interaction at an electrostatic double layer using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Avidin adsorption in the buffer solution was confirmed by scratching the substrate surfaces using the AFM cantilever, and the adsorption patterns were found to depend on the avidin concentration. When KCl was added to the buffer solution to weaken the electrostatic double layer interaction between avidin molecules and LiTaO3 surfaces, adsorption domain patterns disappeared. From the comparison between the adsorption and chemically etched domain patterns, it was found that avidin molecule adsorption is enhanced on negatively polarized domains, indicating that surface polarization should be taken into account in observing biomolecule behaviors on ferroelectric crystals.

  2. Temporal Patterns of Abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Kamgang, Basile; Ngoagouni, Carine; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Paupy, Christophe; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2013-01-01

    The invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) was first reported in central Africa in 2000, in Cameroon, with the indigenous mosquito species Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Today, this invasive species is present in almost all countries of the region, including the Central African Republic (CAR), where it was first recorded in 2009. As invasive species of mosquitoes can affect the distribution of native species, resulting in new patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease, we undertook a comparative study early and late in the wet season in the capital and the main cities of CAR to document infestation and the ecological preferences of the two species. In addition, we determined the probable geographical origin of invasive populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes, COI and ND5. Analysis revealed that Ae. aegypti was more abundant earlier in the wet season and Ae. albopictus in the late wet season. Used tyres were the most heavily colonized productive larval habitats for both species in both seasons. The invasive species Ae. albopictus predominated over the resident species at all sites in which the two species were sympatric. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus in CAR. Phylogeographical analysis based on COI polymorphism indicated that the Ae. albopictus haplotype in the CAR population segregated into two lineages, suggesting multiple sources of Ae. albopictus. These data may have important implications for vector control strategies in central Africa. PMID:24349596

  3. Anomalous 13C isotope abundances in C3S and C4H observed toward the cold interstellar cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Takano, Shuro; Sakai, Takeshi; Shiba, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the abundances of the (13)C isotopic species of C3S and C4H in the cold molecular cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (Cyanopolyyne Peak), by radioastronomical observations of their rotational emission lines. The CCCS/(13)CCCS and CCCS/C(13)CCS ratios are determined to be >206 and 48 ± 15, respectively. The CC(13)CS line is identified with the aid of laboratory microwave spectroscopy, and the range of the CCCS/CC(13)CS ratio is found to be from 30 to 206. The abundances of at least two (13)C isotopic species of C3S are thus found to be different. Similarly, it is found that the abundances of the four (13)C isotopic species of C4H are not equivalent. The CCCCH/(13)CCCCH, CCCCH/C(13)CCCH, CCCCH/CC(13)CCH, and CCCCH/CCC(13)CH ratios are evaluated to be 141 ± 44, 97 ± 27, 82 ± 15, and 118 ± 23, respectively. Here the errors denote 3 times the standard deviation. These results will constrain the formation pathways of C3S and C4H, if the nonequivalence is caused during the formation processes of these molecules. The exchange reactions after the formation of these two molecules may also contribute to the nonequivalence. In addition, we have confirmed that the (12)C/(13)C ratio of some species are significantly higher than the interstellar elemental (12)C/(13)C ratio of 60-70. The observations of the (13)C isotopic species provide us with rich information on chemical processes in cold interstellar clouds.

  4. Saturn's latitudinal C 2H 2 and C 2H 6 abundance profiles from Cassini/CIRS and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesman, Brigette E.; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro V.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Anderson, Carrie M.; Boyle, Robert J.; Nixon, Conor A.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; McCabe, George H.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrocarbons in the upper atmosphere of Saturn are known, from Voyager, ground-based, and early Cassini results, to vary in emission intensity with latitude. Of particular interest is the marked increase in hydrocarbon line intensity near the south pole during southern summer, as the increased line intensity cannot be simply explained by the increased temperatures observed in that region since the variations between C2H2 and C2H6 emission in the south pole region are different. In order to measure the latitudinal variations of hydrocarbons in Saturn's southern hemisphere we have used 3 cm-1 resolution Cassini CIRS data from 2006 and combined this with measurements from the ground in October 2006 at NASA's IRTF using Celeste, an infrared high-resolution cryogenic grating spectrometer. These two data sets have been used to infer the molecular abundances of C2H2 and C2H6 across the southern hemisphere in the 1-10 mbar altitude region. We find that the latitudinal acetylene profile follows the yearly average mean daily insolation except at the southern pole where it peaks in abundance. Near the equator (5° S) the C2H2 abundance at the 1.2 mbar level is (1.6 ± 0.19) ×10-7 and it decreases by a factor of 2.7 from the equator toward the pole. However, at the pole (∼87° S) the C2H2 abundance jumps to (1.8 ± 0.3) ×10-7, approximately the equatorial value. The C2H6 abundance near the equator at the 2 mbar level is (0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5 and stays approximately constant until mid-latitudes where it increases gradually toward the pole, attaining a value of (1.4 ± 0.4) ×10-5 there. The increase in ethane toward the pole with the corresponding decrease in acetylene is consistent with southern hemisphere meridional winds [Greathouse, T.K., Lacy, J.H., Bézard, B., Moses, J.I., Griffith, C.A., Richter, M.J., 2005. Icarus 177, 18-31]. The localized increase in acetylene at the pole provides evidence that there is dynamical transport of hydrocarbons from the equator to the

  5. ASCA Observation of the Poor Cluster of Galaxies AWM 7: Evidence of an Abundance Increase in the Intra-Cluster Medium at the Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiguang; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Ohashi, Takaya; Tamura, Takayuki

    1997-02-01

    We present the results of the ASCA central-pointing observation of the poor cD cluster AWM 7. The Performance Verification phase data of GIS 2, GIS 3, SIS 0 chip 1, and SIS 1 chip 3 were used to study the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) within 16' around the X-ray centroid. We found that, compared with the outer regions, the equivalent width of the Fe-K lines increases in the central 4' ( ~ 123 h(-1_{50) kpc)} region by a factor of ~ 1.5. Although the ICM temperature tends to decrease in the same region, the observed increase in the Fe-K line equivalent width cannot be explained away by a possible temperature drop. The model fitting indicates that the abundance increases from ~ 0.4 solar outside 4' to ~ 0.6 solar at the center. Thus, after the Centaurus cluster and the Virgo cluster, AWM 7 is the third poor cD cluster confirmed to show an abundance increase in the central region. The 0.5--3 keV flux of the cool emission within 4' is constrained to be <8*E(42) h(-2}_{50) erg s(-1) , or <21% of the total 0.5--3 keV flux from the same spatial region. We discuss possible relations of these phenomena to the cD galaxy.

  6. Patterns in Crew-Initiated Photography of Earth from ISS - Is Earth Observation a Salutogenic Experience?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Slack, Kelley; Olson, V.; Trenchard, M.; Willis, K.; Baskin, P.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation asks the question "Is the observation of earth from the ISS a positive (salutogenic) experience for crew members?"All images are distributed to the public via the "Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth at http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov. The objectives of the study are (1) Mine the dataset of Earth Observation photography--What can it tell us about the importance of viewing the Earth as a positive experience for the crewmembers? (2) Quantify extent to which photography was self-initiated (not requested by scientists) (3) Identify patterns photography activities versus scientific requested photography.

  7. Observations and modelling of CO and [C i] in protoplanetary disks. First detections of [C i] and constraints on the carbon abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Güsten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J.-P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The gas-solid budget of carbon in protoplanetary disks is related to the composition of the cores and atmospheres of the planets forming in them. The principal gas-phase carbon carriers CO, C0, and C+ can now be observed regularly in disks. Aims: The gas-phase carbon abundance in disks has thus far not been well characterized observationally. We obtain new constraints on the [C]/[H] ratio in a large sample of disks, and compile an overview of the strength of [C i] and warm CO emission. Methods: We carried out a survey of the CO 6-5 line and the [C i] 1-0 and 2-1 lines towards 37 disks with the APEX telescope, and supplemented it with [C ii] data from the literature. The data are interpreted using a grid of models produced with the DALI disk code. We also investigate how well the gas-phase carbon abundance can be determined in light of parameter uncertainties. Results: The CO 6-5 line is detected in 13 out of 33 sources, [C i] 1-0 in 6 out of 12, and [C i] 2-1 in 1 out of 33. With separate deep integrations, the first unambiguous detections of the [C i] 1-0 line in disks are obtained, in TW Hya and HD 100546. Conclusions: Gas-phase carbon abundance reductions of a factor of 5-10 or more can be identified robustly based on CO and [C i] detections, assuming reasonable constraints on other parameters. The atomic carbon detection towards TW Hya confirms a factor of 100 reduction of [C]/[H]gas in that disk, while the data are consistent with an ISM-like carbon abundance for HD 100546. In addition, BP Tau, T Cha, HD 139614, HD 141569, and HD 100453 are either carbon-depleted or gas-poor disks. The low [C i] 2-1 detection rates in the survey mostly reflect insufficient sensitivity for T Tauri disks. The Herbig Ae/Be disks with CO and [C ii] upper limits below the models are debris-disk-like systems. An increase in sensitivity of roughly order of magnitude compared to our survey is required to obtain useful constraints on the gas-phase [C]/[H] ratio in most of the

  8. Calibration of a distributed hydrologic model using observed spatial patterns from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Mehmet C.; González, Gorka M.; Mai, Juliane; Stisen, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Distributed hydrologic models are typically calibrated against streamflow observations at the outlet of the basin. Along with these observations from gauging stations, satellite based estimates offer independent evaluation data such as remotely sensed actual evapotranspiration (aET) and land surface temperature. The primary objective of the study is to compare model calibrations against traditional downstream discharge measurements with calibrations against simulated spatial patterns and combinations of both types of observations. While the discharge based model calibration typically improves the temporal dynamics of the model, it seems to give rise to minimum improvement of the simulated spatial patterns. In contrast, objective functions specifically targeting the spatial pattern performance could potentially increase the spatial model performance. However, most modeling studies, including the model formulations and parameterization, are not designed to actually change the simulated spatial pattern during calibration. This study investigates the potential benefits of incorporating spatial patterns from MODIS data to calibrate the mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM). This model is selected as it allows for a change in the spatial distribution of key soil parameters through the optimization of pedo-transfer function parameters and includes options for using fully distributed daily Leaf Area Index (LAI) values directly as input. In addition the simulated aET can be estimated at a spatial resolution suitable for comparison to the spatial patterns observed with MODIS data. To increase our control on spatial calibration we introduced three additional parameters to the model. These new parameters are part of an empirical equation to the calculate crop coefficient (Kc) from daily LAI maps and used to update potential evapotranspiration (PET) as model inputs. This is done instead of correcting/updating PET with just a uniform (or aspect driven) factor used in the mHM model

  9. Video camera observation for assessing overland flow patterns during rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Oismüller, Markus; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Physically based hydrological models have been widely used in various studies to model overland flow propagation in cases such as flood inundation and dam break flow. The capability of such models to simulate the formation of overland flow by spatial and temporal discretization of the empirical equations makes it possible for hydrologists to trace the overland flow generation both spatially and temporally across surface and subsurface domains. As the upscaling methods transforming hydrological process spatial patterns from the small obrseved scale to the larger catchment scale are still being progressively developed, the physically based hydrological models become a convenient tool to assess the patterns and their behaviors crucial in determining the upscaling process. Related studies in the past had successfully used these models as well as utilizing field observation data for model verification. The common observation data used for this verification are overland flow discharge during natural rainfall events and camera observations during synthetic events (staged field experiments) while the use of camera observations during natural events are hardly discussed in publications. This study advances in exploring the potential of video camera observations of overland flow generation during natural rainfall events to support the physically based hydrological model verification and the assessment of overland flow spatial patterns. The study is conducted within a 64ha catchment located at Petzenkirchen, Lower Austria, known as HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory). The catchment land covers are dominated by arable land (87%) with small portions (13%) of forest, pasture and paved surfaces. A 600m stream is running at southeast of the catchment flowing southward and equipped with flumes and pressure transducers measuring water level in minutely basis from various inlets along the stream (i.e. drainages, surface runoffs, springs) to be calculated into flow discharge. A

  10. Sediment dispersal patterns within the Nares Abyssal Plain: observations from GLORIA Sonographs

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, L.E.; Tucholke, B.E.; Fry, V.A.; Flood, R.E.; Searle, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Features evident on GLORIA sonographs from the Nares Abyssal Plain suggest a sediment dispersal pattern for turbidity currents that varies temporally and spatially, resulting in randomly distributed turbidite deposits in the distal abyssal plain east of 64/sup 0/W. Regional variations in backscatter intensities across the abyssal plain are related to the frequency and thickness of near-surface silt beds, basement highs disrupting the seafloor, and subtle changes in surface and sub-surface bedforms related to low-relief turbidite flow paths, biologic activity, and possibly erosion. High backscatter intensities, prevalent west of 64/sup 0/W, are generally associated with those areas containing thicker silt beds and very regular subbottom reflectors on 3.5 kHz profiles. Low backscatter intensities, prevalent east of 64/sup 0/W, are associated with those areas containing thin silt beds or stringers with a much higher percentage of pelagic clay. Seafloor lineaments occur throughout the survey area but decrease in abundance east of 64/sup 0/W. These features have no apparent relief when crossed by surface-towed seismic reflection profiles. In some instances the lineaments may correspond to low-relief turbidite flow paths that contain varying textural compositions resulting in increased backscatter. These features would be indicative of sediment transport directions. Other possible origins for the lineaments, that often appear trackline parallel, include near-surface morphology that is preferentially detected and aligned by GLORIA, or possibly the lineaments result from complex subbottom interference patterns that would not be readily apparent in areas with a more irregular seafloor.

  11. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Jason D; Hogan, J Derek; Downey-Wall, Alan M; Gurski, Lauren M; Portnoy, David S; Heath, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or "chaotic" pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres). These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought. PMID:27119659

  12. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, J. Derek; Downey-Wall, Alan M.; Gurski, Lauren M.; Portnoy, David S.; Heath, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or “chaotic” pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres). These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought. PMID:27119659

  13. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Jason D; Hogan, J Derek; Downey-Wall, Alan M; Gurski, Lauren M; Portnoy, David S; Heath, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or "chaotic" pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres). These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought.

  14. Practical Bias Correction in Aerial Surveys of Large Mammals: Validation of Hybrid Double-Observer with Sightability Method against Known Abundance of Feral Horse (Equus caballus) Populations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reliably estimating wildlife abundance is fundamental to effective management. Aerial surveys are one of the only spatially robust tools for estimating large mammal populations, but statistical sampling methods are required to address detection biases that affect accuracy and precision of the estimates. Although various methods for correcting aerial survey bias are employed on large mammal species around the world, these have rarely been rigorously validated. Several populations of feral horses (Equus caballus) in the western United States have been intensively studied, resulting in identification of all unique individuals. This provided a rare opportunity to test aerial survey bias correction on populations of known abundance. We hypothesized that a hybrid method combining simultaneous double-observer and sightability bias correction techniques would accurately estimate abundance. We validated this integrated technique on populations of known size and also on a pair of surveys before and after a known number was removed. Our analysis identified several covariates across the surveys that explained and corrected biases in the estimates. All six tests on known populations produced estimates with deviations from the known value ranging from -8.5% to +13.7% and <0.7 standard errors. Precision varied widely, from 6.1% CV to 25.0% CV. In contrast, the pair of surveys conducted around a known management removal produced an estimated change in population between the surveys that was significantly larger than the known reduction. Although the deviation between was only 9.1%, the precision estimate (CV = 1.6%) may have been artificially low. It was apparent that use of a helicopter in those surveys perturbed the horses, introducing detection error and heterogeneity in a manner that could not be corrected by our statistical models. Our results validate the hybrid method, highlight its potentially broad applicability, identify some limitations, and provide insight and guidance

  15. Long-term Observations of Jovian Mid-Infrared Aurora, Hydrocarbon Abundances, and Temperature: Ground-based and Space-based Comparison and Preparation for Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Schmuelling, F.

    2015-12-01

    With Juno's approach to Jupiter in 2016 nearing, we report on long term measurements of Jupiter's thermal infrared aurora covering spectral and altitude regions that will complement Juno observational capabilities. Previously acquired spectral data from ground-based observatories as well as by Voyager IRIS and Cassini CIRS during Jupiter flybys will be investigated using current methods and capabilities. The thermal (mid-) IR aurora from Jupiter's polar regions, hydrocarbon abundances, and thermal structure retrieved from the ground and from space-based investigations will be compared and used to illustrate the different capabilities and complementarity of the measurement platforms. We report on the reexamination and re-analysis of hydrocarbon emission spectra from Jupiter obtained using ground-based ultra-high spectral resolution infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) from Cassini CIRS during its flyby of Jupiter in 2000-2001 and Voyager IRIS data obtained during flybys in 1979. Measurements with IRHS have been made over 30 years, primarily of ethane near 12 micrometer wavelength. These measurements yield fully resolved individual spectral lines whose shape provides unique information on variability of temperature and abundance. CIRS and IRIS data at coarser spectral resolution provide extended spatial distributions covering a broad spectral region, including abundances and auroral response of hydrocarbon constituents in the 8-13 micrometer spectral region (ethane, methane, ethylene, and acetylene). Analysis shows detailed spatial variability of the primary hydrocarbons in northern latitudes. Temporal changes of the ethane line emission over three solar cycles and comparison of retrievals from ethane data taken contemporaneously during the Cassini flyby by both techniques will be compared and results discussed. From these analyses, the expectation is that the thermal IR auroral emission may be low during the Juno tour at

  16. Dust pattern over Indian subcontinent based on NAAPS model, satellite and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, R.; Husar, R. B.; Sethi, V.; Westphal, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an integrated analysis of dust pattern over the Indian subcontinent using NRL Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), multiple satellite sensors and surface based aerosol measurements. The satellite datasets include MODIS AOT and OMI Aerosol Index. The surface measurements include RSPM from Indian regulatory PM network (NAMP). The analysis methodology deals with spatial patterns, seasonality as well as the vertical distribution as a function of space and time. Based on the NAAPS model, the highest average surface dust concentrations of about 300 μg/m3 are observed over the dust source regions, north Gujarat- Pakistan border and over south Afghanistan- Pakistan border. The monsoon season has lowest surface dust concentrations over most of India, except the source regions. In the post-monsoon and winter seasons, the highest surface dust concentrations of about 150μg/m3 are observed over Indo-Gangetic basin (IGB). The location of highest concentration shift from West IGB in post monsoon to East IGB in winter. The spatial patterns in columnar dust concentration is the highest (AOT=0.4) near Pakistan border in North West Rajasthan, in summer and monsoon, while the surface dust concentration is highest over north Gujarat- Pakistan border. This indicates that the dust is more spread out at higher elevations than at the surface. The spatial pattern of dust AOT in winter and post-monsoon matches with that of surface concentrations, indicating that the dust is confined to the surface layer IGB. Unlike surface concentrations, a significant dust AOT of 0.2 is observed even in monsoon season over most part of India.The NAAPS average dust vertical profile shows elevated dust layer covering most part of India during monsoon season, reaching about 100 μg/m3 over the west at about 2 km elevation (about 0.75 sigma units). The satellite data, MODIS AOT and OMI Aerosol Index corroborate the NAAPS simulations of dust AOT. MODIS AOT show

  17. Observed vegetation patterns in tidal environments: neutral vs. non-neutral explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluco, E.; Zillio, T.; Silvestri, S.; Maritan, A.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of vegetation patterns in tidal environments from high-resolution satellite and airborne sensors has recently been shown to be accurate and repeatable. This makes available unprecedentedly accurate observations of competing species distributions over a broad range of spatial scales. Such distributions are here characterized statistically, suggesting the absence of characteristic scales, as revealed by the power-law form of cluster size pdf's. A competition model based on a neutral approach, serving as a reference null hypothesis, reproduces some of the basic observed system properties. It is, however, shown that the availability of spatially-detailed observations allows the development and application of a non-neutral model, which is seen to capture several observed bio-diversity properties (alpha and beta diversity). The non-neutral model developed, based on cloning and seed dispersal processes, is amenable to analytical solution and yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The validation of the non-neutral model shows a remarkable agreement with observations within the wide observational range of scales explored (0.5 m - 1000 m). We contend the good agreement of the neutral model with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory to be misleading, as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. The hypothesis of neutrality, often fostered by the lack of spatially-detailed data, is no longer a necessity, in view of the recent advances in remote-sensing retrievals of vegetation

  18. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Zhou, Hongyi; Stass, S.A.; Sen, P. ); Mulac-Jericevic, B.; Pirrotta, V. )

    1994-02-01

    Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will be generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Abundance, behavior, and movement patterns of western gray whales in relation to a 3-D seismic survey, Northeast Sakhalin Island, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gailey, Glenn; Würsig, Bernd; McDonald, Trent L

    2007-11-01

    A geophysical seismic survey was conducted in the summer of 2001 off the northeastern coast of Sakhalin Island, Russia. The area of seismic exploration was immediately adjacent to the Piltun feeding grounds of the endangered western gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus). This study investigates relative abundance, behavior, and movement patterns of gray whales in relation to occurrence and proximity to the seismic survey by employing scan sampling, focal follow, and theodolite tracking methodologies. These data were analyzed in relation to temporal, environmental, and seismic related variables to evaluate potential disturbance reactions of gray whales to the seismic survey. The relative numbers of whales and pods recorded from five shore-based stations were not significantly different during periods when seismic surveys were occurring compared to periods when no seismic surveys were occurring and to the post-seismic period. Univariate analyses indicated no significant statistical correlation between seismic survey variables and any of the eleven movement and behavior variables. Multiple regression analyses indicated that, after accounting for temporal and environmental variables, 6 of 11 movement and behavior variables (linearity, acceleration, mean direction, blows per surfacing, and surface-dive blow rate) were not significantly associated with seismic survey variables, and 5 of 11 variables (leg speed, reorientation rate, distance-from-shore, blow interval, and dive time) were significantly associated with seismic survey variables. In summary, after accounting for environmental variables, no correlation was found between seismic survey variables and the linearity of whale movements, changes in whale swimming speed between theodolite fixes, mean direction of whale movement, mean number of whale exhalations per minute at the surface, mean time at the surface, and mean number of exhalations per minute during a whales surface-to-dive cycle. In contrast, at higher

  20. ESTIMATION OF THE NEON/OXYGEN ABUNDANCE RATIO AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK AND IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FROM IBEX OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochsler, P.; Petersen, L.; Moebius, E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wurz, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Frisch, P. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the Ne/O abundance ratio of the interstellar neutral gas flowing into the inner heliosphere. From the first year of Interstellar Boundary Explorer IBEX data collected in spring 2009, we derive the fluxes of interstellar neutral oxygen and neon. Using the flux ratio at the location of IBEX at 1 AU at the time of the observations, and using the ionization rates of neon and oxygen prevailing in the heliosphere during the period of solar minimum, we estimate the neon/oxygen ratios at the heliospheric termination shock and in the gas phase of the inflowing local interstellar medium. Our estimate is (Ne/O){sub gas,ISM} = 0.27 {+-} 0.10, which is-within the large given uncertainties-consistent with earlier measurements from pickup ions. Our value is larger than the solar abundance ratio, possibly indicating that a significant fraction of oxygen in the local interstellar medium is hidden in grains and/or ices.

  1. The water abundance behind interstellar shocks: results from Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/IRS observations of H{sub 2}O, CO, and H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, David A.; Gusdorf, Antoine; Güsten, Rolf; Herczeg, Greg J.; Kristensen, Lars; Melnick, Gary J.; Nisini, Brunella; Ossenkopf, Volker; Tafalla, Mario; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the water abundance in shock-heated molecular gas, making use of Herschel measurements of far-infrared (IR) CO and H{sub 2}O line emissions in combination with Spitzer measurements of mid-IR H{sub 2} rotational emissions. We present far-IR line spectra obtained with Herschel's Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer instrument in range spectroscopy mode toward two positions in the protostellar outflow NGC 2071 and one position each in the supernova remnants W28 and 3C391. These spectra provide unequivocal detections, at one or more positions, of 12 rotational lines of water, 14 rotational lines of CO, 8 rotational lines of OH (4 lambda doublets), and 7 fine-structure transitions of atoms or atomic ions. We first used a simultaneous fit to the CO line fluxes, along with H{sub 2} rotational line fluxes measured previously by Spitzer, to constrain the temperature and density distribution within the emitting gas; we then investigated the water abundances implied by the observed H{sub 2}O line fluxes. The water line fluxes are in acceptable agreement with standard theoretical models for nondissociative shocks that predict the complete vaporization of grain mantles in shocks of velocity v ∼ 25 km s{sup –1}, behind which the characteristic gas temperature is ∼1300 K and the H{sub 2}O/CO ratio is 1.2.

  2. Atom-column distinction by Kikuchi pattern observed by an aberration-corrected convergent electron probe.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Koh; Tatara, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Kikuchi patterns of an MgO crystal at the [110] incidence have been taken by a sub-angstrom electron beam focused on the single atom-column. A significant change in intensity has been observed in the 111 band; that is, the contrast in the central and side bands is reversed depending on the illuminated atom-column. The contrast reversal in the 111 band has been reproduced by multislice simulation using the frozen-phonon approach. The beam-position dependence of the 111 band intensity can be interpreted by electron channelling and the reciprocity theorem. The anomalous Kikuchi pattern can be a probe for identifying the illuminated atom-column, which is useful for column-by-column electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  3. Diurnal rainfall pattern over and around the Indochina Peninsula observed by TRMM-PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H. G.

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed a diurnal rainfall pattern during summer monsoon season (May to September; e.g., Takahashi and Yasunari 2006) over and around the Indochina Peninsula focusing on its relationship to terrain, using 10-year (1998-2007) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR) observation. First, we compared TRMM-PR rainfall to 30-year mean rain-gauge rainfall over land, which indicated that TRMM-PR can capture the spatial distribution of summer-mean rainfall amount. We investigated a 3-hour mean diurnal pattern of rainfall. Previous studies of diurnal cycle of rainfall over the whole Asian monsoon region (e.g., Hirose and Nakamura 2005) showed the evening peak in rainfall over land and morning peak over the sea near land. Focusing attention on the regional-scale diurnal pattern in rainfall over the Indochina Peninsula, a daytime maximum of rainfall occurs along the Indochina mountain ranges, and evening rainfall was observed over a windward foot of mountain range, a valley, and basin-shaped plain, for example, around Bangkok, Thailand and plains in Cambodia. In addition, heavy rainfall in early morning was found around the coasts over the eastern Gulf of Thailand and the Bay of Bengal, as well as eastern Khorat Plateau. Note that the evening rainfall did not continue until the middle of the night. Hence, the early-morning rainfall was likely to be newly-developed, although the mechanism of triggering of the early-morning rainfall has not been clarified. Rainfall intensity and rainfall occurrence rate were also investigated to understand characteristics of rainfall. The examination of rainfall occurrence rate and rainfall intensity showed that both factors contributed to the heavy rainfall in early evening. In addition, we found that the spatial distribution of total rainfall was very similar to that of rainfall amount during early-morning. Therefore, the early-morning rainfall probably contributes to forming of the climatological spatial

  4. SPATIALLY AND SPECTRALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF A ZEBRA PATTERN IN A SOLAR DECIMETRIC RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; Gary, D. E.; Jing Ju

    2011-07-20

    We present the first interferometric observation of a zebra-pattern radio burst with simultaneous high spectral ({approx}1 MHz) and high time (20 ms) resolution. The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope Subsystem Testbed (FST) and the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) were used in parallel to observe the X1.5 flare on 2006 December 14. By using OVSA to calibrate the FST, the source position of the zebra pattern can be located on the solar disk. With the help of multi-wavelength observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, the zebra source is explored in relation to the magnetic field configuration. New constraints are placed on the source size and position as a function of frequency and time. We conclude that the zebra burst is consistent with a double-plasma resonance model in which the radio emission occurs in resonance layers where the upper-hybrid frequency is harmonically related to the electron cyclotron frequency in a coronal magnetic loop.

  5. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  6. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  7. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns.

    PubMed

    Barascud, Nicolas; Pearce, Marcus T; Griffiths, Timothy D; Friston, Karl J; Chait, Maria

    2016-02-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation--dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input--both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals.

  8. Characteristics of proportionate growth observed in instability patterns of miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ramachandran, Radha; Nagel, Sidney R.; Nagel lab Team

    2014-11-01

    As a baby mammal grows, different parts of its body develop at the nearly the same rate and thus to a good approximation in direct proportion to one another. This type of growth is called proportionate growth. As familiar as it appears to us, it is very rarely found in physical systems outside of the biological world. We here show an example of proportionate growth that occurs in the instability formed when a less viscous liquid, of viscosity ηin displaces a more viscous miscible one, of viscosity ηout. We investigate the growth of these patterns in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry. Within a range of viscosity ratios 0.1 <ηin /ηout <0.3, we observe the formation of small blunt structures that form at the edges of an inner circular region devoid of fingers. As the pattern grows, the size of these structures increases in proportion to the size of the inner circle, such that even small details in the shape of the pattern remain essentially unchanged during growth. These characteristics of proportionate growth are reflected in the shape of the interface in the third dimension as well.

  9. Benthic macrofaunal colonization patterns and preservation of laminated sediments: Observations in an extreme coastal basin environment in the lower Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herguera, J.; Paull, C. K.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.; Lundsten, E. M.; Kundz, L.; Edwards, B. D.; McGann, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    New observations and cores obtained with the ROV Doc Ricketts operated from the RV/Western Flyer provide a glimpse into a macrofauna barren sea-floor where laminated sediments are known to accumulate on the sea-floor of Alfonso Basin. This basin, located north of La Paz Bay, Baja California, is known to be an important repository of laminated sediments due to a combination of the relatively high input of terrigenous sediments brought in by summer rains, a moderate to high export productivity from its surface waters, and the very low oxygen concentrations at depth bathed by tropical subsurface waters. These laminated sediments are unique repositories of paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic information for its very high resolution records of past conditions comparable to ice core, tree ring, coral and cave records although spanning continuously much further back in time. However, the paleoceanographic community rarely has had the opportunity to visualize the seafloor surface where these sediments are accumulating and examine the biological abundance patterns in these extreme environments. Here we will show results from ROV Doc Ricketts quantitative video transects providing benthic faunal abundance patterns on the seafloor in these highly oxygen depleted bottom waters. These observations are further compared with the underlying stratigraphy. A coring system carried on the ROV allowed us to replicate cores and to collect a transect of 5 closely spaced cores to evaluate the horizontal extent of the observed variability down-core. We will also show some preliminary results from x-radiographs showing the nature of the laminations and its sediment composition based on elemental analysis on organic carbon, carbonate and biogenic opal analysis. New XRF results from a box core will be used to calibrate its terrigenous components with the historical rainfall record and evaluate its potential to reconstruct summer precipitation patterns in this region.

  10. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  11. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  12. Sleeping patterns observation for bedsores and bed-side falls prevention.

    PubMed

    Wai, Aung Aung Phyo; Yuan-Wei, Kow; Fook, Foo Siang; Jayachandran, Maniyeri; Biswas, Jit; Cabibihan, John-John

    2009-01-01

    Disabled or cognition impaired elderly may lie in the bed most of their time. It is important to monitor their health conditions and look out for life threatening events in and around the bed continuously. Abrupt unassisted movements may lead to falls whereas the lack of desirable movements may cause bedsores. In order to alleviate these problems, we propose automated means of continuous and unobtrusive sleeping pattern observation through pressure sensing bed. By understanding of subjects' states from observed pressure evidences, timely intervention and nursing care can be provided to subjects immediately. This enables provision of high quality care to frail and dependent elderly, and also enhances their quality of life in a cost-effective and resource-efficient manner.

  13. Observing the Invisible through Imaging Mass Spectrometry, a Window into the Metabolic Exchange Patterns of Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David J.; Xu, Yuquan; Yang, Yu-Liang; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Liu, Wei-Ting; Edlund, Anna; Duong, Tram; Du, Liangcheng; Molnár, István; Gerwick, William H.; Jensen, Paul R.; Fischbach, Michael; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Straight, Paul; Nizet, Victor; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-01-01

    Many microbes can be cultured as single-species communities. Often, these colonies are controlled and maintained via the secretion of metabolites. Such metabolites have been an invaluable resource for the discovery of therapeutics (e.g. penicillin, taxol, rapamycin, epothilone). In this article, written for a special issue on imaging mass spectrometry, we show that MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry can be adapted to observe, in a spatial manner, the metabolic exchange patterns of a diverse array of microbes, including thermophilic and mesophilic fungi, cyanobacteria, marine and terrestrial actinobacteria, and pathogenic bacteria. Dependent on media conditions, on average and based on manual analysis, we observed 11.3 molecules associated with each microbial IMS experiment, which was split nearly 50:50 between secreted and colony-associated molecules. The spatial distributions of these metabolic exchange factors are related to the biological and ecological functions of the organisms. This work establishes that MALDI-based IMS can be used as a general tool to study a diverse array of microbes. Furthermore the article forwards the notion of the IMS platform as a window to discover previously unreported molecules by monitoring the metabolic exchange patterns of organisms when grown on agar substrates. PMID:22641157

  14. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  15. Do Patterns of Bacterial Diversity along Salinity Gradients Differ from Those Observed for Macroorganisms?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shen, Ji; van der Gast, Christopher; Hahn, Martin W.; Wu, Qinglong

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that biodiversity is lower in more extreme environments. In this study, we sought to determine whether this trend, well documented for macroorganisms, also holds at the microbial level for bacteria. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with phylum-specific primers to quantify the taxon richness (i.e., the DGGE band numbers) of the bacterioplankton communities of 32 pristine Tibetan lakes that represent a broad salinity range (freshwater to hypersaline). For the lakes investigated, salinity was found to be the environmental variable with the strongest influence on the bacterial community composition. We found that the bacterial taxon richness in freshwater habitats increased with increasing salinity up to a value of 1‰. In saline systems (systems with >1‰ salinity), the expected decrease of taxon richness along a gradient of further increasing salinity was not observed. These patterns were consistently observed for two sets of samples taken in two different years. A comparison of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that the bacterial community of the lake with the highest salinity was characterized by a higher recent accelerated diversification than the community of a freshwater lake, whereas the phylogenetic diversity in the hypersaline lake was lower than that in the freshwater lake. These results suggest that different evolutionary forces may act on bacterial populations in freshwater and hypersaline lakes on the Tibetan Plateau, potentially resulting in different community structures and diversity patterns. PMID:22125616

  16. The Suzaku Observation of the Nucleus of the Radio Loud Active Galaxy Centaurus A: Constraints on Abundances in the Accreting Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Takahashi, T.A; Watanabe, S.; Nakazawa, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Awaki, H.; Bamba, A.; Isobe, N.; Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Mushotzky, R.; Okajima, T.; Ptak, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Ueda, Y.; Yamasaki, T.; Yaqoob, T.

    2007-01-01

    A Suzaku observation of the nucleus of the radio-loud AGN Centaurus A in 2005 has yielded a broadband spectrum spanning 0.3 to 250 keV. The hard X-rays are fit by two power laws, absorbed by columns of 1.5 and 7 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. The dual power-laws are consistent with previous suggestions that the powerlaw components are X-ray emission from the sub-pc VLBI jet and from Bondi accretion at the core, or are consistent with a partial covering interpretation. The soft band is dominated by thermal emission from the diffuse plasma and is fit well by a two-temperature VAPEC model, plus a third power-law component to account for scattered nuclear emission, kpc-scale jet emission, and emission from X-ray Binaries and other point sources. Narrow fluorescent emission lines from Fe, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Ni are detected. The width of the Fe Ka line yields a 200 light-day lower limit on the distance from the black hole to the line-emitting gas. K-shell absorption edges due to Fe, Ca, and S are detected. Elemental abundances are constrained via the fluorescent lines strengths, absorption edge depths and the diffuse plasma emission lines. The high metallicity ([Fe/H]=+0.l) of the circumnuclear material compared to that in the metal-poor outer halo suggests that the accreting material could not have originated in the outer halo unless enrichment by local star formation has occurred. Relative abundances are consistent with enrichment from Type II and Ia supernovae.

  17. The Suzaku Observation of the Nucleus of theRadio-Loud Active Galaxy Centaurus A: Constraints on Abundances of the Accreting Material

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, A.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Nakazawa, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Awaki, H.; Bamba, A.; Isobe, N.; Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Mushotzky, R.; Okajima, T.; Ptak, A.; Reeves, J.N.; Ueda, Y.; Yamasaki, T.; Yaqoob, T.

    2007-06-27

    A Suzaku observation of the nucleus of the radio-loud AGN Centaurus A in 2005 has yielded a broadband spectrum spanning 0.3 to 250 keV. The net exposure times after screening were: 70 ks per X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) camera, 60.8 ks for the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) PIN, and 17.1 ks for the HXD-GSO. The hard X-rays are fit by two power-laws of the same slope, absorbed by columns of 1.5 and 7 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} respectively. The spectrum is consistent with previous suggestions that the power-law components are X-ray emission from the sub-pc VLBI jet and from Bondi accretion at the core, but it is also consistent with a partial covering interpretation. The soft band is dominated by thermal emission from the diffuse plasma and is fit well by a two-temperature vapec model, plus a third power-law component to account for scattered nuclear emission, jet emission, and emission from X-ray Binaries and other point sources. Narrow fluorescent emission lines from Fe, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Ni are detected. The Fe K{alpha} line width yields a 200 light-day lower limit on the distance from the black hole to the line-emitting gas. Fe, Ca, and S K-shell absorption edges are detected. Elemental abundances are constrained via absorption edge depths and strengths of the fluorescent and diffuse plasma emission lines. The high metallicity ([Fe/H]=+0.1) of the circumnuclear material suggests that it could not have originated in the relatively metal-poor outer halo unless enrichment by local star formation has occurred. Relative abundances are consistent with enrichment from Type II and Ia supernovae.

  18. Vitality Forms Processing in the Insula during Action Observation: A Multivoxel Pattern Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare, Giuseppe; Valente, Giancarlo; Di Dio, Cinzia; Ruffaldi, Emanuele; Bergamasco, Massimo; Goebel, Rainer; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Observing the style of an action done by others allows the observer to understand the cognitive state of the agent. This information has been defined by Stern “vitality forms”. Previous experiments showed that the dorso-central insula is selectively active both during vitality form observation and execution. In the present study, we presented participants with videos showing hand actions performed with different velocities and asked them to judge either their vitality form (gentle, neutral, rude) or their velocity (slow, medium, fast). The aim of the present study was to assess, using multi-voxel pattern analysis, whether vitality forms and velocities of observed goal-directed actions are differentially processed in the insula, and more specifically whether action velocity is encoded per se or it is an element that triggers neural populations of the insula encoding the vitality form. The results showed that, consistently across subjects, in the dorso-central sector of the insula there were voxels selectively tuned to vitality forms, while voxel tuned to velocity were rare. These results indicate that the dorso-central insula, which previous data showed to be involved in the vitality form processing, contains voxels specific for the action style processing. PMID:27375461

  19. Vitality Forms Processing in the Insula during Action Observation: A Multivoxel Pattern Analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Giuseppe; Valente, Giancarlo; Di Dio, Cinzia; Ruffaldi, Emanuele; Bergamasco, Massimo; Goebel, Rainer; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Observing the style of an action done by others allows the observer to understand the cognitive state of the agent. This information has been defined by Stern "vitality forms". Previous experiments showed that the dorso-central insula is selectively active both during vitality form observation and execution. In the present study, we presented participants with videos showing hand actions performed with different velocities and asked them to judge either their vitality form (gentle, neutral, rude) or their velocity (slow, medium, fast). The aim of the present study was to assess, using multi-voxel pattern analysis, whether vitality forms and velocities of observed goal-directed actions are differentially processed in the insula, and more specifically whether action velocity is encoded per se or it is an element that triggers neural populations of the insula encoding the vitality form. The results showed that, consistently across subjects, in the dorso-central sector of the insula there were voxels selectively tuned to vitality forms, while voxel tuned to velocity were rare. These results indicate that the dorso-central insula, which previous data showed to be involved in the vitality form processing, contains voxels specific for the action style processing.

  20. Anosognosia and patterns of impaired self-awareness observed in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Prigatano, George P

    2014-12-01

    Disturbances of self-awareness are observed in a wide variety of patients. While group studies can provide useful information concerning potential mechanisms underlying these complex disturbances, experienced clinicians, such as Babinski, recognized the potential value of repeated observations on individual patients to insure the reliability of findings and to aid in diagnosis. This paper describes patterns of impaired self-awareness (ISA) that are observed in clinical practice that suggest a model for clinical classification. Repeated observations are reported on four patients ranging from anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP), ISA associated with bilateral cerebral dysfunction with frontal lobe involvement, and apparent denial of disability (DD). A patient who presents with denial of ability (DA) is also studied for comparison purposes. When coupled with brain imaging findings, the nature of the patients' subjective responses to feedback regarding their functional capacities, speed of finger tapping in the left, nondominant hand, and their capacity to express and perceive affect suggests different clinical correlates in these four conditions.

  1. Unsaturated flow patterns observed in mine soils with embedded porous fragments using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, A.; Gerke, H. H.; Vontobel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Mine soils represent a typical dual-porosity medium characterized by porous fragments (e.g., lignitic or clayey clods) that are embedded in a coarser-textured sand-dust matrix. Effects of heterogeneously-distributed embedded fragments of various sizes and shapes on flow are largely unknown. The objective of this study is to identify water flow paths using neutron radiography and imaging techniques. Experiments were carried out at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ (PSI, Villigen). Neutron radiography (at the NEUTRA instrument) was used to observe unsaturated water movement under different flow conditions. For 2D-steady-state flow experiments, we used a double-membrane setup to infiltrate water (H2O) in slap-type undisturbed soil samples. Before the experiments, most of the water that was initially present in the samples has been exchanged by deuterium oxide (D2O). The 2D radiography series' show the dynamics of the spatial changes in water contents during the unsaturated flow process at defined matric potentials. In addition, we conducted multistep in- and outflow experiments to observe the 3D spatial distribution of the water content during the stationary phases at different steps of imposed pressure heads. Two minature tensiometers, one in the sandy matrix and the other in lignitic fragments, monitored the equilibration of soil water matric potentials in the dual-porosity medium. Our observations basically confirm that flow patterns are strongly related to the local-scale structures and that a more continuous pore region exists in the vicinity of fragments for the imposed moisture conditions. This continuous pore domain allows for preferential flow within a relatively small fraction of the otherwise coarse-textured porous medium. The geometries and hydraulic properties of the porous fragments are additionally modifying the flow patterns.

  2. Analysis of the summertime buildup of tropospheric ozone abundances over the Middle East and North Africa as observed by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jane J.; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Worden, John R.; Noone, David; Parrington, Mark; Kar, Jay

    2009-03-01

    We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to interpret observations of tropospheric ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite instrument in summer 2005. Observations from TES reveal elevated ozone in the middle troposphere (500-400 hPa) across North Africa and the Middle East. Observed ozone abundances in the middle troposphere are at a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter, consistent with the previously predicted summertime "Middle East ozone maximum." This summertime enhancement in ozone is associated with the Arabian and Sahara anticyclones, centered over the Zagros and Atlas Mountains, respectively. These anticyclones isolate the middle troposphere over northeast Africa and the Middle East, with westerlies to the north and easterlies to the south, facilitating the buildup of ozone. Over the Middle East, we find that in situ production and transport from Asia provides comparable contributions of 30-35% to the ozone buildup. Over North Africa, in situ production is dominant (at about 20%), with transport from Asia, North America, and equatorial Africa each contributing about 10-15% to the total ozone. We find that although the eastern Mediterranean is characterized by strong descent in the middle and upper troposphere in summer, transport from the boundary layer accounts for about 25% of the local Middle Eastern contribution to the ozone enhancement in the middle troposphere. This upward transport of boundary layer air is associated with orographic lifting along the Zagros Mountains in Iran and the Asir and Hijaz Mountain ranges in Saudi Arabia, and is consistent with TES observations of deuterated water.

  3. Assessing Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Observed and Predicted Ozone in Multiple Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Heather; Wells, Benjamin; Baker, Kirk R.; Hubbell, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ambient monitoring data show spatial gradients in ozone (O3) across urban areas. Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reductions will likely alter these gradients. Epidemiological studies often use exposure surrogates that may not fully account for the impacts of spatially and temporally changing concentrations on population exposure. Objectives: We examined the impact of large NOx decreases on spatial and temporal O3 patterns and the implications on exposure. Methods: We used a photochemical model to estimate O3 response to large NOx reductions. We derived time series of 2006–2008 O3 concentrations consistent with 50% and 75% NOx emissions reduction scenarios in three urban areas (Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Chicago) at each monitor location and spatially interpolated O3 to census-tract centroids. Results: We predicted that low O3 concentrations would increase and high O3 concentrations would decrease in response to NOx reductions within an urban area. O3 increases occurred across larger areas for the seasonal mean metric than for the regulatory metric (annual 4th highest daily 8-hr maximum) and were located only in urban core areas. O3 always decreased outside the urban core (e.g., at locations of maximum local ozone concentration) for both metrics and decreased within the urban core in some instances. NOx reductions led to more uniform spatial gradients and diurnal and seasonal patterns and caused seasonal peaks in midrange O3 concentrations to shift from midsummer to earlier in the year. Conclusions: These changes have implications for how O3 exposure may change in response to NOx reductions and are informative for the design of future epidemiology studies and risk assessments. Citation: Simon H, Wells B, Baker KR, Hubbell B. 2016. Assessing temporal and spatial patterns of observed and predicted ozone in multiple urban areas. Environ Health Perspect 124:1443–1452; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP190 PMID:27153213

  4. Differential Movement Patterns of Juvenile Tengmalms Owls (Aegolius funereus) during the Post-Fledging Dependence Period in Two Years with Contrasting Prey Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Kouba, Marek; Bartoš, Luděk; Štastný, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Fledgling behaviour and movement patterns throughout the post-fledging dependence period (PFDP), especially in relation to changing environmental conditions, have been rarely studied, despite the fact that this period is recognized as of crucial significance in terms of high mortality of juveniles. The PFDP can extend over quite a protracted period, particularly in birds of prey, and a knowledge of the movement patterns of individuals is fundamental for understanding mechanisms underlying survival, habitat use and dispersion. We radiotracked 39 fledglings of the Tengmalm’s owl (Aegolius funereus) in two years with different availability of prey: 2010 (n = 29) and 2011 (n = 10) and obtained 1455 daily locations. Fledglings reached independence on average in 45 days after fledging in 2010 (n = 22) and 57 days in 2011 (n = 6). Within years, the most important measures influencing the distance moved from the nest box were age of fledglings and number of surviving siblings present. Individual home range size and duration of PFDP in particular were dependent on maximal number of siblings seen outside the nest box. In the season with low prey availability fledglings were observed at greater distances from the nest box than in the year with higher prey availability (mean distance: 350 m in 2010 and 650 m in 2011) and occupied larger home ranges (mean: 30.3 ha in 2010 and 57.7 ha in 2011). The main factor causing these differences between years was probably the different availability of prey in these two years, affecting breeding success and post-fledging survivorship of the Tengmalm’s owls. PMID:23843981

  5. Differential movement patterns of juvenile Tengmalms owls (Aegolius funereus) during the post-fledging dependence period in two years with contrasting prey abundance.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Marek; Bartoš, Luděk; Štastný, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Fledgling behaviour and movement patterns throughout the post-fledging dependence period (PFDP), especially in relation to changing environmental conditions, have been rarely studied, despite the fact that this period is recognized as of crucial significance in terms of high mortality of juveniles. The PFDP can extend over quite a protracted period, particularly in birds of prey, and a knowledge of the movement patterns of individuals is fundamental for understanding mechanisms underlying survival, habitat use and dispersion. We radiotracked 39 fledglings of the Tengmalm's owl (Aegolius funereus) in two years with different availability of prey: 2010 (n = 29) and 2011 (n = 10) and obtained 1455 daily locations. Fledglings reached independence on average in 45 days after fledging in 2010 (n = 22) and 57 days in 2011 (n = 6). Within years, the most important measures influencing the distance moved from the nest box were age of fledglings and number of surviving siblings present. Individual home range size and duration of PFDP in particular were dependent on maximal number of siblings seen outside the nest box. In the season with low prey availability fledglings were observed at greater distances from the nest box than in the year with higher prey availability (mean distance: 350 m in 2010 and 650 m in 2011) and occupied larger home ranges (mean: 30.3 ha in 2010 and 57.7 ha in 2011). The main factor causing these differences between years was probably the different availability of prey in these two years, affecting breeding success and post-fledging survivorship of the Tengmalm's owls. PMID:23843981

  6. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics for the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis Reveal Distinct Abundance Patterns upon Growth on Cellobiose, Crystalline Cellulose, and Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Lochner, Adriane; Keller, Martin; Antranikian, Garabed; Graham, David E; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures grown on four different carbon sources identified 65% of the cells predicted proteins in cell lysates and supernatants. Biological and technical replication together with sophisticated statistical analysis were used to reliably quantify protein abundances and their changes as a function of carbon source. Extracellular, multifunctional glycosidases were significantly more abundant on cellobiose than on the crystalline cellulose substrates Avicel and filter paper, indicating either disaccharide induction or constitutive protein expression. Highly abundant flagellar, chemotaxis, and pilus proteins were detected during growth on insoluble substrates, suggesting motility or specific substrate attachment. The highly abundant extracellular binding protein COB47-0549 together with the COB47-1616 ATPase might comprise the primary ABC-transport system for cellooligosaccharides, while COB47-0096 and COB47-0097 could facilitate monosaccharide uptake. Oligosaccharide degradation can occur either via extracellular hydrolysis by a GH1 {beta}-glycosidase or by intracellular phosphorolysis using two GH94 enzymes. When C. obsidiansis was grown on switchgrass, the abundance of hemicellulases (including GH3, GH5, GH51, and GH67 enzymes) and certain sugar transporters increased significantly. Cultivation on biomass also caused a concerted increase in cytosolic enzymes for xylose and arabinose fermentation.

  7. Label-free quantitative proteomics for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis reveal distinct abundance patterns upon growth on cellobiose, crystalline cellulose, and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Adriane; Giannone, Richard J; Keller, Martin; Antranikian, Garabed; Graham, David E; Hettich, Robert L

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures grown on four different carbon sources identified 65% of the cells' predicted proteins in cell lysates and supernatants. Biological and technical replication together with sophisticated statistical analysis were used to reliably quantify protein abundances and their changes as a function of carbon source. Extracellular, multifunctional glycosidases were significantly more abundant on cellobiose than on the crystalline cellulose substrates Avicel and filter paper, indicating either disaccharide induction or constitutive protein expression. Highly abundant flagellar, chemotaxis, and pilus proteins were detected during growth on insoluble substrates, suggesting motility or specific substrate attachment. The highly abundant extracellular binding protein COB47_0549 together with the COB47_1616 ATPase might comprise the primary ABC-transport system for cellooligosaccharides, while COB47_0096 and COB47_0097 could facilitate monosaccharide uptake. Oligosaccharide degradation can occur either via extracellular hydrolysis by a GH1 β-glycosidase or by intracellular phosphorolysis using two GH94 enzymes. When C. obsidiansis was grown on switchgrass, the abundance of hemicellulases (including GH3, GH5, GH51, and GH67 enzymes) and certain sugar transporters increased significantly. Cultivation on biomass also caused a concerted increase in cytosolic enzymes for xylose and arabinose fermentation.

  8. Humans but Not Chimpanzees Vary Face-Scanning Patterns Depending on Contexts during Action Observation

    PubMed Central

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Yoshida, Chisato; Hirata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human and nonhuman primates comprehend the actions of other individuals by detecting social cues, including others’ goal-directed motor actions and faces. However, little is known about how this information is integrated with action understanding. Here, we present the ontogenetic and evolutionary foundations of this capacity by comparing face-scanning patterns of chimpanzees and humans as they viewed goal-directed human actions within contexts that differ in whether or not the predicted goal is achieved. Human adults and children attend to the actor’s face during action sequences, and this tendency is particularly pronounced in adults when observing that the predicted goal is not achieved. Chimpanzees rarely attend to the actor’s face during the goal-directed action, regardless of whether the predicted action goal is achieved or not. These results suggest that in humans, but not chimpanzees, attention to actor’s faces conveying referential information toward the target object indicates the process of observers making inferences about the intentionality of an action. Furthermore, this remarkable predisposition to observe others’ actions by integrating the prediction of action goals and the actor’s intention is developmentally acquired. PMID:26535901

  9. THE FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-REDSHIFT DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AND AFFILIATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, A. J.; Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K.; Jenkins, E. B.; Lehner, N.; Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.

    2012-01-10

    We present Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) measurements of metal abundances in eight 0.083 < z{sub abs} < 0.321 damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption systems serendipitously discovered in the COS-Halos survey. We find that these systems show a large range in metallicities, with -1.10 < [Z/H] < 0.31, similar to the spread found at higher redshifts. These low-redshift systems on average have subsolar metallicities, but do show a rise in metallicity over cosmic time when compared to higher-redshift systems. We find that the average sub-DLA metallicity is higher than the average DLA metallicity at all redshifts. Nitrogen is underabundant with respect to {alpha}-group elements in all but perhaps one of the absorbers. In some cases, [N/{alpha}] is significantly below the lowest nitrogen measurements in nearby galaxies. Systems for which depletion patterns can be studied show little, if any, depletion, which is characteristic of Milky Way halo-type gas. We also identify affiliated galaxies for three of the sub-DLAs using spectra obtained from a Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS). None of these sub-DLAs arise in the stellar disks of luminous galaxies; instead, these absorbers may exist in galaxy halos at impact parameters ranging from 38 to 92 kpc. Multiple galaxies are present near two of the sub-DLAs, and galaxy interactions may play a role in the dispersal of the gas. Many of these low-redshift absorbers exhibit simple kinematics, but one sub-DLA has a complicated mix of at least 13 components spread over 150 km s{sup -1}. We find three galaxies near this sub-DLA, which also suggests that galaxy interactions roil the gas. This study reinforces the view that DLAs have a variety of origins, and low-redshift studies are crucial for understanding absorber-galaxy connections.

  10. Patterns and causes of observed piñon pine mortality in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meddens, Arjan J.H.; Hicke, Jeff H.; Macalady, Alison K.; Buotte, P.C.; Cowles, T.R.; Allen, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, widespread piñon pine die-off occurred in the southwestern United States. Here we synthesize observational studies of this event and compare findings to expected relationships with biotic and abiotic factors. Agreement exists on the occurrence of drought, presence of bark beetles and increased mortality of larger trees. However, studies disagree about the influences of stem density, elevation and other factors, perhaps related to study design, location and impact of extreme drought. Detailed information about bark beetles is seldom reported and their role is poorly understood. Our analysis reveals substantial limits to our knowledge regarding the processes that produce mortality patterns across space and time, indicating a poor ability to forecast mortality in response to expected increases in future droughts.

  11. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave-particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  12. Naturalistic observation of athletic drug-use patterns and behavior in professional-caliber bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Augé, W K; Augé, S M

    1999-01-01

    Athletic performance-enhancing drug use is widespread. Awareness in the medical community lags because various athletic subcultures have not been penetrated by conventional medical literature. This report presents a current and comprehensive assessment of drugs used by professional-caliber bodybuilders to enhance athletic performance. The scale of drug use documented significantly exceeds all previous reports from athletic populations and indicates that this group is at significant risk for use. Drug-use patterns and behavior encompass multiple domestic, foreign, and veterinary agents to create "successful" training programs. The presence of interathlete and intersport communication at amateur and professional levels creates a wide application for this information in athletic settings. Since use may not be limited to the competitive athlete, a heightened awareness will aid practitioners in correlating clinical observations with accurate athletic drug-use information.

  13. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, L; Lummen, T.T.A.; Quiñonez, E; Murooka, Y; Reed, B.W.; Barwick, B; Carbone, F

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits. PMID:25728197

  14. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  15. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    DOE PAGES

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinducedmore » near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.« less

  16. Directivity Patterns of Complex Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, T.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Complex solar type III-like radio bursts are a group of type III bursts that occur in association with slowly drifting type II radio bursts excited by coronal mass ejection (CME) driven shock waves. We presentsimultaneous observations of these radio bursts from the STEREO A, B and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies, located at different vantage points in the ecliptic plane. Using these stereoscopic observations, wedetermine the directivity of these complex radio bursts. We estimate the angles between the directions of the magnetic field at the sources and the lines connecting the source to the spacecraft (viewing angles) by assuming that the sources are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere. We estimate the normalized peak intensities of these bursts (directivity factors) at each spacecraft using their time profiles at each spacecraft. These observations indicate that the complex type III bursts can be divided into two groups: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field, and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone. We show that the bursts , which are emitted along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source are very intense, and their intensities steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. We have developed a ray tracing code and computed the distributions of the trajectories of rays emitted at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency. The comparison of the observed emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relativelyweaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  17. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  18. Relative abundances of sub-iron to iron nuclei in low energy (50-250 MeV/N) cosmic rays as observed in the Skylab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgaprasad, N.; Yadav, J. S.; Biswas, S.

    1985-01-01

    A Lexan polycarbonate detector exposed on the exterior of Skylab-3 for 73 days during a solar quiet period was used to study the relative abundances of calcium to nickel ions in low energy cosmic rays of 50 to 250 MeV/N. The method of charge identification is based on the measurement of conelength (L) and residual range (R) of these particles in various Lexan sheets. Since more than one cone (sometimes as many as five) is observed and is measured, the charge accuracy becomes precise and accurate. The ratio of (calcium to manganese) to (iron and cobalt) obtained at three energy intervals of 50 to 80, 80 to 150, 150 to 250 and 50 to 250 MeV/N are 7.6 plus or minus 3.8, 2.7 plus or minus 0.8, 1.4 plus or minus 0.6 and 3.3 plus or minus 0.7 respectively. These data thus indicate a large increase of this ratio with decreasing energy. The origin of this strong energy dependence is not understood at present.

  19. Study of Neutron-Capture Element Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongjie; Shen, Xiaojing; Liang, Shuai; Cui, Wenyuan; Zhang, Bo

    2013-02-01

    This work describes a study of elemental abundances for 30 metal-poor stars whose chemical abundances provide excellent information for setting constraints on models of neutron-capture processes. Based on the abundances of main r- and weak r-process stars, the abundance patterns of main r-process and weak r-process are obtained. The two r-process component coefficients are defined to determine the relative contributions from individual neutron-capture process to abundances of metal-poor stars. Based on the component coefficients, we find that metal-poor stars BD+42621 and HD 4306 are also weak r-process stars, which means that the abundance pattern produced by weak r-process is stable. All metal-poor star abundances contain the contributions of both main r-process and weak r-process. The elements produced by weak r-process have increased along with Fe over the polluted history. Most of the metal-poor star abundances do not follow the pattern observed in the solar system, but there is a small fraction that do. For the low-[Sr/Fe] star BD-185550 ([Sr/Fe] lsim -1), neutron-capture element abundances can be explained by the mixture of two r-process components. Since lighter elements in this star cannot be fitted by the two components, the abundance pattern of P-component is estimated from those abundances.

  20. Excitation and abundance of C3 in star forming cores. Herschel/HIFI observations of the sight-lines to W31C and W49N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Giesen, T.; Stutzki, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Luca, M.; Bell, T. A.; Gupta, H.; Gerin, M.; Persson, C. M.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Makai, Z.; Black, J.; Boulanger, F.; Coutens, A.; Dartois, E.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Geballe, T.; Godard, B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gry, C.; Hennebelle, P.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Kołos, R.; Krełowski, J.; Lis, D. C.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Menten, K. M.; Monje, R.; Pearson, J. C.; Perault, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Teyssier, D.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Dieleman, P.; Güsten, R.; Honingh, C. E.; Morris, P.; Roelfsema, P.; Schieder, R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2010-10-01

    We present spectrally resolved observations of triatomic carbon (C3) in several ro-vibrational transitions between the vibrational ground state and the low-energy ν2 bending mode at frequencies between 1654-1897 GHz along the sight-lines to the submillimeter continuum sources W31C and W49N, using Herschel's HIFI instrument. We detect C3 in absorption arising from the warm envelope surrounding the hot core, as indicated by the velocity peak position and shape of the line profile. The sensitivity does not allow to detect C3 absorption due to diffuse foreground clouds. From the column densities of the rotational levels in the vibrational ground state probed by the absorption we derive a rotation temperature (Trot) of ~50-70 K, which is a good measure of the kinetic temperature of the absorbing gas, as radiative transitions within the vibrational ground state are forbidden. It is also in good agreement with the dust temperatures for W31C and W49N. Applying the partition function correction based on the derived Trot, we get column densities N(C3) ~ 7-9 × 1014 cm-2 and abundance x(C3) ~ 10-8 with respect to H2. For W31C, using a radiative transfer model including far-infrared pumping by the dust continuum and a temperature gradient within the source along the line of sight we find that a model with x(C3) = 10-8, Tkin = 30-50 K, N(C3) = 1.5 × 1015 cm-2 fits the observations reasonably well and provides parameters in very good agreement with the simple excitation analysis. Appendix A (page 5) is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgHerschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Ventilatory efficiency and breathing pattern in world-class cyclists: A three-year observational study.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Terrados, Nicolás; Burtscher, Martin; Santalla, Alfredo; Naranjo Orellana, José

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this three-year observational study was to analyze the ventilatory efficiency and breathing pattern in world-class professional cyclists. Twelve athletes (22.61±3.8years; 177.38±5.5cm; 68.96±5.5kg and VO2max 75.51±3.3mLkg(-1)min(-1)) were analyzed retrospectively. For each subject, respiratory and performance variables were recorded during incremental spiroergometry: oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), tidal volume (Vt), breathing frequency (fR), driving (Vt/Ti), timing (Ti/Ttot), peak power output (PPO) and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). Ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope) was calculated from the beginning of exercise testing to the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). The VE/VCO2 slope was unaffected during the study period (24.63±3.07; 23.61±2:79; 24:89±2:61) with a low effect size (ES=0.04). The PPO improved significantly in the third year (365±33.74; 386.36±32.33; 415.00±24.15) (p<0.05). The breathing pattern variables, Vt/Ti and Ti/Ttot, did not change significantly over the three year period (ES=0.00; ES=0.03 respectively). These findings suggest that changes in cycling performance in world-class professional cyclists do not modify breathing variables related to the control of ventilatory efficiency.

  2. Ventilatory efficiency and breathing pattern in world-class cyclists: A three-year observational study.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Terrados, Nicolás; Burtscher, Martin; Santalla, Alfredo; Naranjo Orellana, José

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this three-year observational study was to analyze the ventilatory efficiency and breathing pattern in world-class professional cyclists. Twelve athletes (22.61±3.8years; 177.38±5.5cm; 68.96±5.5kg and VO2max 75.51±3.3mLkg(-1)min(-1)) were analyzed retrospectively. For each subject, respiratory and performance variables were recorded during incremental spiroergometry: oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), tidal volume (Vt), breathing frequency (fR), driving (Vt/Ti), timing (Ti/Ttot), peak power output (PPO) and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). Ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope) was calculated from the beginning of exercise testing to the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). The VE/VCO2 slope was unaffected during the study period (24.63±3.07; 23.61±2:79; 24:89±2:61) with a low effect size (ES=0.04). The PPO improved significantly in the third year (365±33.74; 386.36±32.33; 415.00±24.15) (p<0.05). The breathing pattern variables, Vt/Ti and Ti/Ttot, did not change significantly over the three year period (ES=0.00; ES=0.03 respectively). These findings suggest that changes in cycling performance in world-class professional cyclists do not modify breathing variables related to the control of ventilatory efficiency. PMID:27083403

  3. Abundance models improve spatial and temporal prioritization of conservation resources.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alison; Fink, Daniel; Reynolds, Mark D; Hochachka, Wesley M; Sullivan, Brian L; Bruns, Nicholas E; Hallstein, Eric; Merrifield, Matt S; Matsumoto, Sandi; Kelling, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Conservation prioritization requires knowledge about organism distribution and density. This information is often inferred from models that estimate the probability of species occurrence rather than from models that estimate species abundance, because abundance data are harder to obtain and model. However, occurrence and abundance may not display similar patterns and therefore development of robust, scalable, abundance models is critical to ensuring that scarce conservation resources are applied where they can have the greatest benefits. Motivated by a dynamic land conservation program, we develop and assess a general method for modeling relative abundance using citizen science monitoring data. Weekly estimates of relative abundance and occurrence were compared for prioritizing times and locations of conservation actions for migratory waterbird species in California, USA. We found that abundance estimates consistently provided better rankings of observed counts than occurrence estimates. Additionally, the relationship between abundance and occurrence was nonlinear and varied by species and season. Across species, locations prioritized by occurrence models had only 10-58% overlap with locations prioritized by abundance models, highlighting that occurrence models will not typically identify the locations of highest abundance that are vital for conservation of populations.

  4. Sources of Information and Behavioral Patterns in Online Health Forums: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Friede, Tim; Grabowski, Jens; Koschack, Janka; Makedonski, Philip; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of patients are raising their voice in online forums. This shift is welcome as an act of patient autonomy, reflected in the term “expert patient”. At the same time, there is considerable concern that patients can be easily misguided by pseudoscientific research and debate. Little is known about the sources of information used in health-related online forums, how users apply this information, and how they behave in such forums. Objective The intent of the study was to identify (1) the sources of information used in online health-related forums, and (2) the roles and behavior of active forum visitors in introducing and disseminating this information. Methods This observational study used the largest German multiple sclerosis (MS) online forum as a database, analyzing the user debate about the recently proposed and controversial Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) hypothesis. After extracting all posts and then filtering relevant CCSVI posts between 01 January 2008 and 17 August 2012, we first identified hyperlinks to scientific publications and other information sources used or referenced in the posts. Employing k-means clustering, we then analyzed the users’ preference for sources of information and their general posting habits. Results Of 139,912 posts from 11,997 threads, 8628 posts discussed or at least mentioned CCSVI. We detected hyperlinks pointing to CCSVI-related scientific publications in 31 posts. In contrast, 2829 different URLs were posted to the forum, most frequently referring to social media, such as YouTube or Facebook. We identified a total of 6 different roles of hyperlink posters including Social Media Fans, Organization Followers, and Balanced Source Users. Apart from the large and nonspecific residual category of the “average user”, several specific behavior patterns were identified, such as the small but relevant groups of CCSVI-Focused Responders or CCSVI Activators. Conclusions The bulk

  5. High-Frequency Patterns in the Abundance of Benthic Species near a Cold-Seep – An Internet Operated Vehicle Application

    PubMed Central

    Doya, Carolina; Thomsen, Laurenz; Purser, Autun; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Three benthic megafaunal species (i.e. sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria; pacific hagfish Eptatretus stoutii and a group of juvenile crabs) were tested for diel behavioral patterns at the methane hydrates site of Barkley Canyon (890 m depth), off Vancouver Island (BC, Canada). Fluctuations of animal counts in linear video-transects conducted with the Internet Operated Deep-Sea Crawler “Wally” in June, July and December of 2013, were used as proxy of population activity rhythms. Count time series and environmental parameters were analyzed under the hypothesis that the environmental conditioning of activity rhythms depends on the life habits of particular species (i.e. movement type and trophic level). Non-linear least squares modeling of biological time series revealed significant diel periods for sablefish in summer and for hagfish and crabs in December. Combined cross-correlation and redundancy (RDA) analyses showed strong relationships among environmental fluctuations and detected megafauna. In particular, sablefish presence during summer months was related to flow magnitude, while the activity of pacific hagfish and juvenile crabs in December correlated with change in chemical parameters (i.e. chlorophyll and oxygen concentrations, respectively). Waveform analyses of animal counts and environmental variables confirmed the phase delay during the 24 h cycle. The timing of detection of sablefish occurred under low flow velocities, a possible behavioral adaptation to the general hypoxic conditions. The proposed effect of chlorophyll concentrations on hagfish counts highlights the potential role of phytodetritus as an alternative food source for this opportunistic feeder. The juvenile crabs seemed to display a cryptic behavior, possibly to avoid predation, though this was suppressed when oxygen levels were at a minimum. Our results highlight the potential advantages such mobile observation platforms offer in multiparametric deep-sea monitoring in terms of both spatial

  6. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  7. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  8. Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Meyer, David M.

    2001-06-01

    We evaluate the stellar abundances often used to represent the total (gas plus dust) composition of the interstellar medium. Published abundances for B stars, young later type (F and G) stars, and the Sun are compared to the modeled dust-phase and measured gas-phase compositions of the interstellar medium. This study uses abundances for the five most populous elements in dust grains-C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe-and the cosmically abundant element, N. We find that B stars have metal abundances that are too low to be considered valid representations of the interstellar medium. The commonly invoked interstellar standard that is two-thirds of the solar composition is also rejected by recent observations. Young (<=2 Gyr) F and G disk stars and the Sun, however, cannot be ruled out as reliable proxies for the total interstellar composition. If their abundances are valid representations of the interstellar medium, then the apparent underabundance of carbon with respect to that required by dust models, i.e., the carbon crisis, is substantially eased.

  9. Simulated versus observed patterns of warming over the extratropical Northern Hemisphere continents during the cold season.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John M; Fu, Qiang; Smoliak, Brian V; Lin, Pu; Johanson, Celeste M

    2012-09-01

    A suite of the historical simulations run with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4) models forced by greenhouse gases, aerosols, stratospheric ozone depletion, and volcanic eruptions and a second suite of simulations forced by increasing CO(2) concentrations alone are compared with observations for the reference interval 1965-2000. Surface air temperature trends are disaggregated by boreal cold (November-April) versus warm (May-October) seasons and by high latitude northern (N: 40°-90 °N) versus southern (S: 60 °S-40 °N) domains. A dynamical adjustment is applied to remove the component of the cold-season surface air temperature trends (over land areas poleward of 40 °N) that are attributable to changing atmospheric circulation patterns. The model simulations do not simulate the full extent of the wintertime warming over the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere continents during the later 20th century, much of which was dynamically induced. Expressed as fractions of the concurrent trend in global-mean sea surface temperature, the relative magnitude of the dynamically induced wintertime warming over domain N in the observations, the simulations with multiple forcings, and the runs forced by the buildup of greenhouse gases only is 721, and roughly comparable to the relative magnitude of the concurrent sea-level pressure trends. These results support the notion that the enhanced wintertime warming over high northern latitudes from 1965 to 2000 was mainly a reflection of unforced variability of the coupled climate system. Some of the simulations exhibit an enhancement of the warming along the Arctic coast, suggestive of exaggerated feedbacks. PMID:22847408

  10. Simulated versus observed patterns of warming over the extratropical Northern Hemisphere continents during the cold season

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John M.; Fu, Qiang; Smoliak, Brian V.; Lin, Pu; Johanson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    A suite of the historical simulations run with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4) models forced by greenhouse gases, aerosols, stratospheric ozone depletion, and volcanic eruptions and a second suite of simulations forced by increasing CO2 concentrations alone are compared with observations for the reference interval 1965–2000. Surface air temperature trends are disaggregated by boreal cold (November-April) versus warm (May-October) seasons and by high latitude northern (N: 40°–90 °N) versus southern (S: 60 °S–40 °N) domains. A dynamical adjustment is applied to remove the component of the cold-season surface air temperature trends (over land areas poleward of 40 °N) that are attributable to changing atmospheric circulation patterns. The model simulations do not simulate the full extent of the wintertime warming over the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere continents during the later 20th century, much of which was dynamically induced. Expressed as fractions of the concurrent trend in global-mean sea surface temperature, the relative magnitude of the dynamically induced wintertime warming over domain N in the observations, the simulations with multiple forcings, and the runs forced by the buildup of greenhouse gases only is 7∶2∶1, and roughly comparable to the relative magnitude of the concurrent sea-level pressure trends. These results support the notion that the enhanced wintertime warming over high northern latitudes from 1965 to 2000 was mainly a reflection of unforced variability of the coupled climate system. Some of the simulations exhibit an enhancement of the warming along the Arctic coast, suggestive of exaggerated feedbacks. PMID:22847408

  11. Signal separation: the quest for independent mass flux patterns in geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Rietbroek, R.; Forootan, E.

    2010-12-01

    Today, the analysis of the Earth’s time-variable gravity field and land and ocean surface plays a key role in geodetic Earth system research. The GRACE and GPS observables provide, together with satellite altimetry, an almost direct measurement of the amount of mass that is redistributed at or near the surface of the planet by oceanic and atmospheric circulation and through the hydrological cycle. With reprocessed data sets, it is now widely accepted that GRACE gravimetry and GPS loading inversion see the same mass flux signals, although at different spatial and temporal scales. The same goes for GRACE and ocean altimetry, when steric effects in the sea level are taken into account. This has lead to promising approaches that combine these techniques, e.g. in order to improve geocenter estimates or to estimate ocean heat storage. However, in the view of the authors, the biggest challenge in data analysis is the problem of signal separation. This problem is three-fold: 1) separation of signal and noise stemming from the measurement systems, 2) separation of mass flux patterns originating from different compartments of the Earth system (trends in continental hydrology vs. GIA, the leakage problem in ice sheet mass balance from GRACE), 3) identification of physically dependent and independent signals within the same compartment (sea level contributors, teleconnections in the hydrological cycle). In this contribution we will first review different techniques that have been suggested for signal separation using multi-sensor data, including the joint spherical harmonic analysis, the ‘fingerprint’ inversion method and various methods rooted in the assumption that physically independent processes generate uncorrelated or statistically independent observations. The, results obtained by our group in jointly analysing global GRACE, GPS and altimetry data sets will be presented.

  12. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of the temporal variability and the spatial distribution of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial to better quantify atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions, in particular sea-ice mass and energy budgets. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study, we combine diurnal brightness temperature differences (dTB(37 GHz)) and ratios (TB(19 GHz)/TB(37 GHz)) to detect and classify snowmelt processes. We distinguish temporary snowmelt from continuous snowmelt to characterize dominant melt patterns for different Antarctic sea-ice regions from 1988/1989 to 2014/2015. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 38.9 ± 6.0% of all detected melt events are diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, characteristic of temporary melt (Type A). Less than 2% reveal immediate continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, i.e., strong melt over a period of several days (Type B). In 11.7 ± 4.0%, Type A and B take place consecutively (Type C), and for 47.8 ± 6.8% no surface melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous snowmelt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 17 days after the onset of temporary melt. Comparisons with Snow Buoy data suggest that also the onset of continuous snowmelt does not translate into changes in snow depth for a longer period but might rather affect the internal stratigraphy and density structure of the snowpack. Considering the entire data set, the timing of snowmelt processes does not show significant temporal trends.

  13. Observed anomalous atmospheric patterns in summers of unusual Arctic sea ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Erlend M.; Orsolini, Yvan J.; Furevik, Tore; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic sea ice retreat has accelerated over the last decade. The negative trend is largest in summer, but substantial interannual variability still remains. Here we explore observed atmospheric conditions and feedback mechanisms during summer months of anomalous sea ice melt in the Arctic. Compositing months of anomalous low and high sea ice melt over 1979-2013, we find distinct patterns in atmospheric circulation, precipitation, radiation, and temperature. Compared to summer months of anomalous low sea ice melt, high melt months are characterized by anomalous high sea level pressure in the Arctic (up to 7 hPa), with a corresponding tendency of storms to track on a more zonal path. As a result, the Arctic receives less precipitation overall and 39% less snowfall. This lowers the albedo of the region and reduces the negative feedback the snowfall provides for the sea ice. With an anticyclonic tendency, 12 W/m2 more incoming shortwave radiation reaches the surface in the start of the season. The melting sea ice in turn promotes cloud development in the marginal ice zones and enhances downwelling longwave radiation at the surface toward the end of the season. A positive cloud feedback emerges. In midlatitudes, the more zonally tracking cyclones give stormier, cloudier, wetter, and cooler summers in most of northern Europe and around the Sea of Okhotsk. Farther south, the region from the Mediterranean Sea to East Asia experiences significant surface warming (up to 2.4°C), possibly linked to changes in the jet stream.

  14. A framework for the Subaru Telescope observation control system based on the command design pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric; Bon, Bruce; Inagaki, Takeshi; Streeper, Sam

    2008-08-01

    Subaru Telescope is developing a second-generation Observation Control System that specifically addresses some of the deficiencies of the current Subaru OCS. One area of concern is better extensibility: the current system uses a custom language for implementing commands with a complex macro processing subsystem written in C. It is laborious to improve the language and awkward for scientists to extend and use standard programming techniques. Our Generation 2 OCS provides a lightweight, object-oriented task framework based on the Command design pattern. The framework provides a base task class that abstracts services for processing status and other common infrastructure activities. Upon this are built and provided a set of "atomic" tasks for telescope and instrument commands. A set of "container" tasks based on common sequential and concurrent command processing paradigms is also included. Since all tasks share the same exact interface, it is straightforward to build up compound tasks by plugging simple tasks into container tasks and container tasks into other containers, and so forth. In this way various advanced astronomical workflows can be readily created, with well controlled behaviors. In addition, since tasks are written in Python, it is easy for astronomers to subclass and extend the standard observatory tasks with their own custom extensions and behaviors, in a high-level, full-featured programming language. In this talk we will provide an overview of the task framework design and present preliminary results on the use of the framework during two separate engineering runs.

  15. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli.

  16. Submersible- and lander-observed community patterns in the Mariana and New Britain trenches: Influence of productivity and depth on epibenthic and scavenging communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Natalya D.; Cameron, James; Hardy, Kevin; Fryer, Patricia; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Levin, Lisa A.

    2015-05-01

    Deep-sea trenches remain one of the least explored ocean ecosystems due to the unique challenges of sampling at great depths. Five submersible dives conducted using the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible generated video of undisturbed deep-sea communities at bathyal (994 m), abyssal (3755 m), and hadal (8228 m) depths in the New Britain Trench, bathyal depths near the Ulithi atoll (1192 m), and hadal depths in the Mariana Trench Challenger Deep (10908 m). The New Britain Trench is overlain by waters with higher net primary productivity (~3-fold) than the Mariana Trench and nearby Ulithi, and receives substantially more allochthonous input from terrestrial sources, based on the presence of terrestrial debris in submersible video footage. Comparisons between trenches addressed how differences in productivity regime influence benthic and demersal deep-sea community structure. In addition, the scavenger community was studied using paired lander deployments to the New Britain (8233 m) and Mariana (10918 m) trenches. Differences in allochthonous input were reflected in epibenthic community abundance, biodiversity, and lifestyle representation. More productive locations were characterized by higher faunal abundances (~2-fold) at both bathyal and hadal depths. In contrast, biodiversity trends showed a unimodal pattern with more food-rich areas exhibiting reduced bathyal diversity and elevated hadal diversity. Hadal scavenging communities exhibited similar higher abundance but also ~3-fold higher species richness in the more food-rich New Britain Trench compared to the Mariana Trench. High species- and phylum-level diversity observed in the New Britain Trench suggest that trench environments may foster higher megafaunal biodiversity than surrounding abyssal depths if food is not limiting. However, the absence of fish at our hadal sites suggests that certain groups do have physiological depth limits. Submersible video footage allowed novel in situ observation of holothurian

  17. Experimental observation and computer simulation of HOLZ line patterns of quasicrystalline icosahedral phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingxing; Wang, Renhui

    1990-01-01

    Higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) line patterns of an Al 76Si 4Mn 20 quasi- crystalline icosahedral phase (I phase) have been obtained experimentally with a large angular range by connecting a series of conventional convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns. The computer simulated HOLZ line patterns covering the whole orientation triangle of the I phase, which were calculated by using cut and projection method and the simple quasilattice model, show principle agreement with the experimental ones.

  18. Surface circulation patterns at the southeastern Bay of Biscay: new observations from HF radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solabarrieta, L.; Rubio, A.; Medina, R.; Paduan, J. D.; Castanedo, S.; Fontán, A.; Cook, M.; González, M.

    2012-12-01

    A CODAR Seasonde High Frequency (HF) radar network has been operational since the beginning of 2009 for the oceanic region of the Basque Country, Spain (south-eastern Bay of Biscay, Atlantic Ocean). It forms part of the Basque operational data acquisition system, established by the Directorate of Emergency Attention and Meteorology of the Basque Government. It is made up of two antennas, at the capes Higer (43d 23.554' N, 1d 47.745' W) and Matxitxako (43d 7.350' N, 2d 45.163' W), emitting at 4.525 MHz frequency and 30 kHz bandwidth. This system provides hourly surface currents with 5.12 km spatial resolution, covering 10,000 km2. Space- and time-covering measurements have been available in the study area since 2009. The data contribute considerably to the study of surface current patterns and the main physical processes in the area. Additional applications relate to security of navigation, maritime rescue, validation and improvement of numerical models, etc. For comparison with other validation studies and to obtain an estimate of the performance of the Basque system, statistical and spectral analysis of the surface currents obtained through the HF radar and different in-situ platforms have been conducted. The analyses show values of comparison between the different measuring systems consistent with those done by other authors (Paduan and Rosenfeld, 1996; Kaplan et al., 2005). The radar is able to reproduce the time evolution of the currents with a reasonable accuracy; likewise, the main three spectral peaks (inertial, semidiurnal and diurnal) are well resolved. In this context, the aim of this work is to show the HF radar ability to measure accurately the surface currents in the south-eastern Bay of Biscay and to study the ocean circulation in the area (figures 1 and 2). Surface current patterns are analysed and described for the period 2009-2011, for different timescales. A clear seasonality at a large-scale has been observed in accordance with previous work

  19. Patterns of fire activity over Indonesia and Malaysia from polar and geostationary satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, Edward J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Prins, Elaine M.; Hoffman, Jay P.; Schmidt, Christopher C.; Miettinen, Jukka I.; Giglio, Louis

    2013-03-01

    Biomass burning patterns over the Maritime Continent of Southeast Asia are examined using a new active fire detection product based on application of the Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) to data from the imagers on the MTSAT geostationary satellites operated by the Japanese space agency JAXA. Data from MTSAT-1R and MTSAT-2 covering 34 months from September 2008 to July 2011 are examined for a study region consisting of Indonesia, Malaysia, and nearby environs. The spatial and temporal distributions of fires detected in the MTSAT WF_ABBA product are described and compared with active fire observations from MODIS MOD14 data. Land cover distributions for the two instruments are examined using a new 250 m land cover product from the National University of Singapore. The two products show broadly similar patterns of fire activity, land cover distribution of fires, and pixel fire radiative power (FRP). However, the MTSAT WF_ABBA data differ from MOD14 in important ways. Relative to MODIS, the MTSAT WF_ABBA product has lower overall detection efficiency, but more fires detected due to more frequent looks, a greater relative fraction of fires in forest and a lower relative fraction of fires in open areas, and significantly higher single-pixel retrieved FRP. The differences in land cover distribution and FRP between the MTSAT and MODIS products are shown to be qualitatively consistent with expectations based on pixel size and diurnal sampling. The MTSAT WF_ABBA data are used to calculate coverage-corrected diurnal cycles of fire for different regions within the study area. These diurnal cycles are preliminary but demonstrate that the fraction of diurnal fire activity sampled by the two MODIS sensors varies significantly by region and vegetation type. Based on the results from comparison of the two fire products, a series of steps is outlined to account for some of the systematic biases in each of these satellite products in order to produce a

  20. An "Andesitic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source legions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from andesitic rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  1. An "Andestic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source regions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from "andesitic" rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  2. A comparison of multiple indicator kriging and area-to-point Poisson kriging for mapping patterns of herbivore species abundance in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, Ruth; Goovaerts, Pierre; Smit, Izak P.J.; Ingram, Ben R.

    2015-01-01

    Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa, provides protected habitats for the unique animals of the African savannah. For the past 40 years, annual aerial surveys of herbivores have been conducted to aid management decisions based on (1) the spatial distribution of species throughout the park and (2) total species populations in a year. The surveys are extremely time consuming and costly. For many years, the whole park was surveyed, but in 1998 a transect survey approach was adopted. This is cheaper and less time consuming but leaves gaps in the data spatially. Also the distance method currently employed by the park only gives estimates of total species populations but not their spatial distribution. We compare the ability of multiple indicator kriging and area-to-point Poisson kriging to accurately map species distribution in the park. A leave-one-out cross-validation approach indicates that multiple indicator kriging makes poor estimates of the number of animals, particularly the few large counts, as the indicator variograms for such high thresholds are pure nugget. Poisson kriging was applied to the prediction of two types of abundance data: spatial density and proportion of a given species. Both Poisson approaches had standardized mean absolute errors (St. MAEs) of animal counts at least an order of magnitude lower than multiple indicator kriging. The spatial density, Poisson approach (1), gave the lowest St. MAEs for the most abundant species and the proportion, Poisson approach (2), did for the least abundant species. Incorporating environmental data into Poisson approach (2) further reduced St. MAEs. PMID:25729318

  3. Microplastic particles in sediments of Lagoon of Venice, Italy: First observations on occurrence, spatial patterns and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, A.; Boldrin, A.; Guerriero, P.; Moschino, V.; Rella, R.; Sturaro, A.; Da Ros, L.

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve knowledge of the identification, distribution and abundances of microplastic particles of 1 mm or less (S-MPPs) in the coastal area of the Mediterranean region, a preliminary monitoring survey was carried out in a transitional environment along the north-eastern Italian coasts, the Lagoon of Venice. S-MPPs were evaluated in sediments collected from 10 sites chosen in shallow areas variously affected by natural conditions and anthropogenic influences (i.e., landward stations influenced by freshwater inputs, seaward areas near sea inlets, and sites influenced by the presence of aquaculture farms, industry and city centers). S-MPPs, extracted from bulk sediments by density separation, were counted and identified by Fourier-Transform Infrared Micro-spectroscopy (μFT-IR). The μFT-IR process included automatic surface chemical mapping and references to an infrared library database to identify the compositional spectra of particles. S-MPPs were recovered from all samples - a fact which emphasizes their extensive distribution throughout the Lagoon. Total abundances varied from 2175 to 672 S-MPPs kg-1 d.w., higher concentrations generally being observed in landward sites. Of the ten polymer types identified, the most abundant, accounting for more than 82% of total S-MPPs, were polyethylene and polypropylene. The most frequent size (93% of observed microplastics) was in the range 30-500 μm. Total S-MPP values were significantly correlated with the finer sediment fraction and with the metal pollution index.

  4. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli. PMID:27580040

  5. Patterns and outcomes of traumatic neck injuries: A population-based observational study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Mathew, Sharon; Khawar, Mahwish; Asim, Mohammad; Abdelrahman, Husham; Peralta, Ruben; Parchani, Ashok; Zarour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to analyze the pattern and outcome of traumatic neck injury (TNI) in a small population. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of all TNI patients who were admitted to the trauma center between 2008 and 2012. Patients’ demographics, details of TNI, associated injuries, hospital course, and mortality were analyzed. Results: A total of 51 TNI cases were included revealing an overall incidence of 0.61/100,000 population. The mean age was 31 ± 9 years. The most frequent mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crash (29.4%) followed by stab (17.6%), machinery injury (17.6%), fall (9.8%), and assault (7.8%). Larynx, thyroid gland, trachea, jugular veins, and carotid were the commonly injured structures. The majority of cases had Zone II TNI whereas isolated injury was observed in 11 cases. TNI were mainly presented with active bleeding (38%), hypovolemic shock (16%) and respiratory distress (16%). Surgical interventions mainly included simple repair and closure (53%), vein ligation (12%), repair of major arteries (4%), tracheal repair (6%), larynx and hypopharynx repair (4%), and repair of parotid gland (2%). Neck exploration was performed in 88%, and emergency tracheostomy was required in 18% of cases. Overall mortality rate was 11.8%, of which five patients had associated injuries, and one had isolated TNI. Conclusion: TNI are not frequent but represent an alarming serious entity in Qatar. Patients with persistent signs of major injuries should undergo early operative interventions. Moreover, the effective injury prevention program should be developed to minimize these preventable injuries in the majority of cases. PMID:26229299

  6. Observations and modeling of the coupled latitude-altitude patterns of equatorial plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Zesta, Eftyhia; Shodhan, Sheela; Sultan, Peter J.; Doe, Richard; Sahai, Yogeshwar; Baumgardner, Jeffrey

    2005-09-01

    The equatorial ionosphere is host to the most dramatic and enigmatic plasma instability mechanism in the geospace environment. Equatorial spread F (ESF) was discovered in early ionosonde measurements and interpreted theoretically using Rayleigh-Taylor theory. Subsequent diagnostic and modeling advances have improved substantially our understanding of ESF onset and evolution and its associated effects on the ionosphere throughout the low-latitude domain. The degree to which ESF mechanisms penetrate into the lower midlatitudes is a topic of current study, a reverse of the familiar concept of high-to-low latitude coupling for space weather phenomena. Optical diagnostic systems, first ground based and now space based, reveal the presence of ESF structures via images of airglow depletions that are aligned in the approximately north-south direction spanning the geomagnetic equator. Ground-based all-sky camera systems used to capture the two-dimensional horizontal patterns of airglow depletions are the main source of observations showing that ESF processes intrude to midlatitudes in the L ˜ 1.5 domain. In this paper we review the process of mapping airglow depletions along geomagnetic field lines to the equatorial plane, hence defining the maximum apex heights achieved. A case study comparison of simultaneous radar backscatter data from Kwajalein with optical data from Wake Island, sites that share common magnetic meridians in the Pacific section, confirms the utility of the approach and its applicability to sites at other longitudes. Modeling studies based on buoyancy arguments using flux tube-integrated mean density values versus L shell apex heights show that instability-induced plasma depletions starting at F layer bottomside heights easily reach altitudes above 2000 km in the equatorial plane, implying that ESF intrusions to lower midlatitudes should be a relatively frequent occurrence.

  7. OH Column Abundance Apparent Response to Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, C. R.; Minschwaner, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    The 33-year series of high spectral resolution measurements of absorption of sunlight by OH at 308 nm has exhibited temporary decreases of column abundances in 1986, 1997, and 2008 near the times of minimum solar activity. These observations and analyses are of significance as they encompass three complete solar cycles for comparison. During solar cycle 23, the annual average abundances increased approximately 20% from the minimum abundance in 1997 to high-sun enhanced values in 2000-2006, then dropped approximately 15% in 2008. The abundances exhibited a pronounced reduction at solar minimum in August-October 2008, similar to that seen in fall 1986 and fall 1997. The average morning abundances on those occasions were 13% smaller than the 1980-88 corresponding average, about 0.9 x 1013 cm-2, with minimum values broadly consistent with model results. In contrast, high-sun OH abundances observed during periods of solar maximum are approximately 33% larger than modeled abundances. This discrepancy cannot be explained by reasonable adjustments of reaction rates or modeled constituent concentrations in the stratosphere or mesosphere. However, the observed responses to a tropopause fold event in 1988 and to the Pinatubo aerosol in 1991 do suggest an important contribution to the total OH column from the lower stratosphere. In addition to the apparent variations with solar activity, this OH column database contains a number of other effects such as diurnal and seasonal patterns, and geographic differences between observations from Colorado, Florida, Alaska, Micronesia, New Zealand, and New Mexico.

  8. Natural history of Ctenus medius Keyserling, 1891 (Araneae, Ctenidae) I: observations on habitats and the development of chromatic patterns.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C E; Ramos, E F; Gouvêa, E; do Carmo-Silva, M; Costa, J

    2000-08-01

    Ctenus medius Keyserling, 1891 is a common species in several spots of Mata Atlântica, however there is a great lack of studies in all aspects of its natural history. This work aims to elucidate aspects of ecotope preference compared to large spiders, and to provide data on the development of chromatic patterns during its life cycle. The observations on the behavior of C. medius were done in the campus of Centro Universitário de Barra Mansa (UBM) by means of observations and nocturnal collections using cap lamps. For observations on the development of chromatic patterns, spiderlings raised in laboratory, hatched from an oviposition of a female from campus of UBM, and others spiderlings collected in field were used. The field observations indicate that: C. medius seems to prefer ecotopes characterized by dense shrub vegetation or herbal undergrowth; Lycosa erythrognatha and L. nordeskioldii seems to prefer open sites; Phoneutria nigriventer seems to prefer shrub vegetation and anthropogenic ecotopes as rubbish hills; Ancylometes sp. seems to prefer ecotopes near streams. Concerning chromatic patterns, it was observed that males and females show well distinct patterns during the last two instars, allowing distinction by sex without the use of a microscope. Through chromatic patterns it was also possible to draw a distinction between C. medius and C. ornatus longer that 3 mm cephalothorax width. 69 specimens of C. medius (males and females) collected in the campus of UBM did not show a striking polymorphism in chromatic pattern, but one among 7 adult females collected in National Park of Itatiaia, showed a distinct chromatic pattern.

  9. Too hot to trot? evaluating the effects of wildfire on patterns of occupancy and abundance for a climate-sensitive habitat-specialist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varner, Johanna; Lambert, Mallory S.; Horns, Joshua J.; Laverty, Sean; Dizney, Laurie; Beever, Erik; Dearing, M. Denise

    2015-01-01

    Wildfires are increasing in frequency and severity as a result of climate change in many ecosystems; however, effects of altered disturbance regimes on wildlife remain poorly quantified. Here, we leverage an unexpected opportunity to investigate how fire affects the occupancy and abundance of a climate-sensitive habitat specialist, the American pika (Ochotona princeps). We determine the effects of a fire on microclimates within talus and explore habitat factors promoting persistence and abundance in fire-affected habitat. During the fire, temperatures in talus interstices remained below 19°C, suggesting that animals could have survived in situ. Within 2 years, pikas were widely distributed throughout burned areas and did not appear to be physiologically stressed at severely burned sites. Furthermore, pika densities were better predicted by topographic variables known to affect this species than by metrics of fire severity. This widespread distribution may reflect quick vegetation recovery and the fact that the fire did not alter the talus microclimates in the following years. Together, these results highlight the value of talus as a thermal refuge for small animals during and after fire. They also underscore the importance of further study in individual species’ responses to typical and altered disturbance regimes.

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Signaling during Gastrulation Negatively Modulates the Abundance of MicroRNAs That Regulate Proteins Required for Cell Migration and Embryo Patterning*

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander S.; Saarela, Aleksi V.; Yatskievych, Tatiana A.; Antin, Parker B.

    2012-01-01

    FGF signaling plays a pivotal role in regulating cell movements and lineage induction during gastrulation. Here we identify 44 microRNAs that are expressed in the primitive streak region of gastrula stage chicken embryos. We show that the primary effect of FGF signaling on microRNA abundance is to negatively regulate the levels of miR-let-7b, -9, -19b, -107, -130b, and -218. LIN28B inhibits microRNA processing and is positively regulated by FGF signaling. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments show that LIN28B negatively regulates the expression of miR-19b, -130b, and let-7b, whereas negative modulation of miR-9, -107, and -218 appears to be independent of LIN28B function. Predicted mRNA targets of the FGF-regulated microRNAs are over-represented in serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase receptors, including ACVR1, ACVR2B, PDGFRA, TGFBR1, and TGFBR3. Luciferase assays show that these and other candidates are targeted by FGF-regulated microRNAs. PDGFRA, a receptor whose activity is required for cell migration through the primitive streak, is a target of miR-130b and -218 in vivo. These results identify a novel mechanism by which FGF signaling regulates gene expression by negatively modulating microRNA abundance through both LIN28B-dependent and LIN28B-independent pathways. PMID:22995917

  11. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  12. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  13. Changes in intrapopulation resource use patterns of an endangered raptor in response to a disease-mediated crash in prey abundance.

    PubMed

    Moleón, Marcos; Sebastián-González, Esther; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Real, Joan; Pires, Mathias M; Gil-Sánchez, José M; Bautista, Jesús; Palma, Luís; Bayle, Patrick; Guimarães, Paulo R; Beja, Pedro

    2012-11-01

    1. A long-standing question in ecology is how natural populations respond to a changing environment. Emergent optimal foraging theory-based models for individual variation go beyond the population level and predict how its individuals would respond to disturbances that produce changes in resource availability. 2. Evaluating variations in resource use patterns at the intrapopulation level in wild populations under changing environmental conditions would allow to further advance in the research on foraging ecology and evolution by gaining a better idea of the underlying mechanisms explaining trophic diversity. 3. In this study, we use a large spatio-temporal scale data set (western continental Europe, 1968-2006) on the diet of Bonelli's Eagle Aquila fasciata breeding pairs to analyse the predator trophic responses at the intrapopulation level to a prey population crash. In particular, we borrow metrics from studies on network structure and intrapopulation variation to understand how an emerging infectious disease [the rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD)] that caused the density of the eagle's primary prey (rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus) to dramatically drop across Europe impacted on resource use patterns of this endangered raptor. 4. Following the major RHD outbreak, substantial changes in Bonelli's Eagle's diet diversity and organisation patterns at the intrapopulation level took place. Dietary variation among breeding pairs was larger after than before the outbreak. Before RHD, there were no clusters of pairs with similar diets, but significant clustering emerged after RHD. Moreover, diets at the pair level presented a nested pattern before RHD, but not after. 5. Here, we reveal how intrapopulation patterns of resource use can quantitatively and qualitatively vary, given drastic changes in resource availability. 6. For the first time, we show that a pathogen of a prey species can indirectly impact the intrapopulation patterns of resource use of an endangered predator.

  14. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  15. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; DenHartog, E. A.; Collier, Jason; Dodge, Homer L.

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy the progenitors of the halo stars responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

  16. The Hamburg/ESO R-process Enhanced Star survey (HERES). IX. Constraining pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio from observations of r-II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.; Christlieb, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The oldest stars born before the onset of the main s-process are expected to have a pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio. Aims: We revised barium and europium abundances of selected very metal-poor (VMP) and strongly r-process enhanced (r-II) stars to evaluate an empirical r-process Ba/Eu ratio. Methods: Our calculations were based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ba ii and Eu ii in the classical 1D MARCS model atmospheres. Homogeneous stellar abundances were determined from the Ba ii subordinate and resonance lines by applying a common Ba isotope mixture. We used high-quality VLT/UVES spectra and observational material from the literature. Results: For most investigated stars, NLTE leads to a lower Ba, but a higher Eu abundance. The resulting elemental ratio of the NLTE abundances amounts to, on average, log(Ba/Eu) = 0.78±0.06. This is a new constraint to pure r-process production of Ba and Eu. The obtained Ba/Eu abundance ratio of the r-II stars supports the corresponding solar system r-process ratio as predicted by recent Galactic chemical evolution calculations of Bisterzo, Travaglio, Gallino, Wiescher, and Käppeler. We present the NLTE abundance corrections for the Ba ii and Eu ii lines in the grid of VMP model atmospheres. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal numbers 170.D-0010, and 280.D-5011).Tables 7 and 8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. CO-SPATIAL LONG-SLIT UV/OPTIC AL SPECTRA OF 10 GALACTIC PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH HST/STIS. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE OBSERVATIONS, GLOBAL EMISSION-LINE MEASUREMENTS, AND CNO ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Balick, Bruce; Corradi, Romano L. M.

    2015-04-10

    We present observations and initial analysis from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 19 program using STIS to obtain the first co-spatial, UV–optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNs). Our primary objective was to measure the critical emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and spatial resolution over the wavelength range 1150–10270 Å, with the ultimate goal of quantifying the production of these elements in low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our sample was selected from PNs with a near-solar metallicity, but spanning a broad range in N/O based on published ground-based and IUE spectra. This study, the first of a series, concentrates on the observations and emission-line measurements obtained by integrating along the entire spatial extent of the slit. We derived ionic and total elemental abundances for the seven PNs with the strongest UV line detections (IC 2165, IC 3568, NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, and NGC 7662). We compare these new results with other recent studies of the nebulae and discuss the relative merits of deriving the total elemental abundances of C, N, and O using ionization correction factors (ICFs) versus summed abundances. For the seven PNs with the best UV line detections, we conclude that summed abundances from direct diagnostics of ions with measurable UV lines give the most accurate values for the total elemental abundances of C and N (although ICF abundances often produced good results for C). In some cases where significant discrepancies exist between our abundances and those from other studies, we show that the differences can often be attributed to their use of fluxes that are not co-spatial. Finally, we examined C/O and N/O versus O/H and He/H in well-observed Galactic, LMC, and SMC PNs and found that highly accurate abundances are essential for properly inferring elemental yields from their progenitor stars. Future papers will discuss photoionization modeling of

  18. Relating underrepresented genomic DNA patterns and tiRNAs: the rule behind the observation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the central problems of post-genomic biology is the understanding of regulatory network of genes. Traditionally the problem is approached from the protein-DNA interaction perspective. In recent years various types of noncoding RNAs appeared on the scene as new potent players of the game. The exact role of these molecules in gene expression control is mostly unknown at present, while their importance is generally recognized. Results The Human and Mouse genomes have been screened with a statistical model for sequence patterns underrepresented in these genomes, and a subset of motifs, named spanions, has been identified. The common portion of the motif lists of the two species is 75% indicating evolutionary conservation of this feature. These motifs are arranged in clusters at close proximity of distinct genetic landmarks: 5' ends of genes, exon side of the exon/intron junctions and 5' ends of 3' UTRs. The length of the clusters is typically in the 20 to 25 bases range. The findings are in agreement with the known C/G bias of promoter regions while access much more sequential information than the simple composition based model. In the Human genome the recently reported transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) are typically transcribed from these spanion clusters according to the presented results. The spanion clusters account for 70% of the published tiRNAs. Apparently, the model access the common statistical feature of this new and mostly uncharacterized non-coding RNA class and, in this way, supports the experimental observations with theoretical background. Conclusions The presented results seem to support the emerging model of the RNA-driven eukaryotic gene expression control. Beyond that, the model detects spanion clusters at genetic positions where no tiRNA counterpart was considered and reported. The GO-term analysis of genes with high concentration of spanion clusters in their promoter proximal region indicates involvement in gene regulatory

  19. Dietary patterns are associated with plasma F2-isoprostanes in an observational cohort study of adults

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katie A.; Sijtsma, Femke P.C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Van Horn, Linda; Shikany, James M.; Gross, Myron D.; Mursu, Jaakko; Traber, Maret G.; Jacobs, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Associations between individual foods or nutrients and oxidative markers have been reported. Comprehensive measures of food intake may be uniquely informative, given the complexity of oxidative systems and the possibility for antioxidant synergies. We quantified associations over a 20 y history between 3 food-based dietary patterns, summary measures of whole diet, and a plasma biomarker of lipid peroxidation, F2-isoprostanes in a cohort of Americans, aged 18–30 at year 0 (1985–86). We assessed diet at years 0, 7, and 20 through a detailed history of past-month food consumption and supplement use, and measured plasma F2-isoprostanes at years 15 and 20. We created 3 different dietary patterns: 1) a priori (“a priori diet quality score”) based on hypothesized healthy foods, 2) an empirical pattern reflecting high fruit and vegetable intake (“fruit-veg”), and 3) an empirical pattern reflecting high meat intake (“meat”). We used linear regression to estimate associations between each dietary pattern and plasma F2-isoprostanes cross-sectionally (at year 20, n=2,736) and prospectively (year 0/7 average diet and year 15/20 average F2-isoprostanes, n=2,718), adjusting for age, sex, race, total energy intake, education, smoking, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, physical activity, and supplement use. In multivariable-adjusted cross-sectional analysis, the a priori diet quality score and the fruit-veg diet pattern were negatively, and the meat pattern positively, associated with F2-isoprostanes (all p-values<0.001). These associations remained statistically significant in prospective analysis. Our findings suggest that a long-term adherence to a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in red meat may decrease lipid peroxidation. PMID:22982044

  20. Preliminary observations on the ability of hyperspectral imaging to provide detection and visualization of bloodstain patterns on black fabrics.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Rebecca L; Kish, Paul E; Plese, Cara A

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of bloodstain patterns can assist investigators in understanding the circumstances surrounding a violent crime. Bloodstains are routinely subjected to pattern analysis, which is inherently dependent upon the ability of the examiner to locate and visualize bloodstain patterns on items of evidence. Often, the ability to properly visualize bloodstain patterns is challenging, especially when the stain patterns occur on dark and/or patterned substrates. In this study, preliminary research was performed to better understand how near-infrared reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) could be used to observe bloodstain patterns on commonly encountered black fabrics. The ability of HSI to visualize latent bloodstains on several commonly encountered substrates is demonstrated. The images acquired through HSI are of sufficient quality to allow for differentiation between stains produced from an impact mechanism or a transfer mechanism. This study also serves as a proof of concept in the differentiation of multiple staining materials. Because of its ability to generate spectral data, the data provide a preliminary separation of stains where more than one type of stain existed. PMID:22563710

  1. Biogeographic patterns in below-ground diversity in New York City's Central Park are similar to those observed globally.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kelly S; Leff, Jonathan W; Barberán, Albert; Bates, Scott Thomas; Betley, Jason; Crowther, Thomas W; Kelly, Eugene F; Oldfield, Emily E; Shaw, E Ashley; Steenbock, Christopher; Bradford, Mark A; Wall, Diana H; Fierer, Noah

    2014-11-22

    Soil biota play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, however, compared to our knowledge of above-ground plant and animal diversity, the biodiversity found in soils remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we present an assessment of soil biodiversity and biogeographic patterns across Central Park in New York City that spanned all three domains of life, demonstrating that even an urban, managed system harbours large amounts of undescribed soil biodiversity. Despite high variability across the Park, below-ground diversity patterns were predictable based on soil characteristics, with prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities exhibiting overlapping biogeographic patterns. Further, Central Park soils harboured nearly as many distinct soil microbial phylotypes and types of soil communities as we found in biomes across the globe (including arctic, tropical and desert soils). This integrated cross-domain investigation highlights that the amount and patterning of novel and uncharacterized diversity at a single urban location matches that observed across natural ecosystems spanning multiple biomes and continents.

  2. Light-induced patterning of azopolymer films: observation of Wood's anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christophe; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Celine; Rocha, Licinio; Raimond, Paul; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2004-08-01

    It is now well established that, in azo-dye polymers repeated trans-cis-trans isomerization cycles induces molecular reorientation leading to quasi-permanent birefringence and dichroism. More recently, it has been shown that irradiation of an azo-polymer thin film with an interference pattern between polarized laser beams can lead to a direct and reversible topographic modification of the polymer film surface resulting in the induction of surface relief gratings in conjunction with the light interference pattern. Here, we provide experimental evidence of an original spontaneous light-assisted submicrometer patterning process. We show that uniform irradiation of an azo-dye polymer using a single collimated laser beam with normal incidence leads to the formation of organized hexagonal patterns. These structures geometry depends on the laser beam polarization : their period is about the irradiation wavelength and their modulation amplitude can reach one hundred nanometers. Possible origin of such process is discussed. Although showing similar features with models or experiments already described in the literature, the origin of light-assisted spontaneous patterning in azo-polymers is still unclear and further complementary investigations are needed. Indeed, accurate determination of the relevant parameters at the origin of such process should enable a full control of the process together with further possible generation of more complex structures.

  3. Task 1, Fractal characteristics of drainage patterns observed in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge and Plateau provinces

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Dominic, J.; Halverson, J.

    1996-04-10

    Drainage patterns observed in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge and Plateau provinces exhibit distinctly different patterns. The patterns appear to be controlled by varying influences of local structural and lithologic variability. Drainage patterns in the Valley and Ridge study area can be classified as a combination of dendritic and trellis arrangements. The patterns vary over short distances in both the strike and dip directions. In the Granny Creek area of the Appalachian Plateau drainage patterns are predominantly dendritic. The possibility that these drainage patterns have fractal characteristics was evaluated by box-counting. Results obtained from box counting do not yield a well defined fractal regime in either areas. In the Valley and Ridge a space-filling, or random regime (D=2) is observed for boxes with side-lengths of 300 meters and greater. Below 300 meters, large changes in D occur between consecutively smaller box sizes. From side lengths of 300 to 150m, 150 to 75m, and 75 to 38m, D is measured at 1.77, 1.39, and 1.08 respectively. For box sizes less than 38m the fractal dimension is 1 or less. While the l0g-log response of the box counting data is nonlinear and does not define a fractal regime, the curves offer the possibility of characterizing non-fractal patterns. The rate at which D drops outside the random regime correlates to drainage density. D in areas with a smaller density of drainage segments fell toward saturation (D=1) more abruptly. The break-away point from the random regime and the transition to the saturated regime may provide useful information about the relative lengths of stream segments.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen abundance variations in globular cluster red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2008-06-01

    This dissertation describes investigations into two of the persistent questions of elemental abundances in Galactic globular clusters: the phenomenon of deep mixing, observed through the progressive depletion of surface carbon abundance as stars evolve along the red giant branch, and abundance bimodality, a phenomenon observed only in globular clusters, in which a subset of stars in a given globular cluster have a distinctive pattern of elemental enhancements and depletions relative to the Solar pattern. The first chapter gives an introduction to the history of globular cluster abundance studies, with particular focus on low-resolution spectroscopy. For both deep mixing and abundance bimodality, the leading theoretical models and the data which support and challenge them are laid out. Each section ends with a description of presently-unanswered questions; these are the motivation for the various projects contained in this dissertation. The second chapter describes the use of molecular handstrengths for determining elemental abundances from low-resolution spectra, and introduces a new CH bandstrength index that is designed to be sensitive to carbon abundance and insensitive to nitrogen abundance in Pop. II red giants over a wide range of metallicity. Various CH indices defined elsewhere in the literature are also discussed, and are shown to have comparable accuracy to the new index only over a limited range of stellar properties. Carbon abundances determined using the new CH index are compared to literature abundances for a few stars, and general concordance with published abundances is found. The third chapter contains a large-scale application of the new CH index: a survey of present-day carbon abundances and calculated carbon depletion rates in bright red giants belonging to eleven Galactic globular clusters spanning the full metallicity range of halo globular clusters. Targets were selected with similar evolutionary states, were observed with one instrument on

  5. Recovery patterns, histological observations and genetic integrity in Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using droplet vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A droplet-vitrification procedure is described for cryopreservation of Malus shoot tips. Survival patterns, recovery types, histological observations, and genetic integrity were compared for Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using this droplet-vitrification procedure and an encapsulation-dehydration pr...

  6. Importance of time and place: patterns in abundance of Symbiodinium clades A and B in the tropical sea anemone Condylactis gigantea.

    PubMed

    Venn, A A; Loram, J E; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G; Joyce, D A; Douglas, A E

    2008-12-01

    The capacity of some corals and other cnidarians to form symbioses with multiple algae (Symbiodinium) is a candidate route by which these symbioses tolerate variable environmental conditions. On Bermuda, the coral reef dwelling anemone Condylactis gigantea bears Symbiodinium of clades A and B. At thermally variable inshore and nearshore sites, clade A predominates (as sole symbiont or in mixed infection with clade B), whereas animals at offshore sites with more uniform temperatures bear only clade B or mixed infections. Individual animals at one nearshore site monitored over a year by sampling tentacles showed increased prevalence of clade A in March-November, when sea waters were warm (average 26 degrees C), and increased clade B in November-March when cool waters prevailed (average 18.5 degrees C). In laboratory analyses of excised tentacles, the symbiosis with clade B, but not clade A, bleached at elevated temperature (32 degrees C), suggesting that thermal tolerance may contribute to the higher prevalence of clade A at inshore/nearshore sites and in the summer. The temporal changes in the algal complement were not accompanied by bleaching, and Symbiodinium density fluctuated in hosts with stable Symbiodinium composition but not in hosts with variable composition. This suggests that changes in the relative abundance of Symbiodinium clades do not require bleaching and may even protect the symbiosis from large fluctuations in algal density. PMID:19098145

  7. Observations of different patterns of dysplasia in barretts esophagus - a first step to harmonize grading.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Michael; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Riddell, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed a set of cases of early neoplasia (low grade / high grade dysplasia / IEN and mucosal carcinoma) to reach better defined criteria for subtypes of dysplasia/differentiation in the columnar lined (Barretts) esophagus. We discuss criteria that we categorized for recognizing low and high-grade dysplasia and mucosal carcinoma in patterns of neoplasia that we regarded as intestinal, gastric and mixed.

  8. Characteristics of atmospheric circulation patterns associated with extreme temperatures over North America in observations and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loikith, Paul C.

    associated with extreme temperature days in most places. Model-simulated patterns tend to resemble observed patterns better in the winter than the summer and at 500 hPa than at the surface. There is substantial variability among the suite of models analyzed and most models simulate circulation patterns more realistically away from influential features such as large bodies of water and complex topography.

  9. Experimental observation of multistability and dynamic attractors in silicon central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Le; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We report on the multistability of chaotic networks of silicon neurons and demonstrate how spatiotemporal sequences of voltage oscillations are selected with timed current stimuli. A three neuron central pattern generator was built by interconnecting Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with mutually inhibitory links mimicking gap junctions. By systematically varying the timing of current stimuli applied to individual neurons, we generate the phase lag maps of neuronal oscillators and study their dependence on the network connectivity. We identify up to six attractors consisting of triphasic sequences of unevenly spaced pulses propagating clockwise and anticlockwise. While confirming theoretical predictions, our experiments reveal more complex oscillatory patterns shaped by the ratio of the pulse width to the oscillation period. Our work contributes to validating the command neuron hypothesis.

  10. What Use Patterns Were Observed for PEV Drivers at Publicly Accessible AC Level 2 EVSE Sites?

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward

    2015-12-01

    The EV Project deployed over 4,000 ACL2 EVSE for drivers to charge their plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) when away-from-home. The vast majority of these EVSE stations were installed to be available to all PEV drivers at publicly accessible locations. Some were also deployed for use at workplaces and fleets. This paper examines only the use patterns of PEV drivers using the EVSE intended to be publicly accessible.

  11. Sleeping patterns of Afghan unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents: a large observational study.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Israel; Montgomery, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) have experienced multiple traumas and are a high-risk group for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The effects of trauma are known to be associated with sleep problems; indeed sleeping problems are core features of PTSD. However, there has been no systematic research examining the sleep of this high risk group of children. This study presents the first evidence on the sleeping patterns of Afghan UASC living in the UK. A total of 222 male Afghan children, aged 13-18, were interviewed using validated self-report questionnaires measuring sleeping patterns and PTSD. Overall, UASC patterns for bed time and rise time appear acculturated to the country of asylum. Mean UASC sleep onset latency scores were approximately 20 minutes greater compared with normative scores, which may be a reflection of UASC pre-migration and post-migration experiences. As expected, UASC who screened above the clinical cut-off for PTSD reported significantly greater sleep onset latency, increased nightmares, and less total sleep time compared to the non-PTSD group. The results may be of particular interest to clinicians given that, compared to screening for PTSD, screening for sleep problems may be a less culturally disputed form of initial assessment indicating distress in UASC. Similarly, the field of UASC and refugee child interventions is largely focused on trauma, yet sleep may provide a novel avenue for equally or more effective treatment. PMID:23457517

  12. Observed Patterns of Teacher-Pupil Classroom Behavior as Predicators of Student Growth in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Homer; Lorentz, Jeffrey L.

    This study examined the relationship between observed classroom behavior (teacher-pupil interactions) and reading achievement. An elementary school reading teacher and six students with different coping styles were observed six times in each of 41 classrooms during the school year. Pretest and posttest reading scores, a measure for socioeconomic…

  13. Why abundant tropical tree species are phylogenetically old

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Anping; Fang, Jingyun; Pacala, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Neutral models of species diversity predict patterns of abundance for communities in which all individuals are ecologically equivalent. These models were originally developed for Panamanian trees and successfully reproduce observed distributions of abundance. Neutral models also make macroevolutionary predictions that have rarely been evaluated or tested. Here we show that neutral models predict a humped or flat relationship between species age and population size. In contrast, ages and abundances of tree species in the Panamanian Canal watershed are found to be positively correlated, which falsifies the models. Speciation rates vary among phylogenetic lineages and are partially heritable from mother to daughter species. Variable speciation rates in an otherwise neutral model lead to a demographic advantage for species with low speciation rate. This demographic advantage results in a positive correlation between species age and abundance, as found in the Panamanian tropical forest community. PMID:24043767

  14. Why abundant tropical tree species are phylogenetically old.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Anping; Fang, Jingyun; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    Neutral models of species diversity predict patterns of abundance for communities in which all individuals are ecologically equivalent. These models were originally developed for Panamanian trees and successfully reproduce observed distributions of abundance. Neutral models also make macroevolutionary predictions that have rarely been evaluated or tested. Here we show that neutral models predict a humped or flat relationship between species age and population size. In contrast, ages and abundances of tree species in the Panamanian Canal watershed are found to be positively correlated, which falsifies the models. Speciation rates vary among phylogenetic lineages and are partially heritable from mother to daughter species. Variable speciation rates in an otherwise neutral model lead to a demographic advantage for species with low speciation rate. This demographic advantage results in a positive correlation between species age and abundance, as found in the Panamanian tropical forest community. PMID:24043767

  15. Electronic properties and van Hove singularities of observed moiré patterns of dislocated graphene on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulseren, Oguz; Sen, H. Sener; Yildiz, Dilek; Gurlu, Oguzhan

    2015-03-01

    Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) can be described as stacked graphene layers. Due the weak van der Waals interaction between the layers, topmost layer of HOPG can be rotated or shifted by chemical or mechanical means. With rotation of the topmost layer, super periodic structures called as moiré patterns are formed. In this work, moiré patterns on HOPG surfaces due to dislocated graphene layers were studied. A simple geometric investigation of the atomic structure of the moiré patterns revealed that different atomic moiré periodicities result in similar geometric moiré periods. Our calculations showed that the band structure of moiré patterns even though exhibits the fingerprints of those of twisted bilayer graphene system, like the preserved Dirac cone at the K point of moiré Brillouin zone, it has several new emerging features like van Hove singularities and linear or flat bands depending on the moiré periodicity. Our results show that most of the moiré patterns observed on graphene/HOPG system do not have a purely electronic or structural origin, but both. Moreover, our results show that van Hove singularities in these systems with different twist angles have different origins in their respective band structure. e-mail: gulseren@fen.bilkent.edu.tr

  16. Satellite observations of surface temperature patterns induced by synoptic circulation over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Itamar; Dayan, Uri

    2013-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) controls most physical and biological processes on Earth. Knowledge of the LST at high spatial resolution enables representation of different climate regimes. The main factors controlling LST are the seasonal and diurnal cycles, land cover, cloud cover, and atmospheric processes at several scales. Lensky and Dayan analyzed atmospheric processes at the topoclimatic scale, and the mesoscale (Lensky and Dayan 2011, 2012). Here we will demonstrate an analysis of the spatial distribution of LST anomaly as affected by typical synoptic circulation patterns over the Eastern Mediterranean (EM). LST anomaly is defined as the difference between daily and climatological LST. Using LST anomaly reduces the effects of land cover and the seasonal and diurnal cycles, enabling a better detection of surface temperature patterns induced by synoptic circulation. In this study we used all available 2000-2012 NASA daily MODIS LST data over the EM, together with NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data of SLP, surface winds and Omega (at 700hPa). We will present two frequent synoptic circulation patterns as classified by Levy and Dayan (2008) to demonstrate the LST patterns induced by synoptic circulation over the EM. The first is the "Red Sea Trough" (RST) with eastern axis, which is an extension of a low surface pressure from a tropical depression toward the Red Sea, penetrating up north as far as Turkey. It migrates from south to north and mostly frequent during the autumn. The axis of the RST separates distinctively between regions of positive (warm) anomalies over Turkey and regions of negative anomalies (cold) over Egypt induced by the wind flow from both sides of the axis. The second synoptic circulation pattern is "shallow Cyprus low to the north", which is a disturbance of the polar front extending southward. This synoptic system some times migrates over the Mediterranean eastward toward the EM during the winter season. The strong northwesterly flow featuring the

  17. Observation of the waveguide resonance in a periodically patterned high refractive index broadband antireflection coating.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, O; Wilbrandt, S; Chen, X; Schlegel, R; Coriand, L; Duparré, A; Zeitner, U; Benkenstein, T; Wächter, C

    2014-05-10

    Grating waveguide structures have been prepared by the deposition of a high refractive index broadband antireflection coating onto a patterned fused silica substrate. Aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide as well as mixtures thereof have been used as coating materials. Optical reflection measurements combined with atomic force microscopy have been used to characterize the structures. Upon illumination with a TE wave, the best structure shows a narrow reflection peak located at 633 nm at an incidence angle of about 17°. The peak reflectance of that sample accounts for more than 89%. Off-resonance interference structures appear strongly suppressed in the spectrum between 450 and 800 nm because of the characteristics of the designed antireflection layer. The structure thus possesses a notch filter spectral characteristic in a broad spectral range. PMID:24922038

  18. Odd-Even Pattern Observed in Polyaniline/(Au0 – Au8) Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jonke, Alex P.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Janata, Jiri

    2012-01-12

    Theoretically predicted effect of odd-even pattern of electron pairing on behavior of gold clusters in polyaniline/AuN (N = 0 to 8) has been confirmed experimentally. In these composites the atomic Au clusters with even number of atoms exhibit higher catalytic activity for electrochemical oxidation of n-propanol in 1 M NaOH than the odd-number atoms clusters. Also, infrared spectroscopy shows that even numbered PANI/AuN composites affect the N-H stretching vibration more strongly than the corresponding odd numbered ones. This behavior matches the theoretically predicted variations of HOMO-LUMO gap energy and the stability of the atomic Au clusters. It also agrees with the earlier experimental work in which the UPS spectra of isolated, mass-selected Au clusters have been reported.

  19. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): Global dune distribution and wind pattern observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Fenton, Lori; Titus, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) is complete and now extends from 90°N to 90°S latitude. The recently released south pole (SP) portion (MC-30) of MGD3 adds ∼60,000 km2 of medium to large-size dark dune fields and ∼15,000 km2 of sand deposits and smaller dune fields to the previously released equatorial (EQ, ∼70,000 km2), and north pole (NP, ∼845,000 km2) portions of the database, bringing the global total to ∼975,000 km2. Nearly all NP dunes are part of large sand seas, while the majority of EQ and SP dune fields are individual dune fields located in craters. Despite the differences between Mars and Earth, their dune and dune field morphologies are strikingly similar. Bullseye dune fields, named for their concentric ring pattern, are the exception, possibly owing their distinctive appearance to winds that are unique to the crater environment. Ground-based wind directions are derived from slipface (SF) orientation and dune centroid azimuth (DCA), a measure of the relative location of a dune field inside a crater. SF and DCA often preserve evidence of different wind directions, suggesting the importance of local, topographically influenced winds. In general however, ground-based wind directions are broadly consistent with expected global patterns, such as polar easterlies. Intriguingly, between 40°S and 80°S latitude both SF and DCA preserve their strongest, though different, dominant wind direction, with transport toward the west and east for SF-derived winds and toward the north and west for DCA-derived winds.

  20. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): Global dune distribution and wind pattern observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, R. K.; Fenton, L. K.; Titus, T. N.

    2014-02-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) is complete and now extends from 90°N to 90°S latitude. The recently released south pole (SP) portion (MC-30) of MGD3 adds ˜60,000 km2 of medium to large-size dark dune fields and ˜15,000 km2 of sand deposits and smaller dune fields to the previously released equatorial (EQ, ˜70,000 km2), and north pole (NP, ˜845,000 km2) portions of the database, bringing the global total to ˜975,000 km2. Nearly all NP dunes are part of large sand seas, while the majority of EQ and SP dune fields are individual dune fields located in craters. Despite the differences between Mars and Earth, their dune and dune field morphologies are strikingly similar. Bullseye dune fields, named for their concentric ring pattern, are the exception, possibly owing their distinctive appearance to winds that are unique to the crater environment. Ground-based wind directions are derived from slipface (SF) orientation and dune centroid azimuth (DCA), a measure of the relative location of a dune field inside a crater. SF and DCA often preserve evidence of different wind directions, suggesting the importance of local, topographically influenced winds. In general however, ground-based wind directions are broadly consistent with expected global patterns, such as polar easterlies. Intriguingly, between 40°S and 80°S latitude both SF and DCA preserve their strongest, though different, dominant wind direction, with transport toward the west and east for SF-derived winds and toward the north and west for DCA-derived winds.

  1. Pressure oscillations on the surface of Gale Crater and coincident observations of global circulation patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Kass, D. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Harri, A. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kahanpää, H.; Kahre, M. A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Martín-Torres, J.; Newman, C. E.; Rafkin, S. C.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Peinado, V.; Vasavada, A. R.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The annual cycle of mean diurnal surface pressures observed by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) has shown oscillations after two Southern Hemispheric storms that occurred before the annual pressure maxima and minima of the dusty season (Ls~250 and 330). The oscillations had a period of ~7 sols and were less visible or absent during the dust free seasons (Ls ~ 0). Martian airborne dust alters the atmosphere's response to solar radiation and the resulting heating profiles. Since the atmospheric circulation responds to thermal forcing by the Sun, atmospheric dust can alter the large-scale circulation. We use coincident global observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) to examine the global circulation. We find that the observed surface pressure oscillations relate to oscillations of the Hadley cell. We also analyze the potential impacts of these coupled oscillations especially as related to traveling waves and thermal tides.

  2. A Naturalistic Observational Study of Informal Segregation: Seating Patterns in Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Jennifer; Durrheim, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the removal of legislated racial segregation, a number of observational studies in South Africa and elsewhere have shown that "informal," nonlegislated segregation persists in spaces of everyday interaction. Most of these have been case studies of segregation at single sites. The authors seek to quantify segregation in a sample of…

  3. Generation and use of observational data patterns in the evaluation of data quality for AmeriFlux and FLUXNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, G.; Agarwal, D.; Poindexter, C.; Papale, D.; Trotta, C.; Ribeca, A.; Canfora, E.; Faybishenko, B.; Gunter, D.; Chu, H.

    2015-12-01

    presentation, using AmeriFlux fluxes and micrometeorological data, we discuss our approach to creating observational data patterns, and how we are using them to implement new automated checks. We also detail examples of these observational data patterns, illustrating how they are being used.

  4. OBSERVATIONAL UPPER BOUND ON THE COSMIC ABUNDANCES OF NEGATIVE-MASS COMPACT OBJECTS AND ELLIS WORMHOLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Asada, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The latest result in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) has set the first cosmological constraints on negative-mass compact objects and Ellis wormholes. There are no multiple images lensed by the above two exotic objects for {approx}50, 000 distant quasars in the SQLS data. Therefore, an upper bound is put on the cosmic abundances of these lenses. The number density of negative-mass compact objects is n < 10{sup -8}(10{sup -4}) h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at the mass scale |M| > 10{sup 15}(10{sup 12}) M{sub Sun }, which corresponds to the cosmological density parameter |{Omega}| < 10{sup -4} at the galaxy and cluster mass range |M| = 10{sup 12-15} M{sub Sun }. The number density of the Ellis wormhole is n < 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} for a range of the throat radius a = 10-10{sup 4} pc, which is much smaller than the Einstein ring radius.

  5. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations in China, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal and spatial distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher OC/EC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, smaller SOC/OC is found for cold seasons, particularly at rural and remote sites, attributed partly to weaker atmospheric oxidation and SOC formation in winter. Enhanced SOC formation from oxidization and anthropogenic activities like biomass combustion is judged to have crucial effects on severe haze events characterized by high particle concentrations. Several observational studies indicate an increasing trend in ambient OC/EC (but not in OC or EC individually) from 2000 to 2010, confirming increased atmospheric oxidation of OC across the country. Combining the results of

  6. Observations and Modeling of Low Level Moisture Convergence Patterns in the Southern Appalachians during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) Extended Observing Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Anna M.; Barros, Ana P.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate fields of precipitation accumulations and intensity at high spatial resolution in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable. This is due to first, a lack of existing in situ observations, both because of the challenge in having high enough density in the instrument placement to represent the large spatial heterogeneity in rainfall patterns in these regions and because of the remote, harsh nature of the terrain that makes it difficult to install and maintain instrumentation and second, obstacles to remote sensing such as beam blockage and ground clutter that are caused by the complex orography. In this study we leverage observations from two sources: 1) a high-elevation, high-density tipping bucket rain gauge network that has been recording precipitation observations for over six years along ridgelines in the Pigeon River Basin, a small watershed in the Southern Appalachians, and 2) the 4-D database of observations collected in 2014 in support of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) during the first field campaign after the launch of the GPM satellite, the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), to learn about formation and maintenance mechanisms for fog and low cloud in this region and the resulting impact on the precipitation regime. The observations focused on here are those at the near surface, within 2 kilometers of the ground level. This presentation will focus on process-based modeling studies using the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model conducted based upon observations made during this campaign. Case studies will be presented for real events simulated during the IPHEx campaign. These case studies occurred with different synoptic conditions, but include observational evidence of orographic enhancement. The case studies are simulated and analyzed in order to investigate how the topography modulates the regional, diurnal patterns of moisture convergence and fog and low cloud formation, as well as the mid

  7. Length and Geometric Patterns of the Greater Palatine Canal Observed in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Howard-Swirzinski, Karen; Edwards, Paul C.; Saini, Tarnjit S.; Norton, Neil S.

    2010-01-01

    The greater palatine canal is an important anatomical structure that is often utilized as a pathway for infiltration of local anesthesia to affect sensation and hemostasis. Increased awareness of the length and anatomic variation in the anatomy of this structure is important when performing surgical procedures in this area (e.g., placement of osseointegrated dental implants). We examined the anatomy of the greater palatine canal using data obtained from CBCT scans of 500 subjects. Both right and left canals were viewed (N = 1000) in coronal and sagittal planes, and their paths and lengths determined. The average length of the greater palatine canal was 29 mm (±3 mm), with a range from 22 to 40 mm. Coronally, the most common anatomic pattern consisted of the canal traveling inferior-laterally for a distance then directly inferior for the remainder (43.3%). In the sagittal view, the canal traveled most frequently at an anterior-inferior angle (92.9%). PMID:20871845

  8. Different decay patterns observed in a nineteenth-century building (Palma, Spain).

    PubMed

    Genestar, Catalina; Pons, Carmen; Cerro, José Carlos; Cerdà, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric pollutants and climatic conditions were studied in a decayed column in the Seminary of Sant Pere. This nineteenth-century building is situated in the historic centre of Palma (Mallorca, Spain), less than 0.5 km from the sea. Samples were collected from the internal and external part of the crusts formed in the four sides of the column. The samples were analysed by means of thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ion chromatography. Results show significant differences in the four sides of the column. A high degree of carbonate stone sulfation is observed in all of the samples analysed. A synergistic effect between atmospheric factors and micropollutants on the deterioration of stone is observed. A high uptake of atmospheric particulate matter is found in the external part of the black crusts. PMID:24705948

  9. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Mao, P.; Zhao, Y.; Nielsen, C. P.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-01

    China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29 % from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37 % (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 74-78, 17-21, and 4-6 % of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 49-55, 30-34, and 14-18 % of EC. Updated emission factors (EFs) based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, led to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while higher OC / EC ratios are found in southern sites, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher OC / EC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC / OC is reduced, particularly at rural and remote sites

  10. Observations Of General Learning Patterns In An Upper-Level Thermal Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, David E.

    2009-11-01

    I discuss some observations from using interactive-engagement instructional methods in an upper-level thermal physics course over a two-year period. From the standpoint of the subject matter knowledge of the upper-level students, there was a striking persistence of common learning difficulties previously observed in students enrolled in the introductory course, accompanied, however, by some notable contrasts between the groups. More broadly, I comment on comparisons and contrasts regarding general pedagogical issues among different student sub-populations, for example: differences in the receptivity of lower- and upper-level students to diagrammatic representations; varying receptivity to tutorial-style instructional approach within the upper-level population; and contrasting approaches to learning among physics and engineering sub-populations in the upper-level course with regard to use of symbolic notation, mathematical equations, and readiness to employ verbal explanations.

  11. Different decay patterns observed in a nineteenth-century building (Palma, Spain).

    PubMed

    Genestar, Catalina; Pons, Carmen; Cerro, José Carlos; Cerdà, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric pollutants and climatic conditions were studied in a decayed column in the Seminary of Sant Pere. This nineteenth-century building is situated in the historic centre of Palma (Mallorca, Spain), less than 0.5 km from the sea. Samples were collected from the internal and external part of the crusts formed in the four sides of the column. The samples were analysed by means of thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ion chromatography. Results show significant differences in the four sides of the column. A high degree of carbonate stone sulfation is observed in all of the samples analysed. A synergistic effect between atmospheric factors and micropollutants on the deterioration of stone is observed. A high uptake of atmospheric particulate matter is found in the external part of the black crusts.

  12. Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Quinn; Zaehle, Sönke; Templer, Pamela H; Goodale, Christine L

    2013-10-01

    Projections of future changes in land carbon (C) storage using biogeochemical models depend on accurately modeling the interactions between the C and nitrogen (N) cycles. Here, we present a framework for analyzing N limitation in global biogeochemical models to explore how C-N interactions of current models compare to field observations, identify the processes causing model divergence, and identify future observation and experiment needs. We used a set of N-fertilization simulations from two global biogeochemical models (CLM-CN and O-CN) that use different approaches to modeling C-N interactions. On the global scale, net primary productivity (NPP) in the CLM-CN model was substantially more responsive to N fertilization than in the O-CN model. The most striking difference between the two models occurred for humid tropical forests, where the CLM-CN simulated a 62% increase in NPP at high N addition levels (30 g N m(-2) yr(-1)), while the O-CN predicted a 2% decrease in NPP due to N fertilization increasing plant respiration more than photosynthesis. Across 35 temperate and boreal forest sites with field N-fertilization experiments, we show that the CLM-CN simulated a 46% increase in aboveground NPP in response to N, which exceeded the observed increase of 25%. In contrast, the O-CN only simulated a 6% increase in aboveground NPP at the N-fertilization sites. Despite the small response of NPP to N fertilization, the O-CN model accurately simulated ecosystem retention of N and the fate of added N to vegetation when compared to empirical (15) N tracer application studies. In contrast, the CLM-CN predicted lower total ecosystem N retention and partitioned more losses to volatilization than estimated from observed N budgets of small catchments. These results point to the need for model improvements in both models in order to enhance the accuracy with which global C-N cycle feedbacks are simulated.

  13. An Efficient Sampling Technique for Observing Topographically-Dependent Spatial Variability in Catchment-Scale Soil Moisture Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbylo, K. L.; Niemann, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Catchment-scale variability in soil moisture plays an important role in many hydrologic applications. The magnitude of spatial variability in soil moisture patterns affects the catchment-scale evapotranspiration rate, while the spatial structure of soil moisture patterns affects runoff production. In many cases, spatial variations in soil moisture are associated with variations in topographic attributes such as drainage area, slope, and curvature. In the past, large soil moisture datasets have been collected on uniform grids at experimental catchments to characterize the spatial and temporal variability, but this approach is very time-consuming and expensive with most grids containing hundreds of locations monitored over several dates. Although many studies have focused on efficient strategies to observe the catchment-average soil moisture, few have advanced improved strategies to characterize the spatial variability. In this study, we propose a new stratified sampling technique that aims to reduce the number of observations that are required to observe the main variations in soil moisture. The method is applied to soil moisture patterns with topographically-induced variability, but it can be generalized to consider patterns with other sources of variation. In the method, topographic attributes that potentially introduce variability are preselected, and the observed range of values for each attribute is divided into sub-ranges or stratifications. Because multiple topographic attributes are considered, any given location in the catchment will fall into a joint stratification that corresponds to a particular combination of individual stratifications. The sampling locations are then randomly selected from the locations in each joint stratification. The method thus assures that all combinations of low and high terrain attribute values that exist in the catchment are represented in the dataset. The number of sampling locations can be controlled by changing the number of

  14. [Direct Observation on the Temporal and Spatial Patterns of the CO2 Concentration in the Atmospheric of Nanjing Urban Canyon in Summer].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun-qiu; Liu, Shou-dong; Hu, Ning; Wang, Shu-min; Deng, Li-chen; Yu, Zhou; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xu-hui

    2015-07-01

    Direct observation of urban atmospheric CO2 concentration is vital for the research in the contribution of anthropogenic activity to the atmospheric abundance since cities are important CO2 sources. The observations of the atmospheric CO2 concentration at multiple sites/heights can help us learn more about the temporal and spatial patterns and influencing mechanisms. In this study, the CO2 concentration was observed at 5 sites (east, west, south, north and middle) in the main city area of Nanjing from July 18 to 25, 2014, and the vertical profile of atmospheric CO2 concentration was measured in the middle site at 3 heights (30 m, 65 m and 110 m). The results indicated that: (1) An obvious vertical CO2 gradient was found, with higher CO2 concentration [molar fraction of 427. 3 x 10(-6) (±18. 2 x 10(-6))] in the lower layer due to the strong influences of anthropogenic emissions, and lower CO2 concentration in the upper layers [411. 8 x 10(-6) (±15. 0 x 10(-6)) and 410. 9 x 10(-6) (±14. 6 x 10(-6)) at 65 and 110 m respectively] for the well-mixed condition. The CO2 concentration was higher and the vertical gradient was larger when the atmosphere was stable. (2) The spatial distribution pattern of CO2 concentration was dominated by wind and atmospheric stability. During the observation, the CO2 concentration in the southwest was higher than that in the northeast region with the CO2 concentration difference of 7. 8 x 10(-6), because the northwest wind was prevalent. And the CO2 concentration difference reduced with increasing wind speed since stronger wind diluted CO2 more efficiently. The more stable the atmosphere was, the higher the CO2 concentration was. (3) An obvious diurnal variation of CO2 concentration was shown in the 5 sites. A peak value occurred during the morning rush hours, the valley value occurred around 17:00 (Local time) and another high value occurred around 19:00 because of evening rush hour sometimes.

  15. Unmodeled observation error induces bias when inferring patterns and dynamics of species occurrence via aural detections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClintock, Brett T.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2010-01-01

    The recent surge in the development and application of species occurrence models has been associated with an acknowledgment among ecologists that species are detected imperfectly due to observation error. Standard models now allow unbiased estimation of occupancy probability when false negative detections occur, but this is conditional on no false positive detections and sufficient incorporation of explanatory variables for the false negative detection process. These assumptions are likely reasonable in many circumstances, but there is mounting evidence that false positive errors and detection probability heterogeneity may be much more prevalent in studies relying on auditory cues for species detection (e.g., songbird or calling amphibian surveys). We used field survey data from a simulated calling anuran system of known occupancy state to investigate the biases induced by these errors in dynamic models of species occurrence. Despite the participation of expert observers in simplified field conditions, both false positive errors and site detection probability heterogeneity were extensive for most species in the survey. We found that even low levels of false positive errors, constituting as little as 1% of all detections, can cause severe overestimation of site occupancy, colonization, and local extinction probabilities. Further, unmodeled detection probability heterogeneity induced substantial underestimation of occupancy and overestimation of colonization and local extinction probabilities. Completely spurious relationships between species occurrence and explanatory variables were also found. Such misleading inferences would likely have deleterious implications for conservation and management programs. We contend that all forms of observation error, including false positive errors and heterogeneous detection probabilities, must be incorporated into the estimation framework to facilitate reliable inferences about occupancy and its associated vital rate parameters.

  16. Field observations of swash zone flow patterns and 3D morphodynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puelo, Jack A.; Holland, K. Todd; Kooney, Timothy N.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Edge, Billy L.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid video measurements of foreshore morphology and velocity were collected at Duck, NC in 1997 to investigate sediment transport processes in the swash zone. Estimates of foreshore evolution over a roughly 30 m cross-shore by 80 m alongshore study area were determined using a stereogrammetric technique. During the passage of a small storm (offshore wave heights increased from 1.4 to 2.5 m), the foreshore eroded nearly 40 cm in less than 4 hours. Dense, horizontal surface velocities were measured over a sub-region (roughly 30 m by 40 m) of the study area using a new particle image velocimetry technique. This technique was able to quantify velocities across the bore front approaching 5 m s–1 as well as the rapid velocities in the very shallow backwash flows. The velocity and foreshore topography measurements were used to test a three-dimensional energetics-based sediment transport model. Even though these data represent the most extensive and highly resolved swash measurements to date, the results showed that while the model could predict some of the qualitative trends in the observed foreshore change, it was a poor predictor of the observed magnitudes of foreshore change. Model — data comparisons differed by roughly an order of magnitude with observed foreshore changes on the order of 10's of centimeters and model predictions on the order of meters. This poor comparison suggests that future models of swash-zone sediment transport may require the inclusion of other physical processes such as bore turbulence, fluid accelerations and skewness, infiltration/exfiltration, water depth variations, and variable friction factors (to name a few).

  17. Chemical abundance of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Wehinger, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Observations of NH2, (OI) and molecular ion spectra in comets represent virtually all of the volatile fraction of a comet nucleus. Their study leads to the N2, NH3, H2O, CO2, CO content of the nucleus, and thus to important constraints on models of comet formation and chemical processing in the primitive solar nebula. The observations of Comet Halley provide the opportunity for the first comprehensive determination of the abundances in a comet nucleus. The carbon isotope abundance ratio 12 C/13 C = 65 plus or minus 8 has been determined for Comet Halley from resolved rotational line structure in the CN B-X (0,0) band. The ratio is approximately 30 pct lower than the solar system value, 89, indicating either an enhancement of 13CN or a depletion of 12CN in the comet. Scenarios consistent with the observed carbon isotope ratio are: (1) formation of the comet at the periphery of the solar nebula in a fractionation-enriched 13CN region, or hidden from 12CN enrichment sources, and (2) capture of an interestellar comet. Long-slit charge coupled device (CCD) spectra obtained at the time of the spacecraft encounter of Comet Halley have also been analyzed. Scale lengths, production rates and column densities of CH, CN, C2 and NH2 were determined.

  18. Social observation enhances cross-environment activation of hippocampal place cell patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiang; Ji, Daoyun

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals frequently learn through observing or interacting with others. The local enhancement theory proposes that presence of social subjects in an environment facilitates other subjects' understanding of the environment. To explore the neural basis of this theory, we examined hippocampal place cells, which represent spatial information, in rats as they stayed in a small box while a demonstrator rat running on a separate, nearby linear track, and as they ran on the same track themselves. We found that place cell firing sequences during self-running on the track also appeared in the box. This cross-environment activation occurred even prior to any self-running experience on the track and was absent without a demonstrator. Our data thus suggest that social observation can facilitate the observer’s spatial representation of an environment without actual self-exploration. This finding may contribute to neural mechanisms of local enhancement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18022.001 PMID:27692067

  19. Accumulation Patterns and Basal Conditions from Radar Observations Along the US- ITASE Traverse in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobel, R. W.; Arcone, S. A.; Welch, B. C.; Youngblood, B. W.; Olson, J. L.; Stamp, J. R.; Werner, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present short-pulse radio echo reflection profiles recorded along a largely cross-flow transect during the 2006-08 US-ITASE traverse from Taylor Dome to South Pole. We used a 200-MHz system to focus on firn strata within the upper 100 meters and a 4-MHz system to focus on englacial strata, as well as the bed. Within the catchment area of Byrd Glacier unusual cross-cutting englacial horizons, alternating with metamorphic layers representing hiatuses in accumulation, suggest changing patterns of accumulation, possibly caused by long term wind shifts. Profiles recorded by both systems from south of the Byrd catchment area to Titan Dome are conspicuously characterized by buried megadunal type stratigraphy, consistent with the traverse being downflow from the apparent eastern edge of the modern megadunes region. The 200-MHz profiles reveal buried and partially buried foreset beds extending over 25 km in length, up to 50 m thick and sandwiched between 4 to 15 m thick unstratified layers up to 60 km long. These beds are antidunal deposits, and the unstratified layers are glazed, zero accumulation zones of extreme, long term metamorphism. The deeper, 4-MHz profiles show prograding beds occur to 1700 m depth, up to 250 m thick along a segment on the northeast fringe of the megadunes. These impressive features, both near the surface and at depth, show the concentrated way snow has been, and now accumulates, in the megadunes area and well east of it. If these beds formed during high accumulation Holocene warming periods, then we need to understand how they could be interleaved with features characteristic of zero accumulation. The 4- MHz detection of prograded beds must be made possible by embedded, volcanic high conductivity layers, which reveals that these beds contain datable layers. We have also plotted the power received from some 300,000 bed echoes versus ice thickness along the traverse. We use these data to estimate the average 4-MHz signal absorption rate within

  20. Global carbon-water cycles patterns inferred from FLUXNET observations - useful for model evaluation? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstein, M.; Jung, M.; Beer, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Tomelleri, E.; Papale, D.; Fluxnet Lathuille Synthesis Team (Cf. Www. Fluxdata. Org)

    2010-12-01

    The current FLUXNET database (www.fluxdata.org) of CO2, water and energy exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere contains almost 1000 site-years with data from more than 250 sites, encompassing all major biomes of the world and being processed in a standardized way (1-3). In this presentation we show that the information in the data is sufficient to derive generalized empirical relationships between vegetation/respective remote sensing information, climate and the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges across global biomes. These empirical patterns are used to generate global grids of the respective fluxes and derived properties (e.g. radiation and water-use efficiencies or climate sensitivities in general, bowen-ratio, AET/PET ratio). For example we re-estimate global “text-book” numbers such as global Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as ca. 123PgC (4), or global evapotranspiration (ET) as ca. 65km3/yr (5) - for the first time with a more solid and direct empirical basis. Evaluation against independent data at regional to global scale (e.g. atmospheric carbon dioxide inversions, runoff data) lends support to the validity of our almost purely empirical up-scaling approaches. Moreover climate factors such as radiation, temperature and water balance are identified as driving factors for variations and trends of carbon and water fluxes, with distinctly different sensitivities between different regions. Hence, these global fields of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and the inferred relations between climate, vegetation type and fluxes should be used for evaluation or benchmarking of climate models or their land-surface components, while overcoming scale-issues with classical point-to-grid-cell comparisons. 1. M. Reichstein et al., Global Change Biology 11, 1424 (2005). 2. D. Baldocchi, Australian Journal of Botany 56,1 (2008). 3. D. Papale et al., Biogeosciences 3, 571 (2006). 4. Beer et al. Science 329 (2010). 5. Jung et al. Nature in press (doi:10

  1. Observing health professionals' workflow patterns for diabetes care - First steps towards an ontology for EHR services.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M; Lasierra, N; Hoerbst, A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility from a user-perspective and enabling a workflow based interaction, facilitates an easy user-friendly utilization of EHRs for healthcare professionals' daily work. To offer such versatile EHR-functionality, our approach is based on the execution of clinical workflows by means of a composition of semantic web-services. The backbone of such architecture is an ontology which enables to represent clinical workflows and facilitates the selection of suitable services. In this paper we present the methods and results after running observations of diabetes routine consultations which were conducted in order to identify those workflows and the relation among the included tasks. Mentioned workflows were first modeled by BPMN and then generalized. As a following step in our study, interviews will be conducted with clinical personnel to validate modeled workflows.

  2. Wear Pattern Observations from TDR Retrievals Using Autoregistration of Voxel Data

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnikov, Yakov P.; Bowden, Anton; MacDonald, Daniel; Kurtz, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Due to their unique geometry, characterization of wear damage in total disc replacement (TDR) is difficult. In the paper, we developed and validated an automated damage calculation technique for explanted TDR components. Eight polyethylene cores implanted from 4.6 to 16.0 years were using cone-beam microCT imaging (SCANCO Medical, Switzerland). The nominal uniform voxel size for the implant under investigation was 18 microns, however with a smaller sample size increased resolutions (10 micron nominal voxel size) could be achieved using the same microCT imaging hardware. Nominal surface data for both sizes of TDR components we examined were obtained from manufacturer’s drawings (Link, Germany) and converted to highly discretized triangular meshes. The damage calculation technique utilized an initial alignment phase, followed by a pointwise calculation of the linear damage at each 3D surface point. During the alignment phase, a three-dimensional surface of the undamaged component was automatically aligned with volumetric image data from the damaged component. The alignment algorithm maximized the contact area between undamaged portions of the implant and its nominal surface using an iterative optimization technique. Linear damage at each triangle on the nominal surface was computed by moving along the local normal of the surface both inward and outward direction for a distance much less than the size of the implant. For the retrieved components, the maximum damage occurred away from the central axis of the dome close to the rim. Penetrations of up to 0.8 mm were observed in this region. Lower magnitude penetrations were observed near the pole of the dome. In conclusion, we have developed an analytical method to automatically align and measure three-dimensional surface damage with both high resolution and accuracy on implants with complicated, non-parametric, surface geometry and used this technique to analyze eight implants. PMID:20586080

  3. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting ‘sperm dispersal’ could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  4. Global Multi-Year O3-CO Correlation Patterns from Models and TES Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voulgarakis, A.; Telford, P. J.; Aghedo, A. M.; Braesicke, P.; Faluvegi, G.; Abraham, N. L.; Bowman, K. W.; Pyle, J. A.; Shindell, D. T.

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between measured tropospheric ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) has been used extensively in tropospheric chemistry studies to explore the photochemical characteristics of different regions and to evaluate the ability of models to capture these characteristics. Here, we present the first study that uses multi-year, global, vertically resolved, simultaneous and collocated O3 and CO satellite (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) measurements, to determine this correlation in the middle/lower free troposphere for two different seasons, and to evaluate two chemistry-climate models. We find results that are fairly robust across different years, altitudes and timescales considered, which indicates that the correlation maps presented here could be used in future model evaluations. The highest positive correlations (around 0.8) are found in the northern Pacific during summer, which is a common feature in the observations and the G-PUCCINI model. We make quantitative comparisons between the models using a single-figure metric (C), which we define as the correlation coefficient between the modeled and the observed O3-CO correlations for different regions of the globe. On a global scale, the G-PUCCINI model shows a good performance in the summer (C =0.71) and a satisfactory performance in the winter (C = 0.52). It captures midlatitude features very well, especially in the summer, whereas the performance in regions like South America or Central Africa is weaker. The UKCA model (C = 0.46/0.15 for July-August/December-January on a global scale) performs better in certain regions, such as the tropics in winter, and it captures some of the broad characteristics of summer extratropical correlations, but it systematically underestimates the O3-CO correlations over much of the globe. It is noteworthy that the correlations look very different in the two models, even though the ozone distributions are similar. This demonstrates that this technique provides a powerful

  5. Patterns and Variability in Global Ocean Chlorophyll: Satellite Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2004-01-01

    Recent analyses of SeaWiFS data have shown that global ocean chlorophyll has increased more than 4% since 1998. The North Pacific ocean basin has increased nearly 19%. These trend analyses follow earlier results showing decadal declines in global ocean chlorophyll and primary production. To understand the causes of these changes and trends we have applied the newly developed NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Assimilation Model (OBAM), which is driven in mechanistic fashion by surface winds, sea surface temperature, atmospheric iron deposition, sea ice, and surface irradiance. The model utilizes chlorophyll from SeaWiFS in a daily assimilation. The model has in place many of the climatic variables that can be expected to produce the changes observed in SeaWiFS data. This enables us to diagnose the model performance, the assimilation performance, and possible causes for the increase in chlorophyll. A full discussion of the changes and trends, possible causes, modeling approaches, and data assimilation will be the focus of the seminar.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic and abundance mapping of the cool Ap star HD 24712 . I. Spectropolarimetric observations in all four Stokes parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.; Jeffers, S. V.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Keller, C. U.; Makaganiuk, V.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Stempels, H. C.; Valenti, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Context. High-resolution spectropolarimetric observations provide simultaneous information about stellar magnetic field topologies and three-dimensional distributions of chemical elements. High-quality spectra in the Stokes IQUV parameters are currently available for very few early-type magnetic chemically peculiar stars. Here we present analysis of a unique full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric data set, acquired for the cool magnetic Ap star HD 24712 with a recently commissioned spectropolarimeter. Aims: The goal of our work is to examine the circular and linear polarization signatures inside spectral lines and to study variation of the stellar spectrum and magnetic observables as a function of rotational phase. Methods: HD 24712 was observed with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope over a period of 2010-2011. We achieved full rotational phase coverage with 43 individual Stokes parameter observations. The resulting spectra have a signal-to-noise ratio of 300-600 and resolving power exceeding 105. The multiline technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) was applied to combine information from the spectral lines of Fe-peak and rare earth elements. Results: We used the HARPSPol spectra of HD 24712 to study the morphology of the Stokes profile shapes in individual spectral lines and in LSD Stokes profiles corresponding to different line masks. From the LSD Stokes V profiles we measured the longitudinal component of the magnetic field, ⟨Bz⟩, with an accuracy of 5-10 G. We also determined the net linear polarization from the LSD Stokes Q and U profiles. Combining previous ⟨Bz⟩ measurements with our data allowed us to determine an improved rotational period of the star, Prot = 12.45812 ± 0.00019 d. We also measured the longitudinal magnetic field from the cores of Hα and Hβ lines. The analysis of ⟨Bz⟩ measurements showed no evidence for a significant radial magnetic field gradient in the atmosphere of HD 24712. We used our ⟨Bz⟩ and

  7. Comparison of XCO abundances from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change measured in Karlsruhe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Matthäus; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Kirner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    We present a comparison of Karlsruhe XCO records (April 2010-December 2014) from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and from the spectral region covered by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The Karlsruhe TCCON Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer allows us to record spectra in the mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral region simultaneously, which makes Karlsruhe a favourable FTIR site to directly compare measurements from both spectral regions. We compare XCO retrieved from the fundamental absorption band at 4.7 µm (as used by NDACC) and first overtone absorption band at 2.3 µm (TCCON-style measurements). We observe a bias of (4.47 ± 0.17) ppb between both data sets with a standard deviation of 2.39 ppb in seasonal variation. This corresponds to a relative bias of (4.76 ± 0.18) % and a standard deviation of 2.28 %. We identify different sources which contribute to the observed bias (air-mass-independent correction factor, air-mass-dependent correction factor, isotopic identities, differing a priori volume mixing ratio profiles) and quantify their contributions. We show that the seasonality in the residual of NDACC and TCCON XCO can be largely explained by the smoothing effect caused by differing averaging kernel sensitivities between the MIR and NIR spectral region. This study aims to improve the comparability of NDACC and TCCON XCO validation data sets as desired for potential future satellite missions and model studies.

  8. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  9. Climate Change Induces Shifts in Abundance and Activity Pattern of Bacteria and Archaea Catalyzing Major Transformation Steps in Nitrogen Turnover in a Soil from a Mid-European Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  10. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  11. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Arndt, S.; Willmes, S.; Dierking, W.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and regional distribution of surface properties of Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the atmosphere-ocean interaction and characterizes the mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Therefore, it is important to map and analyze changes and trends of the related processes and parameters. Since Antarctic sea ice is covered with snow during most of the year, inter-annual and regional variations in summer surface melt can be described through the timing of snowmelt onset. So far, the melt onset was described through the amplitude of diurnal freeze-thaw cycles detected by microwave brightness temperatures using a fixed threshold. However, other studies reveal that the strength of the diurnal variations is differing between the perennial snowpack characterized by strong snow metamorphism and the thinner and less complex seasonal snow cover. Therefore, we present two complementary approaches to improve the existing melt onset algorithms: (1) We consider regional differences of the diurnal variations in the brightness temperature. (2) We combine brightness temperature measured at different polarizations and frequencies in order to describe also subsurface melt processes. Our analysis includes a comparison with autonomous measurements from snow buoys and previous studies on snow melt onset detection of Antarctic sea ice. In doing so, we derive a distinct latitudinal dependence of the surface and subsurface snow melt onset. The major part of the East-Antarctic sea ice is dominated by lateral and bottom melt with negligible diurnal surface variations. Although a positive trend in sea-ice extent and concentration of Antarctic sea ice is observed, our melt onset time series do not indicate a significant trend from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Instead its inter-annual variability is not changing over time. From the assumed dynamically induced sea-ice growth in the Southern Ocean we expect an increasing importance of surface freeze-thaw cycles.

  12. Patterns of Rapid Deceleration Observed at Two Tidewater Outlet Glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, L. A.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T.; Sutherland, D.; Nash, J. D.; Shroyer, E.; Byers, L. C.; Rosenau, R.; Fried, M.; Felikson, D.; Walker, R. T.; Carroll, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flow speeds of Greenland outlet glaciers play an important role in modulating ice sheet mass balance. Flow variability is dictated by how outlet glaciers respond to unknown or poorly constrained perturbations in their boundary conditions; identifying the physical processes controlling outlet glacier flow variability is key to improving models of ice sheet evolution. In this study, we use satellite remote sensing data, in situ observations, and numerical models to explore the boundary conditions that control the unique flow behavior of two West Greenland outlet glaciers. Kangerdlugssup Sermerssua (KS) and Kangilerngata Sermia (KGS), exhibit seasonal flow variability that is anti-correlated with surrounding glaciers. Both glaciers decelerate in the spring when meltwater becomes available. The seasonal deceleration is usually on the order of 10% the annual average speed, and lasts ~2 months. During high melt years, the deceleration is highly exaggerated (~80% of the annual average), causing a near shutdown of glacier flow along the lower 20 km of the trunk. For example, in 2010 KS decelerated from its average speed of ~2000 m/yr to 250 m/yr; the deceleration and the acceleration back to its average speed took roughly 2 months. Force balance analyses show that both glaciers have anomalously low driving stress and basal drag values. We hypothesize that glaciers with low basal drag are particularly sensitive to variations in subglacial water. The discrete decelerations and reactivation of these two unique glacier systems allow us to analyze the complicated evolution of subglacial hydrologic systems and their interaction with ice velocity and force components.

  13. Observational and modeling studies of heat, moisture, precipitation and global-scale circulation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.

    1994-01-01

    This research grant was a revised version of an original proposal. The period of the grant was for three years with a six-month no-cost extension; thus, it was from 20 July 1990 to 19 January 1994. The objectives of the grant were to identify periods and locations of active convection centers, primarily over the Southern Hemisphere tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans; determine reasons for any periodic behavior found in the first objective; identify cases where subtropical jets over the South Pacific persisted for several days and examine the influences of tropical versus extra-tropical mechanisms in maintaining them; obtain estimates of precipitation by Q(sub 1) and Q(sub 2) budgets, including the importance of terms in each of the respective budgets, and compare these estimates to those obtained by other methods; and diagnose the distributions of moisture and precipitable water over the North Atlantic Ocean using routine analyses and satellite microwave data. To accomplish these objectives, we used grant funds to purchase several data sets, including the Global Precipitation Climate Project (GPCP) observations of station precipitation, ECMWF WCRP/TOGA archive two analyses for January 1985 - December 1990, ECMWF WMO analyses for January 1980 - December 1987, and OLR data for July 1974 - December 1991. We already had some SSM/I data and GLA analyses from a previous grant. In addition, to improve our computing power, we also used grant funds to purchase an IBM PS/2 with accessories, a NEC laser jet printer, and a microcomputer system for word processing. This report is organized as follows. Our research team is listed first. Section two contains a summary of our significant accomplishments; however, a detailed discussion of research results is not included since this information can be found in the accompanying reprints and preprints. Section three offers some concluding remarks, and a complete bibliographic summary is given in Section four.

  14. Commonly rare and rarely common: comparing population abundance of invasive and native aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Blum, Michael J; Clayton, Murray K; Hain, Ernie F; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S; McIntyre, Peter B; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies.

  15. Commonly Rare and Rarely Common: Comparing Population Abundance of Invasive and Native Aquatic Species

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake; Blum, Michael J.; Clayton, Murray K.; Hain, Ernie F.; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D.; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies. PMID:24194883

  16. Commonly rare and rarely common: comparing population abundance of invasive and native aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Blum, Michael J; Clayton, Murray K; Hain, Ernie F; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S; McIntyre, Peter B; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies. PMID:24194883

  17. Spatially-resolved mean flow and turbulence help explain observed erosion and deposition patterns of snow over Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, E.; Giometto, M. G.; Leonard, K. C.; Maksym, T. L.; Meneveau, C. V.; Parlange, M. B.; Lehning, M.

    2014-12-01

    Sea ice-atmosphere interactions are major drivers of patterns of sea ice drift and deformations in the Polar regions, and affect snow erosion and deposition at the surface. Here, we combine analyses of sea ice surface topography at very high-resolutions (1-10 cm), and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) to study surface drag and snow erosion and deposition patterns from process scales to floe scales (1 cm - 100 m). The snow/ice elevations were obtained using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner during the SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem eXperiment II) research voyage to East Antarctica (September-November 2012). LES are performed on a regular domain adopting a mixed pseudo-spectral/finite difference spatial discretization. A scale-dependent dynamic subgrid-scale model based on Lagrangian time averaging is adopted to determine the eddy-viscosity in the bulk of the flow. Effects of larger-scale features of the surface on wind flows (those features that can be resolved in the LES) are accounted for through an immersed boundary method. Conversely, drag forces caused by subgrid-scale features of the surface should be accounted for through a parameterization. However, the effective aerodynamic roughness parameter z0 for snow/ice is not known. Hence, a novel dynamic approach is utilized, in which z0 is determined using the constraint that the total momentum flux (drag) must be independent on grid-filter scale. We focus on three ice floe surfaces. The first of these surfaces (October 6, 2012) is used to test the performance of the model, validate the algorithm, and study the spatial distributed fields of resolved and modeled stress components. The following two surfaces, scanned at the same location before and after a snow storm event (October 20/23, 2012), are used to propose an application to study how spatially resolved mean flow and turbulence relates to observed patterns of snow erosion and deposition. We show how erosion and deposition patterns are correlated with the

  18. Seasonal circulation patterns of the Yellow and East China Seas derived from satellite-tracked drifter trajectories and hydrographic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Heung-Jae; Cho, Cheol-Ho

    2016-08-01

    We investigated seasonal circulation patterns of the Yellow and East China Seas (YECS), by reviewing previous works on the circulation and its dominant currents, and taking into account newly-compiled trajectories of satellite-tracked drifters collected between the 1980s and 2000s. The circulation patterns suggested before the 1990s can be categorized into two groups, depending on the identified origin of the Tsushima Warm Current in the Korea-Tsushima Straits: (i) branching from the Kuroshio southwest of Kyushu, or (ii) northeastward continuation of the Taiwan Strait throughflow. The branching of the Kuroshio southwest of Kyushu and northeast of Taiwan was clearly evidenced by current measurements and concurrent hydrographic surveys. However, there is still no clear evidence for the northeastward pathway of Taiwan Strait throughflow across the mid-shelf area of the East China Sea. Target-oriented surveys in the 1990s and 2000s employing advanced instruments, such as drifter tracking and acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements, now provide decisive proof of the clockwise rounding of the Cheju Warm Current around Jeju-do throughout the year, of the northeastward extension of Changjiang discharge in summer, and of the presence of the Yellow Sea Warm Current only in winter. Thus, both coastal currents in shallow water and secondary branch currents of the Kuroshio (such as the Yellow Sea Warm Current) are found to significantly change from winter to summer. To better present the basic pattern of YECS circulation and its seasonality, we have constructed seasonal circulations patterns, based on review results, on the newly-compiled drifter trajectories, and on hydrographic observations. Further investigations should be carried out in future, with support of comprehensive current measurements on shelf areas and through elaborate numerical modeling.

  19. High-Resolution Imaging in 3-mm and 0.8-mm Bands and Abundances of Shock/Dust Related Molecules Toward the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Harada, N.; Herbst, E.; Tamura, Y.; Izumi, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Tosaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of high-angular-resolution in 3-mm and 0.8-mm band observations with ALMA in cycle-0 toward one of the nearest galaxies with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1068. The physical properties of CO isotopic species, CS, CN, and shock and dust related molecules such as HNCO, CH3CN, SO, and CH3OH were estimated using rotation diagrams. We discuss the chemistry of each species, and compare the fractional abundances in the circumnuclear disk (CND) and starburst ring with those of Galactic sources in order to study the overall characteristics.

  20. Cross-Scale Interactions and the Distribution-Abundance Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Earl E.; Davis, Christopher J.; Skelly, David K.; Relyea, Rick A.; Benard, Michael F.; McCauley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive interspecific relationships between local abundance and extent of regional distribution are among the most ubiquitous patterns in ecology. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanisms underlying distribution-abundance (d-a) relationships remain poorly understood. We examined the intra- and interspecific distribution-abundance relationships for a metacommunity of 13 amphibian species sampled for 15 consecutive years. Mean density of larvae in occupied ponds was positively related to number of ponds occupied by species; employing the fraction of ponds uniquely available to each species this same relationship sharply decelerates. The latter relationship suggested that more abundant species inhabited most available habitats annually, whereas rarer species were dispersal limited. We inferred the mechanisms responsible for this pattern based on the dynamics of one species, Pseudacris triseriata, which transitioned between a rare, narrowly distributed species to a common, widely distributed species and then back again. Both transitions were presaged by marked changes in mean local densities driven by climatic effects on habitat quality. We identified threshold densities separating these population regime shifts that differed with landscape configuration. Our data suggest that these transitions were caused by strong cross-scale interactions between local resource/niche processes and larger scale metapopulation processes. The patterns we observed have relevance for understanding the mechanisms of interspecific d-a relationships and critical thresholds associated with habitat fragmentation. PMID:24875899

  1. Understanding relationships among abundance, extirpation, and climate at ecoregional scales.

    PubMed

    Beever, Erik A; Dobrowski, S Z; Long, J; Mynsberge, A R; Piekielek, N B

    2013-07-01

    Recent research on mountain-dwelling species has illustrated changes in species distributional patterns in response to climate change. Abundance of a species will likely provide an earlier warning indicator of change than will occupancy, yet relationships between abundance and climatic factors have received less attention. We tested whether predictors of counts of American pikas (Ochotona princeps) during surveys from the Great Basin region in 1994-1999 and 2003-2008 differed between the two periods. Additionally, we tested whether various modeled aspects of ecohydrology better predicted relative density than did average annual precipitation, and whether risk of site-wide extirpation predicted subsequent population counts of pikas. We observed several patterns of change in pika abundance at range edges that likely constitute early warnings of distributional shifts. Predictors of pika abundance differed strongly between the survey periods, as did pika extirpation patterns previously reported from this region. Additionally, maximum snowpack and growing-season precipitation resulted in better-supported models than those using average annual precipitation, and constituted two of the top three predictors of pika density in the 2000s surveys (affecting pikas perhaps via vegetation). Unexpectedly, we found that extirpation risk positively predicted subsequent population size. Our results emphasize the need to clarify mechanisms underlying biotic responses to recent climate change at organism-relevant scales, to inform management and conservation strategies for species of concern.

  2. Global Free Tropospheric NO2 Abundances Derived Using a Cloud Slicing Technique Applied to Satellite Observations from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S.; Joiner, J.; Choi, Y.; Duncan, B. N.; Bucsela, E.

    2014-01-01

    We derive free-tropospheric NO2 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and stratospheric column amounts of NO2 by applying a cloud slicing technique to data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. In the cloud-slicing approach, the slope of the above-cloud NO2 column versus the cloud scene pressure is proportional to the NO2 VMR. In this work, we use a sample of nearby OMI pixel data from a single orbit for the linear fit. The OMI data include cloud scene pressures from the rotational-Raman algorithm and above-cloud NO2 vertical column density (VCD) (defined as the NO2 column from the cloud scene pressure to the top-of-the-atmosphere) from a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm. Estimates of stratospheric column NO2 are obtained by extrapolating the linear fits to the tropopause. We compare OMI-derived NO2 VMRs with in situ aircraft profiles measured during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign in 2006. The agreement is generally within the estimated uncertainties when appropriate data screening is applied. We then derive a global seasonal climatology of free-tropospheric NO2 VMR in cloudy conditions. Enhanced NO2 in the free troposphere commonly appears near polluted urban locations where NO2 produced in the boundary layer may be transported vertically out of the boundary layer and then horizontally away from the source. Signatures of lightning NO2 are also shown throughout low and middle latitude regions in summer months. A profile analysis of our cloud slicing data indicates signatures of uplifted and transported anthropogenic NO2 in the middle troposphere as well as lightning-generated NO2 in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the climatology with simulations from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) for cloudy conditions (cloud optical thicknesses > 10) shows similarities in the spatial patterns of continental pollution outflow. However, there are also some differences in

  3. Middle and upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles and the abundances of CO2 and CO in the upper atmosphere from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Zander, R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for retrieving pressure-temperature profiles is described and is used to retrieve profiles of the kinetic-temperature and atmospheric-pressure profiles between 20 and 116 km altitudes and the CO2 and CO volume-mixing ratios between 70 and 116 km, using the IR occultation spectra recorded by the Spacelab 3 atmospheric trace molecular spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer between April 29 and May 6, 1985. Profiles are derived for six ATMOS occultations. The CO2 and CO volume-mixing profiles are compared with previous observations and model predictions. Evidence is found for vibrational non-LTE by analyzing the lines of the (nu-2 + nu-3 - nu-2) (C-12)(O-16) band. Results are used for deriving (C-12)(O-16) (010) vibrational temperatures, which are compared with the retrieved kinetic temperatures and the predictions of non-LTE effects by recent models.

  4. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  5. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  6. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  7. Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of PM2.5 in China based on ground-level observations for 190 cities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Zhaohai; Zhang, Wenzhong

    2016-09-01

    Whereas air pollution in many Chinese cities has reached epidemic levels in recent years, limited research has explored the spatial and temporal patterns of fine air particles such as PM2.5, or particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm, using nationally representative data. This article applied spatial statistical approaches including spatial interpolation and spatial regression to the analysis of ground-level PM2.5 observations for 190 Chinese cities in 2014 obtained from the Chinese Air Quality Online Monitoring Platform. Results of this article suggest that most Chinese cities included in the dataset recorded severe levels of PM2.5 in excess of the WHO's interim target and cities in the North China Plain had the highest levels of PM2.5 regardless of city size. Spatially interpolated maps of PM2.5 and population-weighted PM2.5 indicate vast majority of China's land and population was exposed to disastrous levels of PM2.5 concentrations. The regression results suggest that PM2.5 in a city was positively related to its population size, amount of atmospheric pollutants, and emissions from nearby cities, but inversely related to precipitation and wind speed. Findings from this research can shed new light on the complex spatiotemporal patterns of PM2.5 throughout China and provide insights into policies aiming to mitigate air pollution in China. PMID:27318543

  8. [Preliminary report concerning the histologica patterns of an anthracotic pneumoconiosis observed in the area of Londrina, Brasil (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Coelho, R

    1975-01-01

    The A. presents a preliminary report concerning on the histologic patterns of an anthracotic pneumoconiosis found in necropsies of the "Hospital Universitário da Universidade de Londrina", Paraná, Brazil, and in some cases from the Legal Institute of the same town. The lesions, on its histologic pattern are comparable to those observed in the lung of coal and iron mines workers as described in the consulted literature. The cases studied (plantations workers and dwellers at rural and suburban areas) are proceeding from an essencially agricultural region, without detectable polluition by industry or others known factors. This agricultural zone presents some geophysic peculiarities and dust from the errosive soil, is a constant factor in the local athmosphere. The soil is so called "Terra Roxa" (red soil) and in its physicochemical composition there is a great amount of iron oxides, silica (silt, agril laceous material), aluminium, manganese, organic compounds. In this preliminary report the A. suggests further research for a better knowledge of the composition of the respirable air and if dust exposures are or not responsible for the lung lesions.

  9. Measurement scale in maximum entropy models of species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The consistency of the species abundance distribution across diverse communities has attracted widespread attention. In this paper, I argue that the consistency of pattern arises because diverse ecological mechanisms share a common symmetry with regard to measurement scale. By symmetry, I mean that different ecological processes preserve the same measure of information and lose all other information in the aggregation of various perturbations. I frame these explanations of symmetry, measurement, and aggregation in terms of a recently developed extension to the theory of maximum entropy. I show that the natural measurement scale for the species abundance distribution is log-linear: the information in observations at small population sizes scales logarithmically and, as population size increases, the scaling of information grades from logarithmic to linear. Such log-linear scaling leads naturally to a gamma distribution for species abundance, which matches well with the observed patterns. Much of the variation between samples can be explained by the magnitude at which the measurement scale grades from logarithmic to linear. This measurement approach can be applied to the similar problem of allelic diversity in population genetics and to a wide variety of other patterns in biology. PMID:21265915

  10. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  11. Host trait combinations drive abundance and canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Cleber Juliano Neves; Dyonisio, Júlio César; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are strongly dependent on the conditions created by their host's traits and a certain degree of specificity is expected between them, even if these species are largely abundant in a series of tree hosts of a given environment, as in the case of atmospheric bromeliads. Despite their considerable abundance in these environments, we hypothesize that stochasticity alone cannot explain the presence and abundance of atmospheric bromeliads on host trees, since host traits could have a greater influence on the establishment of these bromeliads. We used secondary and reforested seasonal forests and three distinct silvicultures to test whether species richness, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity of trees can predict the differential presence, abundance and distribution of atmospheric bromeliads on hosts. We compared the observed parameters of their assemblage with null models and performed successive variance hierarchic partitions of abundance and distribution of the assemblage to detect the influence of multiple traits of the tree hosts. Our results do not indicate direct relationships between the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads and phylogenetic or functional diversity of trees, but instead indicate that bromeliads occurred on fewer tree species than expected by chance. We distinguished functional tree patterns that can improve or reduce the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads, and change their distribution on branches and trunk. While individual tree traits are related to increased abundance, species traits are related to the canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages. A balance among these tree functional patterns drives the atmospheric bromeliad assemblage of the forest patches. PMID:26888951

  12. Host trait combinations drive abundance and canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Cleber Juliano Neves; Dyonisio, Júlio César; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are strongly dependent on the conditions created by their host's traits and a certain degree of specificity is expected between them, even if these species are largely abundant in a series of tree hosts of a given environment, as in the case of atmospheric bromeliads. Despite their considerable abundance in these environments, we hypothesize that stochasticity alone cannot explain the presence and abundance of atmospheric bromeliads on host trees, since host traits could have a greater influence on the establishment of these bromeliads. We used secondary and reforested seasonal forests and three distinct silvicultures to test whether species richness, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity of trees can predict the differential presence, abundance and distribution of atmospheric bromeliads on hosts. We compared the observed parameters of their assemblage with null models and performed successive variance hierarchic partitions of abundance and distribution of the assemblage to detect the influence of multiple traits of the tree hosts. Our results do not indicate direct relationships between the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads and phylogenetic or functional diversity of trees, but instead indicate that bromeliads occurred on fewer tree species than expected by chance. We distinguished functional tree patterns that can improve or reduce the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads, and change their distribution on branches and trunk. While individual tree traits are related to increased abundance, species traits are related to the canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages. A balance among these tree functional patterns drives the atmospheric bromeliad assemblage of the forest patches. PMID:26888951

  13. Mothers as Teachers: Instruction and Control Patterns Observed in Interactions of Middle-Class Mothers with Trainable Mentally Retarded and Nonretarded Children. Final Report Number 7.32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolley, Diane Greenough

    A study was conducted to compare teaching and control patterns used by mothers of 4- to 6-year-old trainable mentally retarded (TMR) children to patterns used by mothers of nonretarded children, and to evaluate an analysis strategy identifying sequential behavior chains from observational data. Literature was explored on three topics: cognitive…

  14. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-12-01

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF's Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratification at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the trade-wind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. These findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.

  15. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    SciTech Connect

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-11-06

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratification at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the tradewind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. As a result, these findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.

  16. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    DOE PAGES

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-11-06

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratificationmore » at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the tradewind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. As a result, these findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.« less

  17. Universal ecological patterns in college basketball communities.

    PubMed

    Warren, Robert J; Skelly, David K; Schmitz, Oswald J; Bradford, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    The rank abundance of common and rare species within ecological communities is remarkably consistent from the tropics to the tundra. This invariant patterning provides one of ecology's most enduring and unified tenets: most species rare and a few very common. Increasingly, attention is focused upon elucidating biological mechanisms that explain these species abundance distributions (SADs), but these evaluations remain controversial. We show that college basketball wins generate SADs just like those observed in ecological communities. Whereas college basketball wins are structured by competitive interactions, the result produces a SAD pattern indistinguishable from random wins. We also show that species abundance data for tropical trees exhibits a significant-digit pattern consistent with data derived from complex structuring forces. These results cast doubt upon the ability of SAD analysis to resolve ecological mechanism, and their patterning may reflect statistical artifact as much as biological processes.

  18. Understanding patterns of variability in tropospheric ozone over Europe and eastern Asia in 2005-2009 using TES observations and the TM5 chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; van Geel, M. H. A.; Boersma, K. F.

    2012-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important greenhouse gas and a global air pollutant. Because of its oxidizing power, it is harmful to the tissues of many living organisms. Ozone in the troposphere is produced by photo-chemical oxidation of precursors including volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and CO in the presence of NOx. These precursors may originate from anthropogenic emissions, but may also be naturally produced by vegetation, animals, bacteria and fungi. Intrusions of stratospheric ozone into the higher troposphere also contribute to the ozone abundance in the troposphere. The interpretation of tropospheric ozone observations remains a challenging task due to complex varying spatio-temporal emissions of ozone precursors with different lifetimes (from minutes to hours, days and weeks), stratospheric intrusion, and the effect of long-range transport of precursors and ozone driven by meteorological variables. In some areas the combination of favourable photochemical regimes and specific meteorological conditions may enhance the local tropospheric ozone productions. Thanks to their extensive spatial coverage and frequent overpasses, spaceborne sensors are excellent tools to map spatio-temporal patterns of tropospheric ozone. However, evaluating trends in tropospheric ozone concentrations over Europe (e.g. Mediterranean maxima) and China requires the use of advanced chemical transport models (CTM) for understanding and attributing the different sources to the observations. The objective of this study was to evaluate time series of tropospheric ozone observed from space by TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer onboard NASA's EOS-Aura satellite) with the TM5 CTM using five years (2005-2009) of observations and simulations. From dedicated TM5 model runs, the spatio-temporal TES trends of tropospheric ozone are analysed aiming at understanding the different sources and mechanisms involved. First comparison of tropospheric ozone concentration from TES v4 observations and

  19. Do top-down or bottom-up forces determine Stephanitis pyrioides abundance in urban landscapes?

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Raupp, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the influence of habitat structural complexity on the collective effects of top-down and bottom-up forces on herbivore abundance in urban landscapes. The persistence and varying complexity of urban landscapes set them apart from ephemeral agroecosystems and natural habitats where the majority of studies have been conducted. Using surveys and manipulative experiments. We explicitly tested the effect of natural enemies (enemies hypothesis), host plant quality, and herbivore movement on the abundance of the specialist insect herbivore, Stephanitis pyrioides, in landscapes of varying structural complexity. This herbivore was extremely abundant in simple landscapes and rare in complex ones. Natural enemies were the major force influencing abundance of S. pyrioides across habitat types. Generalist predators, particularly the spider Anyphaena celer, were more abundant in complex landscapes. Predator abundance was related to greater abundance of alternative prey in those landscapes. Stephanitis pyrioides survival was lower in complex habitats when exposed to endemic natural enemy populations. Laboratory feeding trials confirmed the more abundant predators consumed S. pyrioides. Host plant quality was not a strong force influencing patterns of S. pyrioides abundance. When predators were excluded, adult S. pyrioides survival was greater on azaleas grown in complex habitats, in opposition to the observed pattern of abundance. Similarly, complexity did not affect S. pyrioides immigration and emigration rates. The complexity of urban landscapes affects the strength of top-down forces on herbivorous insect populations by influencing alternative prey and generalist predator abundance. It is possible that habitats can be manipulated to promote the suppressive effects of generalist predators.

  20. Light element non-LTE abundances of lambda Bootis stars. II. Nitrogen and sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, I.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Paunzen, E.; Pintado, O. I.; Solano, E.; Barzova, I. S.

    2001-09-01

    One of the main characteristics proclaimed for the group of the lambda Bootis stars is the apparent solar abundance of the light elements C, N, O and S. The typical abundance pattern is completed by the strong underabundances of the Fe-peak elements. In the first paper of this series, we have shown that carbon is less abundant than oxygen but both elements are still significantly more abundant than Fe-peak elements. The mean abundances, based on a detailed non-LTE investigation, were found -0.37 dex and -0.07 dex, respectively. As a further step, we now present non-LTE abundances of nitrogen and sulphur for thirteen members of the lambda Bootis group based on several spectral lines between 8590 Å, and 8750 Å. Furthermore, LTE abundances for calcium in the same spectral range were derived and compared with values from the literature. Similar to the mean abundances of carbon and oxygen, nearly solar values were found (-0.30 dex for nitrogen and -0.11 dex for sulphur) for our sample of program stars. Among our sample, one previously undetected binary system (HD 64491) was identified. From a statistical point of view, the abundances of the light elements range from slightly overabundant to moderately underabundant compared to the Sun. However, the individual objects always exhibit a similiar pattern, with the Fe-peak elements being significantly more underabundant than the light elements. No correlation of the derived abundances with astrophysical parameters such as the effective temperature, surface gravity or projected rotational velocity was found. Furthermore, the abundances of the light elements do not allow us to discriminate between any proposed theory. Based on observations obtained at BNAO Rozhen and Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan.

  1. REPRODUCING THE OBSERVED ABUNDANCES IN RCB AND HdC STARS WITH POST-DOUBLE-DEGENERATE MERGER MODELS-CONSTRAINTS ON MERGER AND POST-MERGER SIMULATIONS AND PHYSICS PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Athira; Herwig, Falk; Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Staff, Jan; Pignatari, Marco; Paxton, Bill

    2013-07-20

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen-deficient, variable stars that are most likely the result of He-CO WD mergers. They display extremely low oxygen isotopic ratios, {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O {approx_equal} 1-10, {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C {>=} 100, and enhancements up to 2.6 dex in F and in s-process elements from Zn to La, compared to solar. These abundances provide stringent constraints on the physical processes during and after the double-degenerate merger. As shown previously, O-isotopic ratios observed in RCB stars cannot result from the dynamic double-degenerate merger phase, and we now investigate the role of the long-term one-dimensional spherical post-merger evolution and nucleosynthesis based on realistic hydrodynamic merger progenitor models. We adopt a model for extra envelope mixing to represent processes driven by rotation originating in the dynamical merger. Comprehensive nucleosynthesis post-processing simulations for these stellar evolution models reproduce, for the first time, the full range of the observed abundances for almost all the elements measured in RCB stars: {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios between 9 and 15, C-isotopic ratios above 100, and {approx}1.4-2.35 dex F enhancements, along with enrichments in s-process elements. The nucleosynthesis processes in our models constrain the length and temperature in the dynamic merger shell-of-fire feature as well as the envelope mixing in the post-merger phase. s-process elements originate either in the shell-of-fire merger feature or during the post-merger evolution, but the contribution from the asymptotic giant branch progenitors is negligible. The post-merger envelope mixing must eventually cease {approx}10{sup 6} yr after the dynamic merger phase before the star enters the RCB phase.

  2. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  3. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  4. A Minimal Regulatory Network of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Factors Recovers Observed Patterns of CD4+ T Cell Differentiation and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Sanchez, Mariana Esther; Mendoza, Luis; Villarreal, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells orchestrate the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. While both experimental and modeling work has been conducted to understand the molecular genetic mechanisms involved in CD4+ T cell responses and fate attainment, the dynamic role of intrinsic (produced by CD4+ T lymphocytes) versus extrinsic (produced by other cells) components remains unclear, and the mechanistic and dynamic understanding of the plastic responses of these cells remains incomplete. In this work, we studied a regulatory network for the core transcription factors involved in CD4+ T cell-fate attainment. We first show that this core is not sufficient to recover common CD4+ T phenotypes. We thus postulate a minimal Boolean regulatory network model derived from a larger and more comprehensive network that is based on experimental data. The minimal network integrates transcriptional regulation, signaling pathways and the micro-environment. This network model recovers reported configurations of most of the characterized cell types (Th0, Th1, Th2, Th17, Tfh, Th9, iTreg, and Foxp3-independent T regulatory cells). This transcriptional-signaling regulatory network is robust and recovers mutant configurations that have been reported experimentally. Additionally, this model recovers many of the plasticity patterns documented for different T CD4+ cell types, as summarized in a cell-fate map. We tested the effects of various micro-environments and transient perturbations on such transitions among CD4+ T cell types. Interestingly, most cell-fate transitions were induced by transient activations, with the opposite behavior associated with transient inhibitions. Finally, we used a novel methodology was used to establish that T-bet, TGF-β and suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins are keys to recovering observed CD4+ T cell plastic responses. In conclusion, the observed CD4+ T cell-types and transition patterns emerge from the feedback between the intrinsic or intracellular regulatory core

  5. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  6. Impact of ion cloud densities on the measurement of relative ion abundances in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: experimental observations of coulombically induced cyclotron radius perturbations and ion cloud dephasing rates.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E F; Muddiman, D C

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental research into the quantitative properties of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) has yielded interesting observations, especially in terms of factors affecting the accuracy of relative ion abundances. However, most of the previous discussions have focused on theoretical systems, or systems of limited scope. In this paper, we document ion motion attributes of a 30 spectra (six samples, five replicates each) system previously established as linear over two orders of magnitude. Observed behaviors include the perturbation of one charged species (cyclosporin A, CsA) of low ion density to a cyclotron orbit of greater radius than that of an almost identical, but slightly mass-separated species (CsG) with a higher ion density. This radial perturbation is attributed to the coulombic repulsion between the two ion clouds as they interact during the excitation process, as previously proposed by Uechi and Dunbar. Magnitudes of the perturbation were confirmed by making cyclotron radii determinations utilizing the ratio of the third-to-first harmonics for the charged species of interest. It was found that these radial differences can account for as much as a 55% signal bias in favor of CsA for a single sample and a >20% positive bias in the slope of the regressed data set. A second behavior noted that also contributes to the potential inaccuracy of relative ion abundance measurements is the difference in signal decay rates for CsA and CsG. Damping constants and initial time domain signal amplitudes were evaluated using segmented Fourier transforms. Discrepancies in decay rates were not expected from two species that have essentially identical collisional cross-sections. However, it has been observed that the faster decay rates are observed by the species of lower ion cloud density. We have attributed this differential signal decay phenomenon to the rates of loss of phase coherence for the two ion clouds. Previously, others have

  7. Where No (Observed) Forest has Gone Before: New Patterns in Forest Response to Climate Change and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, S.; Sun, G.; Boggs, J. L.; Ward, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Insect outbreaks, wildfire, and drought have directly or indirectly impacted forest health, productivity and water use long before the advent of modern forestry practices. However, climate change may be acerbating these impacts are causing land managers to reconsider the use and timing of management tools. However, even as new methods are being devised to combat negative drought impacts, the forest response to chronic and increasingly severe episodic drought may be changing. Historically, the weakest (e.g., suppressed, understory) trees were the first to succumb to stress while the strongest (e.g., dominant, fast growing). However, recent studies have suggested that a combination of chronic and increasingly extreme episodic stress may be causing hereunto unobserved patterns in forest mortality with the more vigorously growing trees having higher rates of mortality than slower growing, more generally stressed individuals. I suggest that the forests have not altered their response to stress, but only that the level of stress, and the forest response to that stress has not previously been observed in recorded history. This extension of the forest stress response continuum has very significant implications to forest management under drought and associated disturbance. Therefore, this paper explores the causes and implications for maintaining forest resilience and sustainability under an increasingly variable climate.

  8. Experimenting with a Visible Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction in Agar Gel and Observing Copper Crystal Growth Patterns to Engage Student Interest and Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Meifen; Wang, Xiaogang; Yang, Yangyiwei; Shi, Xiang; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The reaction process of copper-aluminum displacement in agar gel was observed at the microscopic level with a stereomicroscope; pine-like branches of copper crystals growing from aluminum surface into gel at a constant rate were observed. Students were asked to make hypotheses on the pattern formation and design new research approaches to prove…

  9. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  10. Large brown seaweeds of the British Isles: Evidence of changes in abundance over four decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesson, Chris; Bush, Laura E.; Davies, Andrew J.; Maggs, Christine A.; Brodie, Juliet

    2015-03-01

    The large brown seaweeds (macroalgae) are keystone species in intertidal and shallow subtidal marine ecosystems and are harvested for food and other products. Recently, there have been sporadic, often anecdotal, reports of local abundance declines around the British Isles, but regional surveys have rarely revisited sites to determine possible changes. An assessment was undertaken of changes in the abundance of large brown seaweeds around the British Isles using historical survey data, and determination of whether any changes were linked with climate change. Data were analysed from multiple surveys for 14 habitat-forming and commercially important species of Phaeophyceae, covering orders Laminariales, Fucales and Tilopteridales. Changes in abundance were assessed for sites over the period 1974-2010. Trends in distribution were compared to summer and winter sea surface temperatures (SST). Results revealed regional patterns of both increase and decrease in abundance for multiple species, with significant declines in the south for kelp species and increases in northern and central areas for some kelp and wracks. Abundance patterns of 10 of the 14 species showed a significant association with SSTs, but there was a mixture of positive and negative responses. This is the first British Isles-wide observation of declining abundance of large brown seaweeds. Historical surveys provide useful data to examine trends in abundance, but the ad hoc nature of these studies limit the conclusions that can be drawn. Although the British Isles remains a stronghold for large brown algae, it is imperative that systematic surveys are undertaken to monitor changes.

  11. In situ observation of biomolecules patterned on a PEG-modified Si surface by scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Kang, Sung Koo; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Younghun; Yi, Jongheop

    2006-09-01

    A Si(100) wafer was modified with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (M-PEG silane) via a self-assembly technique and nano-/micro-sized patterns were then fabricated by scanning probe lithography. The protrusive silicon dioxide pattern was more reactive compared to the non-patterned area, i.e. the PEG deposited area. To demonstrate the feasibility of the submicron patterning of protein based on the anodic oxidation of the Si surface by atomic force microscopy (AFM), streptavidin labelled with Au-colloidal particle and non-labelled streptavidin were site-selectively immobilized on the patterned areas. The streptavidin-patterned surface produced by these procedures can be utilized for the detection of biotinylated materials, such as an antibody and an antigen. A patterned silicon surface is the basis of biosensing devices, in which the patterned areas serve as sensing elements that directly interact with bioanalytes, while the background of the substrate remains passive to the deposition of analytes, thus resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Vegetation effects on event water dynamics - Insights from in-situ stable isotope observations and dye patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, Till; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The predicted changes of climate and land-use could have drastic effects on the water balance of ecosystems, particularly under frequent drought and subsequent rewetting conditions. Yet, inference of these effects and related consequences for the structure and functioning of ecosystems, groundwater recharge, leaching of nutrients and pollutants, drinking water availability, and the water cycle is currently impeded by gaps in our understanding of the manifold interactions between vegetation and soil water dynamics. While plants require water and nutrients, they also exert, for instance, important below-ground controls on the distribution and movement of water and chemicals in the rooted soil horizons via uptake and redistribution of water, modification of soil hydraulic properties, and formation of conduits for rapid preferential water flow. This work aims to contribute to fill existing gaps by assessing the effects of different plant types and their rooting systems on the soil water dynamics. Therefore, we conducted artificial drought and subsequent rewetting experiments using isotopically and dye (Brilliant Blue FCF) labeled water on plots of various surface cover (bare soil, grass, beech, oak, vine) established on relatively homogeneous luvisol on loess in southwestern Germany. Detailed insight into the short-term dynamics of event water infiltration and root uptake during the field experiments was facilitated by the application of novel techniques for high-frequency in-situ monitoring of stable isotope signatures in pore and transpiration water using commercial laser-based spectrometers, augmenting conventional observations of soil physicochemical states (soil water content, matric potential, electrical conductivity). The temporal point information is complemented by dye staining profiles, providing a detailed picture of spatial infiltration patterns, and by root density observations. The results of the experiments allow for a comprehensive spatiotemporal

  13. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  14. Observed and modeled patterns of circulation in a semi-enclosed bay: Ria de Vigo (NW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilczynski, Krzysztof; Dubert, Jesus; Nolasco, Rita; Barton, Des; Souto Torres, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Ría de Vigo, as a semi-enclosed bay, belonging to the area so-called Rias Baixas, located at the northern tip of the Iberian coastal upwelling system. The circulation of the Ria de Vigo, being one of the major areas of mussels production, has become the subject of intensive research. The Ria de Vigo behaves as a partially-mixed estuary with a two-layered residual circulation, and is influenced by water exchange with the surrounding ocean. During northerly (upwelling favorable) winds, water enters into the Ria through the northern mouth and leaves through the surface layer of the southern mouth, in a double layer circulation at this mouth. Nearly opposed situation occours during downwelling favourable wind periods. Numerical models have become useful tools to study the hydrology and circulation of the Ria de Vigo. In this research we used the ROMS - AGRIF model. The implementation of several nested domains to increase the spatial resolution (up to 150m resolution) allowed solving the interactions between Ria de Vigo and surrounding coastal ocean in a realistic way. We have obtained a detailed description of the circulation with good agreement between observational data (ADCP moorings at both mouths, and weekly hydrological cruises) and predicted currents, salinity and temperature fields. Two new patterns of circulation in the Ria are revealed by our research: -In particular conditions associated with northerly wind relaxation, there are two-layer circulation occurs in both mouths of the Ria, consisting of outflow and inflow though the surface and bottom layers. This situation happens in the absence of stratification during winter. -Also during winter, one-layer circulation in the southern mouth of the Ria (typically there are two layers) can occur during long periods of persistent and strong upwelling-favourable wind. Our research has provided a detailed study of the circulation and hydrology of the Ria de Vigo, explaining specifically different mechanisms of

  15. Prediction of maximum P- and S-wave amplitude distributions incorporating frequency- and distance-dependent characteristics of the observed apparent radiation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Manabu; Yoshimoto, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Frequency-dependent model of the apparent radiation pattern has been extensively incorporated into engineering and scientific applications for high-frequency seismic waves, but distance-dependent properties have not yet been fully taken into account. We investigated the unified characteristics of frequency and distance dependences in both apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns during local crustal earthquakes. Observed distortions of the apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns could be simply modeled by using a function of the normalized hypocentral distance, which is a product of the wave number and hypocentral distance. This behavior suggests that major cause of distortion of the apparent radiation pattern is seismic wave scattering and diffraction within the heterogeneous crust. On the basis of observed normalized hypocentral distance dependency, we proposed a method for prediction of spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes. Our method incorporating normalized hypocentral distance dependence of the apparent radiation pattern reproduced the observed spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes over a wide frequency and distance ranges successfully.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Trace-element abundances in several new ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Hill, Dolores H.

    1993-01-01

    Four new ureilites are analyzed for trace-element abundances. Frontier Mountain (FRO) 90054 is an augite-rich ureilite and has high rare earth element (REE) abundances with a pattern expected of augite. FRO 90036 and Acfer 277 have REE patterns similar to the V-shape pattern of other ureilites. Nuevo Mercurio (b) has very high REE abundances, but they look like they are due to terrestrial alteration. The siderophile-element pattern of these ureilites are similar to those of known ureilites.

  17. Effect of nitrate and sulfate relative abundance in PM2.5 on liquid water content explored through half-hourly observations of inorganic soluble aerosols at a polluted receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Griffith, Stephen M.; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Liquid water content (LWC) is the amount of liquid water on aerosols. It contributes to visibility degradation, provides a surface for gas condensation, and acts as a medium for heterogeneous gas/particle reactions. In this study, 520 half-hourly measurements of ionic chemical composition in PM2.5 at a receptor site in Hong Kong are used to investigate the dependence of LWC on ionic chemical composition, particularly on the relative abundance of sulfate and nitrate. LWC was estimated using a thermodynamic model (AIM-III). Within this data set of PM2.5 ionic compositions, LWC was highly correlated with the multivariate combination of sulfate and nitrate concentrations and RH (R2 = 0.90). The empirical linear regression result indicates that LWC is more sensitive to nitrate mass than sulfate. During a nitrate episode, the highest LWC (80.6 ± 17.9 μg m-3) was observed and the level was 70% higher than that during a sulfate episode despite a similar ionic PM2.5 mass concentration. A series of sensitivity tests were conducted to study LWC change as a function of the relative nitrate and sulfate abundance, the trend of which is expected to shift