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Sample records for abundance solid-state 13c

  1. Measuring Long-Range 13C– 13C Correlations on a Surface under Natural Abundance Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance [Measuring Long Range 13C– 13C Correlations on Surface under Natural Abundance Using DNP-enhanced Solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek

    Here, we report that spatial (<1 nm) proximity between different molecules in solid bulk materials and, for the first time, different moieties on the surface of a catalyst, can be established without isotope enrichment by means of homonuclear CHHC solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiment. This 13C– 13C correlation measurement, which hitherto was not possible for natural-abundance solids, was enabled by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization. Importantly, it allows the study of long-range correlations in a variety of materials with high resolution.

  2. Measuring Long-Range 13C– 13C Correlations on a Surface under Natural Abundance Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance [Measuring Long Range 13C– 13C Correlations on Surface under Natural Abundance Using DNP-enhanced Solid-state NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek

    2017-10-13

    Here, we report that spatial (<1 nm) proximity between different molecules in solid bulk materials and, for the first time, different moieties on the surface of a catalyst, can be established without isotope enrichment by means of homonuclear CHHC solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiment. This 13C– 13C correlation measurement, which hitherto was not possible for natural-abundance solids, was enabled by the use of dynamic nuclear polarization. Importantly, it allows the study of long-range correlations in a variety of materials with high resolution.

  3. Natural Abundance 15 N and 13 C Solid-State NMR Chemical Shifts: High Sensitivity Probes of the Halogen Bond Geometry.

    PubMed

    Cerreia Vioglio, Paolo; Catalano, Luca; Vasylyeva, Vera; Nervi, Carlo; Chierotti, Michele R; Resnati, Giuseppe; Gobetto, Roberto; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2016-11-14

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is a versatile characterization technique that can provide a plethora of information complementary to single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) analysis. Herein, we present an experimental and computational investigation of the relationship between the geometry of a halogen bond (XB) and the SSNMR chemical shifts of the non-quadrupolar nuclei either directly involved in the interaction ( 15 N) or covalently bonded to the halogen atom ( 13 C). We have prepared two series of X-bonded co-crystals based upon two different dipyridyl modules, and several halobenzenes and diiodoalkanes, as XB-donors. SCXRD structures of three novel co-crystals between 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane, and 1,4-diiodobenzene, 1,6-diiodododecafluorohexane, and 1,8-diiodohexadecafluorooctane were obtained. For the first time, the change in the 15 N SSNMR chemical shifts upon XB formation is shown to experimentally correlate with the normalized distance parameter of the XB. The same overall trend is confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the chemical shifts. 13 C NQS experiments show a positive, linear correlation between the chemical shifts and the C-I elongation, which is an indirect probe of the strength of the XB. These correlations can be of general utility to estimate the strength of the XB occurring in diverse adducts by using affordable SSNMR analysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Identifying guanosine self assembly at natural isotopic abundance by high-resolution 1H and 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Webber, Amy L; Masiero, Stefano; Pieraccini, Silvia; Burley, Jonathan C; Tatton, Andrew S; Iuga, Dinu; Pham, Tran N; Spada, Gian Piero; Brown, Steven P

    2011-12-14

    By means of the (1)H chemical shifts and the proton-proton proximities as identified in (1)H double-quantum (DQ) combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) solid-state NMR correlation spectra, ribbon-like and quartet-like self-assembly can be identified for guanosine derivatives without isotopic labeling for which it was not possible to obtain single crystals suitable for diffraction. Specifically, characteristic spectral fingerprints are observed for dG(C10)(2) and dG(C3)(2) derivatives, for which quartet-like and ribbon-like self-assembly has been unambiguously identified by (15)N refocused INADEQUATE spectra in a previous study of (15)N-labeled derivatives (Pham, T. N.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2005, 127, 16018). The NH (1)H chemical shift is observed to be higher (13-15 ppm) for ribbon-like self-assembly as compared to 10-11 ppm for a quartet-like arrangement, corresponding to a change from NH···N to NH···O intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The order of the two NH(2)(1)H chemical shifts is also inverted, with the NH(2) proton closest in space to the NH proton having a higher or lower (1)H chemical shift than that of the other NH(2) proton for ribbon-like as opposed to quartet-like self-assembly. For the dG(C3)(2) derivative for which a single-crystal diffraction structure is available, the distinct resonances and DQ peaks are assigned by means of gauge-including projector-augmented wave (GIPAW) chemical shift calculations. In addition, (14)N-(1)H correlation spectra obtained at 850 MHz under fast (60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS) confirm the assignment of the NH and NH(2) chemical shifts for the dG(C3)(2) derivative and allow longer range through-space N···H proximities to be identified, notably to the N7 nitrogens on the opposite hydrogen-bonding face. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-05

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  7. A Molecular Budget for a Peatland Based Upon 13C Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine S.; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth D.; Burt, Tim P.; Apperley, David C.; Rose, Rob

    2018-02-01

    Peatlands can accumulate organic matter into long-term carbon (C) storage within the soil profile. This study used solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) to investigate the transit of organic C through a peatland ecosystem to understand the molecular budget that accompanies the long-term accumulation of C. Samples of biomass, litter, peat soil profile, particulate organic matter, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were taken from the Moor House National Nature Reserve, a peat-covered catchment in northern England where both the dry matter and C budget for the ecosystem were known. The results showed that: The interpretation of the 13C-NMR spectra shows that polysaccharides are preferentially removed through the ecosystem, while lignin components are preferentially retained and come to dominate the organic matter accumulated at depth in the profile. The DOM is derived from the oxidation of both biomass and the degradation of lignin, while the particulate organic matter is derived from erosion of the peat profile. The DOM is differentiated by its proportion of oxidized functional groups and not by its aromatic content. The changes in functionality leading to DOM production suggest side chain oxidation resulting in C-C cleavage/depolymerisation of lignin, a common reaction within white rot fungi. The 13C-NMR budget shows that O-alkyl functional groups are disproportionately lost between primary production and accumulation in the deep peat, while C-alkyl functional groups are disproportionately preserved. The carbon lost as gases (CO2 and CH4) was estimated to be composed of 93% polysaccharide-derived carbon and 7% lignin-derived carbon.

  8. 2-Octyl thiophene based three ring mesogens: solid state (13)C NMR and XRD investigations.

    PubMed

    Veeraprakash, B; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T; Mandal, A B

    2015-08-14

    2-Octyl thiophene based three-ring mesogens namely 4-n-alkoxyphenyl 4-(5-n-octyl-2-thienyl)benzoates are synthesized by employing palladium acetate based direct arylation. The alkoxy terminal is varied with even carbons from C2 to C14 and enantiotropic polymesomorphism is noticed for all the homologs. Accordingly, phase sequence consisting of nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B is seen for mesogens with terminal chains C6, C8, C10 and C12 on cooling the isotropic phase. For mesogens with C2, C4, C8 and C10 terminal alkoxy chains, the mesophase assignment from hot-stage optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry is further confirmed by variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction measurements. The appearance of smectic B phase is established by noticing sharp and intense peaks in both small-angle and wide-angle regions. For a representative mesogen, i.e. T10, high-resolution solid-state (13)C NMR investigations are carried out in all the phases, viz. nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B phases. The orientational order parameters calculated from (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings from 2D SAMPI-4 experiments are found to be 0.44, 0.67, 0.73 and 0.79 in nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B mesophases for the center phenyl ring respectively. Remarkably, the thiophene order parameter in all mesophases is found to be higher than that of phenyl rings and is explained by considering the molecular shape, which has a terminal bend. Further, the mesogens are found to be photoemissive in chloroform solution with an emission band at ∼410 nm.

  9. Enhancing the resolution of 1H and 13C solid-state NMR spectra by reduction of anisotropic bulk magnetic susceptibility broadening.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Michael P; Venkatesh, Amrit; Carnahan, Scott L; Calahan, Julie L; Lubach, Joseph W; Munson, Eric J; Rossini, Aaron J

    2017-10-25

    We demonstrate that natural isotopic abundance 2D heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra can be used to significantly reduce or eliminate the broadening of 1 H and 13 C solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids due to anisotropic bulk magnetic susceptibility (ABMS). ABMS often manifests in solids with aromatic groups, such as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and inhomogeneously broadens the NMR peaks of all nuclei in the sample. Inhomogeneous peaks with full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼1 ppm typically result from ABMS broadening and the low spectral resolution impedes the analysis of solid-state NMR spectra. ABMS broadening of solid-state NMR spectra has previously been eliminated using 2D multiple-quantum correlation experiments, or by performing NMR experiments on diluted materials or single crystals. However, these experiments are often infeasible due to their poor sensitivity and/or provide limited gains in resolution. 2D 1 H- 13 C HETCOR experiments have previously been applied to reduce susceptibility broadening in paramagnetic solids and we show that this strategy can significantly reduce ABMS broadening in diamagnetic organic solids. Comparisons of 1D solid-state NMR spectra and 1 H and 13 C solid-state NMR spectra obtained from 2D 1 H- 13 C HETCOR NMR spectra show that the HETCOR spectrum directly increases resolution by a factor of 1.5 to 8. The direct gain in resolution is determined by the ratio of the inhomogeneous 13 C/ 1 H linewidth to the homogeneous 1 H linewidth, with the former depending on the magnitude of the ABMS broadening and the strength of the applied field and the latter on the efficiency of homonuclear decoupling. The direct gains in resolution obtained using the 2D HETCOR experiments are better than that obtained by dilution. For solids with long proton longitudinal relaxation times, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was applied to enhance sensitivity and enable the acquisition of 2D 1 H- 13 C

  10. The role of solid state 13 C NMR spectroscopy in studies of the nature of native celluloses

    Treesearch

    R.H. Atalla; D.L. VanderHart

    1999-01-01

    Published spectroscopic observations pertaining to the crystal structure of native celluloses are reviewed for the purpose of defining our current level of understanding about crystalline polymorphism in these materials. Emphasis is placed on observations from solid state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which first led to the postulate that most native,...

  11. CP/MAS /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopic study of chlorophyll a in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.E.; Spencer, R.B.; Burger, V.T.

    1983-09-01

    Solid-state cross-polarization, magic-angle sample spinning carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been recorded on chlorophyll a- water aggregates, methyl pyrochlorophyllide a and methyl pyropheophorbide a (derivatives that lack a phytyl chain). Spectra have also been collected under a decoupling regime in which resonances of certain hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms are suppressed. These observations are used to assign the solid state spectra.

  12. Quantitative solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric analyses of wood xylen: effect of increasing carbohydrate content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Isolated lignin with a low carbohydrate content was spiked with increasing amounts of alpha-cellulose, and then analysed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CPMAS) and dipolar dephasing methods in order to assess the quantitative reliability of CPMAS measurement of carbohydrate content and to determine how increasingly intense resonances for carbohydrate carbons affect calculations of the degree of lignin's aromatic ring substitution and methoxyl carbon content. Comparisons were made of the carbohydrate content calculated by NMR with carbohydrate concentrations obtained by phenol-sulfuric acid assay and by the calculation from the known amounts of cellulose added. The NMR methods used in this study yield overestimates for carbohydrate carbons due to resonance area overlap from the aliphatic side chain carbons of lignin. When corrections are made for these overlapping resonance areas, the NMR results agree very well with results obtained by other methods. Neither the calculated methoxyl carbon content nor the degree of aromatic ring substitution in lignin, both calculated from dipolar dephasing spectra, change with cellulose content. Likewise, lignin methoxyl content does not correlate with cellulose abundance when measured by integration of CPMAS spectra. ?? 1992.

  13. Solid-state selective (13)C excitation and spin diffusion NMR to resolve spatial dimensions in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Foston, Marcus; Katahira, Rui; Gjersing, Erica; Davis, Mark F; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a (13)C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. (13)C spin diffusion time constants (T(SD)) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for (13)C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated (13)C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances ∼0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  14. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of a large fossil gymnosperm from the Yallourn Open Cut, Latrobe Valley, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A series of samples taken from the cross section of a 3-m-diameter fossilized gymnospermous log (Araucariaceae) in the Yallourn Seam of the Australian brown coals was examined by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate chemical changes related to the combined processes of peatification and coalification. The results show that cellulosic materials were degraded and lost on the periphery of the log, however, the degree of such degradation in the central core is substantially less. The lignin is uniformly altered by coalification reactions to a macromolecular substance displaying decreased aryl ether linkages but significantly greater amounts of carbon linkages compared to modern lignin. Changes in the methoxyl carbon contents of lignin in cross section reveal demethylation reactions, but these do not appear to be related to degree of carbon linking. Both the degredation of cellulosic materials and demethylation of lignin appear to be early diagenetic processes occurring during peatification independently of the coalification reactions. ?? 1989.

  15. A solid-state [sup 13]C NMR study of the molecular motion of ethylene adsorbed on a silver surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxin Wang; Ellis, P.D.

    1993-01-13

    The reorientation of ethylene on a silver catalyst surface has been studied by solid-state [sup 13]C NMR. The static cross-polarization spectra at different temperatures have been measured. Different jump site models are proposed to simulate the experimental results. It was found that the models involving a low number of jump sites are more sensitive to the experimental details. By comparison of the simulated and experimental results, the 6- and 4-site jump models are chosen as the most satisfactory model to fit the experimental spectra. On the basis of this representation, the activation energy derived for the jump process is 4.3more » kJ/mol. From the simulated results, it was concluded that the symmetry axis for the motion of the ethylene at low temperatures ([minus]173 to ca. [minus]45[degrees]C) is perpendicular to the plane of the ethylene molecule. At higher temperatures motion about other axes is initiated such that at room temperature a nearly isotropically averaged [sup 13]C shielding tensor is observed. 20 refs., 9 figs.« less

  16. High-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of the paramagnetic metal-organic frameworks, STAM-1 and HKUST-1.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Daniel M; Jamieson, Lauren E; Mohideen, M Infas H; McKinlay, Alistair C; Smellie, Iain A; Cadou, Romain; Keddie, Neil S; Morris, Russell E; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2013-01-21

    Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the Cu(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and STAM-1, and the structural changes occurring within these MOFs upon activation (dehydration). NMR spectroscopy is an attractive technique for the investigation of these materials, owing to its high sensitivity to local structure, without any requirement for longer-range order. However, interactions between nuclei and unpaired electrons in paramagnetic systems (e.g., Cu(II)-based MOFs) pose a considerable challenge, not only for spectral acquisition, but also in the assignment and interpretation of the spectral resonances. Here, we exploit the rapid T(1) relaxation of these materials to obtain (13)C NMR spectra using a spin-echo pulse sequence at natural abundance levels, and employ frequency-stepped acquisition to ensure uniform excitation of resonances over a wide frequency range. We then utilise selective (13)C isotopic labelling of the organic linker molecules to enable an unambiguous assignment of NMR spectra of both MOFs for the first time. We show that the monomethylated linker can be recovered from STAM-1 intact, demonstrating not only the interesting use of this MOF as a protecting group, but also the ability (for both STAM-1 and HKUST-1) to recover isotopically-enriched linkers, thereby reducing significantly the overall cost of the approach.

  17. Cross-polarization/magic-angle sample-spinning /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopic study of chlorophyll a in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.E.; Spencer, R.B.; Burger, V.T.

    1984-01-01

    Solid-state cross-polarization/magic-angle sample-spinning /sup 13/C NMR spectra have been recorded on chlorophyll a-water aggregates, methyl pyrochlorophyllide a, and methyl pyropheophorbide a. Spectra have also been collected under a decoupling regime in which resonances of certain hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms are suppressed. These observations are used to assign the solid-state spectra. 18 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. On the problem of resonance assignments in solid state NMR of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Determination of accurate resonance assignments from multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra is one of the major problems in biomolecular solid state NMR, particularly for relative large proteins with less-than-ideal NMR linewidths. This article investigates the difficulty of resonance assignment, using a computational Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm to search for assignments from artificial three-dimensional spectra that are constructed from the reported isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts of two proteins whose structures have been determined by solution NMR methods. The results demonstrate how assignment simulations can provide new insights into factors that affect the assignment process, which can then help guide the design of experimental strategies. Specifically, simulations are performed for the catalytic domain of SrtC (147 residues, primarily β-sheet secondary structure) and the N-terminal domain of MLKL (166 residues, primarily α-helical secondary structure). Assuming unambiguous residue-type assignments and four ideal three-dimensional data sets (NCACX, NCOCX, CONCA, and CANCA), uncertainties in chemical shifts must be less than 0.4 ppm for assignments for SrtC to be unique, and less than 0.2 ppm for MLKL. Eliminating CANCA data has no significant effect, but additionally eliminating CONCA data leads to more stringent requirements for chemical shift precision. Introducing moderate ambiguities in residue-type assignments does not have a significant effect.

  19. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, S M; Chen, C R; Xu, Z H; Nelson, P N; Boyd, S E; Meszaros, I; Chan, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Using solid state (13)C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of dissolved organic matter in pore waters from different depositional environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore waters from sediments of a number of different depositional environments was isolated by ultrafiltration using membranes with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 500. This > 500 molecular weight DOM represents 70-98% of the total DOM in these pore waters. We determined the gross chemical structure of this material using both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Our results show that the DOM in these pore waters appears to exist as two major types: one type dominated by carbohydrates and paraffinic structures and the second dominated by paraffinic and aromatic structures. We suggest that the dominance of one or the other structural type of DOM in the pore water depends on the relative oxidizing/reducing nature of the sediments as well as the source of the detrital organic matter. Under dominantly anaerobic conditions carbohydrates in the sediments are degraded by bacteria and accumulate in the pore water as DOM. However, little or no degradation of lignin occurs under these conditions. In contrast, sediments thought to be predominantly aerobic in character have DOM with diminished carbohydrate and enhanced aromatic character. The aromatic structures in the DOM from these sediments are thought to arise from the degradation of lignin. The large amounts of paraffinic structures in both types of DOM may be due to the degradation of unidentified paraffinic materials in algal or bacterial remains. ?? 1987.

  2. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  3. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid-state

  4. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  5. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  6. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  7. Determination of Multiple φ-Torsion Angles in Proteins by Selective and Extensive 13C Labeling and Two-Dimensional Solid-State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei

    1999-08-01

    We describe an approach to efficiently determine the backbone conformation of solid proteins that utilizes selective and extensive 13C labeling in conjunction with two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning NMR. The selective 13C labeling approach aims to reduce line broadening and other multispin complications encountered in solid-state NMR of uniformly labeled proteins while still enhancing the sensitivity of NMR spectra. It is achieved by using specifically labeled glucose or glycerol as the sole carbon source in the protein expression medium. For amino acids synthesized in the linear part of the biosynthetic pathways, [1-13C]glucose preferentially labels the ends of the side chains, while [2-13C]glycerol labels the Cα of these residues. Amino acids produced from the citric-acid cycle are labeled in a more complex manner. Information on the secondary structure of such a labeled protein was obtained by measuring multiple backbone torsion angles φ simultaneously, using an isotropic-anisotropic 2D correlation technique, the HNCH experiment. Initial experiments for resonance assignment of a selectively 13C labeled protein were performed using 15N-13C 2D correlation spectroscopy. From the time dependence of the 15N-13C dipolar coherence transfer, both intraresidue and interresidue connectivities can be observed, thus yielding partial sequential assignment. We demonstrate the selective 13C labeling and these 2D NMR experiments on a 8.5-kDa model protein, ubiquitin. This isotope-edited NMR approach is expected to facilitate the structure determination of proteins in the solid state.

  8. NMR crystallography to probe the breathing effect of the MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework using solid-state NMR measurements of 13C-27Al distances.

    PubMed

    Giovine, Raynald; Volkringer, Christophe; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean Paul; Loiseau, Thierry; Lafon, Olivier; Pourpoint, Frédérique

    2017-03-01

    The metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) (aluminium terephthalate) exhibits a structural transition between two porous structures with large pore (lp) or narrow pore (np) configurations. This transition, called the breathing effect, is observed upon changes in temperature or external pressure, as well as with the adsorption of guest molecules, such as H 2 O, within the pores. We show here how these different pore openings can be detected by observing the dephasing of 13 C magnetization under 13 C- 27 Al dipolar couplings using Rotational-Echo Saturation-Pulse Double-Resonance (RESPDOR) solid-state NMR experiments with Simultaneous Frequency and Amplitude Modulation (SFAM) recoupling. These double-resonance NMR experiments between 13 C and 27 Al nuclei, which have close Larmor frequencies, are feasible thanks to the use of a frequency splitter. The experimental SFAM-RESPDOR signal fractions agree well with those simulated from the MIL-53(Al)-lp and -np crystal structures obtained from powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Hence, these 13 C- 27 Al solid-state NMR experiments validate these structures and confirm their rigidity. A similar agreement is reported for the framework ligands in the as-synthesized (as) MIL-53(Al), in which the pores contain free ligands. Furthermore, in this case, 13 C-{ 27 Al} SFAM-RESPDOR experiments allow an estimation of the average distance between the free ligands and the 27 Al nuclei of the framework.

  9. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  10. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  11. Dynamic pictures of membrane proteins in two-dimensional crystal, lipid bilayer and detergent as revealed by site-directed solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Saitô, Hazime

    2004-11-01

    We have compared site-directed 13C solid-state NMR spectra of [3-13C]Ala- and/or [1-13C]Val-labeled membrane proteins, including bacteriorhodopsin (bR), pharaonis phoborhodopin (ppR), its cognate transducer (pHtrII) and Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DGK), in two-dimensional (2D) crystal, lipid bilayers, and detergent. Restricted fluctuation motions of these membrane proteins due to oligomerization of bR by specific protein-protein interactions in the 2D crystalline lattice or protein complex between ppR and pHtrII provide the most favorable environment to yield well-resolved, fully visible 13C NMR signals for [3-13C]Ala-labeled proteins. In contrast, several signals from such membrane proteins were broadened or lost owing to interference of inherent fluctuation frequencies (10(4)-10(5)Hz) with frequency of either proton decoupling or magic angle spinning, if their 13C NMR spectra were recorded as a monomer in lipid bilayers at ambient temperature. The presence of such protein dynamics is essential for the respective proteins to achieve their own biological functions. Finally, spectral broadening found for bR and DGK in detergents were discussed.

  12. Conformational study of 13C-enriched fibroin in the solid state, using the cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance method.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Kobayashi, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Kataoka, K

    1986-01-05

    Silk fibroin with the alanyl carboxyl carbon enriched with 13C was obtained by giving a diet containing 13C-enriched alanine to the larvae of Bombyx mori and Antheraea pernyi at the fifth instar. Sericin-free fibroin fibers were prepared from cocoons, and gut was made from the liquid silk in the gland. The final 13C content was about 13%. Cross polarization/magic angle sample spinning spectra at 25 MHz and 75 MHz were measured for each sample at different orientations. Spectra were simulated using the principal values and orientations of the shielding tensor in the alanine crystal. The results indicate that the beta-structure of the fibroin may be a little more flattened than the typical pleated sheet beta-structure.

  13. 13C-13C dipolar recoupling under very fast magic angle spinning in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: Applications to distance measurements, spectral assignments, and high-throughput secondary-structure determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2001-05-01

    A technique is presented to recouple homonuclear dipolar couplings between dilute spin pairs such as 13C-13C systems under very fast magic angle spinning (MAS) in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The presented technique, finite pulse rf driven recoupling (fpRFDR), restores homonuclear dipolar interactions based on constructive usage of finite pulse-width effects in a phase- and symmetry-cycled π-pulse train in which a rotor-synchronous π pulse is applied every rotation period. The restored effective dipolar interaction has the form of a zero-quantum dipolar Hamiltonian for static solids, whose symmetry in spin space is different from that obtained by conventional rf driven recoupling (RFDR) techniques. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of recoupling by fpRFDR is not strongly dependent on chemical shift differences or resonance offsets in contrast to previous recoupling methods under very fast MAS. To realize distance measurements without effects of spin relaxation, a constant-time version of fpRFDR (CT-fpRFDR) is introduced, in which the effective evolution period is varied by refocusing dipolar evolution with a rotor-synchronized solid echo while the total recoupling period is kept constant. From CT-fpRFDR experiments at a spinning speed of 30.3 kHz in a field of 17.6 T, the 13C-13C distance of [1-13C]Ala-[1-13C]Gly-Gly was determined to be 3.27 Å, which agrees well with the value of 3.20 Å obtained by x-ray diffraction. Also, two-dimensional (2D) 13C/13C chemical-shift correlation NMR spectrum in a field of 9.4 T was obtained with fpRFDR for fibrils of the segmentally 13C- and 15N-labeled Alzheimer's β-Amyloid fragments, Aβ16-22 (residues 16-22 taken from the 40-residue Aβ peptide) in which Leu-17 through Ala-21 are uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled. Most 13C resonances for the main chain as well as for the side chains are assigned based on 2D 13C/13C chemical-shift correlation patterns specific to amino-acid types. Examination

  14. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemicmore » mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.« less

  15. Composite-pulse and partially dipolar dephased multiCP for improved quantitative solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Pu; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2017-12-01

    Improved multiple cross polarization (multiCP) pulse sequences for quickly acquiring quantitative 13C NMR spectra of organic solids are presented. Loss of 13C magnetization due to imperfect read-out and storage pulses in multiCP has been identified as a significant mechanism limiting polarization enhancement for 13C sites with weak couplings to 1H. This problem can be greatly reduced by composite 90° pulses with non-orthogonal phases that flip the magnetization onto the spin-lock field and back to the longitudinal direction for the 1H repolarization period; the observed loss is <3% for over ±10 kHz resonance offset and up to 20% flip-angle error. This composite-pulse multiCP (ComPmultiCP) sequence consistently provides performance superior to that of conventional multiCP, without any trade-off. The longer total CP time enabled by the composite pulses allows for a wider amplitude ramp during CP, which decreases the sensitivity to Hartmann-Hahn mismatch by a factor of two, with a <7% root-mean-square deviation within a 1-dB range for Boc-alanine. In samples with very short T1ρ, under-polarization of non-protonated carbons can be compensated by slight dipolar dephasing of CHn signals resulting from relatively weak decoupling during the Hahn spin echo period before detection. Quantitative spectra have been obtained by ComPmultiCP for low-crystallinity branched polyethylene at 4.5 kHz MAS, and in combination with partial dipolar dephasing for soil organic matter at 14 kHz MAS.

  16. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of oligosaccharides in the solid state from experimental 13C NMR data and ab initio chemical shift surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Ivan; Moyna, Guillermo

    2005-05-02

    A novel method for the determination of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of oligosaccharides in the solid state using experimental 13C NMR data is presented. The approach employs this information, combined with 13C chemical shift surfaces (CSSs) for the glycosidic bond carbons in the generation of NMR pseudopotential energy functions suitable for use as constraints in molecular modeling simulations. Application of the method to trehalose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose produces 3D models that agree remarkably well with the reported X-ray structures, with phi and psi dihedral angles that are within 10 degrees from the ones observed in the crystals. The usefulness of the approach is further demonstrated in the determination of the 3D structure of the cellohexaose, an hexasaccharide for which no X-ray data has been reported, as well as in the generation of accurate structural models for cellulose II and amylose V6.

  17. Solid-state NMR detection of 14N-13C dipolar couplings between amino acid side groups provides constraints on amyloid fibril architecture.

    PubMed

    Middleton, David A

    2011-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) is a powerful technique for the structural analysis of amyloid fibrils. With suitable isotope labelling patterns, SSNMR can provide constraints on the secondary structure, alignment and registration of β-strands within amyloid fibrils and identify the tertiary and quaternary contacts defining the packing of the β-sheet layers. Detection of (14)N-(13)C dipolar couplings may provide potentially useful additional structural constraints on β-sheet packing within amyloid fibrils but has not until now been exploited for this purpose. Here a frequency-selective, transfer of population in double resonance SSNMR experiment is used to detect a weak (14)N-(13)C dipolar coupling in amyloid-like fibrils of the peptide H(2)N-SNNFGAILSS-COOH, which was uniformly (13)C and (15)N labelled across the four C-terminal amino acids. The (14)N-(13)C interatomic distance between leucine and asparagine side groups is constrained between 2.4 and 3.8 Å, which allows current structural models of the β-spine arrangement within the fibrils to be refined. This procedure could be useful for the general structural analysis of other proteins in condensed phases and environments, such as biological membranes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Solid-State (13)C NMR Delineates the Architectural Design of Biopolymers in Native and Genetically Altered Tomato Fruit Cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Matas, Antonio J; Isaacson, Tal; Kehlet, Cindie; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Stark, Ruth E

    2016-01-11

    Plant cuticles on outer fruit and leaf surfaces are natural macromolecular composites of waxes and polyesters that ensure mechanical integrity and mitigate environmental challenges. They also provide renewable raw materials for cosmetics, packaging, and coatings. To delineate the structural framework and flexibility underlying the versatile functions of cutin biopolymers associated with polysaccharide-rich cell-wall matrices, solid-state NMR spectra and spin relaxation times were measured in a tomato fruit model system, including different developmental stages and surface phenotypes. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of the cutin ensures compatibility with the underlying polysaccharide cell walls; the hydroxy fatty acid structures of outer epidermal cutin also support deposition of hydrophobic waxes and aromatic moieties while promoting the formation of cell-wall cross-links that rigidify and strengthen the cuticle composite during fruit development. Fruit cutin-deficient tomato mutants with compromised microbial resistance exhibit less efficient local and collective biopolymer motions, stiffening their cuticular surfaces and increasing their susceptibility to fracture.

  19. XRD and solid state 13C-NMR evaluation of the crystallinity enhancement of 13C-labeled bacterial cellulose biosynthesized by Komagataeibacter xylinus under different stimuli: A comparative strategy of analyses.

    PubMed

    Meza-Contreras, Juan C; Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Gutiérrez-Ortega, José A; Gonzalez-Garcia, Yolanda

    2018-05-22

    The production and crystallinity of 13 C bacterial cellulose (BC) was examined in static culture of Komagataeibacter xylinus with different chemical and physical stimuli: the addition of NaCl or cloramphenicol as well as exposure to a magnetic field or to UV light. Crystalline BC biosynthesized under each stimulus was studied by XRD and solid state 13 C NMR analyses. All treatments produced BC with enhanced crystallinity over 90% (XRD) and 80% (NMR) compared to the control (83 and 76%, respectively) or to Avicel (77 and 62%, respectively). The XRD data indicated that the crystallite size was 80-85 Å. Furthermore, changes on the allomorphs (I α and I β ) ratio tendency of BC samples addressed to the stimuli were estimated using the C4 signal from 13 C NMR data. These results showed a decrease of the allomorph I α (3%) when BC was biosynthesized with UV light and chloramphenicol compared to control (58.79%). In contrast, the BC obtained with NaCl increased up to 60.31% of the I α allomorph ratio. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  2. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Solid-state 11B and 13C NMR, IR, and X-ray crystallographic characterization of selected arylboronic acids and their catechol cyclic esters.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Woung; Weiss, Joseph W E; Kerneghan, Phillip A; Korobkov, Ilia; Maly, Kenneth E; Bryce, David L

    2012-05-01

    Nine arylboronic acids, seven arylboronic catechol cyclic esters, and two trimeric arylboronic anhydrides (boroxines) are investigated using (11)B solid-state NMR spectroscopy at three different magnetic field strengths (9.4, 11.7, and 21.1 T). Through the analysis of spectra of static and magic-angle spinning samples, the (11)B electric field gradient and chemical shift tensors are determined. The effects of relaxation anisotropy and nutation field strength on the (11)B NMR line shapes are investigated. Infrared spectroscopy was also used to help identify peaks in the NMR spectra as being due to the anhydride form in some of the arylboronic acid samples. Seven new X-ray crystallographic structures are reported. Calculations of the (11)B NMR parameters are performed using cluster model and periodic gauge-including projector-augmented wave (GIPAW) density functional theory (DFT) approaches, and the results are compared with the experimental values. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR experiments and spectral simulations are applied to determine the chemical shifts of the ipso carbons of the samples. One bond indirect (13)C-(11)B spin-spin (J) coupling constants are also measured experimentally and compared with calculated values. The (11)B/(10)B isotope effect on the (13)C chemical shift of the ipso carbons of arylboronic acids and their catechol esters, as well as residual dipolar coupling, is discussed. Overall, this combined X-ray, NMR, IR, and computational study provides valuable new insights into the relationship between NMR parameters and the structure of boronic acids and esters. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Distinct solvent- and temperature-dependent packing arrangements of anti-parallel β-sheet polyalanines studied with solid-state 13C NMR and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Shunsuke; Tasei, Yugo; Nishimura, Akio; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2017-08-09

    Polyalanine (polyA) sequences are well known as the simplest sequence that naturally forms anti-parallel β-sheets and constitute a key element in the structure of spider and wild silkworm silk fibers. We have carried out a systematic analysis of the packing of anti-parallel β-sheets for (Ala) n , n = 5, 6, 7 and 12, using primarily 13 C solid-state NMR and MD simulation. HFIP and TFA are frequently used as the dope solvents for recombinant silks, and polyA was solidified from both HFIP and TFA solutions by drying. An analysis of Ala Cβ peaks in the 13 C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated that polyA from HFIP was mainly rectangular but polyA from TFA was mainly staggered. The transition from the rectangular to the staggered arrangement in (Ala) 6 was observed for the first time from the change in the Ala Cβ peak through heat treatment at 200 °C for 4 h. The removal of the bound water was confirmed by thermal analysis. This transition could be reproduced by MD simulation of (Ala) 6 molecules at 200 °C after removal of the bound water molecules. In this way, the origin of the stability of the different packing arrangements of polyA was clarified.

  5. Solid-state NMR characterization of cross-linking in EPDM/PP blends from 1H-13C polarization transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aluas, Mihaela; Filip, Claudiu

    2005-05-01

    A novel approach for solid-state NMR characterization of cross-linking in polymer blends from the analysis of (1)H-(13)C polarization transfer dynamics is introduced. It extends the model of residual dipolar couplings under permanent cross-linking, typically used to describe (1)H transverse relaxation techniques, by considering a more realistic distribution of the order parameter along a polymer chain in rubbers. Based on a systematic numerical analysis, the extended model was shown to accurately reproduce all the characteristic features of the cross-polarization curves measured on such materials. This is particularly important for investigating blends of great technological potential, like thermoplastic elastomers, where (13)C high-resolution techniques, such as CP-MAS, are indispensable to selectively investigate structural and dynamical properties of the desired component. The validity of the new approach was demonstrated using the example of the CP build-up curves measured on a well resolved EPDM resonance line in a series of EPDM/PP blends.

  6. 13C and 19F solid-state NMR and X-ray crystallographic study of halogen-bonded frameworks featuring nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Szell, Patrick M J; Gabriel, Shaina A; Gill, Russell D D; Wan, Shirley Y H; Gabidullin, Bulat; Bryce, David L

    2017-03-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction between the electrophilic region of a halogen (σ-hole) and an electron donor. We report a crystallographic and structural analysis of halogen-bonded compounds by applying a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) approach. Single-crystal XRD was first used to characterize the halogen-bonded cocrystals formed between two fluorinated halogen-bond donors (1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene and 1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene) and several nitrogen-containing heterocycles (acridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, and hexamethylenetetramine). New structures are reported for the following three cocrystals, all in the P2 1 /c space group: acridine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C 6 F 3 I 3 ·C 13 H 9 N, 1,10-phenanthroline-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C 6 F 3 I 3 ·C 12 H 8 N 2 , and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C 6 F 3 I 3 ·C 8 H 12 N 2 . 13 C and 19 F solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is shown to be a convenient method to characterize the structural features of the halogen-bond donor and acceptor, with chemical shifts attributable to cocrystal formation observed in the spectra of both nuclides. Cross polarization (CP) from 19 F to 13 C results in improved spectral sensitivity in characterizing the perfluorinated halogen-bond donor when compared to conventional 1 H CP. Gauge-including projector-augmented wave density functional theory (GIPAW DFT) calculations of magnetic shielding constants, along with optimization of the XRD structures, provide a final set of structures in best agreement with the experimental 13 C and 19 F chemical shifts. Data for carbons bonded to iodine remain outliers due to well-known relativistic effects.

  7. Phospholamban and its Phosphorylated Form Interact Differently with Lipid Bilayers: A 31P, 2H and 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Baker, Shadi; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLB) is a 52-amino acid integral membrane protein that helps to regulate the flow of Ca2+ ions in cardiac muscle cells. Recent structural studies on the PLB pentamer and the functionally active monomer (AFA-PLB) debate whether its cytoplasmic domain, in either the phosphorylated or dephosphorylated states, is α-helical in structure as well as whether it associates with the lipid head groups [Oxenoid, K. (2005) Proc Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 10870–10875, Karim, C. B. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 14437–14442, Andronesi, C.A. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 12965–12974, Li, J. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 10674–10682, Metcalfe, E. E. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 4386–4396, Clayton, J. C. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 17016–17026]. Comparing the secondary structure of the PLB pentamer and its phosphorylated form (P-PLB) as well as their interaction with the lipid bilayer is crucial in order to understand its regulatory function. Therefore, in this study, the full-length wild-type (WT)-PLB and P-PLB were incorporated into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers and studied utilizing solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The analysis of the 2H and 31P solid-state NMR data of PLB and P-PLB in POPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) indicates that a direct interaction takes place between both proteins and the phospholipid head groups. However, the interaction of P-PLB with POPC bilayers was less significant when compared to PLB. Moreover, the secondary structure using 13C=O site-specific isotopically labeled Ala15-PLB and Ala15-P-PLB in POPC bilayers suggests that this residue, located in the cytoplasmic domain, is a part of an α-helical structure for both PLB and P-PLB. PMID:17073452

  8. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying oil/marine snow associations in mesocosm simulations of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Patrick G; Obeid, Wassim; Wozniak, Andrew S; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Santschi, Peter H; Quigg, Antonietta

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill stimulated the release of marine snow made up of dead/living plankton/bacteria and their exopolymeric polysaccharide substances (EPS), termed marine oil snow (MOS), promoting rapid removal of oil from the water column into sediments near the well site. Mesocosm simulations showed that Macondo surrogate oil readily associates with the marine snow. Quantitative solid-state 13 C NMR readily distinguishes this oil from naturally formed marine snow and reveals that adding the dispersant Corexit enhances the amount of oil associated with the MOS, thus contributing to rapid removal from the water column. Solvent extraction of MOS removes the oil-derived compounds for analysis by one and two-dimensional GC/MS and evaluation of potential transformations they undergo when associated with the EPS. The results reveal that the oil associated with EPS is subjected to rapid transformation, in a matter of days, presumably by bacteria and fungi associated with EPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative (13)C MultiCP solid-state NMR as a tool for evaluation of cellulose crystallinity index measured directly inside sugarcane biomass.

    PubMed

    Bernardinelli, Oigres Daniel; Lima, Marisa Aparecida; Rezende, Camila Alves; Polikarpov, Igor; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is often associated with changes in cellulose structure after biological and physicochemical pretreatments. While some results obtained with lignocellulosic biomass demonstrate a progressive increase in the CI as a function of pretreatments, it is also shown that the CI can significantly vary depending on the choice of the measurement method. Besides, the influence of the CI on the recalcitrance of biomass has been controversial for a long time, but the most recent results tend to point out that the efficiency of pretreatments in reducing the recalcitrance is not clearly correlated with the decrease of the CI. Much of this controversy is somewhat associated with the inability to distinguish between the CI of the cellulose inside the biomass and the CI of the full biomass, which contains other amorphous components such as lignin and hemicellulose. Cross polarization by multiple contact periods (Multi-CP) method was used to obtain quantitative (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectra of sugarcane bagasse biomass submitted to two-step pretreatments and/or enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing the dipolar filtered Multi-CP (13)C NMR spectra of untreated bagasse samples with those of samples submitted to acid pretreatment, we show that a 1% H2SO4-assisted pretreatment was very effective in removing practically all the hemicellulose signals. This led us to propose a spectral editing procedure based on the subtraction of MultiCP spectra of acid-treated biomass from that of the extracted lignin, to obtain a virtually pure cellulose spectrum. Based on this idea, we were able to evaluate the CI of the native cellulose inside the sugarcane bagasse biomass. The results show the validity of the proposed method as a tool for evaluating the variations in the CI of the cellulose inside biomasses of similar kinds. Despite a clear increase in the CI of biomass as measured by X-ray diffraction, no significant variations were observed in

  11. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, S. S.; Zhu, Y.; Meng, W.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  13. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  14. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA=Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the (1)H T1 values were calculated from data collected by (1)H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the (1)H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the (13)C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from (13)C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using (1)H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid State 29Si, 13C NMR Spectroscop

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.

    2010-03-11

    Ex situ solid state NMR was used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+supercriticalCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80 C and 96 atm. 29Si NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce dissolved Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. Surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1(Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to lessmore » than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. 29Si NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. 13C MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediate as (MgCO3)4-Mg(OH)2-5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed.« less

  16. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  17. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  18. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  19. Body temperatures of modern and extinct vertebrates from 13C-18O bond abundances in bioapatite

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Tütken, Thomas; Hulbert, Richard C.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotope compositions of biologically precipitated apatite in bone, teeth, and scales are widely used to obtain information on the diet, behavior, and physiology of extinct organisms and to reconstruct past climate. Here we report the application of a new type of geochemical measurement to bioapatite, a “clumped-isotope” paleothermometer, based on the thermodynamically driven preference for 13C and 18O to bond with each other within carbonate ions in the bioapatite crystal lattice. This effect is dependent on temperature but, unlike conventional stable isotope paleothermometers, is independent from the isotopic composition of water from which the mineral formed. We show that the abundance of 13C-18O bonds in the carbonate component of tooth bioapatite from modern specimens decreases with increasing body temperature of the animal, following a relationship between isotope “clumping” and temperature that is statistically indistinguishable from inorganic calcite. This result is in agreement with a theoretical model of isotopic ordering in carbonate ion groups in apatite and calcite. This thermometer constrains body temperatures of bioapatite-producing organisms with an accuracy of 1–2 °C. Analyses of fossilized tooth enamel of both Pleistocene and Miocene age yielded temperatures within error of those derived from similar modern taxa. Clumped-isotope analysis of bioapatite represents a new approach in the study of the thermophysiology of extinct species, allowing the first direct measurement of their body temperatures. It will also open new avenues in the study of paleoclimate, as the measurement of clumped isotopes in phosphorites and fossils has the potential to reconstruct environmental temperatures. PMID:20498092

  20. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    SciTech Connect

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{ 15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH + and RR'NH 2 +) or other (i.e., RNH 2 and RNO 2) nitrogen environments.« less

  1. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; ...

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{ 15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH + and RR'NH 2 +) or other (i.e., RNH 2 and RNO 2) nitrogen environments.« less

  2. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  3. Critical evaluation of 13C natural abundance techniques to partition soil-surface CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, H.; Midwood, A. J.; Robinson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial store of carbon and the flux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere is estimated at around 98 Pg (98 billion tonnes) of carbon per year. The CO2 efflux from the soil surface is derived from plant root and rhizosphere respiration (autotrophically fuelled) and microbial degradation of soil organic matter (heterotrophic respiration). Heterotrophic respiration is a key determinant of an ecosystem's long-term C balance, but one that is difficult to measure in the field. One approach involves partitioning the total soil-surface CO2 efflux between heterotrophic and autotrophic components; this can be done using differences in the natural abundance stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 as the end-members of a simple mixing model. In most natural, temperate ecosystems, current and historical vegetation cover (and therefore also plant-derived soil organic matter) is produced from C3 photosynthesis so the difference in δ13C between the autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 sources is small. Successful partitioning therefore requires accurate and precise measurements of the δ13CO2 of the autotrophic and heterotrophic end-members (obtained by measuring the δ13CO2 of soil-free roots and root-free soil) and of total soil CO2 efflux. There is currently little consensus on the optimum measurement protocols. Here we systematically tested some of the most commonly used techniques to identify and minimise methodological errors. Using soil-surface chambers to sample total CO2 efflux and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measure δ13CO2 in a partitioning study on a Scottish moorland, we found that: using soil-penetrating collars leads to a more depleted chamber measurement of total soil δ13CO2 as a result of severing roots and fungal hyphae or equilibrating with δ13CO2 at depth or both; root incubations provide an accurate estimate of in-situ root respired δ13CO2 provided they are sampled within one hour; the δ13CO2 from root

  4. NMR crystallography of campho[2,3-c]pyrazole (Z' = 6): combining high-resolution 1H-13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and GIPAW chemical-shift calculations.

    PubMed

    Webber, Amy L; Emsley, Lyndon; Claramunt, Rosa M; Brown, Steven P

    2010-09-30

    (1)H-(13)C two-dimensional magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR correlation spectra, recorded with the MAS-J-HMQC experiment, are presented for campho[2,3-c]pyrazole. For each (13)C moiety, there are six resonances associated with the six distinct molecules in the asymmetric unit cell (Z' = 6). The one-bond C-H correlations observed in the 2D (1)H-(13)C MAS-J-HMQC spectra allow the experimental determination of the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts associated with the separate CH, CH(2), and CH(3) groups. (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts calculated by using the GIPAW (Gauge Including Projector Augmented Waves) plane-wave pseudopotential approach are presented. Calculations for the whole unit cell (12 × 29 = 348 atoms, with geometry optimization of all atoms) allow the assignment of the experimental (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts to the six distinct molecules. The calculated chemical shifts for the full crystal structure are compared with those for isolated molecules as extracted from the geometry-optimized crystal structure. In this way, the effect of intermolecular interactions on the observed chemical shifts is quantified. In particular, the calculations are sufficiently precise to differentiate the small (<1 ppm) differences between the (1)H chemical shifts of the six resonances associated with each distinct CH or CH(2) moiety.

  5. Characterization of water in hydrated Bombyx mori silk fibroin fiber and films by 2H NMR relaxation and 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Isobe, Kotaro; Kametani, Shunsuke; Ukpebor, Obehi T; Silverstein, Moshe C; Boutis, Gregory S

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF), such as elasticity and tensile strength, change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction with water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. In this work, the dynamics of water molecules interacting with SF was studied by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. Additionally, the conformations of hydrated [3- 13 C]Ala-, [3- 13 C]Ser-, and [3- 13 C]Tyr-SF fibers and films were investigated by 13 C DD/MAS NMR. Using an inverse Laplace transform algorithm, we were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber. Namely, A: bulk water outside the fiber, B: water molecules trapped weakly on the surface of the fiber, C: bound water molecules located in the inner surface of the fiber, and D: bound water molecules located in the inner part of the fiber were distinguishable. In addition, four components were also observed for water in the SF film immersed in methanol for 30s, while only two components for the film immersed in methanol for 24h. The effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and non-crystalline domains of 13 C selectively labeled SF, respectively, could be determined independently. Our measurements provide new insight relating the characteristics of water and the hydration structure of silk, which are relevant in light of current interest in the design of novel silk-based biomaterials. The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction between SF and water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. We were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. In addition, the effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and

  6. (1)H-(13)C Hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole couplings of methyl groups in stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; Das, Bibhuti B; Opella, Stanley J

    2010-02-01

    (13)C NMR of isotopically labeled methyl groups has the potential to combine spectroscopic simplicity with ease of labeling for protein NMR studies. However, in most high resolution separated local field experiments, such as polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA), that are used to measure (1)H-(13)C hetero-nuclear dipolar couplings, the four-spin system of the methyl group presents complications. In this study, the properties of the (1)H-(13)C hetero-nuclear dipolar interactions of (13)C-labeled methyl groups are revealed through solid-state NMR experiments on a range of samples, including single crystals, stationary powders, and magic angle spinning of powders, of (13)C(3) labeled alanine alone and incorporated into a protein. The spectral simplifications resulting from proton detected local field (PDLF) experiments are shown to enhance resolution and simplify the interpretation of results on single crystals, magnetically aligned samples, and powders. The complementarity of stationary sample and magic angle spinning (MAS) measurements of dipolar couplings is demonstrated by applying polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle and magic angle spinning (PISEMAMAS) to unoriented samples. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. GIPAW (gauge including projected augmented wave) and local dynamics in 13C and 29Si solid state NMR: the study case of silsesquioxanes (RSiO1.5)8.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Christel; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Mauri, Francesco; Babonneau, Florence; Bonhomme, Christian

    2009-08-28

    Octameric silsesquioxanes (RSiO(1.5))(8) are versatile and interesting nano building blocks, suitable for the synthesis of nanocomposites with controlled porosity. In this paper, we revisit the (29)Si and (13)C solid state NMR spectroscopy for this class of materials, by using GIPAW (gauge including projected augmented wave) first principles calculations [Pickard & Mauri, Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 245101]. Full tensorial data, including the chemical shift anisotropies (CSA) and the absolute orientation of the corresponding principal axes systems (PAS), were calculated. Subsequent averaging of the calculated tensors (due to fast reorientation of the R groups around the Si-C bonds) allowed for the interpretation of the strong reduction of CSA and dipolar couplings for these derivatives. Good agreement was observed between the averaged calculated data and the experimental parameters. Interesting questions related to the interplay between X-ray crystallography and solid state NMR are raised and will be emphasized.

  8. Minimising methodological biases to improve the accuracy of partitioning soil respiration using natural abundance 13C.

    PubMed

    Snell, Helen S K; Robinson, David; Midwood, Andrew J

    2014-11-15

    Microbial degradation of soil organic matter (heterotrophic respiration) is a key determinant of net ecosystem exchange of carbon, but it is difficult to measure because the CO2 efflux from the soil surface is derived not only from heterotrophic respiration, but also from plant root and rhizosphere respiration (autotrophic). Partitioning total CO2 efflux can be achieved using the different natural abundance stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C) of root and soil CO2. Successful partitioning requires very accurate measurements of total soil efflux δ(13)CO2 and the δ(13)CO2 of the autotrophic and heterotrophic sources, which typically differ by just 2-8‰. In Scottish moorland and grass mesocosm studies we systematically tested some of the most commonly used techniques in order to identify and minimise methodological errors. Typical partitioning methods are to sample the total soil-surface CO2 efflux using a chamber, then to sample CO2 from incubated soil-free roots and root-free soil. We investigated the effect of collar depth on chamber measurements of surface efflux δ(13)CO2 and the effect of incubation time on estimates of end-member δ(13)CO2. (1) a 5 cm increase in collar depth affects the measurement of surface efflux δ(13)CO2 by -1.5‰ and there are fundamental inconsistencies between modelled and measured biases; (2) the heterotrophic δ(13)CO2 changes by up to -4‰ within minutes of sampling; we recommend using regression to estimate the in situ δ(13)CO2 values; (3) autotrophic δ(13)CO2 measurements are reliable if root CO2 is sampled within an hour of excavation; (4) correction factors should be used to account for instrument drift of up to 3‰ and concentration-dependent non-linearity of CRDS (cavity ringdown spectroscopy) analysis. Methodological biases can lead to large inaccuracies in partitioning estimates. The utility of stable isotope partitioning of soil CO2 efflux will be enhanced by consensus on the optimum measurement protocols and by

  9. 1H, 13C, 15N NMR analysis of sildenafil base and citrate (Viagra) in solution, solid state and pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Iwona; Pisklak, Maciej; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław

    2005-08-10

    Sildenafil citrate (SC) (Viagra) and sildenafil base in pure form are easily and unequivocally characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of chemical shifts indicates that: (i) N6-H forms intramolecular hydrogen bonds, (ii) N25 is protonated in the salt and (iii) intermolecular OH...N hydrogen bonds involving N2 and N4 are present in the solid sildenafil citrate. 13C CPMAS NMR method has been proposed for the identification and quantitation of Viagra in its pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment.

  11. Characterization of the reactivity of a silica derived from acid activation of sepiolite with silane by 29Si and 13C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Valentín, J L; López-Manchado, M A; Posadas, P; Rodríguez, A; Marcos-Fernández, A; Ibarra, L

    2006-06-15

    The mechanism of the reaction between a silica sample coming from acid treatment of sepiolite (denominated Silsep) and an organosilane, namely bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)tetrasulfane (TESPT), has been evaluated by solid state NMR spectroscopy, being compared with the silanization reaction of a commercial silica. The effect of the silane concentration and temperature on the course of the reaction was considered. Experimental results indicate that the silanization reaction is more effective in the case of Silsep, favoring both the reaction of silane molecules with the filler surface and the reaction between neighboring silane molecules. This different behavior is attributed to structural factors, moisture, and number of acid centers on silica surface. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to deposit micrometric water drops on the surface of these samples and to evaluate the proportion and distribution of the organophylization process.

  12. Distinguishing tautomerism in the crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide using DFT-D calculations and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaozhou; Bond, Andrew D.; Johansson, Kristoffer E.

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide contains an imine tautomer, rather than the previously reported amine tautomer. The tautomers can be distinguished using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations and by comparison of calculated and measured {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra. The crystal structure of the title compound, C{sub 11}H{sub 13}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}, has been determined previously on the basis of refinement against laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data, supported by comparison of measured and calculated {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra [Hangan et al. (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. B66, 615–621]. The mol@@ecule is tautomeric, and was reported as an aminemore » tautomer [systematic name: N-(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thia@@diazol-2-yl)-p-toluene@@sulfonamide], rather than the correct imine tautomer. The protonation site on the mol@@ecule’s 1,3,4-thia@@diazole ring is indicated by the inter@@molecular contacts in the crystal structure: N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are established at the correct site, while the alternative protonation site does not establish any notable inter molecular inter@@actions. The two tautomers provide essentially identical Rietveld fits to laboratory PXRD data, and therefore they cannot be directly distinguished in this way. However, the correct tautomer can be distinguished from the incorrect one by previously reported qu@@anti@@tative criteria based on the extent of structural distortion on optimization of the crystal structure using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Calculation of the {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum based on the correct imine tautomer also provides considerably better agreement with the measured {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum.« less

  13. Quantitative comparison of structure and dynamics of elastin following three isolation schemes by 13C solid state NMR and MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, A; Louis, M; Dhital, B; Ho, H P; Chang, E J; Boutis, G S

    2015-05-01

    Methods for isolating elastin from fat, collagen, and muscle, commonly used in the design of artificial elastin based biomaterials, rely on exposing tissue to harsh pH levels and temperatures that usually denature many proteins. At present, a quantitative measurement of the modifications to elastin following isolation from other extracellular matrix constituents has not been reported. Using magic angle spinning (13)C NMR spectroscopy and relaxation methodologies, we have measured the modification in structure and dynamics following three known purification protocols. Our experimental data reveal that the (13)C spectra of the hydrated samples appear remarkably similar across the various purification methods. Subtle differences in the half maximum widths were observed in the backbone carbonyl suggesting possible structural heterogeneity across the different methods of purification. Additionally, small differences in the relative signal intensities were observed between purified samples. Lyophilizing the samples results in a reduction of backbone motion and reveals additional differences across the purification methods studied. These differences were most notable in the alanine motifs indicating possible changes in cross-linking or structural rigidity. The measured correlation times of glycine and proline moieties are observed to also vary considerably across the different purification methods, which may be related to peptide bond cleavage. Lastly, the relative concentration of desmosine cross-links in the samples quantified by MALDI mass spectrometry is reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 15N and 13C abundances in the Antartic Ocean with emphasis on the biogeochemical structure of the food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Eitaro; Terazaki, Makoto; Kabaya, Yuko; Nemoto, Takahisa

    1987-06-01

    Distributions of δ 15N and δ 13C for biogenic substances in the Antarctic Ocean were investigated to construct a biogeochemical framework for assessing the Antarctic ecosystem. Phytoplankton exhibited particularly low δ 15N (0.5%) and 13C (-26.9%) values in pelagic plankton samples. High nitrate concentrations, and high PCO 2 in the surface waters on the southern side of the polar front and the resulting slow growth rate of phytoplankton under low light intensity are suggested as possible factors in causing the low isotopic compositions. Mean fractionation factors of 1.029 and 1.006 were estimated for photosynthetic carbon fixation and for the assimilation of inorganic nitrogeneous compounds (ammonium plus nitrate) during algal growth, respectively. Enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level was confirmed for Antarctic ecosystems: δ15N animal% = 3.3 (trophic level -1) + δ5N algae, whereas 13C content did not increase in the same manner. Differences in lipid content among animals may be the main factor in causing this δ 13C anomaly. 15N and 13C abundance of sedimentary organic nitrogen differed from phytoplankton and settling particles. An exact mechanism for explaining the high δ 15N (around 5%) is not known. The very high δ 13C value of -20.5% at Sta. 3B may originate in ice algae that had grown under CO 2-limited conditions. Particles collected by sediment traps gave characteristically low δ 15N values (-3.0 to 0.9%), strongly suggesting a phytoplankton origin. The δ 15N and δ 13C values of settling material showed similar vertical profiles with depth which might arise from temporal variation of algal growth.

  17. Plant diversity moderates drought stress in grasslands: Implications from a large real-world study on (13)C natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Solly, Emily F; Hänsel, Falk; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2016-10-01

    Land-use change and intensification play a key role in the current biodiversity crisis. The resulting species loss can have severe effects on ecosystem functions and services, thereby increasing ecosystem vulnerability to climate change. We explored whether land-use intensification (i.e. fertilization intensity), plant diversity and other potentially confounding environmental factors may be significantly related to water use (i.e. drought stress) of grassland plants. Drought stress was assessed using δ(13)C abundances in aboveground plant biomass of 150 grassland plots across a gradient of land-use intensity. Under water shortage, plants are forced to increasingly take up the heavier (13)C due to closing stomata leading to an enrichment of (13)C in biomass. Plants were sampled at the community level and for single species, which belong to three different functional groups (one grass, one herb, two legumes). Results show that plant diversity was significantly related to the δ(13)C signal in community, grass and legume biomass indicating that drought stress was lower under higher diversity, although this relation was not significant for the herb species under study. Fertilization, in turn, mostly increased drought stress as indicated by more positive δ(13)C values. This effect was mostly indirect by decreasing plant diversity. In line with these results, we found similar patterns in the δ(13)C signal of the organic matter in the topsoil, indicating a long history of these processes. Our study provided strong indication for a positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship with reduced drought stress at higher plant diversity. However, it also underlined a negative reinforcing situation: as land-use intensification decreases plant diversity in grasslands, this might subsequently increases drought sensitivity. Vice-versa, enhancing plant diversity in species-poor agricultural grasslands may moderate negative effects of future climate change. Copyright

  18. The natural abundance of 13C with different agricultural management by NIRS with fibre optic probe technology.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Mariela; González-Martín, Inmaculada; Hernández-Hierro, Jose Miguel; Hidalgo, Claudia; Govaerts, Bram; Etchevers, Jorge; Sayre, Ken D; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-06-30

    In the present study the natural abundance of (13)C is quantified in agricultural soils in Mexico which have been submitted to different agronomic practices, zero and conventional tillage, retention of crop residues (with and without) and rotation of crops (wheat and maize) for 17 years, which have influenced the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the soil. The natural abundance of C13 is quantified by near infrared spectra (NIRS) with a remote reflectance fibre optic probe, applying the probe directly to the soil samples. Discriminate partial least squares analysis of the near infrared spectra allowed to classify soils with and without residues, regardless of the type of tillage or rotation systems used with a prediction rate of 90% in the internal validation and 94% in the external validation. The NIRS calibration model using a modified partial least squares regression allowed to determine the delta(13)C in soils with or without residues, with multiple correlation coefficients 0.81 and standard error prediction 0.5 per thousand in soils with residues and 0.92 and 0.2 per thousand in soils without residues. The ratio performance deviation for the quantification of delta(13)C in soil was 2.5 in soil with residues and 3.8 without residues. This indicated that the model was adequate to determine the delta(13)C of unknown soils in the -16.2 per thousand to -20.4 per thousand range. The development of the NIR calibration permits analytic determinations of the values of delta(13)C in unknown agricultural soils in less time, employing a non-destructive method, by the application of the fibre optic probe of remote reflectance to the soil sample.

  19. Dynamics of shoot vs. root C assessed by natural 13C abundance of their biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes; Dignac, Marie-France; Rumpel, Cornelia; Rasse, Daniel P.; Derenne, Sylvie

    2010-05-01

    Cutins and suberins are biopolyesters that have been suggested to significantly contribute to the stable pool of soil organic matter (SOM). They might be used as tracers for the above- or belowground origin of plant material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of shoot and root-derived biomarkers in soils using a wheat/maize (C3/C4) chronosequence. Our results suggest that α,?-alkanedioic acids can be considered as root specific markers and mid-chain hydroxy acids as shoot specific markers of wheat and maize in this agricultural soil. The changes of the 13C isotopic signatures of these markers with years of maize cropping after wheat evidenced their contrasted behaviour in soil. After 12 years of maize cropping, shoot markers present in soils probably originated from old C3 vegetation suggesting that new maize cutin added to soils was mostly degraded within a year. The reasons for long-term stabilisation of shoot biomarkers remain unclear. By contrast, maize root markers were highly incorporated into SOM during the first six years of maize crop, which suggested a selective preservation of root biomass when compared to shoots, possibly due to physical protection. The contrasting distribution of the plant-specific monomers in plants and soils might be explained by different chemical mechanisms leading to selective degradation or stabilization of some biomarkers.

  20. Structure of N-(5-ethyl-[1,3,4]-thiadiazole-2-yl)toluenesulfonamide by combined X-ray powder diffraction, 13C solid-state NMR and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Hangan, Adriana; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Xenia; Tripon, Carmen; Morari, Cristian; Oprean, Luminita; Filip, Claudiu

    2010-12-01

    The crystal structure solution of the title compound is determined from microcrystalline powder using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct-space methods with information from (13)C solid-state NMR (SSNMR), and molecular modelling using the GIPAW (gauge including projector augmented-wave) method. The space group is Pbca with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The proposed methodology proves very useful for unambiguously characterizing the supramolecular arrangement adopted by the N-(5-ethyl-[1,3,4]-thiadiazole-2-yl)toluenesulfonamide molecules in the crystal, which consists of extended double strands held together by C-H···π non-covalent interactions.

  1. Biological degradation of tannins in sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) by the white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Cyathus stercoreus analyzed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, G R; Akin, D E; Makkar, H P; Becker, K

    1996-01-01

    Leaves of sericea lespedeza exhibit a high proportion of condensed tannin, resulting in poor forage quality. The white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Cyathus sterocoreus are known to preferentially degrade lignin in a variety of plants and were evaluated for their ability to degrade condensed tannin from sericea leaves with the aim of improving digestibility. Relative levels of condensed tannin, cutin, pectin, and cellulose were monitored as a function of fungal treatment by solid-state cross-polarization and magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total soluble phenolics, soluble tannins, and soluble and insoluble proanthocyanidin levels in fungus-treated and control samples were measured by established chemical techniques. Results indicate that both species of fungus preferentially degrade condensed tannin and that C. subvermispora is markedly superior to C. stercoreus in this capacity. PMID:8837414

  2. Sensitivity enhancement in whole-body natural abundance 13C spectroscopy using 13C/1H double-resonance techniques at 4 tesla.

    PubMed

    Bomsdorf, H; Röschmann, P; Wieland, J

    1991-11-01

    In vivo 13C spectroscopy experiments were performed using a whole-body MR system at a static field of 4 T. The main goal of the investigations was to evaluate the sensitivity increase achievable by means of 13C/1H double-resonance techniques at 4 T. Spectra from subcutaneous fat as well as muscle glycogen from the lower leg were acquired using frequency selective proton decoupling and the polarization transfer method SINEPT. With respect to measurements on subcutaneous fat, polarization transfer turned out to be more efficient than selective decoupling. About a fourfold enhancement in spectral peak intensity for the C = C line doublet of the unsaturated fatty acid chain was obtained. Combining polarization transfer with decoupling yielded a factor of 6 in signal amplitude. In contrast to that, the signal enhancement observed in measurements on the glycogen C-1 resonance was only around twofold. The lower efficiency is explained by fast T2 relaxation of the proton transition. A T2 value of about 3 ms was derived from the experimental data. Acquisition times as low as 3 min were realized for normal level glycogen in human calf muscle, enabling a time resolution adequate for dynamic studies on muscle glycogen depletion. Aspects of RF power absorption in tissue and the generally higher efficiency make polarization transfer methods preferable to selective decoupling in whole-body 13C spectroscopy at 4 T.

  3. Effects of varying water adsorption on a Cu3(BTC)2 metal-organic framework (MOF) as studied by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Jee, Bettina; Pöppl, Andreas; Hartmann, Martin; Himsl, Dieter; Bertmer, Marko

    2011-05-07

    The process of water adsorption on a dehydrated Cu(3)(BTC)(2) (copper (II) benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxylate) metal-organic framework (MOF) was studied with (1)H and (13)C solid-state NMR. Different relative amounts of water (0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, and 5 mole equivalents with respect to copper) were adsorbed via the gas phase. (1)H and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of dehydrated and water-loaded Cu(3)(BTC)(2) samples gave evidence on the structural changes due to water adsorption within the MOF material as well as information on water dynamics. The analysis of (1)H spinning sideband intensities reveals differences in the (1)H-(63/65)Cu hyperfine coupling between dehydrated and water-loaded samples. The investigation was continued for 60 days to follow the stability of the Cu(3)(BTC)(2) network under humid conditions. NMR data reveal that Cu(3)(BTC)(2) decomposes quite fast with the decomposition being different for different water contents. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  4. In VivoQuantitation of Cerebral Metabolite Concentrations Using Natural Abundance 13C MRS at 1.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüml, Stefan

    1999-02-01

    A method for the quantitation of cerebral metabolites on a clinical MR scanner by natural abundance13C MRSin vivois described. Proton-decoupled spectra were acquired with a power deposition within FDA guidelines using a novel coil design.myo-Inositol, quantified by a separate proton MRS, and readily detectable in13C MRS, was used as an internal reference. Normal concentrations, measured in four control subjects, age 7 months to 12 years, were glutamate 9.9 ± 0.7, glutamine 5.6 ± 1.0, and NAA 8.8 ± 2.8 mmol/kg. In a patient diagnosed with Canavan disease, examined four times, glutamate was reduced to 46% of normal, 4.6 ± 0.5 mmol/kg. NAA was increased by 50% to 13.2 ± 1.6 mmol/kg in13C MRS, consistent with the 41% increase to 12.3 ± 1.1 from control 8.7 ± 1.1 mmol/kg assayed by1H MRS. Limited concentration of glutamate may impact on glutamatergic neurons and excitatory neurotransmission in Canavan disease. Quantitation of cerebral glutamate in human brain may have clinical value in human neuropathologies in which glutamate is believed to play a central role.

  5. Abundance and δ13C values of fatty acids in lacustrine surface sediments: Relationships with in-lake methane concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötter, Tabea; Bastviken, David; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Rinta, Päivi; Schilder, Jos; Schubert, Carsten J.; Heiri, Oliver

    2018-07-01

    Proxy-indicators in lake sediments provide the only approach by which the dynamics of in-lake methane cycling can be examined on multi-decadal to centennial time scales. This information is necessary to constrain how lacustrine methane production, oxidation and emissions are expected to respond to global change drivers. Several of the available proxies for reconstructing methane cycle changes of lakes rely on interpreting past changes in the abundance or relevance of methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), either directly (e.g. via analysis of bacterial lipids) or indirectly (e.g. via reconstructions of the past relevance of MOB in invertebrate diet). However, only limited information is available about the extent to which, at the ecosystem scale, variations in abundance and availability of MOB reflect past changes in in-lake methane concentrations. We present a study examining the abundances of fatty acids (FAs), particularly of 13C-depleted FAs known to be produced by MOB, relative to methane concentrations in 29 small European lakes. 39 surface sediment samples were obtained from these lakes and FA abundances were compared with methane concentrations measured at the lake surface, 10 cm above the sediments and 10 cm within the sediments. Three of the FAs in the surface sediment samples, C16:1ω7c, C16:1ω5c/t, and C18:1ω7c were characterized by lower δ13C values than the remaining FAs. We show that abundances of these FAs, relative to other short-chain FAs produced in lake ecosystems, are related with sedimentary MOB concentrations assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We observed positive relationships between methane concentrations and relative abundances of C16:1ω7c, C16:1ω5c/t, and C18:1ω7c and the sum of these FAs. For the full dataset these relationships were relatively weak (Spearman's rank correlation (rs) of 0.34-0.43) and not significant if corrected for multiple testing. However, noticeably stronger and statistically significant

  6. Powder X-ray diffraction, infrared and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of the homologous series of some solid-state zinc(II) and sodium(I) n-alkanoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter N.; Taylor, Richard A.

    2015-03-01

    A comparative study of the room temperature molecular packing and lattice structures for the homologous series of zinc(II) and sodium(I) n-alkanoates adduced from Fourier transform infrared and solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopic data in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction measurements is carried out. For zinc carboxylates, metal-carboxyl bonding is via asymmetric bridging bidentate coordination whilst for the sodium adducts, coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding. All compounds are packed in a monoclinic crystal system. Furthermore, the fully extended all-trans hydrocarbon chains are arranged as lamellar bilayers. For zinc compounds, there is bilayer overlap, for long chain adducts (nc > 8) but not for sodium compounds where methyl groups from opposing layers in the lamellar are only closely packed. Additionally, the hydrocarbon chains are extended along the a-axis of the unit cell for zinc compounds whilst for sodium carboxylates they are extended along the c-axis. These packing differences are responsible for different levels of Van der Waals effects in the lattices of these two series of compounds, hence, observed odd-even alternation is different. The significant difference in lattice packing observed for these two series of compounds is proposed to be due to the difference in metal-carboxyl coordination mode, arising from the different electronic structure of the central metal ions.

  7. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (free POM), light occluded particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (occluded POM<1.6) and dense occluded particulate organic matter 1.6 to 2.0 g cm-3 (occluded POM1.6-2.0)) of silty soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) < maize (13.0 g kg-1) < grassland (24.5 g kg-1) < spruce (40.5 g kg-1). The major part (86-91%) of the SOC was associated with the heavy mineral fraction at the grassland, maize and wheat site. In the A horizon of the spruce soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated

  8. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C–H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes, E-mail: tiago.ferreira@fkem1.lu.se; Physical Chemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund; Ollila, O. H. Samuli

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C–H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of {sup 13}C or {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R{sub 1}, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomicallymore » resolved model-free estimation of the C–H bond effective reorientational correlation time τ{sub e}, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of {sup 13}C R{sub 1} and R{sub 1ρ} relaxation rates, as well as {sup 1}H−{sup 13}C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τ{sub e} from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g{sub 1} methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τ{sub e}-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τ{sub e}-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C–H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C–H bond reorientation dynamics

  9. Solid-State 87Sr NMR Spectroscopy at Natural Abundance and High Magnetic Field Strength.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Alexandra; Terskikh, Victor V; Ye, Eric; Bernard, Guy M; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2015-12-10

    Twenty-five strontium-containing solids were characterized via (87)Sr NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance and high magnetic field strength (B0 = 21.14 T). Strontium nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in these compounds are sensitive to the strontium site symmetry and range from 0 to 50.5 MHz. An experimental (87)Sr chemical shift scale is proposed, and available data indicate a chemical shift range of approximately 550 ppm, from -200 to +350 ppm relative to Sr(2+)(aq). In general, magnetic shielding increased with strontium coordination number. Experimentally measured chemical shift anisotropy is reported for stationary samples of solid powdered SrCl2·6H2O, SrBr2·6H2O, and SrCO3, with δaniso((87)Sr) values of +28, +26, and -65 ppm, respectively. NMR parameters were calculated using CASTEP, a gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) DFT-based program, which addresses the periodic nature of solids using plane-wave basis sets. Calculated NMR parameters are in good agreement with those measured.

  10. Effect of photosynthesis on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Pons, Thijs L.; Ziegler, Martin; Lourens, Lucas J.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The abundance of the isotopologue 18O13C16O (Δ47) in atmospheric air is a promising new tracer for the atmospheric carbon cycle (Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al., 2007). The large gross fluxes in CO2 between the atmosphere and biosphere are supposed to play a major role in controlling its abundance. Eiler and Schauble (2004) set up a box model describing the effect of air-leaf interaction on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric air. The main assumption is that the exchange between CO2 and water within the mesophyll cells will imprint a Δ47 value on the back-diffusing CO2 that reflects the leaf temperature. Additionally, kinetic effects due to CO2 diffusion into and out of the stomata are thought to play a role. We investigated the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 under controlled conditions using a leaf chamber set-up to quantitatively test the model assumptions suggested by Eiler and Schauble (2004). We studied the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 using two C3 and one C4 plant species: (i) sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a C3 species with a high leaf conductance for CO2 diffusion, (ii) ivy (Hedera hibernica), a C3 species with a low conductance, and (iii), maize (Zea mays), a species with the C4 photosynthetic pathway. We also investigated the effect of different light intensities (photosynthetic photon flux density of 200, 700 and 1800 μmol m2s-1), and thus, photosynthetic rate in sunflower and maize. A leaf was mounted in a cuvette with a transparent window and an adjustable light source. The air inside was thoroughly mixed, making the composition of the outgoing air equal to the air inside. A gas-mixing unit was attached at the entrance of the cuvette that mixed air with a high concentration of scrambled CO2 with a Δ47 value of 0 to 0.1‰ with CO2 free air to set the CO2 concentration of ingoing air at 500 ppm. The flow rate through the cuvette was adjusted to the photosynthetic activity of the leaf

  11. Solid state 13C-NMR, infrared, X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal studies of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal (Li, Na, K, Ag) n-alkanoates: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter N.; Ellis, Henry A.; White, Nicole A. S.

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of the molecular packing, lattice structures and phase behaviors of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal carboxylates (Li, Na, K and Ag) is carried out via solid state FT-infrared and 13C-NMR spectroscopes, X-rays powder diffraction, density measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy and variable temperature infrared spectroscopy. It is proposed that, for lithium, sodium and potassium carboxylates, metal-carboxyl coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding with extensive intermolecular interactions to form tetrahedral metal centers, irrespective of chain length. However, for silver n-alkanoates, carboxyl moieties are bound to silver ions via syn-syn type bridging bidentate coordination to form dimeric units held together by extensive head group inter-molecular interactions. Furthermore, the fully extended hydrocarbon chains which are crystallized in the all-trans conformation are tilted at ca. 30°, 27°, 15° and 31° with respect to a normal to the metal plane, for lithium, sodium, silver and potassium carboxylates, respectively. All compounds are packed as lamellar bilayer structures, however, lithium compounds are crystallized in a triclinic crystal system whilst silver, sodium and potassium n-alkanoates are all monoclinic with possible P1 bravais lattice. Odd-even alternation observed in various physical features is associated with different inter-planar spacing between closely packed layers in the bilayer which are not in the same plane; a phenomenon controlled by lattice packing symmetry requirements. All compounds, except silver carboxylates, show partially reversibly first order pre-melting transitions; the number of which increases with increasing chain length. These transitions are associated, for the most part, with lamellar collapse followed by increased gauche-trans isomerism in the methylene group assembly, irrespective of chain length. It is proposed that the absence of

  12. Natural abundance (25)Mg solid-state NMR of mg oxyanion systems: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Hanna, John V; Wong, Alan; Freitas, Jair C C; Yates, Jonathan R; Harris, Robin K; Smith, Mark E

    2009-09-28

    Solid-state (25)Mg magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) data are reported from a range of organic and inorganic magnesium-oxyanion compounds at natural abundance. To constrain the determination of the NMR interaction parameters (delta(iso), chi(Q), eta(Q)) data have been collected at three external magnetic fields (11.7, 14.1 and 18.8 T). Corresponding NMR parameters have also been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) methods using the GIPAW approach, with good correlations being established between experimental and calculated values of both chi(Q) and delta(iso). These correlations demonstrate that the (25)Mg NMR parameters are very sensitive to the structure, with small changes in the local Mg(2+) environment and the overall hydration state profoundly affecting the observed spectra. The observations suggest that (25)Mg NMR spectroscopy is a potentially potent probe for addressing some key problems in inorganic materials and of metal centres in biologically relevant molecules.

  13. [Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; Lü, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

    2011-04-01

    A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer.

  14. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anomalous 13C isotope abundances in C3S and C4H observed toward the cold interstellar cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Takano, Shuro; Sakai, Takeshi; Shiba, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2013-10-03

    We have studied the abundances of the (13)C isotopic species of C3S and C4H in the cold molecular cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (Cyanopolyyne Peak), by radioastronomical observations of their rotational emission lines. The CCCS/(13)CCCS and CCCS/C(13)CCS ratios are determined to be >206 and 48 ± 15, respectively. The CC(13)CS line is identified with the aid of laboratory microwave spectroscopy, and the range of the CCCS/CC(13)CS ratio is found to be from 30 to 206. The abundances of at least two (13)C isotopic species of C3S are thus found to be different. Similarly, it is found that the abundances of the four (13)C isotopic species of C4H are not equivalent. The CCCCH/(13)CCCCH, CCCCH/C(13)CCCH, CCCCH/CC(13)CCH, and CCCCH/CCC(13)CH ratios are evaluated to be 141 ± 44, 97 ± 27, 82 ± 15, and 118 ± 23, respectively. Here the errors denote 3 times the standard deviation. These results will constrain the formation pathways of C3S and C4H, if the nonequivalence is caused during the formation processes of these molecules. The exchange reactions after the formation of these two molecules may also contribute to the nonequivalence. In addition, we have confirmed that the (12)C/(13)C ratio of some species are significantly higher than the interstellar elemental (12)C/(13)C ratio of 60-70. The observations of the (13)C isotopic species provide us with rich information on chemical processes in cold interstellar clouds.

  16. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  17. Exploring the salt–cocrystal continuum with solid-state NMR using natural-abundance samples: implications for crystal engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Lalit; Banik, Manas; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Joseph, Sumy; Pandey, Manoj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    There has been significant recent interest in differentiating multicomponent solid forms, such as salts and cocrystals, and, where appropriate, in determining the position of the proton in the X—H⋯A—Y X −⋯H—A +—Y continuum in these systems, owing to the direct relationship of this property to the clinical, regulatory and legal requirements for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In the present study, solid forms of simple cocrystals/salts were investigated by high-field (700 MHz) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) using samples with naturally abundant 15N nuclei. Four model compounds in a series of prototypical salt/cocrystal/continuum systems exhibiting {PyN⋯H—O—}/{PyN+—H⋯O−} hydrogen bonds (Py is pyridine) were selected and prepared. The crystal structures were determined at both low and room temperature using X-ray diffraction. The H-atom positions were determined by measuring the 15N—1H distances through 15N-1H dipolar interactions using two-dimensional inversely proton-detected cross polarization with variable contact-time (invCP-VC) 1H→15N→1H experiments at ultrafast (νR ≥ 60–70 kHz) magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency. It is observed that this method is sensitive enough to determine the proton position even in a continuum where an ambiguity of terminology for the solid form often arises. This work, while carried out on simple systems, has implications in the pharmaceutical industry where the salt/cocrystal/continuum condition of APIs is considered seriously. PMID:28875033

  18. Exploring the salt-cocrystal continuum with solid-state NMR using natural-abundance samples: implications for crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Lalit; Banik, Manas; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Joseph, Sumy; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2017-07-01

    There has been significant recent interest in differentiating multicomponent solid forms, such as salts and cocrystals, and, where appropriate, in determining the position of the proton in the X -H⋯ A - Y X - ⋯H- A + - Y continuum in these systems, owing to the direct relationship of this property to the clinical, regulatory and legal requirements for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In the present study, solid forms of simple cocrystals/salts were investigated by high-field (700 MHz) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) using samples with naturally abundant 15 N nuclei. Four model compounds in a series of prototypical salt/cocrystal/continuum systems exhibiting {PyN⋯H-O-}/{PyN + -H⋯O - } hydrogen bonds (Py is pyridine) were selected and prepared. The crystal structures were determined at both low and room temperature using X-ray diffraction. The H-atom positions were determined by measuring the 15 N- 1 H distances through 15 N- 1 H dipolar interactions using two-dimensional inversely proton-detected cross polarization with variable contact-time (invCP-VC) 1 H→ 15 N→ 1 H experiments at ultrafast (ν R ≥ 60-70 kHz) magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency. It is observed that this method is sensitive enough to determine the proton position even in a continuum where an ambiguity of terminology for the solid form often arises. This work, while carried out on simple systems, has implications in the pharmaceutical industry where the salt/cocrystal/continuum condition of APIs is considered seriously.

  19. Strong Coupling of Shoot Assimilation and Soil Respiration during Drought and Recovery Periods in Beech As Indicated by Natural Abundance δ13C Measurements.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Carola H; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Drought down-regulates above- and belowground carbon fluxes, however, the resilience of trees to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of these above- and belowground fluxes after re-wetting. Carbon isotope composition of above- and belowground carbon fluxes at natural abundance provides a methodological approach to study the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration (SR) under conditions (such as drought) that influence photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination. In turn, the direct supply of root respiration with recent photoassimilates will impact on the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO 2 . We independently measured shoot and soil CO 2 fluxes of beech saplings ( Fagus sylvatica L.) and their respective δ 13 C continuously with laser spectroscopy at natural abundance. We quantified the speed of recovery of drought stressed trees after re-watering and traced photosynthetic carbon isotope signal in the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO 2 . Stomatal conductance responded strongly to the moderate drought (-65%), induced by reduced soil moisture content as well as increased vapor pressure deficit. Simultaneously, carbon isotope discrimination decreased by 8‰, which in turn caused a significant increase in δ 13 C of recent metabolites (1.5-2.5‰) and in δ 13 C of SR (1-1.5‰). Generally, shoot and soil CO 2 fluxes and their δ 13 C were in alignment during drought and subsequent stress release, clearly demonstrating a permanent dependence of root respiration on recently fixed photoassimilates, rather than on older reserves. After re-watering, the drought signal persisted longer in δ 13 C of the water soluble fraction that integrates multiple metabolites (soluble sugars, amino acids, organic acids) than in the neutral fraction which represents most recently assimilated sugars or in the δ 13 C of SR. Nevertheless, full recovery of all aboveground physiological variables was reached within 4 days

  20. Early-stage changes in natural (13)C and (15)N abundance and nutrient dynamics during different litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Song, Byeong-Yeol; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Decomposition, nutrient, and isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) dynamics during 1 year were studied for leaf and twig litters of Pinus densiflora, Castanea crenata, Erigeron annuus, and Miscanthus sinensis growing on a highly weathered soil with constrained nutrient supply using litterbags in a cool temperate region of South Korea. Decay constant (k/year) ranged from 0.58 to 1.29/year, and mass loss ranged from 22.36 to 58.43 % among litter types. The results demonstrate that mass loss and nutrient dynamics of decomposing litter were influenced by the seasonality of mineralization and immobilization processes. In general, most nutrients exhibited alternate phases of rapid mineralization followed by gradual immobilization, except K, which was released throughout the field incubation. At the end of study, among all the nutrients only N and P showed net immobilization. Mobility of different nutrients from decomposing litter as the percentage of initial litter nutrient concentration was in the order of K > Mg > Ca > N ≈ P. The δ(13)C (0.32-6.70 ‰) and δ(15)N (0.74-3.90 ‰) values of residual litters showed nonlinear increase and decrease, respectively compared to initial isotopic values during decomposition. Litter of different functional types and chemical quality converged toward a conservative nutrient use strategy through mechanisms of slow decomposition and slow nutrient mobilization. Our results indicate that litter quality and season, are the most important regulators of litter decomposition in these forests. The results revealed significant relationships between litter decomposition rates and N, C:N ratio and P, and seasonality (temperature). These results and the convergence of different litters towards conservative nutrient use in these nutrient constrained ecosystems imply optimization of litter management because litter removal can have cascading effects on litter decomposition and nutrient availability in these systems.

  1. Molecular Investigation of the Short-term Sequestration of Natural Abundance 13C -labelled Cow Dung in the Surface Horizons of a Temperate Grassland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; Evershed, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    An adequate understanding of the carbon (C) sequestration potential of grasslands requires that the quantity and residence times of C inputs be measured. Herbivore dung is largely comprised of plant cell wall material, a significant source of stable C in intensively grazed temperate grassland ecosystems that contributes to the soil carbon budget. Our work uses compound-specific isotope analysis to identify the pattern of input of dung-derived compounds from natural abundance 13C/-labelled cow dung into the surface horizons of a temperate grassland soil over one year. C4 dung (δ 13C \\-12.6 ‰ ) from maize fed cows was applied to a temperate grassland surface (δ 13C \\-29.95 ‰ ) at IGER-North Wyke (Devon, UK), and dung remains and soil cores beneath the treatments collected at ŧ = 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224 and 372 days. Bulk dung carbon present in the 0\\-1 cm and 1\\-5 cm surface horizons of a grassland soil over one year was estimated using Δ 13C between C4 dung and C3 dung, after Bol {\\et al.} (2000). The major biochemical components of dung were quantified using proximate forage fibre analyses, after Goering and Van Soest (1970) and identified using `wet' chemical and GC-MS methods. Plant cell wall polysaccharides and lignin were found to account for up to 67 {%} of dung dry matter. Hydrolysed polysaccharides were prepared as alditol acetates for analyses (after Docherty {\\et al.}, 2001), and a novel application of an off-line pyrolysis method applied to measure lignin-derived phenolic compounds (after Poole & van Bergen, 2002). This paper focuses on major events in the incorporation of dung carbon, estimated using natural abundance 13C&-slash;labelling technique. This revealed a major bulk input of dung carbon after a period of significant rainfall with a consequent decline in bulk soil δ 13C values until the end of the experiment (Dungait {\\et al.}, submitted). Findings will be presented revealing contribution of plant cell wall polysaccharides and

  2. High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Richard N.; Kuramoto, Douglas S.; Haase, Christa; Tan, Sze M.; Crosson, Eric R.; Saad, Nabil M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system integrating a chromatographic separation technique, a catalytic combustor, and an isotopic 13C/12C optical analyzer is described for the isotopic analysis of a mixture of organic compounds. A demonstration of its potential is made for the geochemically important class of short-chain hydrocarbons. The system proved to be linear over a 3-fold injection volume dynamic range with an average precision of 0.95‰ and 0.67‰ for ethane and propane, respectively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3‰ of the values determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), which is the current method of choice for compound-specific isotope analysis. With anticipated improvements, the low-cost, portable, and easy-to-use CRDS-based instrumental setup is poised to evolve into a credible challenge to the high-cost and complex IRMS-based technique. PMID:19564619

  3. Preparation of Mo-Re-C samples containing Mo7Re13C with the β-Mn-type structure by solid state reaction of planetary-ball-milled powder mixtures of Mo, Re and C, and their crystal structures and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh-ishi, Katsuyoshi; Nagumo, Kenta; Tateishi, Kazuya; Takafumi, Ohnishi; Yoshikane, Kenta; Sugiyama, Machiko; Oka, Kengo; Kobayashi, Ryota

    2017-01-01

    Mo-Re-C compounds containing Mo7Re13C with the β-Mn structure were synthesized with high-melting-temperature metals Mo, Re, and C powders using a conventional solid state method with a planetary ball milling machine instead of the arc melting method. Use of the ball milling machine was necessary to obtain Mo7Re13C with the β-Mn structure using the solid state method. Almost single-phase Mo7Re13C with a trace of impurity were obtained using the synthesis method. By XRF and lattice parameter measurements on the samples, Fe element existed in the compound synthesized using the planetary ball milling machine with a pot and balls made of steel, though Fe element was not detected in the compound synthesized using a pot and balls made of tungsten carbide. The former compound containg the Fe atom did not show superconductivity but the latter compound without the Fe atom showed superconductivity at 6.1 K.

  4. Preparation of Mo-Re-C samples containing Mo{sub 7}Re{sub 13}C with the β-Mn-type structure by solid state reaction of planetary-ball-milled powder mixtures of Mo, Re and C, and their crystal structures and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Oh-ishi, Katsuyoshi, E-mail: oh-ishi@kc.chuo-u.ac.jp; Nagumo, Kenta; Tateishi, Kazuya

    Mo-Re-C compounds containing Mo{sub 7}Re{sub 13}C with the β-Mn structure were synthesized with high-melting-temperature metals Mo, Re, and C powders using a conventional solid state method with a planetary ball milling machine instead of the arc melting method. Use of the ball milling machine was necessary to obtain Mo{sub 7}Re{sub 13}C with the β-Mn structure using the solid state method. Almost single-phase Mo{sub 7}Re{sub 13}C with a trace of impurity were obtained using the synthesis method. By XRF and lattice parameter measurements on the samples, Fe element existed in the compound synthesized using the planetary ball milling machine with amore » pot and balls made of steel, though Fe element was not detected in the compound synthesized using a pot and balls made of tungsten carbide. The former compound containg the Fe atom did not show superconductivity but the latter compound without the Fe atom showed superconductivity at 6.1 K. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility measured under 10 Oe for the superconducting PBM-T samples without Fe element and non-superconducting PBM-S with Fe element. The inset is the enlarged view of the data for the PBM-S sample.« less

  5. Seasonal variation in natural abundance of δ13C and 15N in Salicornia brachiata Roxb. populations from a coastal area of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Doongar R; Seo, Juyoung; Kang, Hojeong; Rathore, Aditya P; Jha, Bhavanath

    2018-05-01

    High and fluctuating salinity is characteristic for coastal salt marshes, which strongly affect the physiology of halophytes consequently resulting in changes in stable isotope distribution. The natural abundance of stable isotopes (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) of the halophyte plant Salicornia brachiata and physico-chemical characteristics of soils were analysed in order to investigate the relationship of stable isotope distribution in different populations in a growing period in the coastal area of Gujarat, India. Aboveground and belowground biomass of S. brachiata was collected from six different populations at five times (September 2014, November 2014, January 2015, March 2015 and May 2015). The δ 13 C values in aboveground (-30.8 to -23.6 ‰, average: -26.6 ± 0.4 ‰) and belowground biomass (-30.0 to -23.1 ‰, average: -26.3 ± 0.4 ‰) were similar. The δ 13 C values were positively correlated with soil salinity and Na concentration, and negatively correlated with soil mineral nitrogen. The δ 15 N values of aboveground (6.7-16.1 ‰, average: 9.6 ± 0.4 ‰) were comparatively higher than belowground biomass (5.4-13.2 ‰, average: 7.8 ± 0.3 ‰). The δ 15 N values were negatively correlated with soil available P. We conclude that the variation in δ 13 C values of S. brachiata was possibly caused by soil salinity (associated Na content) and N limitation which demonstrates the potential of δ 13 C as an indicator of stress in plants.

  6. Complete (1)H resonance assignment of beta-maltose from (1)H-(1)H DQ-SQ CRAMPS and (1)H (DQ-DUMBO)-(13)C SQ refocused INEPT 2D solid-state NMR spectra and first principles GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Webber, Amy L; Elena, Bénédicte; Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Pham, Tran N; Mauri, Francesco; Pickard, Chris J; Gil, Ana M; Stein, Robin; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Brown, Steven P

    2010-07-14

    A disaccharide is a challenging case for high-resolution (1)H solid-state NMR because of the 24 distinct protons (14 aliphatic and 10 OH) having (1)H chemical shifts that all fall within a narrow range of approximately 3 to 7 ppm. High-resolution (1)H (500 MHz) double-quantum (DQ) combined rotation and multiple pulse sequence (CRAMPS) solid-state NMR spectra of beta-maltose monohydrate are presented. (1)H-(1)H DQ-SQ CRAMPS spectra are presented together with (1)H (DQ)-(13)C correlation spectra obtained with a new pulse sequence that correlates a high-resolution (1)H DQ dimension with a (13)C single quantum (SQ) dimension using the refocused INEPT pulse-sequence element to transfer magnetization via one-bond (13)C-(1)H J couplings. Compared to the observation of only a single broad peak in a (1)H DQ spectrum recorded at 30 kHz magic-angle spinning (MAS), the use of DUMBO (1)H homonuclear decoupling in the (1)H DQ CRAMPS experiment allows the resolution of distinct DQ correlation peaks which, in combination with first-principles chemical shift calculations based on the GIPAW (Gauge Including Projector Augmented Waves) plane-wave pseudopotential approach, enables the assignment of the (1)H resonances to the 24 distinct protons. We believe this to be the first experimental solid-state NMR determination of the hydroxyl OH (1)H chemical shifts for a simple sugar. Variable-temperature (1)H-(1)H DQ CRAMPS spectra reveal small increases in the (1)H chemical shifts of the OH resonances upon decreasing the temperature from 348 K to 248 K.

  7. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  8. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Multiple Locations of Peptides in the Hydrocarbon Core of Gel-Phase Membranes Revealed by Peptide 13C to Lipid 2H Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Membrane locations of peptides and proteins are often critical to their functions. Solid-state rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to probe the locations of two peptides via peptide 13CO to lipid 2H distance measurements. The peptides are KALP, an α-helical membrane-spanning peptide, and HFP, the β-sheet N-terminal fusion peptide of the HIV gp41 fusion protein that plays an important role in HIV–host cell membrane fusion. Both peptides are shown to have at least two distinct locations within the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes. The multiple locations are attributed to snorkeling of lysine side chains for KALP and to the distribution of antiparallel β-sheet registries for HFP. The relative population of each location is also quantitated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clear experimental support of multiple peptide locations within the membrane hydrocarbon core. These data are for gel-phase membranes, but the approach should work for liquid-ordered membranes containing cholesterol and may be applicable to liquid-disordered membranes with appropriate additional analysis to take into account protein and lipid motion. This paper also describes the methodological development of 13CO–2H REDOR using the lyophilized I4 peptide that is α-helical and 13CO-labeled at A9 and 2Hα-labeled at A8. The I4 spins are well-approximated as an ensemble of isolated 13CO–2H spin pairs each separated by 5.0 Å with a 37 Hz dipolar coupling. A pulse sequence with rectangular 100 kHz 2H π pulses results in rapid and extensive buildup of REDOR (ΔS/S0) with a dephasing time (τ). The buildup is well-fit by a simple exponential function with a rate of 24 Hz and an extent close to 1. These parameter values reflect nonradiative transitions between the 2H spin states during the dephasing period. Each spin pair spends approximately two-thirds of its time in the 13CO–2H (m = ±1) states and approximately one-third of

  10. The relative isotopic abundance13C, δ15N) during composting of agricultural wastes in relation to compost quality and feedstock.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Caio T; Magalhães, Alberto M T; Souza, Paulo O; Chalk, Phillip M; Urquiaga, Segundo

    2018-05-01

    Variations in the relative isotopic abundance of C and N (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) were measured during the composting of different agricultural wastes using bench-scale bioreactors. Different mixtures of agricultural wastes (horse bedding manure + legume residues; dairy manure + jatropha mill cake; dairy manure + sugarcane residues; dairy manure alone) were used for aerobic-thermophilic composting. No significant differences were found between the δ 13 C values of the feedstock and the final compost, except for dairy manure + sugarcane residues (from initial ratio of -13.6 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of -14.4 ± 0.2 ‰). δ 15 N values increased significantly in composts of horse bedding manure + legumes residues (from initial ratio of +5.9 ± 0.1 ‰ to final ratio of +8.2 ± 0.5 ‰) and dairy manure + jatropha mill cake (from initial ratio of +9.5 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of +12.8 ± 0.7 ‰) and was related to the total N loss (mass balance). δ 13 C can be used to differentiate composts from different feedstock (e.g. C 3 or C 4 sources). The quantitative relationship between N loss and δ 15 N variation should be determined.

  11. Screening molecular associations with lipid membranes using natural abundance 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Middleton, David A; Hughes, Eleri; Madine, Jillian

    2004-08-11

    We describe an NMR approach for detecting the interactions between phospholipid membranes and proteins, peptides, or small molecules. First, 1H-13C dipolar coupling profiles are obtained from hydrated lipid samples at natural isotope abundance using cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR methods. Principal component analysis of dipolar coupling profiles for synthetic lipid membranes in the presence of a range of biologically active additives reveals clusters that relate to different modes of interaction of the additives with the lipid bilayer. Finally, by representing profiles from multiple samples in the form of contour plots, it is possible to reveal statistically significant changes in dipolar couplings, which reflect perturbations in the lipid molecules at the membrane surface or within the hydrophobic interior.

  12. Degradation of mangrove tissues by arboreal termites (Nasutitermes acajutlae) and their role in the mangrove C cycle (Puerto Rico): Chemical characterization and organic matter provenance using bulk δ13C, C/N, alkaline CuO oxidation-GC/MS, and solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vane, Christopher H.; Kim, Alexander W.; Moss-Hayes, Vicky; Snape, Colin E.; Diaz, Miguel Castro; Khan, Nicole S.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2013-08-01

    Arboreal termites are wood decaying organisms that play an important role in the first stages of C cycling in mangrove systems. The chemical composition of Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa leaf, stem, and pneumatophore tissues as well as associated sediments was compared to that of nests of the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae. Nests gave δ13C values of -26.1 to -27.2‰ (±0.1) and C/N of 43.3 (±2.0) to 98.6 (±16.2) which were similar to all stem and pneumatophores but distinct from mangrove leaves or sediments. Organic matter processed by termites yielded lignin phenol concentrations (Λ, lambda) that were 2-4 times higher than stem or pneumatophores and 10-20 times higher than that of leaves or sediments, suggesting that the nests were more resistant to biodegradation than the mangrove vegetation source. 13C NMR revealed that polysaccharide content of mangrove tissues (50-69% C) was higher than that of the nests (46-51% C). Conversely, lignin accounted for 16.2-19.6% C of nest material, a threefold increase relative to living mangrove tissues; a similar increase in aromatic methoxyl content was also observed in the nests. Lipids (aliphatic and paraffinic moieties) were also important but rather variable chemical components of all three mangrove species, representing between 13.5 and 28.3% of the C content. Termite nests contained 3.14 Mg C ha-1 which represents approximately 2% of above ground C storage in mangroves, a value that is likely to increase upon burial due to their refractory chemical composition.

  13. Abundance gradients in cooling flow clusters: Ginga Large Area Counters and Einstein Solid State Spectrometer spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Day, C. S. R.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the Ginga Large Area Counters (LAC) and Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) spectra of four cooling flow clusters, A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199, each of which shows firm evidence of a relatively cool component. The inclusion of such cool spectral components in joint fits of SSS and LAC data leads to somewhat higher global temperatures than are derived from the high-energy LAC data alone. We find little evidence of cool emission outside the SSS field of view. Metal abundances appear to be centrally enhanced in all four clusters, with varying degrees of model dependence and statistical significance: the evidence is statistically strongest for A496 and A2142, somewhat weaker for A2199 and weakest for A1795. We also explore the model dependence in the amount of cold, X-ray-absorbing matter discovered in these clusters by White et al.

  14. The 13C-Pocket Structure In AGB Models: Constraints From Zirconium Isotope Abundances In Single Mainstream SiC Grains

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Nan; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; ...

    2014-06-04

    In this paper, we present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different 13C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar 92Zr/ 94Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a 13C-pocket with a flat 13C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth 13C profile. Finally, the improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat 13C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  15. Suppression of Native Soil Organic Matter Decomposition by Post-Fermentation Sludge in Agriculture Soil as Assessed by 13C Natural Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmach, W.; Bieganowski, A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic wastes results in the production of biogas and post-fermentation sludge. Post-fermentation sludge, which is rich in nutrients and contains more easily accessible inorganic-N than comparable composts, can be used as an alternative fertilizer in organic agriculture systems. While the effects of post fermentation sludge application on crop health and productivity have been extensively studied, little is known about its effects on soil parameters and long-term soil health. Thus, the main aim of this study was to determine the effects of post-fermentation sludge fertilization on agriculture soil quality. Specifically, it examined the efficiency and sequence of sludge utilisation by microorganisms and its influence on the utilisation/stabilization of native soil organic matter (SOM).To determine changes in SOM turnover after the addition of sludge, we utilized a natural stable carbon isotope labelling approach. Sludge produced from C4 plant residues (e.g. maize) was applied to soil under C3 cropping, resulting in distinct stable isotope signatures of fertilizer and SOM. Measuring the carbon isotope composition of CO2 produced in this microcosm experiment permitted accurate determination of the proportion of CO2 fluxes arising from both C sources. The addition of post-fermentation sludge increased the CO2 emissions from the soil by 30%. δ13C analysis of the total CO2 efflux revealed that post-fermentation sludge decreased SOM decomposition by 42% compared to control. Only 34% of the post-fermentation sludge had been mineralized after two months of incubation in the soil.The collective results of our study reveal that application of post-fermentation sludge suppresses SOM decomposition, suggesting its use as a fertilizer could positively influence long-term soil quality. Finally, the success of the natural abundance microcosm labeling approach in our study supports its use as an effective method of analyzing the effects of various

  16. Natural 13C abundance: a tool to trace the incorporation of dung-derived carbon into soil particle-size fractions.

    PubMed

    Amelung, W; Bol, R; Friedrich, C

    1999-01-01

    During the decay of 13C enriched dung patches, the; delta 13C signal of surface soil (1-5 cm) increased with a temporary maximum after 42 d. To understand the underlying processes, we investigated the incorporation of dung-derived C into soil particle-size fractions. Dung, collected from beef steers fed on maize (delta 13C = -15.36/1000) or ryegrass (delta 13C = -25.67/1000), was applied in circular patches to a C3 pasture at North Wyke, UK. Triplicates were sampled from surface soil (1-5 cm) at 14, 28, 42, and 70 d after application, pooled, separated into fine (< 0.2 micron) and coarse clay (0.2-2 microns), silt plus fine sand (2-250 microns), and coarse sand (250-2000 microns), and analyzed for total C, N, and delta 13C. As particle-size diameter decreased, the C/N ratios decreased and delta 13C values increased at all plots due to increasing microbial alteration of soil organic matter. After dung application, ca. 60% of dung-derived C in soil was recovered in the 0.2-250 microns fractions during the whole experiment. The proportion of dung-derived C in the fine clay peaked 42 d after dung application, coinciding with the delta 13C maximum in the bulk soil and the maximum leaching rate measured in lysimeters at this time in another study at the same sites. The percentage of dung-derived C as particulate C in the coarse sand fraction increased until the end of the experiment. We conclude that incorporation of C into soil from decomposing dung patches involved both temporary sorption of leached dung C to < 0.2 micron fractions and continuous accumulation of particulate C (> 250 microns).

  17. 13C Natural Abundance of Serum Retinol Is a Novel Biomarker for Evaluating Provitamin A Carotenoid-Biofortified Maize Consumption in Male Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Bryan M; Pungarcher, India; Mourao, Luciana; Davis, Christopher R; Simon, Philipp; Pixley, Kevin V; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2016-07-01

    Crops such as maize, sorghum, and millet are being biofortified with provitamin A carotenoids to ensure adequate vitamin A (VA) intakes. VA assessment can be challenging because serum retinol concentrations are homeostatically controlled and more sensitive techniques are resource-intensive. We investigated changes in serum retinol relative differences of isotope amount ratios of (13)C/(12)C (δ(13)C) caused by natural (13)C fractionation in C3 compared with C4 plants as a biomarker to detect provitamin A efficacy from biofortified (orange) maize and high-carotene carrots. The design was a 2 × 2 × 2 maize (orange compared with white) by carrot (orange compared with white) by a VA fortificant (VA+ compared with VA-) in weanling male Mongolian gerbils (n = 55), which included a 14-d VA depletion period and a 62-d treatment period (1 baseline and 8 treatment groups; n = 5-7/group). Liver VA and serum retinol were quantified, purified by HPLC, and analyzed by GC combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry for (13)C. Treatments affected liver VA concentrations (0.048 ± 0.039 to 0.79 ± 0.24 μmol/g; P < 0.0001) but not overall serum retinol concentrations (1.38 ± 0.22 μmol/L). Serum retinol and liver VA δ(13)C were significantly correlated (R(2) = 0.92; P < 0.0001). Serum retinol δ(13)C differentiated control groups that consumed white maize and white carrots (-27.1 ± 1.2 δ(13)C‰) from treated groups that consumed orange maize and white carrots (-21.6 ± 1.4 δ(13)C‰ P < 0.0001) and white maize and orange carrots (-30.6 ± 0.7 δ(13)C‰ P < 0.0001). A prediction model demonstrated the relative contribution of orange maize to total dietary VA for groups that consumed VA from mixed sources. Provitamin A efficacy and quantitative estimation of the relative contribution to dietary VA were demonstrated with the use of serum retinol δ(13)C. This method could be used for maize efficacy or effectiveness studies and with other C4 crops biofortified with provitamin A

  18. Miocene weathering environments in Western Australia-Inferences from the abundance and 13C/12C of Fe(CO3)OH in CID goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Tyler O.; Yapp, Crayton J.

    2018-04-01

    The channel iron deposits (CID) of the Hamersley Province in Western Australia are dominated by pedogenic goethite/hematite-rich ooids and pisoids that were transported to, and deposited in, the meandering channels of Miocene rivers. Information about the Miocene weathering environments that produced the Fe(III) oxides is archived in the mole fraction (X) and δ13C of the Fe(CO3)OH component in solid solution in oolitic CID goethite (α-FeOOH). Values of X and δ13C were measured for 12 oolitic goethite samples from different depths in two cores drilled in CID of the Robe Formation of Mesa J. The weighted-average plateau values of X ranged from 0.0098 to 0.0334, which suggest ambient CO2 concentrations that ranged from ∼50,000 ppm V to perhaps as much as ∼200,000 ppm V at the time of goethite crystallization. In a vadose zone characterized by in situ production of CO2 with steady-state Fickian diffusive transport of the gas, such concentrations would correspond to modeled soil respiration rates (Q) ranging from about 10 to 30 mmol/m2/h. Values for Q of about 10 mmol/m2/h are reported for soils in modern tropical forests with MAP ≥ ∼2000 mm. However, model-derived values of Q that exceed 15 mmol/m2/h are larger than observed in modern systems. This could indicate that some of the CID goethites crystallized in conditions that were phreatic or near phreatic rather than vadose. The δ13C values of the Fe(CO3)OH component in these 12 CID samples ranged from -24.0‰ to -22.3‰, which are among the most negative measured to date. If they reflect steady-state diffusive transport of CO2 in vadose environments, the soil CO2 would have been derived from a source with δ13C values that ranged from ∼-31‰ to -29‰. If, on the other hand, the goethites crystallized in a nearly phreatic environment that was moderately acidic, the inferred δ13C of the ancient CO2 source would have been about -27.6‰ to -25.8‰. In either case, the δ13C values point to in situ

  19. A strategy for acquisition and analysis of complex natural abundance (33)S solid-state NMR spectra of a disordered tetrathio transition-metal anion.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Hans J; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Brorson, Michael; Gor'kov, Peter; Gan, Zhehong

    2010-02-01

    A strategy, involving (i) sensitivity enhancement for the central transition (CT) by population transfer (PT) employing WURST inversion pulses to the satellite transitions (STs) in natural abundance (33)S MAS NMR for two different MAS frequencies (nu(r)=5.0 and 10.0kHz) at 14.1T and (ii) a (33)S static QCPMG experiment at 19.6T, has allowed acquisition and analysis of very complex solid-state (33)S CT NMR spectra for the disordered tetrathioperrhenate anion ReS(4)(-) in [(C(2)H(5))(4)N][ReS(4)]. This strategy of different NMR experiments combined with spectral analysis/simulations has allowed determination of precise values for two sets of quadrupole coupling parameters (C(Q) and eta(Q)) assigned to the two different S sites for the four sulfur atoms in the ReS(4)(-) anion in the ratio S1:S2=1:3. These sets of C(Q), eta(Q) values for the S1 and S2 site are quite similar and the magnitudes of the quadrupole coupling constants (C(Q)=2.2-2.5MHz) are a factor of about three larger than observed for other tetrathiometalates A(2)MS(4) (A=NH(4), Cs, Rb and M=W, Mo). In addition, the spectral analysis also leads to a determination of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters (delta(sigma) and eta(sigma)) for the S1 and S2 site, however, with much lower precisions (about 20% error margins) compared to those for C(Q), eta(Q), because the magnitudes of the two CSAs (i.e., delta(sigma)=60-90ppm) are about a factor of six smaller than observed for the other tetrathiometalates mentioned above. This large difference in the magnitudes of the anisotropic parameters C(Q) and delta(sigma) for the ReS(4)(-) anion, compared to those for the WS(4)(2-) and MoS(4)(2-) anions determined previously under identical experimental conditions, accounts for the increased complexity of the PT-enhanced (33)S MAS spectra observed for the ReS(4)(-) anion in this study. This difference in C(Q) also contributes significantly to the intensity distortions observed in the outer wings of the CTs when

  20. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  1. Natural 13C abundance reveals trophic status of fungi and host-origin of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi in mixed forests

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Peter; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Taylor, Andrew F. S.; Fransson, Petra M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fungi play crucial roles in the biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems, most notably as saprophytes decomposing organic matter and as mycorrhizal fungi enhancing plant nutrient uptake. However, a recurrent problem in fungal ecology is to establish the trophic status of species in the field. Our interpretations and conclusions are too often based on extrapolations from laboratory microcosm experiments or on anecdotal field evidence. Here, we used natural variations in stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) as an approach to distinguish between fungal decomposers and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungal species in the rich sporocarp flora (our sample contains 135 species) of temperate forests. We also demonstrated that host-specific mycorrhizal fungi that receive C from overstorey or understorey tree species differ in their δ13C. The many promiscuous mycorrhizal fungi, associated with and connecting several tree hosts, were calculated to receive 57–100% of their C from overstorey trees. Thus, overstorey trees also support, partly or wholly, the nutrient-absorbing mycelia of their alleged competitors, the understorey trees. PMID:10411910

  2. Comparative structural analysis of cytidine, ethenocytidine and their protonated salts III. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR studies at natural isotope abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Kozerski, L; Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Krzyzosiak, W; Bratek-Wiewiórowska, M; Jaskólski, M; Wiewiórowski, M

    1984-01-01

    The 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of cytidine /Cyd/, ethenocytidine /epsilon Cyd/ and their hydrochlorides /Cyd X HC1/ and /epsilon Cyd X HC1/ have been analysed to compare structural differences observed in solution with those existing in the crystalline state. The effects of ethenobridging and protonation of the hertero-aromatic base on the intramolecular stereochemistry, intermolecular interactions and electronic structure of the whole molecule are discussed on the basis of the NMR studies in DMSO solutions. Particular interest is devoted to the discussion of the conformation of the ribose ring, the presence of the intramolecular C-5'-0...H-6-C hydrogen bond, unambiguous assignment of the site of protonation, the mechanism of the 5C-H deuterium exchange in Cyd X HC1, and the intermolecular interactions in solution. PMID:6701098

  3. Effect of pressure on the short-range structure and speciation of carbon in alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa: 13C, 27Al, 17O and 29Si solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Fei, Yingwei; Lee, Sung Keun

    2018-03-01

    Despite the pioneering efforts to explore the nature of carbon in carbon-bearing silicate melts under compression, experimental data for the speciation and the solubility of carbon in silicate melts above 4 GPa have not been reported. Here, we explore the speciation of carbon and pressure-induced changes in network structures of carbon-bearing silicate (Na2O-3SiO2, NS3) and sodium aluminosilicate (NaAlSi3O8, albite) glasses quenched from melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa using multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The 27Al triple quantum (3Q) MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts revealed the pressure-induced increase in the topological disorder around 4 coordinated Al ([4]Al) without forming [5,6]Al. These structural changes are similar to those in volatile-free albite melts at high pressure, indicating that the addition of CO2 in silicate melts may not induce any additional increase in the topological disorder around Al at high pressure. 13C MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts show multiple carbonate species, including [4]Si(CO3)[4]Si, [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al, [4]Al(CO3)[4]Al, and free CO32-. The fraction of [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al increases with increasing pressure, while those of other bridging carbonate species decrease, indicating that the addition of CO2 may enhance mixing of Si and Al at high pressure. A noticeable change is not observed for 29Si NMR spectra for the carbon-bearing albite glasses with varying pressure at 1.5-6 GPa. These NMR results confirm that the densification mechanisms established for fluid-free, polymerized aluminosilicate melts can be applied to the carbon-bearing albite melts at high pressure. In contrast, the 29Si MAS NMR spectra for partially depolymerized, carbon-bearing NS3 glasses show that the fraction of [5,6]Si increases with increasing pressure at the expense of Q3 species ([4]Si species with one non-bridging oxygen as the nearest neighbor). The pressure-induced increase in topological disorder around Si is evident from an

  4. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  5. Distributions and Transformations of Natural Abundance 14C and 13C in Dissolved and Particulate Lipids in a Major Temperate Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Canuel, E. A.; McIntosh, H.; Barrett, A.; Ferer, E.; Hossler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Limited previous studies have shown major differences in the natural 14C and 13C isotopic signatures and radiocarbon ages of different biochemical classes (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipid, etc.) in river, estuarine and marine dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively). Of particular note are the much greater radiocarbon ages of lipophilic materials than other compound classes. Possible explanations for these findings include greater-than-expected inputs of fossil and highly aged lipid-containing organic matter to rivers and estuaries, extended sorptive-protection of lipophilic materials from degradation and/or lower overall reactivities of lipids vs. other major biochemical classes. We measured the Delta 14C and del 13C signatures and 14C ages of lipid classes in DOM and POM in a major temperate estuary, Delaware Bay (USA) over two years. Changes in DOM were also followed during large volume dark and light incubations to assess the microbial and photochemical reactivity and processing of DOM and lipids. Neutral lipids in DOM were among the most highly aged (> 30,000 yrs BP) of any materials measured in natural waters to date, and were significantly older than co-occurring polar lipids (~4,000-5,000 yrs BP). In general, DOM lipid ages were significantly greater than POM lipid ages across the river-estuary transect, arguing against sorptive protection as the major factor explaining greater ages of lipid than those of other compound classes. Both dark and light incubations of DOM resulted in losses of very highly aged material (30-50,000 y BP), with the remnant exported lipids being correspondingly younger. The microbial and photochemical alterations were most pronounced for lipids from freshwater reaches of the system (i.e., the Delaware River). These findings suggest that a) dissolved vs. particulate lipids have fundamentally different sources and/or physico-chemical partitioning, b) different lipid classes (e.g., neutral vs. polar

  6. Priming of Soil Carbon Decomposition in Two Inner Mongolia Grassland Soils following Sheep Dung Addition: A Study Using 13C Natural Abundance Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiuzhi; Ambus, Per; Wang, Shiping; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Chengjie

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of sheep dung on soil carbon (C) sequestration, a 152 days incubation experiment was conducted with soils from two different Inner Mongolian grasslands, i.e. a Leymus chinensis dominated grassland representing the climax community (2.1% organic matter content) and a heavily degraded Artemisia frigida dominated community (1.3% organic matter content). Dung was collected from sheep either fed on L. chinensis (C3 plant with δ13C = −26.8‰; dung δ13C = −26.2‰) or Cleistogenes squarrosa (C4 plant with δ13C = −14.6‰; dung δ13C = −15.7‰). Fresh C3 and C4 sheep dung was mixed with the two grassland soils and incubated under controlled conditions for analysis of 13C-CO2 emissions. Soil samples were taken at days 17, 43, 86, 127 and 152 after sheep dung addition to detect the δ13C signal in soil and dung components. Analysis revealed that 16.9% and 16.6% of the sheep dung C had decomposed, of which 3.5% and 2.8% was sequestrated in the soils of L. chinensis and A. frigida grasslands, respectively, while the remaining decomposed sheep dung was emitted as CO2. The cumulative amounts of C respired from dung treated soils during 152 days were 7–8 times higher than in the un-amended controls. In both grassland soils, ca. 60% of the evolved CO2 originated from the decomposing sheep dung and 40% from the native soil C. Priming effects of soil C decomposition were observed in both soils, i.e. 1.4 g and 1.6 g additional soil C kg−1 dry soil had been emitted as CO2 for the L. chinensis and A. frigida soils, respectively. Hence, the net C losses from L. chinensis and A. frigida soils were 0.6 g and 0.9 g C kg−1 soil, which was 2.6% and 7.0% of the total C in L. chinensis and A. frigida grasslands soils, respectively. Our results suggest that grazing of degraded Inner Mongolian pastures may cause a net soil C loss due to the positive priming effect, thereby accelerating soil deterioration. PMID:24236024

  7. Late-Quaternary variation in C3 and C4 grass abundance in southeastern Australia as inferred from δ13C analysis: Assessing the roles of climate, pCO2, and fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David M.; Urban, Michael A.; Kershaw, A. Peter; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Climate, atmospheric pCO2, and fire all may exert major influences on the relative abundance of C3 and C4 grasses in the present-day vegetation. However, the relative role of these factors in driving variation in C3 and C4 grass abundances in the paleorecord is uncertain, and C4 abundance is often interpreted narrowly as a proxy indicator of aridity or pCO2. We measured δ13C values of individual grains of grass (Poaceae) pollen in the sediments of two sites in southeastern Australia to assess changes in the proportions of C3 and C4 grasses during the past 25,000 years. These data were compared with shifts in pCO2, temperature, moisture balance, and fire to assess how these factors were related to long-term variation of C4 grass abundance during the late Quaternary. At Caledonia Fen, a high-elevation site in the Snowy Mountains, C4 grass abundance decreased from an average of 66% during the glacial period to 11% during the Holocene, primarily in response to increased pCO2 and temperature. In contrast, this pattern did not exist in low-elevation savannah woodlands around Tower Hill Northwest Crater, where C4 grass abundance instead varied in response to shifts in regional aridity. Fire did not appear to have strongly influenced the proportions of C3 and C4 grasses on the landscape at millennial timescales at either site. These patterns are similar to those of a recent study in East Africa, suggesting that elevation-related climatic differences influence how the abundance of C3 and C4 grasses responds to shifts in climate and pCO2. These results caution against using C4 plant abundance as a proxy indicator of either climate or pCO2 without an adequate understanding of key controlling factors.

  8. Short-Term Effects of Tillage Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Turnover Assessed by δ 13C Abundance in Particle-Size Fractions of Black Soils from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xuewen

    2014-01-01

    The combination of isotope trace technique and SOC fractionation allows a better understanding of SOC dynamics. A five-year tillage experiment consisting of no-tillage (NT) and mouldboard plough (MP) was used to study the changes in particle-size SOC fractions and corresponding δ 13C natural abundance to assess SOC turnover in the 0–20 cm layer of black soils under tillage practices. Compared to the initial level, total SOC tended to be stratified but showed a slight increase in the entire plough layer under short-term NT. MP had no significant impacts on SOC at any depth. Because of significant increases in coarse particulate organic carbon (POC) and decreases in fine POC, total POC did not remarkably decrease under NT and MP. A distinct increase in silt plus clay OC occurred in NT plots, but not in MP plots. However, the δ 13C abundances of both coarse and fine POC increased, while those of silt plus clay OC remained almost the same under NT. The C derived from C3 plants was mainly associated with fine particles and much less with coarse particles. These results suggested that short-term NT and MP preferentially enhanced the turnover of POC, which was considerably faster than that of silt plus clay OC. PMID:25162052

  9. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  10. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  11. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  12. Welcoming natural isotopic abundance in solid-state NMR: probing π-stacking and supramolecular structure of organic nanoassemblies using DNP† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02709a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Märker, Katharina; Paul, Subhradip; Fernández-de-Alba, Carlos; Lee, Daniel; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Hediger, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of small organic molecules is an intriguing phenomenon, which provides nanoscale structures for applications in numerous fields from medicine to molecular electronics. Detailed knowledge of their structure, in particular on the supramolecular level, is a prerequisite for the rational design of improved self-assembled systems. In this work, we prove the feasibility of a novel concept of NMR-based 3D structure determination of such assemblies in the solid state. The key point of this concept is the deliberate use of samples that contain 13C at its natural isotopic abundance (NA, 1.1%), while exploiting magic-angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization (MAS-DNP) to compensate for the reduced sensitivity. Since dipolar truncation effects are suppressed to a large extent in NA samples, unique and highly informative spectra can be recorded which are impossible to obtain on an isotopically labeled system. On the self-assembled cyclic diphenylalanine peptide, we demonstrate the detection of long-range internuclear distances up to ∼7 Å, allowing us to observe π-stacking through 13C–13C correlation spectra, providing a powerful tool for the analysis of one of the most important non-covalent interactions. Furthermore, experimental polarization transfer curves are in remarkable agreement with numerical simulations based on the crystallographic structure, and can be fully rationalized as the superposition of intra- and intermolecular contributions. This new approach to NMR crystallography provides access to rich and precise structural information, opening up a new avenue to de novo crystal structure determination by NMR. PMID:28451235

  13. Solid-State Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Yi, Xin; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei; Li, Tie

    2018-02-20

    Solid-state nanopore has captured the attention of many researchers due to its characteristic of nanoscale. Now, different fabrication methods have been reported, which can be summarized into two broad categories: "top-down" etching technology and "bottom-up" shrinkage technology. Ion track etching method, mask etching method chemical solution etching method, and high-energy particle etching and shrinkage method are exhibited in this report. Besides, we also discussed applications of solid-state nanopore fabrication technology in DNA sequencing, protein detection, and energy conversion.

  14. Solid-State Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Yi, Xin; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei; Li, Tie

    2018-02-01

    Solid-state nanopore has captured the attention of many researchers due to its characteristic of nanoscale. Now, different fabrication methods have been reported, which can be summarized into two broad categories: "top-down" etching technology and "bottom-up" shrinkage technology. Ion track etching method, mask etching method chemical solution etching method, and high-energy particle etching and shrinkage method are exhibited in this report. Besides, we also discussed applications of solid-state nanopore fabrication technology in DNA sequencing, protein detection, and energy conversion.

  15. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  16. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  17. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  18. Solid State Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-07

    Excimer-Laser Projection Lithography 38 4.5 Observation of Millimeter-Wave Oscillations from Resonant- Tunneling Diodes and Some Theroretical...and SIMOX Circuits 32 4-1 Resonant Tunneling Diode Parameters 41 XI INTRODUCTION 1. SOLID STATE DEVICE RESEARCH Optoelectronic switches have...radiation and reflective optics. Oscillation frequencies as high as 56 GHz have been observed from resonant- tunneling double- barrier diodes. Recent

  19. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  20. Solid State Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-21

    266-nm, l-,W, 500-ps laser pulse from a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG microchip laser operating at 10 kHz. Fluorescence and elastic scattering from the...on Solid State Research xv Organization xxiii QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1.1 Fluorescence-Cued Laser -Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Detection of Bioaerosols...2. ELECTRO-OfI’ICAL MATERIALS AND DEVICES 2.1 Narrow-Linewidth, High-Power 1556-nm Slab-Coupled Optical Waveguide External-Cavity Laser 7 3

  1. Solid State Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-23

    pumped at frequencies up to 5.5 kHz (with 10-W pumping). At high pulse repetition rates the radius of the beam waist decreases to ~60 jum, owing to...1998) A 1.3-GHz SOI CMOS Test Chip for R. Berger Low-Power High -Speed Pulse W. G. Lyons Processing A. M. Soares IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits...Goodhue D. E. Mull J. M. Rossler Y. Royter C.G.Fonstad* /. Vac. Sei. Technol. Modeling the Microwave Impedance of High -Tc Long Josephson

  2. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  3. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  4. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  5. Quantitative atomic-scale structure characterization of ordered mesoporous carbon materials by solid state NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhuoran; Opembe, Naftali; Kobayashi, Takeshi; ...

    2018-02-03

    In this study, solid-state (SS)NMR techniques were applied to characterize the atomic-scale structures of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials prepared using Pluronic F127 as template with resorcinol and formaldehyde as polymerizing precursors. A rigorous quantitative analysis was developed using a combination of 13C SSNMR spectra acquired with direct polarization and cross polarization on natural abundant and selectively 13C-enriched series of samples pyrolyzed at various temperatures. These experiments identified and counted the key functional groups present in the OMCs at various stages of preparation and thermal treatment. Lastly, the chemical evolution of molecular networks, the average sizes of aromatic clusters andmore » the extended molecular structures of OMCs were then inferred by coupling this information with the elemental analysis results.« less

  6. Quantitative atomic-scale structure characterization of ordered mesoporous carbon materials by solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhuoran; Opembe, Naftali; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    In this study, solid-state (SS)NMR techniques were applied to characterize the atomic-scale structures of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials prepared using Pluronic F127 as template with resorcinol and formaldehyde as polymerizing precursors. A rigorous quantitative analysis was developed using a combination of 13C SSNMR spectra acquired with direct polarization and cross polarization on natural abundant and selectively 13C-enriched series of samples pyrolyzed at various temperatures. These experiments identified and counted the key functional groups present in the OMCs at various stages of preparation and thermal treatment. Lastly, the chemical evolution of molecular networks, the average sizes of aromatic clusters andmore » the extended molecular structures of OMCs were then inferred by coupling this information with the elemental analysis results.« less

  7. Solid State Humidity Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Song-Lin

    There are only a few solid state humidity sensors available today. Most of those sensors use a porous oxide material as a principal part of the device. The devices work on the basis of a change in resistance as the moisture in the air varies. In this experiment, two solid state humidity sensors have been developed for use under practical conditions. One is a Polymer Oxide Semiconductor device with a POLYOX film that absorbs the moisture from the air. The amount of water dipoles absorbed by the polymer is a function of relative humidity. This sensor can measure relative humidity from 20% to 90%. The other is a Dew Point sensor. The sensor is in contact with the upper surface of a miniature Peltier cooler. Water molecules deposited on the sensor surface cause the electrical current through the sensor to increase. The operator adjusts the temperature of the Peltier cooler until a saturated current through the sensor is reached. About one min. is required to measure low relative humidities. The Dew Point sensor can measure a range of relative humidities of 30% to 80%.

  8. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  9. Solid state microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P D; Rosenfeld, A B; Zaider, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of solid state microdosimetry is presented with an emphasis on silicon-based devices. The historical foundations and basics of microdosimetry are briefly provided. Various methods of experimental regional microdosimetry are discussed to facilitate a comparison with the more recent development of silicon microdosimetry. In particular, the performance characteristics of a proportional gas counter and a silicon microdosimeter are compared. Recent improvements in silicon microdosimetry address the issues of requirement specification, non-spherical shape, tissue equivalence, sensitive volume definition (charge collection complexity) and low noise requirements which have previously impeded the implementation of silicon-based microdosimetry. A prototype based on silicon-on-insulator technology is described along with some example results from clinical high LET radiotherapy facilities. A brief summary of the applications of microdosimetry is included. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  11. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  12. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rationale, analysis, design, breadboarding and testing of the incremental functional requirements are reported that led to the development of prototype 1 and 5 Amp dc and 1 Amp ac solid state power controllers (SSPC's). The SSPC's are to be considered for use as a replacement of electro-mechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 Vdc. They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small guage wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, unboard testing, and power management and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability.

  13. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  14. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed.

    PubMed

    Kenig, F; Damsté, J S; Frewin, N L; Hayes, J M; De Leeuw, J W

    1995-06-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  15. 3D 14N/1H Double Quantum/1H Single Quantum Correlation Solid-State NMR for Probing Parallel and Anti-Parallel Beta-Sheet Arrangement of Oligo-Peptides at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Hong, You-Lee; Asakura, Tetsuo; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2018-05-08

    β-sheet structure of oligo- and poly-peptides can be formed in anti-parallel (AP)- and parallel (P)-structure, which is the important feature to understand the structures. In principle, P- and AP-β-sheet structures can be identified by the presence (AP) and absence (P) of the interstrand 1HNH/1HNH correlations on a diagonal in 2D 1H double quantum (DQ)/1H single quantum (SQ) spectrum due to the different interstrand 1HNH/1HNH distances between these two arrangements. However, the 1HNH/1HNH peaks overlap to the 1HNH3+/1HNH3+ peaks, which always give cross peaks regardless of the β-sheet arrangement. The 1HNH3+/1HNH3+ peaks disturb the observation of the presence/absence of 1HNH/1HNH correlations and the assignment of 1HNH and 1HNH3+ is not always available. Here, 3D 14N/1H DQ/1H SQ correlation solid-state NMR experiments at fast magic angle spinning (70 kHz) are introduced to distinguish AP and P β-sheet structure. The 14N dimension allows the separate observation of 1HNH/1HNH peaks from 1HNH3+/1HNH3+ peaks with clear assignment of 1HNH and 1HNH3+. In addition, the high natural abundance of 1H and 14N enables 3D 14N/1H DQ/1H SQ experiments of oligo-alanines (Ala3-6) in four hours without any isotope labelling. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  17. Solid State Ultracapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, Terry D.

    2015-01-01

    NASA analyzes, tests, packages, and fabricates electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts used in space vehicles. One area that NASA wishes to advance is energy storage and delivery. Currently, space vehicles use rechargeable batteries that utilize silver zinc or lithium ion electrochemical processes. These current state-of-the-art rechargeable batteries cannot be rapidly charged, contain harmful chemicals, and suffer from early wear-out mechanisms. A solid state ultracapacitor is an EEE part that offers significant advantages over current electrochemical and electrolytic devices. The objective of this research is to develop an internal barrier layer ultracapacitor (IBLC) using novel dielectric materials as a battery replacement with a focus on these advantages: longer life, lower mass-toweight ratio, rapid charging, on-demand pulse power, improved on-pad standby time without maintenance, and environmental friendliness. The approach is unique in two areas. A deposition technique is used that has been shown to produce a more uniformly coated nanoparticle than sol-gel, which has resulted in colossal permittivities. These particles are then distributed in an ink formulation developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and deposited utilizing a 3D aerosol jet technique. This additive manufacturing technique controls layer thickness, resulting in extremely large capacitance and energy density.

  18. A Solid State Pyranometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Anca Laura; Paulescu, Marius; Ercuta, Aurel

    2015-12-01

    The construction of a solid state device-based pyranometer designated to broadband irradiance measurements is presented in this paper. The device is built on the physical basis that the temperature difference between two bodies of identical shape and external surface area, identically exposed to the incident radiation, but having different absorption and heat transfer coefficients (e.g. one body is painted white and the other is painted black), is proportional to the incident irradiance. This proportionality may be put in evidence if the two bodies consisting of identical arrays of correspondingly painted semiconductor diodes, due to the thermal behaviour of their p-n junction. It is theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed that the voltage drop across a diode passed through a constant forward current linearly decreases with the temperature of the junction. In other words, a signal proportional to the irradiance of the light source may be obtained via conventional analog electronics. The calibration of the apparatus, as performed by means of a professional device (LP PYRA 03), indicates a good linearity.

  19. Solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A. (Inventor); Moulton, Peter F. (Inventor); Harrison, James (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength-tunable, injection-seeded, dispersion-compensated, dispersively-pumped solid state laser includes a lasing medium; a highly reflective mirror; an output coupler; at least one isosceles Brewster prism oriented to the minimum deviation angle between the medium and the mirror for directing light of different wavelengths along different paths; means for varying the angle of the highly reflective mirror relative to the light from at least one Brewster angle for selecting a predetermined laser operating wavelength; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the lasing medium; a laser injection seeding port disposed between the dispersion compensation apparatus and one of the mirror and coupler and including a reflective surface at an acute non-Brewster angle to the laser beam for introducing a seed input; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the laser medium including opposite chirality optical elements; the lasing medium including a pump surface disposed at an acute angle to the laser beam to define a discrete path for the pumping laser beam separate from the pumped laser beam.

  20. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Solid state power controllers (SSPC's) are to be considered for use as replacements of electromechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 v(dc). They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near the utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small gauge wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, onboard testing, power management, and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability. Conventional systems require the heavy gage load wiring and the control wiring to be routed from the bus to the load to other remote relay contacts, switches, sensors, etc. and to the circuit breaker located in the flight engineer's compartment for purposes of manual reset.

  1. Les phénols de la lignine et le 13C, traceurs de l'origine des matières organiques du solLabelling the origin of soil organic matter by lignin phenols and 13C natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Claudy; Guillet, Bernard; Karroum, Michel; Andreux, Francis; Bernoux, Martial; Arrouays, Dominique

    2001-11-01

    In spodosols of Gascony (France), conversion of maritime pine stands into maize cropping leads to an incorporation of maize organic matter, which changed the isotopic ( δ13C) and phenolic signature in A and L horizons of soil. Hydrolysis of phenol lignin in forests and cultivated soils showed the predominance of vanillic units under forest and the early but moderate incorporation of cinnamic acids. Incorporation of syringic units appeared higher, related to a large maize production of stable syringic phenols. Syringic units represented a long-term marker of maize inputs in soils, whereas vanillic units revealed the degradation of forest organic matter.

  2. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as 1H–13C and 1H–15N HETCOR or 13C–13C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  3. Glass for Solid State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  4. Advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Cao, Xiaoyan; Olk, Dan C; Chu, Wenying; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Solid-state NMR is essential for the characterization of natural organic matter (NOM) and is gaining importance in geosciences and environmental sciences. This review is intended to highlight advanced solid-state NMR techniques, especially a systematic approach to NOM characterization, and their applications to the study of NOM. We discuss some basics of how to acquire high-quality and quantitative solid-state 13 C NMR spectra, and address some common technical mistakes that lead to unreliable spectra of NOM. The identification of specific functional groups in NOM, primarily based on 13 C spectral-editing techniques, is described and the theoretical background of some recently-developed spectral-editing techniques is provided. Applications of solid-state NMR to investigating nitrogen (N) in NOM are described, focusing on limitations of the widely used 15 N CP/MAS experiment and the potential of improved advanced NMR techniques for characterizing N forms in NOM. Then techniques used for identifying proximities, heterogeneities and domains are reviewed, and some examples provided. In addition, NMR techniques for studying segmental dynamics in NOM are reviewed. We also briefly discuss applications of solid-state NMR to NOM from various sources, including soil organic matter, aquatic organic matter, organic matter in atmospheric particulate matter, carbonaceous meteoritic organic matter, and fossil fuels. Finally, examples of NMR-based structural models and an outlook are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Zircon (Hf, O isotopes) as melt indicator: Melt infiltration and abundant new zircon growth within melt rich layers of granulite-facies lenses versus solid-state recrystallization in hosting amphibolite-facies gneisses (central Erzgebirge, Bohemian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Whitehouse, Martin; Gerdes, Axel; Schulz, Bernhard

    2018-03-01

    partial Hf isotope homogenization in the melt, and melt infiltration from an external source. New zircon was most likely formed by a peritectic reaction with melt above the wet solidus (peritectic zircon). Conversely, the amphibolite-facies host gneisses lack indications of significant melt production. Pre-metamorphic zircons experienced mainly solid-state recrystallization and variable Pb loss with only minor new zircon formation. However, subtle changes in cathodoluminescence pattern, in the Hf and O isotopes, and in the Lu/Hf, Yb/Hf ratios of zircons suggest that small volumes of melt were locally present. In difference to granulites, melt was internally produced. The detection of low degree melts (inferred from zircon geochemistry) is extremely important for the rheology because these amphibolite-facies rocks could act as large scale ductile shear zones. The new zircon data support a different P-T path for closely spaced amphibolite- and granulite-facies rocks.

  6. A reconnaissance study of 13C-13C clumping in ethane from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, Matthieu; Lawson, Michael; Peterson, Brian; Ferreira, Alexandre A.; Santos Neto, Eugenio V.; Eiler, John M.

    2018-02-01

    Ethane is the second most abundant alkane in most natural gas reservoirs. Its bulk isotopic compositions (δ13C and δD) are used to understand conditions and progress of cracking reactions that lead to the accumulation of hydrocarbons. Bulk isotopic compositions are dominated by the concentrations of singly-substituted isotopologues (13CH3-12CH3 for δ13C and 12CDH2-12CH3 for δD). However, multiply-substituted isotopologues can bring additional independent constraints on the origins of natural ethane. The 13C2H6 isotopologue is particularly interesting as it can potentially inform the distribution of 13C atoms in the parent biomolecules whose thermal cracking lead to the production of natural gas. This work presents methods to purify ethane from natural gas samples and quantify the abundance of the rare isotopologue 13C2H6 in ethane at natural abundances to a precision of ±0.12 ‰ using a high-resolution gas source mass spectrometer. To investigate the natural variability in carbon-carbon clumping, we measured twenty-five samples of thermogenic ethane from a range of geological settings, supported by two hydrous pyrolysis of shales experiments and a dry pyrolysis of ethane experiment. The natural gas samples exhibit a range of 'clumped isotope' signatures (Δ13C2H6) at least 30 times larger than our analytical precision, and significantly larger than expected for thermodynamic equilibration of the carbon-carbon bonds during or after formation of ethane, inheritance from the distribution of isotopes in organic molecules or different extents of cracking of the source. However we show a relationship between the Δ13C2H6 and the proportion of alkanes in natural gas samples, which we believe can be associated to the extent of secondary ethane cracking. This scenario is consistent with the results of laboratory experiments, where breaking down ethane leaves the residue with a low Δ13C2H6 compared to the initial gas. Carbon-carbon clumping is therefore a new

  7. The Rotational Spectrum of Singly and Doubly 13C-SUBSTITUTED Dimethylether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, Monika; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Giesen, Thomas F.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Pohl, Roland; Klein, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Dimethylether (DME) is a nearly prolate asymmetric top with two internal rotors (methyl groups) which undergo periodic large amplitude motions and show a complicated torsional splitting of each rotational energy level. Due to its complex spectrum and its high abundance in hot cores such as Orion KL or Sagittarius B2 at temperatures exceeding 100 K, DME is very prominent in astronomical line surveys and contributes to spectral line confusion of such sources. The interpretation of astronomical observations therefore depends on the knowledge of accurate rest frequencies and reliable intensities. Precise predictions for the ground state of DME's main isotopologue are now available up to 2.1 THz In contrast, very little is known about 13C-substituted DME. Only a few data are available on singly 13C-substituted DME, 12CH_3O13CH_3. However, no data are available on doubly 13C-substituted DME, (13CH_3)_2O, yet. While in (13CH_3)_2O the two internal rotating methyl groups are equivalent and the splitting of rotational energy levels into four substates is comparable to the main isotopologue, singly 13C-substituted DME has two non-equivalent internal rotors resulting in torsional splitting of rotational energy levels into five substates. The purpose of our new laboratory measurements is to extend the knowledge on the astrophysically relevant species 12CH_3O13CH_3. To analyze the complicated spectrum resulting from a 13C-enriched sample of DME, containing all different 13C-substituted species as well as the main isotopologue, also precise data on doubly 13C-substituted DME are inevitable. We performed measurements in the frequency region 35-120 GHz using an all solid state spectrometer. Rotational as well as torsional parameters have been obtained for (13CH_3)_2O as well as 12CH_3O13CH_3 by fitting the assigned transitions to an effective rotational Hamiltonian introduced by Peter Groner. C. Comito et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 156, 127-167 (2005) C. P. Endres et al

  8. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  9. Solid State Sciences Committee Forum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    3. REPOT TYPE AND CATES COVERED I Final Report 01 Mar 91-29 Feb 92 4. MrlLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNOG4 NUMBERS SOLID STATE SCIENCES COMMITTEE FORUM AFOSR...lON IU2EM , Appeved kv pub~e We=% I3. ABSTRACT (MaOimum 200 wovij The 1991 SSSC Forum was conductted under the auspices of the Board on Physics and...Astronomy’s Solid State Sciences Committe (SSSC) and cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). The Forum was the culmination of a

  10. Advances in Solid State Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Bernhard

    The present volume 45 of Advances in Solid-State Physics contains the written versions of selected invited lectures from the spring meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft in the World Year of Physics 2005, the Einstein Year, which was held from 4 - 11 March 2005 in Berlin, Germany. Many topical talks given at the numerous symposia are included. Most of these were organized collaboratively by several of the divisions of the Arbeitskreis. The book presents, to some extent, the status of the field of solid-state physics in 2005 not only in Germany but also internationally.

  11. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  12. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  13. Characterization of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals and Salts by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Li; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Chakravarty, Paroma; ...

    2018-02-15

    Multicomponent solids such as cocrystals have emerged as a way to control and engineer the stability, solubility and manufacturability of solid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Cocrystals are typically formed by solution- or solid-phase reactions of APIs with suitable cocrystal coformers, which are often weak acids. One key structural question about a given multicomponent solid is whether it should be classified as a salt, where the basic API is protonated by the acid, or as a cocrystal, where the API and coformer remain neutral and engage in hydrogen bonding interactions. It has previously been demonstrated that solid-state NMR spectroscopy is amore » powerful probe of structure in cocrystals and salts of APIs, however, the poor sensitivity of solid-state NMR spectroscopy usually restricts the types of experiments that can be performed. Here relayed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was applied to reduce solid-state NMR experiments by one to two orders of magnitude for salts and cocrystals of a complex API. The large sensitivity gains from DNP facilitates rapid acquisition of natural isotopic abundance 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra. Critically, DNP enables double resonance 1H-15N solid-state NMR experiments such as 2D 1H-15N HETCOR, 1H-15N CP-build up, 15N{1H} J-resolved/attached proton tests, 1H-15N DIPSHIFT and 1H-15N PRESTO. The latter two experiments allow 1H-15N dipolar coupling constants and H-N bond lengths to be accurately measured, providing an unambiguous assignment of nitrogen protonation state and definitive classification of the multi-component solids as cocrystals or salts. In conclusion, these types of measurements should also be extremely useful in the context of polymorph discrimination, NMR crystallography structure determination and for probing hydrogen bonding in a variety of organic materials.« less

  14. Characterization of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals and Salts by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Li; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Chakravarty, Paroma

    Multicomponent solids such as cocrystals have emerged as a way to control and engineer the stability, solubility and manufacturability of solid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Cocrystals are typically formed by solution- or solid-phase reactions of APIs with suitable cocrystal coformers, which are often weak acids. One key structural question about a given multicomponent solid is whether it should be classified as a salt, where the basic API is protonated by the acid, or as a cocrystal, where the API and coformer remain neutral and engage in hydrogen bonding interactions. It has previously been demonstrated that solid-state NMR spectroscopy is amore » powerful probe of structure in cocrystals and salts of APIs, however, the poor sensitivity of solid-state NMR spectroscopy usually restricts the types of experiments that can be performed. Here relayed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was applied to reduce solid-state NMR experiments by one to two orders of magnitude for salts and cocrystals of a complex API. The large sensitivity gains from DNP facilitates rapid acquisition of natural isotopic abundance 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra. Critically, DNP enables double resonance 1H-15N solid-state NMR experiments such as 2D 1H-15N HETCOR, 1H-15N CP-build up, 15N{1H} J-resolved/attached proton tests, 1H-15N DIPSHIFT and 1H-15N PRESTO. The latter two experiments allow 1H-15N dipolar coupling constants and H-N bond lengths to be accurately measured, providing an unambiguous assignment of nitrogen protonation state and definitive classification of the multi-component solids as cocrystals or salts. In conclusion, these types of measurements should also be extremely useful in the context of polymorph discrimination, NMR crystallography structure determination and for probing hydrogen bonding in a variety of organic materials.« less

  15. Solid-state radioluminescent compositions

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Gill, John T.; Hawkins, Daniel B.; Renschler, Clifford L.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Smith, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

  16. Solid-state power controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. A.; Fullemann, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Compact, solid state, electric-power controller switches power on and off at remote load, limits current drawn by load, and shuts off (with 2- to 3- second trip time) in case of short circuit. Lightweight efficient hybrid unit operates at 28 volts dc and at maximum currents of from 3 to 2 amperes.

  17. Versatile solid-state relay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Solid-state relay (SSR), containing multinode control logic, is operated as normally open, normally closed, or latched. Moreover several can be paralleled to form two-pole or double-throw relays. Versatile unit ends need to design custom control circuit for every relay application. Technique can be extended to incorporate selectable time delay, on operation or release, or pulsed output.

  18. First Spectroscopic Studies and Detection in SgrB2 of 13C-DOUBLY Substitued Ethyl Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Müller, Holger S. P.; Belloche, Arnaud

    2015-06-01

    Ethyl cyanide (CH_3CH_2CN) is one of the most abundant complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium firstly detected in OMC-1 and Sgr B2 in 1977. The vibrationally excited states are enough populated under ISM conditions and could be detected. Apart from the deuterated ones, all mono-substituted isotopologues of ethyl cyanide (13C and 15N have been detected in the ISM. The detection of isotopologues in the ISM is important: it can give information about the formation process of complex organic molecules, and it is essential to clean the ISM spectra from the lines of known molecules in order to detect new ones. The 12C/13C ratio found in SgrB2: 20-30 suggests that the doubly 13C could be present in the spectral line survey recently obtained with ALMA (EMoCA), but no spectroscopic studies exist up to now. We measured and analyzed the spectra of the 13C-doubly-substitued species up to 1 THz with the Lille solid-state based spectrometer. The spectroscopic results and and the detection of the doubly 13C species in SgrB2 will be presented. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. This work was also done under ANR-13-BS05-0008-02 IMOLABS. Support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB 956, project B3 is acknowledged D.~R.~Johnson, et al., Astrophys.~J. 1977, 218, L370 A.~Belloche, et al., A&A 2013, 559, A47 A.M.~Daly, et al., Astrophys.~J. 2013, 768, 81 K.~Demyk, et al. A&A 2007 466, 255 Margulès, et al. A&A 2009, 493, 565 Belloche et al. 2014, Science, 345, 1584

  19. Solid-state membrane module

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard [Salt Lake City, UT; Taylor, Dale M [Murray, UT

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  20. Solid-state membrane module

    DOEpatents

    Hinklin, Thomas Ray; Lewinsohn, Charles Arthur

    2015-06-30

    A module for separating oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture comprising planar solid-state membrane units, each membrane unit comprising planar dense mixed conducting oxides layers, planar channel-free porous support layers, and one or more planar intermediate support layers comprising at least one channeled porous support layer. The porosity of the planar channeled porous support layers is less than the porosity of the planar channel-free porous support layers.

  1. Solid-State Quantum Refrigeration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    i n a l Te c h n... i c a l Re p o r t Name of Grantee: Northwestern University Grant Title: Solid-State Quantum Refrigeration Grant #: FA9550-09-1...200 -150 -100 -50 0 Anglewavelength b a c k c o u p lin g i n to th e w a v e g u id e l o s s ( d B ) Figure 8. results of a) percentage

  2. Solid-State Nuclear Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for "Solid-State" Nuclear Power is proposed to guide development of technologies and systems into the second 50 years of nuclear spaceflight. The strategy emphasizes a simple and highly integrated system architecture with few moving parts or fluid loops; the leverage of modern advances in materials, manufacturing, semiconductors, microelectromechanical and nanotechnology devices; and the targeted advancement of high temperature nuclear fuels, materials and static power conversion to enable high performance from simple system topologies.

  3. Solid state electrochemical current source

    DOEpatents

    Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich; Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich

    2002-04-30

    A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.

  4. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Novel Solid State Ultracapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortes-Pena, A. Y.; Rolin, T. D.; Hill, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Novel dielectric materials were researched to develop an internal barrier layer capacitor that is fully solid state. These materials included reduced nanoparticles of barium titanate that were coated with various atomic layer deposited oxides. The nanoparticle powders were then densified into pellets and characterized using a dielectric test fixture over a frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz. Densification and sintering were evaluated using scanning electron microscopic techniques. Ultimately, the samples showing the most promising electrical characteristics of permittivity, dissipation factor and equivalent series resistance were chosen to manufacture devices for subsequent testing.

  6. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1990-01-01

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  7. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-01-01

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  8. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-12-07

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  9. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  10. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1990-07-03

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

  11. Solid-state proton conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewulski, J. R.; Osif, T. L.; Remick, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling, and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies are described which include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells are presented which include the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms.

  12. Solid State Lighting Program (Falcon)

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, Steven

    2012-06-30

    Over the past two years, KLA-Tencor and partners successfully developed and deployed software and hardware tools that increase product yield for High Brightness LED (HBLED) manufacturing and reduce product development and factory ramp times. This report summarizes our development effort and details of how the results of the Solid State Light Program (Falcon) have started to help HBLED manufacturers optimize process control by enabling them to flag and correct identified killer defect conditions at any point of origin in the process manufacturing flow. This constitutes a quantum leap in yield management over current practice. Current practice consists of die dispositioningmore » which is just rejection of bad die at end of process based upon probe tests, loosely assisted by optical in-line monitoring for gross process deficiencies. For the first time, and as a result of our Solid State Lighting Program, our LED manufacturing partners have obtained the software and hardware tools that optimize individual process steps to control killer defects at the point in the processes where they originate. Products developed during our two year program enable optimized inspection strategies for many product lines to minimize cost and maximize yield. The Solid State Lighting Program was structured in three phases: i) the development of advanced imaging modes that achieve clear separation between LED defect types, improves signal to noise and scan rates, and minimizes nuisance defects for both front end and back end inspection tools, ii) the creation of defect source analysis (DSA) software that connect the defect maps from back-end and front-end HBLED manufacturing tools to permit the automatic overlay and traceability of defects between tools and process steps, suppress nuisance defects, and identify the origin of killer defects with process step and conditions, and iii) working with partners (Philips Lumileds) on product wafers, obtain a detailed statistical correlation of

  13. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  14. Prospective Work for Alma: the Millimeterwave and Submillimeterwave Spectrum of 13C-GLYCOLALDEHYDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, Imane; Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Therese R.; Motiyenko, Roman; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Glycolaldehyde has been identified in interstellar sources. The relative abundance ratios of the three isomers (acetic acid) : (glycolaldehyde) : (methylformate) were estimated . The detection of 13C_1 and 13C_2 isotopomers of methylformate has been recently reported in Orion, as a result of the detailled labororatory spectroscopic study. Therefore the spectroscopy of the 13C isotopomers of glycolaldehyde is investigated in laboratory in order to provide data for an astronomical search. The instrument ALMA will certainly be a good instrument to detect them. Up to now, only the microwave spectra of 13CH_2OH-CHO and of CH_2OH-13CHO have been observed several years ago in the 12-40 GHz range. Spectra of both species are presently recorded in Lille in the 150-950 GHz range with the new submillimetre-wave spectrometer based on harmonic generation of a microwave synthesizer source, using only solid-state devices, and coupled to a cell of 2.2 m length The absolute accuracy of the line positions is better than 30 KHz. The rotational structure of the ground state and of the three first excited vibrational states has been observed. Two 13C enriched samples were used. The analysis is in progress. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) and by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 J. M. Hollis, S. N. Vogel, L. E. Snyder, et al., Astrophys. J. 554(2001) L81 R. A. H. Butler, F. C. De Lucia, D. T Petkie, et al., Astrophys. J. Supp. 134 (2001) 319 M. T. Beltran, C. Codella, S. Viti, R. Niri, R. Cesaroni, Astrophys. J. 690 (2009) L93. M. Carjaval, L. Margulès, B. Tercero et al., Astron. Astrophys. 500 (2009) 1109. K.-M. Marstokk and H. Møllendal, J. Mol. Struct. 16 (1973) 259. R. A. Motiyenko, L. Margulès, E. A. Alekseev et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 264 (2010) 94.

  15. Directly and indirectly detected through-bond heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy under fast MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi; Pruski, Marek

    Two-dimensional through-bond {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) solid-state NMR experiments utilizing fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and homonuclear multipulse {sup 1}H decoupling are presented. Remarkable efficiency of polarization transfer can be achieved at MAS rates exceeding 40 kHz, which is instrumental in these measurements. Schemes utilizing direct and indirect detection of heteronuclei are compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity. A simple procedure for optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling sequences under these conditions is proposed. The capabilities of these techniques were confirmed on two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal.

  16. Directly and indirectly detected through-bond heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy under fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Kanmi; Pruski, Marek

    2009-12-01

    Two-dimensional through-bond 1H{ 13C} solid-state NMR experiments utilizing fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and homonuclear multipulse 1H decoupling are presented. Remarkable efficiency of polarization transfer can be achieved at MAS rates exceeding 40 kHz, which is instrumental in these measurements. Schemes utilizing direct and indirect detection of heteronuclei are compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity. A simple procedure for optimization of 1H homonuclear decoupling sequences under these conditions is proposed. The capabilities of these techniques were confirmed on two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N- formyl- L-methionyl- L-leucyl- L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal.

  17. Solid-state radar switchboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiebaud, P.; Cross, D. C.

    1980-07-01

    A new solid-state radar switchboard equipped with 16 input ports which will output data to 16 displays is presented. Each of the ports will handle a single two-dimensional radar input, or three ports will accommodate a three-dimensional radar input. A video switch card of the switchboard is used to switch all signals, with the exception of the IFF-mode-control lines. Each card accepts inputs from up to 16 sources and can pass a signal with bandwidth greater than 20 MHz to the display assigned to that card. The synchro amplifier of current systems has been eliminated and in the new design each PPI receives radar data via a single coaxial cable. This significant reduction in cabling is achieved by adding a serial-to-parallel interface and a digital-to-synchro converter located at the PPI.

  18. Study of solid state photomultiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, K. M.; Laviolette, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Available solid state photomultiplier (SSPM) detectors were tested under low-background, low temperature conditions to determine the conditions producing optimal sensitivity in a space-based astronomy system such as a liquid cooled helium telescope in orbit. Detector temperatures varied between 6 and 9 K, with background flux ranging from 10 to the 13th power to less than 10 to the 6th power photons/square cm-s. Measured parameters included quantum efficiency, noise, dark current, and spectral response. Experimental data were reduced, analyzed, and combined with existing data to build the SSPM data base included herein. The results were compared to analytical models of SSPM performance where appropriate models existed. Analytical models presented here were developed to be as consistent with the data base as practicable. Significant differences between the theory and data are described. Some models were developed or updated as a result of this study.

  19. Solid state VRX CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Melnyk, Roman; Sambari, Aniket; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Zou, Ping

    2000-04-01

    A technique called Variable-Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection that greatly increases the spatial resolution in computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR) is presented. The technique is based on a principle called 'projective compression' that allows the resolution element of a CT detector to scale with the subject or field size. For very large (40 - 50 cm) field sizes, resolution exceeding 2 cy/mm is possible and for very small fields, microscopy is attainable with resolution exceeding 100 cy/mm. Preliminary results from a 576-channel solid-state detector are presented. The detector has a dual-arm geometry and is comprised of CdWO4 scintillator crystals arranged in 24 modules of 24 channels/module. The scintillators are 0.85 mm wide and placed on 1 mm centers. Measurements of signal level, MTF and SNR, all versus detector angle, are presented.

  20. Extending solid state laser performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesak, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Coherent Diode-Pumped Solid-State Orlando (CDO), formerly known as Lee Laser, headquartered in Orlando Florida produces CW and pulsed solid state lasers. Primary wavelengths include 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. Other wavelengths produced include 1320 nm, 15xx nm, and 16xx nm. Pulse widths are in the range of singles to hundreds of nanoseconds. Average powers are in the range of a few watts to 1000 watts. Pulse repetition rates are typically in the range of 100 Hz to 100 KHz. Laser performance parameters are often modified according to customer requests. Laser parameters that can be adjusted include average power, pulse repetition rate, pulse length, beam quality, and wavelength. Laser parameters are typically cross-coupled such that adjusting one may change some or all of the others. Customers often request one or more parameters be changed without changing any of the remaining parameters. CDO has learned how to accomplish this successfully with rapid turn-around times and minimal cost impact. The experience gained by accommodating customer requests has produced a textbook of cause and effect combinations of laser components to accomplish almost any parameter change request. Understanding the relationships between component combinations provides valuable insight into lasing effects allowing designers to extend laser performance beyond what is currently available. This has led to several break through products, i.e. >150W average power 355 nm, >60W average power 6 ps 1064 nm, pulse lengths longer than 400 ns at 532 nm with average power >100W, >400W 532 nm with pulse lengths in the 100 ns range.

  1. Chemical structure of soil organic matter in slickspots as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Slickspot soils are saline, and knowledge of their humic chemistry would contribute to our limited understanding how salinity affects soil C and N stocks. We characterized humic acids (HAs) from slickspot soils with solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Expanding on previous use of cross...

  2. 13C CP MAS NMR and GIAO-CHF calculations of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Zolek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra were recorded for a series of solid coumarins. Ab initio calculations of shielding constants were performed with the use of GIAO-CHF method. The combined CPMAS NMR and theoretical approach was successful in characterizing solid-state conformations of coumarins; a relationship sigma (ppm) = -1.032 xdelta + 205.28 (R(2) = 0.9845) can be used to obtain structural information for coumarins, for which solid-state NMR or crystal structure data are not available. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  3. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  4. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    DOEpatents

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  5. Solid State Research, 1980:1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-15

    ESD-TR-79-325 H 1 Solid State Research 1980 Prepared under Electronic Systems Division Contract FI%28-80-C-0002 by Lincoln Laboratory MASSkCHIISETTS...it is no longer needed. MASSACHUSETTS IN*STITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LINCOLN LABORATORY V SOLID STATE RESEARCH QUARTERLY TECHNICAL SUMMARY REPORT I NOVEMBER...January 1990. The topics covered a-e Solid State Device Research , Quantum Electronics, Materials Rese.rch, Microelec- tronics, and Analog Device

  6. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  7. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  8. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  9. Solid state photochemistry of polycarbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Rembaum, A.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    The quantum yield of photoFries rearrangement in a polycarbonate film has been analyzed as a function of temperature and humidity on the basis of previously reported (Koyler and Mann, 1977) experimental data. Results indicate that in the homogeneous amorphous phase, photoFries rearrangement is a concerted process proceeding either from the pi star reversed arrow n singlet, in which case it must be subject to considerable self quenching, or from a triplet, presumably the first triplet since the lifetime of higher triplets is expected to be very short in the solid phase. If the parent excited state is the first triplet, chain scission is possibly an independent process, probably occurring from the pi star reversed arrow n singlet. Evidence of chain scission on photodegradation in the solid state includes loss of C-O and C-C bond intensities revealed in the Fourier transform infrared spectra, gel permeation chromotography elution profiles of degraded film samples dissolved in CHCl3, and a decrease in tensile strength and T sub g as photodegradation proceeds. Chain scission is apparently inhibited as photoFries products accumulate.

  10. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "positive" terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "negative" terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  11. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-02-23

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating positive'' terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating negative'' terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  12. Protein-nucleotide contacts in motor proteins detected by DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Thomas; Liao, Wei-Chih; Ong, Ta Chung; Däpp, Alexander; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Copéret, Christophe; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2017-11-01

    DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization)-enhanced solid-state NMR is employed to directly detect protein-DNA and protein-ATP interactions and identify the residue type establishing the intermolecular contacts. While conventional solid-state NMR can detect protein-DNA interactions in large oligomeric protein assemblies in favorable cases, it typically suffers from low signal-to-noise ratios. We show here, for the oligomeric DnaB helicase from Helicobacter pylori complexed with ADP and single-stranded DNA, that this limitation can be overcome by using DNP-enhanced spectroscopy. Interactions are established by DNP-enhanced 31 P- 13 C polarization-transfer experiments followed by the recording of a 2D 13 C- 13 C correlation experiment. The NMR spectra were obtained in less than 2 days and allowed the identification of residues of the motor protein involved in nucleotide binding.

  13. Global ocean climatology of the 13C Suess effect and preindustrial δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eide, Marie; Olsen, Are; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Eldevik, Tor; Johannessen, Truls

    2017-04-01

    We present the first observationally based estimate of the full global ocean 13C Suess effect since preindustrial times. This was constructed by using Olsen and Ninnemann's [2010] back-calculation method to calculate the 13C Suess effect with data from 29 cruises spanning the world ocean. We find a strong 13C Suess effect in the upper 1000 m of all basins, with strongest decrease in the Subtropical Gyres of the Northern Hemisphere, where δ13C has decreased by more than 0.8‰ since the industrial revolution. At greater depths, a significant 13C Suess effect can only be detected in the northern parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. The magnitude of the 13C Suess effect is correlated with the concentration of anthropogenic carbon, but their relationship varying strongly between water masses, reflecting the degree to which source waters are equilibrated with the atmospheric 13C Suess effect before sinking. From the 13C Suess effect estimates, we have estimated the preindustrial δ13C (δ13CPI) along the 29 sections. Further, we developed regional multilinear regression equations, which were applied on the World Ocean Atlas data to construct the δ13CPI climatology, which reveals the natural δ13C distribution in the global ocean. Compared to the modern distribution, the preindustrial δ13C spans a larger range of values, and we find that in some regions in the high northern latitudes, the gradient in modern ocean δ13C is completely reversed compared to the preindustrial. Maximum δ13CPI, of up to 1.8‰, are found in the subtropical gyres of all basins, in the upper and intermediate waters of the North Atlantic, as well as in mode waters with a Southern Ocean origin. Particularly strong gradients occur at intermediate depths, revealing a strong potential for using δ13C as a tracer for changes in water mass geometry at these levels. Further, we identify a much tighter relationship between δ13C and Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU) than between δ13C and phosphate that

  14. Solid state recorders for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.

    2003-08-01

    Solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice for meeting airborne ruggedized requirements for reconnaissance and flight test. The cost of solid state recorders have decreased over the past few years that they are now less expense than the traditional high speed tape recorders. CALCULEX, Inc manufactures solid state recorders called MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used on many different platforms such as F/A-22, Global Hawk, F-14, F-15, F-16, U-2, RF-4, and Tornado. This paper will discuss the advantages of using solid state recorders to meet the airborne reconnaissance requirement and the ability to record instrumentation data. The CALCULEX recorder has the ability to record sensor data and flight test data in the same chassis. This is an important feature because it eliminates additional boxes on the aircraft. The major advantages to using a solid state recorder include; reliability, small size, light weight, and power. Solid state recorders also have a larger storage capacity and higher bandwidth capability than other recording devices.

  15. Fungal carbon sources in a pine forest: evidence from a 13C-labeled global change experiment

    Treesearch

    Erik A. Hobbie; Kirsten S. Hofmockel; Linda T.A. Van Diepen; Erik A. Lilleskov; Andrew P. Oiumette; Adrien C. Finzi

    2014-01-01

    We used natural abundance 13C:12C (δ13C) and 8 yr of labeling with 13C-depleted CO2 in a Pinus taeda Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment to investigate carbon sources of saprotrophic fungi, ectomycorrhizal...

  16. Modeling 13C discrimination in Tree Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berninger, Frank; Sonninen, Eloni; Aalto, Tuula; Lloyd, Jon

    2000-03-01

    Annual variations from 1877 to 1995 in tree-ring α-cellulose 13C/12C isotopic ratios for four subarctic Pinus sylvestris trees were determined, and, in conjunction with a recent record of atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios, the historical pattern of photosynthetic isotope discrimination, Δ13C, was evaluated. Year-to-year variability in Δ13C has been as much as 1.5‰ with the period 1900-1920 showing an extended period of unusually high photosynthetic discriminations. The summers during these years were, on average, unusually cold. Since 1920 a long term trend of increasing Δ13C of ˜0.016‰yr-1 is inferred. We compared measured Δ13C with those predicted on the basis of the theoretical relationship between Δ13C and the ratio of substomatal to ambient CO2 concentration, Ci/Ca using mechanistic equations for chloroplast biochemistry coupled with a stomatal conductance model. Two variations of a nonlinear optimal-regulation stomatal conductance model were compared. Although both models were based on the assumption that stomata serve to minimize the average transpiration rate for a given average rate of CO2 assimilation, one version of the model incorporated reductions in stomatal conductance in response to recent increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the other did not. The CO2 sensitive stomatal model failed to describe the long-term increase in 13C discrimination, especially after 1950. The insensitive model gave good agreement, suggesting that an observed increase in subarctic Pinus sylvestris Δ13C since 1920 is attributable to recent increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations with subsequent increases in the ratio of substomatal to ambient CO2 concentrations. The model was also capable of accounting for high frequency (year-to-year) variations in Δ13C, these differences being attributable to year-to-year fluctuations in the average leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference affecting stomatal conductance and hence Ci/Ca.

  17. Comparison of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy for estimating humification and aromatization of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K.; Cooper, W. T.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Verbeke, B. A.; Chanton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Solid state direct polarization 13C NMR spectroscopy (DP-NMR) is generally considered the most quantitatively reliable method for soil organic matter (SOM) characterization, including determination of the relative abundances of carbon functional groups. These functional abundances can then be used to calculate important soil parameters such as degree of humification and extent of aromaticity that reveal differences in reactivity or compositional changes along gradients (e.g. thaw chronosequence in permafrost). Unfortunately, the 13C NMR DP-NMR experiment is time-consuming, with a single sample often requiring over 24 hours of instrument time. Alternatively, solid state cross polarization 13C NMR (CP-NMR) can circumvent this problem, reducing analyses times to 4-6 hours but with some loss of quantitative reliability. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is a quick and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing solid materials, and has been suggested as an alternative to NMR for analysis of soil organic matter and determination of humification (HI) and aromatization (AI) indices. However, the quantitative reliability of ATR-FTIR for SOM analyses has never been verified, nor have any ATR-FTIR data been compared to similar measurements by NMR. In this work we focused on FTIR vibrational bands that correspond to the three functional groups used to calculate HI and AI values: carbohydrates (1030 cm-1), aromatics (1510, 1630 cm-1), and aliphatics (2850, 2920 cm-1). Data from ATR-FTIR measurements were compared to analogous quantitation by DP- and CP-NMR using peat samples from Sweden, Minnesota, and North Carolina. DP- and CP-NMR correlate very strongly, although the correlations are not always 1:1. Direct comparison of relative abundances of the three functional groups determined by NMR and ATR-FTIR yielded satisfactory results for carbohydrates (r2= 0.78) and aliphatics (r2=0.58), but less so for aromatics (r2= 0

  18. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also findmore » that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.« less

  19. Solid state laser technology - A NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's program for developing solid-state laser technology and applying it to the Space Shuttle and Space Platform is discussed. Solid-state lasers are required to fulfill the Earth Observation System's requirements. The role of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology in developing a NASA tunable solid-state laser program is described. The major goals of the program involve developing a solid-state pump laser in the green, using AlGaAs array technology, pumping a Nd:YAG/SLAB crystal or glass, and fabricating a lidar system, with either a CO2 laser at 10.6 microns or a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns, to measure tropospheric winds to an accuracy of + or - 1 m/s and a vertical resolution of 1 km. The procedures to be followed in order to visualize this technology plan include: (1) material development and characterization, (2) laser development, and (3) implementation of the lasers.

  20. Microfluidic multiplexing of solid-state nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Tarun; Rasera, Benjamin C.; Guerrero, Ricardo Jose S.; Lim, Jong-Min; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-12-01

    Although solid-state nanopores enable electronic analysis of many clinically and biologically relevant molecular structures, there are few existing device architectures that enable high-throughput measurement of solid-state nanopores. Herein, we report a method for microfluidic integration of multiple solid-state nanopores at a high density of one nanopore per (35 µm2). By configuring microfluidic devices with microfluidic valves, the nanopores can be rinsed from a single fluid input while retaining compatibility for multichannel electrical measurements. The microfluidic valves serve the dual purpose of fluidic switching and electric switching, enabling serial multiplexing of the eight nanopores with a single pair of electrodes. Furthermore, the device architecture exhibits low noise and is compatible with electroporation-based in situ nanopore fabrication, providing a scalable platform for automated electronic measurement of a large number of integrated solid-state nanopores.

  1. Molecular Structure of Humin and Melanoidin via Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Herzfeld, Judith; Rand, Danielle; Matsuki, Yoh; Daviso, Eugenio; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody; Mamajanov, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Sugar-derived humins and melanoidins figure significantly in food chemistry, agricultural chemistry, biochemistry and prebiotic chemistry. Despite wide interest and significant experimental attention, the amorphous and insoluble nature of the polymers has made them resistant to conventional structural characterization. Here we make use of solid-state NMR methods, including selective 13C substitution, 1H-dephasing, and double quantum filtration. The spectra, and their interpretation, are simplified by relying exclusively on hydronium for catalysis. The results for polymers derived from ribose, deoxyribose and fructose indicate diverse pathways to furans, suggest a simple route to pyrroles in the presence of amines, and reveal a heterogenous network-type polymer in which sugar molecules cross-link the heterocycles. PMID:21456563

  2. Monitoring Cocrystal Formation via In Situ Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Venkata S; Loewus, Sarel J; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-10-02

    A detailed understanding of the mechanism of organic cocrystal formation remains elusive. Techniques that interrogate a reacting system in situ are preferred, though experimentally challenging. We report here the results of a solid-state in situ NMR study of the spontaneous formation of a cocrystal between a pharmaceutical mimic (caffeine) and a coformer (malonic acid). Using (13)C magic angle spinning NMR, we show that the formation of the cocrystal may be tracked in real time. We find no direct evidence for a short-lived, chemical shift-resolved amorphous solid intermediate. However, changes in the line width and line center of the malonic acid methylene resonance, in the course of the reaction, provide subtle clues to the mode of mass transfer that underlies cocrystal formation.

  3. Grating enhanced solid-state laser amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. Such an invention, as disclosed herein, uses diffraction gratings to increase gain, stored energy density, and pumping efficiency of solid-state laser gain media, such as, but not limited to rods, disks and slabs. By coupling predetermined gratings to solid-state gain media, such as crystal or ceramic laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  4. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  5. Optimisation of dynamic nuclear polarisation of [1-13C] pyruvate by addition of gadolinium-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen-Waldner, Lanette; Chen, Albert; Mander, Will; Scholl, Timothy J.; McKenzie, Charles A.

    2012-10-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) of carbon-13 (13C) enriched endogenous compounds provides a novel means for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of biological processes. Adding small amounts of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) to the 13C-enriched substrate matrix increases the amount of hyperpolarisation that can be achieved, but also may decrease the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of the 13C nucleus in solution. This study examined the effects of five different GBCA at concentrations of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mM on [1-13C]-enriched pyruvic acid. It was found that contrast agents with an open chain structure (Gadobenate dimeglumine, Gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gadodiamide) caused the largest enhancement (up to 82%) in solid state polarisation relative to solutions without GBCA. In the liquid state, T1 of pyruvate decreased by as much as 62% and polarisation was much lower (70%) relative to solutions without GBCA added. Conversely, for GBCA with macrocyclic structures (Gadoterate meglumine, Gadoteridol), the solid state polarisation enhancement was only slightly less than the open chain GBCA, but enhanced polarisation was retained much better in the liquid state with minimal decrease in T1 (25% at the highest GBCA concentrations). Near maximum polarisation in the solid state was obtained at a GBCA concentration of 2 mM, with a higher concentration of 3 mM producing minimal improvement. These results indicate that the macrocyclic contrast agents provide the best combination of high solid state and liquid state polarisations with minimal loss of T1 in experiments with hyperpolarised 13C-enriched pyruvate. This suggests that macrocyclic contrast agents should be the GBCA of choice for maximising signal in experiments with hyperpolarised 13C-enriched pyruvate, particularly for in vivo measurements where shortened substrate T1 is especially problematic.

  6. Solid-state NMR and computational studies of 4-methyl-2-nitroacetanilide.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robin K; Ghi, Phuong Y; Hammond, Robert B; Ma, Cai Yun; Roberts, Kevin J; Yates, Jonathan R; Pickard, Chris J

    2006-03-01

    Studies on the solid-state structure of two polymorphs of 4-methyl-2-nitroacetanilide (MNA) were conducted using magic-angle spinning (13)C, (15)N and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, together with first-principles computations of NMR shielding (including use of a program that takes explicit account of the translational symmetry inherent in crystalline structures). The effects on (13)C chemical shifts of side-chain rotations have been explored. Information derived from these studies was then incorporated within a systematic space-search methodology for elucidation of trial crystallographic structures from powder XRD.

  7. Solid-state NMR and IR for the analysis of pharmaceutical solids: polymorphs of fosinopril sodium.

    PubMed

    Brittain, H G; Morris, K R; Bugay, D E; Thakur, A B; Serajuddin, A T

    1993-01-01

    The two polymorphic modifications of fosinopril sodium have been characterized as to their differences in melting behaviour, powder X-ray diffraction patterns, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), and solid-state 31P- and 13C-NMR spectra. The polymorphs were found to be enantiotropically related based upon melting point, heat of fusion, and solution mediated transformation data. Analysis of the solid-state FTIR and 13C-NMR data indicated that the environment of the acetal side chain of fosinopril sodium differed in two polymorphs, and that there might be cis-trans isomerization about the C6-N peptide bond. These conformational differences are postulated as the origin of the observed polymorphism.

  8. Atomic-level structure characterization of biomass pre- and post-lignin treatment by dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Ximing; ...

    2016-12-27

    Here, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising sustainable feedstock for the production of biofuels, biomaterials, and biospecialty chemicals. However, efficient utilization of biomass has been limited by our poor understanding of its molecular structure. Here, we report a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state (SS)NMR study of the molecular structure of biomass, both pre- and postcatalytic treatment. This technique enables the measurement of 2D homonuclear 13C– 13C correlation SSNMR spectra under natural abundance, yielding, for the first time, an atomic-level picture of the structure of raw and catalytically treated biomass samples. We foresee that further such experiments could be used to determinemore » structure–function relationships and facilitate the development of more efficient, and chemically targeted, biomass-conversion technologies.« less

  9. Atomic-level structure characterization of biomass pre- and post-lignin treatment by dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Ximing

    Here, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising sustainable feedstock for the production of biofuels, biomaterials, and biospecialty chemicals. However, efficient utilization of biomass has been limited by our poor understanding of its molecular structure. Here, we report a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state (SS)NMR study of the molecular structure of biomass, both pre- and postcatalytic treatment. This technique enables the measurement of 2D homonuclear 13C– 13C correlation SSNMR spectra under natural abundance, yielding, for the first time, an atomic-level picture of the structure of raw and catalytically treated biomass samples. We foresee that further such experiments could be used to determinemore » structure–function relationships and facilitate the development of more efficient, and chemically targeted, biomass-conversion technologies.« less

  10. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  11. Modular nonvolatile solid state recorder (MONSSTR) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.; Small, Martin B.; Beams, Tom

    2001-12-01

    Solid state recorders have begun replacing traditional tape recorders in fulfilling the requirement to record images on airborne platforms. With the advances in electro-optical, IR, SAR, Multi and Hyper-spectral sensors and video recording requirements, solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice. Solid state recorders provide the additional storage, higher sustained bandwidth, less power, less weight and smaller footprint to meet the current and future recording requirements. CALCULEX, Inc., manufactures a non-volatile flash memory solid state recorder called the MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used to record images from many different digital sensors on high performance aircraft such as the RF- 4, F-16 and the Royal Air Force Tornado. MONSSTR, with its internal multiplexer, is also used to record instrumentation data. This includes multiple streams of PCM and multiple channels of 1553 data. Instrumentation data is being recorded by MONSSTR systems in a range of platforms including F-22, F-15, F-16, Comanche Helicopter and US Navy torpedos. MONSSTR can also be used as a cockpit video recorder. This paper will provide an update of the MONSSTR.

  12. Solid state recording current meter conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Wang, Lichen

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe the conversion of an Endeco-174 current meter to a solid-state recording current meter. A removable solid-state module was designed to fit in the space originally occupied by an 8-track tape cartridge. The module contains a CPU and 128 kilobytes of nonvolatile CMOS memory. The solid-state module communicates with any terminal or computer using an RS-232C interface at 4800 baud rate. A primary consideration for conversion was to keep modifications of the current meter to a minimum. The communication protocol was designed to emulate the Endeco tape translation unit, thus the need for a translation unit was eliminated and the original data reduction programs can be used without any modification. After conversion, the data recording section of the current meter contains no moving parts; the storage capacity of the module is equivalent to that of the original tape cartridge.

  13. Driver circuit for solid state light sources

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Fred; Denvir, Kerry; Allen, Steven

    2016-02-16

    A driver circuit for a light source including one or more solid state light sources, a luminaire including the same, and a method of so driving the solid state light sources are provided. The driver circuit includes a rectifier circuit that receives an alternating current (AC) input voltage and provides a rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a switching converter circuit coupled to the light source. The switching converter circuit provides a direct current (DC) output to the light source in response to the rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a mixing circuit, coupled to the light source, to switch current through at least one solid state light source of the light source in response to each of a plurality of consecutive half-waves of the rectified AC voltage.

  14. Monolithic solid-state lasers for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Merritt, Scott; Glebov, Leonid; Glebova, Larissa; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vadim; Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    A new solution for building high power, solid state lasers for space flight is to fabricate the whole laser resonator in a single (monolithic) structure or alternatively to build a contiguous diffusion bonded or welded structure. Monolithic lasers provide numerous advantages for space flight solid-state lasers by minimizing misalignment concerns. The closed cavity is immune to contamination. The number of components is minimized thus increasing reliability. Bragg mirrors serve as the high reflector and output coupler thus minimizing optical coatings and coating damage. The Bragg mirrors also provide spectral and spatial mode selection for high fidelity. The monolithic structure allows short cavities resulting in short pulses. Passive saturable absorber Q-switches provide a soft aperture for spatial mode filtering and improved pointing stability. We will review our recent commercial and in-house developments toward fully monolithic solid-state lasers.

  15. Obtaining molecular and structural information from 13C-14N systems with 13C FIREMAT experiments.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, Mark; Alderman, D W; Grant, David M

    2002-04-01

    The effect of dipolar coupling to 14N on 13C FIREMAT (five pi replicated magic angle turning) experiments is investigated. A method is developed for fitting the 13C FIREMAT FID employing the full theory to extract the 13C-14N dipolar and 13C chemical shift tensor information. The analysis requires prior knowledge of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensor at the 14N nucleus. In order to validate the method the analysis is done for the amino acids alpha-glycine, gamma-glycine, l-alanine, l-asparagine, and l-histidine on FIREMAT FIDs recorded at 13C frequencies of 50 and 100 MHz. The dipolar and chemical shift data obtained with this analysis are in very good agreement with the previous single-crystal 13C NMR results and neutron diffraction data on alpha-glycine, l-alanine, and l-asparagine. The values for gamma-glycine and l-histidine obtained with this new method are reported for the first time. The uncertainties in the EFG tensor on the resultant 13C chemical shift and dipolar tensor values are assessed. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  16. Structural analysis of geochemical samples by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Role of paramagnetic material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vassallo, A.M.; Wilson, M.A.; Collin, P.J.; Oades, J.M.; Waters, A.G.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of coals, coal tars, a fulvic acid, and soil fractions by solid-state 13C NMR spectrometry has demonstrated widely differing behavior regarding quantitative representation in the spectrum. Spin counting experiments on coal tars and the fulvic acid show that almost all the sample carbon is observed in both solution and solid-state NMR spectra. Similar experiments on two coals (a lignite and a bituminous coal) show that most (70-97%) of the carbon is observed; however, when the lignite is ion exchanged with 3% (w/w) Fe3+, the fraction of carbon observed drops to below 10%. In additional experiments signal intensity from soil samples is enhanced by a simple dithionite treatment. This is illustrated by 13C, 27Al, and 29Si solid-state NMR experiments on soil fractions. ?? 1987 American Chemical Society.

  17. An overview of methods using (13)C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Stupp, Gregory S; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize (13)C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) (13)C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two (13)C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain (13)C-(13)C and (13)C-(1)H statistical correlations using 1D (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct (13)C-(13)C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which (13)C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest.

  18. Solid State Lasers from an Efficiency Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2007-01-01

    Solid state lasers have remained a vibrant area of research because several major innovations expanded their capability. Major innovations are presented with emphasis focused on the laser efficiency. A product of efficiencies approach is developed and applied to describe laser performance. Efficiency factors are presented in closed form where practical and energy transfer effects are included where needed. In turn, efficiency factors are used to estimate threshold and slope efficiency, allowing a facile estimate of performance. Spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical data are provided for common solid state laser materials.

  19. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  20. 13C-TRIPLY Labeled Ethyl Cyanide Submillimeterwave Study with Lille's Fast Scan Dds-Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkina, A.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Müller, Holger S. P.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    This study of the 13C-triply labeled species of ethyl cyanide (CH_3CH_2CN) follows our recent work on the three 13C-doubly-labeled that allowed their detection in the line survey recently obtained with ALMA (EMoCA). The detection of isotopologues could improve the knowledge of the astrochemistry. The other goal is to clean the surveys from the lines of known molecules in order to detect new ones, this is especially important for the abundant complex organic molecules like ethyl cyanide. As in the case of the doubly substitued species, no spectroscopic studies exist up to now for 13CH_313CH_213CN, the first predictions were thus obtained from scaled ab initio calculations. The spectra were recorded and analyzed up to 1 THz. More than 5500 lines were fitted with quantum numbers J and K_a up to 95 and 25 respectively. The spectra were obtained with the new version of the Lille's solid state spectrometers. This new version used Direct Digital Synthesizer in order to speed up acquisition time. We constructed a spectrometer covering a decade, from 150 to 1500 GHz, it scans the full range in 24 hours with high sensitivity and accuracy. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. This work was also done under ANR-13-BS05-0008-02 IMOLABS Margules, L.; et al. 2015, 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, RI06 Belloche, A.; et al. 2014, Science, 345, 1584

  1. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  2. A 13C NMR study of the structure of four cinnamic acids and their methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M. S.; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Silva, V. L. M.

    2001-09-01

    The 13C NMR spectra, both in DMSO solution and in the solid state of four cinnamic acids (p-methoxy, p-hydroxy, p-methyl, p-chloro) and their corresponding methyl esters have been recorded. The two main results in the solid state are: (i) the only significant difference between acids and esters chemical shifts concerns the Cdbnd O group which, on average, appears at 173 ppm in the acids and 168 ppm in the esters; (ii) the signals of the ortho and meta carbons both in the acids and the esters are splitted. The two 'anomalies' disappear in DMSO solution. These observations can be rationalized using simple GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G∗ calculations.

  3. Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry to assess counterfeiting of active pharmaceutical ingredients: site-specific 13C content of aspirin and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Virginie; Mboula, Vanessa Maroga; Jouitteau, Catherine; Akoka, Serge; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-15

    Isotope profiling is a well-established technique to obtain information about the chemical history of a given compound. However, the current methodology using IRMS can only determine the global (13)C content, leading to the loss of much valuable data. The development of quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry at natural abundance enables the measurement of the (13)C content of each carbon within a molecule, thus giving simultaneous access to a number of isotopic parameters. When it is applied to active pharmaceutical ingredients, each manufactured batch can be characterized better than by IRMS. Here, quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR is shown to be a very promising and effective tool for assessing the counterfeiting of medicines, as exemplified by an analysis of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) samples collected from pharmacies in different countries. It is proposed as an essential complement to (2)H NMR and IRMS.

  4. Solid-State Neutron Detector Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak (Inventor); Starikov, David (Inventor); Pillai, Rajeev (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and methods of fabricating a high efficiency compact solid state neutron detector based on III-Nitride semiconductor structures deposited on a substrate. The operation of the device is based on absorption of neutrons, which results in generation of free carriers.

  5. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  6. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  7. Technique for improving solid state mosaic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    Method identifies and corrects mosaic image faults in solid state visual displays and opto-electronic presentation systems. Composite video signals containing faults due to defective sensing elements are corrected by a memory unit that contains the stored fault pattern and supplies the appropriate fault word to the blanking circuit.

  8. Density functional theory in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Hasnip, Philip J.; Refson, Keith; Probert, Matt I. J.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Clark, Stewart J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used in many fields of the physical sciences, but none so successfully as in the solid state. From its origins in condensed matter physics, it has expanded into materials science, high-pressure physics and mineralogy, solid-state chemistry and more, powering entire computational subdisciplines. Modern DFT simulation codes can calculate a vast range of structural, chemical, optical, spectroscopic, elastic, vibrational and thermodynamic phenomena. The ability to predict structure–property relationships has revolutionized experimental fields, such as vibrational and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, where it is the primary method to analyse and interpret experimental spectra. In semiconductor physics, great progress has been made in the electronic structure of bulk and defect states despite the severe challenges presented by the description of excited states. Studies are no longer restricted to known crystallographic structures. DFT is increasingly used as an exploratory tool for materials discovery and computational experiments, culminating in ex nihilo crystal structure prediction, which addresses the long-standing difficult problem of how to predict crystal structure polymorphs from nothing but a specified chemical composition. We present an overview of the capabilities of solid-state DFT simulations in all of these topics, illustrated with recent examples using the CASTEP computer program. PMID:24516184

  9. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  10. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  11. High power diode and solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, H. J.; Fritsche, H.; Lux, O.; Strohmaier, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Diode lasers are now basic pump sources of crystal, glass fiber and other solid state lasers. Progress in the performance of all these lasers is related. Examples of recently developed diode pumped lasers and Raman frequency converters are described for applications in materials processing, Lidar and medical surgery.

  12. The Pythagorean Theorem and the Solid State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Brenda S.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

    2005-01-01

    Packing efficiency and crystal density can be calculated from basic geometric principles employing the Pythagorean theorem, if the unit-cell structure is known. The procedures illustrated have applicability in courses such as general chemistry, intermediate and advanced inorganic, materials science, and solid-state physics.

  13. Solid-state switch increases switching speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, G. F.

    1966-01-01

    Solid state switch for commutating capacitors in an RC commutated network increases switching speed and extends the filtering or commutating frequency spectrum well into the kilocycle region. The switch is equivalent to the standard double- pole double-throw /DPDT/ relay and is driven from digital micrologic circuits.

  14. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  15. Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks

    DOEpatents

    Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2014-04-29

    An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

  16. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  17. The structure of poly(carbonsuboxide) on the atomic scale: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Beck, Johannes; Hoffbauer, Wilfried; Krieger-Beck, Petra

    2005-07-18

    In this contribution we present a study of the structure of amorphous poly(carbonsuboxide) (C3O2)x by 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy supported by infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Poly(carbonsuboxide) was obtained by polymerization of carbonsuboxide C3O2, which in turn was synthesized from malonic acid bis(trimethylsilylester). Two different 13C labeling schemes were applied to probe inter- and intramonomeric bonds in the polymer by dipolar solid-state NMR methods and also to allow quantitative 13C MAS NMR spectra. Four types of carbon environments can be distinguished in the NMR spectra. Double-quantum and triple-quantum 2D correlation experiments were used to assign the observed peaks using the through-space and through-bond dipolar coupling. In order to obtain distance constraints for the intermonomeric bonds, double-quantum constant-time experiments were performed. In these experiments an additional filter step was applied to suppress contributions from not directly bonded 13C,13C spin pairs. The 13C NMR intensities, chemical shifts, connectivities and distances gave constraints for both the polymerization mechanism and the short-range order of the polymer. The experimental results were complemented by bond lengths predicted by density functional theory methods for several previously suggested models. Based on the presented evidence we can unambiguously exclude models based on gamma-pyronic units and support models based on alpha-pyronic units. The possibility of planar ladder- and bracelet-like alpha-pyronic structures is discussed.

  18. [Determination of 13C enrichment in soil amino acid enantiomers by gas chromatogram/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Xue-Li; Bai, Zhen; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xu-Dong

    2008-06-01

    The transformation and renewal of amino acid enantiomers is of significance in indicating the turnover mechanism of soil organic matter. In this paper, a method of gas chromatogram/mass spectrometry combined with U-13 C-glucose incubation was developed to determine the 13C enrichment in soil amino acid enantiomers, which could effectively differentiate the original and the newly synthesized amino acids in soil matrix. The added U-13 C-glucose was utilized rapidly to structure the amino acid carbon skeleton, and the change of relative abundance of isotope ions could be determined by mass spectrometry. The direct incorporation of U-13 C glucose was estimated by the intensity increase of m/z (F + n) to F (F was parent fragment, and n was the carbon number in the fragment), while the total isotope incorporation from the added 13C could be calculated according to the abundance ratio increment summation from m/z (Fa + 1) through (Fa + T) (Fa was the fragment containing all original skeleton carbons, and T was the carbon number in the amino acid molecule). The 13C enrichment in the target compound was expressed as atom percentage excess (APE), and that of D-amino acid needed to be corrected by the coefficient of hydrolysis-induced racemization. The 13C enrichment reflected the carbon turnover velocity of individual amino acid enantiomers, and was powerful to investigate the dynamics of soil amino acids.

  19. Revealing the fine details of functionalized silica surfaces by solid-state NMR and adsorption isotherm measurements: the case of fluorinated stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ciogli, Alessia; Simone, Patrizia; Villani, Claudio; Gasparrini, Francesco; Laganà, Aldo; Capitani, Donatella; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Massi, Alessandro; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2014-06-23

    The structural and chromatographic characterization of two novel fluorinated mesoporous materials prepared by covalent reaction of 3-(pentafluorophenyl)propyldimethylchlorosilane and perfluorohexylethyltrichlorosilane with 2.5 μm fully porous silica particles is reported. The adsorbents were characterized by solid state (29)Si, (13)C, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis (C and F), and various chromatographic measurements, including the determination of adsorption isotherms. The structure and abundance of the different organic surface species, as well as the different silanol types, were determined. In particular, the degree of so-called horizontal polymerization, that is, Si-O-Si bridging parallel to the silica surface due to the reaction, under "quasi-dry" conditions, of trifunctional silanizing agents with the silica surface was quantified. Significant agreement was found between the information provided by solid-state NMR, elemental analysis, and excess isotherms regarding the amount of surface residual silanol groups, on the one hand, and the degree of surface functionalization, on the other. Finally, the kinetic performance of the fluorinated materials as separation media for applications in near-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography was evaluated. At reduced velocities of about 5.5 (ca. 600 bar backpressure at room temperature) with 3 mm diameter columns and toluene as test compound, reduced plate heights on the order of 2 were obtained on columns of both adsorbents. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; del Corro, Pablo G; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A; Lally, Richard W; Bishop, David J

    2015-06-28

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ∼1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.

  1. Broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, David B.; Asghar, Ali; Gupta, Shalini; Kang, Hun; Pan, Ming; Strassburg, Martin; Summers, Chris; Ferguson, Ian T.

    2006-06-01

    Solid state lighting has done well recently in niche markets such as signage and displays, however, no available SSL technologies incorporate all the necessary attributes for general illumination. Development of a novel solid state general illumination source is discussed here. Two LEDs emitting at two distinct wavelengths can be monolithically grown and used to excite two or more phosphors with varied excitation spectra. The combined phosphorescence spectrum can then be controlled by adjusting the relative intensities of the two LED emissions. Preliminary phosphor analysis shows such a scheme to be viable for use in a spectrally dynamic broadband general illumination source. A tunnel junction is envisioned as a means of current spreading in a buried layer for three terminal operation. However, tunnel junction properties in GaN based materials are not well understood, and require further optimization to be practical devices. Preliminary results on GaN tunnel junctions are presented here as well.

  2. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes were investigated. A new generation on nonplanar oscillator was fabricated, and it is anticipated that passive linewidths will be pushed to the kilohertz regime. A number of diode-pumped laser transitions were demonstrated in the rod configuration. Second-harmonic conversion efficiencies as high as 15% are routinely obtained in a servo-locked external resonant doubling crystal at 15 mW cw input power levels at 1064 nm.

  3. Rechargeable sodium all-solid-state battery

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Weidong; Li, Yutao; Xin, Sen; ...

    2017-01-03

    A reversible plating/stripping of a dendrite-free metallic-sodium anode with a reduced anode/ceramic interfacial resistance is created by a thin interfacial interlayer formed in situ or by the introduction of a dry polymer film. Wetting of the sodium on the interfacial interlayer suppresses dendrite formation and growth at different discharge/charge C-rates. Furthermore, all-solid-state batteries were obtained with a high cycling stability and Coulombic efficiency at 65 °C.

  4. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  5. Solid state synthesis of poly(dichlorophosphazene)

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Christopher W.; Hneihen, Azzam S.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making poly(dichlorophosphazene) using solid state reactants is disclosed and described. The present invention improves upon previous methods by removing the need for chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, eliminating complicated equipment and simplifying the overall process by providing a "single pot" two step reaction sequence. This may be accomplished by the condensation reaction of raw materials in the melt phase of the reactants and in the absence of an environmentally damaging solvent.

  6. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  7. Microwave Spectra for the Three 13C_1 Isotopologues of Propene and New Rotational Constants for Propene and its 13C_1 Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Groner, Peter; Conrad, Andrew R.; Gurusinghe, Ranil M.; Tubergen, Michael

    2016-06-01

    New measurements of microwave lines (A and E) of propene and its three 13C_1 isotopologues have been made in the 10-22 GHz region with FT accuracy. The revised lines for propene along with many hundreds from the literature were fitted with the ERHAM program for internal rotors to give improved rotational constants. The new constants for propene are A_0 = 46280.2904(16), B_0 = 9305.24260(30), and C_0 = 8134.22685(28) MHz. Lines for the 3-13C_1 species were observed in a pure sample; lines for the 1-13C_1 and 2-13C_1 species were observed in natural abundance. In fitting the limited sets of lines for the 13C_1 species, many of the centrifugal distortion constants and most of the tunneling parameters were transferred from the fit of propene itself with 27 parameters. Improved rotational constants for the 13C_1 species are reported.

  8. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: a pilot inter-laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2013-07-25

    Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular (13)C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the (13)C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic (13)C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular (13)C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic (13)C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ (13)Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ (13)Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A method for simultaneous echo planar imaging of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2012-04-01

    A rapid echo planar imaging sequence for dynamic imaging of [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] pyruvate simultaneously was developed. Frequency-based separation of these metabolites was achieved by spatial shifting in the phase-encoded direction with the appropriate choice of echo spacing. Suppression of the pyruvate-hydrate and alanine resonances is achieved through an optimized spectral-spatial RF waveform. Signal sampling efficiency as a function of pyruvate and lactate excitation angle was simulated using two site exchange models. Dynamic imaging is demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model, and phantom validations of the RF pulse frequency selectivity were performed.

  10. Solid-State Thyratron Replacement. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Ian

    2017-12-12

    Under this SBIR, DTI developed a solid-state switch as an alternative to legacy thyratron equipment. Our Phase II objective was to make a solid-state thyratron replacement that would provide equivalent or better performance, much higher reliability (at least a 20 year lifetime, compared to a thyratron’s two-year lifetime) and would sell for ~3x the cost of a thyratron, or less than $40k. We were successful in building a solid-state switch which could reliably function as a thyratron replacement. The unit was designed to directly replace the thyratrons currently being used at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), and was builtmore » in a tank that was small enough to fit into the existing thyratron cabinet, providing a true form-fit-function replacement path. We tested the switch at the full operating specifications: 48 kV, 6.3 kA, and 1 µs risetime. We also demonstrated a peak-to-peak pulse jitter of 1.5 ns, which is five times shorter than is typical for thyratrons. This lower jitter would improve the performance of the LCLS beam. The predicted reliability is more than 80 years, which is 40 times greater than a thyratron.« less

  11. Compression selective solid-state chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang

    Compression selective solid-state chemistry refers to mechanically induced selective reactions of solids under thermomechanical extreme conditions. Advanced quantum solid-state chemistry simulations, based on density functional theory with localized basis functions, were performed to provide a remarkable insight into bonding pathways of high-pressure chemical reactions in all agreement with experiments. These pathways clearly demonstrate reaction mechanisms in unprecedented structural details, showing not only the chemical identity of reactive intermediates but also how atoms move along the reaction coordinate associated with a specific vibrational mode, directed by induced chemical stress occurred during bond breaking and forming. It indicates that chemical bonds in solids can break and form precisely under compression as we wish. This can be realized through strongly coupling of mechanical work to an initiation vibrational mode when all other modes can be suppressed under compression, resulting in ultrafast reactions to take place isothermally in a few femtoseconds. Thermodynamically, such reactions correspond to an entropy minimum process on an isotherm where the compression can force thermal expansion coefficient equal to zero. Combining a significantly brief reaction process with specific mode selectivity, both statistical laws and quantum uncertainty principle can be bypassed to precisely break chemical bonds, establishing fundamental principles of compression selective solid-state chemistry. Naturally this leads to understand the ''alchemy'' to purify, grow, and perfect certain materials such as emerging novel disruptive energetics.

  12. Solid state ionics: a Japan perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    2017-12-01

    The 70-year history of scientific endeavor of solid state ionics research in Japan is reviewed to show the contribution of Japanese scientists to the basic science of solid state ionics and its applications. The term 'solid state ionics' was defined by Takehiko Takahashi of Nagoya University, Japan: it refers to ions in solids, especially solids that exhibit high ionic conductivity at a fairly low temperature below their melting points. During the last few decades of exploration, many ion conducting solids have been discovered in Japan such as the copper-ion conductor Rb4Cu16I7Cl13, proton conductor SrCe1-xYxO3, oxide-ion conductor La0.9Sr0.9Ga0.9Mg0.1O3, and lithium-ion conductor Li10GeP2S12. Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 has a conductivity of 0.33 S cm-1 at 25 °C, which is the highest of all room temperature ion conductive solid electrolytes reported to date, and Li10GeP2S12 has a conductivity of 0.012 S cm-1 at 25 °C, which is the highest among lithium-ion conductors reported to date. Research on high-temperature proton conducting ceramics began in Japan. The history, the discovery of novel ionic conductors and the story behind them are summarized along with basic science and technology.

  13. Solid-State NMR Studies Reveal Native-like β-Sheet Structures in Transthyretin Amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan

    Structural characterization of amyloid rich in cross-β structures is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of protein misfolding and amyloid formation associated with a wide range of human disorders. Elucidation of the β-sheet structure in noncrystalline amyloid has, however, remained an enormous challenge. Here we report structural analyses of the β-sheet structure in a full-length transthyretin amyloid using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was employed to investigate native-like β-sheet structures in the amyloid state using selective labeling schemes for more efficient solid-state NMR studies. Analyses of extensive long-range 13 C- 13 C correlation MAS spectra obtained with selectivelymore » 13 CO- and 13 Cα-labeled TTR reveal that the two main β-structures in the native state, the CBEF and DAGH β-sheets, remain intact after amyloid formation. The tertiary structural information would be of great use for examining the quaternary structure of TTR amyloid.« less

  14. Solid-State NMR Studies Reveal Native-like β-Sheet Structures in Transthyretin Amyloid

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan; ...

    2016-09-02

    Structural characterization of amyloid rich in cross-β structures is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of protein misfolding and amyloid formation associated with a wide range of human disorders. Elucidation of the β-sheet structure in noncrystalline amyloid has, however, remained an enormous challenge. Here we report structural analyses of the β-sheet structure in a full-length transthyretin amyloid using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was employed to investigate native-like β-sheet structures in the amyloid state using selective labeling schemes for more efficient solid-state NMR studies. Analyses of extensive long-range 13 C- 13 C correlation MAS spectra obtained with selectivelymore » 13 CO- and 13 Cα-labeled TTR reveal that the two main β-structures in the native state, the CBEF and DAGH β-sheets, remain intact after amyloid formation. The tertiary structural information would be of great use for examining the quaternary structure of TTR amyloid.« less

  15. (13)C NMR Studies, Molecular Order, and Mesophase Properties of Thiophene Mesogens.

    PubMed

    Veeraprakash, B; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T

    2015-12-03

    Three-ring mesogens with a core comprising thiophene linked to one phenyl ring directly and to the other via flexible ester are synthesized with terminal alkoxy chains to probe the mesophase properties and find the molecular order. The phenyl thiophene link in the core offers a comparison of the mesophase features with the molecular shape of the mesogen. The synthesized mesogens display enantiotropic polymesomorphism and accordingly nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B mesophases are perceived depending upon the terminal chain length. For some of the homologues, monotropic higher order smectic phases such as smectic F and crystal E are also witnessed. The existence of polymesomorphism are originally observed by HOPM and DSC and further confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction studies. For the C8 homologue, high resolution solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is employed to find the molecular structure in the liquid crystalline phase and using the 2D SLF technique, the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings are extracted to calculate the order parameter. By comparing the ratio of local order of thiophene as well as phenyl rings, we establish the bent-core shape of the mesogen. Importantly, for assigning the carbon chemical shifts of the core unit of aligned C8 mesogen, the (13)C NMR measured in mesophase of the synthetic intermediate is employed. Thus, the proposed approach addresses the key step in the spectral assignment of target mesogens with the use of (13)C NMR data of mesomorphic intermediate.

  16. An improved 13C-tracer method for the study of lignin structure and reactions : differential 13C-NMR

    Treesearch

    Noritsugu Terashima; Dmitry Evtuguin; Carlos Pascoal Neto; Jim Parkas; Magnus Paulsson; Ulla Westermark; Sally Ralph; John Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The technique of selective 13C-enrichment of specific carbons in lignin combined with 13C-NMR differential spectrometry between spectra of 13C-enriched and unenriched lignins (Ä13C-NMR) provides definitive information on the structure of the lignin macromolecule. Improvements were made on, (1) specific 13C-enrichment of almost all carbons involved in inter-unit bonds...

  17. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  18. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1-13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADE-NA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1-13C-glutamate, 5-13C-glutamate, 1-13C-glutamine and 5-13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood–brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images. PMID:17303454

  19. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  20. Transport of 13C-oleate in adipocytes measured using multi imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Lechene, Claude

    2004-11-01

    The mechanism of long chain free fatty acid (FFA) transport across cell membranes is under active investigation. Here we describe the use of multi imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to monitor intracellular concentrations of FFA and provide new insight into FFA transport in cultured adipocytes. Cells were incubated with 13C-oleate:BSA and either dried directly or dried after washing with a medium deprived of 13C-oleate:BSA. Cells were analyzed with MIMS using a scanning primary Cs+ ion beam and 12C-, 13C-, 12C14N-, 13C14N-) (or 12C 15N-) were imaged simultaneously. From these quantitative images the values of the 13C/ 12C ratios were determined in the intracellular lipid droplets, in the cytoplasm and outside the 3T3F442A adipocytes. The results indicate that after incubation with 13C-oleate:BSA the droplet 13C/ 12C ratio was 15 +/- 6%. This value is about 14-fold higher than the 13C/ 12C terrestrial ratio (1.12%). After washing the 13C-oleate:BSA, the droplet 13C/ 12C ratios decreased to 1.6 +/- 0.1%, about 40% greater than the natural abundance. Results for washed cells indicate that relatively little FFA was esterified. The unwashed cell results, together with the value of the lipid water partition coefficient, reveal that intracellular unbound FFA (FFAu) concentrations were on average about 4.5-fold greater than the extracellular FFAu concentrations. These results are consistent with the possibility that FFA may be pumped into adipocytes against their electro-chemical potential. This work demonstrates that MIMS can be used to image and quantitate stable isotope labeled fatty acid in intracellular lipid droplets.

  1. [Ozone effects on soil microbial community of rice investigated by 13C isotope labeling].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Shang, He

    2014-10-01

    This study was initiated to explore the effects of dynamic ozone (O3) exposure on soil microbial biomass and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) under potted rice. A pulse-chase labeling experiment was designed to expose potted rice with 13CO2 for 6 h after one and two months, the rice were fumigated by elevated O3 concentration with an 8 h mean of 110 nL · L(-1) (O3). The allocation of the assimilated 13C to soil microorganisms was estimated by analyzing the 13C profile of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). After one month O3 exposure, the soil microbial biomass carbon was not affected, while the 13C-microbial biomass was significantly decreased with elevated O3. Both the total and 13C microbial biomass carbon was remarkably lower than that of control treatment after two months O3 exposure. Principal components analysis of 13C-PLFA data showed that elevated O3 significantly changed soil microbial structure after two month exposures, while there was no difference of 13C-PLFA structure between control and elevated O3 treatments after one month exposure. Δδ13C per hundred thousand of individual PLFA was significantly affected by O3 after both one and two month exposures. Only did ozone change the relative abundance of individual 13C-PLFA (13C%) of bacterial fatty acids after one month exposure, while after two month exposures, the 13C% of fungal and actinomycetic fatty acids were markedly changed by elevated O3.

  2. Protecting solid-state spins from a strongly coupled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mo; Calvin Sun, Won Kyu; Saha, Kasturi; Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Cappellaro, Paola

    2018-06-01

    Quantum memories are critical for solid-state quantum computing devices and a good quantum memory requires both long storage time and fast read/write operations. A promising system is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, where the NV electronic spin serves as the computing qubit and a nearby nuclear spin as the memory qubit. Previous works used remote, weakly coupled 13C nuclear spins, trading read/write speed for long storage time. Here we focus instead on the intrinsic strongly coupled 14N nuclear spin. We first quantitatively understand its decoherence mechanism, identifying as its source the electronic spin that acts as a quantum fluctuator. We then propose a scheme to protect the quantum memory from the fluctuating noise by applying dynamical decoupling on the environment itself. We demonstrate a factor of 3 enhancement of the storage time in a proof-of-principle experiment, showing the potential for a quantum memory that combines fast operation with long coherence time.

  3. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  4. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  5. Probing Silica-Biomolecule Interactions by Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stephan Ingmar; Donets, Sergii; Dianat, Arezoo; Bobeth, Manfred; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Brunner, Eike

    2016-11-08

    Understanding the molecular interactions between inorganic phases such as silica and organic material is fundamental for chromatographic applications, for tailoring silica-enzyme interactions, and for elucidating the mechanisms of biomineralization. The formation, structure, and properties of the organic/inorganic interface is crucial in this context. Here, we investigate the interaction of selectively 13 C-labeled choline with 29 Si-labeled monosilicic acid/silica at the molecular level. Silica/choline nanocomposites were analyzed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the silica/organic interface. Cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP MAS)-based NMR experiments like 1 H- 13 C CP-REDOR (rotational-echo double resonance), 1 H- 13 C HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation), and 1 H- 29 Si- 1 H double CP are employed to determine spatial parameters. The measurement of 29 Si- 13 C internuclear distances for selectively 13 C-labeled choline provides an experimental parameter that allows the direct verification of MD simulations. Atomistic modeling using classical MD methodologies is performed using the INTERFACE force field. The modeling results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and reveal the relevant molecular conformations as well as the nature and interplay of the interactions between the choline cation and the silica surface. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding are both important and depend strongly on the hydration level as well as the charge state of the silica surface.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Solid State Physics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    There's a wealth of excellent textbooks on solid state physics. The author of the present book is well aware of this fact and does not attempt to write just another one. Rather, he has provided a very compact introduction to solid state physics for third-year students. As we are faced with the continuous appearance interdisciplinary fields and associated study curricula in natural and engineering sciences (biophysics, mechatronics, etc), a compact text in solid state physics would be appreciated by students of these disciplines as well. The book features 11 chapters where each is provided with supplementary discussion questions and problems. The first chapters deal with a review of chemical bonding mechanisms, crystal structures and mechanical properties of solids, which are brief but by no means superficial. The following, somewhat more detailed chapter on thermal properties of lattices includes a nice introduction to phonons. The foundations of solid state electronics are treated in the next three chapters. Here the author first discusses the classical treatment of electronic behaviour in metals (Drude model) and continues with a quantum-theoretical approach starting with the free-electron model and leading to the band structures in conductive solids. The next chapter is devoted to semiconductors and ends with a brief but, with respect to the topical scope, adequate discussion of semiconductor devices. The classical topics of magnetic and dielectric behaviour are treated in the sequel. The book closes with a chapter on superconductivity and a brief chapter covering the modern topics of quantum confinement and aspects of nanoscale physics. In my opinion, the author has succeeded in creating a very concise yet not superficial textbook. The account presented often probes subjects deep enough to lay the basis for a thorough understanding, preparing the reader for more specialized textbooks. For instance, I think that this book may serve as an excellent first

  7. Solid state ionics: a Japan perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The 70-year history of scientific endeavor of solid state ionics research in Japan is reviewed to show the contribution of Japanese scientists to the basic science of solid state ionics and its applications. The term ‘solid state ionics’ was defined by Takehiko Takahashi of Nagoya University, Japan: it refers to ions in solids, especially solids that exhibit high ionic conductivity at a fairly low temperature below their melting points. During the last few decades of exploration, many ion conducting solids have been discovered in Japan such as the copper-ion conductor Rb4Cu16I7Cl13, proton conductor SrCe1–xYxO3, oxide-ion conductor La0.9Sr0.9Ga0.9Mg0.1O3, and lithium-ion conductor Li10GeP2S12. Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 has a conductivity of 0.33 S cm–1 at 25 °C, which is the highest of all room temperature ion conductive solid electrolytes reported to date, and Li10GeP2S12 has a conductivity of 0.012 S cm–1 at 25 °C, which is the highest among lithium-ion conductors reported to date. Research on high-temperature proton conducting ceramics began in Japan. The history, the discovery of novel ionic conductors and the story behind them are summarized along with basic science and technology. PMID:28804526

  8. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    For the characterization of soil organic matter, a suite of analytical approaches are available. Chemical degradative methods involve an extraction scheme with which the soluble part of the mixture is isolated and analyzed by colorimetrical or chromatographic means. Macromolecular structures can be subjected to thermolytic or combined thermochemolytic degradation. Because secondary reactions (rearrangement, cracking, hydrogenation and polymerization) in a heterogeneous mixture cannot be excluded, it is obvious that conclusions regarding the original structure in the macromolecular phase have to be drawn with caution. A powerful alternative represents solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, allowing the examination of the bulk sample without major pre-treatment In environmental sciences, this technique mostly involves the isotope 13C to study the chemical composition of organic matter in soils, sediments or compost to study the temporal development of humic material or chemical alterations due to variation in environmental parameters. Due to its low sensibility solid-state 15N NMR studies on such samples are only found occasionally. The emphasis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy is not only to determine the gross chemical composition of the material under study via a chemical shift assignment but also a quantitative correlation between the different signal intensities and the relative contribution of the respective C or N types to the total organic C or N content. However, despite increasing popularity, this approach is still viewed as mysterious techniques, in particular with respect to quantification. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to give a short overview on the possibilities and limitations of this technique in environmental science and in particular for the study of soil organic matter. In general, solid-state 13C NMR spectra of soil organic matter are obtained with the cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) technique. This

  9. Solid State Research, 1977:3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-15

    Reflectivity of CdGeAs, G.D. Holah* A. Miller* W. D. Dunnett* G.W. Iseler Solid State Commun. 23, 75 (1977) 4726 Thin-Film VO2 Submillimeter- Wave...Measure- ments 4439 X-Ray Lithographic and Pro- cessing Technologies for Fabricating Surface Relief Gratings with Profile Control < 400 A S. A...stripe-geometry lasers. The stripe width is 1 3 |i.m, and the cavity length is typically 3 80 to 400 |im. Ohmic contacts were made by

  10. Fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kecker, K.H.; Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1975-07-22

    This patent relates to an improved fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter that does not require separation of materials before it can be read out, that utilizes materials that do not melt or otherwise degrade at about 300$sup 0$C readout temperature, that provides a more efficient dosimeter, and that can be reused. The dosimeters are fabricated by intimately mixing a TL material, such as CaSO$sub 4$:Dy, with a powdered polyphenyl, such as p-sexiphenyl, and hot- pressing the mixture to form pellets, followed by out-gassing in a vacuum furnace at 150$sup 0$C prior to first use dosimeters. (auth)

  11. Solid state transport-based thermoelectric converter

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhiyu

    2010-04-13

    A solid state thermoelectric converter includes a thermally insulating separator layer, a semiconducting collector and an electron emitter. The electron emitter comprises a metal nanoparticle layer or plurality of metal nanocatalyst particles disposed on one side of said separator layer. A first electrically conductive lead is electrically coupled to the electron emitter. The collector layer is disposed on the other side of the separator layer, wherein the thickness of the separator layer is less than 1 .mu.m. A second conductive lead is electrically coupled to the collector layer.

  12. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  13. High temperature solid state storage cell

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Jesse R.; Kallianidis, Milton; Kelsey, G. Stephen

    1983-01-01

    A completely solid state high temperature storage cell comprised of a solid rechargeable cathode such as TiS.sub.2, a solid electrolyte which remains solid at the high temperature operating conditions of the cell and which exhibits high ionic conductivity at such elevated temperatures such as an electrolyte comprised of lithium iodide, and a solid lithium or other alkali metal alloy anode (such as a lithium-silicon alloy) with 5-50% by weight of said anode being comprised of said solid electrolyte.

  14. Solid-state turn coordinator display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    A solid state turn coordinator display which employs light emitting diodes (LED's) as the display medium was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for aircraft applications. The input to the display is supplied by a fluidic inertial rate sensor used in an aircraft wing leveler system. The display is composed of the LED radial display face and the electronics necessary to address and drive the individual lines of LED's. Three levels of brightness are provided to compensate for the different amounts of ambient light present in the cockpit.

  15. Rechargeable Sodium All-Solid-State Battery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A reversible plating/stripping of a dendrite-free metallic-sodium anode with a reduced anode/ceramic interfacial resistance is created by a thin interfacial interlayer formed in situ or by the introduction of a dry polymer film. Wetting of the sodium on the interfacial interlayer suppresses dendrite formation and growth at different discharge/charge C-rates. All-solid-state batteries were obtained with a high cycling stability and Coulombic efficiency at 65 °C. PMID:28149953

  16. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Peramunage, Dharmasena

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  17. Solid-state-based analog of optomechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Naumann, Nicolas L.; Droenner, Leon; Carmele, Alexander; ...

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate a semiconductor quantum dot as a microscopic analog of a basic optomechanical setup. We show that optomechanical features can be reproduced by the solid-state platform, arising from parallels of the underlying interaction processes, which in the optomechanical case is the radiation pressure coupling and in the semiconductor case the electron–phonon coupling. We discuss bistabilities, lasing, and phonon damping, and recover the same qualitative behaviors for the semiconductor and the optomechanical cases expected for low driving strengths. However, in contrast to the optomechanical case, distinct signatures of higher order processes arise in the semiconductor model.

  18. High Speed Solid State Circuit Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlesak, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ, has developed and is installing two 3.3 MW high speed solid state circuit breakers at the Army's Pulse Power Center. These circuit breakers will interrupt 4160V three phase power mains in no more than 300 microseconds, two orders of magnitude faster than conventional mechanical contact type circuit breakers. These circuit breakers utilize Gate Turnoff Thyristors (GTO's) and are currently utility type devices using air cooling in an air conditioned enclosure. Future refinements include liquid cooling, either water or two phase organic coolant, and more advanced semiconductors. Each of these refinements promises a more compact, more reliable unit.

  19. The 12C/13C Isotopic Ratio in Planetary Nebulae as Deduced from IUE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskey, C. L.; Feibelman, W. A.; Bruhweiler, F. C.

    2000-05-01

    The relative abundances of C, N, and O and the isotopic ratio of 12C/13C represent tracers of nucleosynthesis in intermediate stars with main-sequence masses between 0.6 and 8.0 solar masses in our Galaxy. Determining these abundances and the isotopic 12C/13C ratio in planetary nebulae (PNe) represent perhaps the best means to discern exactly how the ISM is enriched by CNO stellar nucleosynthesis. Walsh et al. (1996) and Clegg et al. (1997), using the Hubble Space Telescope, have derived the isotopic 12C/13C abundance ratio in the galactic carbon-rich PN, NGC 3918, and placed marginal constraints on it for the Magellanic PNe, N2 (SMC) and N122 (LMC). This was done using the well-known 12C 3P-1S (J=1-0 and J=2-0) transitions of C+2 at 1906.68 Angstroms and 1908.77 Angstroms and a J=0-0 transition at 1909.6 Angstroms, which is strictly forbidden in 12C. The finite nuclear spin of 13C (I=1/2) permits a corresponding F=1/2-1/2 electric dipole transition not seen in 12C. Since the 1909.6 Angstroms line is well separated from the other two 12C transitions, it provides an important means of determining 12C/13C in planetary nebulae. We have just completed a search of archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) high-dispersion spectra of approximately three dozen PNe, and derived 12C/13C ratios of 39 and 23 for the galactic PNe, NGC 2440 and NGC 6302, respectively. These are values much lower than the solar value of 89. In the other objects, the limited S/N of the IUE data indicate 12C/13C ratio upper limits much higher than 50. The implications of these results and their pertinence to stellar evolution are discussed.

  20. A Model of Solid State Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestman, J. T.; Brailsford, A. D.; Shane, M.; Logothetis, E. M.

    1997-03-01

    Solid state gas sensors are widely used to measure the concentrations of gases such as CO, CH_4, C_3H_6, H_2, C_3H8 and O2 The applications of these sensors range from air-to-fuel ratio control in combustion processes including those in automotive engines and industrial furnaces to leakage detection of inflammable and toxic gases in domestic and industrial environments. As the need increases to accurately measure smaller and smaller concentrations, problems such as poor selectivity, stability and response time limit the use of these sensors. In an effort to overcome some of these limitations, a theoretical model of the transient behavior of solid state gas sensors has been developed. In this presentation, a model for the transient response of an electrochemical gas sensor to gas mixtures containing O2 and one reducing species, such as CO, is discussed. This model accounts for the transport of the reactive species to the sampling electrode, the catalyzed oxidation/reduction reaction of these species and the generation of the resulting electrical signal. The model will be shown to reproduce the results of published steady state models and to agree with experimental steady state and transient data.

  1. A theoretical perspective on the accuracy of rotational resonance (R 2)-based distance measurements in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2010-03-01

    The application of solid-state NMR methodology for bio-molecular structure determination requires the measurement of constraints in the form of 13C-13C and 13C-15N distances, torsion angles and, in some cases, correlation of the anisotropic interactions. Since the availability of structurally important constraints in the solid state is limited due to lack of sufficient spectral resolution, the accuracy of the measured constraints become vital in studies relating the three-dimensional structure of proteins to its biological functions. Consequently, the theoretical methods employed to quantify the experimental data become important. To accentuate this aspect, we re-examine analytical two-spin models currently employed in the estimation of 13C-13C distances based on the rotational resonance (R 2) phenomenon. Although the error bars for the estimated distances tend to be in the range 0.5-1.0 Å, R 2 experiments are routinely employed in a variety of systems ranging from simple peptides to more complex amyloidogenic proteins. In this article we address this aspect by highlighting the systematic errors introduced by analytical models employing phenomenological damping terms to describe multi-spin effects. Specifically, the spin dynamics in R 2 experiments is described using Floquet theory employing two different operator formalisms. The systematic errors introduced by the phenomenological damping terms and their limitations are elucidated in two analytical models and analysed by comparing the results with rigorous numerical simulations.

  2. NMR doesn't lie or how solid-state NMR spectroscopy contributed to a better understanding of the nature and function of soil organic matter (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    for organo-mineral interactions. Since decent solid-state NMR spectra cannot be obtained from graphenic components, the successful acquisition of solid-state 13C and 15N NMR spectra of charcoals challenged the well accepted model of their chemical nature. Application of advanced 2D NMR approaches confirmed the new view of charcoal as a heterogeneous material, the composition of which depends upon the feedstock and charring condition. The respective consequences of this alternative for the understanding of C sequestration are still matter of ongoing debates. Although the sensitivity of 15N for NMR spectroscopy is 50 times lower than that of 13C, first solid-state 15N NMR spectra of soils with natural 15N abundance were already published in the 1990's. They clearly identified peptide-like structures as the main organic N form in unburnt soils. However, in spite of their high contribution to SOM, the role of peptides in soils is far from understood. Considering the new technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy, this technique will certainly not stop to contribute to unexpected results.

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a (6)Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m(2), is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  5. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  6. Enhanced electrodes for solid state gas sensors

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    2001-01-01

    A solid state gas sensor generates an electrical potential between an equilibrium electrode and a second electrode indicative of a gas to be sensed. A solid electrolyte substrate has the second electrode mounted on a first portion of the electrolyte substrate and a composite equilibrium electrode including conterminous transition metal oxide and Pt components mounted on a second portion of the electrolyte substrate. The composite equilibrium electrode and the second electrode are electrically connected to generate an electrical potential indicative of the gas that is being sensed. In a particular embodiment of the present invention, the second electrode is a reference electrode that is exposed to a reference oxygen gas mixture so that the electrical potential is indicative of the oxygen in a gas stream.

  7. Solid state potentiometric gaseous oxide sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachsman, Eric D. (Inventor); Azad, Abdul Majeed (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A solid state electrochemical cell (10a) for measuring the concentration of a component of a gas mixture (12) includes first semiconductor electrode (14) and second semiconductor electrode (16) formed from first and second semiconductor materials, respectively. The materials are selected so as to undergo a change in resistivity upon contacting a gas component, such as CO or NO. An electrolyte (18) is provided in contact with the first and second semiconductor electrodes. A reference cell can be included in contact with the electrolyte. Preferably, a voltage response of the first semiconductor electrode is opposite in slope direction to that of the second semiconductor electrode to produce a voltage response equal to the sum of the absolute values of the control system uses measured pollutant concentrations to direct adjustment of engine combustion conditions.

  8. Compact high voltage solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.

    2003-09-23

    A compact, solid state, high voltage switch capable of high conduction current with a high rate of current risetime (high di/dt) that can be used to replace thyratrons in existing and new applications. The switch has multiple thyristors packaged in a single enclosure. Each thyristor has its own gate drive circuit that circuit obtains its energy from the energy that is being switched in the main circuit. The gate drives are triggered with a low voltage, low current pulse isolated by a small inexpensive transformer. The gate circuits can also be triggered with an optical signal, eliminating the trigger transformer altogether. This approach makes it easier to connect many thyristors in series to obtain the hold off voltages of greater than 80 kV.

  9. Spacecraft solid state power distribution switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praver, G. A.; Theisinger, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    As a spacecraft performs its mission, various loads are connected to the spacecraft power bus in response to commands from an on board computer, a function called power distribution. For the Mariner Mark II set of planetary missions, the power bus is 30 volts dc and when loads are connected or disconnected, both the bus and power return side must be switched. In addition, the power distribution function must be immune to single point failures and, when power is first applied, all switches must be in a known state. Traditionally, these requirements have been met by electromechanical latching relays. This paper describes a solid state switch which not only satisfies the requirements but incorporates several additional features including soft turn on, programmable current trip point with noise immunity, instantaneous current limiting, and direct telemetry of load currents and switch status. A breadboard of the design has been constructed and some initial test results are included.

  10. Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincik, Emil

    2014-09-01

    The conference SSSI VIII (November 25-28, 2013) was the 8th continuation of the series of the Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces conferences taking place usually in the Smolenice castle in the western part of the Slovak Republic. The event was organized by the following institutions of Slovak Republic: Institute of Physics of SAS Bratislava, Institute of Aurel Stodola of University of Žilina, and Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of Comenius University Bratislava. More than 150 scientists of the three continents (Europe, Asia and Africa) participated on the event with almost 100 poster presentations. The representatives of all organizing institutions consider this event as very important for Middle Europe region.

  11. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  12. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  13. Zwitterionic metal carboxylate complexes: In solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Bhaskar; Kalita, Dipjyoti; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2012-07-01

    A flexible dicarboxylic acid having composition [(CH(o-C5H4N)(p-C6H4OCH2CO2H)2] derived from corresponding bis-phenol reacts with various metal(II) acetates such as manganese(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) acetate leads to zwtterionic complexes with compositions [CH(o-C5H4N)(p-C6H4OCH2CO2){p-C6H4OCH2CO2M(H2O)5}].6H2O (where M = Mn, Co, Ni). The complexes are characterised by X-ray crystallography. These complexes have chiral center due to unsymmetric structure conferred to the ligand through coordination at only one carboxylate group of the ligand. In solid state these complexes are racemic.

  14. Noise in solid-state nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, R. M. M.; Keyser, U. F.; Dekker, N. H.; Dekker, C.

    2008-01-01

    We study ionic current fluctuations in solid-state nanopores over a wide frequency range and present a complete description of the noise characteristics. At low frequencies (f ≲ 100 Hz) we observe 1/f-type of noise. We analyze this low-frequency noise at different salt concentrations and find that the noise power remarkably scales linearly with the inverse number of charge carriers, in agreement with Hooge's relation. We find a Hooge parameter α = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10−4. In the high-frequency regime (f ≳ 1 kHz), we can model the increase in current power spectral density with frequency through a calculation of the Johnson noise. Finally, we use these results to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for DNA translocation for different salt concentrations and nanopore diameters, yielding the parameters for optimal detection efficiency. PMID:18184817

  15. Noise in solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Smeets, R M M; Keyser, U F; Dekker, N H; Dekker, C

    2008-01-15

    We study ionic current fluctuations in solid-state nanopores over a wide frequency range and present a complete description of the noise characteristics. At low frequencies (f approximately < 100 Hz) we observe 1/f-type of noise. We analyze this low-frequency noise at different salt concentrations and find that the noise power remarkably scales linearly with the inverse number of charge carriers, in agreement with Hooge's relation. We find a Hooge parameter alpha = (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10(-4). In the high-frequency regime (f approximately > 1 kHz), we can model the increase in current power spectral density with frequency through a calculation of the Johnson noise. Finally, we use these results to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for DNA translocation for different salt concentrations and nanopore diameters, yielding the parameters for optimal detection efficiency.

  16. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  17. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  18. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Todd (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  19. Nanoscale solid-state quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, A.; Austwick, M.; Benjamin, S.C.; Briggs, G.A.D.; Dennis, T.J.S.; Ferguson, A.; Hasko, D.G.; Kanai, M.; Khlobystov, A.N.; Lovett, B.W.; Morley, G.W.; Oliver, R.A.; Pettifor, D.G.; Porfyrakis, K.; Reina, J.H.; Rice, J.H.; Smith, J.D.; Taylor, R.A.; Williams, D.A.; Adelmann, C.; Mariette, H.; Hamers, R.J.

    2003-07-01

    Most experts agree that it is too early to say how quantum computers will eventually be built, and several nanoscale solid-state schemes are being implemented in a range of materials. Nanofabricated quantum dots can be made in designer configurations, with established technology for controlling interactions and for reading out results. Epitaxial quantum dots can be grown in vertical arrays in semiconductors, and ultrafast optical techniques are available for controlling and measuring their excitations. Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used for molecular self-assembly of endohedral fullerenes, which can embody quantum information in the electron spin. The challenges of individual addressing in such tiny structures could rapidly become intractable with increasing numbers of qubits, but these schemes are amenable to global addressing methods for computation.

  20. "Solid State" Chemistry in Titan Ice Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-20

    Scientists from NASA's Cassini mission suggested in a 2016 paper that the appearance of a cloud of dicyanoacetylene (C4N2) ice in Titan's stratosphere may be explained by "solid-state" chemistry taking place inside ice particles. The particles have an inner layer of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) ice coated with an outer layer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice. Left: When a photon of light penetrates the outer shell, it can interact with the HC3N, producing C3N and H. Center: The C3N then reacts with HCN to yield C4N2 and H (shown at right). Another reaction that also yields C4N2 ice and H also is possible, but the researchers think it is less likely. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20715

  1. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  2. Solution and solid-state effects on NMR chemical shifts in sesquiterpene lactones: NMR, X-ray, and theoretical methods.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Warżajtis, Beata; Rychlewska, Urszula

    2012-01-12

    Selected guaianolide type sesquiterpene lactones were studied combining solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy with theoretical calculations of the chemical shifts in both environments and with the X-ray data. The experimental (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in solution were successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations (with the GIAO method and DFT B3LYP 6-31++G**) after geometry optimization (DFT B3LYP 6-31 G**) in vacuum. The GIPAW method was used for calculations of solid-state (13)C chemical shifts. The studied cases involved two polymorphs of helenalin, two pseudopolymorphs of 6α-hydroxydihydro-aromaticin and two cases of multiple asymmetric units in crystals: one in which the symmetry-independent molecules were connected by a series of hydrogen bonds (geigerinin) and the other in which the symmetry-independent molecules, deprived of any specific intermolecular interactions, differed in the conformation of the side chain (badkhysin). Geometrically different molecules present in the crystal lattices could be easily distinguished in the solid-state NMR spectra. Moreover, the experimental differences in the (13)C chemical shifts corresponding to nuclei in different polymorphs or in geometrically different molecules were nicely reproduced with the GIPAW calculations.

  3. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  4. In vivo detection of 13C isotopomer turnover in the human brain by sequential infusion of 13C labeled substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shizhe; Zhang, Yan; Ferraris Araneta, Maria; Xiang, Yun; Johnson, Christopher; Innis, Robert B.; Shen, Jun

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneously detecting human brain metabolites labeled by two substrates infused in a sequential order. In vivo 13C spectra of carboxylic/amide carbons were acquired only during the infusion of the second substrate. This approach allowed dynamic detection of 13C labeling from two substrates with considerably different labeling patterns. [2-13C]glucose and [U-13C6]glucose were used to generate singlet and doublet signals of the same carboxylic/amide carbon atom, respectively. Because of the large one-bond 13C-13C homonuclear J coupling between a carboxylic/amide carbon and an aliphatic carbon (˜50 Hz), the singlet and doublet signals of the same carboxylic/amide carbon were well distinguished. The results demonstrated that different 13C isotopomer patterns could be simultaneously and distinctly measured in vivo in a clinical setting at 3 T.

  5. Prediction of recrystallization behavior of troglitazone/polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersion by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsutoshi; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yada, Shuichi; Hamaura, Takeshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2010-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the relationship between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the recrystallization behavior during the storage of troglitazone solid dispersions. The solid dispersions were prepared by either the solvent method or by co-grinding. The recrystallization behavior under storage conditions at 40 degrees C/94% RH was evaluated by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. Solid dispersions prepared by the solvent method or by prolonged grinding brought about inhibition of the nucleation and the nuclei growth at the same time. No differences in the PXRD profiles were found in the samples prepared by the co-grinding and solvent methods, however, (13)C CP/MAS NMR showed significant differences in the spectra. The correlation coefficients using partial least square regression analysis between the PXRD profiles and the apparent nuclei-growth constant or induction period to nucleation were 0.1305 or 0.6350, respectively. In contrast, those between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the constant or the period were 0.9916 or 0.9838, respectively. The (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra had good correlation with the recrystallization kinetic parameters evaluated by the KJMA equation. Consequently, solid-state NMR was judged to be a useful tool for the prediction of the recrystallization behavior of solid dispersions.

  6. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology--especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition.

  7. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarizationmore » transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.« less

  8. Solid-state NMR covariance of homonuclear correlation spectra.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bingwen; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Trebosc, Julien; Deschamps, Michael; Tricot, Gregory

    2008-04-07

    Direct covariance NMR spectroscopy, which does not involve a Fourier transformation along the indirect dimension, is demonstrated to obtain homonuclear correlation two-dimensional (2D) spectra in the solid state. In contrast to the usual 2D Fourier transform (2D-FT) NMR, in a 2D covariance (2D-Cov) spectrum the spectral resolution in the indirect dimension is determined by the resolution along the detection dimension, thereby largely reducing the time-consuming indirect sampling requirement. The covariance method does not need any separate phase correction or apodization along the indirect dimension because it uses those applied in the detection dimension. We compare in detail the specifications obtained with 2D-FT and 2D-Cov, for narrow and broad resonances. The efficiency of the covariance data treatment is demonstrated in organic and inorganic samples that are both well crystallized and amorphous, for spin -1/2 nuclei with 13C, 29Si, and 31P through-space or through-bond homonuclear 2D correlation spectra. In all cases, the experimental time has been reduced by at least a factor of 10, without any loss of resolution and signal to noise ratio, with respect to what is necessary with the 2D-FT NMR. According to this method, we have been able to study the silicate network of glasses by 2D NMR within reasonable experimental time despite the very long relaxation time of the 29Si nucleus. The main limitation of the 2D-Cov data treatment is related to the introduction of autocorrelated peaks onto the diagonal, which does not represent any actual connectivity.

  9. Solution and Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Characterization of Efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Eduardo Gomes Rodrigues de; Carvalho, Erika Martins de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Santos, Tereza Cristina Dos; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo Andrade; Ellena, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Samples of efavirenz (EFZ) were evaluated to investigate the influence of the micronization process on EFZ stability. A combination of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FTIR, observations of isotropic chemical shifts of (1)H in distinct solvents, their temperature dependence and spin-lattice relaxation time constants (T1), solution (1D and 2D) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and solid-state (13)C NMR (CPMAS NMR) provides valuable structural information and structural elucidation of micronized EFZ and heptane-recrystallized polymorphs (EFZ/HEPT). This study revealed that the micronization process did not affect the EFZ crystalline structure. It was observed that the structure of EFZ/HEPT is in the same form as that obtained from ethyl acetate/hexane, as shown in the literature. A comparison of the solid-state NMR spectra revealed discrepancies regarding the assignments of some carbons published in the literature that have been resolved. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensitizing solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of dilute nuclei by spin-diffusion assisted polarization transfers.

    PubMed

    Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-10-07

    Recent years have witnessed efforts geared at increasing the sensitivity of NMR experiments, by relying on the suitable tailoring and exploitation of relaxation phenomena. These efforts have included the use of paramagnetic agents, enhanced (1)H-(1)H incoherent and coherent transfers processes in 2D liquid state spectroscopy, and homonuclear (13)C-(13)C spin diffusion effects in labeled solids. The present study examines some of the opportunities that could open when exploiting spontaneous (1)H-(1)H spin-diffusion processes, to enhance relaxation and to improve the sensitivity of dilute nuclei in solid state NMR measurements. It is shown that polarization transfer experiments executed under sufficiently fast magic-angle-spinning conditions, enable a selective polarization of the dilute low-γ spins by their immediate neighboring protons. Repolarization of the latter can then occur during the time involved in monitoring the signal emitted by the low-γ nuclei. The basic features involved in the resulting approach, and its potential to improve the effective sensitivity of solid state NMR measurements on dilute nuclei, are analyzed. Experimental tests witness the advantages that could reside from utilizing this kind of approach over conventional cross-polarization processes. These measurements also highlight a number of limitations that will have to be overcome for transforming selective polarization transfers of this kind into analytical methods of choice. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  12. Solid state lighting devices and methods with rotary cooling structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    Solid state lighting devices and methods for heat dissipation with rotary cooling structures are described. An example solid state lighting device includes a solid state light source, a rotating heat transfer structure in thermal contact with the solid state light source, and a mounting assembly having a stationary portion. The mounting assembly may be rotatably coupled to the heat transfer structure such that at least a portion of the mounting assembly remains stationary while the heat transfer structure is rotating. Examples of methods for dissipating heat from electrical devices, such as solid state lighting sources are also described. Heat dissipationmore » methods may include providing electrical power to a solid state light source mounted to and in thermal contact with a heat transfer structure, and rotating the heat transfer structure through a surrounding medium.« less

  13. The millimeter and sub-millimeter rotational spectrum of triple 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkina, A. O.; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2017-05-01

    Context. A recently published astronomical detection of all three doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanides toward Sgr B2(N2) motivated us to investigate triple 13C isotopic species that are expected to be also present in the ISM. Aims: We aim to present an experimental study of the rotational spectrum of triple 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide, 13CH313CH213CN, in the frequency range 150-990 GHz. We want to use the determined spectroscopic parameters for searching for 13CH313CH213CN in ALMA data. The main objective of this work is to provide accurate frequency predictions to search for this molecule in the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N) and to facilitate its detection in space. Methods: The laboratory rotational spectrum of 13CH313CH213CN has been recorded with the Lille's fast DDS solid-state spectrometer between 150 GHz and 990 GHz. Results: More than 4000 rotational transitions were identified in the laboratory. The quantum numbers reach J = 115 and Ka = 39. Watson's Hamiltonian in the A and S reductions were used to analyze the spectra. Accurate spectroscopic parameters were determined. The rotational spectra of the 13C containing species CH3CH2CN have been assigned, thus allowing the determination of the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants Full Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A2

  14. Structural factors affecting 13C NMR chemical shifts of cellulose: a computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Tuo; Oehme, Daniel

    Here, the doublet C4 peaks at ~ 85 and ~ 89 ppm in solid-state 13C NMR spectra of native cellulose have been attributed to signals of C4 atoms on the surface (solvent-exposed) and in the interior of microfibrils, designated as sC4 and iC4, respectively. The relative intensity ratios of sC4 and iC4 observed in NMR spectra of cellulose have been used to estimate the degree of crystallinity of cellulose and the number of glucan chains in cellulose microfibrils. However, the molecular structures of cellulose responsible for the specific surface and interior C4 peaks have not been positively confirmed. Using densitymore » functional theory (DFT) methods and structures produced from classical molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated how the following four factors affect 13C NMR chemical shifts in cellulose: conformations of exocyclic groups at C6 ( tg, gt and gg), H 2O molecules H-bonded on the surface of the microfibril, glycosidic bond angles (Φ, Ψ) and the distances between H4 and HO3 atoms. We focus on changes in the δ 13C4 value because it is the most significant observable for the same C atom within the cellulose structure. DFT results indicate that different conformations of the exocyclic groups at C6 have the greatest influence on δ 13C4 peak separation, while the other three factors have secondary effects that increase the spread of the calculated C4 interior and surface peaks.« less

  15. Structural factors affecting 13C NMR chemical shifts of cellulose: a computational study

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Tuo; Oehme, Daniel; ...

    2017-11-02

    Here, the doublet C4 peaks at ~ 85 and ~ 89 ppm in solid-state 13C NMR spectra of native cellulose have been attributed to signals of C4 atoms on the surface (solvent-exposed) and in the interior of microfibrils, designated as sC4 and iC4, respectively. The relative intensity ratios of sC4 and iC4 observed in NMR spectra of cellulose have been used to estimate the degree of crystallinity of cellulose and the number of glucan chains in cellulose microfibrils. However, the molecular structures of cellulose responsible for the specific surface and interior C4 peaks have not been positively confirmed. Using densitymore » functional theory (DFT) methods and structures produced from classical molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated how the following four factors affect 13C NMR chemical shifts in cellulose: conformations of exocyclic groups at C6 ( tg, gt and gg), H 2O molecules H-bonded on the surface of the microfibril, glycosidic bond angles (Φ, Ψ) and the distances between H4 and HO3 atoms. We focus on changes in the δ 13C4 value because it is the most significant observable for the same C atom within the cellulose structure. DFT results indicate that different conformations of the exocyclic groups at C6 have the greatest influence on δ 13C4 peak separation, while the other three factors have secondary effects that increase the spread of the calculated C4 interior and surface peaks.« less

  16. Variability of 13C-labeling in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Tu, Thanh Thuy; Biron, Philippe; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Richard, Patricia; Zeller, Bernd; Quénéa, Katell; Alexis, Marie; Bardoux, Gérard; Vaury, Véronique; Girardin, Cyril; Pouteau, Valérie; Billiou, Daniel; Bariac, Thierry

    2013-09-15

    Plant tissues artificially labeled with (13)C are increasingly used in environmental studies to unravel biogeochemical and ecophysiological processes. However, the variability of (13)C-content in labeled tissues has never been carefully investigated. Hence, this study aimed at documenting the variability of (13)C-content in artificially labeled leaves. European beech and Italian ryegrass were subjected to long-term (13)C-labeling in a controlled-environment growth chamber. The (13)C-content of the leaves obtained after several months labeling was determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The (13)C-content of the labeled leaves exhibited inter- and intra-leaf variability much higher than those naturally occurring in unlabeled plants, which do not exceed a few per mil. This variability was correlated with labeling intensity: the isotope composition of leaves varied in ranges of ca 60‰ and 90‰ for experiments that led to average leaf (13)C-content of ca +15‰ and +450‰, respectively. The reported variability of isotope composition in (13)C-enriched leaves is critical, and should be taken into account in subsequent experimental investigations of environmental processes using (13)C-labeled plant tissues. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Modified Reference SPS with Solid State Transmitting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.; Sperber, B. R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of solid state microwave power amplifiers for a solar power satellite transmitting antenna is discussed. State-of-the-art power-added efficiency, gain, and single device power of various microwave solid state devices are compared. The GaAs field effect transistors and the Si-bipolar transistors appear potentially feasible for solar power satellite use. The integration of solid state devices into antenna array elements is examined and issues concerning antenna integration and consequent satellite configurations are examined.

  18. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  19. Spin-lattice relaxation of 13C in solid amino acids using the CP-MAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, A.; Ganapathy, S.; Akasaka, K.; McDowell, C. A.

    It is shown by a simple application of relaxation theory that the 13C magnetization decays nonexponentially, in principle, in the CP-MAS experiment because of the distribution of the spin-lattice relaxation times; however, the deviation from the exponential decay is quite small. The transient Overhauser effect also contributes appreciably to the nonexponential decay of the 13C magnetization when the protons are not saturated during the 13C T1 measurements and the correlation time of the group rotational motion satisfies the condition, ω2τc2 ≦ 1. It is shown by both experiment and theory that the transient Overhauser effect in the solid state is much smaller than that expected for the liquid state. The 13C spin-lattice relaxation times of L-alanine, deutero- L-alanine, glycine, and L-serine were determined for the individual carbon atoms. The experimentally obtained 13C T1 values agree well with calculated ones, showing that the CH 3 group rotation provides the main source of the relaxation in alanine, while the NH 3+ group motion plays an important role for the relaxation in glycine and serene.

  20. A robust heteronuclear dipolar recoupling method comparable to TEDOR for proteins in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Li, Jianping; Chen, Yanke; Xie, Huayong; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a robust heteronuclear dipolar recoupling method for proteins in magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. This method is as simple, robust and efficient as the well-known TEDOR in the aspect of magnetization transfer between 15N and 13C. Deriving from our recent band-selective dual back-to-back pulses (DBP) (Zhang et al., 2016), this method uses new phase-cycling schemes to realize broadband DBP (Bro-DBP). For broadband 15N-13C magnetization transfer (simultaneous 15N → 13C‧ and 15N → 13Cα), Bro-DBP has almost the same 15N → 13Cα efficiency while offers 30-40% enhancement on 15N → 13C‧ transfer, compared to TEDOR. Besides, Bro-DBP can also be used as a carbonyl (13C‧)-selected method, whose 15N → 13C‧ efficiency is up to 1.7 times that of TEDOR and is also higher than that of band-selective DBP. The performance of Bro-DBP is demonstrated on the N-formyl-[U-13C,15N]-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (fMLF) peptide and the U-13C, 15N labeled β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1) microcrystalline protein. Since Bro-DBP is as robust, simple and efficient as TEDOR, we believe it is very useful for protein studies in MAS solid-state NMR.

  1. Radiation-Hardened Solid-State Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for a radiationhardened (rad-hard) solid-state drive for space mission memory applications by combining rad-hard and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) non-volatile memories (NVMs) into a hybrid architecture. The architecture is controlled by a rad-hard ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) or a FPGA (field programmable gate array). Specific error handling and data management protocols are developed for use in a rad-hard environment. The rad-hard memories are smaller in overall memory density, but are used to control and manage radiation-induced errors in the main, and much larger density, non-rad-hard COTS memory devices. Small amounts of rad-hard memory are used as error buffers and temporary caches for radiation-induced errors in the large COTS memories. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA implements a variety of error-handling protocols to manage these radiation-induced errors. The large COTS memory is triplicated for protection, and CRC-based counters are calculated for sub-areas in each COTS NVM array. These counters are stored in the rad-hard non-volatile memory. Through monitoring, rewriting, regeneration, triplication, and long-term storage, radiation-induced errors in the large NV memory are managed. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA also interfaces with the external computer buses.

  2. Solid state photomultiplier for astronomy, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hays, K. M.; Laviolette, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Epitaxial layers with varying donor concentration profiles were grown on silicon substrate wafers using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques, and solid state photomultiplier (SSPM) devices were fabricated from the wafers. Representative detectors were tested in a low background photon flux, low temperature environment to determine the device characteristics for comparison to NASA goals for astronomical applications. The SSPM temperatures varied between 6 and 11 K with background fluxes in the range from less than 5 x 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 13th power photons/square cm per second at wavelengths of 3.2 and 20 cm. Measured parameters included quantum efficiency, dark count rate and bias current. Temperature for optimal performance is 10 K, the highest ever obtained for SSPMs. The devices exhibit a combination of the lowest dark current and highest quantum efficiency yet achieved. Experimental data were reduced, analyzed and used to generate recommendations for future studies. The background and present status of the microscopic theory of SSPM operation were reviewed and summarized. Present emphasis is on modeling of the avalanche process which is the basis for SSPM operation. Approaches to the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation are described and the treatment of electron scattering mechanisms is presented. The microscopic single-electron transport theory is ready to be implemented for large-scale computations.

  3. Solid state replacement of rotating mirror cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Bartolick, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed 'In-situ Storage Image Sensor' or 'ISIS', by Prof. Goji Etoh has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  4. Solid-state characterization of nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mahua; Perumal, O P; Panchagnula, R

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize nevirapine from commercial samples and samples crystallized from different solvents under various conditions. The solid-state behavior of nevirapine samples was investigated using a variety of complementary techniques such as microscopy (optical, polarized, hot stage microscopy), differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry. The commercial samples of nevirapine had the same polymorphic crystalline form with an anhedral crystal habit. Intrinsic dissolution of nevirapine was similar for both the commercial batches. Powder dissolution showed pH dependency, with maximum dissolution in acidic pH and there was no significant effect of particle size. The samples recrystallized from different solvent systems with varying polarity yielded different crystal habits. Stirring and degrees of supersaturation influenced the size and shape of the crystals. The recrystallized samples did not produce any new polymorphic form, but weak solvates with varying crystal habit were produced. Recrystallized samples showed differences in the x-ray diffractograms. However, all the samples had the same internal crystal lattice as revealed from their similar melting points and heat of fusion. The intrinsic dissolution rate of recrystallized samples was lower than the commercial sample. It was found that the compression pressure resulted in desolvation and partial conversion of the crystal form. After compression, the recrystallized samples showed similar x-ray diffractograms to the commercial sample. Amorphous form showed slightly higher aqueous solubility than the commercial crystalline form.

  5. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  6. Composite Polymer-Garnet Solid State Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Andres; Oduncu, Muhammed R.; Scofield, Gregory D.; Marinero, Ernesto E.; Forbey, Scott

    Solid-state electrolytes provide a potential solution to the safety and reliability issues of Li-ion batteries. We have synthesized cubic-phase Li7-xLa3Zr2-xBixO12 compounds utilizing inexpensive, scalable Sol-gel synthesis and obtained ionic conductivities 1.2 x 10-4 S/cm at RT in not-fully densified pellets. In this work we report on the fabrication of composite polymer-garnet ceramic particle electrolytes to produce flexible membranes that can be integrated with standard battery electrodes without the need for a separator. As a first step we incorporated the ceramic particles into polyethylene oxide polymers (PEO) to form flexible membranes. Early results are encouraging yielding ionic conductivity values 1.0 x 10-5 S/cm at RT. To increment the conductivity in the membranes, we are optimizing amongst other: the ceramic particle size distribution and weight load, the polymer molecular weight and chemical composition and the solvated Li-salt composition and content. Unhindered ion transport across interfaces between the composites and the battery electrode materials is paramount for battery performance. To this end, we are investigating the effect of interface morphology, its atomic composition and exploring novel electrode structures that facilitate ionic transport.

  7. Theoretical estimates of equilibrium 13C-18O clumping in carbonates and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    The development of techniques for measuring small gas-phase molecules containing more than one rare stable isotope (e.g., 13C18O16O) at natural, ppm-level abundances1,2 has made it possible to track sources and sinks of atmospheric gases from a new perspective. Similar measurements of 13C-18O clumping in ancient samples could improve our understanding of ancient climates, if the abundances of `clumped' rare stable isotopes in materials that retain isotopic signatures over geologic time can be measured with sufficient precision. This theoretical study estimates the abundances of such 13C-18O `clumps' in carbonates and organic acids and discusses their potential applications. Accompanying abstracts by Eiler et al. and Ghosh et al. will present the analytical methods and some initial data for carbonate minerals to examine the applicability of our theoretical models. Equilibrium isotopic speciations in carbonate minerals and organic acids are calculated from the reduced partition function ratios of isotopically substituted crystals and molecules. Vibrational frequencies used as input for these calculations come from ab initio force fields, determined using density functional theory. Our calculations indicate that carbonate minerals, including calcite, dolomite, and aragonite, when equilibrated at earth-surface temperatures, will have a slight overabundance of CO32- groups containing both 13C and 18O (i.e., 13C18O16O22-) relative to what would be expected if carbon and oxygen isotopes were distributed randomly in the crystal lattice. Calcite and dolomite crystals are predicted to have 0.4‰ excesses of 13C18O16O22- at 298 K; in aragonite the excess will be about 0.05‰ larger. The excesses are smaller for crystals formed or equilibrated at higher temperatures, decreasing by 0.003\\permil/oC at room temperature and essentially disappearing at temperatures of 1000 K or higher. Similarly, there is an excess of both 13C18O16OH and 13C16O18OH groups in organic acids like

  8. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 13C CPMAS NMR studies and DFT calculations of triterpene xylosides isolated from Actaea racemosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Gliński, Jan A.; Wawer, Iwona

    2011-05-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of four triterpene glycosides: cimigenol xyloside ( 1), 26-deoxyactein ( 2), cimicifugoside H-1 ( 3) and 24-acethylhydroshengmanol xyloside ( 4) were recorded and analyzed to characterize their solid-state structure. Experimental data were supported by theoretical calculations of NMR shielding constants with the GIAO/6-31G**-su1 approach. A number of methods for the conformational search and a number of functionals for the DFT calculations were applied to ( 1). The best method was proven to be MMFF or MMFFAQ for the conformational search and the PBE1PBE functional for the DFT calculations. Extra calculations simulating C16 dbnd O⋯HOH hydrogen bond yield the isotropic shielding closer to the experimental solid-state value. For all the compounds CP kinetics parameters were calculated using either the I-S or the I-I*-S model. The analysis of CP kinetics data for methyl groups revealed differences in the T2 time constant for two methyl groups (C29 and C30) linked at C4.

  10. Spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Xiaoyan; Tian, Fang; Huang, Yuqing; Chen, Zhong; Fu, Riqiang

    2018-02-01

    The feasibility of using the spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression method in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments is demonstrated. A complete phase cycling is designed in such a way that in the indirect dimension only the spin diffused signals are evolved, while all signals not involved in polarization transfer are refocused for cancellation. A data processing procedure is further introduced to reconstruct this acquired spectrum into a conventional two-dimensional homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectrum. A uniformly 13C, 15N labeled Fmoc-valine sample and the transmembrane domain of a human protein, LR11 (sorLA), in native Escherichia coli membranes have been used to illustrate the capability of the proposed method in comparison with standard 13C-13C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  11. Structure of thin diamond films: A 1H and 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruski, M.; Lang, D. P.; Hwang, Son-Jong; Jia, H.; Shinar, J.

    1994-04-01

    The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of thin diamond films deposited from naturally abundant (1.1 at. %) as well as 50% and 100% 13enriched CH4 heavily diluted in H2 is described and discussed. Less than 0.6 at. % of hydrogen is found in the films which contain crystallites up to ~15 μm across. The 1H NMR consists of a broad 50-65-kHz-wide Gaussian line attributed to H atoms bonded to carbon and covering the crystallite surfaces. A narrow Lorentzian line was only occasionally observed and is found not to be intrinsic to the diamond structure. The 13C NMR demonstrates that >99.5% of the C atoms reside in a quaternary diamondlike configuration. 1-13C cross-polarization measurement indicates that, at the very least, the majority of 13C nuclei cross polarized by 1H, i.e., within three bond distances from a 1H at a crystallite surface, reside in sp3 diamondlike coordinated sites. The 13C relaxation rates of the films are four orders of magnitude faster than that of natural diamond and believed to be due to 13C spin diffusion to paramagnetic centers, presumably carbon dangling bonds. Analysis of the measured relaxation rates indicates that within the 13C spin-diffusion length of √DTc1 ~0.05 μm, these centers are uniformly distributed in the diamond crystallites. The possibility that the dangling bonds are located at internal nanovoid surfaces is discussed.

  12. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  13. Polymeric proanthocyanidins 13C NMR studies of procyanidins

    Treesearch

    Lawrence J. Porter; Roger H. Newman; Lai Yeap Foo; Herbert Wong; Richard W. Hemingway

    1982-01-01

    Proanthocyanidin polymers have been shown to consist entirely of flavan-3-ol units by a combination of techniques including 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy. The 13C n.m.r. spectra of the polymers and related molecules are now considered in more detail. Prior to this study UC n.m.r. data has been published of procyanidins and...

  14. Nanoprobes, nanostructured materials and solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Houping

    2005-07-01

    Novel templates have been developed to prepare nanostructured porous materials through nonsurfactant templated pathway. And new applications of these materials, such as drug delivery and molecular imprinting, have been explored. The relationship between template content and pore structure has been investigated. The composition and pore structures were studied in detail using IR, TGA, SEM, TEM, BET and XRD. The obtained mesoporous materials have tunable diameters in the range of 2--12 nm. Due to the many advantages of this nonsurfactant templated pathway, such as environment friendly and biocompatibility, controlled release of antibiotics in the nanoporous materials were studied. The in vitro release properties were found to depend on the silica structures which were well tuned by varying the template content. A controlled long-term release pattern of vancomycin was achieved when the template content was 30 wt% or lower. Nanoscale electrochemical probes with dimensions as small as 50 nm in diameter and 1--2 mum in length were fabricated using electron beam deposition on the apex of conventional micron size electrodes. The electroactive region was limited to the extreme tip of the nanoprobe by coating with an insulating polymer and re-opening of the coating at the extreme tip. The novel nanoelectrodes thus prepared were employed to probe neurons in mouse brain slice and the results suggest that the nanoprobes were capable of recording neuronal excitatory postsynaptic potential signals. Interesting solid state chemistry was found in oxygenated iron phthalocyanine. Their Mossbauer spectra show the formation of four oxygenated species apart from the unoxygenated parent compound. The oxygen-bridged compounds formed in the solid matrix bear no resemblance to the one formed by solution chemistry. Tentative assignment of species has been made with the help of Mossbauer and IR spectroscopy. An effort to modify aniline trimer for potential nanoelectronics applications and to

  15. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  16. Solid state protein monolayers: Morphological, conformational, and functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Biasco, A.; Frascerra, V.; Calabi, F.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.; Verbeet, M. Ph.; de Waal, E.; Canters, G. W.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the morphological, conformational, and electron-transfer (ET) function of the metalloprotein azurin in the solid state, by a combination of physical investigation methods, namely atomic force microscopy, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. We demonstrate that a "solid state protein film" maintains its nativelike conformation and ET function, even after removal of the aqueous solvent.

  17. Advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of natural organic matter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solid-state NMR is essential for the characterization of natural organic matter (NOM) and is gaining importance in geosciences and environmental sciences. This review is intended to highlight advanced solid-state NMR techniques, especially the systematic approach to NOM characterization, and their ...

  18. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  19. Optofluidic devices with integrated solid-state nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Aaron R.; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    This review (with 90 refs.) covers the state of the art in optofluidic devices with integrated solid-state nanopores for use in detection and sensing. Following an introduction into principles of optofluidics and solid-state nanopore technology, we discuss features of solid-state nanopore based assays using optofluidics. This includes the incorporation of solid-state nanopores into optofluidic platforms based on liquid-core anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguides (ARROWs), methods for their fabrication, aspects of single particle detection and particle manipulation. We then describe the new functionalities provided by solid-state nanopores integrated into optofluidic chips, in particular acting as smart gates for correlated electro-optical detection and discrimination of nanoparticles. This enables the identification of viruses and λ-DNA, particle trajectory simulations, enhancing sensitivity by tuning the shape of nanopores. The review concludes with a summary and an outlook. PMID:27046940

  20. Sensitivity-enhanced IPAP experiments for measuring one-bond 13C '- 13C α and 13C α- 1H α residual dipolar couplings in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keyang; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2004-04-01

    Sensitivity-enhanced 2D IPAP experiments using the accordion principle for measuring one-bond 13C '- 13C α and 1H α- 13C α dipolar couplings in proteins are presented. The resolution of the resulting spectra is identical to that of the decoupled HSQC spectra and the sensitivity of the corresponding 1D acquisitions are only slightly lower than those obtained with 3D HNCO and 3D HN(COCA)HA pulse sequences due to an additional delay 2 Δ. For cases of limited resolution in the 2D 15N- 1H N HSQC spectrum the current pulse sequences can easily be modified into 3D versions by introducing a poorly digitized third dimension, if so desired. The experiments described here are a valuable addition to the suites available for determination of residual dipolar couplings in biological systems.

  1. Conformational analysis of capsaicin using 13C, 15N MAS NMR, GIAO DFT and GA calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siudem, Paweł; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Bukowicki, Jarosław

    2017-10-01

    Capsaicin produced by plants from genus Capsicum exerts multiple pharmacological effects and has found applications in food and pharmaceutical industry. The alkaloid was studied by a combined approach: solid-state NMR, GA conformational search and GIAO DFT methods. The 13C CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded using variable contact time and dipolar dephasing experiments. The results of cross-polarization (CP) kinetics, such as TCP values and long T1ρH (100-200 ms), indicated that the capsaicin molecule is fairly mobile, especially at the end of the aliphatic chain. The15N MAS NMR spectrum showed one narrow signal at -255 ppm. Genetic algorithm (GA) search with multi modal optimization was used to find low-energy conformations of capsaicin. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations were performed using different basis sets to characterize five selected conformations. 13C CPMAS NMR was used as a validation method and the experimental chemical shifts were compared with those calculated for selected stable conformers. Conformational analysis suggests that the side chain can be bent or extended. A comparison of the experimental and the calculated chemical shifts indicates that solid capsaicin does not have the same structure as those established by PWXRD.

  2. Metabolism of uniformly labeled 13C-eicosapentaenoic acid and 13C-arachidonic acid in young and old men.

    PubMed

    Léveillé, Pauline; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphaël; Windust, Anthony; Lawrence, Peter; Cunnane, Stephen C; Brenna, J Thomas; Plourde, Mélanie

    2017-08-01

    Background: Plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (AA) concentrations increase with age. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate EPA and AA metabolism in young and old men by using uniformly labeled carbon-13 ( 13 C) fatty acids. Design: Six young (∼25 y old) and 6 old (∼75 y old) healthy men were recruited. Each participant consumed a single oral dose of 35 mg 13 C-EPA and its metabolism was followed in the course of 14 d in the plasma and 28 d in the breath. After the washout period of ≥28 d, the same participants consumed a single oral dose of 50 mg 13 C-AA and its metabolism was followed for 28 d in plasma and breath. Results: There was a time × age interaction for 13 C-EPA ( P time × age = 0.008), and the shape of the postprandial curves was different between young and old men. The 13 C-EPA plasma half-life was ∼2 d for both young and old men ( P = 0.485). The percentage dose recovered of 13 C-EPA per hour as 13 CO 2 and the cumulative β-oxidation of 13 C-EPA did not differ between young and old men. At 7 d, however, old men had a >2.2-fold higher plasma 13 C-DHA concentration synthesized from 13 C-EPA compared with young men ( P age = 0.03). 13 C-AA metabolism was not different between young and old men. The 13 C-AA plasma half-life was ∼4.4 d in both young and old participants ( P = 0.589). Conclusions: The metabolism of 13 C-AA was not modified by age, whereas 13 C-EPA metabolism was slightly but significantly different in old compared with young men. The higher plasma 13 C-DHA seen in old men may be a result of slower plasma DHA clearance with age. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02957188. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-[13 C5 ] ribofuranosyl 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Zarkin, Allison K; Elkins, Phyllis D; Gilbert, Amanda; Jester, Teresa L; Seltzman, Herbert H

    2018-06-14

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-[ 13 C 5 ] ribofuranosyl 5'-monophosphate ([ 13 C 5 ribose] AICAR-PO 3 H 2 ) (6) has been synthesized from [ 13 C 5 ]adenosine. Incorporation of the mass-label into [ 13 C 5 ribose] AICAR-PO 3 H 2 provides a useful standard to aid in metabolite identification and quantification in monitoring metabolic pathways. A synthetic route to the 13 C-labeled compound has not been previously reported. Our method employs a hybrid enzymatic and chemical synthesis approach that applies an enzymatic conversion from adenosine to inosine followed by a ring-cleavage of the protected inosine. A direct phosphorylation of the resulting 2',3'-isopropylidine acadesine (5) was developed to yield the title compound in 99% purity following ion exchange chromatography. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploiting the Synergy of Powder X-ray Diffraction and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy in Structure Determination of Organic Molecular Solids.

    PubMed

    Dudenko, Dmytro V; Williams, P Andrew; Hughes, Colan E; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Velaga, Sitaram P; Brown, Steven P; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2013-06-13

    We report a strategy for structure determination of organic materials in which complete solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data is utilized within the context of structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Following determination of the crystal structure from powder XRD data, first-principles density functional theory-based techniques within the GIPAW approach are exploited to calculate the solid-state NMR data for the structure, followed by careful scrutiny of the agreement with experimental solid-state NMR data. The successful application of this approach is demonstrated by structure determination of the 1:1 cocrystal of indomethacin and nicotinamide. The 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts calculated for the crystal structure determined from the powder XRD data are in excellent agreement with those measured experimentally, notably including the two-dimensional correlation of 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts for directly bonded 13 C- 1 H moieties. The key feature of this combined approach is that the quality of the structure determined is assessed both against experimental powder XRD data and against experimental solid-state NMR data, thus providing a very robust validation of the veracity of the structure.

  5. Geochemical Approach to Archaeal Ecology: δ13C of GDGTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtin, S.; Warren, C.; Pearson, A.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have increasingly been used to reconstruct environmental temperatures; proxies like TEX86 that correlate the relative abundance of these archaeal cell membrane lipids to sea surface temperature are omnipresent in paleoclimatology literature. While it has become common to make claims about past temperatures using GDGTs, our present understanding of the organisms that synthesize the compounds is still quite limited. The generally accepted theory states that microorganisms like the Thaumarchaeota modify the structure of membrane lipids to increase intermolecular interactions, strengthening the membrane at higher temperatures. Yet to date, culture experiments have been largely restricted to a single species, Nitrosopumilus maritimes, and recent studies on oceanic archaeal rRNA have revealed that these biomarkers are produced in diverse, heterogeneous, and site-specific communities. This brings up questions as to whether different subclasses of GDGTs, and all subsequent proxies, represent adaptation within a single organismal group or a shift in community composition. To investigate whether GDGTs with different chain structures, from the simple isoprenoidal GDGT-0 to Crenarchaeol with its many cyclopentane groups, are sourced from archaea with similar or disparate metabolic pathways—and if that information is inherited in GDGTs trapped in marine sediments—this study examines the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of GDGTs extracted from the uppermost meters of sediment in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, using spooling-wire microcombustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (SWiM-IRMS), tackling a fundamental assumption of the TEX86 proxy that influences the way we perceive the veracity of existing temperature records.

  6. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Monica; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. 1H fast MAS NMR and 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the 13C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles. PMID:28228859

  7. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. 1 H fast MAS NMR and 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the 13 C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles.

  8. Solid-state NMR reveals differential carbohydrate utilization in diapausing Culex pipiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, James; Singh, Jugeshwar; Kim, Sungshil; Hockaday, William C.; Sim, Cheolho; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-11-01

    Culex pipiens is the mosquito that vectors West Nile Virus and other human-pathogenic flavivruses in North America. In response to shortened day length and lower temperatures, female Cx. pipiense prepares for the diapause by actively feeding on carbohydrates to increase the biosynthesis of glycogen and lipid to store energy for overwintering. The effect of feeding different carbohydrates on glycogen and lipid biosynthesis in diapausing mosquitoes was investigated in vivo using 13C solid-state NMR. Diapause-destined adult females and nondiapausing counterparts after adult eclosion were fed with three different carbohydrate sources for 7 days: 1) 10% sucrose, 2) 10% D-[13C6]glucose, and 3) 1% D-[13C6]glucose co-provisioned with 10% sucrose. NMR measurements show that sucrose and glucose are metabolized differently in diapausing mosquitoes. Mosquitoes fed on sucrose primarily accumulate glycogen with increased branching structures, but less of lipids. In contrast, mosquitoes fed exclusively on glucose show accumulation of both glycogen and lipid with increased aliphatic chain length. Glucose is exclusively metabolized for the biosynthesis of triacylglyceride when mosquitoes were co-fed with sucrose. Our findings provide novel insights into the insect carbohydrate metabolism that governs glycogen and lipid biosynthesis during diapause, which is fundamental for the insect survival during inimical environments.

  9. Solid State Joining of Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Todd W.

    Solid state joining of titanium via friction stir welding and diffusion bonding have emerged as enablers of efficient monolithic structural designs by the eliminations fasteners for the aerospace industry. As design complexity and service demands increase, the need for joints of dissimilar alloys has emerged. Complex thermomechanical conditions in friction stir weld joints and high temperature deformation behavior differences between alloys used in dissimilar joints gives rise to a highly variable flow pattern within a stir zone. Experiments performed welding Ti-6Al-4V to beta21S show that mechanical intermixing of the two alloys is the primary mechanism for the generation of the localized chemistry and microstructure, the magnitude of which can be directly related to pin rotation and travel speed weld parameters. Mechanical mixing of the two alloys is heavily influenced by strain rate softening phenomena, and can be used to manipulate weld nugget structure by switching which alloy is subjected to the advancing side of the pin. Turbulent mixing of a weld nugget and a significant reduction in defects and weld forces are observed when the beta21S is put on the advancing side of the weld where higher strain rates are present. Chemical diffusion driven by the heat of weld parameters is characterized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and is shown to be a secondary process responsible for generating short-range chemical gradients that lead to a gradient of alpha particle structures. Diffusion calculations are inconsistent with an assumption of steady-state diffusion and show that material interfaces in the weld nugget evolve through the break-down of turbulent interface features generated by material flows. A high degree of recrystallization is seen throughout the welds, with unique, hybrid chemistry grains that are generated at material interfaces in the weld nugget that help to unify the crystal structure of dissimilar alloys. The degree of

  10. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR.

  11. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with 13C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled 13C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhu; Yang, Rui; Yang, Wenning; Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan

    2014-12-10

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C value). However, (13)C labeled standards can be used to control the δ(13)C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the (13)C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ(13)C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different (13)C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-(13)C labeled standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Constraining 3-PG with a new δ13C submodel: a test using the δ13C of tree rings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liang; Marshall, John D; Link, Timothy E; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; DU, Enhao; Pangle, Robert E; Gag, Peter J; Ubierna, Nerea

    2014-01-01

    A semi-mechanistic forest growth model, 3-PG (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth), was extended to calculate δ(13)C in tree rings. The δ(13)C estimates were based on the model's existing description of carbon assimilation and canopy conductance. The model was tested in two ~80-year-old natural stands of Abies grandis (grand fir) in northern Idaho. We used as many independent measurements as possible to parameterize the model. Measured parameters included quantum yield, specific leaf area, soil water content and litterfall rate. Predictions were compared with measurements of transpiration by sap flux, stem biomass, tree diameter growth, leaf area index and δ(13)C. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model's predictions of δ(13)C were sensitive to key parameters controlling carbon assimilation and canopy conductance, which would have allowed it to fail had the model been parameterized or programmed incorrectly. Instead, the simulated δ(13)C of tree rings was no different from measurements (P > 0.05). The δ(13)C submodel provides a convenient means of constraining parameter space and avoiding model artefacts. This δ(13)C test may be applied to any forest growth model that includes realistic simulations of carbon assimilation and transpiration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    as a biomarker of tumor aggressiveness in a MR compatible 3D cell and tissue culture bioreactor ” to be presented at the ISMRM Workshop on Magnetic... Cell Carcinoma, Hyperpolarized 13C MR, Sub-renal capsule, patient derived tissue slice cultures , bioreactor 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: Aim...grade from high grade RCCs using human TSCs cultured in a bioreactor . Aim 2:Identify HP 13C metabolic markers that discriminate low grade from

  14. Field measurements of del13C in ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, Hella; Sabbatini, Simone; Nicolini, Giacomo; Warneke, Thorsten; Papale, Dario; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon isotope del13C-measurements are extensively used to study ecological and biogeochemical processes in ecosystems. Above terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric del13C can vary largely due to photosynthetic fractionation. Photosynthetic processes prefer the uptake of the lighter isotope 12C (in CO2), thereby enriching the atmosphere in 13C and depleting the ecosystem carbon. At night, when ecosystem respiratory fluxes are dominant, 13C-depleted CO2 is respired and thereby depletes the atmospheric del13C-content. Different ecosystems and different parts of one ecosystem (type of plant, leaves, and roots) fractionate and respire with a different del13C-ratio signature. By determining the del13C-signature of ecosystem respiration in temporal and spatial scale, an analysis can be made of the composition of respiratory sources of the ecosystem. A field study at a dry cropland after harvest (province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy) was performed in the summer of 2013. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure CO2-, CH4-, N2O-, CO- and del13C-concentrations. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurements systems: a Flux Gradient system (sampling every half hour at 1.3m and 4.2m) and 2 flux chambers (measured every hour), providing a continuous data set of the biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes and of the gas concentrations at different heights. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the Flux Gradient system at night, were determined to be between -25‰ and -20‰. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the flux chamber system, varied between -24‰ and -29‰, and showed a clear diurnal pattern, suggesting different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night.

  15. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the Galileo Orbiter spacecraft utilizes a high-resolution (1500 mm focal length) television camera with an 800 ?? 800 pixel virtual-phase, charge-coupled detector. It is designed to return images of Jupiter and its satellites that are characterized by a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolution, geometric fiedelity, and spectral range unmatched by imaging data obtained previously. The spectral range extends from approximately 375 to 1100 nm and only in the near ultra-violet region (??? 350 nm) is the spectral coverage reduced from previous missions. The camera is approximately 100 times more sensitive than those used in the Voyager mission, and, because of the nature of the satellite encounters, will produce images with approximately 100 times the ground resolution (i.e., ??? 50 m lp-1) on the Galilean satellites. We describe aspects of the detector including its sensitivity to energetic particle radiation and how the requirements for a large full-well capacity and long-term stability in operating voltages led to the choice of the virtual phase chip. The F/8.5 camera system can reach point sources of V(mag) ??? 11 with S/N ??? 10 and extended sources with surface brightness as low as 20 kR in its highest gain state and longest exposure mode. We describe the performance of the system as determined by ground calibration and the improvements that have been made to the telescope (same basic catadioptric design that was used in Mariner 10 and the Voyager high-resolution cameras) to reduce the scattered light reaching the detector. The images are linearly digitized 8-bits deep and, after flat-fielding, are cosmetically clean. Information 'preserving' and 'non-preserving' on-board data compression capabilities are outlined. A special "summation" mode, designed for use deep in the Jovian radiation belts, near Io, is also described. The detector is 'preflashed' before each exposure to ensure the photometric linearity

  16. 13C NMR and isotopic (δ13C) investigations on modern vegetation samples: a tool to understand the soil organic matter degradation dynamics and preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Subhadeep; Sanyal, Prasanta; Vardhan Gaur, Harsh

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon, one of the largest reservoirs of carbon, is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds with dominant contribution derived from decomposition of plants in various stages. Although general ideas about the processes and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) degradation have been developed, a very few study has linked the SOM with its parent material. In this study we aim to generate reference data set of functional groups from modern vegetation samples (C3 and C4plants) to better understand the degradation dynamics and preferences. The carbon functional groups from modern vegetation samples (eight C3 and nine C4 plants collected from Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India) were examined by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, isotopic investigations (δ13C) has also been carried out on the modern vegetation samples to understand the relationship of bulk isotopic values to the concentration of functional groups. The major functional groups (alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone) of modern vegetation samples form 16%, 65%, 5%, 14% and 1% respectively in C3 plants. Considerable differences has been observed for C4 plants with average values of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone are 8%, 83%, 3%, 5% and 1% respectively. The concentration of functional groups from the modern vegetational samples can be considered as reference scale to compare with the 13C NMR data derived from the different soil horizons to understand the SOM degradation dynamics. The δ13CV PDB values of modern vegetation samples plotted against the individual concentration of functional groups shows significant correlation in C4 plants, whereas a lack in correlation has been observed for C3 plants. We assume this difference in relationship of δ13CV PDB values with functional groups of C3 and C4plants can be due to the differences in photosynthesis pathways, the fractionation of CO2 and accumulation of the products

  17. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) solid-state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A low loss power-combining microstrip antenna suitable for solid state solar power satellite (SPS) application was developed. A unique approach for performing both the combining and radiating function in a single cavity-type circuit was verified, representing substantial refinements over previous demonstration models in terms of detailed geometry to obtain good matching and adequate bandwidth at the design frequency. The combiner circuit was designed, built, and tested and the overall results support the view that the solid state power-combining antenna approach is a viable candidate for a solid state SPS antenna building block.

  18. Solid-state optical refrigeration to sub-100 Kelvin regime

    PubMed Central

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Albrecht, Alexander R.; Hehlen, Markus P.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Since the first demonstration of net cooling twenty years ago, optical refrigeration of solids has progressed to outperform all other solid-state cooling processes. It has become the first and only solid-state refrigerator capable of reaching cryogenic temperatures, and now the first solid-state cooling below 100 K. Such substantial progress required a multi-disciplinary approach of pump laser absorption enhancement, material characterization and purification, and thermal management. Here we present the culmination of two decades of progress, the record cooling to ≈ 91 K from room temperature. PMID:26847703

  19. A survey of current solid state star tracker technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Staley, D. A.

    1985-12-01

    This paper is a survey of the current state of the art in design of star trackers for spacecraft attitude determination systems. Specific areas discussed are sensor technology, including the current state-of-the-art solid state sensors and techniques of mounting and cooling the sensor, analog image preprocessing electronics performance, and digital processing hardware and software. Three examples of area array solid state star tracker development are presented - ASTROS, developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Retroreflector Field Tracker (RFT) by Ball Aerospace, and TRW's MADAN. Finally, a discussion of solid state line arrays explores the possibilities for one-dimensional imagers which offer simplified scan control electronics.

  20. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  1. Solid-state optical refrigeration to sub-100 Kelvin regime

    SciTech Connect

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Albrecht, Alexander R.; Hehlen, Markus P.

    We report that since the first demonstration of net cooling twenty years ago, optical refrigeration of solids has progressed to outperform all other solid-state cooling processes. It has become the first and only solid-state refrigerator capable of reaching cryogenic temperatures, and now the first solid-state cooling below 100 K. Such substantial progress required a multi-disciplinary approach of pump laser absorption enhancement, material characterization and purification, and thermal management. Here we present the culmination of two decades of progress, the record cooling to ≈91K from room temperature.

  2. Solid-state optical refrigeration to sub-100 Kelvin regime

    DOE PAGES

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Albrecht, Alexander R.; Hehlen, Markus P.; ...

    2016-02-05

    We report that since the first demonstration of net cooling twenty years ago, optical refrigeration of solids has progressed to outperform all other solid-state cooling processes. It has become the first and only solid-state refrigerator capable of reaching cryogenic temperatures, and now the first solid-state cooling below 100 K. Such substantial progress required a multi-disciplinary approach of pump laser absorption enhancement, material characterization and purification, and thermal management. Here we present the culmination of two decades of progress, the record cooling to ≈91K from room temperature.

  3. Hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]Glucose reports on glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway activity in EL4 tumors and glycolytic activity in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Timm, Kerstin N; Hartl, Johannes; Keller, Markus A; Hu, De-En; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Ralser, Markus; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-12-01

    A resonance at ∼181 ppm in the (13) C spectra of tumors injected with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose was assigned to 6-phosphogluconate (6PG), as in previous studies in yeast, whereas in breast cancer cells in vitro this resonance was assigned to 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG). These peak assignments were investigated here using measurements of 6PG and 3PG (13) C-labeling using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice were injected with (13) C6 glucose and the (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG concentrations measured. (13) C MR spectra of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (zwf1Δ) and wild-type yeast were acquired following addition of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose and again (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG were measured by LC-MS/MS RESULTS: Tumor (13) C-6PG was more abundant than (13) C-2PG/3PG and the resonance at ∼181 ppm matched more closely that of 6PG. (13) C MR spectra of wild-type and zwf1Δ yeast cells showed a resonance at ∼181 ppm after labeling with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose, however, there was no 6PG in zwf1Δ cells. In the wild-type cells 3PG was approximately four-fold more abundant than 6PG CONCLUSION: The resonance at ∼181 ppm in (13) C MR spectra following injection of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose originates predominantly from 6PG in EL4 tumors and 3PG in yeast cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cellulose accessibility and microbial community in solid state anaerobic digestion of rape straw.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang-Hao; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Bureau, Chrystelle; Peu, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion (SSAD) with leachate recirculation is an appropriate method for the valorization of agriculture residues. Rape straw is a massively produced residue with considerable biochemical methane potential, but its degradation in SSAD remains poorly understood. A thorough study was conducted to understand the performance of rape straw as feedstock for laboratory solid state anaerobic digesters. We investigated the methane production kinetics of rape straw in relation to cellulose accessibility to cellulase and the microbial community. Improving cellulose accessibility through milling had a positive influence on both the methane production rate and methane yield. The SSAD of rape straw reached 60% of its BMP in a 40-day pilot-scale test. Distinct bacterial communities were observed in digested rape straw and leachate, with Bacteroidales and Sphingobacteriales as the most abundant orders, respectively. Archaeal populations showed no phase preference and increased chronologically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 13C-18O isotope signatures and ‘clumped isotope’ thermometry in foraminifera and coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Eagle, Robert A.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Bauch, Henning; Halloran, Paul R.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-10-01

    Accurate constraints on past ocean temperatures and compositions are critical for documenting climate change and resolving its causes. Most proxies for temperature are not thermodynamically based, appear to be subject to biological processes, require regional calibrations, and/or are influenced by fluid composition. As a result, their interpretation becomes uncertain when they are applied in settings not necessarily resembling those in which they were empirically calibrated. Independent proxies for past temperature could provide an important means of testing and/or expanding on existing reconstructions. Here we report measurements of abundances of stable isotopologues of calcitic and aragonitic benthic and planktic foraminifera and coccoliths, relate those abundances to independently estimated growth temperatures, and discuss the possible scope of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. The proportions of 13C- 18O bonds in these samples exhibits a temperature dependence that is generally similar to that previously been reported for inorganic calcite and other biologically precipitated carbonate-containing minerals (apatite from fish, reptile, and mammal teeth; calcitic brachiopods and molluscs; aragonitic coral and mollusks). Most species that exhibit non-equilibrium 18O/ 16O (δ 18O) and 13C/ 12C (δ 13C) ratios are characterized by 13C- 18O bond abundances that are similar to inorganic calcite and are generally indistinguishable from apparent equilibrium, with possible exceptions among benthic foraminiferal samples from the Arctic Ocean where temperatures are near-freezing. Observed isotope ratios in biogenic carbonates can be explained if carbonate minerals generally preserve a state of ordering that reflects the extent of isotopic equilibration of the dissolved inorganic carbon species.

  6. Measurement of starch digestion of naturally 13C-enriched weaning foods, before and after partial digestion with amylase-rich flour, using a 13C breath test.

    PubMed

    Weaver, L T; Dibba, B; Sonko, B; Bohane, T D; Hoare, S

    1995-10-01

    Malnutrition in infancy is a global problem which leads to retardation of childhood growth and development. There is a pressing need to improve weaning strategies for infants of the developing world. Traditional Gambian weaning foods are watery and of low energy density, but addition of energy in the form of fat and carbohydrate leads to thick, viscous gruels which are difficult to ingest. Partial digestion with amylase (EC 3.2.1.1)-rich flour reduces their viscosity while retaining their energy density. The aim of the present study was to measure the digestibility of a maize-based weaning food, before and after amylase digestion, in malnourished children using a 13C breath test. Ten children (aged 7-16 months; mean weight-for-age Z score -0.8) received isovolumetric and isoenergetic quantities of a maize-based weaning food naturally abundant with 13C. Breath samples were collected at intervals of 30 min for 5 h thereafter and 13CO2 enrichment was measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Percentage dose of 13C recovered increased from a mean 13.7 (SD 3.7)% before, to 18.3 (SD 5.6)% after ingestion of amylase-treated weaning foods (P < 0.1). There was a significant inverse relation between age and weight, and percentage dose of 13C recovered in children receiving amylase-treated feeds. There were no differences in concentrations of amylase in saliva of infants or breast milk of their mothers. Partial digestion of supplementary foods may improve the nutrition of undernourished weaning children, not only by reducing their viscosity, thereby increasing ingestion, but also by improving their digestion and thereby their absorption.

  7. Using liquid and solid state NMR and photoluminescence to study the synthesis and solubility properties of amine capped silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, J R; Harley, S J; Carter, R S; Power, P P; Augustine, M P

    2007-08-01

    Water soluble silicon nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of bromine terminated silicon nanoparticles with 3-(dimethylamino)propyl lithium and characterized with liquid and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. The surface site dependent 29Si chemical shifts and the nuclear spin relaxation rates from an assortment of 1H-29Si heteronuclear solid state NMR experiments for the amine coated reaction product are consistent with both the 1H and 13C liquid state NMR results and routine transmission electron microscopy, ultra-violet/visible, and Fourier transform infrared measurements. PL was used to demonstrate the pH dependent solubility properties of the amine passivated silicon nanoparticles.

  8. Compressed Sensing for Resolution Enhancement of Hyperpolarized 13C Flyback 3D-MRSI

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Chen, Albert P.; Crane, Jason; Kerr, Adam; Kelley, Douglas A.C.; Hurd, Ralph; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    High polarization of nuclear spins in liquid state through dynamic nuclear polarization has enabled the direct monitoring of 13C metabolites in vivo at very high signal to noise, allowing for rapid assessment of tissue metabolism. The abundant SNR afforded by this hyperpolarization technique makes high resolution 13C 3D-MRSI feasible. However, the number of phase encodes that can be fit into the short acquisition time for hyperpolarized imaging limits spatial coverage and resolution. To take advantage of the high SNR available from hyperpolarization, we have applied compressed sensing to achieve a factor of 2 enhancement in spatial resolution without increasing acquisition time or decreasing coverage. In this paper, the design and testing of compressed sensing suited for a flyback 13C 3D-MRSI sequence are presented. The key to this design was the undersampling of spectral k-space using a novel blipped scheme, thus taking advantage of the considerable sparsity in typical hyperpolarized 13C spectra. Phantom tests validated the accuracy of the compressed sensing approach and initial mouse experiments demonstrated in vivo feasibility. PMID:18367420

  9. 13C and (15)N chemical shift tensors in adenosine, guanosine dihydrate, 2'-deoxythymidine, and cytidine.

    PubMed

    Stueber, Dirk; Grant, David M

    2002-09-04

    The (13)C and (15)N chemical shift tensor principal values for adenosine, guanosine dihydrate, 2'-deoxythymidine, and cytidine are measured on natural abundance samples. Additionally, the (13)C and (15)N chemical shielding tensor principal values in these four nucleosides are calculated utilizing various theoretical approaches. Embedded ion method (EIM) calculations improve significantly the precision with which the experimental principal values are reproduced over calculations on the corresponding isolated molecules with proton-optimized geometries. The (13)C and (15)N chemical shift tensor orientations are reliably assigned in the molecular frames of the nucleosides based upon chemical shielding tensor calculations employing the EIM. The differences between principal values obtained in EIM calculations and in calculations on isolated molecules with proton positions optimized inside a point charge array are used to estimate the contributions to chemical shielding arising from intermolecular interactions. Moreover, the (13)C and (15)N chemical shift tensor orientations and principal values correlate with the molecular structure and the crystallographic environment for the nucleosides and agree with data obtained previously for related compounds. The effects of variations in certain EIM parameters on the accuracy of the shielding tensor calculations are investigated.

  10. Solid-State Powered X-band Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Mohamed A.K.; Nann, Emilio A.; Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2017-03-06

    In this report we disseminate the hot test results of an X-band 100-W solid state amplifier chain for linear accelerator (linac) applications. Solid state power amplifiers have become increasingly attractive solutions for achieving high power in radar and maritime applications. Here the performance of solid state amplifiers when driving an RF cavity is investigated. Commercially available, matched and fully-packaged GaN on SiC HEMTs are utilized, comprising a wideband driver stage and two power stages. The amplifier chain has a high poweradded- efficiency and is able to supply up to ~1.2 MV/m field gradient at 9.2 GHz in a simple testmore » cavity, with a peak power exceeding 100 W. These findings set forth the enabling technology for solid-state powered linacs.« less

  11. Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

  12. A hybrid electromechanical solid state switch for ac power control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Bidirectional thyristor coupled to a series of actuator driven electromechanical contacts generates hybrid electromechanical solid state switch for ac power control. Device is useful in power control applications where zero crossover switching is required.

  13. Solid state technology: A compilation. [on semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A compilation, covering selected solid state devices developed and integrated into systems by NASA to improve performance, is presented. Data are also given on device shielding in hostile radiation environments.

  14. Solid-state Bonding of Superplastic Aluminum Alloy 7475 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, T. D. S.; Vastava, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental works were carried out to study the feasibility of solid state bonding of superplastic aluminum 7475 sheet. Amount of deformation, bonding time, surface cleaning method and intermediate layer were the process parameters investigated. Other parameters, held constant by the superplastic forming condition which is required to obtain a concurrent solid state bonding, are bonding temperature, bonding pressure and atmosphere. Bond integrity was evaluated through metallographic examination, X-ray line scan analysis, SEM fractographic analysis and lap shear tests. The early results of the development program indicated that sound solid state bonding was accomplished for this high strength 7475 alloy with significant amounts of deformation. A thin intermediate layer of the soft 5052 aluminum alloy aided in achieving a solid state bonding by reducing the required amount of plastic deformation at the interface. Bond strength was substantially increased by a post bond heat treatment.

  15. Multiband Spectral-Spatial RF Excitation for Hyperpolarized [2-13C]Dihydroxyacetone 13C-MR Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Cao, Peng; von Morze, Cornelius; Merrit, Matthew; Moreno, Karlos X; Chang, Gene-Yuan; Ohliger, Michael A.; Pearce, David; Kurhanewicz, John; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a specialized multislice, single-acquisition approach to detect the metabolites of hyperpolarized [2-13C]dihydroxyacetone (DHAc) to probe gluconeogenesis in vivo, which have a broad 144 ppm spectral range (~4.6 KHz at 3T). A novel multiband RF excitation pulse was designed for independent flip angle control over 5-6 spectral-spatial (SPSP) excitation bands, each corrected for chemical shift misregistration effects. Methods Specialized multi-band SPSP RF pulses were designed, tested and applied to investigate hyperpolarized [2-13C]DHAc metabolism in kidney and liver of fasted rats with dynamic 13C-MRS and an optimal flip angle scheme. For comparison, experiments were also performed with narrow-band slice-selective RF pulses and a sequential change of the frequency offset to cover the five frequency bands of interest. Results The SPSP pulses provided a controllable spectral profile free of baseline distortion with improved signal to noise of the metabolite peaks, allowing for quantification of the metabolic products. We observed organ-specific differences in DHAc metabolism. There was 2-5 times more [2-13C]phosphoenolpyruvate and about 19 times more [2-13C]glycerol 3-phosphate in the liver than in the kidney. Conclusion A multiband SPSP RF pulse covering a spectral range over 144 ppm enabled in vivo characterization of HP [2-13C]dihydroxyacetone metabolism in rat liver and kidney. PMID:27017966

  16. Modification and intercalation of layered zirconium phosphates: a solid-state NMR monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bakhmutov, Vladimir I; Kan, Yuwei; Sheikh, Javeed Ahmad; González-Villegas, Julissa; Colón, Jorge L; Clearfield, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    Several layered zirconium phosphates treated with Zr(IV) ions, modified by monomethoxy-polyethyleneglycol-monophosphate and intercalated with doxorubicin hydrochloride have been studied by solid-state MAS NMR techniques. The organic components of the phosphates have been characterized by the 13 C{ 1 H} CP MAS NMR spectra compared with those of initial compounds. The multinuclear NMR monitoring has provided to establish structure and covalent attachment of organic/inorganic moieties to the surface and interlayer spaces of the phosphates. The MAS NMR experiments including kinetics of proton-phosphorus cross polarization have resulted in an unusual structure of zirconium phosphate 6 combining decoration of the phosphate surface by polymer units and their partial intercalation into the interlayer space. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Folding of xylan onto cellulose fibrils in plant cell walls revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Thomas J.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Bernardinelli, Oigres D.; Pöppler, Ann-Christin; Brown, Steven P.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Dupree, Ray; Dupree, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Exploitation of plant lignocellulosic biomass is hampered by our ignorance of the molecular basis for its properties such as strength and digestibility. Xylan, the most prevalent non-cellulosic polysaccharide, binds to cellulose microfibrils. The nature of this interaction remains unclear, despite its importance. Here we show that the majority of xylan, which forms a threefold helical screw in solution, flattens into a twofold helical screw ribbon to bind intimately to cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. 13C solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, supported by in silico predictions of chemical shifts, shows both two- and threefold screw xylan conformations are present in fresh Arabidopsis stems. The twofold screw xylan is spatially close to cellulose, and has similar rigidity to the cellulose microfibrils, but reverts to the threefold screw conformation in the cellulose-deficient irx3 mutant. The discovery that induced polysaccharide conformation underlies cell wall assembly provides new principles to understand biomass properties.

  18. Folding of xylan onto cellulose fibrils in plant cell walls revealed by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Thomas J; Mortimer, Jenny C; Bernardinelli, Oigres D; Pöppler, Ann-Christin; Brown, Steven P; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Dupree, Ray; Dupree, Paul

    2016-12-21

    Exploitation of plant lignocellulosic biomass is hampered by our ignorance of the molecular basis for its properties such as strength and digestibility. Xylan, the most prevalent non-cellulosic polysaccharide, binds to cellulose microfibrils. The nature of this interaction remains unclear, despite its importance. Here we show that the majority of xylan, which forms a threefold helical screw in solution, flattens into a twofold helical screw ribbon to bind intimately to cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. 13 C solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, supported by in silico predictions of chemical shifts, shows both two- and threefold screw xylan conformations are present in fresh Arabidopsis stems. The twofold screw xylan is spatially close to cellulose, and has similar rigidity to the cellulose microfibrils, but reverts to the threefold screw conformation in the cellulose-deficient irx3 mutant. The discovery that induced polysaccharide conformation underlies cell wall assembly provides new principles to understand biomass properties.

  19. Solid-state X-band Combiner Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitzalis, O., Jr.; Russell, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of developing solid-state amplifiers at 4 and 10 GHz for application in spacecraft altimeters was studied. Bipolar-transistor, field-effect-transistor, and Impatt-diode amplifier designs based on 1980 solid-state technology are investigated. Several output power levels of the pulsed, low-duty-factor amplifiers are considered at each frequency. Proposed transistor and diode amplifier designs are illustrated in block diagrams. Projections of size, weight, and primary power requirements are given for each design.

  20. Solid-state resistor for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus, Brian; Savage, Mark E.; Hutsel, Brian Thomas

    2016-12-06

    A flexible solid-state resistor comprises a string of ceramic resistors that can be used to charge the capacitors of a linear transformer driver (LTD) used in a pulsed power machine. The solid-state resistor is able to absorb the energy of a switch prefire, thereby limiting LTD cavity damage, yet has a sufficiently low RC charge time to allow the capacitor to be recharged without disrupting the operation of the pulsed power machine.

  1. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  2. Time averaging of NMR chemical shifts in the MLF peptide in the solid state.

    PubMed

    De Gortari, Itzam; Portella, Guillem; Salvatella, Xavier; Bajaj, Vikram S; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Yates, Jonathan R; Segall, Matthew D; Pickard, Chris J; Payne, Mike C; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-05

    Since experimental measurements of NMR chemical shifts provide time and ensemble averaged values, we investigated how these effects should be included when chemical shifts are computed using density functional theory (DFT). We measured the chemical shifts of the N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-OMe (MLF) peptide in the solid state, and then used the X-ray structure to calculate the (13)C chemical shifts using the gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) method, which accounts for the periodic nature of the crystal structure, obtaining an overall accuracy of 4.2 ppm. In order to understand the origin of the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, we carried out first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the molecular motion of the MLF peptide on the picosecond time scale. We found that (13)C chemical shifts experience very rapid fluctuations of more than 20 ppm that are averaged out over less than 200 fs. Taking account of these fluctuations in the calculation of the chemical shifts resulted in an accuracy of 3.3 ppm. To investigate the effects of averaging over longer time scales we sampled the rotameric states populated by the MLF peptides in the solid state by performing a total of 5 micros classical molecular dynamics simulations. By averaging the chemical shifts over these rotameric states, we increased the accuracy of the chemical shift calculations to 3.0 ppm, with less than 1 ppm error in 10 out of 22 cases. These results suggests that better DFT-based predictions of chemical shifts of peptides and proteins will be achieved by developing improved computational strategies capable of taking into account the averaging process up to the millisecond time scale on which the chemical shift measurements report.

  3. Solid-state NMR characterization of copolymers of nylon 11 and nylon 12.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C G; Mathias, L J

    1997-05-01

    Solid-state 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy, in conjunction with differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, were used to characterize a series of nylon 11 and 12 copolymers with mole percentages of nylon 12 monomer of 0, 15, 35, 50, 65, 85, and 100%. Monotonic melting point (Tm) and heat of fusion depressions were observed for the copolymer series with the 65 mol% nylon 12 copolymer having the lowest apparent crystallinity and Tm at 148 degrees C. Solid-state 15N NMR spectra showed a smooth shift of the main peak position for the as-prepared copolymers from 84 ppm for the alpha-form of pure nylon 11 to 89 ppm for the gamma-form of pure nylon 12. Similar behavior was seen for FTIR amide V and VI modes which are also sensitive to the alpha- and gamma-crystal forms. 13C NMR T1 measurements showed that the overall most mobile sample was the 65:35 copolymer. The amide group of the 1:1 copolymer was labelled using 15N-labelled amino acids available through the Gabriel synthesis; an annealed, solution-cast film of this sample showed a T1N value of 349 s, similar to values seen for annealed nylon 11 and nylon 12 homopolymers. The WAXS pattern for the 65 mol% nylon 12 sample showed a sharp peak at 2 theta = 21.3, overlapping a broad peak centered at 2 theta = 21.0. These are consistent with the values seen for gamma-form nylon 12. The 1:1 copolymer (15N labelled) was shown to be polymorphic, like the homopolymers after specific treatments, with a gamma-like phase formed upon solvent casting, and an alpha-like phase dominating for as-polymerized material and precipitated flakes.

  4. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan; Skibsted, Jørgen, E-mail: jskib@chem.au.dk

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrousmore » and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.« less

  5. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  7. Segmental isotopic labeling of HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies for solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sebanti; Tycko, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies of noncrystalline HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) assemblies by our laboratory and by Polenova and coworkers (Protein Sci 19:716-730, 2010; J Mol Biol 426:1109-1127, 2014; J Biol Chem 291:13098-13112, 2016; J Am Chem Soc 138:8538-8546, 2016; J Am Chem Soc 138:12029-12032, 2016; J Am Chem Soc 134:6455-6466, 2012; J Am Chem Soc 132:1976-1987, 2010; J Am Chem Soc 135:17793-17803, 2013; Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112:14617-14622, 2015; J Am Chem Soc 138:14066-14075, 2016) have established the capability of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to provide site-specific structural and dynamical information that is not available from other types of measurements. Nonetheless, the relatively high molecular weight of HIV-1 CA leads to congestion of solid state NMR spectra of fully isotopically labeled assemblies that has been an impediment to further progress. Here we describe an efficient protocol for production of segmentally labeled HIV-1 CA samples in which either the N-terminal domain (NTD) or the C-terminal domain (CTD) is uniformly 15 N, 13 C-labeled. Segmental labeling is achieved by trans-splicing, using the DnaE split intein. Comparisons of two-dimensional solid state NMR spectra of fully labeled and segmentally labeled tubular CA assemblies show substantial improvements in spectral resolution. The molecular structure of HIV-1 assemblies is not significantly perturbed by the single Ser-to-Cys substitution that we introduce between NTD and CTD segments, as required for trans-splicing.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Solid-State Homonuclear Correlation Spectra of Antiparallel β-Sheet Alanine Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Naito, Akira; Okushita, Keiko; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Boutis, Gregory S; Aoki, Akihiro; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2018-03-15

    Poly-l-alanine (PLA) sequences are a key element in the structure of the crystalline domains of spider dragline silks, wild silkworm silks, antifreeze proteins, and amyloids. To date, no atomic-level structures of antiparallel (AP)-PLA longer than Ala 4 have been reported using the single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In this work, dipolar-assisted rotational resonance solid-state NMR spectra were observed to determine the effective internuclear distances of 13 C uniformly labeled alanine tetramer with antiparallel (AP) β-sheet structure whose atomic coordinates are determined from the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Initial build-up rates, R j, k , were obtained from the build-up curves of the cross peaks by considering the internuclear distances arising in the master equation. Subsequently, experimentally obtained effective internuclear distances, r eff j, k (obs), were compared with the calculated r eff j, k (calc) values obtained from the X-ray crystallographic data. Fairly good correlation between r eff j, k (obs) and r eff j, k (calc) was obtained in the range of 1.0-6.0 Å, with the standard deviation of 0.244 Å, without considering the zero-quantum line-shape functions. It was further noted that the internuclear distances of intermolecular contributions provide details relating to the molecular packing in solid-state samples. Thus, the present data agree well with AP-β-sheet packing but do not agree with P-β-sheet packing.

  9. Solid-state evaluation and polymorphic quantification of venlafaxine hydrochloride raw materials using the Rietveld method.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Larissa S; Ferreira, Fábio F; Cuffini, Silvia L; Campos, Carlos E M; Monti, Gustavo A; Kuminek, Gislaine; Oliveira, Paulo R; Cardoso, Simone G

    2013-12-15

    Venlafaxine hydrochloride (VEN) is an antidepressant drug widely used for the treatment of depression. The purpose of this study was to carry out the preparation and solid state characterization of the pure polymorphs (Forms 1 and 2) and the polymorphic identification and quantification of four commercially-available VEN raw materials. These two polymorphic forms were obtained from different crystallization methods and characterized by X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT), Raman Spectroscopy (RS), liquid and solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and ssNMR) spectroscopies, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. The main differences were observed by DSC and XRPD and the latter was chosen as the standard technique for the identification and quantification studies in combination with the Rietveld method for the commercial raw materials (VEN1-VEN4) acquired from different manufacturers. Additionally Form 1 and Form 2 can be clearly distinguished from their (13)C ssNMR spectra. Through the analysis, it was possible to conclude that VEN1 and VEN2 were composed only of Form 1, while VEN3 and VEN4 were a mixture of Forms 1 and 2. Additionally, the Rietveld refinement was successfully applied to quantify the polymorphic ratio for VEN3 and VEN4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A LOW-E MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING PROBE FOR BIOLOGICAL SOLID STATE NMR AT 750 MHz

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Seth A.; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W.; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Crossed-coil NMR probes are a useful tool for reducing sample heating for biological solid state NMR. In a crossed-coil probe, the higher frequency 1H field, which is the primary source of sample heating in conventional probes, is produced by a separate low-inductance resonator. Because a smaller driving voltage is required, the electric field across the sample and the resultant heating is reduced. In this work we describe the development of a magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR probe utilizing a dual resonator. This dual resonator approach, referred to as “Low-E,” was originally developed to reduce heating in samples of mechanically aligned membranes. The study of inherently dilute systems, such as proteins in lipid bilayers, via MAS techniques requires large sample volumes at high field to obtain spectra with adequate signal-to-noise ratio under physiologically relevant conditions. With the Low-E approach, we are able to obtain homogeneous and sufficiently strong radiofrequency fields for both 1H and 13C frequencies in a 4 mm probe with a 1H frequency of 750 MHz. The performance of the probe using windowless dipolar recoupling sequences is demonstrated on model compounds as well as membrane embedded peptides. PMID:19138870

  11. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  12. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of soil organic matter fractions in a forest ecosystem subjected to prescribed burning and thinning

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prescribed burning and thinning are gaining popularity as low-cost forest protection measures. Such field management practices could alter the chemical properties of soil organic matter (SOM), especially humic substances. In this work, we collected surface soil samples from the Bankhead National For...

  13. Solid-state 13C NMR experiments reveal effects of aggregate size on the chemical composition of particulate organic matter in grazed steppe soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, M.; Kölbl, A.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2009-04-01

    Grazing is one of the most important factors that may reduce soil organic matter (SOM) stocks and subsequently deteriorate aggregate stability in grassland topsoils. Land use management and grazing reduction are assumed to increase the input of OM, improve the soil aggregation and change species composition of vegetation (changes depth of OM input). Many studies have evaluated the impact of grazing cessation on SOM quantity. But until today little is known about the impact of grazing cessation on the chemical quality of SOM in density fractions, aggregate size classes and different horizons. The central aim of this study was to analyse the quality of SOM fractions in differently sized aggregates and horizons as affected by increased inputs of organic matter due to grazing exclusion. We applied a combined aggregate size, density and particle size fractionation procedure to sandy steppe topsoils with different organic matter inputs due to different grazing intensities (continuously grazed = Cg, winter grazing = Wg, ungrazed since 1999 = Ug99, ungrazed since 1979 = Ug79). Three different particulate organic matter (POM; free POM, in aggregate occluded POM and small in aggregate occluded POM) and seven mineral-associated organic matter fractions were separated for each of three aggregate size classes (coarse = 2000-6300 m, medium = 630-2000 m and fine =

  14. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions...

  15. 13C and 14N Solid State NMR Characterization of Aramid-Containing Nylon-6 Polymers Synthesized by In Situ Polymerization of Caprolactam with Benzoyl Caprolactam Derivatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    261.3 show equivalent areas consistant with tiie alternating copolymer structure. Comparison with the model acetanilide (-241.5) indicates the...T.; Fujito, T.; Deguchi. 1\\.; Ando, 1. Macromolecules. 1987, 2?0, 2441. 4 TABLE I CP MNAS ,_’ii N-methyl benzamide -2-o3.3 -226. Acetanilide -241.9

  16. 13C and 15N Solid State MMR Characterization of Aramid-Containing Nylon-6 by In Situ Polymerization with Benzoyl Caprolactam Derivatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    areas consistant with the alternating copolymer structure. Comparison with the model acetanilide (-241.9) indicates the downfield resonance is due to the...Deguchi, l.; Ando, 1. Macromclecule’-, 1987, 20, 2441. 4 S..:! TABLE I CP-NIAS u N-methyl benzainide -23. 3 2 Acetanilide -241.9 ’iC poly(p-benzamide

  17. Potential traceable markers of organic matter in organic and conventional dairy manure using ultraviolet–visible and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic dairy (OD) production is drawing increasing attention because of public concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the potential environmental impacts of conventional dairy (CD) systems. However, very limited information is available on how organic farming practices affect the chemical ...

  18. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  19. δ13C Analysis of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Eastern Canadian Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelinas, Y.; Barber, A.

    2016-12-01

    The application of carbon stable isotope analysis on dissolved organic carbon (δ13C-DOC) from natural seawater samples has been limited owing to the difficulty of such analysis, with order of magnitude differences between interfering ions and analyte concentrations. High temperature catalytic oxidation allows for the separation of interferences from the organic carbon by precipitation on quartz chips upstream from the oxidation catalyst. Unlike wet chemical oxidation, where salts inhibit the oxidation of organic matter to CO2 via side reactions between the salt anions and the persulfate oxidizing agent, high temperature combustion ensures complete organic matter oxidation in a stream of O2. Using a programmable chemical trap to switch carrier gasses from O2 to He, the OI 1030C combustion unit can be coupled to and IRMS, allowing for the analysis of low DOC content saline waters with relatively high throughput. The analytical limitations and large water volumes traditionally required for these types of analyses have prevented any large-scale δ13C-DOC studies. Here we present DOC concentrations and δ13C-DOC signatures for surface and bottom waters obtained along Canada's East Coast. Included in the study are samples from the Esquiman channel (between Newfoundland and Labrador), Lake Melville, the Saglek and Nachvak Fjords, the Hudson Strait and finally covering the salinity gradient across the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Saguenay Fjord. Measured δ13C-DOC signatures ranged from predominantly marine values of -21.3 ± 0.6 ‰ (vs. VPDB) off the coast of Newfoundland to predominantly terrestrial signatures of -25.8 ± 0.1‰ in Lake Melville. Overall, proper blank subtraction using the isotope mass balance equation and four replicate injections are crucial for the collection of meaningful high quality δ13C-DOC signatures on natural abundance, seawater samples.

  20. Biosynthetic production of universally (13)C-labelled polyunsaturated fatty acids as reference materials for natural health product research.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Mai; Fraser, Catherine; Gardner, Graeme; Liang, Wei-Wan; Kralovec, Jaroslav A; Cunnane, Stephen C; Windust, Anthony J

    2007-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) have become important natural health products with numerous proven benefits related to brain function and cardiovascular health. Not only are omega-3 fatty acids available in a plethora of dietary supplements, but they are also increasingly being incorporated as triglycerides into conventional foods, including bread, milk, yoghurt and confectionaries. Recently, transgenic oil seed crops and livestock have been developed that enhance omega-3 fatty acid content. This diverse array of matrices presents a difficult analytical challenge and is compounded further by samples generated through clinical research. Stable isotope (13)C-labelled LCPUFA standards offer many advantages as research tools because they may be distinguished from their naturally abundant counterparts by mass spectrometry and directly incorporated as internal standards into analytical procedures. Further, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are safe to use as metabolic tracers to study uptake and metabolism in humans. Currently, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are expensive, available in limited supply and not in triglyceride form. To resolve these issues, marine heterotrophic microorganisms are being isolated and screened for LCPUFA production with a view to the efficient biosynthetic production of U-(13)C-labelled fatty acids using U-(13)C glucose as a carbon source. Of 37 isolates obtained, most were thraustochytrids, and either DHA or omega-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) were produced as the major LCPUFA. The marine protist Hyalochlorella marina was identified as a novel source of EPA and omega-3 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3). As proof of principle, gram-level production of (13)C-labelled DHA has been achieved with high chemical purity ( >99%) and high (13)C incorporation levels (>90%), as confirmed by NMR and MS analyses. Finally, U-(13)C-DHA was enzymatically re-esterified to

  1. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for ¹⁹F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploiting the Synergy of Powder X-ray Diffraction and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy in Structure Determination of Organic Molecular Solids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a strategy for structure determination of organic materials in which complete solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data is utilized within the context of structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Following determination of the crystal structure from powder XRD data, first-principles density functional theory-based techniques within the GIPAW approach are exploited to calculate the solid-state NMR data for the structure, followed by careful scrutiny of the agreement with experimental solid-state NMR data. The successful application of this approach is demonstrated by structure determination of the 1:1 cocrystal of indomethacin and nicotinamide. The 1H and 13C chemical shifts calculated for the crystal structure determined from the powder XRD data are in excellent agreement with those measured experimentally, notably including the two-dimensional correlation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts for directly bonded 13C–1H moieties. The key feature of this combined approach is that the quality of the structure determined is assessed both against experimental powder XRD data and against experimental solid-state NMR data, thus providing a very robust validation of the veracity of the structure. PMID:24386493

  3. Quantitative 13C NMR characterization of fast pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Happs, Renee M.; Lisa, Kristina; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    2016-10-20

    Quantitative 13C NMR analysis of model catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) oils following literature procedures showed poor agreement for aromatic hydrocarbons between NMR measured concentrations and actual composition. Furthermore, modifying integration regions based on DEPT analysis for aromatic carbons resulted in better agreement. Solvent effects were also investigated for hydrotreated CFP oil.

  4. Metabolic flux analysis using 13C peptide label measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate cellular metabolism. MFA has established flux maps of central metabolism for dozens of microbes, cell cultures, and plant seeds. Steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtai...

  5. Quantitative 13C NMR characterization of fast pyrolysis oils

    SciTech Connect

    Happs, Renee M.; Lisa, Kristina; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    Quantitative 13C NMR analysis of model catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) oils following literature procedures showed poor agreement for aromatic hydrocarbons between NMR measured concentrations and actual composition. Furthermore, modifying integration regions based on DEPT analysis for aromatic carbons resulted in better agreement. Solvent effects were also investigated for hydrotreated CFP oil.

  6. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  7. Distinguishing polymorphs of the semiconducting pigment copper phthalocyanine by solid-state NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shaibat, Medhat A; Casabianca, Leah B; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-08

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of alpha- and beta-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. (13)C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of alpha- and beta-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. (13)C and (1)H SSNMR relaxation times of alpha- and beta-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs.

  8. Distinguishing Polymorphs of the Semiconducting Pigment Copper Phthalocyanine by Solid-state NMR and Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shaibat, Medhat A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y.; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of α- and β-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. 13C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of α- and β-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. 13C and 1H SSNMR relaxation times of α- and β-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs. PMID:20225842

  9. Characterization of Two Distinct Amorphous Forms of Valsartan by Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Apperley, David C; Aguilar, Juan A; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Pyda, Marek; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-01-04

    Valsartan (VAL) is an antihypertensive drug marketed in an amorphous form. Amorphous materials can have different physicochemical properties depending on preparation method, thermal history, etc., but the nature of such materials is difficult to study by diffraction techniques. This study characterizes two different amorphous forms of valsartan (AR and AM) using solid-state NMR (SSNMR) as a primary investigation tool, supported by solution-state NMR, FT-IR, TMDSC, and dissolution tests. The two forms are found to be clearly distinct, with a significantly higher level of structural arrangement in the AR form, as observed in (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H SSNMR. (13)C and (15)N NMR indicates that the fully amorphous material (AM) contains an approximately equal ratio of cis-trans conformers about the amide bond, whereas the AR form exists mainly as one conformer, with minor conformational "defects". (1)H ultrafast MAS NMR shows significant differences in the hydrogen bonding involving the tetrazole and acid hydrogens between the two materials, while (15)N NMR shows that both forms exist as a 1,2,3,4-tetrazole tautomer. NMR relaxation times show subtle differences in local and bulk molecular mobility, which can be connected with the glass transition, the stability of the glassy material, and its response to aging. Counterintuitively the fully amorphous material is found to have a significantly lower dissolution rate than the apparently more ordered AR material.

  10. Energy-saving approaches to solid state street lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitta, Pranciškus; Stanikūnas, Rytis; Tuzikas, Arūnas; Reklaitis, Ignas; Stonkus, Andrius; Petrulis, Andrius; Vaitkevičius, Henrikas; Žukauskas, Artūras

    2011-10-01

    We consider the energy-saving potential of solid-state street lighting due to improved visual performance, weather sensitive luminance control and tracking of pedestrians and vehicles. A psychophysical experiment on the measurement of reaction time with a decision making task was performed under mesopic levels of illumination provided by a highpressure sodium (HPS) lamp and different solid-state light sources, such as daylight and warm-white phosphor converted light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and red-green-blue LED clusters. The results of the experiment imply that photopic luminances of road surface provided by solid-state light sources with an optimized spectral power distribution might be up to twice as low as those provided by the HPS lamp. Dynamical correction of road luminance against road surface conditions typical of Lithuanian climate was estimated to save about 20% of energy in comparison with constant-level illumination. The estimated energy savings due to the tracking of pedestrians and vehicles amount at least 25% with the cumulative effect of intelligent control of at least 40%. A solid-state street lighting system with intelligent control was demonstrated using a 300 m long test ground consisting of 10 solid-state street luminaires, a meteorological station and microwave motion sensor network operated via power line communication.

  11. A zwitterionic gel electrolyte for efficient solid-state supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xu; Liu, Huili; Yin, Qin; Wu, Junchi; Chen, Pengzuo; Zhang, Guangzhao; Liu, Guangming; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrolytes have attracted increasing attention for solid-state supercapacitors. An ideal gel electrolyte usually requires a combination of advantages of high ion migration rate, reasonable mechanical strength and robust water retention ability at the solid state for ensuring excellent work durability. Here we report a zwitterionic gel electrolyte that successfully brings the synergic advantages of robust water retention ability and ion migration channels, manifesting in superior electrochemical performance. When applying the zwitterionic gel electrolyte, our graphene-based solid-state supercapacitor reaches a volume capacitance of 300.8 F cm−3 at 0.8 A cm−3 with a rate capacity of only 14.9% capacitance loss as the current density increases from 0.8 to 20 A cm−3, representing the best value among the previously reported graphene-based solid-state supercapacitors, to the best of our knowledge. We anticipate that zwitterionic gel electrolyte may be developed as a gel electrolyte in solid-state supercapacitors. PMID:27225484

  12. Path toward a high-energy solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gary L.; Merkle, Larry D.; Dubinskii, Mark; Zandi, Bahram

    2004-04-01

    Lasers have come a long way since the first demonstration by Maiman of a ruby crystal laser in 1960. Lasers are used as scientific tools as well as for a wide variety of applications for both commercial industry and the military. Today lasers come in all types, shapes and sizes depending on their application. The solid-state laser has some distinct advantages in that it can be rugged, compact, and self contained, making it reliable over long periods of time. With the advent of diode laser pumping a ten times increase in overall laser efficiency has been realized. This significant event, and others, is changing the way solid-state lasers are applied and allows new possibilities. One of those new areas of exploration is the high energy laser. Solid-state lasers for welding are already developed and yield energies in the 0.5 to 6 kilojoule range. These lasers are at the forefront of what is possible in terms of high energy solid-state lasers. It is possible to achieve energies of greater than 100 kJ. These sorts of energies would allow applications, in addition to welding, such as directed energy weapons, extremely remote sensing, power transfer, propulsion, biological and chemical agent neutralization and unexploded and mine neutralization. This article will review these new advances in solid-state lasers and the different paths toward achieving a high energy laser. The advantages and challenges of each approach will be highlighted.

  13. Solid-State Cloud Radar System (CRS) Upgrade and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matt; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Coon, Michael; Venkatesh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The recent decade has brought rapid development in solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) technology. This has enabled the use of solid-state precipitation radar in place of high-power and high-voltage systems such as those that use Klystron or Magnetron transmitters. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the 94 gigahertz Cloud Radar System (CRS) to incorporate a solid-state transmitter. It is the first cloud radar to achieve sensitivity comparable to that of a high-voltage transmitter using solid-state. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cloud Radar System (CRS) is a 94 gigahertz Doppler radar that flies on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The upgraded CRS system utilizes a state-of-the-art solid-state 94 gigahertz power amplifier with a peak transmit power of 30 watts. The modernized CRS system is detailed here with data results from its deployment during the 2014 Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX).

  14. The 12C/13C Isotopic Ratio In Titan's Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G.; Cassini CIRS Team

    2007-10-01

    Isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres are of considerable interest, yielding insights both about currently occurring processes, and also the formation and early evolution of the body. Before Cassini, ground-based measurements of Titan's 12C/13C in HCN showed no firm evidence of deviation from the terrestrial inorganic standard (88.9) - albeit with large error bars of 20% - contrasting the enrichment in nitrogen (15N/14N≈4.5 terrestrial). Since 2004, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on Cassini has recorded spectra of Titan's stratosphere globally, including the emissions of multiple isotopologues for certain hydrocarbons. We selected spectra for analysis from four flybys (T4, T12, T19, T22), covering five latitudes from 65°S to 71°N. By means of a radiative transfer code and inversion scheme, we have first modeled the ν4 band of 12CH4 at 1304 cm-1 to retrieve stratospheric temperatures, and subsequently the emissions of 13CH4, 12C2H2, 13C12CH2, 12C2H6 and 13C12CH6. Our results indicate 12C/13C = 81.2±2.0 for all three species combined over all five latitudes, in excellent agreement with the Huygens GCMS value of 12CH4/13CH4 = 82.3±1.0 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 9% lower than terrestrial inorganic, and lower than in ethane on Saturn (91 (-13) (+26)) and Jupiter (99 (-23) (+43)) (Sada et al. 1996). No latitude variation was detected, however the 12C/13C in the C2 species (83.9±3.1 in acetylene, 89.9±7.2 in ethane) were consistently higher than in methane (78.0±2.7) after considering random errors. Although it is possible that this is a real chemical or physical (condensation) effect, it is more likely due to systematic errors in our temperature profile, as our spectra do not yield independent temperature information at 10 mbar where the emissions of 13C12CH2 and 13C12CH6 originate, and we default to the Huygens probe temperatures. In future, this problem may be resolved by modeling CIRS limb spectra.

  15. Orphan spin operators enable the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-05-01

    We propose a general method that enables the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra for U-13C, 15N-labeled proteins. This method, called MEIOSIS (Multiple ExperIments via Orphan SpIn operatorS), makes it possible to detect four coherence transfer pathways simultaneously, utilizing orphan (i.e., neglected) spin operators of nuclear spin polarization generated during 15N-13C cross polarization (CP). In the MEIOSIS experiments, two phase-encoded free-induction decays are decoded into independent nuclear polarization pathways using Hadamard transformations. As a proof of principle, we show the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra of U-13C, 15N-labeled microcrystalline ubiquitin. Hadamard decoding of CP coherences into multiple independent spin operators is a new concept in solid-state NMR and is extendable to many other multidimensional experiments. The MEIOSIS method will increase the throughput of solid-state NMR techniques for microcrystalline proteins, membrane proteins, and protein fibrils.

  16. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  17. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A [Santa Fe, NM; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos, NM; Alvarez, Marc A [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein C* is each independently selected from the group consisting of .sup.13C and .sup.12C with the proviso that at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group can independently be either hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is from the group of sulfide, sulfinyl, and sulfone, Z is an aryl group from the group of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently from the group of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group from the group of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently from the group of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms.

  19. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. , Unkefer; Clifford J. , Alvarez; Marc, A [Santa Fe, NM

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to the labeled compounds, ##STR00001## wherein C* is each either .sup.13C and .sup.12C where at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group is hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is sulfide, sulfinyl, or sulfone, Z is an aryl group such as 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, or a phenyl group ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently either hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group such as NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently either a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds ##STR00003##

  20. Relationship between crystal structure and solid-state properties of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Agam R.

    This thesis strives to understand the structure-property relationships of some pharmaceutical crystals at the molecular level with emphasis on the effect of secondary processing on the solid phase. Using single crystal X-ray diffractometry (SCXRD), the structure of warfarin sodium 2-propanol adduct (W) was established to be a true solvate, contrary to previous reports. Using dynamic water vapor sorption, optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy, SCXRD, powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), volume computations and molecular modeling, the effect of relative humidity and temperature on the crystal structure of W was investigated. Ab initio calculations on piroxicam showed that the difference in energy between the two polymorphs, I and II, arises predominantly from the difference between their lattice energies. The detailed hydrogen bonding networks of the two polymorphs are described and compared using graph sets. Despite stabilization of the polymorphs by hydrogen bonds, pair-wise distribution function transforms show a loss of polymorphic memory upon cryogrinding the two polymorphs, leading to a difference in recrystallization behavior between amorphous piroxicam prepared from polymorphs I and II. Structural and solid-state changes of piroxicam polymorphs under mechanical stress were investigated using cryogenic grinding, PXRD, diffuse-reflectance solid-state ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance solid-state Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Intermolecular proton transfer was found to accompany changes in phase and color observed upon cryogrinding the two polymorphs. Model-free and model-fitting studies of the dehydration kinetics of piroxicam monohydrate (PM) showed the dependence of activation energy ( Ea) on both isothermal and non-isothermal heating conditions, and on the fraction of conversion. In the constant-E a region, isothermal dehydration follows the two

  1. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  3. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOEpatents

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1999-01-01

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases.

  4. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  5. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1999-03-09

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases. 8 figs.

  6. The application of 13C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide (13C-TMAH) thermochemolysis to study fungal degradation of wood

    Treesearch

    T.R. Filley; P.G. Hatcher; W.C. Shortle

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an assessment of the application of a new molecular analytical procedure, 13C-TMAH thermochemolysis, to study the chemical modification of lignin by white-rot and brown-rot fungi. This technique differs from other molecular chemolysis procedures (e.g. TMAH thermochemolysis and CuO alkaline oxidation) as it...

  7. Majorana modes in solid state systems and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Wu, Biao

    2018-04-01

    We review the properties of Majorana fermions in particle physics and point out that Majorana modes in solid state systems are significantly different. The key reason is the concept of anti-particle in solid state systems is different from its counterpart in particle physics. We define Majorana modes as the eigenstates of Majorana operators and find that they can exist both at edges and in the bulk. According to our definition, only one single Majorana mode can exist in a system no matter at edges or in the bulk. Kitaev's spinless p-wave superconductor is used to illustrate our results and the dynamical behavior of the Majorana modes.

  8. A Solid-State Modulator for High Speed Kickers

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Cook, E G; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    An all solid-state modulator with multi-pulse burst capability, very fast rise and fall times, pulse width agility, and amplitude modulation capability for use with high-speed beam kickers has been designed and tested at LLNL. The modulator uses multiple solid-state modules stacked in an inductive-adder configuration. It provides a nominal 18kV pulse with {+-} 10% amplitude modulation on the order of several MHz, rise times on the order of 10nS, and can be configured for either positive or negative polarity. The presentation will include measured performance data.

  9. What would Edison do with solid state lighting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Ian T.; Melton, Andrew; Xu, Tianming; Jamil, Muhammad; Fenwick, Will

    2010-08-01

    Thomas Edison is widely regarded as the greatest inventor in history and the most prominent individual behind the invention of the electric light. His impressive characteristics as an individual that led to his amazing success as an innovator continue to be an inspiration for researchers today. This paper considers how Edison might proceed in developing solid state lighting into a technology capable of displacing incumbent light sources, including his own incandescent lamps, then reviews some of the "Edison-like" contributions made to solid state lighting by the Next Generation Lighting research program at Georgia Tech.

  10. Atomistic Simulation of Interfaces in Materials of Solid State Ionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov-Schitz, A. K.; Mazo, G. N.

    2018-01-01

    The possibilities of describing correctly interfaces of different types in solids within a computer experiment using molecular statics simulation, molecular dynamics simulation, and quantum chemical calculations are discussed. Heterophase boundaries of various types, including grain boundaries and solid electrolyte‒solid electrolyte and ionic conductor‒electrode material interfaces, are considered. Specific microstructural features and mechanisms of the ion transport in real heterophase structures (cationic conductor‒metal anode and anionic conductor‒cathode) existing in solid state ionics devices (such as solid-state batteries and fuel cells) are discussed.

  11. Solid State Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.; Walker, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    What is TSW and USW? TSW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and non-rotating containment plates Independent heating, stirring and forging controls Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW. USW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and a non-rotating containment plate; Ultrasonic energy integrated into non-rotating containment plate and stir rod; Independent heating, stirring and forging controls; Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW.

  12. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  13. Solid-state greenhouses and their implications for icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Brown, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The 'solid-state greenhouse effect' model constituted by the subsurface solar heating of translucent, high-albedo materials is presently applied to the study of planetary surfaces, with attention to frost and ice surfaces of the solar system's outer satellites. Temperature is computed as a function of depth for an illustrative range of thermal variables, and it is discovered that the surfaces and interiors of such bodies can be warmer than otherwise suspected. Mechanisms are identified through which the modest alteration of surface properties can substantially change the solid-state greenhouse and force an interior temperature adjustment.

  14. Solid-state NMR of Complex Nano- and Microcrystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, David A.

    The work in this thesis demonstrates the utility and broad applicability of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy to the study of complex materials containing mixtures of multiple structures and/or disparate local environments. Multinuclear SSNMR is particularly well-suited to the characterization of such systems, and can provide a wealth of information that cannot be obtained with other instrumental methods. Studies involving two classes of materials are detailed herein, namely rare-earth nanoparticles and active pharmaceutical ingredients. The first three projects described involve the study of inorganic rare-earth (RE, RE = Y, Sc, La-Lu) nanoparticles (NP), which have unique optical and magnetic properties that are desirable for a diverse range of applications. Many of the properties of these materials are related to the incorporation of dopants into the host structures. The chemical reactions necessary to prepare these materials are complex and challenging to optimize; however, careful structural analysis of these materials is imperative to inform and to improve their rational design. Herein, we first use multinuclear (i.e., 19F, 23Na, 89Y, 1H, 13C, 45Sc) SSNMR to establish the molecular-level structure of a widely used undoped host material, beta-NaYF4, resolving a longstanding debate regarding the crystal structure. Similar experiments are used to probe the structures of NaYF4 nanomaterials formed with advanced core/shell structures containing multiple RE-materials and having oleates bound to their surfaces. Expanding on this foundation, the structural effects of the incorporation of paramagnetic dopant ions in NaYF4 NPs is described in a second study. Through the use of ultra-fast magic angle spinning (UFMAS) SSNMR experiments, we have obtained spectra with valuable details regarding the distributions of the dopant ions and their mean distances from other atoms in the NP cores and surfaces. The final project in this area pertains to a

  15. (13)C breath tests in personalized medicine: fiction or reality?

    PubMed

    Modak, Anil S

    2009-11-01

    The concept of personalized medicine is gathering momentum as various biomarkers are being discovered and developed to lead to genotype and phenotype diagnostic tests, which will enable physicians to individualize therapy. Noninvasive, rapid (13)C breath tests have the potential to serve as clinically significant diagnostic tools, especially for evaluating the enzyme activity of polymorphic enzymes. This would enable physicians to rapidly identify responders/nonresponders to various drugs primarily metabolized by these enzymes prior to initiation of therapy. With the information on enzyme activity, the physician can prescribe the right drug, at the right dose, at the right time, to the right individual, for the right clinical outcome. However, the promise of the era of personalized medicine, including the novel (13)C breath tests, will have to overcome several regulatory, business and financial hurdles for diagnostic tests to become part of routine mainstream clinical practice over the next decade.

  16. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo1H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses.

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    slice cultures , bioreactor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...tumors from RCCs, and low grade from high grade RCCs using human TSCs cultured in a bioreactor . Aim 2:Identify HP 13C metabolic markers that...and cells over 48 hours using fluorescent dyes incubated with TSCs 1 Aim 1: Ex vivo bioreactor experiments We first acquired phosphorous-31 (31P

  18. Silylated Derivatives Retain Carbon and Alter Expected 13C-Tracer Enrichments Using Continuous Flow-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shinebarger, Steven R.; Haisch, Michael; Matthews, Dwight E.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous-flow inlets from oxidation reactors are commonly used systems for biological sample introduction into isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS) to measure 13C enrichment above natural abundance. Because the samples must be volatile enough to pass through a gas chromatograph, silylated derivatization reactions are commonly used to modify biological molecules to add the necessary volatility. Addition of a t-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) group is a common derivatization approach. However, we have found that samples do not produce the expected increment in measured 13C abundance as the TBDMS derivatives. We have made measurements of 13C enrichment of leucine and glutamate standards of known 13C enrichment using derivatives without silicon (N-acetyl n-propyl ester), with silicon (TBDMS), and an intermediate case. The measurements of 13C in amino acids derivatized without silicon were as expected. The 13C enrichment measurements using the TBDMS derivative were higher than expected, but could be corrected to produce the expected 13C enrichment measurement by IRMS if one carbon was removed per silicon. We postulate that the silicon in the derivative forms silicon carbide compounds in the heated cupric oxide reactor, rather than forming silicon dioxide. Doing so reduces the amount of CO2 formed from the carbon in the sample. Silylated derivatives retain carbon with the silicon and must be used carefully and with correction factors to measure 13C enrichments by continuous-flow IRMS. PMID:12510745

  19. Solid State Ionic Materials - Proceedings of the 4th Asian Conference on Solid State Ionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Yahaya, M.; Talib, I. A.; Salleh, M. M.

    1994-07-01

    SO4 (X=Si, Ge, Ti) Systems * A DSC and Conductivity Study of the Influence of Cesium Ion on the Beta-Alpha Transition in Silver Iodide * Phase Diagrams, Stoichiometries and Properties of Bi4V2O11:M2+ Solid Electrolytes * Physical Properties of Electrodeposited Silver Chromotungstate * Pseudopotential Study of Bonding in the Superionic Material AgI: The Effect of Statistical Distribution of Mobile Ions * Cubic Phase Dominant Region in Submicron BaTiO3 Particles * The Crystallization of CoZr Amorphous Alloys via Electrical Resistivity * Cation Ratio Related Properties of Synthetic Mg/Al Layered Double Hydroxide and it's Nanocomposite * DC Conductivity of Nano-Particles of Silver Iodide * Effect of Anomalous Diffusion on Quasielastic Scattering in Superionic Conductors * Computer Simulation Study of Conductivity Enhancement in Superionic-Insulator Composites * Dynamics of Superionic Silver and Copper Iodide Salt Melts * Influence of Dopant Salt AgI, Glass Modifier Ag2O and Glass Formers (SeO3 + MoO3) on Electrical Conductivity in Quaternary Glassy System * Fast Ion Conductivity in the Presence of Competitive Network Formers * Role of Alkali Ions in Borate Glasses * Inelastic Light Scattering in Cadmium Borate Glasses * Investigation on Transport Properties of Mixed Glass System 0.75 [0.75AgI:0.25AgCl]. 0.25[Ag2O:CrO3] * Conduction Mechanism in Lithium Tellurite Glasses * Optimized Silver Tungstoarsenate Glass Electrolyte * Stabilized Superfine Zirconia Powder Prepared by Sol-Gel Process * Study of New PAN-based Electrolytes * Electrical and Thermal Characterization of PVA based Polymer Electrolytes * Conductive Electroactive Polymers: Versatile Solid State Ionic Materials * The Role of Ag2O Addition on the Superconducting Properties of Y-124 Compound * Absorption Spectra Studies of the C60 Films on Transition Metal Film Substrates * Effect of Alumina Dispersal on the Conductivity and Crystallite Size of Polymer Electrolyte * New Mixed Galss-Polymer Solid Electrolytes

  20. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of papers written by the members of the Solid State Technology Branch of NASA LeRC from Jun. 1991 - Jun. 1992 is presented. A range of topics relating to superconductivity, Monolithic Microwave Circuits (MMIC's), coplanar waveguides, and material characterization is covered.

  2. Solid state lift for micrometering in a fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Milam, David M.; Carroll, Thomas S.; Lee, Chien-Chang; Miller, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector performs main fuel injection by raising fuel pressure in a nozzle chamber to lift a check valve member to a fully open position, and performs preinjection or microinjection by operating a solid state motor to lift the check valve member a much smaller distance.

  3. Designing Birefringent Filters For Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monosmith, Bryan

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical model enables design of filter assembly of birefringent plates as integral part of resonator cavity of tunable solid-state laser. Proper design treats polarization eigenstate of entire resonator as function of wavelength. Program includes software modules for variety of optical elements including Pockels cell, laser rod, quarter- and half-wave plates, Faraday rotator, and polarizers.

  4. Solid state remote power controllers for 120 VDC power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.; Baker, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Solid state remote power controllers can be applied to any dc power system up to 120 Vdc and distribute power up to 3.6 kW per hour. Devices have demonstrated total electrical efficiencies of 98.5 percent to 99.0 percent at rated load currents.

  5. Applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Membrane proteins mediate flow of molecules, signals, and energy between cells and intracellular compartments. Understanding membrane protein function requires a detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic properties involved. Lipid bilayers provide a native-like environment for structure-function investigations of membrane proteins. In this review we give a general discourse on the recent progress in the field of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins. Solid-state NMR is a variation of NMR spectroscopy that is applicable to molecular systems with restricted mobility, such as high molecular weight proteins and protein complexes, supramolecular assemblies, or membrane proteins in a phospholipid environment. We highlight recent advances in applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins, specifically focusing on the recent developments in the field of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, proton detection, and solid-state NMR applications in situ (in cell membranes). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  7. Quasi-Solid-State Single-Atom Transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fangqing; Peukert, Andreas; Bender, Thorsten; Obermair, Christian; Wertz, Florian; Schmieder, Philipp; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-06-21

    The single-atom transistor represents a quantum electronic device at room temperature, allowing the switching of an electric current by the controlled and reversible relocation of one single atom within a metallic quantum point contact. So far, the device operates by applying a small voltage to a control electrode or "gate" within the aqueous electrolyte. Here, the operation of the atomic device in the quasi-solid state is demonstrated. Gelation of pyrogenic silica transforms the electrolyte into the quasi-solid state, exhibiting the cohesive properties of a solid and the diffusive properties of a liquid, preventing the leakage problem and avoiding the handling of a liquid system. The electrolyte is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, conductivity measurements, and rotation viscometry. Thus, a first demonstration of the single-atom transistor operating in the quasi-solid-state is given. The silver single-atom and atomic-scale transistors in the quasi-solid-state allow bistable switching between zero and quantized conductance levels, which are integer multiples of the conductance quantum G 0  = 2e 2 /h. Source-drain currents ranging from 1 to 8 µA are applied in these experiments. Any obvious influence of the gelation of the aqueous electrolyte on the electron transport within the quantum point contact is not observed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Solid-state Distributed Temperature Control for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, Jon B.; Reagan, Shawn E.; Day, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed solid-state temperature controller will offer greater flexibility in the thermal control of aerospace vehicle structures. A status of the hardware development along with its implementation on the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module will be provided. Numerous advantages of the device will also be discussed with regards to current and future flight vehicle implementations.

  9. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  10. Screening Plastic-Encapsulated Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buldhaupt, L.

    1984-01-01

    Suitability of plastic-encapsulated solid-state electronic devices for use in spacecraft discussed. Conclusion of preliminary study was plasticencapsulated parts sufficiently reliable to be considered for use in lowcost equipment used at moderate temperature and low humidity. Useful to engineers as guides to testing or use of plastic encapsulated semiconductors in severe terrestrial environments.

  11. Promises and challenges in solid-state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Fred

    2010-03-01

    Lighting technologies based on semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer unprecedented promises that include three major benefits: (i) Gigantic energy savings enabled by efficient conversion of electrical energy to optical energy; (ii) Substantial positive contributions to sustainability through reduced emissions of global-warming gases, acid-rain gases, and toxic substances such as mercury; and (iii) The creation of new paradigms in lighting driven by the unique controllability of solid-state lighting sources. Due to the powerful nature of these benefits, the transition from conventional lighting sources to solid-state lighting is virtually assured. This presentation will illustrate the new world of lighting and illustrate the pervasive changes to be expected in lighting, displays, communications, and biotechnology. The presentation will also address the formidable challenges that must be addressed to continue the further advancement of solid-state lighting technology. These challenges offer opportunities for research and innovation. Specific challenges include light management, carrier transport, and optical design. We will present some innovative approaches in order to solve known technical challenges faced by solid-state lighting. These approaches include the demonstration and use of new optical thin-film materials with a continuously tunable refractive index. These approaches also include the use of polarization-matched structures that reduce the polarization fields in GaInN LEDs and the hotly debated efficiency droop, that is, the decreasing LED efficiency at high currents.

  12. Solid state electro-optic color filter and iris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test results obtained have confirmed the practicality of the solid state electro-optic filters as an optical control element in a television system. Neutral-density control range in excess of 1000:1 has been obtained on sample filters. Test results, measurements in a complete camera system, discussions of problem areas, analytical comparisons, and recommendations for future investigations are included.

  13. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C methylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Methylamine (CH3NH2) is a light molecule of astrophysical interest, which has an intensive rotational spectrum that extends in the submillimeter wave range and far beyond, even at temperatures characteristic for the interstellar medium. It is likely for 13C isotopologue of methylamine to be identified in astronomical surveys, but there is no information available for the 13CH3NH2 millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra. Aims: In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3NH2 spectrum in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we have studied rotational spectra of the 13C methylamine isotopologue in the frequency range from 48 to 945 GHz. Methods: The spectrum of 13C methylamine was recorded using conventional absorption spectrometers. The analysis of the rotational spectrum of 13C methylamine in the ground vibrational state was performed on the basis of the group-theoretical high-barrier tunneling Hamiltonian that was developed for methylamine. The available multiple observations of the parent methylamine species toward Sgr B2(N) at 1, 2, and 3 mm using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory were used to make a search for interstellar 13CH3NH2. Results: In the recorded spectra, we have assigned 2721 rotational transitions that belong to the ground vibrational state of the 13CH3NH2. These measurements were fitted to the Hamiltonian model that uses 75 parameters to achieve an overall weighted rms deviation of 0.73. On the basis of these spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 950 GHz with J ≤ 50 and Ka ≤ 20 are presented. The search for interstellar 13C methylamine in available observational data was not successful and therefore only an upper limit of 6.5 × 1014 cm-2 can be derived for the column density of 13CH3NH2 toward Sgr B2(N), assuming the same source size, temperature, linewidth, and systemic velocity as for parent methylamine isotopic

  14. Structure of indazole N1-oxide derivatives studied by X-ray, theoretical methods, 1H, 13C, 15N NMR and EI/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerpe, Alejandra; Piro, Oscar E.; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2007-12-01

    A series of indazole N1-oxide derivatives has been spectroscopically studied in solution using 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR based on pulsed field gradient selected PFG 1H sbnd X (X = 13C and 15N) gHMQC and gHMBC experiments. Some indazoles were prepared using a new methodology to compare its spectral and structural data with the indazole N1-oxide parent compounds. The 13C resonances of the indazole N1-oxide carbon 3 and 7a demonstrate the N-oxide push-electron capability. The 15N resonances of the indazole N-oxide, nitrogen 1, are near to 30 ppm more shielded than the corresponding values in the indazole heterocycle (deoxygenated form). Moreover, the structures of one indazole and one indazole N-oxide were unambiguously confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The solid state structures were contrasted with the theoretical ones obtained in vacuo at different calculus level. The aromaticity of the derivatives was studied analyzing the H sbnd H coupling constants of indazole's aromatic hydrogens and measuring C sbnd C distances in the solid state. The fragmentation that takes place in EI/MS was gathered for all the indazole N-oxide derivatives and the general fragmentation pattern analyzed.

  15. Solution and solid state NMR approaches to draw iron pathways in the ferritin nanocage.

    PubMed

    Lalli, Daniela; Turano, Paola

    2013-11-19

    Ferritins are intracellular proteins that can store thousands of iron(III) ions as a solid mineral. These structures autoassemble from four-helix bundle subunits to form a hollow sphere and are a prototypical example of protein nanocages. The protein acts as a reservoir, encapsulating iron as ferric oxide in its central cavity in a nontoxic and bioavailable form. Scientists have long known the structural details of the protein shell, owing to very high resolution X-ray structures of the apoform. However, the atomic level mechanism governing the multistep biomineralization process remained largely elusive. Through analysis of the chemical behavior of ferritin mutants, chemists have found the role of some residues in key reaction steps. Using Mössbauer and XAS, they have identified some di-iron intermediates of the catalytic reaction trapped by rapid freeze quench. However, structural information about the iron interaction sites remains scarce. The entire process is governed by a number of specific, but weak, interactions between the protein shell and the iron species moving across the cage. While this situation may constitute a major problem for crystallography, NMR spectroscopy represents an optimal tool to detect and characterize transient species involving soluble proteins. Regardless, NMR analysis of the 480 kDa ferritin represents a real challenge. Our interest in ferritin chemistry inspired us to use an original combination of solution and solid state approaches. While the highly symmetric structure of the homo-24-mer frog ferritin greatly simplifies the spectra, the large protein size hinders the efficient coherence transfer in solution, thus preventing the sequence specific assignments. In contrast, extensive (13)C-spin diffusion makes the solution (13)C-(13)C NOESY experiment our gold standard to monitor protein side chains both in the apoprotein alone and in its interaction with paramagnetic iron species, inducing line broadening on the resonances of

  16. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  17. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D.; Hong, Mei

    2017-01-01

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D 13C-13C correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose 13C chemical shifts differ significantly from the 13C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D 13C-13C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Cellulose f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, cellulose a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of bacterial, algal

  18. Facilitated ion transport in all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong Gill; Hong, Jinkee; Hong, Won Hi; Hammond, Paula T; Park, HoSeok

    2011-09-27

    The realization of highly flexible and all-solid-state energy-storage devices strongly depends on both the electrical properties and mechanical integrity of the constitutive materials and the controlled assembly of electrode and solid electrolyte. Herein we report the preparation of all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors (SCs) through the easy assembly of functionalized reduced graphene oxide (f-RGO) thin films (as electrode) and solvent-cast Nafion electrolyte membranes (as electrolyte and separator). In particular, the f-RGO-based SCs (f-RGO-SCs) showed a 2-fold higher specific capacitance (118.5 F/g at 1 A/g) and rate capability (90% retention at 30 A/g) compared to those of all-solid-state graphene SCs (62.3 F/g at 1A/g and 48% retention at 30 A/g). As proven by the 4-fold faster relaxation of the f-RGO-SCs than that of the RGO-SCs and more capacitive behavior of the former at the low-frequency region, these results were attributed to the facilitated ionic transport at the electrical double layer by means of the interfacial engineering of RGO by Nafion. Moreover, the superiority of all-solid-state flexible f-RGO-SCs was demonstrated by the good performance durability under the 1000 cycles of charging and discharging due to the mechanical integrity as a consequence of the interconnected networking structures. Therefore, this research provides new insight into the rational design and fabrication of all-solid-state flexible energy-storage devices as well as the fundamental understanding of ion and charge transport at the interface. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  20. Preliminary Analysis of a Fully Solid State Magnetocaloric Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    Magnetocaloric refrigeration is an alternative refrigeration technology with significant potential energy savings compared to conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology. Most of the reported active magnetic regenerator (AMR) systems that operate based on the magnetocaloric effect use heat transfer fluid to exchange heat, which results in complicated mechanical subsystems and components such as rotating valves and hydraulic pumps. In this paper, we propose an alternative mechanism for heat transfer between the AMR and the heat source/sink. High-conductivity moving rods/sheets (e.g. copper, brass, iron, graphite, aluminum or composite structures from these) are utilized instead of heat transfer fluid significantly enhancing the heatmore » transfer rate hence cooling/heating capacity. A one-dimensional model is developed to study the solid state AMR. In this model, the heat exchange between the solid-solid interfaces is modeled via a contact conductance, which depends on the interface apparent pressure, material hardness, thermal conductivity, surface roughness, surface slope between the interfaces, and material filled in the gap between the interfaces. Due to the tremendous impact of the heat exchange on the AMR cycle performance, a sensitivity analysis is conducted employing a response surface method, in which the apparent pressure, effective surface roughness and grease thermal conductivity are the uncertainty factors. COP and refrigeration capacity are presented as the response in the sensitivity analysis to reveal the important factors influencing the fully solid state AMR and optimize the solid state AMR efficiency. The performances of fully solid state AMR and traditional AMR are also compared and discussed in present work. The results of this study will provide general guidelines for designing high performance solid state AMR systems.« less

  1. Analysis of measurements for solid state laser remote lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1995-01-01

    The merits of using lidar systems for remote measurements of various atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence, moisture, and aerosol concentration are widely recognized. Although the lidar technology has progressed considerably over the past two decades, significant research particularly in the area of solid state lidars remains to be conducted in order to fully exploit this technology. The work performed by the UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on analyses of measurements required in support of solid state laser remote sensing lidar systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. UAH personnel has studied and recommended to NASA/MSFC the requirements of the optical systems needed to characterize the detection devices suitable for solid state wavelengths and to evaluate various heterodyne detection schemes. The 2-micron solid state laser technology was investigated and several preliminary laser designs were developed and their performance for remote sensing of atmospheric winds and clouds from a spaceborne platform were specified. In addition to the laser source and the detector, the other critical technologies necessary for global wind measurements by a spaceborne solid state coherent lidar systems were identified to be developed and demonstrated. As part of this work, an analysis was performed to determine the atmospheric wind velocity estimation accuracy using the line-of-sight measurements of a scanning coherent lidar. Under this delivery order, a computer database of materials related to the theory, development, testing, and operation of lidar systems was developed to serve as a source of information for lidar research and development.

  2. Two Techniques for Estimating Deglacial Mean-Ocean δ13 C Change from the Same Set of 493 Benthic δ13C Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.

    2013-12-01

    The crux of carbon redistribution over the deglaciation centers on the ocean, where the isotopic signature of terrestrial carbon (δ13C terrestrial carbon = -25‰) is observed as a 0.3-0.7‰ shift in benthic foraminiferal δ13C. Deglacial mean-ocean δ13C estimates vary due to different subsets of benthic δ13C data and different methods of weighting the mean δ13C by volume. Here, we present a detailed 1-to-1 comparison of two methods of calculating mean δ13C change and uncertainty estimates using the same set of 493 benthic Cibicidoides spp. δ13C measurements for the LGM and Late Holocene. The first method divides the ocean into 8 regions, and uses simple line fits to describe the distribution of δ13C data for each timeslice over 0.5-5 km depth. With these line fits, we estimate the δ13C value at 100-meter intervals and weight those estimates by the regional volume at each depth slice. The mean-ocean δ13C is the sum of these volume-weighted regional δ13C estimates and the uncertainty of these mean-ocean δ13C estimates is computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The whole-ocean δ13C change is estimated using extrapolated surface- and deep-ocean δ13C estimates, and an assumed δ13C value for the Southern Ocean. This method yields an estimated LGM-to-Holocene change of 0.38×0.07‰ for 0.5-5km and 0.35×0.16‰ for the whole ocean (Peterson et al., 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The second method reconstructs glacial and modern δ13C by combining the same data compilation as above with a steady-state ocean circulation model (Gebbie, 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The result is a tracer distribution on a 4-by-4 degree horizontal resolution grid with 23 vertical levels, and an estimate of the distribution's uncertainty that accounts for the distinct modern and glacial water-mass geometries. From both methods, we compare the regional δ13C estimates (0.5-5 km), surface δ13C estimates (0-0.5 km), deep δ13C estimates (>5 km), Southern Ocean

  3. Solid State Physics in the People's Republic of China. A Trip Report of the American Solid State Physics Delegation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Anne; Slichter, Charles P.

    This is the fifth chapter of a six chapter report which discusses Chinese research and education in solid state physics, and their relations to technology and the other sciences. This specific chapter concerns the communication of information in the scientific community and the transfer of information to students and practical users…

  4. Atomic layer deposition of lithium phosphates as solid-state electrolytes for all-solid-state microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Biqiong; Liu, Jian; Sun, Qian; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been shown as a powerful technique to build three-dimensional (3D) all-solid-state microbattery, because of its unique advantages in fabricating uniform and pinhole-free thin films in 3D structures. The development of solid-state electrolyte by ALD is a crucial step to achieve the fabrication of 3D all-solid-state microbattery by ALD. In this work, lithium phosphate solid-state electrolytes were grown by ALD at four different temperatures (250, 275, 300, and 325 °C) using two precursors (lithium tert-butoxide and trimethylphosphate). A linear dependence of film thickness on ALD cycle number was observed and uniform growth was achieved at all four temperatures. The growth rate was 0.57, 0.66, 0.69, and 0.72 Å/cycle at deposition temperatures of 250, 275, 300, and 325 °C, respectively. Furthermore, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the compositions and chemical structures of lithium phosphates deposited by ALD. Moreover, the lithium phosphate thin films deposited at 300 °C presented the highest ionic conductivity of 1.73 × 10-8 S cm-1 at 323 K with ˜0.51 eV activation energy based on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity was calculated to be 3.3 × 10-8 S cm-1 at 26 °C (299 K).

  5. Development of solid-state NMR techniques for the characterisation of pharmaceutical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatton, Andrew S.

    Structural characterisation in the solid state is an important step in understanding the physical and chemical properties of a material. Solid-state NMR techniques applied to solid delivery forms are presented as an alternative to more established structural characterisation methods. The effect of homonuclear decoupling upon heteronuclear couplings is investigated using a combination of experimental and density-matrix simulation results acquired from a 13C-1H spinecho pulse sequence, modulated by scalar couplings. It is found that third-order cross terms under MAS and homonuclear decoupling contribute to strong dephasing effects in the NMR signal. Density-matrix simulations allow access to parameters currently unattainable in experiment, and demonstrate that higher homonuclear decoupling rf nutation frequencies reduce the magnitude of third-order cross terms. 15N-1H spinecho experiments were applied to pharmaceutically relevant samples to differentiate between the number of directly attached protons. Using this method, proton transfer in an acid-base reaction is proven in pharmaceutical salts. The indirect detection of 14N lineshapes via protons obtained using 2D 14N-1H HMQC experiments is presented, where coherence transfer is achieved via heteronuclear through-space dipolar couplings. The importance of fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated, and it is found that increasing the recoupling duration reveals longer range NH proximities. The 2D 14N-1H HMQC method is used to demonstrate the presence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions, and thus aid in identifying molecular association in a cocrystal and an amorphous dispersion. In addition, hydrogen bonding motifs were identified by observing the changes in the 14N quadrupolar parameters between individual molecular components relative to the respective solid delivery form. First-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters using the GIPAW method were combined with 14N-1H experimental

  6. Nanoscale Solid State Batteries Enabled by Thermal Atomic Layer Deposition of a Lithium Polyphosphazene Solid State Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Pearse, Alexander J.; Schmitt, Thomas E.; Fuller, Elliot J.

    Several active areas of research in novel energy storage technologies, including three-dimensional solid state batteries and passivation coatings for reactive battery electrode components, require conformal solid state electrolytes. We describe an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for a member of the lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) family, which is employed as a thin film lithium-conducting solid electrolyte. The reaction between lithium tert-butoxide (LiO tBu) and diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA) produces conformal, ionically conductive thin films with a stoichiometry close to Li 2PO 2N between 250 and 300°C. The P/N ratio of the films is always 1, indicative of a particular polymorph ofmore » LiPON which closely resembles a polyphosphazene. Films grown at 300°C have an ionic conductivity of (6.51 ± 0.36)×10 -7 S/cm at 35°C, and are functionally electrochemically stable in the window from 0 to 5.3V vs. Li/Li +. We demonstrate the viability of the ALD-grown electrolyte by integrating it into full solid state batteries, including thin film devices using LiCoO 2 as the cathode and Si as the anode operating at up to 1 mA/cm 2. The high quality of the ALD growth process allows pinhole-free deposition even on rough crystalline surfaces, and we demonstrate the fabrication and operation of thin film batteries with the thinnest (<40nm) solid state electrolytes yet reported. Finally, we show an additional application of the moderate-temperature ALD process by demonstrating a flexible solid state battery fabricated on a polymer substrate.« less

  7. Nanoscale Solid State Batteries Enabled by Thermal Atomic Layer Deposition of a Lithium Polyphosphazene Solid State Electrolyte

    DOE PAGES

    Pearse, Alexander J.; Schmitt, Thomas E.; Fuller, Elliot J.; ...

    2017-04-10

    Several active areas of research in novel energy storage technologies, including three-dimensional solid state batteries and passivation coatings for reactive battery electrode components, require conformal solid state electrolytes. We describe an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for a member of the lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) family, which is employed as a thin film lithium-conducting solid electrolyte. The reaction between lithium tert-butoxide (LiO tBu) and diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA) produces conformal, ionically conductive thin films with a stoichiometry close to Li 2PO 2N between 250 and 300°C. The P/N ratio of the films is always 1, indicative of a particular polymorph ofmore » LiPON which closely resembles a polyphosphazene. Films grown at 300°C have an ionic conductivity of (6.51 ± 0.36)×10 -7 S/cm at 35°C, and are functionally electrochemically stable in the window from 0 to 5.3V vs. Li/Li +. We demonstrate the viability of the ALD-grown electrolyte by integrating it into full solid state batteries, including thin film devices using LiCoO 2 as the cathode and Si as the anode operating at up to 1 mA/cm 2. The high quality of the ALD growth process allows pinhole-free deposition even on rough crystalline surfaces, and we demonstrate the fabrication and operation of thin film batteries with the thinnest (<40nm) solid state electrolytes yet reported. Finally, we show an additional application of the moderate-temperature ALD process by demonstrating a flexible solid state battery fabricated on a polymer substrate.« less

  8. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  9. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  10. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15)N and (13)C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    PubMed

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15)N and δ(13)C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15)N (δ(15)N plant - δ(15)N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13)C in hay and δ(15)N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13)C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15)N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13)C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently

  11. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N (δ15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  12. Noninvasive Measurement of Murine Hepatic Acetyl-CoA 13C-Enrichment Following Overnight Feeding with 13C-Enriched Fructose and Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filipa; Duarte, Joao; Simoes, Ana Rita; Cruz, Pedro F.; Jones, John G.

    2013-01-01

    The 13C-isotopomer enrichment of hepatic cytosolic acetyl-CoA of overnight-fed mice whose drinking water was supplemented with [U-13C]fructose, and [1-13C]glucose and p-amino benzoic acid (PABA) was quantified by 13C NMR analysis of urinary N-acetyl-PABA. Four mice were given normal chow plus drinking water supplemented with 5% [1-13C]glucose, 2.5% [U-13C]fructose, and 2.5% fructose (Solution 1) overnight. Four were given chow and water containing 17.5% [1-13C]glucose, 8.75% [U-13C]fructose and 8.75% fructose (Solution 2). PABA (0.25%) was present in both studies. Urinary N-acetyl-PABA was analyzed by 13C NMR. In addition to [2-13C]- and [1,2-13C]acetyl isotopomers from catabolism of [U-13C]fructose and [1-13C]glucose to acetyl-CoA, [1-13C]acetyl was also found indicating pyruvate recycling activity. This precluded precise estimates of [1-13C]glucose contribution to acetyl-CoA while that of [U-13C]fructose was unaffected. The fructose contribution to acetyl-CoA from Solutions 1 and 2 was 4.0 ± 0.4% and 10.6 ± 0.6%, respectively, indicating that it contributed to a minor fraction of lipogenic acetyl-CoA under these conditions. PMID:23841082

  13. Measurement of δ13C values of soil amino acids by GC-C-IRMS using trimethylsilylation: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Mauro; Milin, Sylvie; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Signoret, Patrick; Hatté, Christine; Balesdent, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives as derivatization reagents for the compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of soil amino acids by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). We used non-proteinogenic amino acids to show that the extraction-derivatization-analysis procedure provides a reliable method to measure δ(13)C values of amino acids extracted from soil. However, we found a number of drawbacks that significantly increase the final total uncertainty. These include the following: production of multiple peaks for each amino acid, identified as di-, tri- and tetra-TMS derivatives; a number of TMS-carbon (TMS-C) atoms added lower than the stoichiometric one, possibly due to incomplete combustion; different TMS-C δ(13)C for di-, tri- and tetra-TMS derivatives. For soil samples, only four amino acids (leucine, valine, threonine and serine) provide reliable δ(13)C values with a total average uncertainty of 1.3 ‰. We conclude that trimethylsilyl derivatives are only suitable for determining the (13)C incorporation in amino acids within experiments using (13)C-labelled tracers but cannot be applied for amino acids with natural carbon isotope abundance until the drawbacks described here are overcome and the measured total uncertainty significantly decreased.

  14. Comparison of IRMS and NMR spectrometry for the determination of intramolecular 13C isotope composition: application to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Alexis; Hattori, Ryota; Silvestre, Virginie; Wasano, Nariaki; Akoka, Serge; Hirano, Satoshi; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2012-09-15

    Isotopic (13)C NMR is a relatively recent technique which allows the determination of intramolecular (13)C isotope composition at natural abundance. It has been used in various scientific fields such as authentication, counterfeiting or plant metabolism. Although its precision has already been evaluated, the determination of its trueness remains still challenging. To deal with that issue, a comparison with another normalized technique must be achieved. In this work, we compare the intramolecular (13)C isotope distribution of ethanol from different origins obtained using both Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry techniques. The IRMS approach consists of the oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid followed by the degradation of the latter for the analysis of each fragments formed. We show here that the oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid does not bring any significant error on the determination of the site-specific δ(13)C (δ(13)C(i)) of ethanol using the IRMS approach. The difference between the data obtained for 16 samples from different origins using IRMS and NMR approaches is not statistically significant and remains below 0.3‰. These results are encouraging for the future studies using isotopic NMR, especially in combination with the IRMS approach. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Racemic crystals of trolox derivatives compared to their chiral counterparts: Structural studies using solid-state NMR, DFT calculations and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałejko, P.; Paradowska, K.; Szeleszczuk, Ł.; Wojtulewski, S.; Baj, A.

    2018-03-01

    Trolox C (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid) is a water-soluble vitamin E analogue that is available in enantiomeric forms R or S. Enantiomerically pure Trolox 1, its derivatives 2, 3 (R and S enantiomers) and racemic forms 1-3 were studied using solid-state 13C cross-polarisation (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR (13C CPMAS NMR). Gauge-including projector-augmented wave density functional theory (GIPAW DFT) calculations of the shielding constants supported the assignment of 13C resonances in the solid-state NMR spectra. For the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of 1, resonances of pure enantiomers were significantly broader than those of the racemic R/S form. In order to explain these effects, five of the available crystal structures were analysed (1R/S, 3R/S, 2S and the newly measured 2R/S and 3S). Cyclic dimers with one R and one S enantiomer linked by two OHsbnd Odbnd C2b hydrogen bonds were formed in 1R/S. Similar hydrogen-bonded dimers were present in 3S but not in 3R/S, in which interactions are water-mediated. A comparison of X-ray diffraction, CPMAS NMR data and the DFT GIPAW calculations of racemic forms and pure enantiomers was conducted for the first time. Our results, particularly the solid-state NMR data, were discussed in relation to Wallach's rule, that the racemic crystal appears as more ordered than its chiral counterpart.

  16. Novel Peak Assignments of in Vivo 13C MRS in Human Brain at 1.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüml, Stefan; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Moreno, Angel; Ross, Brian D.

    2000-04-01

    13C MRS studies at natural abundance and after intravenous 1-13C glucose infusion were performed on a 1.5-T clinical scanner in four subjects. Localization to the occipital cortex was achieved by a surface coil. In natural abundance spectra glucose C3β,5β, myo-inositol, glutamate C1,2,5, glutamine C1,2,5, N-acetyl-aspartate C1-4,Cdbnd O, creatine CH2, CH3, and CCdbnd N, taurine C2,3, bicarbonate HCO-3 were identified. After glucose infusion 13C enrichment of glucose C1α,1β, glutamate C1-4, glutamine C1-4, aspartate C2,3, N-acetyl-aspartate C2,3, lactate C3, alanine C3, and HCO-3 were observed. The observation of 13C enrichment of resonances resonating at >150 ppm is an extension of previously published studies and will provide a more precise determination of metabolic rates and substrate decarboxylation in human brain.

  17. In vivo stationary flux analysis by 13C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, W; de Graaf, A A

    1996-01-01

    Stationary flux analysis is an invaluable tool for metabolic engineering. In the last years the metabolite balancing technique has become well established in the bioengineering community. On the other hand metabolic tracer experiments using 13C isotopes have long been used for intracellular flux determination. Only recently have both techniques been fully combined to form a considerably more powerful flux analysis method. This paper concentrates on modeling and data analysis for the evaluation of such stationary 13C labeling experiments. After reviewing recent experimental developments, the basic equations for modeling carbon labeling in metabolic systems, i.e. metabolite, carbon label and isotopomer balances, are introduced and discussed in some detail. Then the basics of flux estimation from measured extracellular fluxes combined with carbon labeli