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Sample records for abundant accretionary lapilli

  1. Accretionary lapilli in altered tuffs associated with coal beds.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Triplehorn, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli (concentrically-zoned structures with featureless cores and layered rims, composed of volcanic materials) have been previously recognized in recent volcanic eruptions, and in rocks from obvious volcanic environments. The present paper extends the known occurrences to rocks of less obvious volcanic origin; in some cases the lapilli are the primary evidence for their volcanic origin. They are reported from tonsteins (clay beds associated with coals and generally interpreted as altered tuffs), and clays not associated with coals or previously interpreted as volcanic in origin, (flint in Missouri and Kentucky). -W.P.F.

  2. Accretionary lapilli: what’s holding them together?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Paul M.; Lynch, David K.; Buesch, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli from Tagus cone, Isla Isabela, Galápagos were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. Our main findings are (1) the lapilli formed and hardened in a few minutes while still aloft in the dispersing eruption column. (2) Palagonite rinds developed first on the basaltic glass clasts, and subsequently crystallized (3) The crystallization products contain submicron lamellar crystals of a clay (probably smectite) on the surfaces of basaltic glass clasts and (4) The interlocking of these lamellar clays from adjacent clasts binds and cements them together to form the accretionary lapillus. We argue that palagonite and possibly clay formation occur primarily in the presence of hot water vapor.

  3. Origin of accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino deposits of Vesuvius

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, M.F.; Wohletz, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino Plinian ash deposits of Vesuvius consist of centimeter-sized spheroids composed of glass, crystal, and lithic fragments of submillimeter size. The typical structure of the lapilli consists of a central massive core surrounded by concentric layers of fine ash with concentrations of larger clasts and vesicles and a thin outer layer of dust. Clasts within the lapilli larger than 125 ..mu..m are extremely rare. The median grain-size of the fine ash is about 50 ..mu..m and the size-distribution is well sorted. Most constituent particles of accretionary lapilli display blocky shapes characteristic of grains produced by phreatomagmatic hydroexplosions. We have used the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS) to investigate the textural and chemical variation along traverses from the core to the rim of lapilli from Vesuvius.

  4. Accretionary lapilli, tektites, or concretions: the ubiquitous spherules of Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Barry E.

    2004-11-01

    One of the most enigmatic discoveries made by the NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity (MER-B) at the Meridiani Planum landing site are the ubiquitous spherules referred to as "blueberries" by the science team. They cover the entire landing area and can be seen in every direction within view of the rover cameras. Subsequent analysis of a small grouping of the spherules laying on top of a rock outcrop by Mossbauer spectroscopy showed an intense hematite signature not found on the rock or in the surrounding basaltic soils. Spherules were also found attached to and embedded within sedimentary sulfate rock outcrops found at the landing area that have been determined by the MER science team as having been formed in an acidic liquid water environment. The appearance of most of the Meridiani spherules is strikingly similar to the morphology and size of terrestrial accretionary lapilli and show similarities to terrestrial tektites. Accretionary lapilli are spherical balls and fragments with a concentric layered structure that are formed by a variety of mechanisms including hydrovolcanic eruptions, geysers and large meteorite impacts in water. Tektites are glassy impact spherules that form as a result of large meteorite impacts and also seem apparent in some of the rover images. Tektites can be perfectly spherical or have teardrop and dumbbell shapes. A lack of a visible volcanic source capable of producing high volumes of accretionary lapilli as seen in the MER-B images, in combination with the strong spectral signature of hematite, that some of the spherules display, led the MER science team to favor a concretion hypothesis thus far. All of these types of spherules involve interaction of with surface water or ice to form. Problems exist in explaining how the Martian "concretions", if that is indeed what they are, are of such uniform size and have such a wide distribution. Evidence from Martian orbit and on the surface indicate that the Meridiani Planum landing ellipse

  5. 3D Tomography of Accretionary Lapilli From The Island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy): Spatial Arrangement, Internal Structure, Grain Size Distribution and Chemical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Ielpo, M.; Valentini, L.; Laeger, K.; Paredes, J.; Petrelli, M.; Costa, A.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Secche di Lazzaro formation (7 Ka) is a phreatomagmatic deposit in the south-western part of the island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). The volcanic sequence is constituted by three main sub-units. In two of them abundant accretionary lapilli are present. We performed granulometric analysis to describe the spatial arrangement and the grain-size distribution of the lapilli inside the deposit. Lapilli were characterized by SEM investigations (BSE images). EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses of major and trace elements on glasses and minerals were performed. Although BSE images provide accurate morphological information, they do not allow the real 3D microstructure to be accessed. Therefore, non-invasive 3D imaging of the lapilli was performed by X-ray micro-tomography (X-mCT). The results of the X-mCT measurements provided a set of 2D cross-sectional slices stacked along the vertical axis, with a voxel size varying between 2.7 and 4.1 mm, depending on the size of the sample. The X-mCT images represent a mapping of X-ray attenuation, which in turn depends on the density of the phases distributed within the sample. This technique helped us to better constrain the particle and crystal distribution inside the accretionary lapilli. The recognized phases are: glass, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and Ti-Fe minerals. We discover also a high concentration of Na, Cl and SO3 in the ash matrix. This evidence is ubiquitous in all the accretionary lapilli. The work presented here could define a new route for future studies in the field of physical volcanology as X-ray micro-tomography could be a useful, non destructive technique to better characterize the internal structure of accretionary lapilli helping us to describe grain-size distribution of component particles and their spatial distribution within aggregates.

  6. Experimental volcanic ash aggregation: Internal structuring of accretionary lapilli and the role of liquid bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can release vast quantities of pyroclastic material into Earth's atmosphere, including volcanic ash, particles with diameters less than two millimeters. Ash particles can cluster together to form aggregates, in some cases reaching up to several centimeters in size. Aggregation alters ash transport and settling behavior compared to un-aggregated particles, influencing ash distribution and deposit stratigraphy. Accretionary lapilli, the most commonly preserved type of aggregates within the geologic record, can exhibit complex internal stratigraphy. The processes involved in the formation and preservation of these aggregates remain poorly constrained quantitatively. In this study, we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions which may be encountered within eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents via laboratory experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. In this apparatus, solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (particle concentration, air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). Experiments were conducted with soda-lime glass beads and natural volcanic ash particles under a range of experimental conditions. Both glass beads and volcanic ash exhibited the capacity for aggregation, but stable aggregates could only be produced when materials were coated with high but volcanically-relevant concentrations of NaCl. The growth and structure of aggregates was dependent on the initial granulometry, while the rate of aggregate formation increased exponentially with increasing relative humidity (12-45% RH), before overwetting promoted mud droplet formation. Notably, by use of a broad granulometry, we generated spherical, internally structured aggregates similar to some accretionary pellets found in volcanic deposits. Adaptation of a powder-technology model offers an explanation for the origin of natural accretionary

  7. Field evidence for contrasting origins of ash pellets, coated ash pellets, and accretionary lapilli: implications for the vertical structure of density currents and atmospheric ash plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branney, M. J.; Brown, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Field evidence from numerous sites reveals that adhesion of fine ash particles occurs in pyroclastic density currents as well as in lofted atmospheric plumes. Moreover, the type of aggregate in a deposit can help distinguish ashfall layers from thin, topography-draping ash deposits of pyroclastic density currents - a crucial distinction in hazard assessments. Ash aggregates additionally have potential to provide much-needed information on the little-understood vertical concentration-structure of density currents. The ashfall origin of ash-clusters and unstructured ash pellets is well established both from recent eruptions and occurrences in ashfall deposits. In contrast, there is growing evidence that some types of large, concentric-laminated accretionary lapilli grow during transport in pyroclastic density currents, as distinct from growing in lofted atmospheric plumes. On Tenerife, they occur matrix-supported within uppermost parts of ignimbrites, but are absent in the associated co-ignimbrite ashfall layers, even proximal to the ignimbrite. The ashfall layers contain only small, clast-supported unstructured pellets of fine ash, and it appears that the lofted co-ignimbrite plumes were not able to support the lapilli. Field relations of deposits on valley sides suggest that the scenario of a high-concentration density current with a buoyant co-ignimbrite ash plume may be over-simplified. They suggest, rather, that the concentrated part of the density current graded up into levels that were less-concentrated, more turbulent, hot, yet still dense enough to rush downslope. As ash pellets from the co-ignimbrite plume drop through the stratified pyroclastic density current, ash accretion is increasingly affected by the elevated temperatures, where reduced moisture levels inhibit adhesion of all but the finest ash particles to the growing lapillus, hence the development of fine-grained rims. As the lapillus descends to lower levels we infer that they heat up and harden

  8. Highly Sideophile Element Abundance Constraints on the Nature of the Late Accretionary Histories of Earth, Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Puchtel, I. S.; Brandon, A. D.; Horan, M. F.; James, O. B.

    2007-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE) include Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd. These elements are initially nearly-quantitatively stripped from planetary silicate mantles during core segregation. They then may be re-enriched in mantles via continued accretion sans continued core segregation. This suite of elements and its included long-lived radiogenic isotopes systems (Re-187 (right arrow) Os-187; Pt-190 (right arrow) Os-186) can potentially be used to fingerprint the characteristics of late accreted materials. The fingerprints may ultimately be useful to constrain the prior nebular history of the dominant late accreted materials, and to compare the proportion and genesis of late accretionary materials added to the inner planets. The past ten years have seen considerable accumulation of isotopic and compositional data for HSE present in the Earth's mantle, lunar mantle and impact melt breccias, and Martian meteorites. Here we review some of these data and consider the broader implications of the compiled data.

  9. The origin of pelletal lapilli in explosive kimberlite eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Brown, R. J.; Tait, M. A.; Hincks, T. K.

    2012-05-01

    Kimberlites are volatile-rich magmas from mantle depths of >=150km and are the primary source of diamonds. Kimberlite volcanism involves the formation of diverging pipes or diatremes, which are the locus of high-intensity explosive eruptions. A conspicuous and previously enigmatic feature of diatreme fills are 'pelletal lapilli'--well-rounded clasts consisting of an inner 'seed' particle with a complex rim, thought to represent quenched juvenile melt. Here we show that these coincide with a transition from magmatic to pyroclastic behaviour, thus offering fundamental insights into eruption dynamics and constraints on vent conditions. We propose that pelletal lapilli are formed when fluid melts intrude into earlier volcaniclastic infill close to the diatreme root zone. Intensive degassing produces a gas jet in which locally scavenged particles are simultaneously fluidised and coated by a spray of low-viscosity melt. A similar origin may apply to pelletal lapilli in other alkaline volcanic rocks, including carbonatites, kamafugites and melilitites.

  10. The origin of pelletal lapilli in explosive kimberlite eruptions.

    PubMed

    Gernon, T M; Brown, R J; Tait, M A; Hincks, T K

    2012-01-01

    Kimberlites are volatile-rich magmas from mantle depths of ≥ 150  km and are the primary source of diamonds. Kimberlite volcanism involves the formation of diverging pipes or diatremes, which are the locus of high-intensity explosive eruptions. A conspicuous and previously enigmatic feature of diatreme fills are 'pelletal lapilli'--well-rounded clasts consisting of an inner 'seed' particle with a complex rim, thought to represent quenched juvenile melt. Here we show that these coincide with a transition from magmatic to pyroclastic behaviour, thus offering fundamental insights into eruption dynamics and constraints on vent conditions. We propose that pelletal lapilli are formed when fluid melts intrude into earlier volcaniclastic infill close to the diatreme root zone. Intensive degassing produces a gas jet in which locally scavenged particles are simultaneously fluidised and coated by a spray of low-viscosity melt. A similar origin may apply to pelletal lapilli in other alkaline volcanic rocks, including carbonatites, kamafugites and melilitites. PMID:22588294

  11. Silicate glass micro and nanospherules generated in explosive eruptions of ultrabasic magmas: Implications for the origin of pelletal lapilli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo Sánchez, M.; Sarrionandia, F.; Arostegui, J.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.

    2015-02-01

    The genesis of spherical ash to lapilli-sized clasts with a central phenocryst or lithic fragment, mantled by a rim of fine-grained juvenile material that includes abundant concentrically arranged prismatic crystals, is interpreted as either: (i) the result of the spinning of a magma bleb with a crystalline kernel in a fluidized system, or (ii) the accretion of small melt droplets to a previously crystallized nucleus in a gas jet. We demonstrate that the rims of pelletal lapilli within tephras of the Cabezo Segura volcano (Calatrava, Spain) are clastic and were formed by the progressive welding of juvenile crystals and silicate glass droplets, and, to a lesser extent, filaments (both melt in origin) around a large crystalline nucleus. Our results support the accretion hypothesis and offer explicit and new images of the melt droplets that were so far considered hypothetical particles. These results indicate also that nanometre-scale juvenile pyroclasts (melt droplets and crystals) can be generated in explosive eruptions of ultrabasic magmas. Those pyroclasts can be subsequently welded together inside a dense gas jet generating pelletal lapilli and ash.

  12. into the accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Musya, Michimasa; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane are major components in geofluids; however, there is little evidence showing how C-H-O fluids evolve in a subduction zone. We investigated fluid inclusions in quartz veins from the Eocene-Oligocene Shimanto belt (Murotohanto subbelt) on Muroto Peninsula, SW Japan using microthermometry and laser Raman spectroscopy. Quartz veins that cut the cleavage of the host rocks in the Murotohanto subbelt contain one-phase carbonic inclusions (CH4) and two-phase aqueous inclusions (CH4 ± CO2 vapor and H2O liquid). The vapor in the two-phase inclusions is essentially CH4 in the northern part of the belt and a CO2-CH4 mixture in the southern part; values of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (=CO2 / (CO2 + CH4)) vary from 0 to 0.9. Within a single CO2-bearing vein, [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] values decrease from the vein wall ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] = 0.5 to 0.9) to the vein center ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] = 0), and the homogenization temperature increases from approximately 180°C to 240°C-250°C, indicating a transition of the carbonic species from CO2-CH4 to CH4 during vein formation. CO2-dominant fluids are rare in most accretionary prisms formed under low-grade metamorphic conditions, and the generation of CO2 cannot be explained by diagenesis of organic matter in sediments under the P-T conditions of formation of the CO2-bearing veins (235°C to 245°C, 165 to 200 MPa). The CO2 fluids are distributed preferentially near an out-of-sequence thrust that brings the Murotohanto subbelt into contact with the late Oligocene-early Miocene Nabae subbelt and its many volcanic and intrusive rocks. We therefore suggest that the CO2 fluids were generated in association with near-trench magmatism during the middle Miocene and that the fluids were injected and mixed with the CH4 pore fluids of the sediments in the accretionary prism.

  13. Mineralogy of Juvenile Lapilli in Fort a la Corne Pyroclastic Kimberlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. H.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; McBride, J.

    2009-05-01

    Pyroclastic-dominated kimberlites of the Fort a la Corne area (Saskatchewan, Canada) are characterized by the presence of juvenile ash and lapilli tuffs together with crystal tuffs composed of discrete crystals of olivine. Juvenile lapilli are amoeboid-to-curviplanar in shape and composed of olivine set in a fine-grained groundmass. Welding of juvenile lapilli is extremely rare. Clasts can be set in a matrix of calcite and/or serpentine. Commonly, olivine crystals protrude from the clast margins. Many, but not all, clasts contain vesicles filled with carbonates and/or serpentine. Carbonates in the vesicles include Sr-bearing calcite, dolomite and Ba-Mg carbonate. Individual kimberlite units in some instances contain several juxtaposed texturally- and mineralogically-different varieties of juvenile lapilli. In others, clasts are of similar petrographic character that differ in only in their spinel mineralogy. In many clasts early-forming microphenocrystal prisms of calcite are present. The groundmass of the ash and lapilli consists of perovskite, serpentine pseudomorphs after monticellite, diverse discrete euhedral, resorbed and atoll spinels, apatite, serpentine, and laths of quench dolomite. Groundmass mica appears to be absent. Spinel assemblages differ between different vents. At Candle Lake the overall trend of spinel compositions follows that typical of hypabyssal kimberlites with individual clasts within a given unit exhibiting segments of this trend. Compositions belong to a spinel- magnesiochromite-chromite-qandilite-magnetite solid solution series. At Smeaton (FALC 169 body), spinel compositions follow the same overall trend but are all relatively more evolved, and typically Ti-rich and Cr-poor. The majority of compositions plot on the rear face of the reduced spinel prism and belong to the spinel- qandilite-ulvospinel-magnetite series. It is concluded that spinels in Fort a la Corne kimberlites follow the "normal" evolutionary trend of spinel compositions

  14. Accretionary orogens through Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cawood, Peter A.; Kroner, A.; Collins, W.J.; Kusky, T.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Windley, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Accretionary orogens form at intraoceanic and continental margin convergent plate boundaries. They include the supra-subduction zone forearc, magmatic arc and back-arc components. Accretionary orogens can be grouped into retreating and advancing types, based on their kinematic framework and resulting geological character. Retreating orogens (e.g. modern western Pacific) are undergoing long-term extension in response to the site of subduction of the lower plate retreating with respect to the overriding plate and are characterized by back-arc basins. Advancing orogens (e.g. Andes) develop in an environment in which the overriding plate is advancing towards the downgoing plate, resulting in the development of foreland fold and thrust belts and crustal thickening. Cratonization of accretionary orogens occurs during continuing plate convergence and requires transient coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back-arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat-slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion overriding the downgoing plate. Accretionary orogens have been active throughout Earth history, extending back until at least 3.2 Ga, and potentially earlier, and provide an important constraint on the initiation of horizontal motion of lithospheric plates on Earth. They have been responsible for major growth of the continental lithosphere through the addition of juvenile magmatic products but are also major sites of consumption and reworking of continental crust through time, through sediment subduction and subduction erosion. It is probable that the rates of crustal growth and destruction are roughly equal, implying that net growth since the Archaean is effectively zero. ?? The Geological Society of London 2009.

  15. Flotation Experiments with Seafloor-Sampled Pumice Lapilli, IODP 340 - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, M.; Manga, M.; White, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    A 1.25-m-thick, unconsolidated unit of pink pumice lapilli was recovered at site U1396, IODP expedition 340. The drilling site lies at the top of an entirely submarine ridge in a back-arc of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, 35 km offshore from Montserrat Island. The unit was recovered from 122 m below sea floor, at a water depth of ~800 m. Preliminary biostratigraphy and paleomagnetic analysis yield an age of ~4 Ma. This age is much older than any rocks from the island of Montserrat, suggesting that the pumice lapilli unit may have submarine origin. In addition, the pumice lapilli unit has a grading and sorting that does not match conventional eruption-fed products from air-fall or turbidity currents. The pumice lapilli unit was recovered at two holes 40 m apart, and is identical in the two cores. The change in grain size in the stratigraphy of the unit defines a weak stratification. The pumice lapilli unit comprises two main sub-units, with four ash-rich intervals. The lower sub-unit is ~20 cm thick, framework-supported, and dominated by angular white tube-pumice lapilli (2-4 mm); dense lithic clasts (2 mm) are concentrated at the base of this sub-unit. The upper sub-unit is 1 m thick, and mostly composed of angular to sub-angular, white tube pumice lapilli (average 4 mm, max 32 mm), in a pink ash matrix. The ash is chiefly composed of micro-pumice clasts, feldspar and ferromagnesian crystal fragments, glass shards, and lithic clasts that commonly contain fresh pyrite. Three main parameters constrain the floatability of pumice clasts in water: vesicularity, clast size and shape, and clast temperature. The connected vesicularity of the pumice clasts was measured by subtracting the weight of dry pumice clasts from their water-saturated weight, and by functional stereology applied on SEM images. Clast-size distribution and clast shape were measured by particle size analyzer (CILAS) and sieving. We carried out pyroclast flotation and settling experiments in an

  16. New Approaches for the Characterization of Poorly-Exposed Tephra deposits: the Case Study of Fontana Lapilli Eruption, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Houghton, B.

    2006-12-01

    The Fontana Lapilli deposit was erupted in late Pleistocene from a vent located around Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) and represents the product of one of the largest basaltic plinian eruptions studied so far. This eruption evolved from an initial sequence of short hawaiian-strombolian pulses via a moderately explosive phase to the main series of quasi-steady plinian episodes depositing fallout beds of highly-vesicular basaltic- andesite scorias (SiO2 ~ 53 wt%). Even though a few well preserved outcrops in medial area allowed the temporal evolution of the eruption to be well constrained, the lack of deposit exposure in proximal and distal areas prevents crucial eruption parameters to be determined using standard techniques. As a result we have applied an inversion technique in combination with the forward model TEPHRA to achieve column height and total erupted mass of the main units of Fontana Lapilli eruption. The power of this technique is that input parameters are not estimated a priori as in forward modelling but it automates the process of searching for optimal parameters employing a mathematical algorithm to guide the search for the best-fit parameter set. Results on the column height well agree with field data, whereas estimation of the total erupted mass show a significant discrepancy with values obtained using standard techniques. Such a discrepancy significantly affects the estimate of other important parameters, like mass discharge rate and eruption duration. The application of inversion techniques confirms the problematic of uncertainties associated with field data often used as input factors in numerical models, suggesting that numerical solutions should be preferred to curve- fitting techniques for the determination of eruption parameters above all in cases of poor deposit exposure.

  17. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  18. Extreme efficiency of mud volcanism in dewatering accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Achim; Klaeschen, Dirk; Mascle, Jean

    2001-07-01

    Drilling results from two mud volcanoes on the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary complex as well as bottom sampling and the wealth of geophysical data acquired recently have provided fundamental knowledge of the 3D geometry of mud extrusions. Mud volcanism is generally related to buoyancy (density inversion), and is triggered by the collision of the African and Eurasian blocks, forcing undercompacted clayey sediments to extrude along faults in the central and hinterlandward parts of the prism. Volumetric estimates of extruded mud in several well-studied areas were based on pre-stack depth-migrated seismic profiles across the entire, up to >150 km wide, prism. The resulting volumes of mud were combined with ages from mud dome drilling, so that rates of mud extrusion were obtained. Subtracting the solid rock mass from the bulk mud volume using physical property data, fluid flux as a function of mud volcanism alone has been quantified for the first time. The volume of fluid extruding with the mud is found to be variable, but reaches up to 15 km 3 fluid per km trench length and Ma along cross sections with abundant mud volcanoes. Such large fluid quantities in a region some 50-150 km behind the deformation front exceed estimates from those elsewhere (where undoubtedly the majority of the interstitial fluid is lost due to compaction). Such fluids near the backstop are likely to result predominantly from mineral dehydration and diagenetic reactions at depth, and consequently provide a window to understand deeper processes along the deep décollement. More importantly, the enormous rates with which such fluids and liquified mud escape along the out-of-sequence faults alter fluid budget calculations in subduction zones drastically.

  19. Deformation-induced diagenesis and microbial activity in the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famin, V.; Andreani, M.; Boullier, A. M.; Raimbourg, H.; Magnin, V.

    2014-12-01

    We performed a microscopic and chemical study of diagenetic reactions in deformation microstructures within deep mud sediments from the Nankai accretionary prism (SW Japan) collected during IODP Expedition 315. Our study reveals that deformation microstructures localize the crystallization of pyrite, a diagenetic reaction also found in large megasplay faults of the prism. Textural observation shows that pyrite crystallization is synchronous of the sediment deformation. The framboidal shape of pyrite crystals, the barium depletion and the strong arsenic enrichment observed in deformation microstructures compared with the sediment matrix, suggest that pyrite crystallization is mediated by the proliferation of anoxic archae. During scientific drilling expeditions IODP 315, 316 and 319, microbial life has been evidenced at depths of up to 800 m below the sea floor by the presence of biogenic methane and sulfate reducers in sediments. We suggest that deformation structures localize microbial proliferation because the fracturing of silicate minerals produces hydrogen, a necessary compound for bacteria under anoxic conditions. Bacteria proliferate as long as active deformation supplies hydrogen, and vanish when the deformation stops. The development of bacteria in deformation structures impacts our mechanical understanding of fault zones in accretionary prisms: Firstly, bacterial activity converts carbon from organic matter and hydrogen into methane and/or water, which may alter the fluid budget of fault zones and the recurrence of dynamic ruptures in megathrusts. Secondly, the abundance of bacteria could be used to recognize active fault zones from inactive ones in drilling cores.

  20. Thermochronology of the Torlesse accretionary complex, Wellington region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Peter J. J.

    2000-08-01

    The Torlesse Complex comprises several Mesozoic accretionary prism complexes together forming continental basement over large parts of New Zealand. This study focuses on the thermal history of relatively low grade graywacke rocks exposed in a transect in southern North Island that crosses the structural grain of the Torlesse Complex, including its older and younger parts. Zircon fission track (FT) ages for the Late Triassic Rakaia Terrane, which is the most inboard of the accretionary complexes, are partially annealed, some possibly reset, and may indicate early Cretaceous (134±10 Ma) cooling from maximum temperatures (Tmax), probably related to imbrication of younger complexes of the Pahau Terrane. Numerical modeling of the zircon FT ages and published 40ArA/39Ar muscovite and biotite ages for the Rakaia Terrane suggest Tmax values of 265-310°C and exhumation from depths of 10-12 km. The rocks underlying the Aorangi Range and involving the youngest accretionary complex have experienced much lower Tmax values of ≤210° and ≥110°C, bracketed by reset apatite FT ages and detrital zircon FT ages. The occurrence of a circa 100 Ma component of zircon FT ages in both the weakly and highly indurated rocks beneath the Aorangi Range, as well as in remnants of an overlying Albian accretionary slope basin (Whatarangi Formation), imply multistorey accretion and incorporation of sediment into the youngest prism. This circa 100 Ma zircon FT age component also places a maximum age on the termination of Mesozoic subduction beneath the New Zealand region. The occurrence of reset apatite FT ages across the whole of the Wellington transect indicates that at least 4 km of exhumation occurred during the late Miocene.

  1. Ferromanganese nodules from MANOP Sites H, S, and R-Control of mineralogical and chemical composition by multiple accretionary processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dymond, J.; Lyle, M.; Finney, B.; Piper, D.Z.; Murphy, K.; Conard, R.; Pisias, N.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical composition of ferromanganese nodules from the three nodule-bearing MANOP sites in the Pacific can be accounted for in a qualitative way by variable contributions of distinct accretionary processes. These accretionary modes are: 1. (1) hydrogenous, i.e., direct precipitation or accumulation of colloidal metal oxides in seawater, 2. (2) oxic diagenesis which refers to a variety of ferromanganese accretion processes occurring in oxic sediments; and 3. (3) suboxic diagenesis which results from reduction of Mn+4 by oxidation of organic matter in the sediments. Geochemical evidence suggests processes (1) and (2) occur at all three MANOP nodule-bearing sites, and process (3) occurs only at the hemipelagic site, H, which underlies the relatively productive waters of the eastern tropical Pacific. A normative model quantitatively accounts for the variability observed in nearly all elements. Zn and Na, however, are not well explained by the three end-member model, and we suggest that an additional accretionary process results in greater variability in the abundances of these elements. Variable contributions from the three accretionary processes result in distinct top-bottom compositional differences at the three sites. Nodule tops from H are enriched in Ni, Cu, and Zn, instead of the more typical enrichments of these elements in nodule bottoms. In addition, elemental correlations typical of most pelagic nodules are reversed at site H. The three accretionary processes result in distinct mineralogies. Hydrogenous precipitation produces ??MnO2. Oxic diagenesis, however, produces Cu-Ni-rich todorokite, and suboxic diagenesis results in an unstable todorokite which transforms to a 7 A?? phase ("birnessite") upon dehydration. The presence of Cu and Ni as charge-balancing cations influence the stability of the todorokite structure. In the bottoms of H nodules, which accrete dominantly by suboxic diagenesis, Na+ and possibly Mn+2 provide much of the charge balance for

  2. Structure and clay mineralogy: borehole images, log interpretation and sample analyses at Site C0002 Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Schleicher, Anja

    2015-04-01

    Our research focused on the characterization of fracture and fault structures from the deep Nankai Trough accretionary prism in Japan. Logging Data and cuttings samples from the two most recent International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expeditions 338 and 348 of the NanTroSEIZE project were analyzed by Logging While Drilling (LWD) oriented images, geophysical logs and clay mineralogy. Both expeditions took place at Site C0002, but whereas Hole C0002F (Expedition 338) was drilled down to 2004.5 mbsf, Hole C0002N and C0002P (Expedition 348) reached a depth of 2325.5 mbsf and 3058.8 mbsf respectively. The structural interpretation of borehole imaging data illustrates the deformation within the fractured and faulted sections of the accretionary prism. All drill holes show distinct areas of intense fracturing and faulting within a very clay-dominated lithology. Here, smectite and illite are the most common clay minerals, but the properties and the role they may play in influencing the fractures, faults and folds in the accretionary prism is still not well understood. When comparing clay mineralogy and fracture/fault areas in hole C0002F (Expedition 338), a trend in the abundance of illite and smectite, and in particular the swelling behavior of smectite is recognizable. In general, the log data provided a good correlation with the actual mineralogy and the relative abundance of clay. Ongoing postcruise preliminary research on hole C0002 N and C0002P (Expedition 348) should confirm these results. The relationship between fracture and fault structures and the changes in clay mineralogy could be explained by the deformation of specific areas with different compaction features, fluid-rock interaction processes, but could also be related to beginning diagenetic processes related to depth. Our results show the integration of logging data and cutting sample analyses as a valuable tool for characterization of petrophysical and mineralogical changes of the structures of the

  3. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  4. Accretionary origin for the late Archean Ashuanipi Complex of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Ashuanipi complex is one of the largest massif granulite terrains of the Canadian Shield. It makes up the eastern end of the 2000 km long, lower-grade, east-west belts of the Archean Superior Province, permitting lithological, age and tectonic correlation. Numerous lithological, geochemical and metamorphic similarities to south Indian granulites suggest common processes and invite comparison of tectonic evolution. The Ashuanipi granulite terrain of the Cannadian Superior Province was studied in detail, and an origin through self-melting of a 55 km thick accretionary wedge seems possible.

  5. Rock varnish in New York: An accelerated snapshot of accretionary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsley, David H.; Dorn, Ronald I.; DiGregorio, Barry E.; Langworthy, Kurt A.; Ditto, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Samples of manganiferous rock varnish collected from fluvial, bedrock outcrop and Erie Barge Canal settings in New York state host a variety of diatom, fungal and bacterial microbial forms that are enhanced in manganese and iron. Use of a Dual-Beam Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope to manipulate the varnish in situ reveals microbial forms that would not have otherwise been identified. The relative abundance of Mn-Fe-enriched biotic forms in New York samples is far greater than varnishes collected from warm deserts. Moisture availability has long been noted as a possible control on varnish growth rates, a hypothesis consistent with the greater abundance of Mn-enhancing bioforms. Sub-micron images of incipient varnish formation reveal that varnishing in New York probably starts with the mortality of microorganisms that enhanced Mn on bare mineral surfaces; microbial death results in the adsorption of the Mn-rich sheath onto the rock in the form of filamentous networks. Clay minerals are then cemented by remobilization of the Mn-rich material. Thus, the previously unanswered question of what comes first - clay mineral deposition or enhancement of Mn - can be answered in New York because of the faster rate of varnish growth. In contrast, very slow rates of varnishing seen in warm deserts, of microns per thousand years, make it less likely that collected samples will reveal varnish accretionary processes than samples collected from fast-accreting moist settings.

  6. Subsea Gas Emissions from the Barbados Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, A.; Sager, W. W.; Snow, J. E.; Max, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We study newly identified gas plumes in the water column from the Barbados Accretionary Complex using multibeam echo soundings from cruise AT21-02. The multibeam data were used to define a region with several ~600 - 900 m tall gas plumes in the water column directly above cratered hummocky regions of the sea floor that have relatively high backscatter, at a water depth of ~1500 m. The natural gas hydrate stability zone reaches a minimum depth of ~600 m in the water column, similar to that of the tallest imaged bubble plumes, implying hydrate shells on the gas bubbles. Maximum tilt of the plume shows current shear in a direction from northwest to southeast (~128°), similar to the transport direction of North Atlantic Deep Water. The source of hydrocarbons, determined from existing geochemical data, suggests the gas source was subjacent marine Cretaceous source rocks. North-south trending faults, craters and mud volcanoes associated with the gas plumes point to the presence of a deep plumbing system and indicate that gas is a driver of mud volcanism. The widespread occurrence of seafloor morphology related to venting indicates that subsea emissions from the Barbados Accretionary Complex are substantial.

  7. Accretionary rims on inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Hashimoto, A.; Grossman, L.

    1985-01-01

    The origin and composition of the rim sequence on the refractory inclusion in the Allende meteorite are studied. The different textures, mineralogy, and mineral-chemistry of the four layers of the rim are described. The layers are composed of: pyroxene, needles, olivine, hedenbergite, and andradite. Tables of the element and chemical compositions of the layers are presented. The data reveals that: (1) the layers are highly porous masses of euhedral crystals with no intergrowth; (2) layers contain highly disequilibrium mineral assemblages; and (3) the thickness of the layers varies with the underlying topography. These results support the theory that rim structures are accretionary aggregates formed from accretion of independently grown particles onto the surface of inclusions. The formation of the grains in the layers and matrix from nebular condensates is studied.

  8. Accretionary rims on inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Hashimoto, A.; Grossman, L.

    1985-11-01

    The origin and composition of the rim sequence on the refractory inclusion in the Allende meteorite are studied. The different textures, mineralogy, and mineral-chemistry of the four layers of the rim are described. The layers are composed of: pyroxene, needles, olivine, hedenbergite, and andradite. Tables of the element and chemical compositions of the layers are presented. The data reveals that: (1) the layers are highly porous masses of euhedral crystals with no intergrowth; (2) layers contain highly disequilibrium mineral assemblages; and (3) the thickness of the layers varies with the underlying topography. These results support the theory that rim structures are accretionary aggregates formed from accretion of independently grown particles onto the surface of inclusions. The formation of the grains in the layers and matrix from nebular condensates is studied.

  9. Structure of a growing accretionary prism, Hikurangi margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, F. J.; Hampton, M.; Childs, J.; Fisher, M. A.; Lewis, K.; Pettinga, J. R.

    1986-08-01

    The Hikurangi margin of eastern North Island, New Zealand, represents the feather edge of the Indian plate at its convergent boundary with the subducting Pacific plate. A migrated seismic reflection profile across this margin clearly displays the structural evolution of an accretionary prism. A 25-km-wide band of “protothrusts” is delineated between the toe of the slope and a converging seamount; this illustrates an early stage in the seaward propagation of a deformation front. Landward-tilted trench-slope basins are separated by ridges that have clearly defined thrusts, which appear to sole out at a decollement. The decollement continues at an angle of only 3° beneath the 150-km-wide margin to a depth of 14 km near the coast where it coincides with an onshore zone of high seismicity.

  10. Sediment compaction and fluid migration in the Makran Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minshull, Tim; White, Robert

    1989-06-01

    The Makran continental margin in the Gulf of Oman forms the seaward extremity of an accretionary sediment prism which extends several hundred kilometers inland. A recently acquired multichannel seismic reflection profile shot across the margin imaged the structure of the prism in greater detail than was previously possible and allowed us to investigate the relationship between deformation and pore fluid motion in the region. Velocity analyses of the common midpoint gathers reveal a marked change in velocity structure at the toe of the accretionary wedge, as seen in previous sonobuoy wide-angle data. Accreted sediments show significantly higher vertical velocity gradients than those of sediments entering the prism; this change is interpreted as due to porosity reduction as pore fluids are squeezed out of the compacting sediment. A prominent "bottom simulating reflector" appears 500-800 m beneath the sea bed. Several lines of evidence suggest that this reflector represents the base of a gas hydrate zone underlain by widespread free gas, which may be exsolved from pore water migrating from deep within the sediment pile up permeable fault planes imaged in the profile. The hydrate reflector appears to shallow in the region of some faults, suggesting a temperature anomaly due to the presence of warm pore fluids. A heat flow profile derived from the depth of the hydrate reflector does not show the expected landward decrease as the sediment pile thickens. Simple thermal modeling suggests that advective heat flow within the prism may explain this anomaly. The inferred presence of overpressured pore fluids in the Makran suggests that accreted sediments have a low permeability. The seismic evidence suggests a two-stage compaction process, with rapid initial dewatering through intergranular permeability as sediment enters the prism followed by a buildup of pore pressure as the permeability decreases and fluid migration is restricted to fault zones.

  11. Hybrid granodiorites intruding the accretionary prism, Kodiak, Shumagin, and Sanak Islands, southwest Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Malcolm; Morris, Julie; Whelan, Joseph

    1981-11-01

    A narrow belt of tonalite-granodiorite-granite plutons and batholiths intruded the accretionary prism in southwestern Alaska about 60 m.y. ago, simultaneously with plutonism over 100 km north along the main arc axis. The presence of metasedimentary xenoliths, kyanite, and garnet within the intrusions exposed on the Kodiak, Shumagin and Sanak islands establishes the presence of a crustal component. Extremely high values of δ18O, from +10.9 to +13.2 o/oo, require a crustal origin for much of the oxygen in the intrusions. Open-system alteration has disrupted whole-rock Rb-Sr systematics in some samples from the Sanak pluton and Shumagin batholith. Mineral isochrons using unaltered minerals yield an age of 58.7 ± 1.2 m.y. and 87Sr/86Sri = 0.70534 ± 10 for the Shumagin batholith, and ages of 62.7 ± 1.2 m.y. and 87Sr/86Sri = 0.70523 ± 14 for the Sanak pluton. Comparison of the isotopic data for the intrusions with those of sedimentary rocks in the Kodiak and Shumagin formations requires that a low-δ18O, low-87Sr/86Sr component be present as well. Mixing models combining 87Sr/87Sr and Sr contents of various kinds of mafic magmas with partial melts of metasedimentary wall rocks suggest that three types of mafic magmas can satisfactorily duplicate the oxygen isotope signature of the intrusions: (1) a mid ocean ridge (MORB)-like magma, (2) a magma derived by partial fusion of altered MORB, or (3) an arc basalt. The MORB model predicts abundances of Rb, Sr, Ba, and rare earth elements which are similar to those in the intrusions, while the altered MORB model does not. The arc magma model provides a better trace element match than the remelted MORB model, but is not as successful as the MORB model. These intrusions were preceded by a pulse of mafic to intermediate volcanism near or within the accretionary prism, recorded in the Paleocene Ghost Rocks Formation. This volcanism is probably the heat and mass source of the mafic component within the intrusions, and may be

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the petroleum potential of the Tertiary accretionary terrane, west side of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Convergence between the Pacific and North American plates during late Eocene and late middle Miocene times produced two principal terranes of melange and broken formation (Eocene, Ozette Melange and Miocene, Hoh Melange) exposed onshore along the west side of the Olympic Peninsula. Organic geochemical analyses of 150 samples collected from these two accretionary terranes indicate that they are marginally mature and have a low content of type III organic matter, therefore, they are gas prone rather than oil prone. Geochemical analyses, using molecular markers, indicate that the oil in the Sunshine Mining Co. Medina No. 1 is related to oil extracted from middle Eocene siltstone of the Ozette Melange located as much as 140 km north of the well. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic abundance of methane in natural gas seeps and gas in the melange along the west side of the Olympic Peninsula indicate that the gas is mainly thermogenic; however, the relation between these two sources of gas is uncertain.

  13. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  14. Structural development of the North-Sumatran Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, Jacob; McNeill, Lisa; Henstock, Tim; Gaedicke, Christoph; Ladage, Stefan; Kopp, Heidrun

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary prism of northern Sumatra differs from classical prism examples in a number of ways. It consists of an almost flat, up to 130 km wide plateau and a small but steep outer wedge. Along its entire width from the deformation front to the rear of the prism it is composed of multiple, up to 5 km thick undeformed blocks of layered sediments that are adjacent to seismically chaotic units. The intact thrust blocks are the same thickness as the 5 km thick incoming sediment section and are usually bounded on both sides by steep landward and seaward vergent faults. Similar sedimentary blocks, bounded by conjugate normal faults that relate to bending of the subducting oceanic plate, are also observed in the incoming section. Another striking structural feature is the occurrence of landward vergent (seaward dipping) thrust faults in the outer prism. These unusual deformation structures differ from the common fold-and-thrust belt model in the dip direction of the thrust sheets and have, to a similar extent, only been reported from the Cascadia margin. Seismic reflection data also image a series of high-amplitude negative-polarity reflective faults in the prism and the incoming sediment section that only produce minor displacements. These faults do not intersect the seafloor or the plate-boundary at depth and dip both landward and seaward at a lower angle than most prism thrust faults. We use a combination of reflection seismic and bathymetric data to investigate the parameters and processes that lead to the development of the unusual prism structure and morphology. In addition to detailed structural and morphologic descriptions we summarize and compare fault dips in the incoming section and the prism in order to analyse how proto-deformation of oceanic plate sediments influences the structural development of the prism. We present a conceptual model in line with our observations that could be transferable to accretionary margins with a similar geologic history

  15. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  16. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  17. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  18. Structural development of the western Makran Accretionary Complex, Offshore Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, C. M.; Jackson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Makran Accretionary Complex (MAC), which straddles the southern offshore regions of Iran and Pakistan, is a fold-thrust system bound by the Murray Ridge and Ornach Nal Fault to the east, and the Minab Fault System (MFS) to the west. It is c. 1000 km wide and the frontal c. 125 km of the system is submerged beneath the Gulf of Oman. Relatively little is known about this system, despite the fact that constitutes a large portion of the Central Tethyan Orogen and is one of the largest accretionary complexes in the world. We use offshore 2D seismic reflection data to investigate the structural style and evolution of the Iranian segment of the MAC. The MAC is divided into two morphologically distinct domains: (i) a northern domain (Domain 1), which is located landward of a prominant break-in-slope on the seabed and is characterised by a series of normal fault-bound sub-basins that are approximately 50 km wide, and which contain numerous, unconformity-bound seismic units; and (ii) a southern domain (Domain 2), which is located basinward of the prominent seabed slope break, and is characterised by alternating ridges and troughs. Seismic data indicate that these structures are laterally continuous (over 100 km long) north-dipping thrust faults, which are overlain by south-verging, non-cylindrical, fault-propagation folds. Towards the western end of the study area, immediately offshore of the prominent onshore trace of the MFS, there is no single structure that can be reliably interpreted as the offshore extension of the MFS. Instead, a series of oblique-slip faults with thrust and strike-slip components are identified, spanning a zone that is c. 40 km wide. In the north and close to the coastline, the faults are dominantly strike-slip, whereas further south, closer to the deformation front, the thrust-sense component is more important. Irrespective of their slip sense, faults in this zone have a similar N-S strike to the onshore trace of the MFS. In addition, the basin

  19. Propagation tectonics and multiple accretionary processes of the Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunpeng; Zhang, Xiaoning; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Hongfu; Yang, Zhao; Sun, Shengsi; Zhang, Feifei

    2015-05-01

    The Qinling Orogen was built through collision between the North China and South China Blocks. Previous detailed geological, geochemical and geochronological investigations revealed that the mountain range can be divided into four tectonic units with distinct tectono-lithostratigraphy, which are, from north to south, the southern sector of the North China Block, North Qinling Belt, South Qinling Belt and northern sector of the South China Block, separated by the Kuanping, Shangdan and Mianlue sutures. According to the petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of ophiolitic mélanges and related magmatic rocks, as well as the features of sedimentary units, we think that the North China Block, the North Qinling Belt and the South China Block were originally independent continental units while the South Qinling Belt had been the northern part of the South China Block. These units experienced three episodes of accretionary tectonic processes and amalgamation from south to north. The Neoproterozoic accretion took place along the Luonan-Luanchuan Fault and Kuanping ophiolitic mélange belt as a result of southward subduction and subsequent collision between the North Qinling and North China Blocks during ca. 1.0-0.8 Ga related to the formation of the supercontinent of Rodinia. The Paleozoic accretion occurred along the Shangdan suture resulted from northward subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the Early Paleozoic and subsequent continental subduction in the Late Paleozoic. Late Triassic accretion took place along the Mianlue suture between the South Qinling and South China Blocks due to northward subduction of the Mianlue oceanic lithosphere during the Permian-Early Triassic and subsequent collision in the Late Triassic. After the Late Triassic collision along the Mianlue suture the whole Qinling Mountain range entered the phase of intense intracontinental deformation.

  20. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex.

    PubMed

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  1. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex

    PubMed Central

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  2. Geological Controls of a Gas-Hydrate System in the Frontal Taiwan Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Lin, A.; Liu, C.; Hsu, S.; Lin, C.; Chen, G.; Schn Êrle, P.

    2008-12-01

    The frontal accretionary wedge offshore southwest Taiwan is characterized by rapid sedimentation, erosion along submarine canyons, and tectonic uplift due to folding and thrusting. The possible existence of gas hydrates beneath the seafloor has been indicated by geophysical and geological data. The interplays between the processes of sedimentation, erosion, and tectonic uplift therefore maintain a dynamic equilibrium system in which gas hydrates are preserved in the strata. In order to understand this system, we use data of chirp sonar, reflection seismics, and seafloor sediment samples to characterize the geological controls on the gas-hydrate system in the study area. The study area lies in the lower slope domain of the accretionary wedge. Seismic data reveals that, in the west of the study area (i.e., the frontal segment), it consists of a series of folds cored by blind thrusts; in the east of the study area (i.e., the rear segment), it consists of an array of emergent thrusts. The most frontal emergent thrust separates the frontal and rear segments of the lower slope. There are different in sedimentary features, structural styles, distributions of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the frontal and rear segments. In the frontal segment, sedimentation prevails in this region. Areas of major erosion and mass-wasting processes occur mostly in the reaches of submarine canyons. The spatial distribution of BSRs is sparse in this region and BSRs occur mostly beneath the anticlinal and bathymetric ridges. In the rear segment, it typically shows west-vergent and asymmetric fold profiles with long and planar backlimbs versus short forelimbs. The forelimbs are absent or very short in profile, and the east-dipping backlimbs are steeper beneath bathymetric ridge with its stratal dip decreasing and exhibit a homoclinal feature. There is usually a significant stratigraphic section deposited on backlimbs, showing evidences of limb rotation during fold growth. A few seafloor

  3. Accretionary complex structure and kinematics during Paleozoic arc continent collision in the southern Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; Brown, D.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Puchkov, V.; Gorozhanina, Y.

    2000-10-01

    The southern Urals contain a well-preserved accretionary complex that has overthrust the continental margin during arc-continent collision between the East European Craton (EEC) and the Magnitogorsk island arc in the Late Devonian. Within the accretionary complex, we study three tectonic units that differ in deformation style, and each provides a unique geodynamic implication. The Zilair Nappe, the largest and best exposed unit, consists of 5-6 km of syncollisional, arc-derived Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous polymictic and graywacke turbidites that were deposited across the continental margin and incorporated by frontal accretion into the accretionary complex. The Zilair Nappe is a bivergent thrust imbricate where the west-vergent thrusts dominate and have associated kilometer-scale ramp anticlines with well developed east-dipping axial planar cleavage. Along its eastern contact, however, the cleavage fans until it dips moderately westward and the folds are east-vergent. Following its emplacement, west-vergent, basement-involved thrusting that breached the whole accretionary complex imbricated the Zilair Nappe. The Timirovo Duplex is structurally beneath the Zilair Nappe, and outcrops for several tens of kilometers along its northwestern margin. The duplex forms a west-vergent thrust stack composed of a highly deformed and sheared Lower and Middle Devonian reef carbonates of the former EEC margin platform. These rocks were shallowly underplated at the base of the accretionary complex during emplacement over the margin. The Suvanyak Complex outcrops along the eastern contact of the Zilair Nappe, and consists of polydeformed greenschist facies metasediments of the former EEC slope that were offscraped, underplated and incorporated at the rear of the accretionary complex.

  4. The Eurekan Orogeny: convergent intraplate deformation through accretionary tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The Eurekan Orogeny, which created much of the high topography (~1-2km) of Ellesmere Island and adjacent Greenland, exhibits a crustal architecture linked to intraplate orogenesis in the Cenozoic. These features occurred as a result of mountain-building processes the dynamics of which are not well understood. It is generally considered that the rotation of Greenland in the Eocene (related to sedimentary basin formation in Baffin Bay) produced compressional tectonics between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. As part of this process, the Eurekan Orogeny formed away from a traditional convergent ocean-closure plate boundary, and may represent a style of intraplate deformation. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leave deformational `scars' in the crust and mantle lithosphere (specifically in the Ellesmere Island case through accretionary orogenesis in the Palaeozoic). This weakening of the lithosphere may produce episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. For example, lithospheric shortening at a time after continental collision could cause the previously deformed crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In this work, the geodynamic evolution of the Eurekan Orogeny and its relationship to the tectonics of the Canadian polar margin and northern Baffin Basin is explored using high-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments with the modelling code SOPALE. The modelling of the High Arctic is constrained by the first-order crustal structure of the region (deduced by local gravity field and passive seismological data). Presented are suites of numerical experiments that investigate how the pre-existing lithospheric structures (both crustal and sub-crustal) control the evolution of the resulting intraplate orogen. The influence of other primary modelling parameters, such as crustal thickness and assumed rheology, is also explored. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate

  5. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the Paleo-Asian Ocean: Insights from detrital zircons from Silurian to Carboniferous strata at the northwestern margin of the Tarim Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yigui; Zhao, Guochun; Sun, Min; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Hou, Wenzhu; Zhang, Xiaoran; Liu, Dongxing; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Guowei

    2015-02-01

    A detrital zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic study was carried out in the Middle Silurian to Late Carboniferous sedimentary strata of the northwestern Tarim Craton in order to understand accretionary processes in the southern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Detrital zircons from these strata yielded U-Pb ages clustering around 2.8-2.3 Ga, 2.0-1.7 Ga, 1.3-0.9 Ga, 880-600 Ma, and 500-400 Ma, with age populations and Hf isotopic signatures matching those of magmatic rocks in the Tarim Craton and the Central Tianshan Block. Abundant 500-400 Ma detrital zircons most likely reflect deposition in a retroarc foreland basin inboard of an Andean-type magmatic arc to the north, supporting the northern Tarim-Central Tianshan connection during early Paleozoic time. The absence of 380-310 Ma zircon population in the Carboniferous siliciclastic rocks suggests that the Central Tianshan Block may have been separated from the Tarim Craton in the Early Devonian, caused by the interarc/back-arc opening of the South Tianshan Ocean. We propose an accretionary orogenic model switching from advancing to retreating mode during Paleozoic time in the southwestern part of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. This transition most likely occurred coevally with the rifting of Southeast Asian blocks from the northeastern margin of Gondwana.

  6. Unusual lapilli tuff ejecta erupted at Stromboli during the 15 March 2007 explosion shed light on the nature and thermal state of rocks forming the crater system of the volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Stefano; Renzulli, Alberto; Landi, Patrizia; La Felice, Sonia; Rosi, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Textural and mineralogical study of high-temperature, angular blocks erupted during the Stromboli explosion of 15 March 2007 was used to make inferences on the nature and thermal state of rocks forming the subsurface of the volcano' summit crater terrace. The studied ejecta consist of lapilli tuff that formed as a result of the transformation and high temperature induration (sintering) of the basaltic scoriae, lapilli and ash originally accumulated as loose tephra during the current activity of the volcano. The main processes leading to the tephra transformation were investigated through microstructural observations, mineral and glass analyses (SEM-EDS and EMP analyses). Investigations revealed that subsolidus reactions and partial melting of the tephra occurred, at temperatures higher than 600 °C and under variable fO2 conditions from QFM to HM buffering curves. In some blocks, evidence of high-T reheating and partial melting at the expense of secondary hydrothermal minerals was also observed. In order to track the subsolidus reheating history of the basaltic pyroclasts, a detailed study of the pseudomorphic phases and reactions after olivine, driven by iron oxidation under high-T conditions, was performed. The observed mineralogical transformation suggests that the lapilli tuff material, originating from the burial of tephra routinely accumulated by persistent Strombolian explosions within the crater terrace, were in some cases altered by the circulation of acidic fluids and were in any case reheated due to isotherm rise forced by high heat flux and gas streaming delivered by the underlying magma system. It is worth noting that the ejection of these unusual volcanic lithotypes was possible because a few days before the 15 March 2007 event, the craters were clogged with lapilli tuff material that slid into the crater bottom between 7 and 9 March. Findings of this study suggest that the scattered permanently active vents and shallow conduits of Stromboli are

  7. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2015-12-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  8. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.

  9. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  10. Low-frequency tremors associated with reverse faults in a shallow accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2009-09-01

    The shallow part of a seismogenic subduction zone is thought to play an important role in tsunami genesis during large interplate thrust earthquakes. Near the updip portion of the seismogenic zone along the Nankai trough, splay faults, which are major active reverse faults in the accretionary prism, likely rupture during large interplate earthquakes such as the 1944 Mw 8.2 Tonankai earthquake off Kii Peninsula. We observed low-frequency tremors associated with reverse faults in a shallow accretionary prism off Kii Peninsula at close range by using ocean bottom seismographs. The tremors were characterized by a dominant frequency range of 2-8 Hz and a lack of energy in the frequency range above 10 Hz. Their duration ranged from tens of seconds to a few minutes. Their source locations lay in three clusters on the landward slope of the Nankai trough. Activity in each cluster continued for from one day to two weeks. Many of the low-frequency tremors were located near the shallowest part of a major splay fault. The episodic activity of low-frequency tremors and of previously reported very-low-frequency earthquakes, which indicate reverse faulting in the shallow accretionary prism, suggests that the reverse faults in the accretionary prism are conditionally stable faults that can become unstable under sufficiently strong dynamic loading, such as that caused by a large earthquake. Such reverse faults, as typified by a splay fault, can rupture during large interplate earthquakes and generate large tsunamis.

  11. Fluid circulation in the depths of accretionary prisms: an example of the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimbourg, Hugues; Vacelet, Maxime; Ramboz, Claire; Famin, Vincent; Augier, Romain; Palazzin, Giulia; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-08-01

    Accretionary prisms constitute ideal targets to study fluid circulation and fluid-rock interactions at depths beyond the reach of active margin deep drilling. The highest-grade rocks from the Shimanto Belt on Kyushu were buried under 3-5 kbars at ~ 300°C (Toriumi and Teruya, 1988). They contain abundant quartz veins, formed throughout burial and exhumation and variably affected by brittle and ductile deformation. Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals the existence of two distinct types of quartz, characterized by a blue and brown color, respectively. CL-blue quartz fills macro-veins (width ≥ 10μm), while CL-brown quartz is present in micro-veins (width ~ 1 - 10μm) and ductilely recrystallized domains. On the basis of microstructures, the fluids associated with the CL-blue and CL-brown quartz are interpreted as "external" and "local", respectively. Quartz growth rims of alternating CL colors as well as mutually cross-cutting veins show that the two fluids cyclically wetted the host rock. From fluid inclusions analysis, the fluid associated with CL-blue quartz has a salinity similar to seawater, while the fluid associated with CL-brown quartz is less saline. In addition, CL-blue quartz is richer in aluminum than the CL-brown one. In contrast to the salinity/aluminum signature, the δ18O isotopic signature of both quartz types is similar and buffered by host rock. The difference between the preservation of the salinity signature of the fluid and the loss of its δ18O signature is explained by quicker exchange kinetics and larger host rock buffering capacity for isotopic reequilibration. The "local" fluid, associated with CL-brown quartz, reflects the dilution of pore water by the pure water produced by prograde dehydration reactions of clay minerals. The "external" fluid associated with CL-blue quartz is interpreted as seawater or pore water from shallow (depth < 1-2 km below seafloor) sediments. We propose that downward percolation of shallow water to depths ~ 10 km

  12. Major and trace element geochemistry and Os isotopic composition of metalliferous umbers from the Late Cretaceous Japanese accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2005-07-01

    Metalliferous umbers and red shales occur as unique products of the Kula-Pacific ridge-forearc collision in the Late Cretaceous Shimanto Supergroup, an accretionary complex in Japan. These umbers are closely associated with greenstones of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) origin and are regarded as hydrothermal metalliferous precipitates related to MOR-type volcanism. The umbers and red shales were deposited in the trench area where both terrigenous detritus from land and hydrothermal metalliferous particulates from a MOR were supplied simultaneously. Besides a predominance of Fe and Mn, the umbers exhibit remarkable enrichments in P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, Mo, rare earth elements (REEs), and Os relative to continental crustal abundances. The X/Fe (X = Mn, P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, and REEs) ratios and PAAS-normalized REE patterns of the umbers are very similar to those of modern hydrothermal plume fallout precipitates deposited on flanks of MOR. This indicates that the umbers preserve primary geochemical signatures of hydrothermal metalliferous sediments that scavenged seawater-derived elements and thus can be used as a proxy for Late Cretaceous seawater. The marine 187Os/188Os ratios reconstructed from the late Maastrichtian umbers range from 0.42 to 0.56 and are very consistent with recent data obtained from the Pacific and Atlantic pelagic carbonates that record an abrupt decline from 0.55 to 0.4 during the period between 67.0 Ma and 65.7 Ma.

  13. Manganese formations in the accretionary belts of Japan: Implications for subduction-accretion process in an active convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Santosh, M.; Maruyama, S.

    2011-08-01

    In the accretionary complexes of Japan, many bedded manganese and iron-manganese ore deposits occur, especially in the Jurassic complexes such as the Chichibu, Tamba, Mino, Ashio and Northern Kitakami belts. The manganese ores in these Jurassic accretionary complexes probably formed from manganese nodule/crust-bearing siliceous sediments on deep-sea floor and were subsequently converted to the manganese ores by metamorphism during the subduction-accretion process. Some of the deposits also show the signatures of younger granitic intrusions. The manganese formations now incorporated within these belts are marker beds of accretionary tectonics associated with plate tectonic processes in convergent margins.

  14. Modeling Fluid Flow and Microbial Reactions in the Peru Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Matmon, D.

    2002-12-01

    Accretionary complexes are sites where sediment compaction and deeper reactions drive large-scale flow systems that can affect global solute budgets. Extensive modeling and drilling studies have elucidated the origin of the fluids, pore pressures, duration of flow, and major flow paths in these settings. An important research goal is to quantify the effect of these flow systems on global chemical budgets of reactive solutes such as carbon. The Peru margin represents an end member setting that can serve as a basis to extend the results to other margins. The sediments are relatively high in organic carbon with an average value of 2.6%. The subduction rate at ~9 cm/yr and taper angle at 14-17° are among the largest in the world. Recent microbial studies on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201 at the Peru accretionary margin provide many key elements needed to quantify the processes affecting organic carbon in an accretionary complex. Pore water chemistry data from Site 1230 located in the Peru accretionary prism indicate that sulfate reduction is important in the top 8 mbsf. Below this depth, methanogenesis is the dominant process and methane concentrations are among the highest measured at any site on Leg 201. The presence of high methane concentrations at shallow depths suggests that methane is transported upward in the prism by fluid flow. Measurements of in-situ pore pressures and temperatures also support the presence of upward fluid flow. A single in-situ pressure measurement at ~100 mbsf indicated an overpressure of 0.14 MPa. For a reasonable formation permeability of ~ 10-16 m2, the measured overpressure is adequate to produce flow at a rate of ~5 mm/yr. This rate is comparable to previous model estimates for flow rates in the Peru accretionary prism. In addition, curvature in the downhole temperature profile can best be explained by upward fluid flow of 1-10 mm/yr. These data are used to constrain a two-dimensional coupled fluid flow and reactive transport model

  15. Estimating basal friction in accretionary wedges from the geometry and spacing of frontal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Bertram; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2001-12-01

    Elastic theory applied to the deformation in accretionary wedges is used to calculate the condition for slip along an active frontal fault and the basal décollement. The equations for calculating the stresses can be solved for the coefficient of basal friction in the situation of the formation of a new frontal thrust fault. This allows us to calculate the efficient coefficient of basal friction, which includes the weakening effect of pore-fluid pressure, from geometric parameters and material properties only. The geometric parameters, like fault dip and layer thickness, can be derived from high-resolution seismic cross-sections. Application of our analysis to the Makran and the Nankai accretionary wedge allows us to estimate the upper limit of the effective coefficient of basal friction, μb≈0.16 and μb≈0.2, in these two areas respectively.

  16. Hydrogeochemistry of the northern Barbados accretionary complex transect: Ocean Drilling Project leg 110

    SciTech Connect

    Gieskes, J.M. ); Vrolijk, P. ); Blanc, G. )

    1990-06-10

    Detailed studies of the major element geochemistry, oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of pore fluids, and the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of dissolved strontium have made it possible to unravel physical and chemical processes that affect the pore fluid chemistry in a transect of drill holes across the northern Barbados accretionary complex. These processes include (1) alteration of volcanic ash buried in the Pleisticene-Pliocene sediment column; (2) alteration of underlying basalts of layer 2 of the oceanic crust; (3) movement of fluids from deep in the accretionary complex along fault zones (particularly the decollement) and minor permeable layers; these fluids from deeper in the complex are characterized by low chloride concentrations and increased {sup {delta}18}O(H{sub 2}O) values, presumably as a result of dehydration of smectite interlayers; and (4) mixing processes involving the migrating fluids cause incongruities in the geochemical anomalies of these fluids.

  17. Pre-collisional accretionary growth of the southern Laurasian active margin, Central Pontides, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygül, Mesut; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Sudo, Masafumi

    2016-03-01

    Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes crop out over wide areas in the central part of the Pontides, northern Turkey. To the north, the wedge consists of a low-grade metaflysch sequence with blocks of marble, Na-amphibole-bearing metabasite (PT = 7-12 kbar; 400 ± 70 °C) and serpentinite. 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from the phyllites of the metaflysch are ca. 100 Ma. The metaflysch sequence is underlain by oceanic crust-derived HP/LT metabasites and micaschists along a major detachment fault. The metabasites are epidote-blueschists consisting of glaucophane, epidote, titanite, and phengite locally with garnet. Fresh lawsonite-blueschists are exposed as blocks along the detachment fault. Peak metamorphic conditions of a garnet-blueschist are constrained to 17 ± 1 kbar and 500 ± 40 °C and of a lawsonite-blueschist to 14 ± 2 kbar and 370-440 °C. 40Ar/39Ar phengite dating on the micaschists constrains the HP/LT metamorphism as 101-92 Ma, younging southward. Middle Jurassic (ca. 160 Ma) accretionary complexes consisting of blueschist to lower greenschist facies metabasites, marble and volcanogenic metasediment intercalations are exposed at the southern part of the Cretaceous wedge. In the studied area, the North Anatolian Fault forms the contact between Cretaceous and Middle Jurassic HP/LT metamorphic rocks. Wide distribution of Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes implies accretionary tectonic continental growth along the Laurasian active margin. High amount of clastic sediment flux into the trench has a major effect on enlarging the wedge during the Albian. Tectonic thickening of the oceanic HP/LT metamorphic sequence, however, was possibly achieved by propagation of the décollement along the retreating slab which can create the space necessary for progressive deep level basal underplating and extension of the wedge for subsequent syn-subduction exhumation.

  18. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  19. Synchrotron texture analysis of clay-rich sediments from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Kai; Stipp, Michael; Leiss, Bernd; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich

    2013-04-01

    Synchrotron diffraction is the most suitable tool for fast multi-mineral phase texture analysis of water-containing clay rich sediment samples due to short wavelengths (in the range of 0.12 Å), high energy radiation and a resulting mm- to cm-scale sample penetration. We carried out synchrotron texture analysis on a sample set from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism offshore Japan. Samples were encountered by IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 of the NanTroSEIZE project from a depth range between 25 mbsf (meters below seafloor) and 522 mbsf. The accretionary prism sediments have a relatively uniform composition of approximately 40% clay minerals, 25% quartz, 25% feldspar, and up to 10% calcite. A first sample set analyzed was taken as recovered from drilling; a second sample set was additionally experimentally deformed in a triaxial deformation apparatus up to axial strains of 60%. Measurements were carried out at DESY (German Electron Synchrotron source) in Hamburg. In order to measure complete pole figures sample cylinders of 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length were measured in a phi angle-range from -90 to +90° in 5° steps. Rietveld refinement results using the MAUD program package show that the composition of the IODP Expedition 333 samples from the incoming plate differs slightly from the relatively uniform IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples of the accretionary prism. They contain ~35% clay minerals, ~30% quartz and ~35% feldspar. For IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples the Rietveld refinement results correspond to the standard XRD data. The synchrotron texture results of the recovered samples without experimental deformation show an increasingly strong preferred orientation of the clay minerals with increasing sediment depth for the incoming plate. Interestingly, also feldspar shows a significant texture, which is likely due to a shape fabric of the grains. The sediment texture can be explained by compaction and porosity reduction with increasing

  20. Local Seismicity Recorded by ChilePEPPER: Implications for Dynamic Accretionary Prism Response and Long-term Prism Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moor, A.; Trehu, A. M.; Tryon, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the dynamic response of the outer accretionary wedge updip from the patch of greatest slip during the Mw8.8 2010 Maule earthquake, 10 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) were deployed from May 2012 to March 2013 in a small array with an inter-instrument spacing of ~12 km . Nine instruments were recovered, with 4 recording data on 3 intermediate-band 3-component seismometers and a differential pressure gauge and 5 recording data from absolute pressure gauges. [note: All instruments were also equipped with a fluid flow meter sensitive to flow rates as low as 0.0001 cm/yr in or out of the sediments. However, no flow signal was detected.] Here we present hypocenters for 569 local events that have S-P times less than 17 seconds (i.e. within ~125 km of the array) using hand-picked arrival times and a 1D velocity model derived from a 2D seismic refraction profile through the region (Moscoso et al 2011, EPSL). We analyze the distribution of seismicity in the context of published slip models, ChilePEPPER high-resolution seismic reflection data, critical taper analysis done by Cubas et al 2013 (EPSL), and offshore gravity data. The data show distinct segmentation within the outer prism. The northern section of the study area is characterized by a lack of seismicity, accretion of nearly all incoming sediment and a prism at critical taper. In contrast, abundant seismicity, significant sediment underthrusting at the deformation front and a prism below critical taper angle characterize the southern part of the study area. Both coseismic slip and post-rupture local seismicity can be related to density anomalies within the upper plate as revealed by free air gravity data corrected for the effects of bathymetry and the subducting plate. [ChilePEPPER - Project Evaluating Prism Post-Earthquake Response

  1. Fluid seepage, Deformation, Tectonics and Accretionary Prism Formation in Two Different Settings of the Nankai Accretionary Prism- Dive Results of YK05-08 Leg 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y. F.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.; Yokoyama, S.; Kawakami, S.; Moore, G. F.; Dilek, Y.; S. Y.

    2005-12-01

    Fluid seepages recognized by the presence of bacterial mats, chemosynthetic biocommunities, and carbonate deposits were critically analyzed in relation to large to small scale deformation features in two different settings of the Nankai accretionary prism by the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during JAMSTEC cruise YK05-08 Leg 2. We present dive profiles in the Shionomisaki and Tenryu submarine canyons that form a 3D transect extending from the outer-arc ridge formed by out-of-sequence thrusts (OOST ridge) to the prism toe. Ten dives in addition to six previous dives (including three unmanned ROV Kaiko dives) verified that Shionomisaki Canyon exposes typical accretionary prism features, including regular repetition of offscraping and underplating structure, whereas Tenryu Canyon shows highly modified structures caused by the collisional subduction of the Paleo-Zenisu ridge of the Izu island arc. The fluid seepages were observed in three different settings: (1) just beneath large thrust faults which demarcate the sharp ridge foot; (2) the open fractured crests of the thrust-anticline folds; and (3) the conspicuous circular expression on the OOST ridge top. The last case and previously known examples in the forearc basin setting are both examples of large scale seepage that might be due to intermittent, sometimes explosive methane seepage, whereas the first two cases are of constant flow rate of smaller magnitude. Such differences may be due to differences in the tectonic setting between the two; the large flow rate example is due to open or strike-slip regime tectonics where large amount of seepage occurs along the high permeability zones. In contrast, the small flow rate example is seepage along a thrust, with rather constant (although intermittent during co-seismic stage) flow rate along thrust faults which are of relatively lower permeability. In addition, we verified some carbonate veins in fractured or sheared rocks along faults, and the various deformation

  2. Structure and Stratigraphy of the Barbados Accretionary Prism and the Tobago Forearc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaderton, N. A.; Wood, L. J.; Mann, P.

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between the Lesser Antilles island arc, the Tobago forearc basin, and the Barbados accretionary prism shows classic convergent margin geometry. Barbados is the only emergent part of the accretionary prism with 80% of the island's land area being covered by Pleistocene limestone. Erosion of the limestone cap in the northeastern part of the island exposes older rocks of the prism. A 450-km2 2-D seismic data volume allows extension of these stratigraphic units offshore and definition of a regional structural framework. The relationship between the unit identified onshore as the Early Eocene to Middle Miocene Oceanic Formation and the basal unit, the intensively folded and faulted Eocene prism rocks of the Scotland Group, has long been debated. Previous proposals claim that the Oceanic Formation, consisting of pelagic clays with some ash beds, is allochthonous and has been thrusted into its present position above accreted sediments of the Scotland Group. However, seismic data show no evidence of nappes-the basis for the overthrusting hypothesis. Seismic interpretation presented here supports the opposing view that the Oceanic Formation and its offshore equivalent in the offshore Tobago forearc basin was deposited in situ and onlap the older, more highly deformed rocks of the accretionary prism. Previous workers proposed that the region's extensive mud diapirism (identified onshore as the Joes River Formation) has caused the emergence of Barbados, which continues to rise 0.44 mm/yr. However, seismic lines suggest that the island's emergence and present-day uplift is related to footwall uplift along a large, NE-striking normal fault off the east coast of the island.

  3. Modeling consolidation and dewatering near the toe of the northern Barbados accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauffer, P.; Bekins, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    At the toe of the northern Barbados accretionary complex, temperature and pore water chemistry data indicate that fluid flow is channeled along the de??collement and other shallow thrust faults. We examine mechanisms that may prevent consolidation and maintain high permeability over large sections of the de??collement. High-resolution bulk density data from five boreholes show that the de??collement is well consolidated at some sites while other sites remain underconsolidated. Underconsolidated de??collement behavior is associated with kilometer-scale negative-polarity seismic reflections from the de??collement plane that have been interpreted to be fluid conduits. We use a coupled fluid flow/consolidation model to simulate the loading response of a 10-km-long by 680-m-thick slice of sediment as it enters the accretionary complex. The simulations capture 185 ka (5 km) of subduction, with a load function representing the estimated effective stress of the overriding accretionary prism (3.8?? taper angle). Simulation results of bulk density in the de??collement 3.2 km arcward of the deformation front are compared with observations. The results show that persistent high pore pressures at the arcward edge of the simulation domain can explain underconsolidated behavior. The scenario is consistent with previous modeling results showing that high pore pressures can propagate intermittently along the de??collement from deeper in the complex. Simulated seaward fluxes in the de??collement (1-14 cm yr-1) lie between previous estimates from modeling studies of steady state (1 m yr-1) flow. Maximum simulated instantaneous fluid sources (2.5??10-13 s-1) are comparable to previous estimates. The simulations show minor swelling of incoming sediments (fluid sources ??? -3 ?? 1015 s-1) up to 3 km before subduction that may help to explain small-scale shearing and normal faulting proximal to the protode??collement. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Development of tectono-sedimentary mélanges in accretionary wedges: Insights from analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genti, M.; Malavieille, J.; Molli, G.; Dominguez, S.; Taboada, A.; Vitale-Brovarone, A.

    2012-04-01

    Orogenic wedges locally present chaotic tectonostratigraphic units that contain exotic blocks of various size, origin, age and lithology, embedded in a sedimentary matrix. The occurrence of ophiolitic blocks, sometimes huge, in such "mélanges" raises questions on i) the mechanisms responsible for the incorporation of oceanic basement rocks into an accretionary wedge and ii) the mechanisms allowing exhumation and possibly redeposition of these exotic elements in "mélanges" during wedge growth. The tectonic evolution of the back part of doubly vergent accretionary wedges is mainly controled by backthrusting. The retrowedge is characterized by steep slopes that are prone to gravitational instabilities. We assume that these steep slopes trigger submarine landslides playing a major erosional role and therefore inducing huge mass transfers. This erosion allows exhumation of the ophiolitic fragments formerly accreted at the base of the wedge and then reworked as tectono-sedimentary "mélanges" redeposited in proximal basins located at the base of the retrowedge slope. These basin deposits are then continuously involved in backthrusting-induced deformation. In this study, we present the results of a series of analog experiments performed to characterize the processes and parameters responsible for accretion, exhumation and final tectonosedimentary reworking of oceanic basement lithosphere fragments in an accretionary wedge. The experimental setup is designed to simulate the interaction between tectonics, erosion and sedimentation. Different configurations are applied to study the impact of various parameters, such as irregular oceanic floor due to structural inheritance, or the presence of layers with contrasted rheology that can affect deformation partitioning in the wedge (frontal accretion vs basal accretion) influencing its growth. The experimental results are then compared with observations on ophiolite-bearing mélanges in the Taïwan (Lichi mélange) and northern

  5. Implications of Faulting Styles in the Outer Wedge of the Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough, Japan near Kumano Basin displays a well developed accretionary prism with a major out-of-sequence “megasplay” thrust separating the recently active outer wedge of the prism from the forearc basin deposits. While not in the seismogenic zone, this thrust is thought to play a key role in tsunamigenesis by transferring deeper coseismic slip to the seafloor. Understanding the development of this fault requires a detailed understanding of the kinematics and structure of the outer wedge of the accretionary prism. The outer wedge of the Nankai accretionary prism consists of an in-sequence series of landward-dipping thrusts that record two directions of shortening. Based on 3D reflection seismic, older thrusts and their associated folds strike ~225 degrees, almost exactly perpendicular to plate motion in the area, which has an azimuth of 314 (Zang, et al, 2002). The youngest thrusts, including the megasplay at the rear of the outer wedge, trend 240-245 degrees, subparallel to the margin in the area, which trends roughly 250. This suggests two possibilities: 1) the older thrusts formed during a period of relatively strong coupling with the subducting slab, perhaps due to highly irregular oceanic basement topography which has since been subducted, or 2) the trench margin had been previously indented by a subducted seamount and has since been rebuilding. In addition, two right lateral tear faults with offsets of approximately 1km cut the fold-thrust belt of the outer wedge. These faults cleanly offset the fold hinge of faults striking perpendicular to plate motion and interact with the oldest faults that strike parallel to the margin, implying that their timing is coincident with the change in shortening direction. Therefore, these tear faults may accommodate along-strike changes in the taper angle of the accretionary prism following the subduction of irregular basement topography. Significant normal faulting within the seismically imaged portion of the

  6. Application of slip-line analysis to the mechanical model of active accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Lee, H.; Kim, J.

    2012-04-01

    An active accretionary wedge is formed from sediments accreted continuously at a continental margin by a subducting plate and mechanically characterized by a plane-strain compressive frictional flow throughout its entire volume. Continuous deformation induced by incoming sediments raises the distortional stress eventually leading to an ultimate condition known as a critical state. According to the critical taper theory (Davis et al., JGR, 1983), the angle of wedge increases as the incoming materials are accreted into the wedge until it reaches a critical value where the shear force on the basal detachment is in equilibrium with the basal friction. Under this concept, we applied the plastic slip-line theory for the computation of stress and velocity fields throughout the continuously deforming area of the wedge. For the simplicity, we assumed that the tapered wedge overlying a basal décollement fault is described by a perfectly plastic rheology complying with the Coulomb failure criterion and the associated flow rule. A complete description of soil rheology at the critical state requires the determination of stress tensors and velocity vectors at given points within the deforming region. For the boundary condition of stress, the effective normal and shear tractions on the upper surface of wedge are equal to zero, and thus the maximum principal stress acts parallel to the surface. Considering the two-dimensional plane strain deformation, we numerically obtained the slip-line solution for the mean effective stress with respect to the orientation of the maximum principal stress at each intersection point of the potential (conjugate) slip lines given by the Coulomb criterion. Then the maximum shear stress was calculated using the failure criterion. After the stress solution was yielded, the velocity field was determined by the same procedure using the boundary condition of the velocity of incoming sediments obtained from the velocity of subducting plate. Our result

  7. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  8. Earthquake faulting in subduction zones: insights from fault rocks in accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kimura, Gaku

    2014-12-01

    Subduction earthquakes on plate-boundary megathrusts accommodate most of the global seismic moment release, frequently resulting in devastating damage by ground shaking and tsunamis. As many earthquakes occur in deep-sea regions, the dynamics of earthquake faulting in subduction zones is poorly understood. However, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) and fault rock studies in accretionary prisms exhumed from source depths of subduction earthquakes have greatly improved our understanding of earthquake faulting in subduction zones. Here, we review key advances that have been made over the last decade in the studies of fault rocks and in laboratory experiments using fault zone materials, with a particular focus on the Nankai Trough subduction zone and its on-land analog, the Shimanto accretionary complex in Japan. New insights into earthquake faulting in subduction zones are summarized in terms of the following: (1) the occurrence of seismic slip along velocity-strengthening materials both at shallow and deep depths; (2) dynamic weakening of faults by melt lubrication and fluidization, and possible factors controlling coseismic deformation mechanisms; (3) fluid-rock interactions and mineralogical and geochemical changes during earthquakes; and (4) geological and experimental aspects of slow earthquakes.

  9. Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary transtension and strain partitioning in the Chugach accretionary complex, SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. Steven; Roeske, Sarah M.; Karl, Sue M.

    1998-05-01

    Shear zones in the Late Cretaceous Sitka Graywacke of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeast Alaska record constrictional finite strains, with maximum principal stretches plunging shallowly subparallel to strike of the shear zones. Macrostructural analysis indicates the finite strain formed during one deformation event. Microstructural analysis of the shear zones shows that this deformation is ductile, promoted mostly through deformation of low-strength lithic clasts and pressure solution. Kinematic indicators from some of the shear zones indicate dominantly dextral motion. Although multiple scenarios can explain constrictional finite strains in a shear zone, these dextral strike-slip shear zones must have experienced a component of extension across them in order to generate constrictional finite strains. Therefore, the shear zones are dextral transtensional shear zones, an uncommon tectonic regime in an accretionary complex. The transtensional shear zones reflect strike-slip motion related to partitioning of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary right-oblique convergence between North America and the Farallon plate. The extensional component that was superposed on the strike-slip shear zones to generate transtension resulted from contemporaneous collapse of the forearc following thickening related to underplating.

  10. Regional Variation of CH4 and N2 Production Processes in the Deep Aquifers of an Accretionary Prism

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Makoto; Ishikawa, Shugo; Nagai, Kazushige; Hirata, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Kunio; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary prisms are mainly composed of ancient marine sediment scraped from the subducting oceanic plate at a convergent plate boundary. Large amounts of anaerobic groundwater and natural gas, mainly methane (CH4) and nitrogen gas (N2), are present in the deep aquifers associated with an accretionary prism; however, the origins of these gases are poorly understood. We herein revealed regional variations in CH4 and N2 production processes in deep aquifers in the accretionary prism in Southwest Japan, known as the Shimanto Belt. Stable carbon isotopic and microbiological analyses suggested that CH4 is produced through the non-biological thermal decomposition of organic matter in the deep aquifers in the coastal area near the convergent plate boundary, whereas a syntrophic consortium of hydrogen (H2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H2-utilizing methanogens contributes to the significant production of CH4 observed in deep aquifers in midland and mountainous areas associated with the accretionary prism. Our results also demonstrated that N2 production through the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by denitrifying bacteria is particularly prevalent in deep aquifers in mountainous areas in which groundwater is affected by rainfall. PMID:27592518

  11. Structure and Evolution of the Accretionary Margin of Java-Sumatra. Seismic Data and Numerical Modeling Comparisons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Hindle, D.

    2007-12-01

    We present a numerical model for the evolution of an accretionary prism along a subduction margin. We find the mechanical partitioning of the growing prism into active region, abutting against a deformable backstop, and a relatively undeformed forearc basin is a function of the double tapered basal geometry, where the dip of the detachment is assumed to be opposite above oceanic or continental lithopshere. Varying properties of both materials and detachment can be used to adjust the surface slope and hence geometry of the system, but mechanical partitioning remains essentially the same with the regions becoming broader or narrower. The model appears to closely reproduce the geometry of the Sumatra-Java prism, where a high accretion margin has produced the same distinct mechanical units. Newly prestack depth-migrated marine seismic data reveal the extent and geometry of the active deformation of the deformable backstop, and give indications of some material passing into a subduction channel below the accretionary complex. The deformable backstop appears to be composed of multiple duplex structures, but present day tectonic activity is mostly in the form of transtensive or transpressive deformation, possibly reactivating older dip-slip, accretionary structures. The numerical approach used in the simulation (distinct elements) shows great promise in modelling large deformation in situations such as accretionary prisms, and has also been adapted to incorporate the role of fluid pressure and migration in tandem with large deformation (shortening of the order of 100's of kilometres).

  12. Episodic fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex: Timescale, geochemistry, flow rates, and fluid budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Down-hole geochemical anomalies encountered in active accretionary systems can be used to constrain the timing, rates, and localization of fluid flow. Here we combine a coupled flow and solute transport model with a kinetic model for smectite dehydration to better understand and quantify fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex offshore of Japan. Compaction of sediments and clay dehydration provide fluid sources which drive the model flow system. We explicitly include the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments in our calculations to evaluate the impact that variations in this unknown quantity have on pressure and chloride distribution. Sensitivity analysis of steady state pressure solutions constrains bulk and flow conduit permeabilities. Steady state simulations with 30% smectite in the incoming sedimentary sequence result in minimum chloride concentrations at site 808 of 550 mM, but measured chlorinity is as low as 447 mM. We simulate the transient effects of hydrofracture or a strain event by assuming an instantaneous permeability increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude along a flow conduit (in this case the de??collement), using steady state results as initial conditions. Transient results with an increase in de??collement permeability from 10-16 m2 to 10-13 m2 and 20% smectite reproduce the observed chloride profile at site 808 after 80-160 kyr. Modeled chloride concentrations are highly sensitive to the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments, such that rapid compaction of underthrust material leads to increased freshening. Pressures within the de??collement during transient simulations rise rapidly to a significant fraction of lithostatic and remain high for at least 160 kyr, providing a mechanism for maintaining high permeability. Flow rates at the deformation front for transient simulations are in good agreement with direct measurements, but steady state flow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than observed. Fluid budget calculations

  13. Cohesive Strength of Clay-Rich Sediment and Implications for Accretionary Wedge Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Huepers, A.; Kopf, A.

    2011-12-01

    While studies of rock and sediment friction are common, cohesion is a component of the shear strength that is often ignored despite its potential importance for faulting and the structure of accretionary wedges. We directly measure the cohesion of clay-rich sediment by measuring its shear strength in a direct-shear apparatus with no applied effective normal stress (σn' = 0). We present measurements of cohesion for two cases: (1) After vertical consolidation only, and (2) after vertical consolidation followed by shear under applied normal stress. Under consolidation stresses of 90 kPa to 2 MPa, cohesion of both the unsheared and sheared cases depends linearly on the (previously) applied load. We interpret the cohesion measured after shearing under load to be the cohesive strength that exists throughout the shearing process, suggesting that for clay-rich materials the coefficient of internal friction should be used rather than the coefficient of sliding friction. In both sheared and unsheared cases, cohesion depends positively on clay mineral content. Cohesion is low in room-dry sediment, suggesting that it is controlled by the presence of water and may be related to the atomic charge imbalance of clays, which results in hydrogen bonding between adsorbed water molecules and the clay mineral surfaces. Coulomb wedge theory dictates that the taper angle of accretionary wedges depends on the internal friction of the wedge, the basal sliding friction of the décollement, and the amount of excess pore pressure in these locations. Cohesion is typically neglected in such analyses. In the case of the Nankai subduction zone, the accretionary wedge and décollement are composed of clay-rich sediments, meaning that cohesion should not negligible based on our experimental results. This is the case even along the décollement where active slip occurs, because sheared sediment exhibits significant cohesion that is actually higher compared to sediment that experienced only

  14. Seafloor distribution and last glacial to postglacial activity of mud volcanoes on the Calabrian accretionary prism, Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceramicola, Silvia; Praeg, Daniel; Cova, Andrea; Accettella, Daniela; Zecchin, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are abundant along the eastern Mediterranean subduction zones, recording mud breccia extrusion over long timescales (106 years), but to date relatively few have been recognised in the northern Ionian Sea on the Calabrian accretionary prism (CAP). In the present study, the seafloor distribution and recent activity of MVs is investigated across a 35,600 km2 sector of the CAP using a regional acoustic dataset (multibeam bathymetric and backscatter imagery, integrated with subbottom profiles) locally ground-truthed by sediment cores. A total of 54 MVs are identified across water depths of 150-2,750 m using up to four geophysical criteria: distinctive morphology, high backscatter, unstratified subbottom facies and, in one case, a hydroacoustic flare. Fourteen MVs are identified from 3-4 criteria, of which five have been previously proven by cores containing mud breccia beneath up to 1.6 m of hemipelagic sediments (Madonna dello Ionio MVs 1-3, Pythagoras MV and the newly named Sartori MV), while nine others are identified for the first time (Athena, Catanzaro, Cerere, Diana, Giunone, Minerva, `right foot', Venere 1 and 2). Forty other as yet unnamed MVs are inferred from 1-2 geophysical criteria (three from distinctive morphology alone). All but one possible MV lie on the inner plateau of the CAP, landwards of the Calabrian Escarpment in a zone up to 120 km wide that includes the inner pre-Messinian wedge and the fore-arc basins, where they are interpreted to record the ascent from depth of overpressured fluids that interacted with tectonic structures and with evaporitic or shale seals within the fore-arc basins. The rise of fluids may have been triggered by post-Messinian out-of-sequence tectonism that affected the entire pre-Messinian prism, but Plio-Quaternary sedimentation rates and depositional styles support the inference that significant mud volcanism has taken place only on the inner plateau. Sedimentation rates across the CAP applied to a 12

  15. Geochemical and geothermal evidence for fluid migration in the Barbados Accretionary Prism (ODP leg 110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter; Fisher, Andrew; Gieskes, Joris

    Measured geochemical and geothermal effects of fluid migration in the northern Barbados accretionary prism indicate that: (1) fluid flows laterally along low-angle active faults; (2) the entire length of the Leg 110 transect is a fluid discharge zone; (3) migration results in heating of sediments across the transect but most strongly at the deformation front; and (4) migration results in dilution of pore water-Cl and 18O enrichment more in the arcward than the seaward side of the prism, suggesting that the Cl-poor, 18O-rich fluids that intrude the prism are derived from smectiteillite reactions occurring arcward. These conclusions have strengthened those derived from the initial appraisal of shipboard data, modified ideas about where fluids are heated most and where the geochemistry is strongly altered, and provided new ideas about the sources of fluids and their relative contributions.

  16. Early Jurassic Volcanic Rocks from the Raohe Accretionary Complex of NE China: Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Ge, Wenchun

    2016-04-01

    The Raohe accretionary complex is located at the boundary between the Russian Far East and Northeast China, and is an important part of the Western Pacific Ocean tectonic regime. However, owing to the lack of precise age and geochemical constraints, the tectonic setting and petrogenesis of magmatic rocks in this area have been controversial, which has led to the debate on crustal growth mechanisms and subduction accretionary processes in the Northeast China. Herein, we report newly-defined calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites, Nb-enriched basaltic-andesites and andesites, and N-MORB type basalts and basaltic-andesites from the Raohe accretionary complex, NE China. All these volcanic rocks are collected from rocks mapped previously as the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic stratums. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for one andesite, one dacites and three rhyolites indicate the occurrence of magmatic events in the Early Jurassic (186-174 Ma). They have positive ɛHf(t) values of +3.4 to +10.6 and relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.704711 to 0.710235. The calc-alkaline andesites, dacites and rhyolites are typical arc magmas, with moderately enriched LILEs and LREEs, distinctly negative HFSEs, consistent with the chemistry of volcanic rocks from an active continental margin setting. The Nb-enriched basaltic-andesites and andesites have higher TiO2, Nb, and Zr contents, higher Nb/Ta (24.03-87.60), Nb/U (11.89-75.94), (Nb/Th)PM (0.67-2.70), and (Nb/La)PM (1.95-5.00) ratios than typical arc basalts. They are relatively enriched in Nb, Zr, Hf and Ti. They have negative ɛNd(t) values of -5.47 to -6.04 and relatively variable (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.704648 to 0.711430, suggesting that they were possibly generated by a partial melting of mantle wedge peridotites metasomatized by slab-derived adakitic melts and minor fluids. The N-MORB type basalts and basaltic-andesites have comparatively low TiO2 concentrations (1.18-1.42 wt.%), show almost flat REE patterns with

  17. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  18. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T. )

    1996-01-01

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. [delta][sup 13]C[sub 1] values between -22[per thousand] and -36[per thousand] indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  19. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T.

    1996-12-31

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 & 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values between -22{per_thousand} and -36{per_thousand} indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  20. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of subducted sediments, Nankai Trough accretionary prism: Effect of stress path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, H.; Chester, F. M.; Biscontin, G.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the evolution of mechanical and hydraulic properties of sediments during burial, underthrusting, underplating, accretion, and exhumation within accertionary subduction zones, triaxial deformation experiments were conducted on consolidated sediment from the Nankai Trough sampled during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) Stage 1 Expeditions. Samples of older, accretionary prism sediments at the forearc basin, underthrust slope sediments beneath the megasplay fault, and overthrust Upper Shikoku Basin sediments along the frontal thrust, were tested using different load paths. Specifically, isotropic loading, uniaxial strain loading, and triaxial compression (at constant confining pressure, Pc), undrained Pc reduction, drained Pc reduction, and triaxial unloading at constant Pc were employed. We find that all samples are overconsolidated and cemented. From the Pc-reduction stress paths, yield surfaces for the sediments are well described by the original Cam-Clay model and Coulomb failure criteria. Combined with results from the other load paths, we determine the yield surfaces for the sediments in situ, constrain the current stress state, and infer the relationship between consolidation state and deformation history including the effect of horizontal stress changes. Porosity evolution is relatively independent of stress path, and the sediment porosity decreases as the yield surface expands. In contrast, permeability evolution depends on the stress path and consolidation state, e.g., permeability reduction by shear-enhanced compaction occurs at a greater rate under triaxial-compression relative to uniaxial-strain and isotropic loading. Improved understanding of the evolution of hydromechanical properties for different load paths is necessary to accurately treat coupling of deformation and fluid flow in accretionary subduction zones.

  1. Reconciling the detrital zircon record and crustal growth within juvenile accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, C. J.; Cawood, P. A.; Roberts, N. M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Ancient cratons are generally characterised by Archaean cores surrounded by Proterozoic accretionary belts with large volumes of juvenile crust. Their crustal growth histories provide important insights into the genesis of continents and orogenic evolution. Whole-rock and detrital zircon isotopic studies are often used to deduce those histories, but the extent to which representative lithologies within the orogens are reliably sampled for such studies is not well established. This is especially true in cases where juvenile, zircon-poor mafic crust comprises a significant proportion of an orogen such as the East African (0.8-0.5 Ga), Namaqua-Natal (1.2-1.0 Ga), Trans-Hudson (1.9-1.8 Ga), and Kola (2.5 Ga). In particular, the Mesoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal orogenic belt (NNO) fringing the Kalahari Craton is a case in point in which Nd isotopic studies of whole-rock outcrop samples and U-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of detrital zircons from sediments of the Orange River (which drains the NNO) show different crust-formation ages and proportions of new and reworked crustal material. We hypothesise that this discrepancy is due to biasing of the detrital zircon record towards felsic rocks. Understanding the representative nature of the crustal archive preserved in detrital zircons remains critical for many studies of crustal evolution. We present data that: (a) addresses the scale of potential bias within an accretionary orogen containing large proportions of juvenile material, (b) demonstrates how the whole-rock and detrital zircon records can be reconciled for the Namaqua-Natal orogen to start, and (c) can be used to evaluate the effect of zircon bias on previous crustal growth models.

  2. Fluid Overpressure and Connections to Seismicity, Cascadia Tertiary Accretionary Prism, Olympic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H.; Mattinson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Metamorphic dehydration reactions and fluid movement in accretionary prisms have been linked to the recently discovered episodic tremor and slip (ETS) earthquake events along subduction zones, but prior studies lack the detail to effectively test the hypothesis that fluid flow triggers ETS events. I conducted field work along a 52.5 km transect on the Olympic Peninsula metasedimentary accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone, and collected approximately 40 representative samples of sandstone and mudrock that were buried to 6-15 km. This depth range intersects the 10-50 km depth range of ETS events. My objectives are to quantify the water flow recorded in rocks of the Olympic Peninsula via petrographic, whole rock, and isotopic analyses to test the prediction that water release increases at ~10 km depth, creating fluid overpressure needed to trigger seismicity. I calculated that on the Olympic Peninsula 1 km3 of 50% sandstone and 50% mudrock loses ~105 kg H2O/yr during burial from 6-14 km depth, comparable to the values expected from large-scale fluid budget models. Quartz veins that compose 0.5-1% of the Obstruction Peak site (~14 km burial depth) are important records of fluid flow quantity and origin. δ18O values of +11.8‰ to +15.2‰ indicate that vein H2O originated from metamorphic reactions. Flow recorded by 1 km3 of rock containing 0.5-1% quartz veins is >106 kg H2O/yr, comparable to the values 2 × 107 to 2 × 108 kg H2O/yr modeled at compositionally similar subduction zones to produce fluid overpressure conditions. I observed fibrous quartz veins, which also indicate fluid overpressure conditions were reached and support my H2O flow estimates. Therefore, Olympic Peninsula rocks at depths of ~10-14 km record dehydration and fluid overpressure large enough to trigger subduction zone seismicity.

  3. Deformation process and kinematics of mélange in the Early Cretaceous accretionary complex of the Mino-Tamba Belt, eastern southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Akiko; Kano, Ken-Ichi

    2007-04-01

    The Kanayama unit of the Mesozoic Mino-Tamba accretionary complex in eastern southwest Japan is a thick mélange unit composed mainly of abundant muddy matrix and variously sized clasts of chert, hemipelagic siliceous mudstone, and sandstone. Two episodes of deformation formed the mélange fabrics: the first involved fragmentation of sandstone layers in response to mud injections; the second involved layer-parallel, noncoaxial shear that resulted in the mixing of pelagic to terrigenous clasts and the formation of S-C-like asymmetric fabrics with scaly foliation. The S-C fabrics exhibit a predominantly sinistral shear sense in plan view. After fold and tilt corrections, the restored slip motion inferred from the S-C fabrics indicates a bulk top-to-the-south shear. Combining the unit's terminal fossil age and radiometric age with a regional plate reconstruction model, these data suggest that the Kanayama mélange formed along a décollement during oblique subduction of the Izanagi plate in the Early Cretaceous.

  4. Fate of mass-transport deposits in convergent margins: Super- or sub-critical state in accretionary- or non-accretionary slope toes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.

    2011-12-01

    Co-seismic mass-transportation is evidenced by voluminous bathymetric change during subduction type earthquakes of magnitude 8 or 9 class, exemplified by the March 11 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Japan trench, where 50 m horizontal dislocation with 10 m vertical uplift was detected for the large tsunami(Kawamura et al., this session). On account of such successive mass transportation in the trench slope toe being slid into the grabens at the trench axis of the Pacific plate side lead the continuous migration of the trench slope toward the Honshu arc since the middle Miocene, playing the efficient role for the tectonic erosion (Hilde, 1983 Tectonophysics; von Huene & Lallemand, 1990 GSAB). Previously accreted materials of the former prism are largely exposed in the inner slope along the Japan trench, and the present slope is composed of brecciated, calcareous cemented mudstone and sandstone of middle Miocene age according to the submersible observation and sampling (Ogawa, 2011 Springer Book). Due to this trench migration landward, the island volcanic arc front vastly retreated to the west since the middle Miocene for more than 100 km. Such mass transportation occurred compensating the slope instability due to super-critical state of the slope angle. However, the tectonic erosion process is apt not to be preserved in ancient prisms (or "terranes") because they are entirely lost from the surface by erosion and subduction. On the other hand, many examples of such gravitational mass transportation deposits, slid-slumped deposits, liquefied and injected bodies, which are totally classified as mélanges or chaotic deposits, or olistostromes are preserved in ancient on-land prisms such as in the Shimanto and Miura-Boso accretionary complexes(Yamamoto et al., 2009 Island Arc), because they are preserved by offscraping process during plate subduction. Similar processes are known from the present Nankai prism surface and were observed by submersible and bathymetric survey

  5. Ophiolites in the Xing'an-Inner Mongolia accretionary belt of the CAOB: Implications for two cycles of seafloor spreading and accretionary orogenic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shuguang; Wang, Ming-Ming; Xu, Xin; Wang, Chao; Niu, Yaoling; Allen, Mark B.; Su, Li

    2015-10-01

    The Xing'an-Inner Mongolia accretionary belt in the southeastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) was produced by the long-lived subduction and eventual closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean and by the convergence between the North China Craton and the Mongolian microcontinent. Two ophiolite belts have been recognized: the northern Erenhot-Hegenshan-Xi-Ujimqin ophiolite belt and the southern Solonker-Linxi ophiolite belt. Most basalts in the northern ophiolite belt exhibit characteristics of normal-type to enriched-type mid-ocean ridge basalt affinities with depleted Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd(t) > +5), comparable to modern Eastern Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts. Most basaltic rocks in the southern belt show clear geochemical features of suprasubduction zone-type oceanic crust, probably formed in an arc/back-arc environment. The inferred back-arc extension along the Solonker-Linxi belt started at circa 280 Ma. Statistics of all the available age data for the ophiolites indicates two cycles of seafloor spreading/subduction, which gave rise to two main epochs of magmatic activity at 500-410 Ma and 360-220 Ma, respectively, with a gap of ~50 million years (Myr). The spatial and temporal distribution of the ophiolites and concurrent igneous rocks favor bilateral subduction toward the two continental margins in the convergence history, with final collision at ~230-220 Ma. In the whole belt, signals of continental collision and Himalayan-style mountain building are lacking. We thus conclude that the Xing'an-Inner Mongolia segment of the CAOB experienced two cycles of seafloor subduction, back-arc extension, and final "Appalachian-type" soft collision.

  6. Smectite Dehydration, Membrane Filtration, and Pore-Water Freshening in Deep Ultra-Low Permeability Formations: Deep Processes in the Nankai Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. M.; Sample, J. C.; Even, E.; Poeppe, D.; Henry, P.; Tobin, H. J.; Saffer, D. M.; Hirose, T.; Toczko, S.; Maeda, L.

    2014-12-01

    controls on deep system behavior in all deep accretionary wedge and basin environments where clays are abundant. This research used samples provided by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP).

  7. Tectonic imbrication of Palaeo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes in the central Pontides, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, A. I.; Tuysuz, O.; Satir, M.; Eren, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    -eclogite thrust slice was previously also regarded as part of the Palaeo-Tethyan (Triassic) subduction-accretion complex. However, recent isotopic dating of the Elekdag eclogites have yielded Cretaceous ages, indicating that Palaeo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes were thrust imbricated during the Late Cretaceous subduction. A similar observation was recently reported from the Eskisehir region, 370 km to the west, where Triassic blueschists and eclogites are imbricated with the Upper Cretaceous accretionary complexes. Close association of Paleo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes along the Izmir-Ankara suture indicates that the latest Triassic-earliest Jurassic Cimmeride orogeny in Turkey was of accretional rather than collisional nature, and that the Izmir-Ankara suture represents a long-lived plate boundary of late Palaeozoic to early Tertiary age.

  8. Understanding tectonic stress and rock strength in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism, offshore SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Katelyn A.

    Understanding the orientation and magnitude of tectonic stress in active tectonic margins like subduction zones is important for understanding fault mechanics. In the Nankai Trough subduction zone, faults in the accretionary prism are thought to have historically slipped during or immediately following deep plate boundary earthquakes, often generating devastating tsunamis. I focus on quantifying stress at two locations of interest in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism, offshore Southwest Japan. I employ a method to constrain stress magnitude that combines observations of compressional borehole failure from logging-while-drilling resistivity-at-the-bit generated images (RAB) with estimates of rock strength and the relationship between tectonic stress and stress at the wall of a borehole. I use the method to constrain stress at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 808 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0002. At Site 808, I consider a range of parameters (assumed rock strength, friction coefficient, breakout width, and fluid pressure) in the method to constrain stress to explore uncertainty in stress magnitudes and discuss stress results in terms of the seismic cycle. I find a combination of increased fluid pressure and decreased friction along the frontal thrust or other weak faults could produce thrust-style failure, without the entire prism being at critical state failure, as other kinematic models of accretionary prism behavior during earthquakes imply. Rock strength is typically inferred using a failure criterion and unconfined compressive strength from empirical relations with P-wave velocity. I minimize uncertainty in rock strength by measuring rock strength in triaxial tests on Nankai core. I find strength of Nankai core is significantly less than empirical relations predict. I create a new empirical fit to our experiments and explore implications of this on stress magnitude estimates. I find using the new empirical fit can decrease stress

  9. Precambrian accretionary history and phanerozoic structures-A unified explanation for the tectonic architecture of the nebraska region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Phanerozoic history in Nebraska and adjacent regions contains many patterns of structure and stratigraphy that can be directly related to the history of the Precambrian basement rocks of the area. A process is proposed that explains the southward growth of North America during the period 1.8-1.6 Ga. A series of families of accretionary events during the Proterozoic emplaced sutures that remained as fundamental basement weak zones. These zones were rejuvenated in response to a variety of continental stress events that occurred during the Phanerozoic. By combining the knowledge of basement history with the history of rejuvenation during the Phanerozoic, both the details of Proterozoic accretionary growth and an explanation for the patterns of Phanerozoic structure and stratigraphy is provided. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. The Palaeoproterozoic crustal evolution: evidences from granulite-gneiss belts, collisional and accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, M. V.; Konilov, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic juvenile assemblages were emplaced within two types of mobile belts: (1) high-grade or "granulite-gneiss" belts; (2) low- and medium-grade volcano-sedimentary and volcano-plutonic belts. Type (1) belts resulted from plume-induced heating, magmatism, emergence of riftogenic basins and volcano-tectonic depressions, their filling with rift-type sediments and juvenile but strongly contaminated lavas and ash-flow deposits, high-grade recrystallization of the lower- and mid-crustal assemblages including the filling of the basins and depressions that followed in intraplate and back-arc settings, and final thrusting and exhumation caused by collision-related tectonism. Type (2) belts represent sutures containing MORB- and arc-related assemblages, together with initial rift-related assemblages formed during evolution of the short-lived, mainly Red Sea-type oceans (intracontinental collisional orogens) and systems of oceanic, island-arc and back-arc terranes amalgamated along continent margins (peripheral accretionary orogens). Palaeoproterozoic history can be subdivided into five periods: (1) 2.51-2.44 Ga superplume activity and displacement of Fennoscandia; (2) 2.44-2.0 (2.11) Ga quiescent within-plate development complicated by local plume- and plate tectonics-related processes; (3) a 2.0-1.95 Ga superplume event; (4) 1.95-1.75 (1.71) Ga combined plume- and plate tectonics-related evolution, resulting in the partial disruption of the continental crust, and formation of accretionary orogens along some margins of the supercontinent and rebirth of the supercontinent entity, and (5) < 1,75 Ga post- and anorogenic magmatism and metamorphism. Magmatic and thermal activity during the early Palaeoproterozoic was almost exclusively concentrated within Laurentia (comprising North American and Fennoscandian cratons). In contrast, late Palaeoproterozoic assemblages are distributed within all continents. The simultaneous appearance of within-plate plume

  11. Linking collisional and accretionary orogens during Rodinia assembly and breakup: Implications for models of supercontinent cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.; Strachan, Robin A.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Gladkochub, Dmitry P.; Murphy, J. Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments has been a characteristic of the solid Earth for much of its history. Geodynamic drivers of this cyclic activity are inferred to be either top-down processes related to near surface lithospheric stresses at plate boundaries or bottom-up processes related to mantle convection and, in particular, mantle plumes, or some combination of the two. Analysis of the geological history of Rodinian crustal blocks suggests that internal rifting and breakup of the supercontinent were linked to the initiation of subduction and development of accretionary orogens around its periphery. Thus, breakup was a top-down instigated process. The locus of convergence was initially around north-eastern and northern Laurentia in the early Neoproterozoic before extending to outboard of Amazonia and Africa, including Avalonia-Cadomia, and arcs outboard of Siberia and eastern to northern Baltica in the mid-Neoproterozoic (∼760 Ma). The duration of subduction around the periphery of Rodinia coincides with the interval of lithospheric extension within the supercontinent, including the opening of the proto-Pacific at ca. 760 Ma and the commencement of rifting in east Laurentia. Final development of passive margin successions around Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia was not completed until the late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (ca. 570-530 Ma), which corresponds with the termination of convergent plate interactions that gave rise to Gondwana and the consequent relocation of subduction zones to the periphery of this supercontinent. The temporal link between external subduction and internal extension suggests that breakup was initiated by a top-down process driven by accretionary tectonics along the periphery of the supercontinent. Plume-related magmatism may be present at specific times and in specific places during breakup but is not the prime driving force. Comparison of the Rodinia record of continental assembly and dispersal with that

  12. Polyphase deformation of a Paleozoic metamorphosed subduction-accretionary complex in Beishan Orogen, southern Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongfang; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2014-05-01

    formed at ~423 Ma and ~280 Ma, respectively. These indicate that D1 occurred in the interval 424-423 Ma, D2 occurred at or shortly after 423 Ma, D3 and D4 in the period 423-280 Ma. These structural patterns and magmatism events can be interpreted as a result of northward subduction of the Niujuanzi Ocean to the south of the Lebaquan Complex during the Paleozoic. The Lebaquan Complex represent a subduction-accretionary complex probably formed in a forearc setting. Combined with other published data, we conclude that the Beishan orogen may have undergone multiple subduction-accretionary processes during the Paleozoic.

  13. Confined deep water system development on the accretionary wedge (Miocene, Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin, S turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Murat; Cronin, Bryan T.; Gürbüz, Kemal

    2012-09-01

    According to theoretical studies, the foreland basin consists of: accretionary wedge (including wedge top or piggyback basin), foredeep, forebulge and backbulge depozones. All of them are parallel to the orogenic belts of the overlying and underlying plates. The closure of the southern branch of the Neotethys during the Late Cretaceous led to an oblique collision of the Arabian Plate and the Anatolide-Taurides Platform, leading to the development of the Miocene Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin (KFB). Thus, the promontory shape of the Arabian Plate prevented the development of an accretionary wedge parallel to the orogenic belt. The accretionary wedge of the KFB includes blocks of various sizes and age (mainly Mesozoic limestone) scattered within an Early Tertiary matrix (mass wasting deposits and shallow to deep marine sediments). At the beginning of the Miocene, transtensional tectonism led to the development of half-graben basins on top of the accretionary wedge. These basins (namely; the Tekir and Çukurhisar) also cut the foredeep of the KFB obliquely (in contrast with the theoretical study). This paper focuses on the evolution and fillings of those basins. Initially, claystone and basin margin reef deposits filled the half-graben basins as a consequence of the Lower Miocene sea invasion. Then, long and narrow conglomeratic channels starting from the northern edge of the basins (fan-delta) progressed southwards, passing into sandy lobes, then into claystones. An activation of the boundary faults of the wedge top basin stopped the progression of the Lower-Middle Miocene sediments and led to their deformation. Then, the sedimentation of the KFB shifted towards the basin centre during the Middle Miocene.

  14. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  15. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. HFSE-rich picritic rocks from the Mino accretionary complex, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyama, Yuji; Ishiwatari, Akira

    2005-06-01

    Sills, pillow lavas and hyaloclastites of the HFSE-rich picrite and related rocks (ankaramite and basanite) occur in the Middle Permian cherts in the Mino Jurassic accretionary complex, southwestern Japan. These rocks show systematic trace element patterns enriched in incompatible elements, which indicate that the associated ankaramite and basanite are formed by the crystal fractionation from the picrite. The presence of the hyaloclastite in the chert sequence covering a large tholeiitic greenstone body indicates that the picrite was produced in an intraoceanic setting in the Middle Permian time subsequent to the extrusion of the voluminous oceanic island tholeiite. The Mino picrites resemble the Siberian meimechite and Polynesian picrites in its HFSE-rich chemical composition. The HFSE enrichment in these picrites cannot be explained by low degree of partial melting of primitive peridotite mantle only, and needs a source material involving recycled oceanic crust (eclogite). The differences in MgO content and in TiO2/Al2O3 and Zr/Y ratios among the HFSE-rich picrites indicate that the melting pressure increases from the Polynesian picrite through Mino picrite to Siberian picrite. This may reflect the increasing thickness of the overlying lithosphere at the time and place of magmatism. The HFSE-rich picrites may be a product of a superplume event. The presence of HFSE-rich picrite in Mino and Siberia indicate that the superplume activities occur in both continental and oceanic settings in the Permian time.

  17. Falls Lake melange, a polydeformed accretionary complex in the North Carolina piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.W. Jr.; Blake, D.E.; Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Stoddard, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Falls Lake melange in the eastern Piedmont of North Carolina is composed of mafic and ultramafic blocks and pods of diverse shapes and sizes, from about 1 cm to 7 km in length, dispersed without stratigraphic continuity in a matrix of pelitic schist and metagraywacke. The melange lies between the Carolina slate belt on the west and the Raleigh belt on the east. This terrane has been mapped in detail from near Wilton in Granville County, southward for about 40 km to west Raleigh in Wake County. Preliminary petrologic and geochemical data suggest an oceanic crustal origin for the mafic and ultramafic inclusions. Although the lenticular shapes of most fragments are attributable to ductile deformation, a few more equant fragments that are clearly overprinted by the earliest recognized matrix schistosity have round to angular shapes resembling sedimentary clasts. These observations suggest formation by a combination of sedimentary and tectonic processes, perhaps in the accretionary wedge of a convergent plate margin. The Falls Lake melange and the overlying late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian volcanic-arc terrane of the accreted Carolina slate belt were thrust upon a probably continental terrane of the Raleigh belt before overprinting by late Paleozoic folding and metamorphism. The melange and its folded basal decollement are truncated on the east by a later fault of the Nutbush Creek system and have not been found east of this fault.

  18. Estimation of slip parameters of a slip zone in the shallow portion of an accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; Hirono, T.; Ishikawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the widely accepted scenario that a megasplay fault branching from a subduction boundary megathrust can contribute to the generation of devastating tsunamis, we investigated a major reverse fault in the Emi Group, Boso Peninsula, Japan, corresponding to the shallow portion of a thrust in an accretionary prism. We examined the rocks of the slip zone and the surrounding host rocks microscopically, and analyzed their trace elements and isotopes. On the basis of the fluid-mobile trace-element spectrum, which is sensitive to fluid-rock interaction at high temperatures, we estimated the paleo-thermal history of the slip zone. We discovered that the slip zone experienced frictional heating of >350 °C caused by high-velocity sliding. By numerical analysis of the frictional heating, we also estimated a large displacement of several meters along the fault at the shallow depth of approximately 1-2 km below the seafloor. Our results support the hypothesis that the megasplay fault plays an important role in the generation of huge tsunamis during subduction boundary earthquakes.

  19. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism.

    PubMed

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH₄) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH₄ and hydrogen (H₂) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH₄, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H₂ was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H₂ decreased, rapid CH₄ production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH₄ production. For H₂ production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H₂ was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  20. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism

    PubMed Central

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH4) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH4 and hydrogen (H2) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH4, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H2 was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H2 decreased, rapid CH4 production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH4 production. For H2 production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H2 was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H2-producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  1. Fluid flow and mass flux determinations at vent sites on the Cascadia margin accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.; Strasser, J.C. ); Suess, E. )

    1990-06-10

    Fluid venting from the toe of the accretionary prism off Oregon was measured in situ during a series of dives with DSRV Alvin in 1987 and 1988. A benthic chamber was place over active vent sites to sequentially collect samples of venting fluids and to make direct measurements of discharge rates. Calibrated flow meter measurements and flow rates determined from dissolved methane transfer indicate that discharge from two vent sites, Alvin 1428 and Alvin 1900, ranges roughly between 100 and 500 l/m{sup 2}d with the most reliable estimates falling in the range of 125-150 l/m{sup 2}d. These rates imply subsurface advective flow on the order of 100 m/yr. Comparison of observed discharge rates with rates calculated for steady state expulsion supported by accretion-related compaction indicates that the observed flow is greater than predicted flow by several orders of magnitude. The disparity dictates that fluids are not derived locally, but are transported laterally within the prism, or that flow is not steady state and that individual vents are short-lived features in the ongoing accretion process.

  2. Hydrocarbon gas potential of accretionary melange terranes: an example from the olympic peninsula, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Snavely, P.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between the oceanic and North American plates during middle late Eocene and late middle Miocene times produced two principal accretionary terranes of melange and broken formation on the continental margin of Washington. Hydrocarbon analyses of these melange units were undertaken to evaluate their source rock potential for oil and gas and to assess the generative processes operating in these thick melange wedges. The results of pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance, and visual kerogen analyses of samples of these melanges are consistent and in good agreement, showing mainly Type III organic matter that is marginally mature to mature with respect to gas generation. Coastal exposure of Ozette melange commonly have a petroliferous odor which contains methane through at least the pentanes as prominent constitutents. Hydrocarbon gases from seeps and from an abandoned well in the study area have been molecular compositions and methane carbon isotopic values indicating related sources. The authors evidence suggest that the Ozette assemblage melange is the principal source for thermogenic hydrocarbon gases. Potential exploration targets may exist in western Washington where melange and broken formation are thrust beneath the Eocene oceanic crust (Crescent Formation). Gas generated from the underplated rocks could have migrated through the upper plate into structures in the Tertiary strata that overlie these Eocene basalts.

  3. Fluid expulsion sites on the Cascadia accretionary prism: mapping diagenetic deposits with processed GLORIA imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, Bobb; Seke, Erol; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Holmes, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

     Point-discharge fluid expulsion on accretionary prisms is commonly indicated by diagenetic deposition of calcium carbonate cements and gas hydrates in near-surface (<10 m below seafloor; mbsf) hemipelagic sediment. The contrasting clastic and diagenetic lithologies should be apparent in side scan images. However, sonar also responds to variations in bottom slope, so unprocessed images mix topographic and lithologic information. We have processed GLORIA imagery from the Oregon continental margin to remove topographic effects. A synthetic side scan image was created initially from Sea Beam bathymetric data and then was subtracted iteratively from the original GLORIA data until topographic features disappeared. The residual image contains high-amplitude backscattering that we attribute to diagenetic deposits associated with fluid discharge, based on submersible mapping, Ocean Drilling Program drilling, and collected samples. Diagenetic deposits are concentrated (1) near an out-of-sequence thrust fault on the second ridge landward of the base of the continental slope, (2) along zones characterized by deep-seated strikeslip faults that cut transversely across the margin, and (3) in undeformed Cascadia Basin deposits which overlie incipient thrust faults seaward of the toe of the prism. There is no evidence of diagenetic deposition associated with the frontal thrust that rises from the dècollement. If the dècollement is an important aquifer, apparently the fluids are passed either to the strike-slip faults which intersect the dècollement or to the incipient faults in Cascadia Basin for expulsion. Diagenetic deposits seaward of the prism toe probably consist dominantly of gas hydrates

  4. Comparison of frictional strength and velocity dependence between fault zones in the Nankai accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Saffer, Demian M.

    2011-04-01

    Accretionary complexes host a variety of fault zones that accommodate plate convergence and internal prism deformation, including the décollement, imbricate thrusts, and out-of-sequence thrusts or splays. These faults, especially the décollement and major splay faults, are considered to be candidates for hosting slow slip events and large magnitude earthquakes, but it is not clear what modes of slip should be expected at shallow levels or how they are related to fault rock frictional properties. We conducted laboratory experiments to measure the frictional properties of fault and wall rock from three distinct fault zone systems sampled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 316 and Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190 to the Nankai Trough offshore Japan. These are (1) a major out-of-sequence thrust fault, termed the "megasplay" (Site C0004), (2) the frontal thrust zone, a region of diffuse thrust faulting near the trench (Site C0007), and (3) the décollement zone sampled 2 km from the trench (Site 1174). At 25 MPa effective normal stress, at slip rates of 0.03-100 μm/s, and in the presence of brine as a pore fluid, we observe low friction (μ ≤ 0.46) for all of the materials we tested; however, the weakest samples (μ ≤ 0.30) are from the décollement zone. Material from the megasplay fault is significantly weaker than the surrounding wall rocks, a pattern not observed in the frontal thrust and décollement. All samples exhibit primarily velocity-strengthening frictional behavior, suggesting that earthquakes should not nucleate at these depths. A consistent minimum in the friction rate parameter a-b at sliding velocities of ˜1-3 μm/s (˜0.1-0.3 m/d) is observed at all three sites, suggesting that these shallow fault zones may be likely to host slow slip events.

  5. Headless submarine canyons and fluid flow on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orange, D.L.; McAdoo, B.G.; Moore, J.C.; Tobin, H.; Screaton, E.; Chezar, H.; Lee, H.; Reid, M.; Vail, R.

    1997-01-01

    Headless submarine canyons with steep headwalls and shallowly sloping floors occur on both the second and third landward vergent anticlines on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary complex off central Oregon (45 ??N, 125?? 30??W). In September 1993, we carried out a series of nine deep tow camera sled runs and nine ALVIN dives to examine the relationship between fluid venting, structure and canyon formation. We studied four canyons on the second and third landward vergent anticlines, as well as the apparently unfailed intercanyon regions along strike. All evidence of fluid expulsion is associated with the canyons; we found no evidence of fluid flow between canyons. Even though all fluid seeps are related to canyons, we did not find seeps in all canyons, and the location of the seeps within the canyons differed. On the landward facing limb of the second landward vergent anticline a robust cold seep community occurs at the canyon's inflection point. This seep is characterized by chemosynthetic vent clams, tube worms and extensive authigenic carbonate. Fluids for this seep may utilize high-permeability flow paths either parallel to bedding within the second thrust ridge or along the underlying thrust fault before leaking into the overriding section. Two seaward facing canyons on the third anticlinal ridge have vent clam communities near the canyon mouths at approximately the intersection between the anticlinal ridge and the adjacent forearc basin. No seeps were found along strike at the intersection of the slope basin and anticlinal ridge. We infer that the lack of seepage along strike and the presence of seeps in canyons may be related to fluid flow below the forearc basin/slope unconformity (overpressured by the impinging thrust fault to the west?) directed toward canyons at the surface.

  6. Décollement processes at the Nankai accretionary margin, southeast Japan: Propagation, deformation, and dewatering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Julia K.; Karig, Daniel E.

    1995-08-01

    The décollement zone, expressed on seismic profiles and observed in drill cores from the Nankai accretionary margin off the southeast coast of Japan, reveals several unique characteristics which appear to distinguish it from thrust faults identified in the same setting. Physical manifestations of these include evidence for the asymmetric distribution of deformation structures about the décollement, the extension of this fault zone well in front of the tectonic deformation front, and the absence of features indicative of precursory shear, for example, folded sediments, shear bands, and penetrative mineral fabrics. These characteristics suggest that the mode of formation and evolution of this décollement zone may be unique from that of most thrust faults. We propose that the décollement zone propagates not as a shear fracture controlled by tectonic stress conditions but rather as a subhorizontal tension fracture propagating under high pore pressures. To test this possibility, physical property measurements and clay mineral fabrics were obtained for several samples from the Nankai décollement zone using computed tomography and X ray texture methods. Our findings suggest that deformation within the décollement zone is partitioned into a volumetric component, preserved as reduced porosities within coherent fragments, and a localized shear component, evidenced by mineral preferred orientations along discrete slip surfaces. We suggest that the reduced porosities result from the destruction of "cementation" in the sediments during the early stages of deformation and may arise from cyclic fatiguing of the sediment induced by fluctuating pore pressures. The nonpenetrative shear fabrics probably develop as the tectonic deformation front migrates seaward, and the weakened protodécollement subsequently accommodates shear displacements along discrete fractures.

  7. Accretionary Complex Origin of the Mafic-ultramafic Bodies of the Sanbagawa Belt, Central Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terabayashi, M.; Okamoto, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaneko, Y.; Ota, T.; Maruyama, S.; Katayama, I.; Komiya, T.; Anma, R.; Ozawa, H.; Windley, B. F.; Liou, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    In the high-grade Cretaceous Sanbagawa high pressure (HP) metamorphic belt our new 1:5000 scale mapping of the eclogitic mafic-ultramafic bodies and their surrounding epidote-amphibolite-facies schists, has revealed a duplex structure formed by the subduction of the Izanagi-Pacific oceanic plate. Lithologies of the two largest mafic-ultramafic bodies in the Sanbagawa belt, the Iratsu eclogite and the Higashi-Akaishi peridotite, strike WNW-ESE and dip N; the upper boundary with the surrounding schist is a normal fault, whereas the lower boundary is a thrust. The Iratsu body is subdivided into at least two tectonic units; the unit boundary is sub-parallel to a lithological boundary. The protoliths of the upper unit are gabbro, basalt, minor quartz rock and pelite, and those of the lower unit are pyroxenite, gabbro, basalt, chert and marble, in ascending order. The lower unit is characterized by layers of alternating eclogitic metagabbro and pyroxenite. The layers are extensive at the bottom of the Iratsu eclogite, and transient towards the Higashi-Akaishi body. Eclogite-facies metapsammite is intercalated between the Iratsu and Higashi-Akaishi bodies. Our mapping has revealed the following; (1) a duplex structure of the mafic-ultramafic bodies indicating their accretionary complex origin. (2) Reconstructed oceanic plate stratigraphy in ascending order of peridotite, gabbro, basalt, limestone, minor chert and pelite suggests that different parts of the protolith were derived from a mid-oceanic topographic high, an oceanic island or plateau, and an overlying trench turbidite. (3) The convergent motion of the oceanic plate changed from NW to NE during the accretion of the large oceanic island or plateau.

  8. Detrital zircon geochronology and provenance analysis applied to the onshore Makran accretionary wedge, SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Burg, J.; Winkler, W.; Ruh, J. B.; Von Quadt, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Makran is one of the largest accretionary wedges in the world, located in Southeast Iran. The Makran Basin is composed of turbidity sediments ranging in age from late Cretaceous to Holocene. The analysis of detrital zircons is important to interpret the provenance of the sediments and to clarify the geological history of the sedimentary basins and their surrounding source regions. We present about 2777 new U-Pb ages (ICP laser ablation mass spectrometry) from individual detrital zircons of 18 sandstone samples collected throughout the onshore Makran. 101 detrital zircon ages from a late Cretaceous fine grained sandstone ranges from 180-160 Ma (Mid-Jurassic). 478 detrital zircon ages obtained from the mid to late Eocene sandstone reveals different sources for the NE and NW parts of the Makran Basin. Zircon grains in the NE basin belong to two populations peaked at Mid-Jurassic and Mid-Eocene, with the noticeable absence of Cretaceous grains. In the NW basin, detrital zircons are Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. 587 detrital zircon grains from fine to medium grained Oligocene sandstones collected in different parts of the basin range from Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. 1611 detrital zircon age from Early Miocene sandstones collected in the eastern and western parts of the basin show distinctly different detrital zircon ages. They range from Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene in the eastern basin, from Late Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene in the west. Detrital zircon ages from Mid and Late Miocene sandstones rang from Late Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. These new detrital zircon U-Pb age data show that the eastern and western parts of the Makran Basin received sediments from different source areas during Eocene and Early Miocene times. Mid and Late Miocene sediment are recycled (cannibalism) from the Oligocene units of the basin.

  9. Late Paleozoic accretionary complexes on the Gondwana margin of southern Chile: Evidence from the Chonos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Mpodozis, Constantino; Godoy, Estanislao; Hervé, Francisco; Pankhurst, Robert; Brook, Maureen

    The late Paleozoic "basement" rocks that crop out along the Pacific side of the Chonos Archipelago (44°-46°S) can be divided into two north-south trending belts: (1) an eastern belt formed of submarine fan-turbidites and subordinate pelagic cherts, each containing well-preserved primary sedimentary structures, and (2) a western belt, mainly formed by strongly foliated mica schists and greenschists. Trace element contents in the cherts and greenschists indicate rocks of oceanic affinity. The structures present within the eastern rock suite are principally subiso-clinal folds (with tectonic imbrication) and locally developed zones of broken formation. The transition from these rocks into the foliated schists appears to be related to a progressive increase in metamorphism and strain associated with the development of westward verging recumbent folds and a flat-lying crenulation cleavage. It is inferred that these structures developed during the construction of a Late Carboniferous-Early Permian accretionary prism (about 260 Ma Rb-Sr ages), although sedimentation may have taken place throughout the upper Paleozoic. Rb-Sr whole-rock isochrons giving Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous ages for some localities may indicate much later development of S2 structures. Alternatively, they may represent isotopic resetting by hydrothermal effects during the emplacement of transgressive Early Cretaceous granites, one of which gives a new Rb-Sr isochron age of 125±2Ma. This overall scenario seems to be consistent with that reported in the slightly older coastal metamorphic basement north of 34°S and equivalent or younger complexes farther south in the Madre de Dios Archipelago.

  10. Insights on deep, accretionary subduction processes from the Sistan ophiolitic "mélange" (Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, S.; Agard, P.; De Hoog, J. C. M.; Omrani, J.; Plunder, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Sistan ophiolitic belt, formed by the closure of the N-S trending Sistan Ocean during late Cretaceous times, comprises several branches and basins across a 100 × 700 km area along the Iran-Afghanistan border. One of these, the Ratuk complex, exposes disrupted HP ophiolitic blocks from a paleo-subduction complex generally interpreted as a tectonic "mélange". In order to better understand its overall structure and evaluate the degree of mixing within this mélange, an extensive set of serpentinized peridotites, mafic rocks and metasediments was collected in the Sulabest area (Ratuk complex). A detailed geological and structural map of the Sulabest area is herein provided, in which three main units (the Western, Upper and Eclogitic Units) separated by relatively sharp tectonic contacts were identified. The latter two of these slices exhibit metamorphic evidence for burial along the same HP-LT gradient (up to blueschist and eclogite facies, respectively). Sharp differences in peak metamorphic conditions and retrograde parageneses nevertheless suggest that they followed two distinct P-T trajectories. Geochemical signatures of ultramafic rocks indicate an abyssal origin for the non-metamorphic Western Unit while the presence of mantle wedge serpentinites is inferred for some samples from the high-pressure units. The differences in peak temperatures (between 520 and 650 °C) and the geochemical heterogeneity of mafic rocks suggest that tectonic mixing occurred (only) within the high-pressure units, possibly within the hydrated mantle wedge. Our results show that this portion of the Sistan ophiolitic belt did not form, as earlier proposed, by chaotic tectonic "mélange" (i.e. where small tectonic blocks with distinct P-T histories are mixed in a mechanically weak matrix). We instead propose that this segment of the ophiolitic belt formed via accretionary processes deep in the subduction zone, whereby distinct slices with different P-T histories were tectonically

  11. Slope basins, headless canyons, and submarine palaeoseismology of the Cascadia accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAdoo, B.G.; Orange, D.L.; Screaton, E.; Lee, H.; Kayen, R.

    1997-01-01

    A combination of geomorphological, seismic reflection and geotechnical data constrains this study of sediment erosion and deposition at the toe of the Cascadia accretionary prism. We conducted a series of ALVIN dives in a region south of Astoria Canyon to examine the interrelationship of fluid flow and slope failure in a series of headless submarine canyons. Elevated head gradients at the inflection point of canyons have been inferred to assist in localized failures that feed sediment into a closed slope basin. Measured head gradients are an order of magnitude too low to cause seepage-induced slope failure alone; we therefore propose transient slope failure mechanisms. Intercanyon slopes are uniformly unscarred and smooth, although consolidation tests indicate that up to several metres of material may have been removed. A sheet-like failure would remove sediment uniformly, preserving the observed smooth intercanyon slope. Earthquake-induced liquefaction is a likely trigger for this type of sheet failure as the slope is too steep and short for sediment flow to organize itself into channels. Bathymetric and seismic reflection data suggest sediment in a trench slope basin between the second and third ridges from the prism's deformation is derived locally. A comparison of the amounts of material removed from the slopes and that in the basin shows that the amount of material removed from the slopes may slightly exceed the amount of material in the basin, implying that a small amount of sediment has escaped the basin, perhaps when the second ridge was too low to form a sufficient dam, or through a gap in the second ridge to the south. Regardless, almost 80% of the material shed off the slopes around the basin is deposited locally, whereas the remaining 20% is redeposited on the incoming section and will be re-accreted.

  12. Structural characteristics of shallowly buried accretionary prism: Rapidly uplifted Neogene accreted sediments on the Miura-Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The upper Miocene Misaki and Nishizaki formations on the Miura and Boso peninsulas in central Japan preserve the deformation features of an off-scraped accretionary prism. The spatial distribution, geometry, and style of accretion-related deformation with paleotemperature and burial depth estimation are elucidated in this study. The deformation structures and textures are similar to those of modern accretionary prisms. The low maximum paleotemperature (<50°C) and high preserved porosity of the sediments (30-50%) imply a maximum burial depth of less than 1000 m. On the basis of the mode of deformation, this off-scraped body is divided into an imbricate thrust, a thrust unit, and an upper coherent unit in ascending order. The imbricate thrust corresponds to a branch from the basal décollement zone and is subdivided into a brecciated zone, a main gouge zone, and a shear band zone. The thrust unit hosts a concentration of thrust systems that form various orders of duplex structures, while the upper coherent unit is characterized by gravitational instability- and earthquake-induced deformation without thrust faulting. The duplex distribution, shear strain, and fluid migration associated with the off-scraping processes are clearly localized within the imbricate thrust and thrust unit. This accretion-related deformation occurred before lithification of the sediment and under high fluid pressure induced by shear deformation, thickening of the sedimentary sequence, and earthquake-induced liquefaction. These processes are inferred to control the effect on the mode of deformation and the location of thrusting during early deformation of the accretionary prism.

  13. Fold Thrust Belt Kinematics from 3D Seismic Imaging along the NanTroSEIZE Transect, Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H.; Moore, G.

    2008-12-01

    The accretionary prism of the Nankai Trough, Japan provides an excellent location to study the kinematics of a fold and thrust belt developed primarily in low permeability units. Recently acquired 3D reflection seismic data covering a 12 x 56 km area from the Kumano basin seaward to the deformation front reveals three structural domains within the frontal accretionary prism. The farthest seaward domain of the prism consists closely-spaced, apparently in-sequence thrust sheets forming a steep critical taper angle. The primary decollement beneath these thrusts ramps upsection above a topographic high within the oceanic basement. The farthest landward domain within the study area consists of the hanging wall of an apparently out of sequence megasplay thrust fault that dips landward to the top of the oceanic crust. The central structural domain within the prism consists of thrust sheets formed above a decollement approximately 2 km above the top of the oceanic crust, above the decollement associated with the more seaward thrusts. These thrusts are more widely spaced than those nearer the deformation front and are blanketed with syn and post kinematic sediments. Synkinematic sediments indicate that thrusts in the most seaward and most landward structural domains within the prism are the most active, though some reactivation of structures in the middle domain has occurred. Additionally, gas hydrate bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the lowermost portions of the prism are present as discrete bands striking parallel to thrusts. These BSRs occur primarily along the most active thrusts, and are only present as small patches within the central structural domain of the prism. As these are expected to be the result of fluid migration along faults and permeable structures, they provide insight into the hydrologic controls on thrusting within the accretionary prism.

  14. Approximate General Coulomb Model for Accretionary Prisms: An Integrated Study of the Kumano Transect, Nankai Subduction Zone, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Rob; Ikari, Matt; Hüpers, Andre; Rempel, Alan; Wilson, Dean; Kitajima, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    In accretionary wedges, the mechanical and hydrologic properties along splay faults and the plate boundary fault at the base of the wedge are intimately related to properties within the wedge itself, as well as to sedimentation and/or mass wasting at the wedge surface, and accretionary flux at the wedge toe; Coulomb wedge theories tie these processes together and have been successful in their application to convergent margins. Most such theories assume for the sake of simplicity that mechanical parameters (e.g. bulk density, compressibility, frictional strength) and pore pressure are constant throughout the overlying wedge. However, the values of these parameters must necessarily change with depth and distance from the trench. Here, we derive a model for a fully general Coulomb wedge, parameterized using data specific to the Kumano transect at Nankai, to better understand the location of the basal plate interface and the properties of material composing an actively accretionary prism. We use shear strength data collected for incoming sediments at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site C0011 of the NanTroSEIZE project to parameterize the wedge's coefficient of friction. Preliminary results of models where the friction coefficient of the wedge decreases with depth, with other parameters constant and zero cohesion, indicate that including depth dependent frictional strength in the wedge decreases the taper angle of the wedge, with the effect becoming more pronounced with distance from the trench. This model will be further refined by including seismically and numerically determined spatial variations in fluid pressure within the wedge, as well as detailed locations of the upper and basal wedge surfaces along the Kumano transect determined from 3-D seismic data.

  15. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, G.F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  16. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  17. Characterization of structures of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism from integrated analyses of LWD log response, resistivity images and clay mineralogy of cuttings: Expedition 338 Site C0002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Schleicher, Anja

    2014-05-01

    analysis measured at room temperature and a relative humidity of ~30%, we compared the shape and size of illite and smectite, as well as their water content and their polytypes. The comparison of cuttings mineralogy with logging while drilling (LWD) data allowed us to characterize structural, petrophysical and mineralogical properties at fracture and fault zones. We also analyzed the relationship between deformation structures and compositional and mineralogical changes. We established a correlation between observed results on clay mineralogy and log responses in relation with the structures and trends characterized on logging data. In general, the log data provide a good correlation with the actual mineralogy and the relative abundance of clay. In particular we analyzed trends characterized by smectite water layers as indication of compaction. These trends were correlated with log response (on sonic velocity) within Unit IV. Our results show the integration of logging data and cutting sample analyses as a valuable tool for characterization of petrophysical and mineralogical changes of the structures of the Nankai accretionary prism.

  18. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    TsanYao Mud Volcano (TYMV) is the largest mud volcano cone in the Hengchun Mud Volcano Group (HCMVG), located at the upper slope of the accrretionary wedge, southwest of Taiwan. The region is under active tectonic activity with the Philippine Plate, moving northwestward at a rate of ~8 cm/year. This region also receives huge quantity of suspended particle load of ~100 mT/year at present time from adjacent small rivers of the Island of Taiwan. Large loads of suspended sediments influx become a major source of organic carbon and later gas and other hydrocarbon. Gas and fluid in the mud volcano are actively venting from deep to the sea floor on the upper slope of the accretionary wedge. In order to understand venting on the HCMVG, echo sounder, towcam and coring were carried out. Pore water sulfate, chloride, potassium, calcium, stable isotope O-18, gas compositions, dissolved sulfide were analysed. The HCMVG consists of 12 volcano cones of different sizes. Large quantity of gas and fluid are venting directly from deep to the TYMV structure high, as well as 50+ other vents as appeared as flares on the echo sounder. Some flares are reaching to the atmosphere and likely a source of green house gases to the atmosphere. Venting fluids include gas bubbles, suspended particle, mud, and breccia. Breccia size could reach more than 12 cm in diameter. Circular bands in different color appeared around the cone may represent stages of vent eruptions. Compositions of vent gas include methane, ethane and propane. High proportions of ethane and propane in the vent gas demonstrated that source of gas are thermogenic in origin. Patchy authigenic carbonate, bacterial mats, bivalves, tube worms and other chemosynthesis organisms were supported by venting gas AOM process near the sea floor. Pore water chloride concentrations show distinct variation pattern from center cone to the side of the volcano, with low in the center and high away from the cone. Pore water with higher than seawater

  19. The Calm Before the Storm: Exploring the Post Accretionary Doldrums Prior to the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The early bombardment of the inner solar system played a critical role in planetary evolution, but there is still considerable uncertainty about what happened when. Dynamical models suggest two major bombardment phases may have taken place: (i) a post-accretionary period where newly-formed worlds were struck by leftover planetesimals, and (ii) a late heavy bombardment period, possibly produced by conditions related to a violent reshuffling of the planets ~4.1-4.2 Gyr ago (Ga). If valid, a relative impact lull took place between the two bombardment phases. We explore the evidence for such doldrums in this talk. Consider: a) Mars. Geochemical and meteorite evidence indicates the giant 10,600 × 8,500 km Borealis basin formed > 4.5 Ga. Many postulated basins forming afterwards, however, can be ruled out by the surprisingly pristine nature of the Borealis boundary in topography and gravity. Three of the four largest remaining basins, Hellas, Isidis, and Argyre, have superposed craters counts indicating they are < 4.1 Ga. b) Asteroids. The oldest and most extensive sets of 39Ar-40Ar shock degassing ages, found within meteorites that were heavily shocked, shock-melted, or otherwise showed some evidence for having been part of a large collision, show age clusters between ~3.5-4.1 Ga and ~4.4-4.54 Ga. Using dynamical/impact heating models, it can be argued that relatively few projectiles were on planet-crossing orbits between ~4.1-4.4 Ga. c) Moon. The Moon is probably 4.47 Ga, yet most sample evidence for basin-sized impacts may be < 4.2 Ga. The age gap is curious unless many basins were created close in time to the solidification of the lunar crust. Using collisional/dynamical models, it can be shown that many early basins and craters formed > 4.4 Ga. Here the early impactors may be surviving debris from the Moon-forming giant impact event; note that ejecta initially escaping the Earth-Moon system can come back over many tens of Myr. This would leave doldrums between ~4

  20. Origin and evolution of fluids from mud volcanoes in the Barbados accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, Arnaud; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Dia, Aline; Pineau, Françoise; Boulègue, Jacques; Javoy, Marc

    2004-05-01

    A large collection of fluids (54 interstitial fluids and four expelled fluids) were sampled at the Manon site, at the outer edge of the Barbados accretionary complex. These warm fluids (up to 20°C) are expelled by sub-marine (5000 mbsl) mud volcanoes consisting of diapirs (unchanneled flow) and diatremes (channeled). Chlorine stable isotope ratios of these fluids were measured by IRMS with a reproducibility of ± 0.05‰ (1σ) versus SMOC (Standard Mean Ocean Chloride). A large range of δ 37Cl between -5.3‰ and +0.1‰ is observed. Data from each volcanic structure describe a mixing between seawater and a low-δ 37Cl fluid. The whole set of data is interpreted as the result of a mixing between two deep components and seawater. The two deep fluids are chemically distinct (e.g., in Ca, Mg, K, Li, Sr and Br contents and Br/Cl ratio). They display low and significantly different 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.707790 and 0.707892, respectively) and δ 37Cl values (-4.51 and -5.24‰, respectively). Physicochemical processes such as mineralogical transformation, diffusion, compaction or ion filtration are known to fractionate chlorine stable isotopes and can produce fluids with negative δ 37Cl values. Ion filtration due to sediment compaction appears to be the more likely process to explain the negative δ 37Cl values observed at the Manon site. A model for the generation of these signatures is proposed where a residual negative δ 37Cl fluid reservoir is created at the bottom of the prism or the sediment pile. Further compaction/fracturing and/or dewatering of the slab may flush out these fluids and focus them towards the décollement zone. Mixing between the fluids and ultimately with seawater and water released during gas hydrate destabilizations may explain the data set within the individual cores and between the different structures.

  1. Stress states at site C0002, Nankai accretionary wedge, down to 2000 m below seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun; Lee, Hikweon

    2015-04-01

    The boreholes drilled at site C0002 under the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment project, southwest Japan were used to estimate in situ stress states that prevail in the plate interface region between Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate. The depth covered in this study is from seafloor down to ~2000 meter below seafloor (mbsf), somewhat shallow compared to the depths of the megasplay fault (~5000 mbsf) and the plate interface (~6800 mbsf). However, the shallow stress may reflect some tectonic processes prevailing in this region and may give some insight into tectonic settings. Multiple techniques of borehole observations and borehole tests were used to estimate the magnitudes and the orientations of the stresses. The borehole breakouts in the vertical boreholes indicate a consistent orientation (margin-parallel) of the maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) throughout the depths. The analysis on the geometry (or azimuthal span) of borehole breakouts and rock strengths (from log-based estimations) suggests that the stress states in the upper forearc basin sediments above the unconformity (~980 mbsf) are constrained to be in favor of normal faulting (vertical stress (Sv) > SHmax > least horizontal stress (Shmin)). The stress states in the old accretionary prism below the unconformity down to ~1400 mbsf are possibly varying with depth between normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting favored stress regimes. At depths below 1400 mbsf, occurrences of borehole stress indicators (breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITFs)) are limited due to optimally controlled mud pressures. Two sets of breakouts (1616 and 1862 mbsf) and DITFs (1648 and 1884 mbsf) were jointly used to constrain stress states there, which yielded that Shmin is 79-85% of Sv and SHmax is nearly equal to Sv, suggesting a mixed stress regime for normal and strike-slip faulting (Sv ~ SHmax > Shmin). The range of constrained Shmin is consistent with the results from leak

  2. Observations and Rock Analyses in a Kumano Mud Volcano in Nankai Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Aoike, K.; Sawada, T.; Ashi, J.; Gulick, S. P.; Flemings, P. B.; Kuramoto, S.; Saito, S.; Mikada, H.; Kinoshita, M.

    2002-12-01

    Kumano Basin is a forearc basin on the eastern Nankai Accretionary Prism off southwest Japan. Recent bathymetric survey showed existence of small knolls in the Kumano Basin. Submersible and ROV dives, sidescan sonar and deep-towed camera investigations revealed so far that at least five of the small knolls are mud volcanoes erupted on the Kumano Basin floor. In June and August, 2002, Dive 677 and 681 by submersible SHINKAI 6500 (YK02-02: R/V Yokosuka) and Dive 267 by ROV KAIKO (KR02-10: R/V Kairei) were performed in one of the mud volcanoes, Kumano Knoll No.4, which is 100 m high and 800 m in diameter at the foot of the knoll. The knoll has a plateau of about 300 m diameter on the top, which shows bumpy surface where there are waves, steps and craters of several meters in diameter. The craters imply active or dead cold seeps and are occasionally accompanied by Calyptogena colonies. The plateau is mostly covered with mud. Rock gravels and boulders were observed mainly on outer slope of the knoll. Sidescan sonar and subbottom profiler data by KAIKO system show marked contrasts in sonic reflectivity and penetration between the Kumano Knoll No.4 and the Kumano Basin floor. The high sonic reflectivity and the low penetration on the knoll indicate that main body of the knoll is composed of clastic ejecta as a mud volcano. On the Kumano Knoll No.4, the dives obtained semi-consolidated mudstone, mud breccia, and biotite arkose sandstone. Chronological analysis on nannofossil indicates the sedimentary rocks are in the late Early Miocene through the Middle Miocene. According to this age and geological information on land, it is likely that the sedimentary rocks on the knoll were originally deposited at the beginning of formation of the Kumano Basin. Porosity of these sedimentary rocks is very low (< 18 %). Some mud breccias contain calcite veins that cut the angular mud gravels. These features lead to finding processes until when the sedimentary rocks reached to the seafloor

  3. Identification and Analysis of Methane Plumes from the Barbados Accretionary Complex Identified in Multibeam Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, A.; Casey, J.

    2013-12-01

    Integration of modern high-resolution multibeam deliverables can relate water column features to seafloor geologic structures. As well as providing coverage of wide areas, the data can also be used to infer volume and variability of gas seeps and characterize the spatial relationships with seafloor features. As part of cruise AT21-02 to the Barbados Accretionary Complex a ~12 kHz Kongsberg EM122 hull-mounted multibeam system was deployed. We processed the multibeam data using the QPS modules to produce a subsea 4D multi-resolution scene files containing bathymetry, acoustic backscatter and midwater data. Within the scene we have identified a region of giant mud volcanoes and a second region along strike containing several ~1000 m tall flares in the water column data directly above cratered hummocky seafloor with high amplitude backscatter at ~-1500 m water depth that are interpreted as ebullition craters beneath gas plumes. From the acoustic returns we relate the bubble diameter or volume to the received signal strength. Evidence exists for armoring of the gas bubbles in the water column by hydrate: the modeled gas hydrate stability zone reaches ~600 m above the seafloor but the acoustic resolution of our dataset is similar to the maximum depth of disappearance of the bubble plume. The shear observed in the rising gas plume may be the result of transport in the current direction of the lowest water mass from the northwest to southeast at 128°, a direction similar to the transport direction of the lowest water mass in this region, or the presence of abyssal undular vortices. Seismic data from this area has bottom simulating reflectors indicating the presence of methane hydrate and it is likely that the observed flares are related to dissociation of methane in the subsurface. The release of gasses may be related to changes in the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone in the underlying sediments responding to temperature changes in the lowest water mass. To

  4. Minimum work analysis on the critical taper accretionary wedges- insights from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2014-05-01

    The Critical taper theory (CTT) is a fundamental concept for the understanding of mountain building processes. Based on force balance it predicts the preferred steady state geometry of an accretionary wedge system and its tectonic regime (extensive, compressive, stable). However, it does not specify which structures are formed and reactivated to reach the preferred state. The latter can be predicted by the minimum work concept. Here we test both concepts and their interplay by analysing two simple sand wedge models which differ only in the thickness of the basal detachment (a layer of glass beads). While the steady state critical taper is controlled by internal and basal friction coefficients and therefore the same in all experiments, different processes can minimise work by 1. reducing gravitational work e.g. by lowering the amount of uplift or volume uplifted, or 2. reducing frictional work e.g. by lowering the load or due to low friction coefficient along thrusts. Since a thick detachment allows entrainment of low friction material and therefore lowering of the friction along active thrusts, we speculate that the style of wedge growth will differ between the two models. We observe that the wedge with a thin basal detachment localizes strain at the toe of the wedge periodically and reactivate older faults to reach the critical topography. On the contrary, in the wedge with the thicker detachment layer, friction along thrusts is lowered due to the entrainment of low friction material from the detachment zone, subsequently increasing the lifetime of a thrust. Long thrust episodes are always followed by a fault of shorter lifetime, with the aim of reaching the critical taper. From the two experiments, we analyze the time-series evolution of the wedge to infer the work done by the two styles of deformation and predict the trend over time to differ but the maximum work to be similar Our observations show that the critical taper theory determines the geometry of the

  5. Formation of forearc basins by collision between seamounts and accretionary wedges: an example from the New Hebrides subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Fisher, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seabeam data reveal two deep subcircular reentrants in the lower arc slope of the New Hebrides island arc that may illustrate two stages in the development of a novel type of forearc basin. The Malekula reentrant lies just south of the partly subducted Bougainville seamount. This proximity, as well as the similarity in morphology between the reentrant and an indentation in the lower arc slope off Japan, suggests that the Malekula reentrant formed by the collision of a seamount with the arc. An arcuate fold-thrust belt has formed across the mouth of the reentrant, forming the toe of a new accretionary wedge. The Efate reentrant may show the next stage in basin development. This reentrant lies landward of a lower-slope ridge that may have begun to form as an arcuate fold-thrust belt across the mouth of a reentrant. This belt may have grown by continued accretion at the toe of the wedge, by underplating beneath the reentrant, and by trapping of sediment shed from the island arc. These processes could result in a roughly circular forearc basin. Basins that may have formed by seamount collision lie within the accretionary wedge adjacent to the Aleutian trenches. -Authors

  6. Provenance analysis of the Miocene accretionary prism of the Hengchun Peninsula, southern Taiwan, and regional geological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinchang; Yan, Yi; Huang, Chi-Yue; Chen, Duofu; Shan, Yehua; Lan, Qin; Chen, Wenhuang; Yu, Mengming

    2014-05-01

    Petrographic analysis, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and Neodymium isotope are applied to the Middle-Late Miocene turbidite sequences in the Hengchun accretionary prism, southern Taiwan, to constrain the provenance and nature of sedimentation in the Manila subduction system. Both petrographic study and detrital zircon U-Pb ages show that the Middle-Late Miocene turbidite sequences were primarily derived from Mesozoic granites and volcanic rocks of the Cathaysian Block in SE China, which were transported southeastward via rivers like Minjiang and Jiulongjiang to the Taiwan area. This conclusion is further supported by Nd isotope analyses of shales intercalated within sandstone sequences showing negative ɛNd values (-13.3 to -10.5) of a continental origin. During the Late Miocene when global sea-level fell significantly, the SE China coastline shifted seaward to the eastern part of the present Taiwan Strait, which would have facilitated these continent-derived sediments being transported southeastward to the shelf-upper slope of the Chinese continental margin. These turbidite sequences were then deformed and accreted into the accretionary prism of the Hengchun Peninsula when the South China Sea oceanic lithosphere subducted eastward beneath the Philippine Sea Plate in the Late Miocene. Our study suggests that sedimentary deposition of the turbidite sequences in the Hengchun Peninsula could be strongly controlled by different river system supply, submarine channeling transport and fluctuations of sea-level.

  7. Control of structural inheritance on thrust initiation and material transfer in accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, Karen; Geersen, Jacob; Ritter, Malte; Lieser, Kathrin; Behrmann, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Faults in the incoming sediment layer are commonly observed in subduction zone settings and well developed in the incoming plate off Sumatra. To investigate how they affect the structural development of the accretionary wedge, we conducted a series of 2D analogue tectonic experiments in which a 2 cm thick quartz sand layer on top of a thin detachment layer of glass beads was pulled against a rigid backstop by a basal conveyor belt in a 20cm wide box with glass walls. A gap at the base of the back wall avoids entrainment of the glass beads. At regular spacing of either 2.3, 5.5 or 7.8 cm (fractions of the thrust sheet length in the reference model), conjugate pairs of weakness zones dipping 60deg were created by cutting the sand layer with a thin (1 mm) metal blade. Both the undisturbed sand and the pre-cuts have an angle of internal friction of ~29o, but their cohesion is different by 50 Pa (110 Pa for the undisturbed material, 60 Pa along the pre-cuts). Friction of the glass beads is ~24deg. The experiments are monitored with high resolution digital cameras; displacement fields derived from digital image correlation are used to constrain fault activity. In all experiments, a critically tapered wedge developed with a surface slope of 7.5deg. In the reference model (no weakness zones in the input section), the position of new thrust faults is controlled by the frontal slope break. The average length of the thrust sheets is 11 cm and the individual thrusts accommodate on average 8 cm displacement each. The presence of weakness zones causes thrust initiation at a position different from the reference case, and affects their dip. For a fault spacing of 7.8 cm (or 75% of the reference thrust sheet length), every single incoming weakness zone causes the formation of a new thrust, thus resulting in thrust sheets shorter than the equilibrium case. In addition, less displacement is accommodated on each thrust. As a consequence, the frontal taper is smaller than expected

  8. Is the Chrystalls Beach Accretionary Melange a Fossil Subduction Channel Shear Zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.

    2007-12-01

    In the northeast of the Hikurangi subduction margin, a 1-2 km thick layer of high Vp/Vs, low Qp and distributed microseismicity is present along the subduction megathrust interface (Eberhart-Phillips & Chadwick, 2002). This zone is interpreted as a 'subduction channel' consisting of a fluid-saturated, highly sheared mixture of trench-fill sediments, which have been subducted below (or eroded from) the accretionary prism (von Huene & Scholl, 1991). Seismic style within subduction channels may vary from large megathrust ruptures to aseismic slip associated with microseismic activity. The factors controlling these variations in style are not well understood due to the inaccessible nature of active subduction thrust interfaces. The Chrystalls Beach Complex, SE Otago, New Zealand, is a possible analogue for the seismogenic zone of an active subduction channel. This complex comprises an intensely sheared mixture of chert, terrigenous mud and sand, minor volcanogenic sediments and pillow lavas. It has a 'block-in-matrix' mélange structure, where asymmetric, dismembered beds of sand-rich competent material are enclosed within a relatively incompetent, cleaved pelitic matrix. The rock assemblage has been progressively deformed in a top-to-the-north shear zone, and is pervaded by an anastomosing network of quartz/calcite shear- and extension veins, where individual veins can be traced for tens of metres. The presence of extension veins indicates episodes where the tensile overpressure condition (Pf > σ3) was locally attained. Initially the sediments experienced compaction, volume loss and layer-parallel soft sediment shearing, developing a slaty cleavage and viscous S/C shear structures. The dense vein network developed during subsequent brittle deformation. The mineral assemblage (pumpellyite-chlorite to pumpellyite-actinolite), mica b0 spacing and illite crystallinity indicate deformation in a high pressure - low temperature environment ( ~ 3-6 kbar, ~ 200-300°C). This

  9. Low frequency tremors in the Tonankai accretionary prism, triggered by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    There have been many reports of triggered tremors and micro-earthquakes, by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, most of which are based on land observations. Here, we report that numerous low frequency tremors are recorded by broadband ocean-bottom seismographs of DONET, a network of cabled observatory systems deployed in the Tonankai accretionary prism of the Nankai trough. Ten stations were in operation at the time of the earthquake. The tremors are observed at five of the stations, which are located on the landward slope of the Nankai trough. On the other hand, the signals are weak at stations near the coast, which are placed on the Kumano Forarc basin. The tremors are dominant in a frequency range of 1-10Hz. Their duration ranges from tens of seconds to a few minutes. More than 20 events per hour can be detected in the first few days after the earthquake. The activity continues about three weeks with a decrease in the frequency of occurrence. An intriguing feature of the observed tremors is that some of them have a very low frequency (VLF) component, most clearly visible between 0.02 and 0.05 Hz. We found 74 such events within 5 days after the great earthquake. For each event, the VLF signal is detected only at one station in contrast to the high frequency signal (2-8Hz), which can be observed at more than a few stations. We estimated the source location of the VLF events, by measuring the onset of envelope seismograms constructed from the high frequency (2-8Hz) horizontal component. Due to the unclear onset and the limited number of observable stations per event, the individual events were located with large location errors. Therefore, we assumed that 11 of the events, whose VLF waveforms are similar to each other with high correlation coefficient (> 0.92), are co-located. The measured travel times for the 11 events are compared and some outliers were discarded. We grid-searched through a 3-D S-wave velocity model for the event location, which minimizes the travel

  10. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  11. Accretionary margin of north-western Hispaniola: morphology, structure and development of part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Austin, James A., Jr.; Scanlon, K.M.; Terence, Edgar N.; Parson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Broad-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) images and single- and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles demonstrate that the margin of north-western Hispaniola has experienced compression as a consequence of oblique North American-Caribbean plate convergence. Two principal morphological or structural types of accretionary wedges are observed along this margin. The first type is characterized by a gently sloping (???4??) sea floor and generally margin-parallel linear sets of sea-floor ridges that gradually deepen towards the flat Hispaniola Basin floor to the north. The ridges are caused by an internal structure consisting of broad anticlines bounded by thrust faults that dip southwards beneath Hispaniola. Anticlines form at the base of the slope and are eventually sheared and underthrust beneath the slope. In contrast, the second type of accretionary wedge exhibits a steeper (???6-16??) sea-floor slope characterized by local slumping and a more abrupt morphological transition to the adjacent basin. The internal structure appears chaotic on seismic reflection profiles and probably consists of tight folds and closely spaced faults. We suggest that changes in sea-floor declivity and internal structure may result from variations in the dip or frictional resistance of the de??collement, or possibly from changes in the cohesive strength of the wedge sediments. The observed pattern of thickening of Hispaniola Basin turbidites towards the insular margin suggests differential southwards tilting of the Hispaniola Basin strata, probably in response to North America-Caribbean plate interactions since the Early Tertiary. Based upon indirect age control from adjacent parts of the northern caribbean plate boundary, we infer a Late Eocene to Early Miocene episode of transcurrent motion (i.e. little or no tilting), an Early Miocene to Late Pliocene period of oblique convergence (i.e. increased tilt) during which the accretionary wedge began to be constructed, and a Late Pliocene to

  12. Ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with variable effective pressure at the boundary between slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism: IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; 314/315/316 Scientist, I.

    2008-12-01

    IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001 is located on the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay fault in the Nankai subduction zone off Kii peninsula (SW Japan), and penetrated an unconformity between ~200 m thick slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism. While a down-section porosity increase was clearly observed at the boundary from ~50% to ~60%, logging velocity does not appear to decrease at the boundary, which suggests that different diagenetic processes might exist above and below the boundary. In this study, we conducted ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with pore pressure control. We also conducted observations of sediment and chemical analysis. We examined the relationships between the acoustic properties, sediment textures, logging data from IODP Expedition 314 Site C0001 and data from shipboard core analysis. The ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements were conducted under constant pore pressure (500 kPa) and varying confining pressure to control effective pressure. The confining pressure ranges from 550 kPa to a maximum calculated from the density of overlying sediments (lithostatic pressure - hydrostatic pressure). 8 samples were analyzed, located from ~70 m to ~450 m below the sea floor. P-wave velocity ranges from ~1620 m/s to ~1990 m/s under the hydrostatic pressure condition. These velocities are in good agreement with the logging data. Porosity-velocity relationship in the analyzed data also coincide with that observed in the logging data. Samples shallower than ~300 m fall within previously-defined empirical relationships for normal- and high- consolidation. The deeper samples (at ~370 m and ~450 m below sea floor) show much higher velocity than that predicted by the empirical relationship, suggesting that significant cementation is present in those samples. The textural observations of sediments indicate a decrease in pore space with depth. Quartz and feldspar grains are surrounded by clay mineral matrices. Grain size seems to be almost

  13. Structural geology of cuttings and cores recovered from below the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai accretionary margin of Japan: Expedition 319 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, N. W.; Byrne, T. B.; Huftile, G.; McNeill, L. C.; Kanamatsu, T.; Saffer, D.; Araki, E.; Eguchi, N. O.; Toczko, S.; Takahashi, K.; Scientists, E.

    2009-12-01

    The geologic materials below the Kumano Basin provide critical information for understanding the geologic evolution of Japan’s Nankai margin and its earthquake hazards. Riser-based drilling at IODP Site C0009 recovered these geologic materials in cuttings from 704-1604 mbsf, and in ~70 m of core from 1510-1594 mbsf. The >4-mm size fraction of cuttings from 1332-1482 mbsf contains abundant vein structures in moderately consolidated, coarse-siltstones. Vein structures are <1 mm-wide granular rearrangements, possibly paleoseismites, and are mostly restricted to the late Miocene section below a significant unconformity at ~1300 mbsf. At Site C0002, close to the southeastern edge of the forearc basin, vein structures were also localized to a narrow depth interval in a slightly younger (Pliocene age) section. The cored interval at Site C0009 is from below a prominent unconformity at ~1360 mbsf and comprises finely (~10 cm-scale) interbedded, unmetamorphosed, and moderately cohesive silt- and sandstone. Bedding in the cored interval generally dips NNW in logging data and increases in dip from ~20° to ~ 60° with depth in both the FMI and the core data. A set of dominantly thrust-sense shear zones cuts and locally imbricates bedding, with dips <20° to >40°. The shear zones are 1-2 cm-wide, exhibit granular rather than cataclastic (fracture-dominated) microstructures, and though dark in appearance and bright in tomographic images (and thus likely higher density than the surrounding core), they are mineralogically similar to the surrounding material. The shear zones may have formed during tectonically induced dewatering and consolidation. In many places the shear zones define the center of a gradient in stretched and folded sedimentary structures. Younger faults also appear dark relative to the surrounding core, but are <1-mm wide, with a range of geometries and cross cutting relationships; there are likely at least two generations of these thin faults. The youngest

  14. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  15. Late Proterozoic evolution of the northern part of the Hamisana zone, northeast Sudan - Constraints on Pan-African accretionary tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes deformation fabrics developed in the northern part of the Hamisana zone in northeast Sudan. New structural data are presented which establish a structural chronology that characterizes distinct events of accretion, folding, and thrust faulting and reactivation of accretion-related faults. The structural data point to an intraplate compressional origin for the Hamisana zone. A review of available isotopic age data is carried out, and it is concluded that Pan-African accretionary processes may have been analogous to Phanerozoic ophiolite and island arc accretion in the western North American Cordillera, where penetrative deformation occurred in response to periodic intraplate shortening events, rather than an ultimate collision of unrelated crustal fragments.

  16. Early Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis along northern margin of Gondwana constrained by high-Mg metaigneous rocks, SW Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiaowan; Wang, Yuejun; Cawood, Peter A.; Zhang, Yuzhi

    2015-12-01

    SW Yunnan of China constituted part of the northern margin of Gondwana facing the proto-Tethys ocean in the early Paleozoic. However, the evolution of the region and its relationship with the accretionary orogenism have been poorly established. This paper reports a set of new zircon U-Pb age data and whole-rock major oxides, elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic data for early Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks from the previously defined Lancang Group and reveals the development of an Ordovician suprasubduction zone in SW Yunnan. Zircon U-Pb ages of 462 ± 6 and 454 ± 27 Ma for two representative samples indicate eruption of the volcanic rocks in the Late Ordovician. Geochemical data for the metavolcanic rocks together with other available data indicate a calc-alkaline affinity with high Al2O3 (13.04-18.77 wt%) and low TiO2 (0.64-1.00 wt%). They have Mg-numbers ranging from 62 to 50 with SiO2 of 53.57-69.10 wt%, compositionally corresponding to the high-Mg andesitic rocks. They display enrichments in LREEs and LILEs with significant Eu negative anomalies (δEu = 0.20-0.33), and depletions in HFSEs, similar to arc volcanic rocks. Their initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.721356 to 0.722521 and ɛNd(t) values from -7.63 to -7.62 with Nd model ages of 2.06-2.10 Ga. Integration of ages and geochemical data with available geological observations, we propose the presence of Ordovician magmatism related to proto-Tethyan evolution in SW Yunnan and the metaigneous rocks formed in an island-arc setting. They were part of a regional accretionary orogen that extended along the northern margin of Gondwana during Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic period.

  17. Flexural bending-induced plumelets and their seamounts in accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, N.; Dilek, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Seamounts and seamount chains are common in both the upper and lower plates of active subduction zones. Their OIB-type volcanic products are distinctly different from suprasubduction zone (arc, forearc and backarc) generated volcanic rocks in terms of their compositions and mantle sources. Tectonic accretion of such seamounts into the Japanese archipelago in the NW Pacific and into subduction-accretion complexes and active margins of continents/microcontinents within the Tethyan realm during the Cretaceous played a significant role in continental growth. Seamount assemblages comprise alkaline volcanic rocks intercalated with radiolarian and hemipelagic chert, and limestone, and may also include hypabyssal dolerite and gabbro intrusions. In the Tethyan orogenic belts these seamount rocks commonly occur as km-scale blocks in mélange units beneath the late Jurassic - Cretaceous ophiolites nappes, whereas on the Japanese islands they form discrete, narrow tectonic belts within the late Jurassic - Cretaceous accretionary prism complexes. We interpret some of these OIB occurrences in the Japanese and Tethyan mountain belts as asperities in downgoing oceanic plates that formed in <10 million years before their accretion. Their magmas were generated by decompressional melting of upwelling asthenosphere, without any significant mantle plume component, and were brought to the seafloor along deep-seated brittle fractures that developed in the flexed, downgoing lithosphere as it started bending near a trench. The modern occurrences of these "petit-spot volcanoes" are well established in the northwestern Pacific plate, off the coast of Japan. The proposed mechanism of the formation of these small seamounts better explains the lack of hotspot trails associated with their occurrence in the geological record. Magmatic outputs of such flexural bending-induced plumelets should be ubiquitious in the accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts.

  18. Small size very low frequency earthquakes in the Nankai accretionary prism, following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Obana, Koichiro; Sugioka, Hiroko; Araki, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Narumi; Fukao, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    A large number of shallow low frequency events were recorded after the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake by the cabled network of broadband ocean bottom seismometers (DONET) deployed in the eastern part of the Nankai trough. This low frequency event activity was intense for the first few days after the great earthquake and gradually decreased. Signals of the events are most clearly visible at the frequency range around 2-8 Hz. Some of the events are accompanied by a very long frequency (VLF) signal, which is clearly observed at around 0.02-0.05 Hz. The magnitude and source duration estimated by waveform analysis for one of the largest very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) was 3.0-3.5 and 17 s. This source duration is extremely long compared to ordinary earthquakes of comparable magnitude. These newly detected VLFEs are likely to be normal fault earthquakes located at shallow depths within the accretionary prism, in contrast to the previously reported VLFEs that were explained by a low angle thrusting along the decollement zone. On the other hand, the low frequency events with no clear VLF signal were previously regarded as being low frequency tremors (LFTs). We show that events with and without the VLF signal likely represent the same phenomenon, and the VLF signal is only observed when a large magnitude event occurs near the station. The waveforms of VLFEs are characterized by the coexistence of long source duration and high-frequency radiation of signals, and such features were previously explained by the co-occurrence of shear failure and hydrofractures under the influence of fluid brought into the decollement zone. Our result indicates that the stress state and the mechanical environment, which promote the occurrence of VLFEs, exist not only along the decollement zone but also in the shallower part of the accretionary prism.

  19. Permeability of Silty Claystone and Turbidite Samples from IODP Expedition 348, Hole C0002P, Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Underwood, M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main objectives of IODP Expedition 348 was to characterize the variations of lithology and structure with depth in the interior of the Nankai Trough accretionary complex beneath the Kumano forearc basin (offshore SW Japan). Six cores were recovered from Hole C0002P between 2163 and 2218 mbsf. Four whole-round (WR) specimens from depths of 2174.98 to 2209.64 mbsf were tested for constant-flow permeability with a focus on thin interbeds of silty claystone and fine-grained turbidites. Samples are from lithostratigraphic Unit V (accreted trench or Shikoku Basin hemipelagic deposits). Coarser interbeds are important for assessing the prospects of flow through stratigraphic conduits. Our primary objective is to better understand how hydrogeologic properties of different lithologies respond to deformation within the accretionary prism. Equipment for permeability tests consists of a withdrawal-infuse syringe pump to simultaneously inject and extract pore fluid from the top and bottom of the specimen to generate hydraulic head difference. Specimens were trimmed for tests in both vertical direction (along-core) and horizontal direction (cross-core) with the diameter of 3.8 cm (1.5 in). The isotropic effective stress is set at 0.55 MPa. The WR specimens are heterogeneous. The major lithology is silty claystone to fine-grained silty claystone. Some intervals contain thin (~1.3 cm) oblique sandy layers and black organic bands. Bedding is steep to vertical (~70-80˚). One goal is to determine how this lithologic variability affects the anisotropy of permeability. Environmental SEM was used to image the cores (in multiple directions) to evaluate the relation between sediment microstructure and anisotropy of permeability.

  20. Field evidence for fault controlled intrusion of blue-schist-bearing melange into an accretionary wedge, Island Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lamons, R.

    1985-01-01

    Two lithologic units of the Franciscan are well exposed along a loop of the Eel River at Island Mountain. They are 1) zeolite or lower grade lithic graywackes, and 2) a 0.5 km wide band of black shaly melange containing blueschist, chert, greenstone, metagraywacke, and a graywacke-hosted copper deposit. Sedimentary features were not observed in the melange. The graywacke was subdivided on the basis of presence or absence of sodium-cobaltonitrate stained K-spar. Field relationships suggest that the blueschist-bearing melange was emplaced along steep NW-dipping faults in an accretionary wedge. Mapping of S. Jewett Rock and SW Lake Mountain quadrangles show narrow anastomosing bands of the melange following NW-trending faults. East of this band, graywackes without K-spar are folded along NW/SE axes. No folds were found to the west. Other Melange bands pinch out into faults which juxtapose graywackes of different facies. The sheared melange bands are not folded and shale beds in the graywacke show little shear so the melange bands are unlikely to be sheared olistostromes. The areal extent of graywacke is about ten times that of melange shales. Assuming this pattern continues laterally and at depth, the amount of ductile material in the melange is far less than that assumed by Cloos (1982) in his flow model for melange. The ductile melange may have been forced upward by metamorphically produced volatiles, or as a result of relative plate motion. It originated at depth, moved up along the top of a subducting slab, plucking clasts, then splayed upward into pre-existing faults in the accretionary wedge.

  1. Rates of fluid expulsion across the northern Cascadia accretionary prism: Constraints from new heat flow and multichannel seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.E.; Hyndman, R.D. ); Villinger, H. )

    1990-06-10

    One hundred and ten closely spaced probe heat flwo measurements provide new constraints on the thermal regime of the northern Cascadia accretionary prism off Vancouver Island. Complementary heat flow values have been obtained from the depth of a bottom-simulating seismic reflector (BSR) that is interpreted to mark the thermally controlled base of a methane hydrate layer. The only local heat flow variations observed are associated with a sediment slump that is seen in SeaMARC II acoustic images and with the outcrop of several major thrust faults. Fluid expulsion resulting from the dewatering of the prism sediments appears to occur regionally in the 10-20-km-wide zone landward of the deformation front. In this area there is a significant disagreement between the probe and BSR heat flow estimates (roughly 30%) that can be explained by a regionally uniform vertical fluid flow at a rate of about 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} m/s. This is in good agreement with the estimated fluid expulsin rate required by the decrease in porosity landward of the deformation front, as estimated from the increase in seismic velocities derived from multichannel reflection data. The heat flow in Cascadia Basin seaward of the deformation front is in excellent agreement with that predicted by cooling plate models. Landward, there is a regional trend of decreasing heat flow across the accretionary prism, which is consistent with a model of simple tectonic thickening. Temperatures at the interface between the prism and the oceanic crust continue to increase landward, and reach 400-450 C beneath the middle to inner continental shelf. Initiation of megathrust earthquake failure along the main subduction thrust may be thus restricted by the high temperatures to the zone beneath the continental slope and outer shelf.

  2. Variation in deformation of the South Panama Accretionary Prism: Response to oblique subduction and trench sediment variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Mary E.; Moore, Gregory F.

    1990-08-01

    Migrated single-channel seismic lines and Sea-MARC II side scan and bathymetry data document an active accretionary prism along the obliquely convergent margin of south Panama, a region previously believed to be a transform margin. The eastern flank of the Coiba Ridge is being subducted in this region, creating the requisite geometry for along-strike variation in trench sediment thickness and type. The regional east dip of the downgoing plate causes the depth of the oceanic crust along the trench to drop approximately 1800 m from west to east. In the western region of the study area the incoming sedimentary section consists of approximately 600 m of pelagic and hemipelagic sediments. A wedge of trench turbidites that overlies the incoming hemipelagic sediments thickens from less than 100 m in the western region to more than 900 m in the eastern region of the study area. The eastward increase in sediment thickness correlates with the following changes in the accretionary prism: (1) decrease in initial surface slope; (2) broadening of the inner trench slope; (3) increase in thrust spacing; (4) steepening of frontal thrusts; and (5) fold development. Each of the responses reflects, in varying degrees, the increase in volume and changing physical properties of the accreted material, as well as the changing shear strength of the décollement. The increase in overburden pressure and compaction in the deeper sediments, together with the change in lithology from oceanic to trenchfill sediments, should produce an eastward increase in sediment shear strength both within the wedge and along its base. Because the décollement will tend to form where the pore fluid pressure-overburden ratio is at a maximum, the shear strength within the wedge should increase relative to basal shear strength. Decreased surface slopes will result from the increasing contrast in shear strength between the wedge and its base.

  3. Arc-parallel extension and fluid flow in an ancient accretionary wedge: The San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schermer, E.R.; Gillaspy, J.R.; Lamb, R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of the Lopez Structural Complex, a major Late Cretaceous terrane-bounding fault zone in the San Juan thrust system, reveals a sequence of events that provides insight into accretionary wedge mechanics and regional tectonics. After formation of regional ductile flattening and shear-related fabrics, the area was crosscut by brittle structures including: (1) southwest-vergent thrusts, (2) extension veins and normal faults related to northwest-southeast extension, and (3) conjugate strike-slip structures that record northwest-southeast extension and northeast-southwest shortening. Aragonite-bearing veins are associated with thrust and normal faults, but only rarely with strike-slip faults. High-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) minerals constrain the conditions for brittle deformation to ???20 km and <250 ??C. The presence of similar structures elsewhere indicates that the brittle structural sequence is typical of the San Juan nappes. Sustained HP-LT conditions are possible only if structures formed in an accretionary prism during active subduction, which suggests that these brittle structures record internal wedge deformation at depth and early during uplift of the San Juan nappes. The structures are consistent with orogen-normal shortening and vertical thickening followed by vertical thinning and along-strike extension. The kinematic evolution may be related initially to changes in wedge strength, followed by response to overthickening of the wedge in an unbuttressed, obliquely convergent setting. The change in vein mineralogy indicates that exhumation occurred prior to the strike-slip event. The pressure and temperature conditions and spatial and temporal extent of small faults associated with fluid flow suggest a link between these structures and the silent earthquake process. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  4. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  5. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  6. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  7. Constraining exhumation pathway in an accretionary wedge by (U-Th)/He thermochronology—Case study on Meliatic nappes in the Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putiš, Marián; Danišík, Martin; Ružička, Peter; Schmiedt, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    This study reconstructs the late stages in the exhumation history of a nappe derived from the Meliatic accretionary wedge in the Western Carpathians by means of zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He dating. The Meliatic accretionary wedge formed due to the closure of the Neotethyan Triassic-Jurassic Meliata-Hallstatt Ocean in the Late Jurassic. The studied fragments of the blueschist-bearing Meliatic Bôrka Nappe were metamorphosed at low-temperature and high- to medium-pressure conditions at ca. 160-150 Ma and included into the accretionary wedge. The time of the accretionary wedge formation constrains the beginning of the Bôrka Nappe northward thrusting over the Gemeric Unit of the evolving Central Western Carpathians (CWC) orogenic wedge. The zircon (U-Th)/He data on four samples recorded three evolutionary stages: (i) cooling through the ∼180 °C isotherm at 130-120 Ma related to starting collapse of the accretionary wedge, following exhumation of the high-pressure slices in the Meliatic accretionary wedge; (ii) postponed exhumation and cooling of some fragments through the ∼180 °C isotherm from 115 to 95 Ma due to ongoing collapse of this wedge; and (iii) cooling from 80 to 65 Ma, postdating the thrusting (∼100-80 Ma) of the Bôrka Nappe slices during the Late Cretaceous compression related to formation of the CWC orogenic wedge. The third stage already documents cooling of the Meliatic Bôrka Nappe slices in the CWC orogenic wedge. The apatite (U-Th)/He data may indicate cooling of a Bôrka Nappe slice to near-surface temperatures at ∼65 Ma. The younger AHe age clusters indicate that at least one, or possibly two, reheating events could have occurred in the longer interval from ∼40 to ∼10 Ma during the Oligocene-Miocene. These were related to sedimentary burial and/or the magmatism as documented in other parts of the CWC.

  8. Diversity and biogeochemical structuring of bacterial communities across the Porangahau ridge accretionary prism, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamdan, L.J.; Gillevet, P.M.; Pohlman, J.W.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinert, J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from the Porangahau ridge, located off the northeastern coast of New Zealand, were studied to describe bacterial community structure in conjunction with differing biogeochemical regimes across the ridge. Low diversity was observed in sediments from an eroded basin seaward of the ridge and the community was dominated by uncultured members of the Burkholderiales. Chloroflexi/GNS and Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in sediments from a methane seep located landward of the ridge. Gas-charged and organic-rich sediments further landward had the highest overall diversity. Surface sediments, with the exception of those from the basin, were dominated by Rhodobacterales sequences associated with organic matter deposition. Taxa related to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus and the JS1 candidates were highly abundant at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at three sites. To determine how community structure was influenced by terrestrial, pelagic and in situ substrates, sequence data were statistically analyzed against geochemical data (e.g. sulfate, chloride, nitrogen, phosphorous, methane, bulk inorganic and organic carbon pools) using the Biota-Environmental matching procedure. Landward of the ridge, sulfate was among the most significant structuring factors. Seaward of the ridge, silica and ammonium were important structuring factors. Regardless of the transect location, methane was the principal structuring factor on SMTZ communities. FEMS Microbiology Ecology ?? 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  9. Abundances of volatile-bearing phases in carbonaceous chondrites and cooling rates of meteorites based on cation ordering of orthopyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1989-01-01

    Results of preliminary calculations of volatile abundances in carbonaceous chondrites are discussed. The method (Ganguly 1982) was refined for the calculation of cooling rate on the basis of cation ordering in orthopyroxenes, and it was applied to the derivation of cooling rates of some stony meteorites. Evaluation of cooling rate is important to the analysis of condensation, accretion, and post-accretionary metamorphic histories of meteorites. The method of orthopyroxene speedometry is widely applicable to meteorites and would be very useful in the understanding of the evolutionary histories of carbonaceous chondrites, especially since the conventional metallographic and fission track methods yield widely different results in many cases. Abstracts are given which summarize the major conclusions of the volatile abundance and cooling rate calculations.

  10. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  11. A potential record of slow slip earthquakes from the Kodiak Accretionary Complex and the role of silica redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Slow slip earthquakes are observed along both accretionary and nonaccretionary subduction zones with continuous GPS networks, so one would expect that deeply exhumed paleo-decollements in ancient accretionary complexes would carry a record of these events in the form of fault fabrics, microstructures, or veins. One potential example is within the Central Belt of the Late Cretaceous Kodiak Formation, a 10's of meters thick, subhorizontal paleo-decollement zone from the Kodiak accretionary complex in southwest Alaska that is exposed for over 100 km along strike in a regional culmination in the Kodiak archipelago. Here, the main criteria that are likely necessary for slow slip earthquakes are satisfied: 1) proximity to the downdip transition from velocity weakening to velocity strengthening, 2) low effective stresses driven by high fluid pressures related to the onset of dehydration reactions in low permeability rocks, 3) dilation, with hundreds of events of cracking and crack closure, and 4) a regime of simple shear. The central belt is pervasively veined at the scale of mm's, but there are larger veins organized into en echelon sets that lie in seaward dipping arrays regularly spaced at ~0.5 m with small vugs in many cases. There are two types of microstructures in these veins that represent different crack closure mechanisms: crack seal bands and collapse residues. All the early, closely spaced veins close only by sealing (continuous crack seal bands of metamorphic chlorite grown from the seeds on the crack wall), but the center of the larger veins in en echelon sets show a temporal transition from continuous crack seal bands, to discontinuous crack seal bands, to inclusion free growth of euhedral crystals, with bands of collapse residues of dissolved wall rock. Crack seal bands indicate ~10 microns as the median crack aperture, with a large tail in the distribution toward larger values. Fluid inclusion trails that track the crack displacement path systematically

  12. Crustal and Fault Strengths from Critical Taper Measurements: Insights into the behavior of Accretionary Wedges using Distinct-Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L.; Suppe, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that many major faults are weak relative to quasistatic friction because of dynamical effects involving the microprocesses of high-velocity friction and the energetics of large-scale fault rupture. Even at the toes of accretionary wedges where velocity strengthening is expected, large displacements can occur dynamically. We seek to better understand the relationship between the large-scale strength of such faults and of the crust containing them over a timescale much greater than seismic cycles. Critical-taper theory provides straightforward quantitative relationships between accretionary wedge geometry and absolute basal fault and wedge strengths with minimal assumptions. Wedge tapers constrain the far-field stresses under which detachments slip and wedges grow during wedge-growing events, whether they are dynamical or quasistatic. To date most applications of wedge mechanics to accretionary wedges involve analog and numerical modeling with largely conceptual insight, for example illuminating the role of geological heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate that recent theoretical advances that are successful in extracting absolute wedge and detachment strengths from the geometry of active wedges can also be applied to extract large-scale strengths in distinct element numerical models in both mechanically homogeneous and heterogeneous wedges. The distinct element method (DEM) is an ideal tool for the study and modeling of critical taper wedges: model wedges can be initially cohesive (bonded) or cohesionless. Faults and folds form naturally as the result of progressive bond breakage during shortening and wedge growth. Heterogeneity can be introduced by creating layered groups of particles of differing mechanical properties. The DEM suffers to some extent in that macro material properties cannot be directly prescribed but rather must be defined by a modest number of micro-properties and the process in necessarily iterative and developing a wide

  13. Large Erosional Features on the Cascadia Accretionary Wedge Imaged with New High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry and Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, J. W.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing new high resolution multibeam bathymetric data along with chirp sub-bottom and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, we identified remarkable erosional features on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary wedge near Willapa Canyon, offshore Washington, USA. Bathymetric data was compiled from the Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects (COAST) cruise and from the site survey cruise for the Cascadia Initiative. These features loosely resemble slope failures of the frontal thrust, but can be distinguished from such failures by several key features: They incise the crest of the frontal thrust and encompass the landward limb; They have floors below the level of the abyssal plain, similar to plunge pool morphology; They show no evidence of landslide blocks at the base of the slope indicative of block sliding. The features where likely formed during the latest Pleistocene based on post event deposition, cross-cutting relationships with Juan de Fuca Channel and the Willapa Channel levees and wave field, and post event slip on the frontal thrust of the Cascadia accretionary prism. The Holocene levees of both Willapa Channel and Juan de Fuca Channel overlap these older features, and clearly place an upper bound on the age of the erosional features in the latest Pleistocene. A lower bound is estimated from a sub-bottom profile that images ~30 meters of post scour sediment fill. Using existing literature of Holocene and Pleistocene sedimentation rates we estimate a lower age bound between ~23,000 - 56,000 y.b.p. We also map a fault scarp within the erosional feature, with ~60 m of vertical offset. Using multi-channel seismic reflection profiles from the COAST cruise we interpret this scarp as the surface expression of the landward vergent frontal thrust fault. The apparent short duration of the erosional event along the seaward margin of the accretionary wedge, coupled with the presence of the fresh fault scarp within the erosion zone, are indicative of a dormant

  14. Pressure Wave Propagation along the Décollement of the Nankai Accretionary Wedge: Implications for Aseismic Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Appold, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai subduction zone made by the Ocean Drilling Program suggest that pore fluid pressures within the accretionary wedge décollement are highly overpressured to near lithostatic values below depths of 2 km beneath the sea floor as a result of sediment diagenesis and dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate. This overpressured zone is also observed to discharge pulses of high fluid pressure that migrate up-dip along the décollement at rates of 1's of km/day. These high pressure pulses along the décollement may cause large enough reductions in the local effective stress to account for aseismic slip events that have been found to propagate also at rates of 1's of km/day. Because elevated fluid pressure and correspondingly decreased effective stress can lead to a dilation of porosity, the pressure waves may become effective agents of fluid transport that can travel more quickly than fluids flowing in the background Darcian flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to seek theoretical confirmation that pressure waves are able to travel quickly enough to account for the seismic and hydrological observations documented. This confirmation was sought through a transient one-dimensional numerical solution to the differential fluid mass conservation equation for an elastic porous medium. Results of the numerical simulations show that when overpressures at depths greater than 2 km in the décollement exceed lithostatic pressure by at least 3%, pressure waves are formed that migrate up-dip at rates fast enough to account for aseismic slip over a broad range of geologic conditions. Pressure waves spawned from these depths in the décollement may travel fast enough to account for aseismic slip when overpressures there are as low as 99% of lithostatic pressure, but require low specific storage of 3×10-6 m-1, high sensitivity of permeability to effective stress, low permeability no higher than about 10-21 m2 at depths below

  15. Seamount subduction to the Nankai accretionary wedge and its impact on methane hydrate accumulation: insights from analogue and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Baba, K.; Matsuoka, T.

    2006-12-01

    Seamount sudbuction is a common feature at convergent plate margins and several examples can also be seen at the Nankai wedge, but its impact on methane hydrate accumulation has not fully described. In order to understand the accumulation mechanism of methane hydrate, the key issue would be the fluid flow within the sediments. The fluid flow can be classified into two types; the diffusive flow by intergranular porosity and the focused flow along faults (Baba and Yamada, 2004). The diffusive flow can be modeled by conventional reservoir simulator type of approaches, but the focused flow along faults may be difficult. One possible scenario was suggested by Sibson (1995) that fluid may migrate along a fault surface when it slipped (breakage of seal). Following the idea, the focused fluid flow can be evaluated by fault activity that can be modeled and examined by analogue experiments and numerical simulations (Yamada et al., submitted). This research employed analogue experiments that used granular materials (dry sand and glass beads) and numerical simulations that approximate the geologic body as particles (distinct element method). The analogue model results are further analyzed by optical image correlation technique, PIV, to extract faulting events in detail. By using the same tectonic model of sea mount subduction to an accretionary prism, we examined the deformation process particularly the faulting by these two techniques. The results of the analogue experiments and numerical simulations are basically the same, apart from the reproducibility of small structures influenced by the particle size. The models suggest that a sea mount subduction causes segmentation of wedge formation. The segmentation of wedge also produces two types of fault systems; one formed before sea mount subduction and the other afterward. The geometry of these faults illustrates that the fluid from the deeper segment of the sedimentary pile may focus on the faults that formed after sudbuction

  16. Splay Faults and Associated Mass Transport Deposits in the Manila Accretionary Wedge near Taiwan: Implications for Geohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. T.; Liu, C. S.; Dirgantara, F.

    2015-12-01

    Plate interface megathrusts are major seismogenic faults in subduction zone, capable of generating great earthquakes with widespread submarine landslides and damaging tsunami. Upward branching of megathrusts results in splay faults in the accretionary wedge. Reflection seismic data across the accretionary wedge off southern Taiwan, reveal at least two strands of splay faults as well as multiple stacked mass transport deposits (MTDs) nearby the faults. With the help of sediment coring and age datings in the vicinity of the splay fault, implications for temporal evolution of the mass wasting processes and episodic activities of splay faults are discussed in this paper. Seismic data show two branches of arcward and gently-dipping splay faults with two slope basins lying in the footwall and hangingwall of the faults, respectively. The older and buried splay fault is inactive as the fault tip is covered by up to 1000 m thick sediments in the footwall slope basin, indicating that it ceased to be active around 0.5 Ma ago. Repeated slip of this fault prior to ~0.5 Ma ago may also result in 4 stacked and multiple mass transport deposits (MTDs) of up to 700-m thick found in vicinity of this fault. This fossil splay fault is characterized by reflection polarity similar to that of seafloor, indicative of low water saturation along the fault zone and hence not an active fluid conduit. The younger and overlying splay fault cuts through the seafloor and the emergent fault tip lying at the toe of steep slope (~ 15 degree) with significant slope break. There is also a 500-m horizontal offset, between the buried paleo-seafloor in the footwall and the present-day seafloor on the hangingwall. The reflection polarity of this fault zone is reversed to that of seafloor, indicating fluid rich for this fault patch. These lines of evidence suggest that this young splay fault is an active fault with active fluid circulation along the fault. Our results indicate that the old splay fault

  17. Timing of magmatism and migmatization in the 2.0-1.8 Ga accretionary Svecokarelian orogen, south-central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Åke; Stephens, Michael B.

    2016-07-01

    Hedesunda-Tierp sample area. The close spatial and temporal interplay between ductile deformation, magmatism and migmatization, the P-T metamorphic conditions, and the continuation of similar magmatic activity around and after 1.8 Ga support solely accretionary rather than combined accretionary and collisional orogenic processes as an explanation for the metamorphism. The generally lower metamorphic grade and restricted influence of the younger metamorphic episode, at least at the ground surface level, distinguishes the central part of the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit from the migmatite belts further north and south.

  18. Initiation and development of slickenlined surfaces in clay-rich material of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Schleicher, Anja

    2016-04-01

    During the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which is part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (stage 3), the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula (Japan), from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf. Underlying the Kumano Basin sediments, the Nankai accretionary prism appears, below 975.5 mbsf. It accreted during Upper Miocene to Pliocene times and is formed mainly by turbiditic silty claystone with rarely observed sandstone intercalations. Cuttings from both the 1-4 mm and >4 mm size fractions were investigated, showing slickenlined surfaces and deformation bands together with carbonate veins throughout the entire section from 1045.5 until 3058.5 mbsf. A scaly fabric is increasingly observed below approximately 2400 mbsf. Clay-rich cuttings were selected at different depth for specific SEM-EDS analysis, in order to investigate the initiation and development of the slickenlined surfaces, from both a structural and mineralogical point of view. Two end-members of the slickenlined surface types were observed: a) isolated smooth and uniform planes, between 20 and 50 μm long, formed by single grains of smectite with marked lineations and frequently jagged boundaries and b) microfaults (longer than 100 μm) with sharp boundaries to the undeformed rock, formed by aggregates of illite and smectite and with a well-developed lineation. In transition between these two end-member types, planes that are apparently unconnected draw a single plane and show subparallel lineations. Concerning the orientation of the slickenlines, it seems to be coherent with that observed in an array of conjugated faults, i.e. all the slickenlines belong to the same plane, in turn sub-perpendicular to the intersection of conjugated planes. These observations suggest that the slickenlined surfaces initiated along single grains of smectite and that with increasing

  19. Noble gases in presolar diamonds II: Component abundances reflect thermal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the isotopic compositions derived in Huss and Lewis, 1994a, abundances of the P3, HL, and P6 noble-gas components were determined for 15 diamonds separates from primitive chondrites of 8 chondrite classes. Within a meteorite class, the relative abundances of these components correlate with the petrologic subtype of the host meteorite, indicating that metamorphism is primarily responsible for the variations. Relative abundances of P3, HL, and P6 among diamond samples can be understood in terms of thermal processing of a single mixture of diamonds like those now found in CI and CM2 chondrites. With relatively gentle heating, primitive diamonds first lose their low-temperature P3 gases and a 'labile' fraction of the HL component. Mass loss associated with release of these components produces an increase in the HL and P6 content of the remaining diamond relative to unprocessed diamond. Higher temperatures initiate destruction of the main HL carrier, while the HL content of the surviving diamonds remains essentially constant. At the same time, the P6 carrier begins to preferentially lose light noble gases. Meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures greater than or = 650 C have lost essentially all of their presolar diamond through chemical reactions with surrounding minerals. The P3 abundance seems to be a function only of the maximum temperature experienced by the diamonds and thus is independent of the nature of the surrounding environment. If all classes inherited the same mixture of primitive diamonds, then P3 abundances would tie together the metamorphic scales in different meteorite classes. However, if the P3 abundance indicates a higher temperature than do other thermometers applicable to the host meteorite, then the P3 abundance may contain information about heating prior to accretion. Diamonds in the least metamorphosed EH, CV, and CO chondrites seem to carry a record of pre-accretionary thermal processing.

  20. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  1. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  2. The effect of fault-bend folding on seismic velocity in the marginal ridge of accretionary prisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Y.; Wang, Chun-Yong; Hwang, W.-t.; Cochrane, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid venting in accretionary prisms, which feeds chemosynthetic biological communities, occurs mostly on the marginal thrust ridge. New seismic data for the marginal ridge of the Cascadia prism show significantly lower velocity than that in the adjacent oceanic basin and place important constraints on the interpretations of why fluid venting occurs mostly on the marginal ridge. We employed a finite-element method to analyze a typical fault-bend folding model to explain the phenomenon. The fault in the model is simulated by contact elements. The elements are characterized not only by finite sliding along a slide line, but also by elastoplastic deformation. We present the results of a stress analysis which show that the marginal ridge is under subhorizontal extension and the frontal thrust is under compression. This state of stress favors the growth of tensile cracks in the marginal ridge, facilitates fluid flow and reduces seismic velocities therein; on the other hand, it may close fluid pathways along the frontal thrust and divert fluid flow to the marginal ridge. ?? 1995 Birkha??user Verlag.

  3. Relationship between tectonics, argilokinetic structures, and environmental patterns at the south boundary of the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Griboulard, R.; Bobier, C.; Faugeres, J.C.; Gonthier, E.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies have been carried out on limited sectors of the South Barbados accretionary prism. They are supported by SeaBeam map analysis, high resolution seismic data, time-lapse and video camera tracks, numerous cores and Side Scan Sonar data. The analysis of these data point out numerous evidences of an active and present tectonic activity on the southern part of this domain. The development of very large indurate sea-bottoms on which deep-sea communities frequently occur and where we can observe some [open quotes]sigmoidal[close quotes] features and network of conjugate fractures which suggest the presence of shear deformation zone. In addition, tracks of important and probably deep faults extend across both soft and indurated bottom sediments. The regional morphological anomalies are comparable to analogical deformation model for a thick cover sticking out of its sub-stratum and the tectonic activity is closely associated to the presence of deep dysharmonic levels which control, obviously, an important clay-diapirism. This is an effect of both the structural location of this region, at the junction of three lithospheric plates (Caribbean, Atlantic, and South-American) and paleogeographical and sedimentological changes since Neogene time, with the very important terrigeneous supplies coming from the Orinoco River. Consequently, the main deformations that we observed in this region are rather under influence of shearing and transpressive than compressive movements.

  4. Accretionary nature of the crust of Central and East Java (Indonesia) revealed by local earthquake travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christian; Bohm, Mirjam; Asch, Günter

    2014-12-01

    Reassessment of travel time data from an exceptionally dense, amphibious, temporary seismic network on- and offshore Central and Eastern Java (MERAMEX) confirms the accretionary nature of the crust in this segment of the Sunda subduction zone (109.5-111.5E). Traveltime data of P- and S-waves of 244 local earthquakes were tomographically inverted, following a staggered inversion approach. The resolution of the inversion was inspected by utilizing synthetic recovery tests and analyzing the model resolution matrix. The resulting images show a highly asymmetrical crustal structure. The images can be interpreted to show a continental fragment of presumably Gondwana origin in the coastal area (east of 110E), which has been accreted to the Sundaland margin. An interlaced anomaly of high seismic velocities indicating mafic material can be interpreted to be the mantle part of the continental fragment, or part of obducted oceanic lithosphere. Lower than average crustal velocities of the Java crust are likely to reflect ophiolitic and metamorphic rocks of a subduction melange.

  5. The 50 Ma granodiorite of the eastern Gulf of Alaska - Melting in an accretionary prism in the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Fred; Farmer, G. L.; Ayuso, R. A.; Plafker, George; Lull, J. S.

    1992-05-01

    The paper addresses the generation of granitic rocks by the melting of flyschoid sediments in an accretionary prism as part of an investigation of 50-Ma silicic igneous rocks in the Gulf of Alaska, near Cordova, Alaska. Three intrusive bodies exhibiting a range of chemical and initial isotopic compositions were chosen: the McKinley Peak, Rude River, and Sheep Bay plutons. The present chemical data, modeling, and comparison with melting experiments of graywacke by Conrad et al. (1988) indicate that the granodiorite originated by large fractions (65-90 percent) of melting of the Orca Group graywacke and argillite. Plagioclase, pyroxene, and biotite were residual to melting at about 850-950 C and at low H2O activities. It is suggested that the distinct chemical and isotopic compositions of the McKinley Peak pluton result from variations in the character of the flysch at depth in the prism, rather than from mixing between melts of the flysch and mafic magmas injected into the prism itself.

  6. The relationship between mud volcanoes, petroleum migration and accretionary prisms: Lessons from the Caucasus, the Australian margin and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, P.

    1996-08-01

    Mud volcanoes have been widely documented in areas of overpressure where explosive expansion of trapped methane has occurred during argillokinesis. In an area with high sedimentation rate, such as the Gulf of Mexico, there may be no time for fine-grained sediment to de-water before being covered by impermeable material. In an accretionary wedge this process is complicated by overthrusting of off-scraped material which increases the overburden pressure and provides many more avenues for the migration of fluids through the system. In some cases, such as is seen in the Caribbean, the fluids may escape directly to the surface (or seabottom) through high permeability beds. When this happens there may be no diapirism. In other cases, such as in Venezuela, the forearc may be the site of rapid, laterally-derived, sedimentation, and fluids from the overthrusted rocks may be forced to escape through several kilometers of recent deltaic sediments. Since these fluids may include petroleum, this has obvious exploration potential. If there are no suitable reservoir rocks, such as in Timor, there may be no commercial accumulations. However, many giant fields are associated, world-wide, with mud volcanoes, such as those in Azerbaijan.

  7. Accumulation of an earthquake-induced extremely turbid layer in a terminal basin of the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashi, Juichiro; Sawada, Ritsuko; Omura, Akiko; Ikehara, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Seismic shaking is a major trigger for sediment redistribution in subduction zones, and clouds of dilute suspended sediment have been reported in association with large earthquakes. Dive observations in a basin on the slope of the central Nankai accretionary prism soon after the 2004 off-Kii Peninsula earthquakes documented a layer of suspended sediment with extremely high turbidity. We estimated the thickness of this bottom turbid layer to be more than 2.5 m by comparison of seafloor depths between surveys in 2004 and 2010 and about 2.6 m from instrumental evidence involving the submersion of a heat-flow probe. A high-resolution subbottom profiling survey across the basin revealed acoustically transparent layers thicker than 2 m. Because the slope basin is a terminal basin completely enclosed by topographic highs, we examined the possibility that the uppermost transparent layer was deposited as a consequence of the 2004 earthquakes. Considering the sediment source area and the volume of the basin fills, the mobilization and redeposition of thin surface sediments on the prism slope can account for the volume of the transparent layer. We conclude that the 2004 earthquakes caused widespread disturbance of the prism slope and concentrated surface sediments in this terminal basin. Our results emphasize the utility of a terminal basin in a subduction zone as an earthquake recorder.

  8. Fluid flow in and around a mud volcano field seaward of the Barbados accretionary wedge: Results from Manon cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Pierre; Le Pichon, Xavier; Lallemant, Siegfried; Lance, Sophie; Martin, Jonathan B.; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Fiala-MéDioni, Aline; Rostek, Frauke; Guilhaumou, Nicole; Pranal, Vincent; Castrec, Maryse

    1996-09-01

    A field of mud diapirs and mud volcanoes situated in the Barbados trench at 13°50'N and extending along an old oceanic fracture zone (Mercurus) was investigated during the Manon cruise using both surface ship and Nautile submersible sampling and measurements. The entire zone from 13°50'N up to 14°20'N has an anomalously high heat flow which implies that fluids are drained into it from a segment of the accretionary wedge a few hundred kilometers wide. Two structures interpreted as diatremes, Atalante and Cyclops, expell large amounts of water and methane. We propose that they were formed from the release of a light fluid when gas hydrates were dissociated in the sediment as the result of the circulation of warm fluid in the area. However they expell only a small fraction of the incoming fluid, implying that disperse flow is the dominant mode of expulsion in this area. The chemoautotrophic communities on the surface of the structures rely mostly on sulfides. Submersible observations, temperature measurements in the sediment, and the chemistry of the pore fluid indicate that convection of seawater occurs within the first few meters of sediment through high-permeability channels, such as cemented carbonate conduits. We propose that this convection is driven by the density difference between the pore fluid and seawater, but fresh water released by the dissolution of shallow hydrates may also contribute. This shallow convection may be a frequent process in cold seep environments.

  9. Resonant seismic and microseismic ground motion of the Cascadia subduction zone accretionary prism and implications for seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Earl E.; Heesemann, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Seafloor pressure and seismic observations have been made along a transect of sites off southwestern Canada using connections to the NEPTUNE Canada cabled network beginning in the fall of 2009. A comparison of the vertical ground motion response to oceanographic and seismic loading at a site on the outer Cascadia subduction zone accretionary prism to that at a site on the adjacent Juan de Fuca Plate shows generally stronger ground motion at the prism site across the full bandwidths of infragravity waves and microseisms and a strong sharp peak in the relative response at a period of 9 s. This peak is seen in the response to loading by local storm waves and dispersive swell sequences, as well as in the average response to storm- and swell-generated pressure fluctuations averaged over long periods of time. Tuned response to teleseismic surface waves is also seen at the same frequency. We infer that this behavior results from quarter-wavelength harmonic resonance of the prism, with the two-way travel time of compressional waves between the seafloor and underlying igneous crust being one half the resonance period. The consistency of the anomalous spectral peak from year to year at this particular site suggests that the behavior might be used to track small (≈1%) changes in the vertical seismic velocity of the prism if variations related to strain or pore fluid pressure changes through a subduction thrust earthquake cycle were to occur.

  10. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  11. Controls on accretion of flysch and melange belts at convergent margins: evidence from the Chugach Bay thrust and Iceworm melange, Chugach accretionary wedge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kusky, T.M.; Bradley, D.C.; Haeussler, P.J.; Karl, S.

    1997-01-01

    Controls on accretion of flysch and melange terranes at convergent margins are poorly understood. Southern Alaska's Chugach terrane forms the outboard accretionary margin of the Wrangellia composite terrane, and consists of two major lithotectonic units, including Triassic-Cretaceous melange of the McHugh Complex and Late Cretaceous flysch of the Valdez Group. The contact between the McHugh Complex and the Valdez Group on the Kenai Peninsula is a tectonic boundary between chaotically deformed melange of argillite, chert, greenstone, and graywacke of the McHugh Complex and a less chaotically deformed melange of argillite and graywacke of the Valdez Group. We assign the latter to a new, informal unit of formational rank, the Iceworm melange, and interpret it as a contractional fault zone (Chugach Bay thrust) along which the Valdez Group was emplaced beneath the McHugh Complex. The McHugh Complex had already been deformed and metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite facies prior to formation of the Iceworm melange. The Chugach Bay thrust formed between 75 and 55 Ma, as shown by Campanian-Maastrichtian depositional ages of the Valdez Group, and fault-related fabrics in the Iceworm melange that are cut by Paleocene dikes. Motion along the Chugach Bay thrust thus followed Middle to Late Cretaceous collision (circa 90-100 Ma) of the Wrangellia composite terrane with North America. Collision related uplift and erosion of mountains in British Columbia formed a submarine fan on the Farallon plate, and we suggest that attempted subduction of this fan dramatically changed the subduction/accretion style within the Chugach accretionary wedge. We propose a model in which subduction of thinly sedimented plates concentrates shear strains in a narrow zone, generating melanges like the McHugh in accretionary complexes. Subduction of thickly sedimented plates allows wider distribution of shear strains to accommodate plate convergence, generating a more coherent accretionary style

  12. Accretionary Complexes: Recorders of Plate Tectonism and Environmental Conditions Through Time on Earth and Possibly Those Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) in Age on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Miyamoto, H.; Viviano-Beck, C. E.; Anderson, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, highlighted in Japan, North America, Europe, and Greenland, accretionary complexes comprehensively record information compiled while the oceanic crust is en route from the mid-oceanic ridge to the subduction zone, spanning hundreds of millions of years. At the zone, oceanic crustal materials are stacked along thrust faults and/or subducted to be eventually recycled into the mantle. The surviving accretionary-complex materials include Ocean Plate Stratigraphy (OPS). The ideal succession of the OPS (from oldest to youngest) is mid-ocean ridge basalt, pelagic sediment including radiolarian chert, hemipelagic sediment including siliceous shale, and trench turbidite deposits. Therefore, accretionary complexes often record diverse environmental conditions from deep- to shallow-marine environments, including those perturbed by magmatic, impact, and possibly extrasolar events. Stratigraphic, impact-crater, paleotectonic, and magnetic-anomaly information point to Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) Martian geologic terrains; they are extremely ancient environmental records compared to those destroyed on Earth due to differences in planetary mass and evolutional states. Such record a dynamic phase of the evolution of Mars, including interacting ocean, landmass, and atmosphere, as well as possible plate tectonism during an operating dynamo. A candidate accretionary complex and nearby outcrops of steeply dipping beds comprising olistostrome-like blocks, nearby and in the Claritas rise, respectively, may be key evidence of major crustal shortening related to plate tectonism, in addition to being extremely ancient environmental records. Claritas rise is a rugged promontory about 250 km across, which forms the northwest part of an extremely ancient and large mountain range, Thaumasia highlands, with a length nearing 2,400 km, or approximating that of the Himalayas. Future investigation of the ancient Martian basement, which includes geochemical analyses for possible OPS

  13. Tectonostratigraphy and provenance of an accretionary complex within the Yarlung-Zangpo suture zone, southern Tibet: Insights into subduction-accretion processes in the Neo-Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fulong; Ding, Lin; Leary, Ryan J.; Wang, Houqi; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Liyun; Yue, Yahui

    2012-10-01

    Accretionary complexes record critical information about the history of subduction and accretion along the southern margin of Asia prior to the India-Asia collision. This paper presents detailed field mapping, petrographic and detrital zircon U-Pb data from an accretionary complex within the Yalung-Zangpo suture zone, southern Tibet. From structurally higher to lower levels, the accretionary complex consists of a serpentinite mélange, the chert-matrix Tangga mélange, the mud-matrix Pomunong mélange, and the coherent Rongmawa Formation. The Tangga mélange consists of Late Triassic-Early Cretaceous abyssal chert and siliceous shale with blocks of chert and mafic to ultra-mafic rocks. The Tangga mélange was accreted beneath ophiolitic rocks during the Aptian. The Pomunong mélange consists of a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous hemipelagic siliceous shale and chert matrix with blocks from Early Permian seamounts and from Late Cretaceous trench-fill sandstones; it was accreted beneath the Tangga mélange after the Aptian but prior to 71 Ma. Structurally beneath these mélanges to the south, the uppermost Cretaceous Rongmawa Formation consists of turbiditic sandstone, pelagic chert, and siliceous shale and records a transition in depositional setting from lower abyssal plain to upper trench. Detrital zircons from sandstone blocks of the Pomunong mélange and the coherent Rongmawa Formation display similar U-Pb age spectra and are dominated by peaks at 71-231 Ma, 481-693 Ma, and 701-1372 Ma. These age peaks overlap with igneous crystallization ages and detrital zircon ages from sedimentary strata in the Lhasa terrane. Our data indicate that the serpentinite mélange, Tangga mélange, Pomunong mélange and Rongmawa Formation comprise a southward-younging accretionary complex that developed during the northward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere beneath the south margin of the Lhasa terrane and that all exposed ophiolitic and accretionary complex assemblages

  14. The development of folds and cleavages in slate belts by underplating in accretionary complexes: A comparison of the Kodiak Formation, Alaska and the Calaveras Complex, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Scott R.; Sample, James C.

    1988-08-01

    The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. The Maastrichtian Kodiak Formation is composed dominantly of coherent turbidites but includes lesser pebbly mudstone, minor conglomerate, and rare chert. The Kodiak Formation is part of a large accretionary complex that youngs in age seaward, but bedding tops generally show landward younging. A progression of structures has been determined by crosscutting relationships and includes (1) syndeformational depositional features; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; (4) crenulations and crenulation cleavage; (5) late brittle thrust faults; and (6) right-lateral strike-slip faults. Broken formation, slaty cleavage, thrust faults, and folds developed during underthrusting and underplating within an accretionary wedge. Crenulations and brittle thrust faults are related to subsequent intrawedge shortening. Based on peak metamorphism in the uppermost zeolite to prehnite-pumpellyite facies, underplating occurred at a minimum depth of 10 km. The Calaveras Complex is composed of argillite, chert, graywacke, pebbly mudstone, limestone, and volcanic rocks. Its age of deposition has a maximum range from Permian to Early Jurassic. Overall, the unit appears to young westward, but local facing indicators show eastward younging of individual blocks. The sequence of structures developed in the Calaveras Complex is (1) syn-depositional olistostromes; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; and (4) younger Jura-Triassic folds and crenulation cleavages. Broken formation and slaty cleavage developed during underthrusting and

  15. Geochemical features of metabasic rocks from an Early to Middle Jurassic Accretionary Complex (Refahiye metamorphics, Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey): Implications for Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic lull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, G.; Topuz, G.; Çelik, Ö. F.; Altıntaş, Ä.°. E.; Özkan, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Refahiye metamorphics (Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey) represent a metamorphosed accretionary complex of Early to Middle Jurassic age and occur as an interleave between coeval ophiolite. This Early to Middle Jurassic metamorphics and ophiolites are bound by a Permo-Triassic accretionary complex in the north and a Late Cretaceous accretionary complex in the south. The Refahiye metamorphics are made up of greenschist, marble, serpentine, phyllite and subordinately amphibolite, micaschist, eclogite and metachert knockers. The Jurassic and Late Cretaceous accretionary complexes in Eastern Mediterranean are related to the consumption of a Mesozoic ocean, the so-called Neo-Tethys. Regional geology in the Eastern Pontides indicate that the Early to Middle Jurassic and Late Cretaceous times correspond to volumious igneous activity, while Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time to an igneous lull. Here we present whole-rock geochemical data on metabasic rocks from the Refahiye accretionary complex, and discuss these data in terms of accreted material and its implications for the Jurassic evolution of the Eastern Pontides. All the metabasic rocks are well recrystallized, free of any relict texture and are variably hydrated (LOI ~ 1.3-5.1 wt%). Some samples are characterized by the unusually high-Al2O3 contents (up to 20.8 wt%) suggestive of derivation from high-Al basalts. Geochemically three distinct metabasic group are distinguished, on the basis of fluid immobile HFSEs and REEs. Group I is characterized by moderately to strongly fractionated REE patterns [(La/Yb)cn ~8-18], absence of any Nb-Ta anomaly in multi element variation diagrams and high Ti and low Zr/Nb ratios (3.68-5.72), corresponding to unorogenic alkaline basalts (ocean island basalt). Group II characterized by moderately fractionated REE ratios [(La/Yb)cn ~0.6-2.6], absence of any Nb-Ta anomaly, resembling unorogenic tholeiitic basalts (E and N-MORB). Group III on the other hand, displays unfractionated

  16. Structural controls on the development of submarine channel/fan systems since the Pleistocene in the accretionary wedge off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kang-Nien; Tien-Shun Lin, Andrew; Lin, Che-Chuan; Liu, Char-Shine; Wang, Yunshuen

    2016-04-01

    The accretionary wedge off SW Taiwan is the result of incipient arc-continent collision between the Luzon volcanic arc and the northern rifted margin of the South China Sea (SCS). Dynamic interactions of thrusting, folding and a rigorous sediment supply from the Taiwan mountain belts have resulted in two arrays of canyons/channels and slope-fan systems in the accretionary wedge. The Penghu canyon/fan system lies in the lower wedge and near the northern rifted margin of the SCS. The Penghu canyon is a river-fed canyon and receives sediments from southern Taiwan and SE China during eustatic lowstands. It becomes detached from river inputs during eustatic highstands as it is in the present-day. The Gaoping canyon/fan system in the south traverses both the upper slope and lower slope domains of the accretionary wedge. This system is a river-fed system during a full eustatic cycle and it drains sediments from the onshore Gaoping River. We interpreted multiple grids of multichannel seismic reflection data of MCS994, MCS1000-6, MCS1014, MCS1046 collected onboard Ocean Research I during 2012 April to 2013 August to map out thrust/fold structures and channel/fan systems in the study area. Seismic facies analyses were performed on seismic sections and key stratal surfaces of base of Pliocene and base of Pleistocene are correlated from boreholes drilled in the shelf of the northern SCS margin. Our results show that the upper Gaoping Canyon has been confined by structural ridges with limited switching of canyon courses, whereas the lower Gaoping canyon/fan system has been developed on lower slope with channel/levee deposition in multiple slope fans since early Pleistocene. Pleistocene lateral aggrading channel-and-levee systems are especially evident near the modern canyon course in the lower slope. The Penghu can/fan system in the lower accretionary wedge is also evident by seismic facies showing channel cut-and-fill, channel abandonment and channel-and-levee systems. This

  17. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  18. The Palaeoproterozoic accretionary crustal growth: implications from new age data on the crystalline basement in Lithuania, NW Belarus and N Poland (the East European Craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, G.; Bogdanova, S.; Taran, L.; Wiszniewska, J.

    2012-04-01

    A southwestward younging of Palaeoproterozoic terranes in the crystalline basement in the western part of the East European Craton has been recently suggested by numerous isotopic datings (TIMS, SIMS zircon, EPMA monazite and 40Ar/39Ar). Along with geochemical and geophysical data this allows to decipher a multistage accretionary history. In the east, the Belarus-Podlasie Granulite belt (BPG) is dominated by 1.88 Ga dioritic-granodioritic (calc-alkaline) magmatism in Belarus (Claesson et al., 2001). Remnants of c. 1.89 Ga metadiorites, c. 1.90 Ga magmatic zircon cores in c. 1.80 Ga granites (Vejelyte, 2011) in S and E Lithuania and 1.88 Ga metagranodiorites in E Poland (Radzyn area) confirm the c. 1.90 Ga accretion-related magmatism in the BPG and the East Lithuanian domain. Together with the coeval juvenile granitoids in the adjacent Okolovo terrane this indicates the formation of the Lithuanian-Belarus composite terrane at 1.90-1.88 Ga. At c. 1.86-1.84 Ga, abundant gabbro-diorite-granodiorite-granite intrusions were emplaced further southwest in Lithuania, NW Belarus and N Poland. In Lithuana, within the Polish-Lithuanian terrane the TTG suite of deformed and metamorphosed in amphibolite facies calc-alkaline tonalitic, quartz dioritic and dioritic rocks is characteristic for the Randamonys massif. The strongly deformed granitoids in the adjacent NW Belarus, mafic granulites and gneissic granites of igneous origin in central Lithuania, garnet-cordierite bearing granites further north display similar c. 1.84 Ga magmatic age (Motuza et al., 2008). This shows that various tectonic settings including island and continental magmatic arcs were possible. They were accreted to the Lithuanian-Belarus terrane sometime at 1.84-1.81 Ga while voluminous charnockitic magmatism took place in W Lithuania (e.g. Claesson et al., 2001; Vejelyte, 2011). A chain of younger c. 1.83 Ga volcanic arcs was developed in W and S Lithuania and N Poland (Wiszniewska et al., 2005). The

  19. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  20. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  1. A lithium isotopic study of sub-greenschist to greenschist facies metamorphism in an accretionary prism, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lin; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Ague, Jay J.; McDonough, William F.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of Li during low-grade metamorphism and fluid flux in an accretionary prism we measured the Li concentrations ([Li]) and isotopic compositions (δ7Li) of sub-greenschist and greenschist-facies Otago Schist composites, as well as cross-cutting quartz veins, which are interpreted to have precipitated from slab-derived fluids. The average [Li] of sub-greenschist facies composites (41 ± 13 μg/g, 2σ) is statistically distinct (97% confidence level, student t test) to that of greenschist facies composites (34 ± 9 μg/g, 2σ), which have experienced mass addition of silica in the form of quartz veins having [Li] between 0.4-2.3 μg/g. A linear regression of the correlation between [Li] and calculated mass additions suggests that the depletion of [Li] in greenschist facies composites is due to both dilution from the addition of the quartz veins, as well as metamorphic dehydration. The [Li] of both groups of composites correlates with their CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration) values (50-58), which are low, consistent with the inferred graywacke protolith of the Otago Schist. The δ7Li of sub-greenschist and greenschist facies composites are remarkably constant, with an average δ7Li of 0.2 ± 1.7 (2σ) and -0.5 ± 1.9 (2σ), respectively, and comparable to that of the average upper continental crust. Thus, metamorphism has had no discernable effect on δ7Li in these samples. The Li isotopic signature of the schists is similar to that seen in pelitic sedimentary rocks and likely reflects the δ7Li of the protoliths. The surprisingly light δ7Li of the quartz veins (-2.8 to -1.4) likely records kinetic fractionation associated with Li ingress into the veins from surrounding wallrock. An isotopic equilibrium fluid flow model indicates that: 1) if the [Li] of slab-derived fluids is less than a few μg/g, the δ7Li of the overlying lithologies (i.e., the schists) is not significantly influenced by the fluid flux, regardless of the δ7Li of the

  2. Causes and consequences of the great strength variability among soft Nankai accretionary prism sediments from offshore SW-Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, Michael; Schumann, Kai; Leiss, Bernd; Ullemeyer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is the very first attempt to drill into the seismogenic part of a subduction zone. Offshore SW-Japan the oceanic Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the continental Eurasian plate causing earthquakes of magnitude 8.0 to 8.5 and related tsunamis with a recurrence rate of 80-100 years. For the tsunamigenic potential of the forearc slope and accreted sediments their mechanical strength, composition and fabrics have been investigated. 19 drill core samples of IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 were experimentally deformed in a triaxial cell under consolidated and undrained conditions at confining pressures of 400-1000 kPa, room temperature, axial shortening rates of 0.01-9.0 mm/min, and up to an axial strain of ˜64% (Stipp et al., 2013). With respect to the mechanical behavior, two distinct sample groups could be distinguished. Weak samples from the upper and middle forearc slope of the accretionary prism show a deviatoric peak stress after only a few percent strain (< 10%) and a continuous stress decrease after a maximum combined with a continuous increase in pore pressure. Strong samples from the accretionary prism toe display a constant residual stress at maximum level or even a continuous stress increase together with a decrease in pore pressure towards high strain (Stipp et al., 2013). Synchrotron texture and composition analysis of the experimentally deformed and undeformed samples using the Rietveld refinement program MAUD indicates an increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing depth down to 523 m below sea floor corresponding to a preferred mineral alignment due to compaction. Experimentally deformed samples have generally stronger textures than related undeformed core samples and they show also increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing axial strain. Mechanically weak samples have a bulk clay plus

  3. Seismic structure of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and accretionary prism north of the Mendocino triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulick, S.P.S.; Meltzer, A.M.; Clarke, S.H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Four multichannel-seismic reflection profiles, collected as part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, image the toe of the southern Cascadia accretionary prism. Today, 250-600 m of sediment is subducting with the Gorda plate, and 1500-3200 m is accreting to the northern California margin. Faults imaged west and east of the deformation front show mixed structural vergence. A north-south trending, 20 km long portion of the central margin is landward vergent for the outer 6-8 km of the toe of the prism. This region of landward vergence exhibits no frontal thrust, is unusually steep and narrow, and is likely caused by a seaward-dipping backstop close to the deformation front. The lack of margin-wide preferred seaward vergence and wedge-taper analysis suggests the prism has low basal shear stress. The three southern lines image wedge-shaped fragments of oceanic crust 1.1-7.3 km in width and 250-700 m thick near the deformation front. These wedges suggest shortening and thickening of the upper oceanic crust. Discontinuities in the seafloor west of the prism provide evidence for mass wasting in the form of slump blocks and debris fans. The southernmost profile extends 75 km west of the prism imaging numerous faults that offset both the Gorda basin oceanic crust and overlying sediments. These high-angle faults, bounding basement highs, are interpreted as strike-slip faults reactivating structures originally formed at the spreading ridge. Northeast or northwest trending strike-slip faults within the basin are consistent with published focal mechanism solutions and are likely caused by north-south Gorda-Pacific plate convergence. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Recognition and implication for two stage layer-parallel faults in accretionary prisms onland and under the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiguchi, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Nishizaki Formation of the Miura Group in the southernmost Boso Peninsula, southeast of Tokyo, close to the only trench-trench-trench (TTT)-type triple junction, is thought to be an accretionary prism from the late Miocene to early Pliocene, having many initial deformation structures without strong metamorphism. Layer- parallel faults composed of black seams of a few mm thick in the upper alternating beds of sandstone and siltstone are developed ubiquitously in the Nishizaki Formation, crosscutting late faults of both normal and thrust senses, suggesting to form before lithification. By SEM and thin section observation the black seam is characterized not by grain-crushing but by rearrangement of mica-clay minerals. In additon, the mica-clay minerals array at least 2 directions. Such features are similar to the black seam was commonly observed in the samples from the Nankai Trough prism collected by Sinkai 6500 of JAMSTEC. XRD analysis indicates the mica-clay minerals in black seams for both the Nishizaki and Nankai are composed of smectite and illite. Some black seams occurred parallel to bedding plane immediately after sedimentation, because they are cut by vein structure and the grains on the boundary flow ductility, probably during submarine sliding. This kind of faults is transitional to either normal or thrust faults laterally, most probably similar to the based slip plane of land sliding. However, there are at least two stages layer-parallel faults. One is submarine sliding stage before accretion, that is gravitation, another is thrust fault stage during accretion, that is tectonic.

  5. Seismic structure of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and accretionary prism north of the Mendocino triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean P. S.; Meltzer, Anne M.; Clarke, Samuel H., Jr.

    1998-11-01

    Four multichannel-seismic reflection profiles, collected as part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, image the toe of the southern Cascadia accretionary prism. Today, 250-600 m of sediment is subducting with the Gorda plate, and 1500-3200 m is accreting to the northern California margin. Faults imaged west and east of the deformation front show mixed structural vergence. A north-south trending, 20 km long portion of the central margin is landward vergent for the outer 6-8 km of the toe of the prism. This region of landward vergence exhibits no frontal thrust, is unusually steep and narrow, and is likely caused by a seaward-dipping backstop close to the deformation front. The lack of margin-wide preferred seaward vergence and wedge-taper analysis suggests the prism has low basal shear stress. The three southern lines image wedge-shaped fragments of oceanic crust 1.1-7.3 km in width and 250-700 m thick near the deformation front. These wedges suggest shortening and thickening of the upper oceanic crust. Discontinuities in the seafloor west of the prism provide evidence for mass wasting in the form of slump blocks and debris fans. The southernmost profile extends 75 km west of the prism imaging numerous faults that offset both the Gorda basin oceanic crust and overlying sediments. These high-angle faults, bounding basement highs, are interpreted as strike-slip faults reactivating structures originally formed at the spreading ridge. Northeast or northwest trending strike-slip faults within the basin are consistent with published focal mechanism solutions and are likely caused by north-south Gorda-Pacific plate convergence.

  6. Intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of analogue sand-box experiments - Insights from statistical analysis of repeated accretionary sand wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2015-06-01

    Analogue models are not perfectly reproducible even under controlled boundary conditions which make their interpretation and application not always straight forward. As any scientific experiment they include some random component which can be influenced both by intrinsic (inherent processes) and extrinsic (boundary conditions, material properties) sources. In order to help in the assessment of analogue model results, we discriminate and quantify the intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of results from "sandbox" models of accretionary wedges that were repeated in a controlled environment. The extrinsic source of variability, i.e. the parameter varied is the nature of the décollement (material, friction and thickness). Experiment observables include geometric properties of the faults (lifetime, spacing, dip) as well as wedge geometry (height, slope, length). For each variable we calculated the coefficient of variance (CV) and quantified the variability as a symmetric distribution (Normal, Laplacian) or asymmetric distribution (Gamma) using a Chi squared test (χ2). Observables like fault dip/back thrust dip (CV = 0.6-0.7/0.2-0.6) are less variable and decrease in magnitude with decreasing basal friction. Variables that are time dependent like fault lifetime (CV = 0.19-0.56) and fault spacing (CV = 0.12 - 0.36) have a higher CV consequently affecting the variability of wedge slope (CV = 0.12-0.33). These observables also increase in magnitude with increasing basal friction. As the mechanical complexity of the evolving wedge increases over time so does the CV and asymmetry of the distribution. In addition, we confirm the repeatability of experiments using an ANOVA test. Through the statistical analysis of results from repeated experiments we present a tool to quantify variability and an alternative method to gaining better insights into the dynamic mechanics of deformation in analogue sand wedges.

  7. In situ stress magnitudes at the toe of the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism, offshore Shikoku Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying the orientation and magnitude of tectonic stresses is essential toward understanding deformation and faulting in subduction zones. However, constraints on in situ horizontal stress magnitudes (Shmin and SHmax) are rare. We estimate Shmin and SHmax at Ocean Drilling Program Site 808 at the toe of the Nankai accretionary prism offshore Japan, using coupled constraints from (1) the width of wellbore breakouts together with estimates of rock strength and a model describing stress redistribution at the borehole wall and (2) limits on regional differential stress defined by failure on preexisting faults. Our analysis extends from 175 to 915 m below seafloor (mbsf) and spans the active frontal thrust. For an upper bound on rock unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and assuming hydrostatic formation pore pressure, Shmin and SHmax (referenced to the seafloor) increase from 6.5 MPa at 175 mbsf to 17.4 MPa at 915 mbsf, with the stress state gradually transitioning from a thrust or strike-slip faulting regime above 800 mbsf to a normal faulting regime below. For cases with higher formation pore pressure, horizontal stresses are slightly lower but follow a similar pattern. We show that estimated Shmin and SHmax are strongly dependent on UCS, breakout width, and friction coefficient, all of which are characterized by uncertainty. Our results suggest that the prism is near thrust failure in the upper ~300 mbsf, but far from failure below. This may be reconciled with active thrusting if thrust faults are locally weaker than the surrounding rock or if SHmax fluctuates during the seismic cycle.

  8. Distinct deformational history of two contrasting tectonic domains in the Chinese Altai: Their significance in understanding accretionary orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Min; Schulmann, Karel; Zhao, Guochun; Wu, Qihang; Jiang, Yingde; Guy, Alexandra; Wang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, a key component of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, is considered to be formed through multiple accretions of different terranes. However, the deformational histories of each terrane (tectonic domain), i.e. structural records before and after the accretion, are rarely studied, which has hindered our understanding of the accretionary processes. To fill the gap, a systematic macro- and microscopic structural analysis was carried out on two contrasting litho-tectonic units, i.e. the early Paleozoic low-grade Alegedayi Ophiolitic Complex (AOC) juxtaposed to the high grade Tarlang Granitic Massif (TGM). Selected rock samples were analyzed using zircon U-Pb isotopic dating to constrain the timing of polyphase deformation. Our structural and geochronological data suggest that the two litho-tectonic units were initially detached and located in different crustal levels and experienced distinct phases of deformation under contrasting P-T conditions. They were mutually accreted with each other in the early Devonian and jointly underwent a WNW-ESE-directed shortening deformational event (D1) at ∼390 Ma. The change of tectonic regime was further enhanced by a subsequent NNE-SSW-directed shortening deformation (D2) after ∼ 380 Ma. The shortening process ended before the crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip shearing deformation along the Erqis fault zone at 290 - 240 Ma. Results of this study provide solid field-based evidence for a model that the Chinese Altai initially underwent a nearly E-W-oriented subduction-accretional event in the middle Paleozoic, before it was reoriented to a nearly N-S-oriented convergence.

  9. Structural development of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge: The Samaná complex, Northern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gabites, Janet; Suárez-Rodríguez, Ángela

    2011-05-01

    The Samaná metamorphic complex exposes a segment of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, structural and metamorphic analysis, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology show that the deformation can be divided into five main events. Early subduction-related D1 deformation and high-P/low-T M1 metamorphism under lawsonite blueschist (325-425 °C/12-18 kbar; Rincon Marbles and Santa Bárbara Schists lower structural nappes) and eclogite facies conditions (425-450 °C/18-20 kbar; Punta Balandra upper structural nappe), was followed by M2 decompression and cooling in the blueschist facies conditions during D2 folding, thrusting and nappe stacking. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and T-t/P-t estimations revealed Late Eocene to earliest Miocene retrograde M2 metamorphism in the different nappes for a consistent D2 top-to-the-ENE tectonic transport, which suggests a general northeastward progradation of deformation. The D3 event substantially modified the nappe stack and produced open to tight folds with amplitudes up to kilometer-scale and the D4 ductile to brittle normal shear zones and faults, and related subhorizontal folding, record a late extensional deformation, which also affects the whole nappe pile. Non-penetrative D3 and D4 fabrics indicate M3 cooling in and under the M3 greenschist-facies conditions. From the Miocene to the Present, the nappe pile was cut and laterally displaced by a D5 sinistral strike-slip and reverse fault system associated with the Septentrional fault zone.

  10. Block and shear-zone architecture of the Minnesota River Valley subprovince: Implications for late Archean accretionary tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southwick, D.L.; Chandler, V.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Minnesota River Valley subprovince of the Superior Province is an Archean gneiss terrane composed internally of four crustal blocks bounded by three zones of east-northeast-trending linear geophysical anomalies. Two of the block-bounding zones are verified regional-scale shears. The geological nature of the third boundary has not been established. Potential-field geophysical models portray the boundary zones as moderately north-dipping surfaces or thin slabs similar in strike and dip to the Morris fault segment of the Great Lakes tectonic zone at the north margin of the subprovince. The central two blocks of the subprovince (Morton and Montevideo) are predominantly high-grade quartzofeldspathic gneiss, some as old as 3.6 Ga, and late-tectonic granite. The northern and southern blocks (Benson and Jeffers, respectively) are judged to contain less gneiss than the central blocks and a larger diversity of syntectonic and late-tectonic plutons. A belt of moderately metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks having some attributes of a dismembered ophiolite is partly within the boundary zone between the Morton and Montevideo blocks. This and the other block boundaries are interpreted as late Archean structures that were reactivated in the Early Proterozoic. The Minnesota River Valley subprovince is interpreted as a late accretionary addition to the Superior Province. Because it was continental crust, it was not subductible when it impinged on the convergent southern margin of the Superior Craton in late Archean time, and it may have accommodated to convergent-margin stresses by dividing into blocks and shear zones capable of independent movement.

  11. A Role of Low-angle Thrust Fault for the Occurrence of rain-induced Rockslides in an Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, N.; Chigira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme weather related to global warming occurs frequently all over the world; there have been many record-setting rainfall events. Accordingly, potential of rain-induced rockslides increases. Examples of recent rain-induced rock avalanches with tens or more than a hundred of fatalities are a rockslide in Shiaolin village, Taiwan by 2009 Typhoon Morakot, and rockslides induced by 2011 typhoon Talas in Japan. However, the method to predict potential sites of rockslides is not established. Geological causes of rockslides are site specific and they must be clarified for each case. 2011 Typhoon Talas induced more than 50 rockslides in the outer belt of the Southwest Japan, where is underlain by Cretaceous - lower Miocene accretionary complexes. We performed thorough geological mapping in the Akatani area, where two huge rockslides occurred with volumes of 2 million and 8 million m3 respectively. As a result, we found that these two rockslides had their sliding surfaces along a low-angle-thrust with a dip of 29°~40° extending more than 5 km, which fault we name Kawarabi-thrust. This thrust has a fracture zone of 6.0 m in the maximum width, composed of clayey fault breccia with a few layers of black gouges. These fault materials are very weak and impermeable, so the fracture zone is expected to prevent the groundwater filtration and build up the pore pressure. This thrust had been exposed along the riversides at the foot of the two rockslides, which suggests that the slopes on the thrust had been destabilized by the undercutting of long-term river incision. The destabilization induced gravitational slope deformation with small scarps before the catastrophic failure. Our finding suggests that locating a large-scale low-angle-thrust is essentially important to predict potential sites of catastrophic rockslides as well as interpreting the internal structure of gravitationally deformed slopes.

  12. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  13. Seep carbonates and chemosynthetic coral communities in the Early Paleocene alpine accretionary wedge: evidences from the Bocco Shale (Internal Liguride ophiolitic sequence, Northern Apennine, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, Luca; Boschi, Chiara; Luvisi, Edoardo; Alessandro, Ellero; Marroni, Michele; Meneghini, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    In Northern Apennines, the Internal Liguride units are characterized by an ophiolite sequence that represents the stratigraphic base of a Late Jurassic-Early Paleocene sedimentary cover. The Bocco Shale represents the youngest deposit recognized in the sedimentary cover of the ophiolite sequence, sedimented just before the inception of subduction-related deformation history. The Bocco Shale has been interpreted as a fossil example of deposits related to the frontal tectonic erosion of the alpine accretionary wedge slope. The frontal tectonic erosion resulted in a large removal of material from the accretionary wedge front reworked as debris flows and slide deposits sedimented on the lower plate above the trench deposits. These trench-slope deposits may have been successively deformed and metamorphosed during the following accretion processes. The frontal tectonic erosion can be envisaged as a common process during the convergence-related evolution of the Ligure-Piemontese oceanic basin in the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary time span. In the uppermost Internal Liguride tectonic unit (Portello Unit of Pandolfi and Marroni. 1997), that crops-out in Trebbia Valley, several isolated blocks of authigenic carbonates, unidentificated corals and intrabasinal carbonatic arenites have been recognized inside the fine-grained sediments that dominate the Early Paleocene Lavagnola Fm. (cfr. Bocco Shale Auctt.). The preliminary data on stable isotopes from blocks of authigenic carbonates (up to 1 m thick and 3 m across) and associated corals archive a methane signatures in their depleted carbon isotope pattern (up to δ13C -30‰ PDB) and suggest the presence of chemosynthetic paleocommunities. The seep-carbonates recognized at the top of Internal Liguride succession (cfr. Bocco Shale Auctt.) occur predominantly as blocks in very thick mudstone-dominated deposits and probably developed in an environment dominated by the expulsion of large volume of cold methane-bearing fluids

  14. Origin and transport of pore fluids in the Nankai accretionary prism inferred from chemical and isotopic compositions of pore water at cold seep sites off Kumano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Tomohiro; Higa, Ryosaku; Ijiri, Akira; Tsunogai, Urumu; Ashi, Juichiro

    2014-12-01

    We used push corers during manned submersible dives to obtain sediment samples of up to 30 cm from the subseafloor at the Oomine Ridge. The concentrations of B in pore water extracted from the sediment samples from cold seep sites were higher than could be explained by organic matter decomposition, suggesting that the seepage fluid at the site was influenced by B derived from smectite-illite alteration, which occurs between 50°C and 160°C. Although the negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values of the pore fluids cannot be explained by freshwater derived from clay mineral dehydration (CMD), we considered the contribution of pore fluids in the shallow sediments of the accretionary prism, which showed negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values according to the results obtained during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 315 and 316. We calculated the mixing ratios based on a four-end-member mixing model including freshwater derived from CMD, pore fluids in the shallow (SPF) accretionary prism sediment, seawater (SW), and freshwater derived from methane hydrate (MH) dissociation. However, the Oomine seep fluids were unable to be explained without four end members, suggesting that deep-sourced fluids in the accretionary prism influenced the seeping fluids from this area. This finding presents the first evidence of deep-sourced fluids at cold seep sites in the Oomine Ridge, indicating that a megasplay fault is a potential pathway for the deep-sourced fluids.

  15. Triassic deformation of Permian Early Triassic arc-related sediments in the Beishan (NW China): Last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Glen, Richard; Han, Chunming; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ji'en; Wan, Bo; Ao, Songjian; Song, Dongfang

    2015-11-01

    The Beishan orogenic collage (BOC) in the southernmost Altaids provides evidence of the final stage of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. However, the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in the BOC is controversial. From field mapping, and structural analysis of mesoscale, superposed folds in Early Triassic sediments in the Hongyanjing Basin in the central BOC, we define at least two phases of deformation, which we can bracket in age as end-Permian to Early-Late Triassic. The sandstones in the basin are poorly sorted with angular clasts, which indicates immaturity characteristic of proximal and rapid deposition. Geochemical data indicate that the Hongyanjing Basin probably developed in an arc-related setting near an active continental margin or mature island arc. Combined with published regional geological data, we interpret the Hongyanjing Basin as a Permian-Early Triassic inter-arc basin between the Carboniferous Mazongshan arc to the north and the Ordovician to Permian Huaniushan-Dundunshan arc to the south. In addition, the age distribution of our sediments shows that the active continental margin or continental arc on which the Hongyanjing arc-related basin sat was somehow independently distributed in the Paleo-Asian Ocean without any major contribution of provenance from the Tarim Craton and Dunhuang Block to the south and Southern Mongolia accretionary system to the north. Deformation of the superposed folds began in the end-Permian, continued in the Early Triassic, and ended before the middle Late Triassic (219 Ma). Therefore the accretionary orogenesis in the Beishan part of the southernmost Altaids was still ongoing in the early to middle Triassic, and it finished in the Late Triassic, which might have been the last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids. We correlate this terminal event with tectonic developments in the Kunlun and Qinling orogens in the Tethyan domain.

  16. Provenance and origins of a Late Paleozoic accretionary complex within the Khangai-Khentei belt in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, central Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetoshi; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Kon, Yoshiaki; Uchino, Takayuki; Suzuki, Toshiya; Takeuchi, Makoto; Nakane, Yuki; Nuramkhaan, Manchuk; Chuluun, Minjin

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the petrography, geochemistry, and detrital zircon U-Pb LA-ICPMS dating of sandstone from the Gorkhi Formation of the Khangai-Khentei belt in the Ulaanbaatar area, central Mongolia. These data are used to constrain the provenance and source rock composition of the accretionary complex, which is linked to subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean within the Central Asian Orogenic Belt during the Middle Devonian to Early Carboniferous. Field and microscopic observations of the modal composition of sandstone and constituent mineral chemistry indicate that the sandstone of the Gorkhi Formation is feldspathic arenite, enriched in saussuritized plagioclase. Geochemical data show that most of the sandstone and shale were derived from a continental margin to continental island arc setting, with plutonic rocks being the source rocks. Detrital zircon 206Pb/238U ages of two sandstones yields age peaks of 322 ± 3 and 346 ± 3 Ma. The zircon 206Pb/238U age of a quartz-pumpellyite vein that cuts sandstone has a weighted mean age of 339 ± 3 Ma. Based on these zircon ages, we infer that the depositional age of sandstone within the Gorkhi Formation ranges from 320 to 340 Ma (i.e., Early Carboniferous). The provenance and depositional age of the Gorkhi Formation suggest that the evolution of the accretionary complex was influenced by the intrusion and erosion of plutonic rocks during the Early Carboniferous. We also suggest that spatial and temporal changes in the provenance of the accretionary complex in the Khangai-Khentei belt, which developed aound the southern continental margin of the Siberian Craton in relation to island arc activity, were influenced by northward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean plate.

  17. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  18. Low Abundances of Highly Siderophile Elements in the Lunar Mantle: Evidence for Prolonged Late Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Horan, M. F.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE: including Re, Au, Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd, Rh) are strongly partitioned into metal relative to silicates. In the terrestrial planets these elements are concentrated in metallic cores. Earth s mantle has sufficiently high abundances of the HSE (0.008 times CI abundances) that it has been hypothesized approximately 0.1-0.5% of the mass of the Earth was added following the last major interaction between the core and mantle [e.g. 1]. The additional material added to the Earth and Moon has been termed a late veneer , and the process has often been termed late accretion [2]. The timing of the dominant late accretionary period of the Earth and Moon is still poorly known. The abundances of HSE in the lunar mantle could provide important constraints on when the late veneer was added. The material that ultimately became the silicate portion of the Moon was likely stripped of most of its HSE prior to and during coalescence of the Moon. Consequently the initial lunar mantle likely had very low concentrations of the HSE. Unlike Earth, the generation of permanent lunar crust by 4.4 Ga prevented subsequent additions of HSE to the lunar mantle via continued accretion. Thus, if a substantial portion of the late veneer was added after 4.4 Ga, the lunar mantle should have retained very low HSE concentrations. Conversely, if the late veneer was mostly added prior to 4.4 Ga, HSE abundances in the lunar mantle may be roughly similar to abundances in the terrestrial mantle.

  19. Difference in mechanical and hydrological properties between hemipelagic and turbidite mudstones cored from the Nankai Trough accretionary prism at Site C0002 of the IODP Expedition 315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Azuma, S.; Uehara, S.; Inoue, A.; Kanagawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    Very low frequency earthquakes recently found in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism of SW Japan have been ascribed to rather slow faulting along out-of-sequence thrusts or splay faults (Ito and Obara, 2006a). Ito and Obara (2006b) also showed that the stress drops after these earthquakes are as small as 0.1-1% of those after regular earthquakes. Thus at least two types of earthquake faulting occur in the accretionary prism. In order to address the issue of such difference in earthquake faulting, we investigated the mechanical and hydrological properties of mudstones cored from the Nankai Trough accretionary prism. We paid attention to stress drops in particular possibly affected by such properties as permeability. Two mudstone samples designated as #51R06 and #65R02 hereafter were cored from c.a. 1000 mbsf at Site C0002 of the IODP Expedition 315. XRD analyses and SEM observations revealed that the sample #51R06 is a hemipelagic mudstone consisting of well-sorted very fine grains rich in smectite, whereas that the sample #65R02 is a turbidite mudstone consisting of poor-sorted grains rich in quartz and feldspar clasts. We have conducted triaxial compression experiments to induce brittle failure in these mudstone specimens (20 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length), after measurements of elastic and hydrological properties. At room temperature and presumed in-situ confining and pore-water pressures (36~38 MPa and 28~29 MPa, respectively), we first measured Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, permeability and storage capacity of each specimen, then deformed it at a constant axial displacement rate of either 1 micron/sec or 10 micron/sec until its failure. Permeability measurements revealed that the sample #51R06 is 10 times less permeable (2.3×10-20 m2) than the sample #65R02 (2.9×10-19 m2). Triaxial compression experiments revealed that the maximum strength of the former (14.5 MPa) is much lower than that of the latter (20 MPa), and also that the duration time

  20. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  1. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  2. Sources of Low-Chloride Fluids in Sediments beneath Biological Communities on the Nankai Accretionary Wedge off Kumano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Tsunogai, U.; Gamo, T.; Kuramoto, S.; Ashi, J.

    2003-12-01

    We report chemical and isotopic compositions of interstitial waters extracted from surface sediments inside and outside of dense biological communities on the seafloor of the Nankai accretionary prism off Kumano. Particularly those taken within bacterial mat at the Oomine Ridge site show the following characteristics: (1) CH4 enrichment (more than 600 μ mol/kg), (2) chloride depletion (up to 10% depletion from bottom seawater), and (3) δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O depletion (more than 4‰ and 0.7‰ depletion, respectively), compared with bottom seawater. The highest CH4 value observed at the Oomine Ridge samples is compatible with that previously reported at one of the most active seep areas within Nankai Trough, suggesting that also this site should be one of the most active seep sites in Nankai Trough. The fluid chemistries of these samples show that the fluids of CH4 enrichment, chloride depletion, and low δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O value relative to bottom seawater are ascending from deeper zone to sediments beneath the Oomine Ridge site. Assuming simple two-component mixing of ambient seawater with fresh water of Cl- = 0 mmol/kg, the estimated end-member δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O values were -46+/-7‰ SMOW and -6.3+/-0.7‰ SMOW, respectively. The δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O values coincide with those of groundwater at nearby land area. Land-derived groundwater could be one of the possible sources for the low chloride fluids, while we donOt have any idea for such underground lateral flow system of groundwater to the depth of ca. 2,500 m and ca. 100 km off the Japan Islands. Alternative possible source to produce the fluid of low Cl-, δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O is phase separation of seawater. Phase separation would lower Cl-, δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O of vapor phase by a fractionation process during boiling, while we have no idea for a heat source to induce phase separation at the area. Fault slips during large earthquake could possibly be result in such source of heat.

  3. Middle Jurassic oceanic island igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Long; Bi, Jun-Hui; Tian, De-Xin; Xu, Wen-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Whole-rock major and trace element, and Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic data, together with zircon U-Pb ages and in situ zircon Hf isotopes, are reported for Middle Jurassic igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China, to investigate their petrogenesis and tectonic implications. The igneous rocks consist of pillow basalt, pyroxenite, gabbro, plagioclasite, and plagiogranite. The zircons from one plagioclasite and one plagiogranite are euhedral-subhedral and display fine-scale oscillatory growth zoning, indicating a magmatic origin. Zircon U-Pb dating gives an emplacement age of 169-167 Ma. The basalts are associated with late Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic sediments typical of ocean plate stratigraphy; i.e., limestone, bedded chert, and siliceous shale. The basalts, which show geochemical features similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs), are enriched in TiO2, light rare earth elements (LREEs) (average: La/Smn = 2.12), and Nb (average: Zr/Nb = 12.24), and are characterized by positive Nb anomalies (averages: Nb/Thpm = 1.46, Nb/Lapm = 1.31). The rocks are depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) (average: Gd/Ybn = 2.03) and exhibit high εNd(t) (+8.2 to +8.3) and εHf(t) (+9.0 to +9.1) values. The geochemical features indicate the Jurassic OIB-like basalts were derived by a low degree of partial melting (<5%) of peridotite in the garnet stability field. The intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks show typical OIB affinities and are geochemically similar to the basalts. Most of the intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks are enriched in LREEs and Nb, depleted in HREEs, and show low Zr/Nb ratios and high εNd(t) (+7.2 to +8.2) and εHf(t) (+8.8 to +10.3) values, indicating they were derived from a common source and are the products of fractional crystallization of the OIB-like basalts. All of the igneous rocks are likely fragments of oceanic islands/seamounts. The identification of OIB-like basalts and associated intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks

  4. Structure of a paleo subduction décollement, Suzume Fault, Okitsu Mélange, Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Chester, F. M.; Sakaguchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Suzume fault is an internal thrust of an exhumed duplex of underplated rock in the Shimanto accretionary complex. On the basis of structure, age, and paleo-temperature of rock in the duplex, the thrust is a subduction décollement exhumed from the shallow region of the seismogenic zone. Mesoscale structure of the thrust was characterized to investigate slip processes and structural evolution of the décollement. The thrust exhibits an asymmetric structure characterized by a decimeter-thick ultracataclasite bounded by a several-meter-thick zone of fractured basalt in the hanging wall and a 20-meter-thick zone of ductily sheared sedimentary rock in the footwall. The structure of the thrust is similar to that of active décollements drilled at the frontal portions of prisms, but differs in the greater intensity of ductile deformation and the occurrence of ultracataclasite. Hence, the footwall of the Suzume fault records aseismic, distributed shear in poorly consolidated sediment during shallow underthrusting followed by coseismic, localized-slip in lithified sedimentary rock during underplating at depth. The hanging wall, in contrast, records only the later stage of coseismic, localized-slip associated with underplating. The ultracataclasite layers in the Suzume fault exhibit shear localization onto a through-going fracture surface and fabrics indicative of distributed flow, which are likely associated with the seismic cycle, i.e., alternating co- and inter-seismic slip. Off-fault fracture fabric in the hanging wall, related to thrusting at depth, records predominantly up-dip propagation of fault slip events. /// A synthesis of observations of ~20 subduction megathrusts representing the 0-15 km depth range, combined with the findings from the Suzume fault and modern Nankai megathrusts, documents a systematic decrease in the thickness of the slip zone, changes in deformation mechanisms and fluid-rock reactions, and an increase in shear heating, with depth. These

  5. Drilling into the deep interior of the Nankai accretionary prism: Preliminary results of IODP NanTroSEIZE Expedition 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, H. J.; Hirose, T.; Saffer, D. M.; Toczko, S.; Maeda, L.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, the latest advance of the NanTroSEIZE project, started on 13 September 2013 and was completed on 29 January 2014. During Expedition 348, the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the ultra-deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula, from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf, the world record for the deepest scientific ocean drilling, and cased it for future deepening. The drilling operation successfully obtained data on formation physical properties from logging while drilling (LWD) tools, as well as from lithological analyses of cuttings and core from the interior of the active accretionary prism at the Nankai Trough. IODP Site C0002 is the currently only borehole to access the deep interior of an active convergent margin. Preliminary scientific results of Expedition 348 are as follows: (1) Fine-grained turbiditic mudstones with coarser silty and sandy interbeds, exhibiting steep dips (between ~60 and 90 degrees) are predominant in the prism down to ~3000 mbsf. The biostratigraphic age of the sediments in the lowermost part of the hole is thought to be 9-11 Ma, with an assumed age of accretion of 3-5 Ma. (2) Slickenlined surfaces, deformation bands and mineral veins are present throughout the drilled interval, while well-developed scaly clay fabrics are increasingly observed below ~2200 mbsf. A substantial fault zone with well-developed foliation was successfully cored from the deep interior of the prism at ~2205 mbsf. (3) Porosity generally decreases from ~60% to ~20% from the seafloor to 3000 mbsf. However, physical properties including grain density, electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity suggest fairly homogeneous properties in the interior of the prism between ~2000 and 3000 mbsf. (4) Mud gas analysis during the riser drilling indicates that a source of methane gas shifts from microbial origin to thermogenic at around 2325 mbsf. (5) The maximum

  6. Pioneering Research on Accretionary Processes - Jean Francheteau's Contributions to Understanding Mid-Ocean Ridges and Seafloor Volcanic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, D. J.; Ballard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Jean Francheteau's 40-year career as a marine geophysicist spanned an exceptionally broad range of research interests and influenced generations of marine scientists, providing new concepts and insights on accretionary tectonics and seafloor volcanism. Using seafloor mapping techniques that at the time (in the early 1970s) were innovative in their own right, Jean and colleagues provided some of the first detailed perspectives of mid-ocean ridge axial topography that helped solidify acceptance of volcanic accretion at the ridges and specifically the highly focused volcanism occurring within the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Building on that work, Jean collaborated with many investigators, including one of us (RDB), over several decades of exploratory work that elucidated the fine-scale volcanic and tectonic features of many segments of the global mid-ocean ridge from the Mid-Atlanic Ridge to the northern and southern East Pacific Rise. His work in marine tectonics was equally eclectic and included detailed studies of fracture zones, microplates and exposures of crustal and upper mantle rocks in Hess Deep. Jean excelled at using the latest technologies to investigate and map seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal terrains. His work helped establish routine academic use of multibeam sonar and deep submergence technologies - both towed camera and ultimately submersibles - to make in situ field observations and collect samples. In so doing, Jean and colleagues amassed a vast amount of data pertaining to submarine volcanic and hydrothermal processes and he was one of the first to help establish causal links between these processes and their distribution along and across spreading center axes separating at slow to ultra-fast rates. Jean's superb mentorship of young marine scientists, involving them in both field and laboratory studies was a hallmark of his gracious style and reflects one of the many ways in which he admirably served the international oceanographic

  7. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  8. Neotethyan rifting-related ore occurrences: study of an accretionary mélange complex (Darnó Unit, NE Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gabriella B.; Oláh, Erika; Zaccarini, Federica; Szakáll, Sándor

    2016-02-01

    The geology of the NE Hungarian Darnó Unit is rather complicated, as it is composed mostly of a Jurassic accretionary mélange complex, according to the most recent investigations. The magmatic and sedimentary rock blocks of the mélange represent products of different evolutionary stages of the Neotethys; including Permian and Triassic sedimentary rocks of marine rifting related origin, Triassic pillow basalt of advanced rifting related origin and Jurassic pillow basalt originated in back-arc-basin environment. This small unit contains a copper-gold occurrence in the Permian marly-clayey limestone, an iron enrichment in the Triassic sedimentary succession, a copper-silver ore occurrence in Triassic pillow basalts and a copper ore indication, occurring both in the Triassic and Jurassic pillow basalts. The present study deals with the Cu(-Ag) occurrence in the Triassic basalt and the Fe occurrence in the Triassic sedimentary succession. The former shows significant similarities with the Michigan-type mineralizations, while the latter has typical characteristics of the Fe-SEDEX deposits. All the above localities fit well into the new geological model of the investigated area. The mineralizations represent the different evolutionary stages of the Neotethyan rifting and an epigenetic, Alpine metamorphism-related process and their recent, spatially close position is the result of the accretionary mélange formation. Thus, the Darnó Unit represents a perfect natural laboratory for studying and understanding the characteristic features of several different rifting related ore forming processes.

  9. Provenance analysis and detrital zircon geochronology on the onshore Makran accretionary wedge, SE Iran: implication for the geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Wilfried; Ruh, Jonas

    2014-05-01

    The Makran, located in Southeast Iran and South Pakistan, is one of the largest accretionary wedges on Earth. In Iran it comprises turbiditic sediments ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. We present a provenance analysis on sandstones, which is aimed at reconstructing the assemblages of source rocks and the tectonic setting from which the clastic material was derived. Sandstone samples collected from different units span the regional stratigraphy from Late Cretaceous to Miocene. Laser ablation ICP-MS resulted in ca 2800 new U-Pb ages of individual detrital zircons from 18 samples collected in onshore Makran. 101 detrital zircons from a Late Cretaceous fine grained sandstone range from 180 to 160 Ma (Middle Jurassic). 478 detrital zircons from mid- to late Eocene sandstones allow differentiating a NE and NW sector of the Makran Basin. Zircon grains in the NE basin belong to two populations peaking at 180 to 160 Ma (late Early to Middle Jurassic) and 50 to 40 Ma (Mid-Eocene), with the noticeable absence of Cretaceous grains. In the NW basin, detrital zircons are 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Lutetian, Eocene). 587 detrital zircon grains from fine to medium grained Oligocene sandstones collected over the whole area also range from 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Eocene, Lutetian). 1611 detrital zircons from early Miocene sandstones show again distinctly different ages in the eastern and western parts of the basin. They range from 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Eocene) in the eastern and from 80 to 40 Ma (Late Cretaceous to Eocene) in the western basin. Hf isotopes analyses were performed on 120 zircon grains from 6 samples. Negative values (-2 to -15) in Middle Jurassic and late Early Cretaceous zircons indicate minor or no influence of mantle reservoirs which implies a rifting setting during crystallization of the zircons. Low negative to positive (-5 to +10) values in Late Cretaceous and Eocene zircons indicate mixed crustal and

  10. Tectonic implications for the occurrence of ocean floor, hotspot, and island arc materials within accretionary prisms: Examples from the Mesozoic-Cenozoic NW Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, N.; Hirano, N.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.

    2001-12-01

    On-land Mesozoic-Cenozoic accretionary prisms exposed in Japan commonly have basaltic rocks incorporated as blocks into melanges or fault zones during a prolonged history of subduction and/or obduction. Chemical signatures of these basaltic rocks and their mode of occurrence with sedimentary covers and/or associated sedimentary rocks indicate that most of these isolated small basaltic blocks consistently display a WPB chemistry, whereas large slabs of basaltic rocks around the Izu Arc collision zone show MORB chemistry with rare examples of IAT, BABB, and/or WPB affinities. Comparing with the present uniformitarian examples of convergent plate boundaries in the western Pacific that we know through the DSDP and ODP projects and submersible and seismic surveys, we can interpret some of the basaltic material with WPB affinity in the Japanese accretionary prisms as relict edifices of seamounts with hotspot origin. These hotspot-related basaltic rocks are commonly associated with reefal limestones and were incorporated into continental margin melanges either by submarine sliding from the downgoing oceanic plate or by shallow-level offscraping along decollement surfaces during the subduction of oceanic plates. Older, uplifted parts of the fossil accretionary prisms on the continent side further inward from the trench where the deeper levels of accreted material are exposed include larger amounts of basaltic blocks. This observation suggests that significant amount of underplating might have occurred in the deeper levels of oceanic crust along decollement zones at structurally lower depths. The metamorphic belts (e.g.Sambagawa, Chichibu, Shimanto etc.) have commonly alkaline rocks or plateau-type E-MORB basalts without any trace of N-MORB rocks with rare special exceptions. Besides these ordinary accretionary prism examples formed by a simple plate subduction system, another type of accretion resulting from island arc or ridge collision is observed to have occurred in

  11. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  12. Rock magnetic properties of dusty olivine: a potential carrier of pre-accretionary remanence in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Harrison, R. J.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of chondrule formation is an important outstanding question in cosmochemistry. Magnetic signals recorded by Fe-Ni nanoparticles in chondrules could carry clues to their origin. Recently, research in this area has focused on 'dusty olivine' grains within ordinary chondrites as potential carriers of pre-accretionary remanence. Dusty olivine is characterised by the presence of sub-micron Fe-Ni inclusions within the olivine host. These metal particles form via subsolidus reduction of the olivine during chondrule formation and are thought to be protected from subsequent chemical and thermal alteration by the host olivine. Three sets of synthetic dusty olivines have been produced, using natural olivine (average Ni-content of 0.3 wt%), synthetic Ni-containing olivine (0.1wt% Ni) and synthetic Ni-free olivine as starting materials. The starting materials were ground to powders, packed into a 2-3 mm3 graphite crucible, heated up to 1350 °C under a pure CO gas flow and kept at this temperature for 10 minutes. After this the samples were held in a fixed orientation and quenched into water in a range of known magnetic fields, ranging from 0.2 mT to 1.5 mT. We present here for the first time an analysis of a new FORC-based method of paleointensity determination applied to metallic Fe-bearing samples [1, 2]. The method uses a first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagram to generate a Preisach distribution of coercivities and interaction fields within the sample and then physically models the acquisition of TRM as a function of magnetic field, temperature and time using thermal relaxation theory. The comparison of observed and calculated NRM demagnetisation spectra is adversely effected by a large population of particles in the single-vortex state. Comparison of observed and calculated REM' curves, however, yields much closer agreement in the high-coercivity SD-dominated range. Calculated values of the average REM' ratio show excellent agreement with the experimental

  13. Microstructures, Chemical Composition, and Viscosities of Fault-generated Friction Melts in the Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Southwest Japan: Implication for Dynamics of Earthquake Faulting in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2004-12-01

    The pseudotachylytes (PT) were recently found in the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex of eastern and western Shikoku, southwest Japan, but their microstructures under a backscattered electron image, chemical composition, and effects of frictional melting on co-seismic slip in the accretionary prism remains poorly understood. The PT bearing fault is the 1-2 m thick roof thrust of a duplex structure, which bounds the off-scraped coherent turbidites above from the imbricated melange below without a thermal inversion across the fault. The fault zone consists of foliated cataclasite of sandstone-shale melange in origin and dark veins. The PT commonly occurs as brecciated fragments in dark veins. The PT matrix is transparent under plane-polarized light and is optically homogeneous under cross-polarized light, similar to glass matrix. Under a backscattered electron image, the PT clearly shows the evidences for frictional melting and subsequent rapid cooling: rounded and irregularly shaped grains and vesicles in matrix and fracturing associated with grain margins. These textural features of the PT are very similar to those of experimentally generated PT. The EPMA analysis indicates that chemical composition of the PT matrix corresponds to illite with 5.7-9.9 wt% H2O and that partially melted grains are dominated by orthoclase and quartz. This indicates that the temperatures of the PT melt could reach the breakdown temperatures of orthoclase (1150 C) and quartz (1730 C), greater than the maximum temperature recorded in host rocks (170-200 C). We calculated the viscosity of friction melt, based on the chemical composition of the PT matrix and the volume fraction and aspect ratio of grains in the PT. We considered both Arrhenian and non-Arrhenian models for viscosity calculation. Our result demonstrates that the melt viscosity is much lower than PT in continental plutonic and metamorphic rocks: 10^3 Pa s (Arrhenian model) and 10^2 Pa s (non-Arrhenian model) even at

  14. Generation and emplacement of Triassic granitoids within the Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge in a context of slab retreat accommodated by tear faulting, Eastern Tibetan plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sigoyer, Julia; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Duchêne, Stéphanie; Billerot, Audrey

    2014-07-01

    The eastern Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge (northern Tibetan plateau) is characterized by extensive magmatism coeval with Middle to Upper Triassic closure of the Paleotethys Ocean along a double subduction system, traced by the Kunlun-Anyemaqen suture to the north and the Jinsha-Litang suture to the south. New field, petrographic and geochemical data on Mesozoic plutons intrusive into Triassic metasediments of the eastern Songpan Ganze wedge are presented and integrated in a review of available data for the region. Three types of granitoids are distinguished: (i) high-K calc-alkaline granite to granodiorite (Yanggon, Maoergai, Markam, Sheng Meng, Xue Sheng, Taiyanghe, Menggu, Manai, Dusong Xian, Tagong and Jiulong plutons), (ii) high-K alkaline granite (Nyanbaoyeche and Rilong plutons and the Niuxingou shoshonitic syenite), and (iii) peraluminous S-type granite (Markam and Manai leucogranites). Elemental and isotopic signatures of these granitoids are consistent with the implication of both crustal (Yangtze craton, and Songpan Ganze metasediments) and mantle (asthenospheric mantle and metasomatised lithospheric mantle) sources. Based on (i) the ages of the plutons that are concomitant with the end of the northern and southern subductions of the Paleo-Tethys, (ii) the position of the plutons intrusive in the crustal tectonically accreted units decoupled from the downgoing plate of this double subduction system, (iii) the diversity of their petrological and geochemical signatures, we propose that magma emplaced in the Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge were generated at the end of the Paleotethys closure in a context of slab retreat, accommodated by a tear fault along the passive margin of the South China block. Indeed, we argue that this context is the most favourable to trigger synchronous partial melting of (i) the suprasubduction enriched mantle wedge owing to lowering of the mantle solidus by metasomatism, (ii) the upwelled undepleted

  15. Evaluation of Coseismic Fluid-Rock Interaction in Fault Zones on the Basis of Geochemistry of Fault Rocks in Accretionary Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Hirono, T.; Honda, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies revealed that concentration and isotopic composition of fluid-mobile trace elements such as Li, Rb, Cs and Sr in slip-zone rocks can change significantly during coseismic fluid-rock interaction at high temperatures (e.g., Ishikawa et al., 2008). In this study, we summarize the results obtained for fault-zone rocks recovered from various depths of the subduction zones. Analysis of a slip-zone sample recovered from shallow portion (0.27 km bsf) of the magasplay fault at Site C0004, IODP Exp. 316, Nankai Trough showed no clear fluid-induced geochemical signals, although a peak temperature over 300 deg. C is estimated on the basis of vitrinite reflectance data (Sakaguchi et al., 2011). In contrast, a major reverse fault in a fossil accretionary prism, the Emi Group (burial depth, 1-2 km) exhibited marked decreases of Li, Rb and Cs relative to adjacent host rocks, suggesting coseismic fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. Geochemical signals observed in the Emi slip zone have a strong resemblance to those observed in the Taiwan chelungpu fault at comparable depths (1.1-1.2 km). Slip-zone samples collected from a fossil out-of-sequence thrust at greater depth (2.5-5.5 km) adjacent to the Kure Melange in the Shimanto accretionary prism showed unique geochemical characteristics, in which effects from disequilibrium flash melting to generate pseudotachylyte coexist with those from fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. In the cases of Emi and Chelungpu, it is possible that the fluid-induced geochemical signatures, together with fluidization structures observed in these samples, resulted from thermal pressurization. On the other hand, the Kure data suggest a slip process in which high-temperature pore fluids were generated by frictional slip, but the thermally-enhanced pressure might not have reached a sufficient level to cause thermal pressurization, and the temperature continued to increase to attain melting. Kinetic estimation suggests that fluid

  16. Tectonic and Sedimentary Interactions on the Initiation and the Architecture of the Accretionary Wedges in the Southwestern Edge of the Caribbean, off Panama and Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Maurin, T.; Barat, F.; Auxietre, J.

    2013-12-01

    The structurally and stratigraphically complex area of North Panama deformed belt, Sinu-Uraba accretionary prism and south Caribbean deformed belt holds the key to understand the plate tectonic evolution of the southwestern margins of the Caribbean Sea. New geological fieldworks, sedimentary and structural analysis, detailed offshore and onshore seismic interpretation provide insights into the regional structural and stratigraphic evolution of those margins. Detailed results constraint the geodynamic history of these complex wedge architecture which registered successive changes of sedimentary supplies and gravity collapses. During the Paleocene and Eocene time, the southeastward subduction of the Caribbean plate below the northwestern edge of South America is characterized by the development of an accretionary wedge off the Caribbean margin of Colombia, due to the accumulation of a large amount of sediments provided by the Magdalena and the Sinu rivers. The Atrato river, at that time, was providing sediments to the basins restricted within the Panama Isthmus. During the Middle Miocene, the Panama Isthmus began to collide against South America, inducing the uplift of the San Jacinto/Sinu Belt in Colombia. As a consequence, the Magdalena river was deviated northward. The Sinu river was also deviated to the North and started to load the back of the the Sinu accretionary wedge which then began to collapse as convergence has ceased. In the same way, the uplift of the Darien Shear Zone, east of the Atrato basin, has deflected the sedimentary supply from the Chucunaque/Tuira basins to the northern margin of the isthmus, allowing the development of a sedimentary basin and the initiation of the North Panama Deformed Belt. Thus, on one hand, the structure of the Colombian Wedge, the Sinu Wedge and the North Panama Deformed belt, was controlled by the tectonic forces, a consequence of the convergence and progressive accretion of the Central American isthmus against the

  17. Jurassic metabasic rocks in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex (Kargı region, Central Pontides, Northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Özkan, Mutlu; Billor, Zeki; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    The Kızılırmak accretionary complex near Kargı is tectonically bounded by the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous metamorphic massives of the Central Pontides. It consists mainly of serpentinite, serpentinized peridotite, gabbro, basalt, metabasite and deep-marine sedimentary rocks. The metabasites in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex are tectonically located within a serpentinite, radiolarian chert, spilitized basalt, gabbro association and commonly display a steep contact with serpentinites. Amphiboles from metabasites yielded robust 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging between 159.4 ± 0.4 Ma and 163.5 ± 0.8 Ma. These are interpreted as cooling ages of the metabasites. The metabasites have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7035 and 0.7044 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.18 and 18.92. The gabbros have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7044 and 0.7060 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 17.98 and 18.43. Three basalt samples display 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7040 and 0.7059. Their 206Pb/204Pb(i) are unrealistically low (15.42 and 15.62), suggesting, most likely, Pb loss which results in over-corrected values for decay through time. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for all samples consistently plot between the fields of MORB or the Depleted MORB Mantle reservoirs and enriched mantle reservoirs (EMII rather than EMI). All the samples (except one dolerite dike) have negative ɛNdDM(t = 160 Ma) values, suggesting derivation from a reservoir more enriched than the depleted mantle. The protoliths of metabasites correspond to diverse sources (N-MORB, E-MORB, OIB and IAT) based on whole rock major and trace element composition. An IAT-like protolith for the metabasites indicates that the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean domain was subducting and the tectonic regime was compressional during Late Jurassic and before. The protoliths of these rocks were metamorphosed during the subduction/accretion processes, as observed in the metamorphic rocks located along the Balkan, Northern Turkey and

  18. Tectonic and Sedimentation Interactions in the East Caribbean Subduction Zone: AN Overview from the Orinoco Delta to the Barbados Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deville, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent marine geophysical acquisitions and piston-coring allow to better understand the close interactions between the sand-rich Orinoco turbidite system and the compressional structures of the Barbados prism. Because of the morphologic and tectonic control in the east-Caribbean active margin, the Orinoco turbiditic pattern system does not exhibit a classic fan geometry. The sea-floor geometry between the slope of the front of the Barbados prism and the slope of the South-American margin induces the convergence of the turbidite channels toward the abyssal plain, at the front of the accretionary prism. Also, whereas in most passive margins the turbidite systems are organized upstream to downstream as canyon, then channel-levee, then lobes, here, due to the tectonic control, the sedimentary system is organized as channel-levee, then canyons, then channelized lobes. At the edge of the Orinoco platform, the system has multiple sources with several distributaries and downward the channel courses are complex with frequent convergences or divergences that are emphasized by the effects of the undulating seafloor tectonic morphologies associated with active thrust tectonics and mud volcanism. On top of the accretionary prism, turbidite sediments are filling transported piggy-back basins whose timing of sedimentation vs. deformation is complex. Erosion processes are almost absent on the highly subsiding Orinoco platform and in the upper part of the turbidite system. Erosion processes develop mostly between 2000 and 4000 m of water depth, above the compressional structures of the Barbados prism (canyons up to 3 km wide and 300 m deep). In the abyssal plain, turbiditic channels develop on very long distance (> 1000 km) joining the mid-Atlantic channel (sourced mostly by the Amazon), filling several elongated basins corresponding to transform faults (notably the Barracuda Basin), and finally sourcing the Puerto-Rico trench, the deepest morphologic depression of this region

  19. Evidence for tectonic emplacement of ultramafic and associated rocks in the pre-Silurian eugeoclinal belt of western New England- vestiges of an ancient accretionary wedge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, R.S.; Roy, D.L.; Hatch, N.L., Jr.; Knapp, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Three ultramafic and associated rocks occur in a highly faulted zone of pre-Silurian metamorphosed rocks, in which serpentinites and talc-carbonate rocks occur as slivers along faults that separate contrasting lithic assemblages. Results of detailed investigation of the map pattern, fault fabrics, lithic assemblages and metamorphism of the ultramafic belt in the Jay area of northern Vermont and comparison with its southern continuation in Massachusetts are cited as evidence supporting interpretation of the ultramafic and associated rocks as imbricated fragments of oceanic crust. Emplacement of the fragments in a stratigraphic sequence that was originally deposited along the continental margin of North America and on adjoining oceanic crust accompanied development of an accretionary wedge associated with an east-dipping subduction zone. (Preceding abstracts)-M.S.

  20. Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic tectonic evolution of SW Japan: A review - Reappraisal of the accretionary orogeny and revalidation of the collisional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    This paper makes a review of the interpretations of the tectonic evolution of SW Japan during the last three decades. In the late 1970s, the dominant model was the so-called "Pacific-type orogeny", emphasizing the purported absence of nappes and the contrast with the alpine chains, and interpreting the evolution as due to a steady oceanic subduction since the Paleozoic time. In the 80s, the discovery of the actual structure made of a pile of large thrust sheets led authors to propose collisional models, involving the intermittent underthrusting of buoyant blocks like micro-continents. At the same time, the use of high-resolution biostratigraphy allowed several authors to recognize ancient accretionary wedges, with a reconstructed ocean plate stratigraphy of individual accreted units, especially in the Tanba and Shimanto zones. Also, precise radiometric dating permitted the distinction of metamorphosed units, especially in Sanbagawa and Shimanto belts. As a result of these new data, since the 1990s, the plate tectonic interpretation of the history of the Japanese Islands was revised by Japanese scientists and presented again in terms of accretionary processes linked to a steadily oceanic subduction, with an episodic ridge subduction: the so-called "Miyashiro-type orogeny". The review of different data leads to the following conclusions. The structure of SW Japan is made of a pile of sub-horizontal nappes, polydeformed, with a geometry similar to the one encountered in collisional orogens. The geodynamic mechanisms advocated for the tectonic building within the accretionary orogeny concept (Miyashiro-type orogeny) are inappropriate. A permanent oceanic subduction with the intermittent "collision" (actually subduction) of an active ridge or seamount chain is unable to build such structures, as this process induces in fact an acceleration of the tectonic erosion and collapse of the upper plate; the underthrusting of a micro-continent or mature arc is likely needed. The

  1. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  2. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  3. Propagation of a lithospheric tear fault (STEP) through the western boundary of the Calabrian accretionary wedge offshore eastern Sicily (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, Flora; Graindorge, David; Gutscher, Marc-André; Klaeschen, Dirk

    2013-08-01

    The rollback of a segmented slab of oceanic lithosphere is typically accompanied by vertical lithospheric tear fault(s) along the lateral slab edge(s) and by strike slip movement in the upper plate, defined as a STEP fault (Subduction Tear Edge Propagator). The Neogene evolution of the Central Mediterranean is dominated by the interaction between the slow Africa-Eurasia convergence and the SE-ward rollback of the Ionian slab, that leads to the back-arc opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Here, we present post-stack time migrated and pre-stack depth migrated Archimede (1997) multichannel seismic lines, that were acquired offshore eastern Sicily, at the foot of the Malta escarpment. First, we identify the recent deformation along the lateral ramp of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. Towards the east, the Calabrian wedge is formed by the accretion of the post-evaporitic sediments, above a decollement at the base of the Messinian evaporites. At the latitude of Syracuse, 50 km east of the Malta escarpment, a major N150°E trending crustal scale and vertical fault slices through the entire accretionary wedge. This fault cuts by several kilometers, through the pre-evaporitic Messinian sediments and into the basement. The vertical offset along this vertical fault decreases from north to south, and the fault is no longer observed on the seismic lines, 50 km SE of the Alfeo seamount. A previously published Moho depth isocontour map, offshore Sicily and the recent GPS data, combined with the presence of strike slip movements NE onshore Sicily, allow us to identify this 200 km long crustal-scale fault as the surface expression of a STEP fault. The presence of syntectonic Pleistocene sediments on top this crustal-scale fault suggests a recent lithospheric vertical movement of the STEP fault, in response to the rollback of the Ionian slab and to the SE-ward advance of the Calabria-Peloritan block.

  4. In-situ stress and strength in the Nankai inner accretionary prism at Site C0002, IODP NanTroSEIZE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, H.; Valdez, R. D.; Kitamura, M.; Sone, H.; Saffer, D. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Hirose, T.; Kuo, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE), a deep riser borehole has been drilled into the Kumano forearc basin and the underlying inner accretionary wedge at Site C0002, located ~35 km landward from the trench. One of the primary objectives of drilling the riser site was to characterize in-situ stress and pore pressure in the hanging wall above the locked plate boundary. Here, we: (1) investigate the mechanical strength and deformation behavior of prism sediment via laboratory experiments on core samples; and (2) quantify in-situ stress (Sv, Sh, and SH), and pore pressure (Pp) in the Kumano basin and the inner prism. We conducted triaxial compression experiments on core samples recovered from ~ 2200 meters below sea floor (mbsf) during IODP Expedition 348, at effective pressures (Pe) ranging from 8 and 36 MPa, and at temperatures of either 25°C or 60°C. Our preliminary results indicate that the prism (20 - 42% porosity) rocks deform brittlely at Pe < 22 MPa, but exhibit strain hardening at Pe = 36 MPa. This pressure-porosity condition for a brittle-ductile transition is consistent with previous work defining yield models for incoming sediments at the Nankai Trough (Kitajima and Saffer, 2012). Combining P-wave velocity logs and downhole measurements of leak-off pressure at Site C0002 with an empirical relationship between P-wave velocity, porosity, and effective stress, we show that the Kumano forearc basin is in a uniaxial-strain loading path, which defines a normal faulting stress regime (Sv>SH>=Sh), whereas the inner accretionary prism is in a triaxial-strain loading path that defines a strike-slip faulting regime (SH>Sv>Sh). We estimate excess pore pressure below ~2000 mbsf ranging from 0-12 MPa, corresponding to a pore pressure ratio λ* of 0 - 0.40.

  5. Structural Features and Gas Hydrate Distribution Across the Boundary of the Submarine Taiwan Accretionary Wedge and Passive China Continental Margin Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Liu, C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, H.; Ko, C.; Chen, S.; Chung, S.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes a 3D seismic data volume in the upper reach of the Penghu Submarine Canyon for gas hydrate investigation. This 3D seismic data set runs across the deformation front which separates the passive China continental slope from the Taiwan accretionary wedge. Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) are widely distributed in the study area which suggests that gas hydrates are present in both the extensional and compressive structure domains. We use 3D seismic images to map the spatial distribution of BSRs, and to identify structural and sedimentary features across the deformation front. Seismic attribute analysis of the 3D seismic volume has been performed which helps to reveal structure details and physical properties of the substrata. Our study identifies detailed structural variations across the deformation front: In the passive continental slope domain, besides normal faults, buried submarine canyons and paleo-topography of the continental slope before the arc-continent collision are recognized, while in the accretionay wedge domain, the fold and thrust structures dominate. BSR distribution in the 3D box correlates well with the seafloor topography, buried channels and fluid migration paths, we suggest that there may be different gas hydrate systems for the passive continental slope and for the accretionary wedge domains. As the Penghu Submarine Canyon is an important conduit offshore southwestern Taiwan for transporting terrestrial and shallow marine sediments, we suggest that the buried channels that filled with coarse-grain sediments could be good reservoirs for gas hydrates and free gases. Accurate substrata velocity models derived from a large-offset 2D seismic profile data in the study area will help us to better estimate the gas hydrate concentration in those reservoirs.

  6. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the Samaná complex, northern Hispaniola: Implications for the burial and exhumation of high-pressure rocks in a collisional accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Valverde-Vaquero, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The Samaná complex exposes a segment of a high-P metasedimentary collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, metamorphic mineral assemblages, multi-equilibrium calculations and thermodynamical modelling of garnet zoning, together with isotopic ages, allow proposing a tectonothermal evolution of the complex involving three major stages (M1 to M3). M1 metamorphism was characterised by a prograde P-T path towards the pressure-peak in the lawsonite-blueschists (Santa Bárbara Schists and Rincón Marbles lower structural nappes) and garnet-blueschists to eclogite-facies conditions (Punta Balandra upper nappe). This high-P metamorphism and related D1 deformation took place from the Eocene to Late Oligocene, when the different nappes were buried along a cold subduction-zone gradient. Contemporary to the D2 deformation, M2 retrograde metamorphism was associated in all nappes with substantial decompression under nearly isothermal or cooling conditions to the epidote-blueschists and greenchists facies conditions. D2 deformation produced ENE-directed folding, thrusting and nappe stacking in the complex, when nappes went sequentially incorporated to a growing collisional accretionary complex between the Late Eocene and the earliest Miocene. D2 deformation is thus responsible for much of the exhumation of the subducted rocks and for the thinning of the nappe pile. As the continuity of the P-T conditions within the accreted metasedimentary material were in this case preserved, the exhumation mechanisms for Samaná complex high-P rocks was most probably driven by underthrusting/underplating and erosion. Non-penetrative fabrics associated with D3 and D4 late deformations indicate M3 cooling in the greenschists and subgreenchists-facies conditions. D5 sinistral strike-slip brittle faults cut and laterally displaced the whole nappe pile of the Samaná complex from the Lower Miocene to the

  7. Structure, age, and mechanism of emplacement of the Amur and Kiselevka-Manoma accretionary complexes of the lower Amur region, Russian Far East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyabrev, S. V.; Anoikin, V. I.; Kudymov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The Amur and Kiselevka-Manoma accretionary complexes belong to the Cretaceous Khingan-Okhotsk active continental margin, which was formed in the east of Eurasia as a result of the subduction of the Pacific oceanic plates. The Kiselevka-Manoma complex is composed of oceanic pelagic and hemipelagic sedimentary rocks and intraplate oceanic basalts. It is located to the southeast, along the ocean-faced front of the Amur complex, which is predominantly composed of turbidites of the convergent boundary of lithospheric plates. The biostratigraphic study of radiolarians from rocks of the frontal part of the Amur complex allowed us to correlate them with rocks of the Kiselevka-Manoma complex and to define the period of accretion to be from the Late Aptian to the Middle Albian. The tectonostratigraphic interrelations of these two contrasting lithotectonic complexes are established and two possible models of their common emplacement are suggested. Both models suppose a continuous spatiotemporal relation of complexes with the primary paleolocation of the Kiselevka-Manoma complex in front of (on the ocean side) the Amur complex. The frontal part of the Amur complex and the Kiselevka-Manoma complex were emplaced synchronously with the western part of the East Sakhalin accretionary complex. This scenario defines the Early Cretaceous tectonic zonation of the region and the choice of the appropriate paleotectonic model. At the end of the Early Cretaceous, a single convergent boundary of the lithospheric plates is suggested with the position of the Sakhalin island arc system south of the Khingan-Okhotsk active continental margin.

  8. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1995-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of 15 April 1994 to 15 April 1995.

  9. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  10. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  11. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  12. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  13. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  14. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  15. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  16. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  17. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  18. Surface abundances of OC supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Foschino, S.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.; Howarth, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Some O and B stars show unusually strong or weak lines of carbon and/or nitrogen. These objects are classified as OBN or OBC stars. It has recently been shown that nitrogen enrichment and carbon depletion are the most likely explanations for the existence of the ON class. Aims: We investigate OC stars (all being supergiants) to check that surface abundances are responsible for the observed anomalous line strengths. Methods: We perform a spectroscopic analysis of three OC supergiants using atmosphere models. A fourth star was previously studied by us. Our sample thus comprises all OC stars known to date in the Galaxy. We determine the stellar parameters and He, C, N, and O surface abundances. Results: We show that all stars have effective temperatures and surface gravities fully consistent with morphologically normal O supergiants. However, OC stars show little, if any, nitrogen enrichment and carbon surface abundances consistent with the initial composition. OC supergiants are thus barely chemically evolved, unlike morphologically normal O supergiants. Based on observations obtained at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 089.D-0975.

  19. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  20. The U-Pb age and Hf isotope record of detrital zircons from Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the proto-Andean accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    The global record of detrital zircon ages is frequently interpreted as reflecting cycles of supercontinent assembly and dispersal. When peaks in zircon age distributions are combined with data on the relative production of juvenile crust through time, a coincidence between the data sets is discernible for events mainly in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic. Hawkesworth et al. (2009) recently concluded that peaks in U-Pb detrital ages (n=7000; Campbell and Allen, 2008) and juvenile crust production do not always coincide on a global scale, and that a link to supercontinent cycles may in fact not exist. The reason for this is seen in the poor preservation potential of juvenile magmatic arc crust of accretionary orogens relative to continental collisional systems. This is significant as juvenile crust tends to be produced at active margins where it is also prone to destruction by subduction erosion. Granitic magmatic systems in collisional mountain belts, which later may become prolific sources of detrital zircons when eroded, are often formed by partial melting of preexisting crust. They may be volumetrically smaller than arc systems but have a better preservation potential due to their position in the interior of the evolving orogenic belts. The difference in formation and preservation potential is seen as a potential bias of the detrital zircon record towards collisional mountain belts. In contrast, non-collisional accretionary orogens should have detrital zircon age records free of this bias. The SW Amazonia Orogenic System evolved by the episodic accretion of marginal orogenic belts to Amazonia from c. 2.3 to 0.9 Ga. From 0.9 to 0.25 Ga it was superseded by the Andean portion of the Terra Australis accretionary orogen. Recent reconsiderations of paleomagnetic data (e.g. Evans et al., 2010) together with the tectonic evolution of these orogens indicate that they reflect a c. 2 Ga long orogenic history free of major continental collisions. A compilation of U

  1. Petrology of blueschist from the Western Himalaya (Ladakh, NW India): Exploring the complex behavior of a lawsonite-bearing system in a paleo-accretionary setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco; Sachan, Himanshu K.; Rai, Santosh K.

    2016-05-01

    Although the Himalaya is the archetype of collisional orogens, formed as a consequence of the closure of the Neo-Tethyan ocean separating India from Asia, high-pressure metamorphic rocks are rare. Beside few eclogites, corresponding to the metamorphosed continental Indian crust dragged below Asia or underthrusted beneath southern Tibet, blueschists occur seldom along the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture zone, i.e. the suture marking the India-Asia collision. These blueschists, mostly interpreted as related to paleo-accretionary prisms formed in response to the subduction of the Neo-Tethyan ocean below the Asian plate, are crucial for constraining the evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone during the closure of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. In the Western Himalaya, the best occurrence of blueschist is that of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange in Ladakh. This unit is dominated by volcanoclastic sequences rich in mafic material with subordinate interbedding of metasediments, characterized by very fresh lawsonite blueschist-facies assemblages. In this paper, the lawsonite blueschist-facies metasediments have been petrologically investigated with the aims of (i) constraining the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange, (ii) evaluating the influence of Fe2O3 and of H2O on the stability of the high-pressure mineral assemblages, (iii) understanding the processes controlling lawsonite formation and preservation, and (iv) interpreting the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol blueschists in the framework of India-Asia collision. Our results indicate that (i) the Sapi-Shergol blueschists experienced a cold subduction history along a low thermal gradient, up to peak conditions of ca. 470 °C, 19 kbar; furthermore, in order to preserve lawsonite in the studied lithologies, exhumation must have been coupled with significant cooling, i.e. the resulting P-T path is characterized by a clockwise hairpin loop along low thermal gradients (< 8-9 °C/km); (ii) the presence of ferric

  2. The Imbert Formation of northern Hispaniola: a tectono-sedimentary record of arc-continent collision and ophiolite emplacement in the northern Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Suárez-Rodríguez, A.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2015-06-01

    In northern Hispaniola, the Imbert Formation (Fm) has been interpreted as an orogenic "mélange" originally deposited as trench-fill sediments, an accretionary (subduction) complex formed above a SW-dipping subduction zone, or the sedimentary result of the early oblique collision of the Caribbean plate with the Bahama Platform in the middle Eocene. However, new stratigraphical, structural, geochemical and geochronological data from northern Hispaniola indicate that the Imbert Fm constitutes a coarsening-upward stratigraphic sequence that records the transition of the sedimentation from a pre-collisional forearc to a syn-collisional piggy-back basin. This piggy-back basin was transported on top of the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex slab and structurally underlying accreted units of the Rio San Juan complex, as it was emplaced onto the North America continental margin units. The Imbert Fm unconformably overlies different structural levels of the Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism, including a supra-subduction zone ophiolite, and consists of three laterally discontinuous units that record the exhumation of the underlying basement. The distal turbiditic lower unit includes the latest volcanic activity of the Caribbean island arc; the more proximal turbiditic intermediate unit is moderately affected by syn-sedimentary faulting; and the upper unit is a (caotic) olistostromic unit, composed of serpentinite-rich polymictic breccias, conglomerates and sandstones, strongly deformed by syn-sedimentary faulting, slumping and sliding processes. The Imbert Fm is followed by subsidence and turbiditic deposition of the overlying El Mamey Group. The 40Ar / 39Ar plagioclase plateau ages obtained in gabbroic rocks from the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex indicate its exhumation at ∼ 45-40 Ma (lower-to-middle Eocene), contemporaneously to the sedimentation of the overlying Imbert Fm. These cooling ages imply the uplift to the surface and submarine erosion of the complex to

  3. The Imbert Formation of northern Hispaniola: a tectono-sedimentary record of arc-continent collision and ophiolite emplacement in the northern Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Suárez-Rodríguez, Á.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2016-01-01

    In northern Hispaniola, the Imbert Formation (Fm) has been interpreted as an orogenic "mélange" originally deposited as trench-fill sediments, an accretionary (subduction) complex formed above a SW-dipping subduction zone, or the sedimentary result of the early oblique collision of the Caribbean plate with the Bahama Platform in the middle Eocene. However, new stratigraphical, structural, geochemical and geochronological data from northern Hispaniola indicate that the Imbert Fm constitutes a coarsening-upward stratigraphic sequence that records the transition of the sedimentation from a pre-collisional forearc to a syn-collisional basin. This basin was transported on top of the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex slab and structurally underlying accreted units of the Rio San Juan complex, as it was emplaced onto the North America continental margin units.

    The Imbert Fm unconformably overlies different structural levels of the Caribbean subduction-accretionary prism, including a supra-subduction zone ophiolite, and consists of three laterally discontinuous units that record the exhumation of the underlying basement. The distal turbiditic lower unit includes the latest volcanic activity of the Caribbean island arc; the more proximal turbiditic intermediate unit is moderately affected by syn-sedimentary faulting; and the upper unit is a (chaotic) olistostromic unit, composed of serpentinite-rich polymictic breccias, conglomerates and sandstones, strongly deformed by syn-sedimentary faulting, slumping and sliding processes. The Imbert Fm is followed by subsidence and turbiditic deposition of the overlying El Mamey Group.

    The 40Ar / 39Ar plagioclase plateau ages obtained in gabbroic rocks from the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex indicate its exhumation at ˜ 45-40 Ma (lower-to-middle Eocene), contemporaneously to the sedimentation of the overlying Imbert Fm. These cooling ages imply the uplift to the surface and submarine erosion of the complex to

  4. Constraints on the age and provenance of the Chugach accretionary complex from detrital zircons in the Sitka Graywacke near Sitka, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Gehrels, George E.; Karl, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    The Sitka Graywacke is the westernmost and youngest unit of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeastern Alaska. Using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, we obtained 492 detrital-zircon ages on seven typical samples of Sitka Graywacke turbidites, which were collected in a transect across much of the unit near Sitka, Alaska. Individual grains range in age from 66 to 1,802 m.y. The youngest peak ages on relative-probability plots of the western four samples (74, 72, 74, and 74 m.y., from west to east) are distinctly younger than the youngest peak ages of the eastern three samples (105, 103, and 97 m.y., from west to east). These youngest peak ages set maximum depositional ages for each sample. We suggest that these peak ages are not significantly older (within ~5 m.y.) than the depositional age of the Sitka Graywacke because the deposits accumulated in a trench along a convergent margin, where magmatic sources likely continuously introduced juvenile zircons. The differences in the youngest cluster of detrital-zircon ages between the eastern and western sample localities is likely due to both a change in provenance and a fault. The similarity of the youngest peak ages in the Sitka Graywacke to fossil ages in the Valdez Group, in Prince William Sound, implies that the western part of the Sitka Graywacke is correlative with the Valdez Group, as previously inferred. However, the eastern part of the Sitka Graywacke has youngest detrital-zircon ages older than fossil ages in the Valdez Group and younger than fossil ages in the McHugh Complex, which in south-central Alaska is the oldest part of the accretionary complex. The age distribution of zircons in the older, eastern sequence suggests sources along the British Columbia margin. The detrital-zircon ages in the younger, western sequence are similar to igneous ages from south-central Alaska to southern British Columbia. Right-lateral strike slip on various fault systems inboard of the Sitka

  5. Characterizing the Inner Accretionary Prism of the Nankai Trough with 3D Seismic and Logging While Drilling at IODP Site C0002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, B.; Moore, G. F.; Jurado, M. J.; Sone, H.; Tobin, H. J.; Saffer, D. M.; Hirose, T.; Toczko, S.; Maeda, L.

    2014-12-01

    The deeper, inner parts of active accretionary prisms have been poorly studied due the lack of drilling data, low seismic image quality and typically thick overlying sediments. Our project focuses on the interior of the Nankai Trough inner accretionary prism using deep scientific drilling and a 3D seismic cube. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348 extended the existing riser hole to more than 3000 meters below seafloor (mbsf) at Site C0002. Logging while drilling (LWD) data included gamma ray, resistivity, resistivity image, and sonic logs. LWD analysis of the lower section revealed on the borehole images intense deformation characterized by steep bedding, faults and fractures. Bedding plane orientations were measured throughout, with minor gaps at heavily deformed zones disrupting the quality of the resistivity images. Bedding trends are predominantly steeply dipping (60-90°) to the NW. Interpretation of fractures and faults in the image log revealed the existence of different sets of fractures and faults and variable fracture density, remarkably high at fault zones. Gamma ray, resistivity and sonic logs indicated generally homogenous lithology interpretation along this section, consistent with the "silty-claystone" predominant lithologies described on cutting samples. Drops in sonic velocity were observed at the fault zones defined on borehole images. Seismic reflection interpretation of the deep faults in the inner prism is exceedingly difficult due to a strong seafloor multiple, high-angle bedding dips, and low frequency of the data. Structural reconstructions were employed to test whether folding of seismic horizons in the overlying forearc basin could be from an interpreted paleothrust within the inner prism. We used a trishear-based restoration to estimate fault slip on folded horizons landward of C0002. We estimate ~500 m of slip from a steeply dipping deep thrust within the last ~0.9 Ma. Folding is not found in the Kumano sediments

  6. Ediacaran-Devonian opening and closing of the complex Iapetus Ocean and the formation of an accretionary orogen in the northern Appalachians and British Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Staal, Cees; Zagorevski, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    Prior to the formation of Pangea, the Northern Appalachians-British Caledonides accretionary orogen formed over ca. 150 my by piecemeal accretion of outboard terranes to a progressively growing composite Laurentian margin. The accreted material originated either in seaways and marginal basins in the peri-Gondwanan or peri-Laurentian realms and comprises micro-continental ribbons with arc supra-structure and, to a lesser extent, supra-subduction zone oceanic slivers. The preponderance of micro-continental ribbons in Iapetus necessitates detailed knowledge of the opening history in order to understand the closure. The final opening of Iapetus took place between 550 and 540 Ma following a ca. 70 my period of rifting and formation of extensive hyper-extended, non volcanic segments with adjacent seaways partially underlain by exhumed lithospheric mantle along the Laurentian margin. The conjugate margin to Laurentia likely was represented by Arequipa-Antofalla, which was left behind when Amazonia departed earlier during the Ediacaran. Subduction in Iapetus initiated at ca. 515 Ma at opposite margins, probably as a result of a major plate reorganization following the terminal amalgamation of Gondwana. Shortly thereafter Ganderia and Avalonia diachronously rifted-off Gondwana and drifted towards Laurentia, opening the Rheic Ocean in their wake. Meguma could have travelled with Avalonia or as a separate microcontinent. Closure of the main tract of the Iapetus Ocean took place during the Late Ordovician following arc-arc collision. Iapetus' main closure did not lead to widespread orogenesis; most collisional damage took place as a result of arrival of continental ribbons at the composite Laurentian margin following closure of narrow oceanic, Iapetus-related seaways or marginal basins The resultant deformation is grouped into Cambro-Ordovician Taconic-Grampian, Silurian Salinic-Scandian and Devonian Acadian orogenies; however, these orogenies are all composite and involve

  7. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  8. Paleozoic subduction erosion involving accretionary wedge sediments in the South Tianshan Orogen: Evidence from geochronological and geochemical studies on eclogites and their host metasediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Su, Wen; Gao, Jun; Li, Jilei; Jiang, Tuo; Zhang, Xi; Ge, Xiaomei

    2014-12-01

    Geochronological and geochemical data regarding eclogites and their metasedimentary host rocks exposed in two localities of the South Tianshan (U)HP-LT metamorphic belt are presented to reveal the protolith of the eclogites and the provenance of the metasediments. The rim domains of zircon grains from the eclogites contain omphacite, phengite and rutile inclusions and give a U-Pb Concordia age of 321.4 ± 2.4 Ma, representing the peak of eclogite-facies metamorphism. The core domains of zircon grains with magmatic oscillatory zoning yield a U-Pb Concordia age of 453.9 ± 9.4 Ma, suggesting a Late Ordovician age for the eclogites' protolith. Furthermore, the inherited cores of some zircon grains have apparent U-Pb ages between 609 Ma and 2305 Ma, implying the involvement of the Precambrian basement in the formation of the eclogites' protolith. The depletion of high field strength elements and the trace element ratios indicate the eclogite protolith's continental arc affinity. The zircon U-Pb age data of the high-pressure micaschists yield seven age groups ranging from 401 Ma to 3201 Ma and cluster at a pronounced peak of ~ 445 Ma. The major and trace element compositions of the micaschists overlap those of the average upper continental crust. The protolith of the micaschist seems to have formed at an accretionary wedge, which is predominantly composed of sediments derived from Ordovician-Silurian arc-type magmatic rocks and Precambrian basement rocks in an active continental margin. The basic blocks represented by the protolith of the eclogites were most likely scraped from the basement of a continental arc by basal erosion during the subduction of the South Tianshan Ocean in Late Paleozoic. At the same time, the fragments composing the micaschists' protolith are believed to have been dragged into the subduction channel by the frontal erosion of the accretionary prism. Both the basic blocks and the sediment fragments were forced into the subduction channel, mingled

  9. Deformation of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops: Insights from multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution reflection and wide-angle seismics and analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellong, David; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Graindorge, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Moretti, Milena; Marsset, Bruno; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Dominguez, Stephane; Malavieille, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired swath bathymetric data in the Ionian Sea document in unprecedented detail the morphostructure and dynamics of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. A boundary zone between the eastern and western lobes of the accretionary wedge is examined here. Relative displacement between the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops is expected to cause dextral strike-slip deformation between the lobes. A wide-angle seismic profile was acquired in Oct. 2014 with the R/V Meteor (DIONYSUS survey) recorded by 25 Ocean-bottom seismometers (Geomar and Ifremer instruments) and 3 land-stations (INGV stations). Inversion and forward modeling of these seismic data reveal a 5-10 km deep asymmetric rift zone between the Malta Escarpment and the SW tip of Calabria. Analog modeling was performed to test if the origin of this rift could be related to the relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops. Modeling, using two independently moving backstops, produces a zone of dextral transtension and subsidence in the accretionary wedge between two lobes. This corresponds well to the asymmetric rift observed in the southward prolongation of the straits of Messina faults. Paradoxically however, this dextral displacement does not appear to traverse the external Calabrian accretionary wedge, where prominent curved lineaments observed indicate a sinistral sense of motion. One possible explanation is that the dextral kinematic motion is transferred into a region of crisscrossing faults in the internal portion of the Eastern lobe. The bathymetry and high-resolution reflection seismic images indicate ongoing compression at the deformation front of both the western and eastern lobes. Together with the analog modeling results, these observations unambiguously demonstrate that the western lobe remains tectonically active.

  10. Origin of cosmic chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Umberto; Tescari, Edoardo

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, D, D+, H2, H_2^+, HD, HeH+), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman α absorbers at redshift z ≳ 2. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below ˜ 104 K, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/H] at redshifts z ˜ 2-7. Correlations between H I and H2 abundances show temporal and local variations and large spreads as a result of the increasing cosmic star formation activity from z ˜ 6 to 3. The scatter we find in the abundance ratios is compatible with the observational data and is explained by simultaneous enrichment by sources from different stellar phases or belonging to different stellar populations. Simulated synthetic spectra support the existence of metal-poor cold clumps with large optical depth at z ˜ 6 that could be potential Population III sites at low or intermediate redshift. The expected dust content is in line with recent determinations.

  11. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  12. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  13. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  14. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  15. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  16. In situ stress magnitude and rock strength in the Nankai accretionary complex: a novel approach using paired constraints from downhole data in two wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Dugan, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to simultaneously constrain both far-field horizontal stress magnitudes ( S hmin and S Hmax) and in situ rock unconfined compressive strength (UCS), using geophysical logging data from two boreholes located 70 m apart that access the uppermost accretionary prism of the Nankai subduction zone . The boreholes sample the same sediments and are affected by the same tectonic stress field, but were drilled with different annular pressures, thus providing a unique opportunity to refine estimates of both in situ stress magnitudes and rock strength. We develop a forward model to predict the angular width of compressional wellbore failures (borehole breakouts), and identify combinations of S Hmax and UCS that best match breakout widths observed in resistivity images from the two boreholes. The method requires knowledge of S hmin, which is defined by leak-off tests conducted during drilling. Our results define a normal to strike-slip stress regime from 900 to 1386 m below seafloor, consistent with observations from seismic and core data. Our analysis also suggests that in situ values of UCS are generally slightly lower that commonly assumed on the basis of published empirical relations between UCS and P-wave velocity.

  17. Landward vergent thrust faults in marine accretionary prisms off Cascadia, Sumatra, and Southern Chile: Where do they occur and what may control them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, J.; Wilson, D. J.; Cook, B.; McNeill, L. C.; Henstock, T.; Polonia, A.; Klaeschen, D.; Gaedicke, C.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades seismic investigations have identified a number of places where landward vergent thrust faults occur in active accretionary prisms. These unusual deformation structures, that differ from the common fold-and-thrust belt model in the dip direction of the thrust sheets, have been found at the Cascadia, Sumatra and Southern Chile margins. Parameters that have been suggested to control their formation include strength, position and dip of the décollement, pore-fluid pressure, heat-flow, formation and dip direction of a backstop, strength of the wedge, and subduction of topographic features. However, the ultimate causes for their development are not adequately understood. To test the impact of the above mentioned parameters and to further shed light on the question of what drives these fault structures we investigate reflection seismic and bathymetric data from Cascadia, Sumatra, and Southern Chile. We map the detailed spatial distribution of landward vergence and investigate along and across-strike variations in fault structure, spacing, and fault initiation and development along the three margins. We further compile a synthesis of input parameters (e.g. pre-subduction deformation of the oceanic plate, convergence rate and direction, subducting plate dip, sediment thickness and composition, position of the décollement, oceanic plate roughness) for all regions that host landward vergent faults. This provides the base to identify key parameters that control the development of such fault structures on a local and potentially global scale.

  18. Proceedings of the 2nd Columbia River Basalt Symposium: Maar volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, A. C.; Fisher, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of maar-type volcanic cones, including tuff rings, from more than 40 localities in western North America indicates that water had access to volcano orifices during their activity. The most convincing evidence is the abundance of sideromelane (chilled basaltic glass) or its palagonitic decomposition products in the ejecta. Moreover, the volcanoes which were examined erupted in basins that either contained surface water, or else they grew above highly permeable aquifers at shallow dept. Characteristic features of maar ejecta are continuous thin beds, undulations and antidunes characteristic of base surge stratification, abundant accretionary lapilli or mud-armored rock particles, bedding sags that show soft sediment deformation, and in the subaqueous parts of the maar ramparts, great piles of subtly graded thin lenses of hyaloclastic debris.

  19. Controls on accretion of flysch and mélange belts at convergent margins: Evidence from the Chugach Bay thrust and Iceworm mélange, Chugach accretionary wedge, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Karl, Sue

    1997-12-01

    Controls on accretion of flysch and mélange terranes at convergent margins are poorly understood. Southern Alaska's Chugach terrane forms the outboard accretionary margin of the Wrangellia composite terrane, and consists of two major lithotectonic units, including Triassic-Cretaceous mélange of the McHugh Complex and Late Cretaceous flysch of the Valdez Group. The contact between the McHugh Complex and the Valdez Group on the Kenai Peninsula is a tectonic boundary between chaotically deformed melange of argillite, chert, greenstone, and graywacke of the McHugh Complex and a less chaotically deformed mélange of argillite and graywacke of the Valdez Group. We assign the latter to a new, informal unit of formational rank, the Iceworm mélange, and interpret it as a contractional fault zone (Chugach Bay thrust) along which the Valdez Group was emplaced beneath the McHugh Complex. The McHugh Complex had already been deformed and metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite facies prior to formation of the Iceworm mélange. The Chugach Bay thrust formed between 75 and 55 Ma, as shown by Campanian-Maastrichtian depositional ages of the Valdez Group, and fault-related fabrics in the Iceworm mélange that are cut by Paleocene dikes. Motion along the Chugach Bay thrust thus followed Middle to Late Cretaceous collision (circa 90-100 Ma) of the Wrangellia composite terrane with North America. Collision related uplift and erosion of mountains in British Columbia formed a submarine fan on the Farallon plate, and we suggest that attempted subduction of this fan dramatically changed the subduction/accretion style within the Chugach accretionary wedge. We propose a model in which subduction of thinly sedimented plates concentrates shear strains in a narrow zone, generating mélanges like the McHugh in accretionary complexes. Subduction of thickly sedimented plates allows wider distribution of shear strains to accommodate plate convergence, generating a more coherent accretionary style

  20. Abundance patterns in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard B. C.

    1990-06-01

    Abundances of He, N, O, and Ne have been uniformly calculated for 192 planetary nebulas residing in the Galactic disk and halo, the LMC, the SMC, and M31. Direct correlations appear to exist for type I as well as non-type I objects for the following pairs of parameters: N/O-He/H, N/O-N/H, and Ne/H-O/H. Separately, type I planetaries show a weak anticorrelation between N/O and O/H, while non-type I's exhibit direct correlations between N/H and O/H and between N/O and O/H. From these patterns, it is inferred that non-type I's synthesize N via the CN cycle. Type I planetaries, on the other hand, manufacture N at least partially via the ON cycle, destroying O in the process. Neither type appears to synthesize O or Ne.

  1. Reinterpretation of Paleoproterozoic accretionary boundaries of the north-central United States based on a new aeromagnetic-geologic compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, D.K.; Anderson, R.; Boerboom, Terrence; Cannon, W.F.; Chandler, V.; Jirsa, M.; Miller, J.; Schneider, D.A.; Schulz, K.J.; Van Schmus, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Paleoproterozoic crust in the north-central U.S. represents intact juvenile terranes accreted to the rifted Archean Superior craton. A new tectonic province map, based on the interpretation of a new aeromagnetic compilation, published geologic maps, and recent geochronologic data, shows progressive accretion of juvenile arc terranes from ca. 1900-1600 Ma. Contrary to earlier models, geon 18 Penokean-interval crust is primarily confined to a ???2100 Ma tectonic embayment of the rifted Superior craton. The newly defined Spirit Lake tectonic zone, characterized by a sharp magnetic discontinuity that marks the southern limit of Archean and Penokean-interval rocks, is here interpreted to represent an eastern analog of the Cheyenne belt suture zone in southern Wyoming. South of this boundary, geon 17 Yavapai-interval rocks form the basement upon which 1750 Ma rhyolite and succeeding quartzite sequences were deposited. Substantial portions of the Penokean and Yavapai terranes were subsequently deformed during the 1650-1630 Ma Mazatzal orogeny. The northern boundary of the Mazatzal terrane is obscured by abundant 1470-1430 Ma "anorogenic" plutons that stitched the suture with the older Yavapai terrane rocks. These data reveal a progressive tectonic younging to the south as the Laurentian craton grew southward and stabilized during the Proterozoic. Late Mesoproterozoic rift magmatism produced pronounced geophysical anomalies, indicating strong, but localized crustal modification. In comparison to the western U.S., little tectonism has occurred here in the last 1 billion years, providing a uniquely preserved record of the Precambrian evolution of the continental U.S. lithosphere. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  3. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  4. Tomographic images of subducted oceans matched to the accretionary records of orogens - Case study of North America and relevance to Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin; Mihalynuk, Mitchell G.; Hosseini, Kasra

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary orogens are the surface record of subduction on the 100-million-year timescale; they aggregate buoyant crustal welts that resisted subduction. The other record of subduction is found in the deep subsurface: oceanic lithosphere preserved in the mantle that records ocean basin closure between successive generations of arcs. Seismic tomography maps out these crumpled paleo-oceans down to the core-mantle boundary, where slab accumulates. One such accumulation of enormous scale is under Eastern Asia, recording the assembly of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Deep CAOB slab has hardly been explored because tomographic image resolution in the lowermost mantle is limited, but this is rapidly improving. We present new images of the CAOB slabs from our P-wave tomography that includes core-diffracted waves as a technical novelty. The previous slab blur sharpens into the type of elongated geometries expected to trace paleo-trench lines. Since the North American Cordillera is younger than the CAOB (mostly <200 m.y. versus ~650-250 m.y.), its slabs have descended only to mid-mantle depths (<2000 km), where tomographic resolution is much better. Hence we can make a detailed, spatiotemporal match between 3-D slab geometries and the accretion history of the Cordillera - a blueprint for continental-scale investigations in other accretionary orogens, including what may become possible for the CAOB. Lower-mantle slabs beneath North America reveal evolving configurations of arc-trench positions back to the breakup of Pangea. These can be combined with quantitative plate reconstructions to show where and when the westward-drifting continent overrode pre-existing, intra-oceanic subduction zones, and accreted their associated arcs and basement terranes in Jurassic and Cretaceous times. Tectonic predictions from this "tomographic time machine" can be checked against the geological record. To demonstrate, we propose a resolution to the longstanding debate of how and when

  5. Accretionary wedge harzburgite serpentinization and rodingitization constrained by perovskite U/Pb SIMS age, trace elements and Sm/Nd isotopes: Case study from the Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Hua; Putiš, Marián; Yang, Yue-Heng; Koppa, Matúš; Dyda, Marian

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite-bearing harzburgites occur in a “mélange” type blueschist-bearing accretionary wedge complex of the Inner Western Carpathians Meliata Unit in Slovakia. Although dark rounded, slightly hydrated relic “cores” of harzburgite boulders are perovskite-free, perovskite (Prv) occurrence in the surrounding serpentinites and rodingites enabled dating of hydration, resulting in two metamorphic-metasomatic Prv generations. Perovskite (1) grows parallel to relic clinopyroxene exsolution lamellae or forms randomly oriented grain clusters in serpentinized orthopyroxene (Opx1) porphyroclasts, often accompanied by tiny andradite lamellae clusters, or it is partly replaced by Ti-andradite. Perovskite crystallization indicates evolving rodingitization fluids pervading the boundary between the harzburgite “cores” and Prv-free serpentinite. This strictly limited occurrence of Prv (1) within a 1 to 20-cm across-zone implies slightly postponed Prv crystallization to serpentinization by LREE(Ce,La), Ca2+, Ti/Fe3+-enriched aqueous fluids. A grain scale metasomatic mechanism partitioned Ca and Ti from the host orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, spinel (Ti) and grain-boundary pervasive fluids to Prv. In contrast, Prv (2) occurs in a 1 to 3 cm across chlorite-rich blackwall zone between hosting serpentinite and rodingite veins, thus indicating channelled rodingitization fluid flow and accompanying hydraulic fracturing. Here, Prv (2) is ingrown by chlorite and apatite. Part of this Prv (2) formed in a rodingite vein mineral assemblage composed of diopside, andradite, vesuvianite, epidote/zoisite, apatite and chlorite. Both perovskite 1 and 2 are replaced by pyrophanite along the grain rims and interiors; most likely via fluid-aided coupled dissolution-reprecipitation at increased Si-Fe-Mn-Al element solubility in rodingitization fluids pervading serpentinized harzburgite. Both Prv generations, especially Prv (2), can be partly to almost totally replaced by (Ti-) Adr

  6. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  7. A geochemical constraint on the formation process of a manganese carbonate nodule in the siliceous mudstone of the Jurassic accretionary complex in the Mino Belt, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Shirai, Taka'aki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) carbonate nodules, which differ from seafloor Mn nodules mainly composed of MnO2, are occasionally embedded in the form of a lens shape in the Jurassic accretionary complexes, such as the Mino Belt in Japan. The interpretation of the formation process of Mn carbonate is still controversial, particularly concerning whether the Mn carbonate was formed primarily or secondarily. In this study, a fresh Mn carbonate nodule incorporated into the red siliceous mudstone was collected for geochemical and sedimentological analysis. The optical observation of thin sections indicates that the Mn carbonate nodules are composed of abraded grains of rhodochrosite spherule with radiolarians and are sedimentary embedded in siliceous mudstone. Microfossil radiolarians from the Mn carbonate nodules and the host red siliceous mudstone are dated as the Bajocian, but the radiolarians in the nodules are somewhat older than those in the host red siliceous mudstone. Geochemical analysis using the X-ray absorption near-edge structure on Ce indicates the dominance of trivalent Ce at present, despite the observation of a positive Ce anomaly in the PAAS-normalized REE pattern of Mn carbonate. The REE adsorption experiment on synthesized MnCO3 does not show any distinctive positive Ce anomaly, and a thermodynamic calculation suggests the possible coexistence of rhodochrosite and spontaneous oxidation of Ce. A leaching experiment that can selectively decompose the carbonate phase demonstrated no Ce anomaly in the carbonate phase of the Mn carbonate and a poor contribution to the bulk REE concentration. The carbon isotope data of Mn carbonate nodule implied the dominance of inorganic marine carbonate origin with small contribution of organic decomposition. The most plausible account of all of the observational and geochemical results is that the rhodochrosite grains were primarily formed on the depositional site and subsequently transferred to a different site, where siliceous

  8. Redox condition of the late Neoproterozoic pelagic deep ocean: 57Fe Mössbauer analyses of pelagic mudstones in the Ediacaran accretionary complex, Wales, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomohiko; Sawaki, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hisashi; Fujisaki, Wataru; Okada, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Shigenori; Isozaki, Yukio; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Windley, Brian F.

    2015-11-01

    We report geological and geochemical analysis of Neoproterozoic pelagic deep-sea mudstones in an accretionary complex in Lleyn, Wales, UK. Ocean plate stratigraphy at Porth Felen, NW Lleyn, consists of mid-ocean ridge basalt (> 4 m), bedded dolostone (2 m), black mudstone (5 m), hemipelagic siliceous mudstone (1 m,) and turbiditic sandstone (15 m), in ascending order. The absence of terrigenous clastics confirms that the black and siliceous mudstone was deposited in a pelagic deep-sea. Based on the youngest U-Pb age (564 Ma) of detrital zircons separated from overlying sandstone, the deep-sea black mudstone was deposited in the late Ediacaran. The 5 m-thick black mudstone contains the following distinctive lithologies: (i) black mudstone with thin pyritic layers (0.8 m), (ii) alternation of black mudstone and gray/dark gray siliceous mudstone (2.4 m), (iii) thinly-laminated dark gray shale (1 m), and (iv) black mudstone with thin pyritic layers (1 m). 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy confirms that these black mudstones contain pyrite without hematite. In contrast, red bedded claystones (no younger than 542 Ma) in the neighboring Braich section contain hematite as their main iron mineral. These deep-sea mudstones in the Lleyn Peninsula record a change of redox condition on the pelagic deep-sea floor during the Ediacaran. The black mudstone at Porth Felen shows that deep-sea anoxia existed in the late Ediacaran. The eventual change from a reducing to an oxidizing deep-sea environment likely occurred in the late Ediacaran (ca. 564-542 Ma).

  9. Geochronological and Geochemical evidence of amphibolite from the Hualong Group, northwest China: Implication for the early Paleozoic accretionary tectonics of the Central Qilian belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Zongqi; Yan, Zhen; Ma, Zhenhui; He, Shengfei; Fu, Changlei; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The Hualong Group, located in the Central Qilian belt, northwest China, consists mainly of schist, amphibolite, quartzite, and marble, ranging from greenschist to amphibolite facies metamorphism. On the basis of the medium-grade metamorphism, the group has been considered to comprise Proterozoic basement rocks. In this study, geochemical, Sr-Nd isotopic, and zircon U-Pb geochronological analyses were performed on lentoid amphibolites from the Hualong Group, to characterize their age, petrogensis, and tectonic setting. Uranium-lead zircon dating of amphibolite revealed a formation age of 456 ± 2 Ma and a metamorphic age of 440 ± 1 Ma. Major, trace, and rare earth element data indicate that the amphibolites are predominantly basaltic-andesitic to andesitic rocks, with island arc affinities. The trace element patterns show enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and depletion in high field strength elements relative to the N-MORB which confirm their island arc signatures. Obviously enriched light REEs ((La/Yb)N = 2.5-16.9) to chondrite normalized REE patterns further support this interpretation. The εNd(t) values for the amphibolites range from 4.6 to + 2.1, indicating subducted sediments as a larger endmember in the source. Geochemical data for these rocks suggest an island arc setting, and the rocks were derived from the depleted mantle that was enriched by melts of subducted sediments in an active continental margin setting at ca. 456 Ma. Together with regional evidence it suggests that the Hualong Group is an accretionary complex that was incorporated into the Central Qilian belt during the 440-400 Ma orogenic event.

  10. Partition between collision and subduction accretionary prisms along an inherited transcurrent fault zone: New insights on the Taiwan fold and thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusset, StéPhane; Souquet, Pierre; DéRamond, Joachim; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Deffontaines, Benoã®T.; Chu, Hao-Tsu

    1999-06-01

    A new geotectonic framework of the Taiwan orogen is presented in accordance with the hypothesis of an oblique arc-arc collision. The colliding Luzon arc is physically connected to the eastern Coastal Range in which a subduction complex remnant is preserved and backthrust with intra-arc sediments in a small retroforeland basin. A southern and extinct extension of the Ryukyu arc is characterized in western Taiwan. It displays a duplex structure (Tananao and Backbone horses and Lishan triangle zone) between a buried floor thrust located in the arc crust and a roof thrust developed in the arc cover (Hsüehshan Range and South Backbone Range). Westward the basal thrust climbs in the sedimentary series of the western proforeland (Foothills and Hengchun Peninsula) and dies out hi a buried tip line. The northern part of the orogen, including all the Tananao arc core, is shown as an intra-oceanic-continental arc-arc collision belt characterized by an unroofed duplex culmination above a leading floor thrust and both proforeland and retroforeland basins. The southern part, which displays a roof thrust sequence above a buried duplex, is shown as an accretionary prism built in a transition zone between continent and oceanic subduction (transition from the Asian continental crust, including the former Ryukyu arc, to the oceanic Old Philippine Sea crust). The partition is believed to be induced by a deep intracontinental transcurrent fault zone able to influence the difference in shortening, duplex pattern, and leading thrust depth. The evolution was controlled by the Ryukyu subduction (backarc extension, arc magmatism extinction, and cooling and intra-arc collapse) until the early middle Miocene (around 15 Ma) and then it was controlled by the Luzon arc progression (continental subduction, collision, indentation, and hinterland uplift and frontal thrust propagation).

  11. Major and trace-element composition and pressure-temperature evolution of rock-buffered fluids in low-grade accretionary-wedge metasediments, Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, George D.; Wagner, Thomas; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-05-01

    The chemical composition of fluid inclusions in quartz crystals from Alpine fissure veins was determined by combination of microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, and LA-ICPMS analysis. The veins are hosted in carbonate-bearing, organic-rich, low-grade metamorphic metapelites of the Bündnerschiefer of the eastern Central Alps (Switzerland). This strongly deformed tectonic unit is interpreted as a partly subducted accretionary wedge, on the basis of widespread carpholite assemblages that were later overprinted by lower greenschist facies metamorphism. Veins and their host rocks from two locations were studied to compare several indicators for the conditions during metamorphism, including illite crystallinity, graphite thermometry, stability of mineral assemblages, chlorite thermometry, fluid inclusion solute thermometry, and fluid inclusion isochores. Fluid inclusions are aqueous two-phase with 3.7-4.0 wt% equivalent NaCl at Thusis and 1.6-1.7 wt% at Schiers. Reproducible concentrations of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, Cl, Br, and S could be determined for 97 fluid inclusion assemblages. Fluid and mineral geothermometry consistently indicate temperatures of 320 ± 20 °C for the host rocks at Thusis and of 250 ± 30 °C at Schiers. Combining fluid inclusion isochores with independent geothermometers results in pressure estimates of 2.8-3.8 kbar for Thusis, and of 3.3-3.4 kbar for Schiers. Pressure-temperature estimates are confirmed by pseudosection modeling. Fluid compositions and petrological modeling consistently demonstrate that chemical fluid-rock equilibrium was attained during vein formation, indicating that the fluids originated locally by metamorphic dehydration during near-isothermal decompression in a rock-buffered system.

  12. A non-primitive origin of near-chondritic S-Se-Te ratios in mantle peridotites; implications for the Earthʼs late accretionary history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Stephan; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Luguet, Ambre; Graham Pearson, D.

    2014-01-01

    The chalcophile and highly siderophile elements Se and Te, like the other Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE) in the terrestrial mantle, may constitute powerful key tracers for meteoritic materials that hit the Earth in its latest accretionary stages (“Late Veneer”). Here the Se and Te systematics of mantle-derived peridotites (orogenic peridotites, ophiolites, cratonic peridotite xenoliths) are assessed. Combined with published in-situ analyses of HSE host minerals, whole-rock data are modelled with respect to current petrogenetic models that affect mantle composition, for example partial melting and magmatic refertilisation. We demonstrate that the near-chondritic Se/Te signature (SeN/TeN≈9±4; N = CI-chondrite normalised) of “fertile” ophiolitic and orogenic lherzolites cannot be a primitive signature of the Earth's mantle. This signature can however be explained by simple refertilisation models. The HSE-Se-Te budget of these fertile rocks can be modelled by mixing various proportions of a residual assemblage of Fe-Ni monosulphide solid solutions (Mss) and/or refractory platinum group minerals (PGMs - Ru-Os-Ir sulphides + Pt-Ir-Os alloys) with a metasomatic assemblage comprising low-temperature Pt-Pd-Te phases and Cu-Ni-rich sulphides. On the other hand, the reported Se and Te ratios in fertile peridotites are not consistent with melt depletion alone. Additions of late-stage metasomatic S-Se-Te-HSE-rich phases render Primitive Upper Mantle (PUM) estimates for Se and Te highly debatable, especially without appropriate consideration of refertilisation and metasomatism. Our results indicate that there is currently no firm evidence for chondritic S-Se-Te signatures in the Primitive Upper Mantle. This conclusion challenges the simplistic perception that near-chondritic Se/Te ratios may readily trace the Late Veneer composition.

  13. The effect of diagenesis and fluid migration on rare earth element distribution in pore fluids of the northern Cascadia accretionary margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Torres, Marta E.; Haley, Brian A.; Kastner, Miriam; Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Lee, Young-Joo

    2012-01-01

    Analytical challenges in obtaining high quality measurements of rare earth elements (REEs) from small pore fluid volumes have limited the application of REEs as deep fluid geochemical tracers. Using a recently developed analytical technique, we analyzed REEs from pore fluids collected from Sites U1325 and U1329, drilled on the northern Cascadia margin during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311, to investigate the REE behavior during diagenesis and their utility as tracers of deep fluid migration. These sites were selected because they represent contrasting settings on an accretionary margin: a ponded basin at the toe of the margin, and the landward Tofino Basin near the shelf's edge. REE concentrations of pore fluid in the methanogenic zone at Sites U1325 and U1329 correlate positively with concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and alkalinity. Fractionations across the REE series are driven by preferential complexation of the heavy REEs. Simultaneous enrichment of diagenetic indicators (DOC and alkalinity) and of REEs (in particular the heavy elements Ho to Lu), suggests that the heavy REEs are released during particulate organic carbon (POC) degradation and are subsequently chelated by DOC. REE concentrations are greater at Site U1325, a site where shorter residence times of POC in sulfate-bearing redox zones may enhance REE burial efficiency within sulfidic and methanogenic sediment zones where REE release ensues. Cross-plots of La concentrations versus Cl, Li and Sr delineate a distinct field for the deep fluids (z > 75 mbsf) at Site U1329, and indicate the presence of a fluid not observed at the other sites drilled on the Cascadia margin. Changes in REE patterns, the presence of a positive Eu anomaly, and other available geochemical data for this site suggest a complex hydrology and possible interaction with the igneous Crescent Terrane, located east of the drilled transect.

  14. 'Snake River (SR)-type' volcanism at the Yellowstone hotspot track: Distinctive products from unusual, high-temperature silicic super-eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branney, M.J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Andrews, G.D.M.; Ellis, B.; Barry, T.L.; McCurry, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new category of large-scale volcanism, here termed Snake River (SR)-type volcanism, is defined with reference to a distinctive volcanic facies association displayed by Miocene rocks in the central Snake River Plain area of southern Idaho and northern Nevada, USA. The facies association contrasts with those typical of silicic volcanism elsewhere and records unusual, voluminous and particularly environmentally devastating styles of eruption that remain poorly understood. It includes: (1) large-volume, lithic-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites with scarce pumice lapilli; (2) extensive, parallel-laminated, medium to coarse-grained ashfall deposits with large cuspate shards, crystals and a paucity of pumice lapilli; many are fused to black vitrophyre; (3) unusually extensive, large-volume rhyolite lavas; (4) unusually intense welding, rheomorphism, and widespread development of lava-like facies in the ignimbrites; (5) extensive, fines-rich ash deposits with abundant ash aggregates (pellets and accretionary lapilli); (6) the ashfall layers and ignimbrites contain abundant clasts of dense obsidian and vitrophyre; (7) a bimodal association between the rhyolitic rocks and numerous, coalescing low-profile basalt lava shields; and (8) widespread evidence of emplacement in lacustrine-alluvial environments, as revealed by intercalated lake sediments, ignimbrite peperites, rhyolitic and basaltic hyaloclastites, basalt pillow-lava deltas, rhyolitic and basaltic phreatomagmatic tuffs, alluvial sands and palaeosols. Many rhyolitic eruptions were high mass-flux, large volume and explosive (VEI 6-8), and involved H2O-poor, low-??18O, metaluminous rhyolite magmas with unusually low viscosities, partly due to high magmatic temperatures (900-1,050??C). SR-type volcanism contrasts with silicic volcanism at many other volcanic fields, where the fall deposits are typically Plinian with pumice lapilli, the ignimbrites are low to medium grade (non-welded to eutaxitic) with abundant pumice lapilli

  15. A Middle Permian-Middle Triassic accretionary complex and a Late Triassic foredeep basin: Forerunners of an Indosinian (Late Triassic) thrust complex in the Thailand-Malaysia border area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridd, Michael F.

    2013-10-01

    The Semanggol Formation of NW Peninsular Malaysia is a Middle Permian-Late Triassic sequence of predominantly radiolarian chert, sandstone and mudstone (including turbidites), and conglomerate. The belt of country occupied by this unit extends into Thailand where various names including Na Thawi formation have been applied to its correlatives. Fossil evidence, particularly radiolarian, has established its age but also revealed that it is tectonically complex, with numerous out-of-sequence slices interpreted here to be caused by thrusting. The model proposed here involves, initially, in the Middle Permian, accumulation in the oceanward part of an accretionary complex as Palaeotethys began subducting beneath Indochina/East Malaya. This regime, it is proposed, continued until about the end of the Middle Triassic when Sibumasu collided with Indochina/East Malaya bringing an end to subduction. But as crustal shortening continued into the Late Triassic a foredeep basin formed in front of the now-inactive subduction zone and accretionary complex, and the youngest part of the Semanggol Formation was deposited. During this final stage the whole package of rocks comprising those in the accretionary complex and those deposited in the foredeep basin underwent lateral compression resulting in a thrust complex. The Semanggol Formation and its Thailand correlatives occupy part of a N-S belt of imbricately-thrust, deeper-water, sediments which include slope-deposited Carboniferous and Lower Permian beds. That belt is interpreted as a series of thrust slices juxtaposing rocks of different ages, referred to here as the Songkhla-Semanggol terrane. Its western boundary is a N-S line of inferred thrusting which coincides with a major westward facies change to platform carbonates of Middle Permian to Late Triassic age, called here the Rattaphum-Kodiang tectonic line.

  16. Influence of Stress History on Elastic and Frictional Properties of Core Material from IODP Expeditions 315 and 316, NanTroSEIZE Transect: Implications for the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.; Saffer, D. M.; Hashimoto, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present results of ultrasonic P and S-wave velocity measurements on core material recovered during NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 Expeditions 315 and 316 to the Nankai Trough Accretionary Margin, focusing on how different stress paths during subduction and exhumation along regional thrust faults influence the elastic moduli and anisotropy of various components of the accretionary prism. The influence of changes in pore pressure and confining pressure on the elastic properties of prism material has important implications for its mechanical strength, and understanding how elastic properties change along various stress paths will help us use 3D seismic tomography to draw inferences about overpressurization and fluid flow within the accretionary prism. We compare the velocities measured during shipboard physical properties characterization and logging-while-drilling data from Expedition 314 with 3D seismic velocity data and the results of previous shore-based studies to establish in situ conditions for material at various locations within the prism. We test both intact core material and disaggregated gouge and unlithified sediments from the upper prism, subjecting both samples types to a progression of confining pressure, pore pressure, and axial loading conditions representing normal consolidation and overconsolidation stress paths due to compaction and dewatering during burial and subsequent uplift by thrust faulting. While making continuous ultrasonic velocity measurements to determine changes in dynamic and quasistatic elastic moduli during axial and isotropic loading, we also subject granular material to frictional shear in a biaxial double-direct shearing configuration to measure how its frictional properties vary as a function of stress history.

  17. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  18. Abundance Gradients in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato De Alencar

    This dissertation presents the analysis of spatially resolved ASCA satellite X-ray spectra for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, Abell 2199, Abell 3571 and Abell 1060). The abundance distributions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571 are shown to be centrally enhanced. The distribution of elemental abundance ratios, combined with calculations of supernovae rates, shows that the central abundance enhancement in these galaxy clusters is dominated by supernova, Type 1a iron, while the outer parts are dominated by supernovae Type II iron and the most likely mechanism proposed to produce this central iron is ram-pressure stripping, rather than accumulated stellar mass loss from the central dominant galaxy. At least 50% (by mass) of the iron in the central regions is from supernovae Type Ia, varying slightly from cluster to cluster. Although the analysis of Abell 1060 reveals no significant central abundance enhancement, supernovae Type Ia are shown to contribute significantly to the iron content of the central regions. However, accumulated stellar mass loss from the two central dominant galaxies in this cluster can account for all of the supernovae Type la iron in the central regions. The nickel to iron abundance ratio shows that delayed detonation explosion models for supernovae Type la are inconsistent with the observed abundance ratios in the inner regions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571. A comparison of the distributions of iron mass and the luminosity of early type galaxies in four clusters, three of them having central abundance enhancements (Virgo, Abell 496 and Centaurus) and one having a flat abundance distribution (Coma), indicates that the iron mass traces the luminosity of early type galaxies in abundance gradient clusters better than in flat abundance clusters. This suggests that abundance gradients can be washed out by cluster mergers.

  19. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  1. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  2. A geological evidence of very low frequency earthquake inferred from vitrinite thermal records across a microfault within on-land accretionary complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, K.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hirose, T.; Hamada, Y.; Kitamura, M.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of friction heat associated with fault slip is controlled by friction, slip distance and fault thickness. Nature of fault slip can be estimated from the record of frictional heating along a fault (e.g., Fulton et al., 2012). Purpose of this study is to detect the record of frictional heating along a microfault observed in on-land accretionary complex, Shimanto Belt, SW Japan using vitrinite reflectance (Ro) and to examine the characteristics of fault slip in deeper subduction zone. The study area is located in Nonokawa formation, the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, in Kochi Prefecture, Southwest Japan. We found a carbonaceous material concentrated layer (CMCL) in the formation. Some micro-faults cut the layer. The thickness of CMCL is about 3-4m. Ro of host rock is about 0.98-1.1% and of fault rock is over 1.2%. Kitamura et al. (2012) pointed out that fracturing energy may control the high Ro within fault zone. To avoid the effect of fracturing on Ro, we tired to detect a diffusion pattern of frictional heating in host rocks. Distribution of Ro is mapped in thin sections to make the Ro-distance pattern perpendicular to the fault plane. Within the fracture zone, abnormally high Ro (about 2.0% or above) was observed. Ro was 1.25% at the wall of fracture zone and decreases to 1.1% at about 5cm from the wall. We interpreted that the Ro-distance pattern was resulted from the thermal diffusion. Using this diffusion pattern, the characteristic fault parameters, such as friction, slip rate and rise time (Tr) was examined. We set parameters Q (= friction times slip rate). We have simulated frictional heating and Ro maturation on the basis of the method by Sweeny and Burnham (1990). Grid search was conducted to find the best fitted combination of Q and Tr at the smallest residual between simulated Ro and observed Ro. In the result, we estimated about 1500 (Pa m/s) of Q and about 130000(s) of Tr. Because the base temperature is about 185˚C based on the 1.1% of Ro, the

  3. A recent investigation of gas hydrate as a factor in northern Cascadia accretionary margin frontal ridge slope failures and cold seep biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R.; Riedel, M.; Pohlman, J.; Rose, K.; Lapham, L.; Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, R.; Spence, G.; Hyndman, R.

    2008-12-01

    In August 2008, a research expedition was conducted on the n. Cascadia margin by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) as part of the Earth Science Sector, Natural Gas Hydrate Program, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This collaboration included researchers from several universities as well as Canadian and U.S. government agencies. The primary objective was to determine the impact of gas hydrate on slope stability along the frontal ridges of the N. Cascadia accretionary wedge. Multibeam bathymetry data indicate numerous slope collapse features along the frontal ridges. To constrain the cause and timing of the collapse features, sedimentological, physical property and geochemical studies were conducted at several slump areas. Four cores were collected from within the headwall, apron and sole of the slumped material of 'Lopez Slide', a failure area detected prior to IODP Expedition 311. Directly south of Lopez Slide at a slump feature named 'Slipstream Slide', a 5-core transect extended from the headwall scarp to the toe of the slide deposits. Slipstream Slide is a series of en echelon box-like slump blocks bounded by transverse faults that cross-cut that frontal ridge. One additional core from a slump-feature further south (Chunk Slide) was also recovered. Onboard analyses suggest that the slump occurrences are not related to the last mega-thrust earthquake that occurred at the N. Cascadia subduction zone in January 1700. However, the slumps could have been triggered by earlier such earthquakes. Further analyses and age determinations are underway to confirm the linkages between slumps and the mega-thrust earthquake cycle and other possible trigger mechanisms such as eustatic sea level changes. The secondary objective of the expedition was a multidisciplinary program that included microbiological, geochemical, geophysical and sedimentological studies designed to advance our understanding of the environmental factors that control methane fluxes and oxidation at cold

  4. Frictional Heat Generation and Slip Duration Estimated From Micro-fault in an Exhumed Accretionary Complex and Their Relations to the Scaling Law for Slow Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Morita, K.; Okubo, M.; Hamada, Y.; Lin, W.; Hirose, T.; Kitamura, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fault motion has been estimated by diffusion pattern of frictional heating recorded in geology (e.g., Fulton et al., 2012). The same record in deeper subduction plate interface can be observed from micro-faults in an exhumed accretionary complex. In this study, we focused on a micro-fault within the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, SW Japan to estimate fault motion from the frictional heating diffusion pattern. A carbonaceous material concentrated layer (CMCL) with ~2m of thickness is observed in study area. Some micro-faults cut the CMCL. Thickness of a fault is about 3.7mm. Injection veins and dilatant fractures were observed in thin sections, suggesting that the high fluid pressure was existed. Samples with 10cm long were collected to measure distribution of vitrinite reflectance (Ro) as a function of distance from the center of micro-fault. Ro of host rock was ~1.0%. Diffusion pattern was detected decreasing in Ro from ~1.2%-~1.1%. Characteristic diffusion distance is ~4-~9cm. We conducted grid search to find the optimal frictional heat generation per unit area (Q, the product of friction coefficient, normal stress and slip velocity) and slip duration (t) to fit the diffusion pattern. Thermal diffusivity (0.98*10-8m2/s) and thermal conductivity (2.0 W/mK) were measured. In the result, 2000-2500J/m2 of Q and 63000-126000s of t were estimated. Moment magnitudes (M0) of slow earthquakes (slow EQs) follow a scaling law with slip duration and its dimension is different from that for normal earthquakes (normal EQ) (Ide et al., 2007). The slip duration estimated in this study (~104-~105s) consistent with 4-5 of M0, never fit to the scaling law for normal EQ. Heat generation can be inverted from 4-5 of M0, corresponding with ~108-~1011J, which is consistent with rupture area of 105-108m2 in this study. The comparisons in heat generation and slip duration between geological measurements and geophysical remote observations give us the estimation of rupture area, M0, and

  5. Giant quartz vein systems in accretionary orogenic belts: the evidence for a metamorphic fluid origin from δ 15N and δ 13C studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yiefei; Kerrich, Robert

    2000-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope compositions of hydrothermal micas in giant structurally hosted quartz vein systems place constraints on the origin of the hydrothermal fluids. The vein systems are from Neoarchean terranes in the Superior Province of Canada, and the Norseman terrane, Western Australia. The four quartz vein systems studied in different terranes formed at metamorphic grades ranging from lower greenschist to lower amphibolite facies, coevally with metamorphism of the host terrane. Nitrogen resides predominantly as NH 4+ in hydrothermal mica. For lower to upper greenschist facies quartz veins, N contents and δ 15N values of micas are between 40 and 200 ppm and 15‰ and 21‰, respectively, whereas in quartz veins formed at the greenschist to amphibolite transition and lower amphibolite facies, micas have N contents of 20-70 ppm and δ 15N of 11-24‰. In contrast, micas and K-feldspars from granitoids in the Neoarchean Abitibi and Red Lake greenstone belts are characterized by systematically lower δ 15N of -5‰ to 5‰, and generally lower N contents of 20-50 ppm, comparable to other granitoids. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of hydrothermal ferroan dolomite and calcite show systematic depletions with increasing metamorphic grade. The mean values range from -2.2‰ to -3.7‰ for δ 13C and 13.8‰ to 12.3‰ for δ 18O in veins formed at lower to upper greenschist facies, but from -5.8‰ to -7.1‰ for δ 13C and 11.4‰ to 9.8‰ for δ 18O at higher metamorphic grades. Nitrogen isotope compositions rule out mantle (δ 15N mean=-5‰), magmatic (δ 15N=-5‰ to <10‰), or meteoric fluids (δ 15N mean=4.4±2.0‰) for the quartz veins. Accordingly, the results are consistent with fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration of oceanic crust and sediments within accretionary orogenic belts.

  6. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  7. Complete 40Ar resetting in an ultracataclasite by reactivation of a fossil seismogenic fault along the subducting plate interface in the Mugi Mélange of the Shimanto accretionary complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonai, Satoshi; Ito, Shun; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tamura, Hajimu; Tomioka, Naotaka

    2016-08-01

    We used the K-Ar ages of clay-sized mineral grains to investigate the timing of activity on the Minami-Awa Fault, which is a fossil seismogenic fault along a subducting plate interface separating the coherent strata of the Shimanto accretionary complex to the north from the tectonic mélange to the south. The K-Ar ages from the matrix shale of the mélange range from 85 to 48 Ma and decrease with decreasing amount of detrital mica, indicating that they record a mixture of authigenic illite related to burial diagenesis and detrital mica. In contrast, the K-Ar ages of an ultracataclasite within the fault core are significantly younger, ranging from 29 to 23 Ma, and are unrelated to grain size and amount of detrital mica. This indicates that s Ar diffused completely from the ultracataclasite between 29 and 23 Ma, which postdates the formation of authigenic illite by at least several million years. The diffusion of 40Ar in the ultracataclasite was probably caused by frictional heating or high-temperature fluid migration that occurred when the fault was reactivated. The results indicate that seismogenic faults that separate tectonic mélange from coherent strata in accretionary complexes may slip, not only during accretion, but also long after accretion.

  8. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  9. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  10. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly reflect population sizes and trends. This study compares capture-mark-recapture (absolute abundance) and count-index (relative abundance) monitoring methods in three species (Maculinea nausithous and Iolana iolas: Lycaenidae; Minois dryas: Satyridae) in contrasted habitat types. We demonstrate that intraspecific variability in individual detectability under standard monitoring conditions is probably the rule rather than the exception, which questions the reliability of count-based indices to estimate and compare specific population abundance. Our results suggest that the accuracy of count-based methods depends heavily on the ecology and behavior of the target species, as well as on the type of habitat in which surveys take place. Monitoring programs designed to assess the abundance and trends in butterfly populations should incorporate a measure of detectability. We discuss the relative advantages and inconveniences of current monitoring methods and analytical approaches with respect to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability. PMID:22859980

  11. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  12. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  13. Pleistocene hydrovolcanism in the Tule Lake Basin, N. E. California

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, A. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The Prisoners Rock and The Peninsula tuff cones and the North Crater tuff ring, located in the Tule Lake Basin of northeastern California formed along a north-trending fissure approximately 270 ka when basaltic magma interacted with abundant groundwater or shallow lake water, resulting in phreatomagmatic eruptions. Diatomite inclusions in the tuff ring and correlations with the corresponding depth and diatoms in a drill core taken in the center of the basin, 2.5 km to the west of the cones, indicate shallow, marshy or shallow, alkaline-open conditions at Tule Lake around 270 ka. Deposits at Prisoners Rock and The Peninsula indicate subaerial emplacement, which allowed the deposits to lithify with little erosion by the lake. Subsequent wave erosion caused undercutting and breaking off of large blocks along mainly north-trending fractures forming vertical cliff faces on the east and west sides of the cones. The cones are elongated north-south with a greater thickness of deposits on the north and northeast, probably due to prevailing southwesterly winds at the time of eruptions. Deposits of the tuff cones at Prisoners Rock and The Peninsula resulted from deep explosions caused by water-magma ratios of around 3:1. The deposits are mainly inversely graded planar surge beds, ranging in thickness from 5 to 30 cm, and grading from very fine ash to 2 cm-diameter accretionary lapilli. Emplacement by highly steam-saturated, poorly inflated pyroclastic surges is indicated by the abundance of accretionary lapilli, vesiculated tuffs, soft-sediment deformation structures, steep bedding angles (20 to 40 degrees) lack of structures beneath country rock inclusions, massive bedding, and cementation of the deposits by alteration of basaltic glass to calcite, zeolites, clays, and chlorite.

  14. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  15. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of O, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  16. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  17. Abundance variations in solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    Abundance variations are examined in a large number of events including smaller nonimpulsive events not previously considered. Whereas a comparison at equal energy per nucleon is appropriate for heavy ions this is not the case when including H. The best representation is either in terms of rigidity or energy per charge depending on the type of event under consideration. For the majority of large events, where particles are primarily accelerated at interplanetary shocks, if abundances relative to H are evaluated at equal energy per charge then abundance ratios are compatible with solar wind values and spectral shapes agree. Furthermore the behavior of H is then compatible with that of other high FIP elements.

  18. The solar system abundance of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, R. D.; Rosman, K. K. R.; de Laeter, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    The elemental abundance of tin has been determined by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique for four carbonaceous chondrites, including the Cl chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna. A solar system abundance of 3.98 (normalized to Si = 10 to the 6th atoms) can be derived from these data, which is in excellent agreement with the presently accepted value. Recently, a theoretical value of 2.82 + or - 0.21 (Si = 10 to the 6th atoms) has been proposed for the abundance of tin based on an s-process nucleosynthesis model. This value is 26 percent lower than the presently accepted solar system abundance. The present data confirm the higher value for tin and indicate that a reexamination of the assumptions on which the nucleosynthetic value is based is required.

  19. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  20. SAGA: Stellar Abundances for Galatic Archeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, T.

    A tutorial for the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database is presented. This paper describes the outline of the database, reports the current status of the data compilation and known problems, and presents plans for future updates and extensions.

  1. GALA: Stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Pancino, E.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lapenna, E.

    2013-02-01

    GALA is a freely distributed Fortran code to derive the atmospheric parameters (temperature, gravity, microturbulent velocity and overall metallicity) and abundances for individual species of stellar spectra using the classical method based on the equivalent widths of metallic lines. The abundances of individual spectral lines are derived by using the WIDTH9 code developed by R. L. Kurucz. GALA is designed to obtain the best model atmosphere, by optimizing temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity, after rejecting the discrepant lines. Finally, it computes accurate internal errors for each atmospheric parameter and abundance. The code obtains chemical abundances and atmospheric parameters for large stellar samples quickly, thus making GALA an useful tool in the epoch of the multi-object spectrographs and large surveys.

  2. Abundances of Elements in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Interest in stellar coronal abundances was piqued several years ago by the launch of satellites that were able to study the compositions of coronae on stars other than the sun. Motivated by the possibility that other stellar coronae might share the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect solar abundance anomaly, we have in recent years been attempting to determine coronal element abundances in other stars. I will review these results, together with similar results reported in the literature, from a critical perspective of understanding the true uncertainties involved in the measurements. The importance of element abundances for coronal physics will be highlighted, and it will be shown that the differences in the chemical compositions of active stars allow us to draw new conclusions regarding the nature of stellar coronae and coronal heating.

  3. The abundant elements in interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the incorporation of the cosmically abundant species O, C, N, Mg, Si, Fe, and S into interstellar dust. Column densities based on Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph 3.5 km/s resolution measurements from the literature for eight individual absorbing regions toward five lines of sight are used. Corrections are applied as needed in order to account for recent improvements in oscillator strengths. In order to acquire the most accurate column densities, and check on the accuracy of the oscillator strengths, we compare column densities based on the very strong Lorentzian damped lines of C II, O I, N I, and Mg II with results for the weak lines of these species, and confirm the previously determined f-values for O I lambda 1335, C II lambda 2325, and N I lambda lambda 1159, 1160. New empirical f-values of 1.25 x 10(exp -3) and 6.25 x 10(exp -4), respectively, are derived for the Mg II weak doublet at 1239 and 1240 A. Assuming a cosmic reference abundance based on solar and B star values, we derive depletions and dust-phase abundances which suggest that more than 70% of the available Mg and Fe is incorporated into dust-grain cores, whereas only 35% of the silicon is. This implies that oxides are important constituents of the grain core population. Mg and Fe atoms are mantled onto grain cores in a ratio of 1.8 to 1, whereas approximately 4.0 Si atoms are in the mantle per Fe atom. Since Si is not expected to accrete onto silicate or graphite grains, other grain cores, perhaps oxides and/or metallic Fe, may provide mantling sites for this species. The abundances of Fe and Mg in mantles would imply that graphite grains must have a substantial coating unless oxides provide significant mantling sites for these species. The abundance of O and N in the dust phase as implied by the solar reference abundance values are difficult to reconcile with the fact that these elements are not expected to participate in mantle formation, and the 3.1 micrometer H2O ice feature is

  4. Elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy are discussed. Relative abundances of spectroscopically accessible elements of four major shower meteors and one sporadic meteor are presented. A sporadic meteor with dominant sodium radiation and an iron-deficient sporadic meteor are analyzed. Empirical and theoretical tests for self-absorption in optical meteor plasmas have been conducted. Both ionization and incomplete dissociation are found to severely deplete certain neutral atoms from meteor plasmas.

  5. Species Abundance Patterns in Complex Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Kei

    2004-10-01

    An analytic theory of species abundance patterns (SAPs) in biological networks is presented. The theory is based on multispecies replicator dynamics equivalent to the Lotka-Volterra equation, with diverse interspecies interactions. Various SAPs observed in nature are derived from a single parameter. The abundance distribution is formed like a widely observed left-skewed lognormal distribution. As the model has a general form, the result can be applied to similar patterns in other complex biological networks, e.g., gene expression.

  6. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  7. Coronae of stars with supersolar elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-05-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, ι Hor, HR 7291, τ Boo, and α Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and τ Boo no FIP effect is present, while ι Hor, HR 7291, and α Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  8. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund–Grevesse–Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  9. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  10. Zinc Abundances in Galactic Bulge Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, C. R.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is overabundant in metal-poor stars (Cayrel et al. 2004), being partially produced by neutron addition. It decreases with increasing metallicity, similarly to alpha-elements. In order to trace its abundance, the derivation of Zn abundance in different stellar populations, and varying metallicities, helps understanding its nucleosynthesis processes. Zn is also the main element of reference to derive the metallicity from absorption lines in quasars (QSOs), which allows to compare their evolution as a function of redshift and metallicity in metal-poor stars. In the present work, we derive Zn abundances for a sample of 56 bulge field stars, observed at high resolution with the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph. The mean wavelength coverage is 4800-6800 Å, at a resolution R ˜ 45000. The atmospheric parameters effective temperature, gravity and metallicity were derived in Zoccali et al. (2008) and Hill et al. (2011). Recently we have analysed the manganese abundances of this sample (Barbuy et al. 2013). To compute the Zn abundances we use spectrum synthesis, for the lines ZnI 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. The analysis of our data shows that the abundance of [Zn/Fe] decreases with increasing metallicity, in agreement with the data obtained from the literature. The details of Zn behaviour for the metal-rich bulge stars of the present work are under analysis.

  11. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  12. Abundances in 8 QSO Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauroesch, James Thomas

    1995-01-01

    An analysis is given of high resolution observations of metal-absorption line systems in the spectra of 4 QSOs made with the echelle spectrograph on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. High spectral -resolution (9 to 18 km cdot s^{ -1}) observations were obtained for the QSOs S5 0014 + 813, H 0913 + 072, B2 1225 + 317, and HS 1946 + 7658; column densities were derived for the heavy element line systems. Abundances and/or abundance ratios have been determined for 8 systems and a variety of H I column densities in the redshift range 1-3.4 are probed. The systems studies are generally relatively poor in heavy elements, and appear to be similar in heavy element abundances to the gas out of which the Galactic halo stars of similar metallicity formed. Indications of the halo star-abundance sample include the observed ratios of (N/Si), (Al/Si), and (Mn/Fe). The existence of associated H II regions is inferred for a number of damped systems, and it is suggested that the possibly significant amount of gas in H II regions in damped Lyman-alpha systems can be constrained by the comparison of the column densities of O I, N I, N II, Si II, and S II in these systems. The ratio of N(Al II)/N(Al III) is shown to be a poor indicator of the amount of ionized gas in some cases. The abundances of Si as determined from N(Si II)/N(H I) suggest that there is a relatively rapid decrease in abundances in these systems at z _sp{ ~}> 2. Such a decrease in abundances is what would be expected if the galactic (thin) disks did not form before redshifts of z {~} 2. The use of Si II is important, since the weakness of the Zn II lines at low abundances (due to the low relative abundance of Zn compared to elements such as Si) will result in few detections, and in upper limits that are difficult to interpret. The observed drop in abundances is consistent with the decrease in number of heavy-element absorption systems at high redshifts, a result that is found in

  13. Petrogenesis of Late Paleozoic volcanics from the Zhaheba depression, East Junggar: Insights into collisional event in an accretionary orogen of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; He, Deng-fa; Santosh, M.; Tang, Jie-yun

    2014-01-01

    with enrichment of LREE and HFSE (Zr, Hf) and depletion of Ba, Sr, Eu, Nb and Ta. These rocks display high ɛNd(t) (6.9-7.3) and ɛHf(t) (10.3-14.6) values and young crustal model ages (348-557 Ma). Integrating regional geological data from the East Junggar terrane and the available data from the proximal ophiolite belt, we propose that an arc-arc or arc-continent post-collisional setting in the Zhaheba area commenced at ca. 317 Ma. The Late Carboniferous-Early Permian felsic and mafic magmas were derived from the partial melting of the juvenile mafic lower crust and subcontinental lithospheric mantle metasomatized by pre-Carboniferous subduction-related fluids through asthenospheric upwelling. This post-collisional event suggests that vertical accretion played an important role not only in the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian continental growth of the East Junggar, but also in the final evolutionary phase of the accretionary orogen.

  14. Slipstream: an early Holocene slump and turbidite record from the frontal ridge of the Cascadia accretionary wedge off western Canada and paleoseismic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, Randolph J.; Riedel, Michael; Rogers, Gary C.; Pohlman, John W.; Benway, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Slipstream Slump, a well-preserved 3 km wide sedimentary failure from the frontal ridge of the Cascadia accretionary wedge 85 km off Vancouver Island, Canada, was sampled during Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) John P. Tully cruise 2008007PGC along a transect of five piston cores. Shipboard sediment analysis and physical property logging revealed 12 turbidites interbedded with thick hemipelagic sediments overlying the slumped glacial diamict. Despite the different sedimentary setting, atop the abyssal plain fan, this record is similar in number and age to the sequence of turbidites sampled farther to the south from channel systems along the Cascadia Subduction Zone, with no extra turbidites present in this local record. Given the regional physiographic and tectonic setting, megathrust earthquake shaking is the most likely trigger for both the initial slumping and subsequent turbidity currents, with sediments sourced exclusively from the exposed slump face of the frontal ridge. Planktonic foraminifera picked from the resedimented diamict of the underlying main slump have a disordered cluster of 14C ages between 12.8 and 14.5 ka BP. For the post-slump stratigraphy, an event-free depth scale is defined by removing the turbidite sediment intervals and using the hemipelagic sediments. Nine14C dates from the most foraminifera-rich intervals define a nearly constant hemipelagic sedimentation rate of 0.021 cm/year. The combined age model is defined using only planktonic foraminiferal dates and Bayesian analysis with a Poisson-process sedimentation model. The age model of ongoing hemipelagic sedimentation is strengthened by physical property correlations from Slipstream events to the turbidites for the Barkley Canyon site 40 km south. Additional modelling addressed the possibilities of seabed erosion or loss and basal erosion beneath turbidites. Neither of these approaches achieves a modern seabed age when applying the commonly used regional marine 14C reservoir age of

  15. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  16. The Late Cambrian Takaka Terrane, NW Nelson, New Zealand: Accretionary-prism development and arc collision followed by extension and fan-delta deposition at the SE margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Re-evaluation of field and lab data indicates that the Cambrian portion of the Takaka Terrane in the Cobb Valley area of NW Nelson, New Zealand preserves the remnants of an accretionary prism complex, across which the Lockett Conglomerate fan-delta was deposited as a consequence of extension. Previous work has recognized that the structurally disrupted lower Takaka Terrane rocks present an amalgam of sedimentary and igneous rocks generated prior to convergence (Junction Formation) or during convergence (Devil River Volcanics Group, Haupiri Group), including arc-related and MORB components. Portions of the sequence have in the past been loosely described as an accretionary prism. Reevaluation of the detailed mapping, sedimentological and provenance studies shows that remnants of a stratigraphic sequence (Junction Formation, Devil River Volcanics Group, Haupiri Group) can be traced through 10 fault-bounded slices, which include a mélange-dominated slice (Balloon Mélange). These slices are the remnants of the accretionary prism; the stratigraphy within each slice generally youngs to the east, and the overall pattern of aging (based on relative age from provenance studies, sparse fossils, stratigraphic relations, and limited isotopic data) indicates that the older rocks generally dominate fault slices to the east, and younger rocks dominate fault slices to the west, delineating imbricate slices within an eastward-dipping subduction zone, in which the faults record a complex history of multi-phase reactivation. The Lockett Conglomerate is a ~500-m thick fan-delta conglomerate that is the preserved within one of the fault slices, where it is stratigraphically and structurally highest unit in the lower Takaka Terrane; it is also present as blocks within the Balloon Melange. The Lockett Conglomerate is marine at its base and transitions upwards to fluvial facies. The Lockett Conglomerate has previously been interpreted to result from erosion consequent on continued

  17. Preliminary results of three-dimensional stress orientation in the accretionary prism in Nankai Subduction Zone, Japan by anelastic strain recovery measurements of core samples retrieved from IODP NanTroSEIZE Site C0009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Byrne, T. B.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-12-01

    During IODP Expedition 319, the first riser-drilling borehole in ocean was penetrated by D/V CHIKYU at Site C0009 in the Nankai convergent margin, Japan. From 0 mbsf (meters below seafloor) to 1285 mbsf, the borehole crossed the Kumano forearc basin and from 1285 mbsf to the bottom depth of 1604 mbsf, the Nankai accretionary prism. In a short depth range of 84.20 m from 1509.7 to 1593.9 mbsf, core samples were retrieved by rotary core barrel drilling. We collected 3 whole-round core samples for measurements of anelastic strain recovery (ASR) by the same methods of sample preparation and anelastic strain data acquisition conducted in the previous Stage-1 expeditions of the same NanTroSEIZE drilling program (Byrne et al., 2009; GRL, Vol.36, L23310). Anelastic normal strains, measured every ten minutes in nine directions, including six independent directions, were used to calculate the anelastic strain tensors. All three samples showed coherent strain recovery over a long period more than 1 month. The three samples were from C0009A (3R,1531 mbsf; 4R, 1540 mbsf and 8R, 1577 mbsf, respectively) in lithologic Unit IV interpreted as accretionary prism or deformed slope sediments. All samples are composed of silty clays or hemipelagic muds with relatively high porosities (30%~). The ASR measurement results in Kumano Forearc Basin obtained from C0002 (Byrne et al., 2009) showed the maximum stress orientation is nearly vertical and a normal stress regime. However, the ASR results in the accretionary prism from C0009 show that the maximum principal stress axes plunge gently or are nearly horizontal and the stress regimes appear to be strike-slip or thrust (reverse fault) types. The maximum horizontal principal stress orientaions obtained from the ASR tests also show very good consistency with the stress orientaions determined from borehole breakouts in the same borehole and the same depth range (Lin et al., 2010; GRL, Vol.37, L13303). These results suggest that three

  18. Why is Trichodesmium abundant in the Kuroshio?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-12-01

    The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as an abundant and major diazotroph in the Kuroshio, but the reason for this remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since our satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. Numerical particle-tracking experiments simulated the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the Ryukyu Islands could be advected into the Kuroshio.

  19. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  20. Accurate abundance determinations in S stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyskens, P.; Van Eck, S.; Plez, B.; Goriely, S.; Siess, L.; Jorissen, A.

    2011-12-01

    S-type stars are thought to be the first objects, during their evolution on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), to experience s-process nucleosynthesis and third dredge-ups, and therefore to exhibit s-process signatures in their atmospheres. Until present, the modeling of these processes is subject to large uncertainties. Precise abundance determinations in S stars are of extreme importance for constraining e.g., the depth and the formation of the 13C pocket. In this paper a large grid of MARCS model atmospheres for S stars is used to derive precise abundances of key s-process elements and iron. A first estimation of the atmospheric parameters is obtained using a set of well-chosen photometric and spectroscopic indices for selecting the best model atmosphere of each S star. Abundances are derived from spectral line synthesis, using the selected model atmosphere. Special interest is paid to technetium, an element without stable isotopes. Its detection in stars is considered as the best possible signature that the star effectively populates the thermally-pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) phase of evolution. The derived Tc/Zr abundances are compared, as a function of the derived [Zr/Fe] overabundances, with AGB stellar model predictions. The computed [Zr/Fe] overabundances are in good agreement with the AGB stellar evolution model predictions, while the Tc/Zr abundances are slightly over-predicted. This discrepancy can help to set stronger constraints on nucleosynthesis and mixing mechanisms in AGB stars.

  1. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  2. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  3. Petrography and geochemistry of ejecta from the Sudbury impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthew S.; McDonald, Iain; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Ejecta from the Connors Creek site in Michigan (500 km from the Sudbury Igneous Complex [SIC]), the Pine River site in western Ontario (650 km from the SIC), and the Coleraine site in Minnesota (980 km from the SIC) were petrographically and geochemically analyzed. Connors Creek was found to have approximately 2 m of ejecta, including shocked quartz, melt droplets, and accretionary lapilli; Pine River has similar deposits about 1 m in thickness, although with smaller lapilli; Coleraine contains only impact spherules in a 20 cm-thick layer (impact spherules being similar to microkrystites or microtektites). The ejecta transition from chaotic deposits of massively bedded impactoclastic material with locally derived detritus at Connors Creek to a deposit with apparently very little detrital material that is primarily composed of melt droplets at Pine River to a deposit that is almost entirely composed of melt spherules at Coleraine. The major and trace element compositions of the ejecta confirm the previously observed similarity of the ejecta deposits to the Onaping Formation in the SIC. Platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations from each of the sites were also measured, revealing significantly elevated PGE contents in the spherule samples compared with background values. PGE abundances in samples from the Pine River site can be reproduced by addition of approximately 0.2 wt% CI chondrite to the background composition of the underlying sediments in the core. PGE interelement ratios indicate that the Sudbury impact event was probably caused by a chondritic impactor.

  4. Abundance and chemistry of interstellar HOCO(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Brewer, M. K.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Johansson, L. E. B.

    1991-01-01

    Column densities of 10 to the 15th/sq cm toward the Galactic center and not more than 10 to the 12th/sq cm for cold dark clouds are derived from observations using an LVG model, and the chemical implications are discussed. The HOCO(+) 4(04)-3(03) line toward Sgr A is mapped. The fractional abundance of HOCO(+) in the Galactic center region was found to be three orders of magnitude larger than predicted by quiescent ion-molecule chemistry and an order of magnitude larger than predicted by an MHD shock model. It is suggested that the possibly high CO2 abundance, and consequently the observed HOCO(+) abundance in the Galactic center, may result from UV photolysis of grain mantles.

  5. Earth-Abundant Nanomaterials for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Mahmood, Asif; Liang, Zibin; Zou, Ruqiang; Guo, Shaojun

    2016-02-18

    Replacing the rare and precious platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts with earth-abundant materials for promoting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of fuel cells is of great interest in developing high-performance sustainable energy devices. However, the challenging issues associated with non-Pt materials are still their low intrinsic catalytic activity, limited active sites, and the poor mass transport properties. Recent advances in material sciences and nanotechnology enable rational design of new earth-abundant materials with optimized composition and fine nanostructure, providing new opportunities for enhancing ORR performance at the molecular level. This Review highlights recent breakthroughs in engineering nanocatalysts based on the earth-abundant materials for boosting ORR. PMID:26663778

  6. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  7. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  8. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities.

    PubMed

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community. PMID:26565271

  9. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  10. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  11. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, Julie A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5x106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by their mass to be in a mass range of 0.9 to 1.1 solar masses as determined by Lambert & Reddy (2004). They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H] -0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken over several nights, with forty-six spectra taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and six spectra on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) using the Gecko spectrograph. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis, fitting a 4Å region around the resonance lines of Be II. The data were then analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, and metallicity and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to increase with metallicity and the linear relationship evident when extended to metallicities down to -4.0 dex with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread 1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K. This research was conducted through the Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy and was funded by the NSF.

  12. Reliability of indicators of decline in abundance.

    PubMed

    Porszt, Erin J; Peterman, Randall M; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Cooper, Andrew B; Irvine, James R

    2012-10-01

    Although there are many indicators of endangerment (i.e., whether populations or species meet criteria that justify conservation action), their reliability has rarely been tested. Such indicators may fail to identify that a population or species meets criteria for conservation action (false negative) or may incorrectly show that such criteria have been met (false positive). To quantify the rate of both types of error for 20 commonly used indicators of declining abundance (threat indicators), we used receiver operating characteristic curves derived from historical (1938-2007) data for 18 sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. We retrospectively determined each population's yearly status (reflected by change in abundance over time) on the basis of each indicator. We then compared that population's status in a given year with the status in subsequent years (determined by the magnitude of decline in abundance across those years). For each sockeye population, we calculated how often each indicator of past status matched subsequent status. No single threat indicator provided error-free estimates of status, but indicators that reflected the extent (i.e., magnitude) of past decline in abundance (through comparison of current abundance with some historical baseline abundance) tended to better reflect status in subsequent years than the rate of decline over the previous 3 generations (a widely used indicator). We recommend that when possible, the reliability of various threat indicators be evaluated with empirical analyses before such indicators are used to determine the need for conservation action. These indicators should include estimates from the entire data set to take into account a historical baseline. PMID:22741815

  13. INTERSTELLAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD X Per, REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-06-10

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to examine dust grain types and measure elemental abundances in the local interstellar medium (ISM). The absorption features of O, Fe, Mg, and Si along this line of sight were measured using spectra from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments, and the Spex software package. The spectra were fit with dust analogs measured in the laboratory. The O, Mg, and Si abundances were compared to those from standard references, and the O abundance was compared to that along lines of sight toward other X-ray binaries. The results are as follows. First, it was found that a combination of MgSiO{sub 3} (enstatite) and Mg{sub 1.6}Fe{sub 0.4}SiO{sub 4} (olivine) provided the best fit to the O K edge, with N(MgSiO{sub 3})/N(Mg{sub 1.6}Fe{sub 0.4}SiO{sub 4}) = 3.4. Second, the Fe L edge could be fit with models that included metallic iron, but it was not well described by the laboratory spectra currently available. Third, the total abundances of O, Mg, and Si were in very good agreement with that of recently re-analyzed B stars, suggesting that they are good indicators of abundances in the local ISM, and the depletions were also in agreement with expected values for the diffuse ISM. Finally, the O abundances found from X-ray binary absorption spectra show a similar correlation with Galactocentric distances as seen in other objects.

  14. The evolution of abundances in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouze, J.

    This very brief review of the evolution of the abundances in the Galaxy first recalls the main observational facts regarding such abundances. After having defined what are the crucial parameters which define such model, emphasis is given to two approaches: the first analyzed by Vangioni-Flam and Audouze (1988), and Andreani et al. (1988), in which the rate of star formation is allowed to vary with time; the second approach was favored by Matteucci and Francois (1989), who invoke a multizone galactic model with infall (inflow) of external gas into the galactic disk.

  15. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE - 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  16. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  17. Empirical oxygen abundances and physical conditions for relatively low abundance H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, E.D. )

    1989-12-01

    The utility of the emission-line ratio (3727 + 4959 + 5007 A)/H-beta as an estimate of the total oxygen abundance in H II regions of low abundance (less than 10 percent of the solar value) is discussed. Using both observational data where the 4363A line is measured and model H II regions it is concluded that, for low abundance systems, total oxygen abundances can be determined with an accuracy of + or - 0.2 dex in the absence of a 4363A measurement. An attempt is made to study the average behavior of the stellar effective temperature (Teff) and ionization parameter (U) with changing abundance in low abundance systems. It is shown that some diagnostic methods which are viable for high abundance systems are not capable of uniquely determining Teff and U in low abundance systems. The most promising method of determining Teff and U requires measuring emission lines of forbidden O II, O III, S II, and S III. 53 refs.

  18. Toward Reliable Estimates of Abundance: Comparing Index Methods to Assess the Abundance of a Mammalian Predator

    PubMed Central

    Güthlin, Denise; Storch, Ilse; Küchenhoff, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Due to time and financial constraints indices are often used to obtain landscape-scale estimates of relative species abundance. Using two different field methods and comparing the results can help to detect possible bias or a non monotonic relationship between the index and the true abundance, providing more reliable results. We used data obtained from camera traps and feces counts to independently estimate relative abundance of red foxes in the Black Forest, a forested landscape in southern Germany. Applying negative binomial regression models, we identified landscape parameters that influence red fox abundance, which we then used to predict relative red fox abundance. We compared the estimated regression coefficients of the landscape parameters and the predicted abundance of the two methods. Further, we compared the costs and the precision of the two field methods. The predicted relative abundances were similar between the two methods, suggesting that the two indices were closely related to the true abundance of red foxes. For both methods, landscape diversity and edge density best described differences in the indices and had positive estimated effects on the relative fox abundance. In our study the costs of each method were of similar magnitude, but the sample size obtained from the feces counts (262 transects) was larger than the camera trap sample size (88 camera locations). The precision of the camera traps was lower than the precision of the feces counts. The approach we applied can be used as a framework to compare and combine the results of two or more different field methods to estimate abundance and by this enhance the reliability of the result. PMID:24743565

  19. Elemental abundances in meteoritic and terrestrial matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Major and trace element analyses of over 180 individual chondrules from 12 carbonaceous chondrites are reported, including individual analyses of 60 chondrules from Pueblito de Allende. Siderophile elements in most chondrules are depleted, compared to the whole chondrite. Correlations of Al-Ir and Ir-Sc among chondrules high in Ca and Al were observed. A Cu-Mn correlation was also found for chondrules from some meteorites. No correlation was observed between Au and other siderophile elements (Fe, Ni, Co and Ir). It is suggested that these elemental associations were present in the material from which the chondrules formed. Compositionally, chondrules appear to be a multicomponent mixture of remelted dust. One component displaying an Al-Ir correlation is identified as Allende-type white aggregates. The other components are a material chemically similar to the present matrix and sulfides-plus-metal material. Abundances of the REE (rare earth elements) were measured in ordinary Allende chondrules and were 50% higher than REE abundances in Mokoia chondrules; REE abundances in Ca-Al rich chondrules were similar to REE abundances in Ca-rich white aggregates.

  20. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  1. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  2. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  3. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  4. Early Earth differentiation investigated through 142Nd, 182W, and highly siderophile element abundances in samples from Isua, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizo, H.; Walker, R. J.; Carlson, R. W.; Touboul, M.; Horan, M. F.; Puchtel, I. S.; Boyet, M.; Rosing, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    We report new data for W concentrations, stable W isotopic compositions, high-precision 182W/184W ratios, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and 187Re-187Os systematics in a suite of 3.8-3.3 Ga mafic and ultramafic rocks from the Isua supracrustal belt, and the Paleoarchean terrane in the northwestern part of the belt. These data are compared with published data for 146Sm-142Nd systematics in the same samples. The samples from the Isua supracrustal belt show well resolved excesses of 182W/184W of up to ∼21 ppm, consistent with previous W isotopic data reported by Willbold et al. (2011). While there is abundant evidence that W was mobilized in the crust accessed by the Isua supracrustal suite, the isotopic anomalies are interpreted to primarily reflect processes that affected the mantle precursors to these rocks. The origin of the 182W excesses in these rocks remains uncertain. The Isua mantle source could represent a portion of the post-core-formation mantle that was isolated from late accretionary additions (e.g., Willbold et al., 2011). However, the combined 182W, Re-Os isotopic systematics and HSE abundances estimated for the source of the Isua basalts are difficult to reconcile with this interpretation. The W isotope variations were more likely produced as a result of fractionation of the Hf/W ratio in the mantle during the lifetime of 182Hf, i.e., during the first 50 Ma of Solar System history. This could have occurred as a result of differentiation in an early magma ocean. The Isua suite examined is also characterized by variable 142Nd/144Nd, but the variations do not correlate with the variations in 182W/184W. Further, samples with ages between 3.8 and 3.3 Ga show gradual diminution of 142Nd anomalies until these are no longer resolved from the modern mantle isotopic composition. By contrast, there is no diminishment of 182W variability with time, suggesting different mechanisms of origin and retention of isotopic variations for these two extinct

  5. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  6. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  7. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  8. Solar abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy - Comparisons with energetic particle, photospheric, and coronal abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Reames, D. V.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerated particle and ambient gas abundances have been derived using solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results with photospheric and coronal abundances, as well as with solar energetic particle abundances. This is the first time that the composition of accelerated particles interacting in an astrophysical source has been compared with the composition of particles escaping from the source. The analysis shows that the derived composition of the accelerated particles is different from the composition of particles observed in large proton flares; rather, it resembles the composition observed in He-3-rich flares. The analysis also suggests an ambient gas composition which differs from the composition of both the photosphere and the corona.

  9. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  10. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  11. Abundances from solar-flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Forrest, D. J.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    Elemental abundances of the ambient gas at the site of gamma ray line production inthe solar atmosphere are deduced using gamma ray line observations from a solar flare. The resultant abundances are different from local galactic abundances which are thought to be similar to photospheric abundances.

  12. Deuterium Abundance in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlet, R.; Gry, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present situation of deuterium abundance evaluation in interstellar space is discussed, and it is shown that it should be or = .00001 by studying in more detail lambda the Sco line of sight and by observing two NaI interstellar components toward that star, it can be shown that the D/H evaluation made toward lambda Sco is in fact related to the local interstellar medium (less than 10 pc from the Sun). Because this evaluation is also or = .00001 it is in striking contrast with the one made toward alpha Aur (D/H or = .000018 confirming the fact that the deuterium abundance in the local interstellar medium varies by at least a factor of two over few parsecs.

  13. THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    SciTech Connect

    RodrIguez, Monica; Delgado-Inglada, Gloria E-mail: gloria@inaoep.mx

    2011-06-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of the oxygen abundance in five H II regions and eight planetary nebulae (PNe) located at distances lower than 2 kpc and with available spectra of high quality. We find that both the collisionally excited lines (CELs) and recombination lines imply that the PNe are overabundant in oxygen by about 0.2 dex. An explanation that reconciles the oxygen abundances derived with CELs for H II regions and PNe with the values found for B stars, the Sun, and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) requires the presence in H II regions of an organic refractory dust component that is not present in PNe. This dust component has already been invoked to explain the depletion of oxygen in molecular clouds and in the diffuse ISM.

  14. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling.

    PubMed

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  15. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling

    PubMed Central

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  16. Solar abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1989-01-01

    Determinations of solar abundances from gamma-ray line observations are reviewed. The principal results are: (1) in flare loops, at atmospheric heights betwen the transition region and the upper photosphere, the Mg/O ratio is higher by about a factor of 3 than in the photosphere, while the C/O ratio is essentially photospheric; (2) in the same region, the Ne/O ratio is higher by about a factor of 3 than the Ne/O ratio in the corona; (3) the photospheric He-3/H ratio is less than 0.000035. These results, combined with other data, suggest abundance variations in the solar atmosphere, possibly resulting from charge and mass dependent transport.

  17. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  18. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  19. Helium abundance enhancements in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrini, G.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for a link between helium enhancements at 1 AU and transient coronal mass ejections is provided by the statistical analysis of 73 large helium abundance enhancement observations made by IMPs 6, 7 and 8 over 1972-1978. These events, in which helium abundance enhancement is greater than about 10%, are sporadic, sometimes clustered in time, occur approximately in phase with the solar cycle, and nearly 50% of them are associated with interplanetary shocks and/or geomagnetic activity sudden commencements. The plasma pattern associated with them is nevertheless independent of shock occurrence, and features high magnetic field strength, low alpha-proton velocity difference, and low proton temperature, suggesting that the enhancement is embedded in a closed, magnetically dominated structure that expands adiabatically. Evidence of an association between helium enhancement at 1 AU and type II and IV radio bursts in the corona is presented.

  20. Helium isotopic abundance variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The isotopic abundance of helium in nature has been reviewed. This atomic weight value is based on the value of helium in the atmosphere, which is invariant around the world and up to a distance of 100,000 feet. Helium does vary in natural gas, volcanic rocks and gases, ocean floor sediments, waters of various types and in radioactive minerals and ores due to {alpha} particle decay of radioactive nuclides.

  1. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  2. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ðapo, H.

    2012-10-01

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on 4HeX-+2H-->6Li+X-, where the X- is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  3. Revised Thorium Abundances for Lunar Red Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar red spots are features on the nearside of the Moon that are characterized by high albedo and by a strong absorption in the ultraviolet. These red spots include the Gruithuisen domes, the Mairan domes, Hansteen Alpha, the southern portion of Montes Riphaeus, Darney Chi and Tau, Helmet, and an area near the Lassell crater. It has been suggested that many of the red spots are extrusive, nonmare, volcanic features that could be composed of an evolved lithlogy enriched in thorium. In fact, Hawke et al. used morphological characteristics to show that Hansteen Alpha is a nonmare volcanic construct. However, because the apparent Th abundances (6 - 7 ppm) were lower than that expected for evolved rock types, Hawke et al. concluded that Hansteen Alpha was composed of an unknown rock type. Subsequent studies by Lawrence et al. used improved knowledge of the Th spatial distribution for small area features on the lunar surface to revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at the Hansteen Alpha red spot. As part of their study, Lawrence et al. used a forward modeling technique to show that the Th abundance at Hansteen Alpha is not 6 ppm, but is more likely closer to 25 ppm, a value consistent with evolved lithologies. This positive correlation between the morphology and composition of Hansteen Alpha provides support for the presence of evolved lithologies on the lunar surface. It is possible, however, that Hansteen Alpha represents an isolated occurrence of non-mare volcanism. That is why we have chosen to use the forward modeling technique of Lawrence et al. to investigate the Th abundances at other lunar red spots, starting with the Gruithuisen domes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    SciTech Connect

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Porter, R.L. E-mail: olive@umn.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  5. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions.

    PubMed

    Alroy, John

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood-related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the "double geometric." Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly. PMID:26601249

  6. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, John

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood–related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the “double geometric.” Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly. PMID:26601249

  7. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  8. Fluorine Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Gibson, Brad K.

    2008-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) abundances are derived in a sample of six bulge red giants in Baade's window. These giants span a factor of 10 in metallicity, and this is the first study to define the behavior of 19F with metallicity in the bulge. The bulge results show an increase in F/O with increasing oxygen. This trend overlaps what is found in the disk at comparable metallicities, with the most oxygen-rich bulge target extending the disk trend. The increase in F/O in the disk arises from 19F synthesis in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars through stellar winds. The lack of an s-process enhancement in the most fluorine-rich bulge giant in this study suggests that WR stars represented a larger contribution than did AGB stars to 19F production in the bulge, when compared to the disk. If this result for fluorine is combined with the previously published overall decline in the O/Mg abundance ratios in metal-rich bulge stars, it suggests that WR winds played a role in shaping chemical evolution in the bulge. One star in this study exhibits a very low value of F/O while having a large O abundance; this chemical mixture can be understood if this star formed from gas that was enriched by metal-poor core-collapse supernovae, and it may indicate that chemical evolution in the bulge was inhomogeneous.

  9. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  10. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  11. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  12. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  13. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  14. Environmental factors shaping ungulate abundances in Poland.

    PubMed

    Borowik, Tomasz; Cornulier, Thomas; Jędrzejewska, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Population densities of large herbivores are determined by the diverse effects of density-dependent and independent environmental factors. In this study, we used the official 1998-2003 inventory data on ungulate numbers from 462 forest districts and 23 national parks across Poland to determine the roles of various environmental factors in shaping country-wide spatial patterns of ungulate abundances. Spatially explicit generalized additive mixed models showed that different sets of environmental variables explained 39 to 50 % of the variation in red deer Cervus elaphus, wild boar Sus scrofa, and roe deer Capreolus capreolus abundances. For all of the studied species, low forest cover and the mean January temperature were the most important factors limiting their numbers. Woodland cover above 40-50 % held the highest densities for these species. Wild boar and roe deer were more numerous in deciduous or mixed woodlands within a matrix of arable land. Furthermore, we found significant positive effects of marshes and water bodies on wild boar abundances. A juxtaposition of obtained results with ongoing environmental changes (global warming, increase in forest cover) may indicate future growth in ungulate distributions and numbers. PMID:24244044

  15. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  16. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  17. Bringing abundance into environmental politics: Constructing a Zionist network of water abundance, immigration, and colonization.

    PubMed

    Alatout, Samer

    2009-06-01

    For more than five decades, resource scarcity has been the lead story in debates over environmental politics. More importantly, and whenever environmental politics implies conflict, resource scarcity is constructed as the culprit. Abundance of resources, if at all visited in the literature, holds less importance. Resource abundance is seen, at best, as the other side of scarcity--maybe the successful conclusion of multiple interventions that may turn scarcity into abundance. This paper reinstates abundance as a politico-environmental category in its own right. Rather than relegating abundance to a second-order environmental actor that matters only on occasion, this paper foregrounds it as a crucial element in modern environmental politics. On the substantive level, and using insights from science and technology studies, especially a slightly modified actor-network framework, I describe the emergence and consolidation of a Zionist network of abundance, immigration, and colonization in Palestine between 1918 and 1948. The essential argument here is that water abundance was constructed as fact, and became a political rallying point around which a techno-political network emerged that included a great number of elements. To name just a few, the following were enrolled in the service of such a network: geologists, geophysicists, Zionist settlement experts, Zionist organizations, political and technical categories of all sorts, Palestinians as the negated others, Palestinian revolts in search of political rights, the British Mandate authorities, the hydrological system of Palestine, and the absorptive capacity of Palestine, among others. The point was to successfully articulate these disparate elements into a network that seeks opening Palestine for Jewish immigration, redefining Palestinian geography and history through Judeo-Christian Biblical narratives, and, in the process, de-legitimizing political Palestinian presence in historic Palestine. PMID:19848183

  18. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.; Chen, Y. Q.; Carigi, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stars are important in many fields of astrophysics including nucleosynthesis, stellar structure, evolution of galaxies, and formation of planetary systems. Still, our knowledge of the abundances of these elements in different stellar populations is uncertain because of difficulties in observing and analyzing atomic and molecular lines of C and O. Aims: Abundances of C, O, and Fe are determined for F and G main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood with metallicities in the range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.4 in order to study trends and possible systematic differences in the C/Fe, O/Fe, and C/O ratios for thin- and thick-disk stars as well as high- and low-alpha halo stars. In addition, we investigate if there is any connection between C and O abundances in stellar atmospheres and the occurrence of planets. Methods: Carbon abundances are determined from the λλ 5052,5380 C i lines and oxygen abundances from the λ7774 O i triplet and the forbidden [O i] line at 6300 Å. MARCS model atmospheres are applied and non-LTE corrections for the O i triplet are included. Results: Systematic differences between high- and low-alpha halo stars and between thin- and thick-disk stars are seen in the trends of [C/Fe] and [O/Fe]. The two halo populations and thick-disk stars show the same trend of [C/O] versus [O/H], whereas the thin-disk stars are shifted to higher [C/O] values. Furthermore, we find some evidence of higher C/O and C/Fe ratios in stars hosting planets than in stars for which no planets have been detected. Conclusions: The results suggest that C and O in both high- and low-alpha halo stars and in thick-disk stars are made mainly in massive (M> 8 M⊙) stars, whereas thin-disk stars have an additional carbon contribution from low-mass AGB and massive stars of high metallicity causing a rising trend of the C/O ratio with increasing metallicity. However, at the highest metallicities investigated ([Fe/H] ≃ + 0.4), C/O does not

  19. Metamorphic evolution of the high-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Kemer area (Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey): Implications for the accretionary continental growth and closure of the Intra-Pontide Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygül, M.; Topuz, G.; Satır, M.

    2009-04-01

    The northwestern part of the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey, corresponds to the so-called Intra-Pontide suture, separating the Rhodope-Strandja zone to the north and Sakarya zone to the south. This suture zone is marked by the exposures of high-pressure metamorphics, oceanic accretionary complexes and ophiolites, which are widely covered by Eocene to Miocene volcanics and volcano-clastics, and crosscut by Eocene to Miocene granites. The Kemer area is one of the key-areas where high-pressure metamorphics and an ophiolitic mélange were widely exposed. This contribution deals with the metamorphic evolution of the Kemer high-pressure rocks, and their implications for the geodynamic evolution. The Kemer high-pressure rocks comprise predominantly micaschist, calcschist, marble and minor metabasite and serpentinite. The micaschists contain mineral assemblages involving garnet, phengite (3,30-3,44 c.p.f.u.), paragonite, epidote, chlorite, albite and titanite, and the metabasites consists of garnet, barrosite, albite, chlorite, epidote, albite and titanite. The equilibrium conditions are poorly constrained as 550 ± 50 °C temperature and >8-10 kbar pressure by Fe-Mg partitioning between garnet and phengite, and phengite-barometry, respectively. Timing of the high-pressure metamorphism is constrained as 84-64 Ma by Rb-Sr phengite-whole rock dating on four samples. Although the obtained age values display a wide scatter, they are consistent with geochronological data from the neighboring high-pressure areas: 86 ± 2 Ma from the Şarköy blueschists (Topuz et al. 2008) and 65-69 Ma from the Çamlıca garnet-micaschists (Okay and Satır, 2000). These data in conjunction with those from the literature suggest that Late Cretaceous represent a time of substantional accretionary continental growth related to the northward subduction of the Intra-Pontide Ocean. The closure of the Intra-Pontide Ocean is constrained between Late Cretaceous and Eocene, because Eocene volcanics and volcano

  20. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  1. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  2. Abundances of Planetary Nebula NGC 5315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Beintema, D. A.; Koorneef, J.; Salas, J. Bernard; Feibelman, W. A.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the elliptical nebula NGC 5315 is presented. These spectra axe combined with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebulae is then calculated and compared to previous determinations. The HST Nicmos observations of the nebula in 3 emission lines are also presented. These observations are used to determine the helium abundance as a function of position in the nebula. A discussion is given of possible evolutionary effects.

  3. Chemical abundances in cold, dark interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Ohishi, M; Kaifu, N

    1991-05-01

    The Sun may well have formed in the type of interstellar cloud currently referred to as a cold, dark cloud. We present current tabulations of the totality of known interstellar molecules and of the subset which have been identified in cold clouds. Molecular abundances are given for two such clouds which show interesting chemical differences in spite of strong physical similarities, Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 (TMC-1) and Lynd's 134N (L134N, also referred to as L183). These regions may be at different evolutionary stages. PMID:11542208

  4. Chemical abundances in cold, dark interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.; Kaifu, Norio; Ohishi, Masatoshi

    1991-01-01

    Current tabulations are presented of the entire range of known interstellar molecules, giving attention to that subset which has been identified in the cold, dark interstellar clouds out of which the sun has been suggested to have formed. The molecular abundances of two such clouds, Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 and Lynd's 134N, exhibit prepossessing chemical differences despite considerable physical similarities. This discrepancy may be accounted for by the two clouds' differing evolutionary stages. Two novel classes of interstellar molecules are noted: sulfur-terminated carbon chains and silicon-terminated ones.

  5. Neon and Oxygen Abundances and Abundance Ratio in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Testa, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we determine the Ne/O abundance ratio from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) off-disk observations of quiescent streamers over the 1996-2008 period. We find that the Ne/O ratio is approximately constant over solar cycle 23 from 1996 to 2005, at a value of 0.099 ± 0.017 this value is lower than the transition region determinations from the quiet Sun used to infer the neon photospheric abundance from the oxygen photospheric abundance. Also, the Ne/O ratio we determined from SUMER is in excellent agreement with in situ determinations from ACE/SWICS. In 2005-2008, the Ne/O abundance ratio increased with time and reached 0.25 ± 0.05, following the same trend found in the slowest wind analyzed by ACE/SWICS. Further, we measure the absolute abundance in the corona for both oxygen and neon from the data set of 1996 November 22, obtaining A o = 8.99 ± 0.04 and A Ne = 7.92 ± 0.03, and we find that both elements are affected by the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, with oxygen being enhanced by a factor of 1.4-2.1 over its photospheric abundance, and neon being changed by a factor of 0.75-1.20. We conclude that the Ne/O ratio is not constant in the solar atmosphere, both in time and at different heights, and that it cannot be reliably used to infer the neon abundance in the photosphere. Also, we argue that the FIP effect was less effective during the minimum of solar cycle 24, and that the Ne/O = 0.25 ± 0.05 value measured at that time is closer to the true photospheric value, leading to a neon photospheric abundance larger than assumed by ≈40%. We discuss the implications of these results for the solar abundance problem, for the FIP effect, and for the identification of the source regions of the solar wind.

  6. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    PubMed Central

    Genung, Mark A.; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Claire B.; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; Reynolds, Wm. Nicholas; Felker-Quinn, Emmi; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot) of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1) plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2) plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. Conclusions/Significance These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:20090850

  7. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. V. Nebular Abundances of 15 Intermediate Luminosity Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Bresolin, Fabio; Saviane, Ivo; Yegorova, Irina

    2015-09-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy of 15 emission-line galaxies cataloged in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey, selected for their possession of high equivalent width [O iii] lines. The primary goal of this study was to attempt to derive direct-method (Te) abundances for use in constraining the upper-metallicity branch of the {R}23 relation. The spectra cover the full optical region from [O ii]λλ3726,3729 to [S iii]λλ9069,9531 and include the measurement of [O iii]λ4363 in 13 objects. From these spectra, we determine abundance ratios of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon. We find these galaxies to predominantly possess oxygen abundances in the range of 8.0 ≲ 12+log(O/H) ≲ 8.3. We present a comparison of direct-method abundances with empirical strong-emission-line techniques, revealing several discrepancies. We also present a comparison of direct-method oxygen abundance calculations using electron temperatures determined from emission lines of O++ and S++, finding a small systematic shift to lower Te (∼1184 K) and higher metallicity (∼0.14 dex) for sulfur-derived Te compared to oxygen-derived Te. Finally, we explore in some detail the different spectral activity types of targets in our sample, including regular star-forming galaxies, those with suspected AGN contamination, and a local pair of low-metallicity, high-luminosity compact objects.

  8. Environmentally-mediated ash aggregate formation: example from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Benjamin; Delmelle, Pierre; Douillet, Guilhem A.; Lavallée, Yan; Mueller, Sebastian B.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Dobson, Kate J.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash is generated during explosive eruptions through an array of different processes; it can be produced in large quantities and can, in some circumstances, have the potential for far-reaching impacts beyond the flanks of the volcano. Aggregation of ash particles can significantly impact the dispersal within the atmosphere, and its subsequent deposition into terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, our understanding of the complex interplay of the boundary conditions which permit aggregation to occur remain incomplete. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, has been intermittently active since 1999. In August 2006, a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDC) were generated during a series of dry, Vulcanian explosions and travelled down the western and northern flanks of the volcano. In some locations, the related PDC deposits temporarily dammed the Chambo river, and the residual heat within those deposits produced vigorous steam plumes. During several field campaigns (2009-2015), we mapped, sampled, and analysed the related deposits. At the base of the Rea ravine, a large delta fan of PDC deposits had dammed the river over a length of several hundred metres. In several outcrops adjacent to the river and in small erosional gullies we found a peculiar stratigraphic layer (up to ten centimetres thick) at the top of the PDC deposits. As this layer is capped by a thin fall unit of coarse ash that we also find elsewhere at the top of the August 2006 deposits, the primary nature is without doubt. In this unit, we observed abundant ash aggregates up to eight millimetres in diameter within a poorly sorted, ash-depleted lapilli tuff, primarily comprised of rounded pumiceous and scoriaceous clasts of similar size. Leaching experiments have shown that these aggregates contain several hundred ppm of soluble sulphate and chloride salts. Recent laboratory experiments (Mueller et al. 2015) have suggested that in order for accretionary lapilli to be preserved within ash

  9. Occupancy as a surrogate for abundance estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Nichols, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    In many monitoring programmes it may be prohibitively expensive to estimate the actual abundance of a bird species in a defined area, particularly at large spatial scales, or where birds occur at very low densities. Often it may be appropriate to consider the proportion of area occupied by the species as an alternative state variable. However, as with abundance estimation, issues of detectability must be taken into account in order to make accurate inferences: the non?detection of the species does not imply the species is genuinely absent. Here we review some recent modelling developments that permit unbiased estimation of the proportion of area occupied, colonization and local extinction probabilities. These methods allow for unequal sampling effort and enable covariate information on sampling locations to be incorporated. We also describe how these models could be extended to incorporate information from marked individuals, which would enable finer questions of population dynamics (such as turnover rate of nest sites by specific breeding pairs) to be addressed. We believe these models may be applicable to a wide range of bird species and may be useful for investigating various questions of ecological interest. For example, with respect to habitat quality, we might predict that a species is more likely to have higher local extinction probabilities, or higher turnover rates of specific breeding pairs, in poor quality habitats.

  10. Parameters and abundances in luminous stars

    SciTech Connect

    Earle Luck, R.

    2014-06-01

    Parameters and abundances for 451 stars of spectral types F, G, and K of luminosity classes I and II have been derived. Absolute magnitudes and E(B – V) have been derived for the warmer stars in order to investigate the galactic abundance gradient. The value found here: d[Fe/H]/dR ∼ –0.06 dex kpc{sup –1}, agrees well with previous determinations. Stellar evolution indicators have also been investigated with the derived C/O ratios indicating that standard CN processing has been operating. Perhaps the most surprising result found in these supposedly relatively young intermediate-mass stars is that both [O/Fe] and [C/Fe] show a correlation with [Fe/H] much the same as found in older populations. While the stars were selected based on luminosity class, there does exist a significant [Fe/H] range in the sample. The likely explanation of this is that there is a significant range in age in the sample; that is, some of the sample are low-mass red-giant stars with types that place them within the selection criteria.

  11. Elemental Abundances of Mercury-Manganese Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    We propose to obtain a carefully planned set of multiple high dispersion exposures of three MercuryManganese stars in both the SWP and LWP cameras. These observations will be coadded to increase the S/N ratio so that accurate elemental abundances can be derived for these examples of HgMn stars, each of which represents some extreme class aspect. This will increase of sample of HgMn stars from four to seven. Of particular interest are the abundances of N and Co in which some HgMn stars have shown remarkable underabundances. Comparison of the UV and optical spectra features due to light elements such as N (and C and 0) provide an observational framework to test NLTE models such as those of Takada (1993). This work has already shed some light on some of earlier findings for normal stars. The ability to accurately determine the surface chemical composition of the late B stars through such studies will lead to better tests for theories purporting to explain the origin of the chemical peculiarities seen in this temperature domain.

  12. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  13. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  14. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  16. ABUNDANCES OF GALACTIC ANTICENTER PLANETARY NEBULAE AND THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE GRADIENT IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R. B. C.; Morrison, Michael A.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Jaskot, Anne E.; Balick, Bruce; Milingo, Jacquelynne B. E-mail: morrison@nhn.ou.ed E-mail: ajaskot@umich.ed E-mail: jmilingo@gettysburg.ed

    2010-11-20

    We have obtained spectrophotometric observations of 41 anticenter planetary nebulae (PNe) located in the disk of the Milky Way. Electron temperatures and densities, as well as chemical abundances for He, N, O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar were determined. Incorporating these results into our existing database of PN abundances yielded a sample of 124 well-observed objects with homogeneously determined abundances extending from 0.9 to 21 kpc in galactocentric distance. We performed a detailed regression analysis which accounted for uncertainties in both oxygen abundances and radial distances in order to establish the metallicity gradient across the disk to be 12 + log(O/H) = (9.09 {+-} 0.05) - (0.058 {+-} 0.006) x R{sub g} , with R{sub g} in kpc. While we see some evidence that the gradient steepens at large galactocentric distances, more objects toward the anticenter need to be observed in order to confidently establish the true form of the metallicity gradient. We find no compelling evidence that the gradient differs between Peimbert Types I and II, nor is oxygen abundance related to the vertical distance from the galactic plane. Our gradient agrees well with analogous results for H II regions but is steeper than the one recently published by Stanghellini and Haywood over a similar range in galactocentric distance. A second analysis using PN distances from a different source implied a flatter gradient, and we suggest that we have reached a confusion limit which can only be resolved with greatly improved distance measurements and an understanding of the natural scatter in oxygen abundances.

  17. Mechanical properties of simulated Mars materials: gypsum-rich sandstones and lapilli tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn; Lockner, David; Okubo, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity, and other recent studies on diagenesis in the extensive equatorial layered deposits on Mars, suggest that the likely lithologies of these deposits are gypsum-rich sandstones and tuffaceous sediments (for example, Murchie and others, 2009; Squyres and others, 2012; Zimbelman and Scheidt, 2012). Of particular interest is how the diagenesis history of these sediments (degree of cementation and composition) influences the strength and brittle behavior of the material. For instance, fractures are more common in lower porosity materials under strain, whereas deformation bands, characterized by distributed strain throughout a broader discontinuity in a material, are common in higher porosity sedimentary materials. Such discontinuities can either enhance or restrict fluid flow; hence, failure mode plays an important role in determining the mechanics of fluid migration through sediments (Antonellini and Aydin, 1994; 1995; Taylor and Pollard, 2000; Ogilvie and Glover, 2001). As part of a larger study to characterize processes of fault-controlled fluid flow in volcaniclastic and gypsum-rich sediments on Mars, we have completed a series of laboratory experiments to focus on how gypsum clast content and degree of authigenic cementation affects the strength behavior of simulated Mars rocks. Both axial deformation and hydrostatic pressure tests were done at room temperature under dry conditions.

  18. VLT spectroscopy of low-metallicity emission-line galaxies: abundance patterns and abundance discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Stasińska, G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.; Papaderos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Context. We present deep spectroscopy of a large sample of low-metallicity emission-line galaxies. Aims: The main goal of this study is to derive element abundances in these low-metallicity galaxies. Methods: We analyze 121 VLT spectra of H ii regions in 46 low-metallicity emission-line galaxies. Of these spectra 83 are archival VLT/FORS1+UVES spectra of H ii regions in 31 low-metallicity emission-line galaxies that are studied for the first time with standard direct methods to determine the electron temperatures, the electron number densities, and the chemical abundances. Results: The oxygen abundance of the sample lies in the range 12 + log O/H = 7.2-8.4. We confirm previous findings that Ne/O increases with increasing oxygen abundance, likely because of a higher depletion of oxygen in higher-metallicity galaxies. The Fe/O ratio decreases from roughly solar at the lowest metallicities to about one tenth of solar, indicating that the degree of depletion of iron into dust grains depends on metallicity. The N/O ratio in extremely low-metallicity galaxies with 12 + log O/H < 7.5 shows a slight increase with decreasing oxygen abundance, which could be the signature of enhanced production of primary nitrogen by rapidly rotating stars at low metallicity. We present the first empirical relation between the electron temperature derived from [S iii]λ6312/λ9069 or [N ii]λ5755/λ6583 and the one derived from [O iii]λ4363/λ(4959+5007) in low-metallicity galaxies. We also present an empirical relation between te derived from [O ii]λ3727/(λ7320 + λ7330) or [S ii]λ4068/(λ6717 + λ6730) and [O iii]λ4363/λ(4959+5007). The electron number densities Ne(Cl iii) and Ne(Ar iv) were derived in a number of objects and are found to be higher than Ne(O ii) and Ne(S ii). This has potential implications for the derivation of the pregalactic helium abundance. In a number of objects, the abundances of C++ and O++ could be derived from recombination lines. Our study confirms the

  19. The radiolarian evidence for the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation with the inferred oceanic plate stratigraphy: A case of weakly-metamorphosed accretionary complex in Ishigaki Jima, southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    The island of Ishigaki Jima, located in the western part of the southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan, is underlain by a basement comprising the Tumuru and Fu-saki formations. The former is a pelitic glaucophane schist with a metamorphic age of 220-190 Ma, and the latter is a weakly metamorphosed accretionary complex, composed mainly of chert, mudstone and sandstone with minor amounts of limestone and mafic rocks. The Fu-saki Formation was weakly metamorphosed at ∼140 Ma. Latest Carboniferous-Early Jurassic microfossils have been obtained from the limestones, cherts and siliceous mudstones of this formation, but no fossils have been collected from the phyllitic mudstones. The radiolarian fauna of the phyllitic mudstones described herein indicates a late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian (Early Jurassic) age. This result, when combined with existing data, enables the reconstruction of an oceanic plate stratigraphy, showing a succession of (in ascending order) Upper Carboniferous-Triassic cherts, Sinemurian-lower Pliensbachian siliceous mudstones and upper Pliensbachian-lower Toarcian phyllitic mudstones and sandstones. The radiolarians from the phyllitic mudstones are important in constraining the timing of the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation to the base of the Tumuru Formation.

  20. The carbon monoxide abundance in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The steady-state abundance of carbon monoxide in interstellar clouds is calculated as a function of optical depth, density, and temperature. The molecular reactions which lead to CO can be initiated by the following ion-molecule reactions: H(+) + O yields O(+) + H, C(+) + H2 yields CH2(+) + a photon, and H3(+) + C and O. As the ultraviolet radiation field is attenuated, C(+) is transformed primarily into CO and C I. There are characteristic column densities for the transition to CO corresponding to the optical depths for attenuating this field at different wavelengths. For thick, low-temperature clouds the attenuation of the fields which ionize carbon, sulfur, and heavy metals is important for CO production initiated by H3(+). Complete conversion to CO does not necessarily occur, and considerable neutral carbon may be expected even in optically thick clouds. Comparison of integrated column densities of CO with extinction are in reasonable agreement with observations.

  1. An Update of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Luridiana, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Three of the best determinations of the primordial helium abundance (Yp) are those obtained from low metallicity HII regions by Aver, Olive, Porter, & Skillman (2013); Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014); and Peimbert, Peimbert, & Luridiana (2007). In this poster we update the Yp determination by Peimbert et al. taking into account, among other aspects, recent advances in the determination of the He atomic physical parameters, the temperature structure, the collisional effects of high temperatures on the Balmer lines, as well as the effect of H and He bound-bound absorption.We compare our results with those of Aver et al. and Izotov et al. and point out possible explanations for the differences among the three determinations. We also compare our results with those obtained with the Plank satellite considering recent measurements of the neutron mean life; this comparison has implications on the determination of the number of light neutrino families.

  2. Element abundance ratios in stellar population modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    I review the implementation of the effects from varying chemical element abundance ratios in stellar population modelling, focusing on α- and Fe-peak elements. A brief overview of the development of such models over the past 30 years is provided, starting with early work on the identification of relevant absorption features in the spectra of early-type galaxies in the 1980s leading to the most recent developments of the past years. Recent highlights include the adoption of new flux calibrated libraries, the inclusion of a wide range of chemical elements, the calculation of error estimates on the model, and the consideration of element variation effects on full spectra. The calibration of such models with globular clusters and some key results on the element ratios measured in early-type galaxies are presented.

  3. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  4. Chemical abundances in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Lecureur, A.; Hill, V.; Barbuy, B.; Renzini, A.; Minniti, D.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    We spectroscopically characterize the Galactic Bulge to infer its star formation timescale, compared to the other Galactic components, through the chemical signature on its individual stars. O, Na, Mg, Al were obtained for 50 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge from UVES spectra (R=45,000), while Fe was measured in more than 400 stars with a slightly low resolution (R=20,000) and the GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. Oxygen and Magnesium show a well defined trend with [Fe/H], with abundances larger than those measured in both thin and thick disk stars, supporting a scenario in which the bulge formed before and more rapidly than the disk. On the other hand the iron distribution peaks at solar metallicity and it is slightly narrower than that measured in previous works. Part of the present results have been published by \\citet{Zoccali06} and \\citet{Lecureur07}, and part will be discussed in forthcoming papers.

  5. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced versus native communities, because ecological or evolutionary based shifts in popula...

  6. Cosmological implications of light element abundances: theory.

    PubMed

    Schramm, D N

    1993-06-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from 1H at 76% and 4He at 24% by mass through 2H and 3He at parts in 105 down to 7Li at parts in 1010. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (Nnu) are a positive laboratory test of this standard Big Bang scenario. The possible alternate scenario of quark-hadron-induced inhomogeneities is also discussed. It is shown that when this alternative scenario is made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density (Omegab) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus adding to the robustness of the standard model and the conclusion that Omegab approximately 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for nonbaryonic dark matter (assuming total density Omegatotal = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since the density of visible matter Omegavisible < Omegab. The recent Population II B and Be observations are also discussed and shown to be a consequence of cosmic ray spallation processes rather than primordial nucleosynthesis. The light elements and Nnu successfully probe the cosmological model at times as early as 1 sec and a temperature (T) of approximately 10(10) K (approximately 1 MeV). Thus, they provided the first quantitative arguments that led to the connections of cosmology to nuclear and particle physics. PMID:11607387

  7. Cosmological implications of light element abundances: theory.

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, D N

    1993-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from 1H at 76% and 4He at 24% by mass through 2H and 3He at parts in 105 down to 7Li at parts in 1010. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (Nnu) are a positive laboratory test of this standard Big Bang scenario. The possible alternate scenario of quark-hadron-induced inhomogeneities is also discussed. It is shown that when this alternative scenario is made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density (Omegab) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus adding to the robustness of the standard model and the conclusion that Omegab approximately 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for nonbaryonic dark matter (assuming total density Omegatotal = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since the density of visible matter Omegavisible < Omegab. The recent Population II B and Be observations are also discussed and shown to be a consequence of cosmic ray spallation processes rather than primordial nucleosynthesis. The light elements and Nnu successfully probe the cosmological model at times as early as 1 sec and a temperature (T) of approximately 10(10) K (approximately 1 MeV). Thus, they provided the first quantitative arguments that led to the connections of cosmology to nuclear and particle physics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:11607387

  8. Earth abundant bimetallic nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Jonathan F., Jr.

    Polymer exchange membrane fuel cells have the potential to replace current fossil fuel-based technologies in terms of emissions and efficiency, but CO contamination of H2 fuel, which is derived from steam methane reforming, leads to system inefficiency or failure. Solutions currently under development are bimetallic nanoparticles comprised of earth-abundant metals in different architectures to reduce the concentration of CO by PROX during fuel cell operation. Chapter One introduces the Pt-Sn and Co-Ni bimetallic nanoparticle systems, and the intermetallic and core-shell architectures of interest for catalytic evaluation. Application, theory, and studies associated with the efficacy of these nanoparticles are briefly reviewed. Chapter Two describes the concepts of the synthetic and characterization methods used in this work. Chapter Three presents the synthetic, characterization, and catalytic findings of this research. Pt, PtSn, PtSn2, and Pt 3Sn nanoparticles have been synthesized and supported on gamma-Al2O3. Pt3Sn was shown to be an effective PROX catalyst in various gas feed conditions, such as the gas mixture incorporating 0.1% CO, which displayed a light-off temperatures of ˜95°C. Co and Ni monometallic and CoNi bimetallic nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized, ultimately leading to the development of target Co Ni core-shell nanoparticles. Proposed studies of catalytic properties of these nanoparticles in preferential oxidation of CO (PROX) reactions will further elucidate the effects of different crystallographic phases, nanoparticle-support interactions, and architecture on catalysis, and provide fundamental understanding of catalysis with nanoparticles composed of earth abundant metals in different architectures.

  9. Halo abundances within the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, D.; Eardley, E.; Peacock, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dependence of the mass function of dark-matter haloes on their environment within the cosmic web of large-scale structure. A dependence of the halo mass function on large-scale mean density is a standard element of cosmological theory, allowing mass-dependent biasing to be understood via the peak-background split. On the assumption of a Gaussian density field, this analysis can be extended to ask how the mass function depends on the geometrical environment: clusters, filaments, sheets and voids, as classified via the tidal tensor (the Hessian matrix of the gravitational potential). In linear theory, the problem can be solved exactly, and the result is attractively simple: the conditional mass function has no explicit dependence on the local tidal field, and is a function only of the local density on the filtering scale used to define the tidal tensor. There is nevertheless a strong implicit predicted dependence on geometrical environment, because the local density couples statistically to the derivatives of the potential. We compute the predictions of this model and study the limits of their validity by comparing them to results deduced empirically from N-body simulations. We have verified that, to a good approximation, the abundance of haloes in different environments depends only on their densities, and not on their tidal structure. In this sense we find relative differences between halo abundances in different environments with the same density which are smaller than ˜13 per cent. Furthermore, for sufficiently large filtering scales, the agreement with the theoretical prediction is good, although there are important deviations from the Gaussian prediction at small, non-linear scales. We discuss how to obtain improved predictions in this regime, using the `effective-universe' approach.

  10. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  11. Dynamical implications of Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; de Pater, Imke

    2005-03-01

    Groundbased radio observations indicate that Jupiter's ammonia is globally depleted from 0.6 bars to at least 4-6 bars relative to the deep abundance of ˜3 times solar, a fact that has so far defied explanation. The observations also indicate that (i) the depletion is greater in belts than zones, and (ii) the greatest depletion occurs within Jupiter's local 5-μm hot spots, which have recently been detected at radio wavelengths. Here, we first show that both the global depletion and its belt-zone variation can be explained by a simple model for the interaction of moist convection with Jupiter's cloud-layer circulation. If the global depletion is dynamical in origin, then important endmember models for the belt-zone circulation can be ruled out. Next, we show that the radio observations of Jupiter's 5-μm hot spots imply that the equatorial wave inferred to cause hot spots induces vertical parcel oscillation of a factor of ˜2 in pressure near the 2-bar level, which places important constraints on hot-spot dynamics. Finally, using spatially resolved radio maps, we demonstrate that low-latitude features exceeding ˜4000 km diameter, such as the equatorial plumes and large vortices, are also depleted in ammonia from 0.6 bars to at least 2 bars relative to the deep abundance of 3 times solar. If any low-latitude features exist that contain 3-times-solar ammonia up to the 0.6-bar ammonia condensation level, they must have diameters less than ˜4000 km.

  12. Li-7 abundances in halo stars: Testing stellar evolution models and the primordial Li-7 abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaboyer, Brian; Demarque, P.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with (Fe/H) = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial Li-7 abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of accurate Li abundances in extremely metal-poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models with gray atmospheres do a very good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than approximately 5600 K. They predict a primordial. Li-7 abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24 +/- 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the Li-7 destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of Li-7 from the surface of the star. Rotational mixing inhibits the microscopic diffusion and the (Fe/H) = -2.28 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the mean trend in T(sub eff) which is present in the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable Li-7 depletion in these models and the primordial Li-7 abundance inferred from these models is log N(Li) = 3.08 +/- 0.1. However, the (Fe/H) = -3.28 isochrones reveal problems with the combined models. These isochrones predict a trend of decreasing log N(Li) with increasing T(sub eff) which is not present in the observations. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  13. Li-7 abundances in halo stars: Testing stellar evolution models and the primordial Li-7 abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboyer, Brian; Demarque, P.

    1994-10-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with (Fe/H) = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial Li-7 abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of accurate Li abundances in extremely metal-poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models with gray atmospheres do a very good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than approximately 5600 K. They predict a primordial. Li-7 abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24 +/- 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the Li-7 destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of Li-7 from the surface of the star. Rotational mixing inhibits the microscopic diffusion and the (Fe/H) = -2.28 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the mean trend in Teff which is present in the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable Li-7 depletion in these models and the primordial Li-7 abundance inferred from these models is log N(Li) = 3.08 +/- 0.1. However, the (Fe/H) = -3.28 isochrones reveal problems with the combined models. These isochrones predict a trend of decreasing log N(Li) with increasing Teff which is not present in the observations. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  14. Deep-bedded ultramafic diatremes in the Missouri River Breaks volcanic field, Montana, USA: 1 km of syn-eruptive subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpit, Séverine; Ross, Pierre-Simon; Hearn, B. Carter

    2014-07-01

    The ultramafic Eocene Missouri River Breaks volcanic field (MRBVF, Montana, USA) includes over 50 diatremes emplaced in a mostly soft substrate. The current erosion level is 1.3-1.5 km below the pre-eruptive surface, exposing the deep part of the diatreme structures and some dikes. Five representative diatremes are described here; they are 200-375 m across and have sub-vertical walls. Their infill consists mostly of 55-90 % bedded pyroclastic rocks (fine tuffs to coarse lapilli tuffs) with concave-upward bedding, and 45-10 % non-bedded pyroclastic rocks (medium lapilli tuffs to tuff breccias). The latter zones form steep columns 15-135 m in horizontal dimension, which cross-cut the bedded pyroclastic rocks. Megablocks of the host sedimentary formations are also present in the diatremes, some being found 1 km or more below their sources. The diatreme infill contains abundant lithic clasts and ash-sized particles, indicating efficient fragmentation of magma and country rocks. The spherical to sub-spherical juvenile clasts are non-vesicular. They are accompanied by minor accretionary lapilli and armored lapilli. The deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents are locally observed. Our main interpretations are as follows: (1) the observations strongly support phreatomagmatic explosions as the energy source for fragmentation and diatreme excavation; (2) the bedded pyroclastic rocks were deposited on the crater floor, and subsided by 1.0-1.3 km to their current location, with subsidence taking place mostly during the eruption; (3) the observed non-bedded pyroclastic columns were created by debris jets that punched through the bedded pyroclastic material; the debris jets did not empty the mature diatreme, occupying only a fraction of its width, and some debris jets probably did not reach the crater floor; (4) the mature diatreme was nearly always filled and buttressed by pyroclastic debris at depth - there was never a 1.3-1.5-km-deep empty hole with sub-vertical walls

  15. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H. H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with Z = 6-30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  16. Solar Coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 Z or = 30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  17. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 = or Z or = 30. The ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  18. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and at the lower boundary of the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate contents. Depending on oxygen availability, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was consumed within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition zone (SMTZ) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMTZ did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 162 cm yr-1 in central habitats characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna to 348 cm yr-1 in habitats of large and small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats at the lower boundary of the OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way bioirrigation compensates for the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats and stimulates rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation macrofauna engineer their geochemical environment and fuel

  19. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities, and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and below the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted sediment pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate concentrations. Depending on oxygen availability in the bottom water, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats, which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was retained within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMT did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 120 cm yr-1 in the central habitat, characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna, to 297 cm yr-1 in the habitat of large and few small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats below the core-OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate down into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way the animals deal with the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats by stimulating rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide hydrogen sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation, macrofauna engineer their geochemical

  20. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Large Silicon Abundance in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoko; Onaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shibai, Hiroshi; Tomono, Daigo; Yui, Yukari Y.

    2006-03-01

    We have made one-dimensional raster scan observations of the ρ Oph and σ Sco star-forming regions with two spectrometers (SWS and LWS) on board the ISO. In the ρ Oph region, [Si II] 35 μm, [O I] 63 μm, 146 μm, [C II] 158 μm, and the H2 pure rotational transition lines S(0) to S(3) are detected, and the photodissociation region (PDR) properties are derived as the radiation field scaled by the solar neighborhood value G0~30-500, the gas density n~250-2500 cm-3, and the surface temperature T~100-400 K. The ratio of [Si II] 35 μm to [O I] 146 μm indicates that silicon of 10%-20% of the solar abundance must be in the gaseous form in the PDR, suggesting that efficient dust destruction is ongoing even in the PDR and that a fraction of the silicon atoms may be contained in volatile forms in dust grains. The [O I] 63 μm and [C II] 158 μm emissions are too weak relative to [O I] 146 μm to be accounted for by standard PDR models. We propose a simple model, in which overlapping PDR clouds along the line of sight absorb the [O I] 63 μm and [C II] 158 μm emissions, and show that the proposed model reproduces the observed line intensities fairly well. In the σ Sco region, we have detected three fine-structure lines, [O I] 63 μm, [N II] 122 μm, and [C II] 158 μm, and derived that 30%-80% of the [C II] emission comes from the ionized gas. The upper limit of the [Si II] 35 μm is compatible with the solar abundance relative to nitrogen, and no useful constraint on the gaseous Si is obtained for the σ Sco region. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  2. Metallic abundances of the 2002 Leonid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuga, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Watanabe, J.; Yano, H.

    spectra, time variation of the abundances of metallic atoms and of their electronic excitation temperature were obtained. In this meeting, we will discuss the metallic abundances of the 2001 and 2002 Leonid meteors and the possibility of the delivery mechanism of OH and CN (387.9 nm B2Σ+ - X2π) from the comet. The discussion of the possibility of the volatile element is one of the interesting subjects of the meteor.

  3. High Abundance of Ions in Cosmic Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Water-rich, mixed molecular ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout interstellar molecular clouds and the Solar System. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation and particle bombardment of these abiotic ices produces complex organic species, including important biogenic molecules such as amino acids and functionalized PAHs which may have played a role in the origin of life. This ability of such water-rich, oxygen dominated ices to promote production of complex organic species is surprising and points to an important, unusual, but previously overlooked mechanism at play within the ice. Here we report the nature of this mechanism using electronic spectroscopy. VUV-irradiation of PAH/H2O ices leads to an unprecedented and efficient (greater than 70 %) conversion of the neutral PAHs to their cation form (PAH+). Further, these H2O/PAH+ ices are stabile at temperatures below 50 K, a temperature domain common throughout interstellar clouds and the Solar System. Between 50 and 125 K they react to form the complex organics. In view of this, we conclude that charged PAHs and other molecular ions should be common and abundant in many cosmic ices. The chemical, spectroscopic and physical properties of these ion-rich ices can be of fundamental importance for objects as diverse as comets, planets, and molecular clouds and may account for several poorly understood phenomena associated with each of these object classes.

  4. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  5. Abundances of isotopes in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes show no large anomalies on Venus (no more than 10-15%) or Mars (less than 5%); the high value of N-15/N-14 found on Mars is explained by nonthermal escape of nitrogen. The isotopes of nonradiogenic noble gases in the atmosphere of Mars exhibit abundance patterns similar to those in the primordial component of meteoritic gases and in the earth's atmosphere. This implies that gas fractionation took place in the inner solar nebula prior to planet formation. The relatively high value of Xe-129 on Mars emphasizes its deficiency on earth, implying a difference in accretion histories of volatiles for the two planets. In the outer solar system, normal isotope ratios for nitrogen and carbon on Jupiter, and for carbon on Saturn are found, but precision is low (+ or - 15% at best). Controversy exists about the correct value of D/H, with current estimates ranging from 2.3 plus or minus 1.1 to 5.1 plus or - 0.7 times 10 to the minus 5th. Planetary missions planned for the next few years should add considerably to the quantity and quality of these data.

  6. Energetic particle abundances in solar electron events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive search of the ISEE 3 energetic particle data for solar electron events with associated increases in elements with atomic number Z = 6 or greater are reported. A sample of 90 such events was obtained. The events support earlier evidence of a bimodal distribution in Fe/O or, more clearly, in Fe/C. Most of the electron events belong to the group that is Fe-rich in comparison with the coronal abundance. The Fe-rich events are frequently also He-3-rich and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts and impulsive solar flares. Fe-poor events are associated with type IV bursts and with interplanetary shocks. With some exceptions, event-to-event enhancements in the heavier elements vary smoothly with Z and with Fe/C. In fact, these variations extend across the full range of events despite inferred differences in acceleration mechanism. The origin of source material in all events appears to be coronal and not photospheric.

  7. Modeling abundances in star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are produced from various types of supernovae (and AGB stars). I first show that elemental abundances of extremely metal-poor stars are consistent not with pair-instability supernovae but with faint supernovae. Then I introduce subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions. These "minor" supernovae are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies. With "major" chemical enrichment sources, I show cosmic chemical enrichment in our cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is also included with a new model for the formation of black holes motivated by the first star formation. AGN-driven outflows transport metals into the circumgalactic medium and the intergalactic medium. Nonetheless, the metallicity changes of galaxies are negligible, and the mass-metallicity relations, which are mainly generated by supernova feedback at the first star burst, are preserved. Within galaxies, metallicity radial gradients are produced, which can be affected by AGN feedback but are more sensitive to the merging histories. We find a weak correlation between the gradients and galaxy mass, which is consistent with available observations. These simulations also provide predictions of supernova/hypernova/GRB rates and the properties of their host galaxies.

  8. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  9. Numerical resolution limits on subhalo abundance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; White, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) inserts galaxies into dark matter only simulations of the growth of cosmic structure in a way that requires minimal assumptions about galaxy formation. A galaxy is placed at the potential minimum of each distinct self-bound subhalo with a luminosity which is a monotonically increasing function of the maximum mass (or circular velocity) attained over the subhalo's earlier history. Galaxy and subhalo properties are linked by matching model and observed luminosity functions. Simulated structures can then be compared in detail with observation, for example, through galaxy correlation statistics, group catalogues or galaxy-galaxy lensing. Robust astrophysical conclusions can be drawn from such a comparison only on scales which are unaffected by the numerical limitations of the simulation. Here, we compare results for the Millennium Simulation (MS) with subhaloes defined using the SUBFIND to those obtained applying identical analysis to the much higher resolution Millennium-II. Correlation statistics on scales between 200 and 2 Mpc converge to within 20 per cent only for subhaloes with masses at infall corresponding to at least 1000 simulation particles in the MS. Numerically converged results can be obtained to much lower infall particle number, if galaxies are followed even after their associated subhaloes have been tidally disrupted, as in most recent semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations. This allows robust comparison between simulation and observation over a wider dynamic range in mass than for a SHAM analysis which ignores such `orphan' galaxies.

  10. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  11. Beryllium abundances in Hg-Mn stars

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Heacox, W.D.; Wolff, S.C.; Borsenberger, J.; Praderie, F.

    1982-08-15

    The Hg-Mn stars show anomalous line strengths of many chemical elements including Be. We have observed the Be ii resonance doublet at lambdalambda 3130, 3131 at 6.7 A mm/sup -1/ in 43 Hg-Mn stars and 10 normal stars in the same temperature range with the coude spectrograph of the 2.24 m University of Hawaii telescope at Mauna Kea. Measured equivalent widths of the two lines and/or the blend of the doublet have been compared with predictions from (1) LTE model atmospheres and (2) non-LTE line formation on non-LTE model atmospheres. (For strong Be ii lines, the LTE calculations result in more Be by factors of 2 to 4 than do the non-LTE calculations.) Overabundances of factors of 20--2 x 10/sup 4/ relative to solar have been found for 75% of the Hg-Mn stars. The 25% with little or no Be are typically among the cooler Hg-Mn stars, but for the stars with Be excesses, there is only marginal evidence for a correlationi of the size of the overabundance and temperature. It is suggested that diffusion driven by radiation pressure is responsible for the observed Be abundance anomalies.

  12. Elemental Abundance Analyses with DAO Spectrograms. XXXV. On the Iron Abundances of B and A Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    2014-06-01

    I compared the results of LTE fine analyses for B and A stars based on the newer "precise and accurate" Fe II gf values of Melendez & Barbuy (MB) with those based on the relatively recent major critical compilation of Fuhr & Wiese (FW). Only nonblended Fe II lines with both FW and MB gf values for 34 B and A stars with equivalent widths derived from high dispersion, high (>200) signal-to-noise ratio Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectra were used. For most stars the standard deviations of the abundances derived from Fe II lines decrease slightly with the MB values, which is the signature of better consistency among the gf values. Then, for stars with many Fe I lines, I performed analyses using all lines with FW gf values and those with only A and B quality gf values and found minor improvements in the latter case. However, the abundances and microturbulences derived from Fe I lines are in better agreement with the Fe II FW results. The discrepancy between the results for Fe I FW and Fe II MB values could be due to NLTE effects on Fe I. A more limited comparison is made with the recent theoretical values of Deb & Hibbert which, when used, show a greater scatter of the derived Fe II gf values and smaller abundances than those obtained with the MB gf values.

  13. Chemical abundance analysis of symbiotic giants - III. Metallicity and CNO abundance patterns in 24 southern systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, Cezary; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants are essential to address the role of chemical composition in the evolution of symbiotic binaries, to map their parent population, and to trace their mass transfer history. However, the number of symbiotic giants with fairly well determined photospheric composition is still insufficient for statistical analyses. This is the third in a series of papers on the chemical composition of symbiotic giants determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000), near-infrared spectra. Here we present results for 24 S-type systems. Spectrum synthesis methods employing standard local thermal equilibrium analysis and atmosphere models were used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Fe, Ti, Ni, and Sc). Our analysis reveals metallicities distributed in a wide range from slightly supersolar ([Fe/H] ˜ +0.35 dex) to significantly subsolar ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.8 dex) but principally with near-solar and slightly subsolar metallicity ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.4 to -0.3 dex). The enrichment in 14N isotope, found in all these objects, indicates that the giants have experienced the first dredge-up. This was confirmed in a number of objects by the low 12C/13C ratio (5-23). We found that the relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  14. Abundance models improve spatial and temporal prioritization of conservation resources.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alison; Fink, Daniel; Reynolds, Mark D; Hochachka, Wesley M; Sullivan, Brian L; Bruns, Nicholas E; Hallstein, Eric; Merrifield, Matt S; Matsumoto, Sandi; Kelling, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Conservation prioritization requires knowledge about organism distribution and density. This information is often inferred from models that estimate the probability of species occurrence rather than from models that estimate species abundance, because abundance data are harder to obtain and model. However, occurrence and abundance may not display similar patterns and therefore development of robust, scalable, abundance models is critical to ensuring that scarce conservation resources are applied where they can have the greatest benefits. Motivated by a dynamic land conservation program, we develop and assess a general method for modeling relative abundance using citizen science monitoring data. Weekly estimates of relative abundance and occurrence were compared for prioritizing times and locations of conservation actions for migratory waterbird species in California, USA. We found that abundance estimates consistently provided better rankings of observed counts than occurrence estimates. Additionally, the relationship between abundance and occurrence was nonlinear and varied by species and season. Across species, locations prioritized by occurrence models had only 10-58% overlap with locations prioritized by abundance models, highlighting that occurrence models will not typically identify the locations of highest abundance that are vital for conservation of populations. PMID:26591443

  15. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-08-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  16. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-07-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [ A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  17. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  18. Nitrogen abundances in damped Lyalpha absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, T.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; Péroux, C.; D'Odorico, V.; Vladilo, G.

    Nitrogen is thought to have both primary and secondary origins depending on whether the seed carbon and oxygen are produced by the star itself (primary) or already present in the interstellar medium (secondary) from which star forms. Damped Lyalpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems with typical metallicities of -3.0≲ Z/Z⊙ ≲ -0.5 are excellent tools to study nitrogen production. We made a search for nitrogen in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) advanced data products (EUADP) database. In the EUADP database, we find 10 new measurements and 9 upper limits of nitrogen. We further compiled DLA/sub-DLA data from the literature with estimates available of nitrogen and alpha -elements. This yields a total of 98 systems, i.e. the largest nitrogen abundance sample investigated so far. In agreement with previous studies, we indeed find a bimodal [N/alpha ] behaviour: three-quarter systems show a mean value of [N/alpha ] =-0.87 with a scatter of 0.21 dex and one-quarter shows ratios clustered at [N/alpha ] = -1.43 with a lower dispersion of 0.13 dex. The high [N/alpha ] group is consistent with the blue compact dwarves and dwarf irregular galaxies, suggesting primary nitrogen production. The low [N/alpha ] group is the lowest ever observed in any astrophysical site and probably provides an evidence of the primary production by fast rotating massive stars in young sites. Moreover, we find a transition between the two [N/alpha ] groups around [N/H] ≃-2.5. The transition is not abrupt and there are a few systems lying in the transition region. Additional observations of DLAs/sub-DLAs below [N/H] <-2.5 would provide more clues.

  19. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Neyrinck, Mark; Paranjape, Aseem

    2015-08-01

    We compare analytical predictions of void volume functions to those measured from N-body simulations, detecting voids with the ZOBOV void finder. We push to very small, non-linear voids, below few Mpc radius, by considering the unsampled dark matter density field. We also study the case where voids are identified using haloes. We develop analytical formula for the void abundance of both the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism. These formulas are valid for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space, with a large class of realistic barrier models. We test the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of subvoids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of subvoid exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density δv of the ZOBOV voids - which is predicted to be a constant δv ≈ -2.7 in the spherical evolution model - is different from the predicted value, showing substantial scatter and scale dependence. This result applies to voids identified at z = 0 with effective radius between 1 and 10 h-1 Mpc. Our analytical approximations are flexible enough to give a good description of the resulting volume function; however, this happens for choices of parameter values that are different from those suggested by the spherical evolution assumption. We conclude that analytical models for voids must move away from the spherical approximation in order to be applied successfully to observations, and we discuss some possible ways forward.

  20. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, K.; Bel, J.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-06-01

    We model the abundance of haloes in the ˜(3 Gpc h-1)3 volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jackknife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear (b1) and non-linear (c2 and c3) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their performance when including the low mass range (Mh ≲ 3 × 1012 M⊙ h-1) in the analysis. Together with fits from the literature, we find an overall variation in the amplitudes of around 10 per cent in the low mass and up to 50 per cent in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range (Mh > 1014 M⊙ h-1). These variations propagate into a 10 per cent change in b1 predictions and a 50 per cent change in c2 or c3. Despite these strong variations, we find universal relations between b1 and c2 or c3 for which we provide simple fits. Excluding low-mass haloes, different models fitted with reasonable goodness in this analysis, show per cent level agreement in their b1 predictions, but are systematically 5-10 per cent lower than the bias directly measured with two-point halo-mass clustering. This result confirms previous findings derived from smaller volumes (and smaller masses). Inaccuracies in the bias predictions lead to 5-10 per cent errors in growth measurements. They also affect any halo occupation distribution fitting or (cluster) mass calibration from clustering measurements.

  1. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  2. Global distribution of microbial abundance and biomass in subseafloor sediment

    PubMed Central

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Pockalny, Robert; Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Smith, David C.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The global geographic distribution of subseafloor sedimentary microbes and the cause(s) of that distribution are largely unexplored. Here, we show that total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. This variation is strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance from land. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9⋅1029 cells [corresponding to 4.1 petagram (Pg) C and ∼0.6% of Earth’s total living biomass]. This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate Earth’s total number of microbes and total living biomass to be, respectively, 50–78% and 10–45% lower than previous estimates. PMID:22927371

  3. On the radial abundance gradients in discs of irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilyugin, L. S.; Grebel, E. K.; Zinchenko, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    We determine the radial abundance distributions across the discs of 14 irregular galaxies of the types Sm and Im (morphological T types 9 and 10) as traced by their H II regions. The oxygen and nitrogen abundances in H II regions are estimated through the Te method or/and with the counterpart method (C method). Moreover, we examine the correspondence between the radial abundance gradient and the surface brightness profile. We find that irregular galaxies with a flat inner profile (flat or outwardly increasing surface brightness in the central region) show shallow (if any) radial abundance gradients. On the other hand, irregular galaxies with a steep inner profile (with or without a bulge or central star cluster) usually show rather steep radial abundance gradients. This is in contrast to the widely held belief that irregular galaxies do not usually show a radial abundance gradient.

  4. Solar abundances as derived from solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there are well defined average abundances of heavy (Z above 2) solar energetic particles (SEPs), with variations in the acceleration and propagation producing a systematic flare-to-flare fractionation that depends on the charge per unit mass of the ion. Correcting the average SEP abundances for this fractionation yields SEP-derived coronal abundances for 20 elements. High-resolution SEP studies have also provided isotopic abundances for five elements. SEP-derived abundances indicate that elements with high first ionization potentials (greater than 10 eV) are depleted in the corona relative to the photosphere and provide new information on the solar abundance of C and Ne-22.

  5. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism. PMID:26563752

  6. Evolution of dispersion in the cosmic deuterium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorkin, Irina; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph; Petitjean, Patrick; Olive, Keith A.

    2016-05-01

    Deuterium is created during big bang nucleosynthesis, and, in contrast to the other light stable nuclei, can only be destroyed thereafter by fusion in stellar interiors. In this Letter, we study the cosmic evolution of the deuterium abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM) and its dispersion using realistic galaxy evolution models. We find that models that reproduce the observed metal abundance are compatible with observations of the deuterium abundance in the local ISM and z ˜ 3 absorption line systems. In particular, we reproduce the low astration factor which we attribute to a low global star formation efficiency. We calculate the dispersion in deuterium abundance arising from different structure formation histories in different parts of the Universe. Our model also predicts a tight correlation between deuterium and metal abundances which could be used to measure the primordial deuterium abundance.

  7. Galilean satellite eclipse studies. III - Jovian methane abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. W.; Greene, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    The methane abundance in the lower Jovian stratosphere is measured using the Galilean satellite eclipse technique. The average mixing ratio at the locations measured is larger than the expected value for a solar abundance of carbon with the expected value for a solar abundance of carbon with the possibility of some zenographic variation. Observationally compatible values are found for the South Temperate Zone, the edge of the Great Red Spot and the South Tropical Zone, and the Great Red Spot.

  8. The abundance of carbon in HU 2-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A logarithmic carbon abundance of 8.61 + or - 0.3 is derived for the planetary nebula Hu 2-1 using data taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. This value is close to the logarithmic carbon abundance of 8.67 + or - 0.1, found for the sun by other investigators. The carbon abundance of Hu 2-1 is compared to those of other planetary nebulae and to the predictions of stellar evolution calculations.

  9. Column abundance measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl at 45 deg S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. W.; Keep, D. J.; Burnett, C. R.; Burnett, E. B.

    1994-01-01

    The first Southern Hemisphere measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been obtained at Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S) with a PEPSIOS instrument measuring the absorption of sunlight at 308 nm. The variation of column OH with solar zenith angle is similar to that measured at other sites. However average annual abundances of OH are about 20% higher than those found by similar measurements at 40 deg N. Minimum OH abundances about 10% less than average levels at 40 deg N, are observed during austral spring. The OH abundance abruptly increases by 30% in early summer and remains at the elevated level until late the following winter.

  10. Abundances of planetary nebulae in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Planetary nebulae (PNe) abundances are poorly known for those nebulae in the Galactic bulge. This is because of the high and uneven extinction in the bulge which makes visual spectral measurements difficult. In addition, the extinction corrections may be unreliable. Elements considered are O, N, Ne, S, Ar, and Cl. Aims: We determine the abundances in 19 PNe, 18 of which are located in the bulge. This doubles the number of PNe abundance determinations in the bulge. The Galactic abundance gradient is discussed for five elements. Methods: The mid-infrared spectra measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope are used to determine the abundances. This part of the spectrum is little affected by extinction for which an uncertain correction is no longer necessary. In addition the connection with the visible and ultraviolet spectrum becomes simpler because hydrogen lines are observed both in the infrared and in the visible spectra. In this way we more than double the number of PNe with reliable abundances. Results: Reliable abundances are obtained for O, N, Ne, S, and Ar for Galactic bulge PNe. Conclusions: The Galactic abundance gradient is less steep than previously thought. This is especially true for oxygen. The sulfur abundance is reliable because all stages of ionization expected have been measured. It is not systematically low compared to oxygen as has been found for some Galactic PNe. Based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  11. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  12. Origin of Stellar Abundances in the early Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, F.; Beers, T. C.; Cowan, J.; Elliot, T.; Schatz, H.; Farouqi, K.; Gallino, R.; Heil, M.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Pignatari, M.

    2007-10-26

    Observations of metal-poor stars in the last decade have revealed an abundance pattern that have recently been explained as the result of two nucleosynthesis processes, a strong r-process that creates most of the Z{>=}56 and some 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and a light element primary process (LEPP) responsible for creating the remaining 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and some small contribution to heavier elements. We review some of the current literature on the LEPP and show a derived abundance pattern as a function of mass number.

  13. Gaseous abundances in galaxies explored with IFU surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present here our recent results in the analysis of the gas abundance gradients in galaxies in the Local Universe using IFU data extracted mostly from the CALIFA survey. With an updated statistics based on the analysis of more than 600 galaxies we confirm previous results: (1) the abundance gradient seems to present a characteristic value when normalized to the effective radius, (2) the shape of the abundance gradient depends on the stellar mass, with a clear drop in the inner regions for more massive galaxies, (3) using the abundance at the effective radius we confirm our previous results showing no secondary correlation with the SFR in the M-z relation.

  14. Highly Siderophile Element Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Neal, C. R.; Ely, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Critical evaluation of new and literature data for highly siderophile elements (HSE) in Martian (SNC) meteorites allows several first order conclusions to be drawn. (i) Re concentrations in SNC meteorites are nearly constant (within a factor of two) and do not correlate with rock type. Exceptions to this rule are Chassigny and Dar al Gani (DaG) 476, both of which are inferred to have experienced terrestrial Re contamination. (ii) Fractionations between Rh and Pd are small. Excluding Shergotty, the Rh/Pd ratio of the SNC suite is 0.22\\pm0.05. (iii) Os and Ir contents vary by about four orders of magnitude; and positive correlations with MgO, Cr, and Ni suggest that these variations are not controlled by sulfide fractionation. A possible exception is the orthopyroxenite ALH84001, whose HSE's (including Ni, which is compatible in opx) are very low. (iv) Zagami, Shergotty, and Nakhla have nearly identical HSE signatures. Shergotty and Zagami have experienced assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) and have "crustal" Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. Conversely, the Nakhla parent was a small degree partial melt of a depleted mantle that interacted little with the Martian crust. These observations suggest that "evolved" HSE signatures can be produced by either fractional crystallization or small degrees of partial melting. (v) Chassigny and other mafic SNC's have HSE signatures that are very distinct from those of Nakhla-Zagami-Shergotty. The HSE elemental ratios of mafic SNC's approach chondritic, implying that the Martian mantle has nearly chondritic relative abundances of the HSE's. (vi) This chondritic HSE signature is observed in SNC's of various ages, suggesting that this is an ancient feature that has not evolved over time. (vii) No correlation is observed between HSE's and signatures of crustal contamination (e.g., Sr isotopes), indicating that the HSE signatures of the SNC suite are not derived from the crust. (vii) The Ru/Pd for the SNC suite ratio is about

  15. Heavy Element Abundances in NGC 5846

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the diffuse X-ray coronae surrounding the elliptical galaxy NGC 5846, combining measurements from two observatories, ROSAT and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics. We map the gas temperature distribution and find a central cool region within an approximately isothermal gas halo extending to a radius of about 50 kpc and evidence for a temperature decrease at larger radii. With a radially falling temperature profile, the total mass converges to (9.6 +/- 1.0) x 10(exp 12) solar mass at 230 kpc radius. This corresponds to a total mass to blue light ratio of 53 +/- 5 solar mass/solar luminosity. As in other early type galaxies, the gas mass is only a few percent of the total mass. Using the spectroscopic measurements, we also derive radial distributions for the heavy elements silicon and iron and find that the abundances of both decrease with galaxy radius. The mass ratio of Si to Fe lies between the theoretical predictions for element production in SN Ia and SN II, suggesting an important role for SN Ia, as well as SN II, for gas enrichment in ellipticals. Using the 2 SN la yield of Si, we set an upper limit of 0.012 h(sup 2, sub 50) solar neutrino units (SNU) for the SN Ia rate at radii >50 kpc, which is independent of possible uncertainties in the iron L-shell modeling. We compare our observations with the theoretical predictions for the chemical evolution of ellipticals. We conclude that the metal content in stars, if explained by the star formation duration, requires a significant decline in the duration of star formation with galaxy radius, ranging from 1 Gyr at the center to 0.01 Gyr at 100 kpc radius. Alternatively, the decline in metallicity with galaxy radius may be caused by a similar drop with radius in the efficiency of star formation. Based on the Si and Fe measurements presented in this paper, we conclude that the latter scenario is preferred unless a dependence of the SN Ia rate on stellar metallicity is invoked.

  16. Climatic effects on mosquito abundance in Mediterranean wetlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases is highly controversial. One of the principal points of debate is whether or not climate influences mosquito abundance, a key factor in disease transmission. Methods To test this hypothesis, we analysed ten years of data (2003–2012) from biweekly surveys to assess inter-annual and seasonal relationships between the abundance of seven mosquito species known to be pathogen vectors (West Nile virus, Usutu virus, dirofilariasis and Plasmodium sp.) and several climatic variables in two wetlands in SW Spain. Results Within-season abundance patterns were related to climatic variables (i.e. temperature, rainfall, tide heights, relative humidity and photoperiod) that varied according to the mosquito species in question. Rainfall during winter months was positively related to Culex pipiens and Ochlerotatus detritus annual abundances. Annual maximum temperatures were non-linearly related to annual Cx. pipiens abundance, while annual mean temperatures were positively related to annual Ochlerotatus caspius abundance. Finally, we modelled shifts in mosquito abundances using the A2 and B2 temperature and rainfall climate change scenarios for the period 2011–2100. While Oc. caspius, an important anthropophilic species, may increase in abundance, no changes are expected for Cx. pipiens or the salt-marsh mosquito Oc. detritus. Conclusions Our results highlight that the effects of climate are species-specific, place-specific and non-linear and that linear approaches will therefore overestimate the effect of climate change on mosquito abundances at high temperatures. Climate warming does not necessarily lead to an increase in mosquito abundance in natural Mediterranean wetlands and will affect, above all, species such as Oc. caspius whose numbers are not closely linked to rainfall and are influenced, rather, by local tidal patterns and temperatures. The final impact of changes in vector abundance on disease frequency

  17. The Abundance and Distribution of Presolar Materials in Cluster IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Ito, Motoo

    2007-01-01

    Presolar grains and remnants of interstellar organic compounds occur in a wide range of primitive solar system materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comet Wild-2 samples. Among the most abundant presolar phases are silicate stardust grains and molecular cloud material. However, these materials have also been susceptible to destruction and alteration during parent body and nebular processing. In addition to their importance as direct samples of remote and ancient astrophysical environments, presolar materials thus provide a measure of how well different primitive bodies have preserved the original solar system starting materials. The matrix normalized abundances of presolar silicate grains in meteorites range from 20 ppm in Semarkona and Bishunpur to 170 ppm for Acfer 094. The lower abundances of presolar silicates in Bishunpur and Semarkona has been ascribed to the destruction of presolar silicates during aqueous processes. Presolar silicates appear to be significantly more abundant in anhydrous IDPs, possibly because these materials did not experience parent body hydrothermal alteration. Among IDPs the estimated abundances of presolar silicates vary by more than an order of magnitude, from 480 to 5500 ppm. The wide disparity in the abundances of presolar silicates of IDPs may be a consequence of the relatively small total area analyzed in those studies and the fine grain sizes of the IDPs. Alternatively, there may be a wide range in presolar silicate abundances between different IDPs. This view is supported by the observation that 15N-rich IDPs have higher presolar silicate abundances than those with isotopically normal N.

  18. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR TURNOFF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Inoue, Susumu; Barklem, Paul S.; Beers, Timothy C.; Christlieb, Norbert; Perez, Ana E. GarcIa; Norris, John E.; Carollo, Daniela E-mail: Paul.Barklem@physics.uu.se E-mail: N.Christlieb@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: inoue@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-06-20

    We have determined Li abundances for eleven metal-poor turnoff stars, among which eight have [Fe/H] <-3, based on LTE analyses of high-resolution spectra obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. The Li abundances for four of these eight stars are determined for the first time by this study. Effective temperatures are determined by a profile analysis of H{alpha} and H{beta}. While seven stars have Li abundances as high as the Spite Plateau value, the remaining four objects with [Fe/H] <-3 have A(Li) =log (Li/H)+ 12 {approx}< 2.0, confirming the existence of extremely metal-poor (EMP) turnoff stars having low Li abundances, as reported by previous work. The average of the Li abundances for stars with [Fe/H]<-3 is lower by 0.2 dex than that of the stars with higher metallicity. No clear constraint on the metallicity dependence or scatter of the Li abundances is derived from our measurements for the stars with [Fe/H]<-3. Correlations of the Li abundance with effective temperatures, with abundances of Na, Mg, and Sr, and with the kinematical properties are investigated, but no clear correlation is seen in the EMP star sample.

  19. Element Abundances in Solar Energetic Particles and the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2014-03-01

    This is a study of abundances of the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe in solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the 2 - 15 MeV amu-1 region measured on the Wind spacecraft during 54 large SEP events occurring between November 1994 and June 2012. The origin of most of the temporal and spatial variations in abundances of the heavier elements lies in rigidity-dependent scattering during transport of the particles away from the site of acceleration at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Variation in the abundance of Fe is correlated with the Fe spectral index, as expected from scattering theory but not previously noted. Clustering of Fe abundances during the "reservoir" period, late in SEP events, is also newly reported. Transport-induced enhancements in one region are balanced by depletions in another, thus, averaging over these variations produces SEP abundances that are energy independent, confirms previous SEP abundances in this energy region, and provides a credible measure of element abundances in the solar corona. These SEP-determined coronal abundances differ from those in the solar photosphere by a well-known function that depends upon the first ionization potential (FIP) or ionization time of the element.

  20. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; DenHartog, E. A.; Collier, Jason; Dodge, Homer L.

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy the progenitors of the halo stars responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

  1. Elemental abundances of the B6 IV star Xi Octantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    An elemental abundance study used AAT echelle spectrograms of the ultrasharp-lined, superficially normal B6 IV star Xi Octantis. The derived abundances fall within the trends of values derived for normal B main-sequence band stars. On average, they are 0.28 dex less than solar.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  3. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  4. Total carbon and sulfur abundances in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Total carbon and sulfur abundances have been measured in five Antarctic meteorites. Two C2 carbonaceous chondrites Yamato 74662 and Allan Hills 77306 have sulfur abundances (3.490 plus or minus .040% and 3.863 plus or minus 0.050% respectively) similar to other C2 chondrites but their carbon abundances (1.514 plus or minus 0.050% and 1.324 plus or minus .040% respectively) are lower than previously measured C2 chondrites. The decreased carbon abundances may reflect the effects of weathering in cold environments. Carbon and sulfur abundances for one C4 carbonaceous chondrite, one E4 enstatite chondrite and one ureilite are similar to values reported previously for meteorites of the same petrologic grades.

  5. An "Andesitic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source legions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from andesitic rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.