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Sample records for abundant amino groups

  1. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  2. Nature's starships. I. Observed abundances and relative frequencies of amino acids in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-10

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. These two trends (total abundance and relative frequencies) can be used to constrain formation parameters of amino acids within planetesimals. Our organization of the data supports an onion shell model for the temperature structure of planetesimals. The least altered meteorites (type 3) and their amino acids originated near cooler surface regions. The most active amino acid synthesis likely took place at intermediate depths (type 2). The most altered materials (type 1) originated furthest toward parent body cores. This region is likely too hot to either favor amino acid synthesis or for amino acids to be retained after synthesis.

  3. Are amino groups advantageous to insensitive high explosives (IHEs)?

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Wen, Yushi; Xiang, Bin; Long, Xinping; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2012-10-01

    There is usually a contradiction between increasing energy densities and reducing sensitivities of explosives. The explosives with both high energy densities and low sensitivities, or the so-called insensitive high explosives (IHEs), are desirable in most cases. It seems from applied explosives that amino groups are advantageous to IHE but the amount of amino groups contained IHEs is very limited. To make this clear, we present systemic examinations of the effects on the two properties stressed in IHEs after introducing amino groups to different molecular skeletons. As a result, the amino groups on resonant sites to nitro groups in conjugated systems can improve distinctly sensitivities and change energy densities in terms of oxygen balance; while the amino groups in unconjugated systems can hardly increase energy densities and usually cause increased sensitivities. It agrees well with a fact that almost all the molecules of applied amino group contained explosives possess conjugated skeletons. We therefore confirm that if amino groups are introduced resonantly to a nitro group in a conjugated system and the introduction improves OB, they are advantageous to IHEs. PMID:22660963

  4. Chemical abundances of massive stars in Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Kaufer, Andreas; Tolstoy, Eline; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Przybilla, Norbert; Smartt, Stephen J.; Lennon, Daniel J.

    The relative abundances of elements in galaxies can provide valuable information on the stellar and chemical evolution of a galaxy. While nebulae can provide abundances for a variety of light elements, stars are the only way to directly determine the abundances of iron-group and s-process and r-process elements in a galaxy. The new 8m and 10m class telescopes and high-efficiency spectrographs now make high-quality spectral observations of bright supergiants possible in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have been concentrating on elemental abundances in the metal-poor dwarf irregular galaxies, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextants A, and GR 8. Comparing abundance ratios to those predicted from their star formation histories, determined from color-magnitude diagrams, and comparing those ratios between these galaxies can give us new insights into the evolution of these dwarf irregular galaxies. Iron-group abundances also allow us to examine the metallicities of the stars in these galaxies directly, which affects their inferred mass loss rates and predicted stellar evolution properties.

  5. New Abundant Microbial Groups in Aquatic Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rohit; Pašić, Lejla; Fernández, Ana Beatriz; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; McMahon, Katherine D.; Papke, R. Thane; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rodriguez-Brito, Beltran; Rohwer, Forest; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We describe the microbiota of two hypersaline saltern ponds, one of intermediate salinity (19%) and a NaCl saturated crystallizer pond (37%) using pyrosequencing. The analyses of these metagenomes (nearly 784 Mb) reaffirmed the vast dominance of Haloquadratum walsbyi but also revealed novel, abundant and previously unsuspected microbial groups. We describe for the first time, a group of low GC Actinobacteria, related to freshwater Actinobacteria, abundant in low and intermediate salinities. Metagenomic assembly revealed three new abundant microbes: a low-GC euryarchaeon with the lowest GC content described for any euryarchaeon, a high-GC euryarchaeon and a gammaproteobacterium related to Alkalilimnicola and Nitrococcus. Multiple displacement amplification and sequencing of the genome from a single archaeal cell of the new low GC euryarchaeon suggest a photoheterotrophic and polysaccharide-degrading lifestyle and its relatedness to the recently described lineage of Nanohaloarchaea. These discoveries reveal the combined power of an unbiased metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. PMID:22355652

  6. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides. PMID:23741717

  7. Lead and uranium group abundances in cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadav, J. S.; Perelygin, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of Lead and Uranium group abundances in cosmic rays is discussed in understanding their evolution and propagation. The electronic detectors can provide good charge resolution but poor data statistics. The plastic detectors can provide somewhat better statistics but charge resolution deteriorates. The extraterrestrial crystals can provide good statistics but with poor charge resolution. Recent studies of extraterrestrial crystals regarding their calibration to accelerated uranium ion beam and track etch kinetics are discussed. It is hoped that a charge resolution of two charge units can be achieved provided an additional parameter is taken into account. The prospects to study abundances of Lead group, Uranium group and superheavy element in extraterrestrial crystals are discussed, and usefulness of these studies in the light of studies with electronic and plastic detectors is assessed.

  8. Amino and Acetamide Functional Group Effects on the Ionization and Fragmentation of Sugar Chains in Positive-Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagaki, Tohru; Sugahara, Kohtaro; Watanabe, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the influence of amino (-NH2) and acetamide (-NHCOCH3, -NAc) groups in sugar chains on their ionization and fragmentation, cycloamyloses (cyclodextrins, CyDs) and lacto-oligosaccharide are analyzed by MALDI TOF/TOF and ESI Q-TOF mass spectrometry. CyD derivatives substituted by amino or acetamide groups are ideal analytes to extract the function group effects, which are amino-CyD with one hexosamine (HexNH2) and acetamide-CyD with one N-acetyl hexosamine (HexNAc). Interestingly, the relative ion intensities and isotope-like patterns in their product ion spectra depend on the functional groups and ion forms of sugar chains. Consequently, the results indicate that a proton (H+) localizes on the amino group of the amino sugar, and that the proton (H+) induces their fragmentation. Sodium cation (Na+) attachment is independent from amino group and exerts no influence on their fragmentation patterns in amino group except for mono- and disaccharide fragment ions because there is the possibility of the reducing end effect. In contrast, a sodium cation localizes much more frequently on the acetamide group in acetamide-CyDs because the chemical species with HexNAc are stable. Thus, their ions with HexNAc are abundant. These results are consistent with the fragmentation of lacto-neo- N-tetraose and maltotetraose, suggesting that a sodium cation generally localizes much more frequently on the acetamide group in sugar chains.

  9. The Heavy Element Abundance in Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Laurence

    2000-01-01

    Over the past few years we have analyzed a sample of clusters observed by the Advanced Spacecraft for Cosmology Astrophysics (ASCA) X-ray satellite. We performed spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy of a sample of 18 relaxed clusters of galaxies with gas temperatures below 4 keV. The spectral analysis was done using ASCA/SIS (Solid state Imaging Spectrometer) data combined with imaging data from ROSAT/PSPC (German acronym for X-ray satellite/Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) and Einstein/IPC (Imaging Proportional Counter) observations. We derived temperature profiles using single-temperature fits for all of the clusters in the sample, and also corrected for the presence of cold gas in the center of so-called 'cooling flow' clusters. For all of the clusters in the sample we derived Si and Fe abundance profiles. For a few of the clusters we also were able to derive Ne and S abundance profiles. We compared the elemental abundances derived at similar overdensities in all of the clusters in the sample. We also compared element mass-to-light ratios for the entire sample. We concluded that the preferential accretion of low entropy, low abundance gas into the potentials of groups and cold clusters can explain most of the observed trends in metallicity. In addition, we discussed the importance of preheating of the intracluster medium by Type II supernovae on the cluster scaling relations.

  10. Search of Amino Group in the Universe: 2-Aminopyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Chandra, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the Search for life in the Universe, scientists are interested in identification of molecules, having amino (-NH{_2}) group in the interstellar space. The aminoacetonitrile (NH{_2}CH{_2}CN), which is precursor of the simplest amino acid glycine (NH{_2}CH{_2}COOH), is identified near the galactic center. The 2-Aminopyridine (H{_2}NC{_5}H{_4}N) is of interest for scientists as it has close association with life on the earth. Based on spectroscopic studies, we have calculated the intensities of 2-Aminopyridine lines due to transitions between the rotational levels up to 47 cm{^{-1}} and have found a number of lines which may help in its identification in the interstellar medium. Frequencies of some of these transitions are found close to those detected in the envelope of IRC+10216 that are not assigned to any of the known species.

  11. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Linking of sensor molecules with amino groups to amino-functionalized AFM tips.

    PubMed

    Wildling, Linda; Unterauer, Barbara; Zhu, Rong; Rupprecht, Anne; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Rankl, Christian; Ebner, Andreas; Vater, Doris; Pollheimer, Philipp; Pohl, Elena E; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J

    2011-06-15

    The measuring tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be upgraded to a specific biosensor by attaching one or a few biomolecules to the apex of the tip. The biofunctionalized tip is then used to map cognate target molecules on a sample surface or to study biophysical parameters of interaction with the target molecules. The functionality of tip-bound sensor molecules is greatly enhanced if they are linked via a thin, flexible polymer chain. In a typical scheme of tip functionalization, reactive groups are first generated on the tip surface, a bifunctional cross-linker is then attached with one of its two reactive ends, and finally the probe molecule of interest is coupled to the free end of the cross-linker. Unfortunately, the most popular functional group generated on the tip surface is the amino group, while at the same time, the only useful coupling functions of many biomolecules (such as antibodies) are also NH(2) groups. In the past, various tricks or detours were applied to minimize the undesired bivalent reaction of bifunctional linkers with adjacent NH(2) groups on the tip surface. In the present study, an uncompromising solution to this problem was found with the help of a new cross-linker ("acetal-PEG-NHS") which possesses one activated carboxyl group and one acetal-protected benzaldehyde function. The activated carboxyl ensures rapid unilateral attachment to the amino-functionalized tip, and only then is the terminal acetal group converted into the amino-reactive benzaldehyde function by mild treatment (1% citric acid, 1-10 min) which does not harm the AFM tip. As an exception, AFM tips with magnetic coating become demagnetized in 1% citric acid. This problem was solved by deprotecting the acetal group before coupling the PEG linker to the AFM tip. Bivalent binding of the corresponding linker ("aldehyde-PEG-NHS") to adjacent NH(2) groups on the tip was largely suppressed by high linker concentrations. In this way, magnetic AFM tips could be

  13. The synthesis of oligonucleotides containing a primary amino group at the 5'-terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, B A

    1987-01-01

    Oligonucleotides containing a primary amino group at their 5'-termini have been prepared and further derivatised with amino specific probes. The sequence required is prepared using standard solid phase phosphoramidite techniques and an extra round of synthesis is then performed with N-monomethoxytrityl-0-methoxydiisopropylaminophosphinyl 3-aminopropan(1)ol. After cleavage from the resin, removal of the phosphate and base protecting groups and purification gives a monomethoxytrityl-NH(CH2)3PO4-oligomer. The monomethoxytrityl group can be removed with acetic acid to give the desired amino containing oligomer. The amino group can be further derivatised with amino specific probes yielding fluorescent or biotinylated oligonucleotide products. PMID:3562247

  14. Optimization of Amino Group Introduction onto Polyurethane Surface Using Ammonia and Argon Surface-Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Akihisa; Noguchi, Suguru; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    Effects of hydrogen and NHx species produced by a surface-wave excited Ar/NH3 plasma on amino group introduction onto a polyurethane surface were studied by comparing the results of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and primary amino group concentration. For increasing the introduced primary amino group concentration on the surface, the monitoring and control of the concentration of NHx species as a precursor and that of atomic hydrogen as an etchant are important. From the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and OES analysis, the primary amino group concentration and the emission intensity of Hβ reached a minimum and a maximum, respectively, at around 25% NH3 gas mixture ratio. An excess of atomic hydrogen over nitrogen grafting species might reduce the amino group selectivity and N/C surface density. To increase the concentration of NHx species produced in a plasma, the enhancement of NHx generation by the Penning effect was examined by adding Ar gas. As a result, the primary amino group concentration increased with the increase in the emission intensity of NH. However, the amino group selectivity became lower than that in the case of pure NH3 plasma treatment since not only the primary amino group concentration but also the secondary and tertiary amino group concentrations increased with the enhanced decomposition of NH3 by Ar metastables.

  15. Abundance trends in kinematical groups of the Milky Way's disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, C.; Girard, P.

    2005-07-01

    We have compiled a large catalogue of metallicities and abundance ratios from the literature in order to investigate abundance trends of several alpha and iron peak elements in the thin disk and the thick disk of the Galaxy. The catalogue includes 743 stars with abundances of Fe, O, Mg, Ca, Ti, Si, Na, Ni and Al in the metallicity range -1.30 < [Fe/H] < +0.50. We have checked that systematic differences between abundances measured in the different studies were lower than random errors before combining them. Accurate distances and proper motions from Hipparcos and radial velocities from several sources have been retreived for 639 stars and their velocities (U, V, W) and galactic orbits have been computed. Ages of 322 stars have been estimated with a Bayesian method of isochrone fitting. Two samples kinematically representative of the thin and thick disks have been selected, taking into account the Hercules stream which is intermediate in kinematics, but with a probable dynamical origin. Our results show that the two disks are chemically well separated, they overlap greatly in metallicity and both show parallel decreasing alpha elements with increasing metallicity, in the interval -0.80 < [Fe/H] < -0.30. The Mg enhancement with respect to Fe of the thick disk is measured to be 0.14 dex. An even larger enhancement is observed for Al. The thick disk is clearly older than the thin disk with tentative evidence of an AMR over 2-3 Gyr and a hiatus in star formation before the formation of the thin disk. We do not observe a vertical gradient in the metallicity of the thick disk. The Hercules stream has properties similar to that of the thin disk, with a wider range of metallicity. Metal-rich stars assigned to the thick disk and super-metal-rich stars assigned to the thin disk appear as outliers in all their properties.

  16. Quantitative determination of chitosan and the percentage of free amino groups.

    PubMed

    Curotto, E; Aros, F

    1993-06-01

    Chitosans were quantified with ninhydrin, a reagent normally used for recognizing and quantifying amino groups. The reaction was time dependent and there was no effect when different acids were added to the mixture. This method was used to determine the percentage of free amino groups in chitosans of different origins. PMID:8317699

  17. A facile method to modify carbon nanotubes with nitro/amino groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Feng, Shouai; Zhao, Jianghong; Zheng, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhijian; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2010-08-01

    Nitro groups (-NO 2) have been introduced on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by treatment with a mixture of concentrated H 2SO 4/HNO 3 solution at low temperature (60 °C). Such a low-temperature treatment simultaneously can well prevent MWCNTs from the structural damage. From the nitro-modified MWCNTs, MWCNTs can be readily modified with amino groups by reduction of nitro groups. The prepared amino-modified MWCNTs are highly soluble in polar solvents such as dimethylformamide (DMF), alcohol and acetone. Further, as a demonstration, MWCNTs can be functionalized with guest objects, provided by the strong bonding ability of amino groups.

  18. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  19. THE ABUNDANCE OF BULLET GROUPS IN ΛCDM

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Foex, G.; Motta, V.; Verdugo, T. E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co

    2014-06-01

    We estimate the expected distribution of displacements between the two dominant dark matter (DM) peaks (DM-DM displacements) and between the DM and gaseous baryon peak (DM-gas displacements) in DM halos with masses larger than 10{sup 13} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. As a benchmark, we use the observation of SL2S J08544–0121, which is the lowest mass system (1.0 × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}) observed so far, featuring a bi-modal DM distribution with a dislocated gas component. We find that (50 ± 10)% of the DM halos with circular velocities in the range 300-700 km s{sup –1} (groups) show DM-DM displacements equal to or larger than 186 ± 30 h {sup –1} kpc as observed in SL2S J08544–0121. For DM halos with circular velocities larger than 700 km s{sup –1} (clusters) this fraction rises to (70 ± 10)%. Using the same simulation, we estimate the DM-gas displacements and find that 0.1%-1.0% of the groups should present separations equal to or larger than 87 ± 14 h {sup –1} kpc, corresponding to our observational benchmark; for clusters, this fraction rises to (7 ± 3)%, consistent with previous studies of DM to baryon separations. Considering both constraints on the DM-DM and DM-gas displacements, we find that the number density of groups similar to SL2S J08544–0121 is ∼6.0 × 10{sup –7} Mpc{sup –3}, three times larger than the estimated value for clusters. These results open up the possibility for a new statistical test of ΛCDM by looking for DM-gas displacements in low mass clusters and groups.

  20. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  1. Iron-group Abundances in the Metal-poor Main-Sequence Turnoff Star HD~84937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Pignatari, Marco; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Wood, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    We have derived new, very accurate abundances of the Fe-group elements Sc through Zn (Z = 21-30) in the bright main-sequence turnoff star HD 84937 based on high-resolution spectra covering the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. New or recent laboratory transition data for 14 species of seven elements have been used. Abundances from more than 600 lines of non-Fe species have been combined with about 550 Fe lines in HD 84937 to yield abundance ratios of high precision. The abundances have been determined from both neutral and ionized transitions, which generally are in agreement with each other. We find no substantial departures from the standard LTE Saha ionization balance in this [Fe/H] = -2.32 star. Noteworthy among the abundances are [Co/Fe] = +0.14 and [Cu/Fe] = -0.83, in agreement with past studies of abundance trends in this and other low-metallicity stars, and < [{{Sc,Ti,V/Fe}}]> = +0.31, which has not been noted previously. A detailed examination of scandium, titanium, and vanadium abundances in large-sample spectroscopic surveys reveals that they are positively correlated in stars with [Fe/H] < -2 HD 84937 lies at the high end of this correlation. These trends constrain the synthesis mechanisms of Fe-group elements. We also examine the Galactic chemical evolution abundance trends of the Fe-group elements, including a new nucleosynthesis model with jet-like explosion effects.

  2. Immune response to a potyvirus with exposed amino groups available for chemical conjugation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The amino terminus of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) capsid protein is located on the external surface of infectious TEV particles, as proposed by previous studies and an in silico model. The epsilon amino groups on the exposed lysine residues are available for chemical conjugation to any given protein, and can thus act as antigen carriers. The availability of amino groups on the surfaces of TEV particles was determined and the immune response to TEV evaluated. Results Using a biotin-tagged molecule that reacts specifically with amino groups, we found that the TEV capsid protein has amino groups on its surface available for coupling to other molecules via crosslinkers. Intraperitoneal TEV was administered to female BALB/c mice, and both their humoral and cellular responses measured. Different IgG isotypes, particularly IgG2a, directed against TEV were induced. In a cell proliferation assay, only spleen cells from vaccinated mice that were stimulated in vitro with TEV showed significant proliferation of CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ subpopulations and secreted significant amounts of interferon γ. Conclusions TEV has surface amino groups that are available for chemical coupling. TEV induces both humoral and cellular responses when administered alone intraperitoneally to mice. Therefore, TEV should be evaluated as a vaccine adjuvant when chemically coupled to antigens of choice. PMID:22452850

  3. Effect of Amino Acids on Steady-State Growth of a Group A Hemolytic Streptococcus1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Helen C.; Karush, Fred; Rudd, Joanne H.

    1965-01-01

    Davies, Helen C. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), Fred Karush, and Joanne H. Rudd. Effect of amino acids on steady-state growth of a group A hemolytic streptococcus. J. Bacteriol. 89:421–427. 1965.—A study has been made of amino acid utilization by a strain of type 4, group A streptococcus growing under steady-state conditions in a continuous-culture device and supplied with a completely synthetic medium. At a fixed growth rate, corresponding to a generation of time of 84 min, and with the pH maintained constant at 7.4, the bacterial turbidity was made dependent on the concentration of one of the amino acids of the defined medium. Under these conditions, the extracellular concentration of the limiting amino acid is fixed by the preset growth rate. The steady-state concentration of each of 14 essential l-amino acids was measured by means of C14-labeled amino acids in such limited cultures. At approximately equal turbidities, these concentrations ranged from 1.6 × 10−6m for methionine to 4.3 × 10−4m for glutamic acid. The rates of utilization of the amino acids ranged from 26 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for histidine to 310 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for glutamic acid. The percentage of the limiting amino acid used varied from 95% for threonine and methionine to 43% for gluamic acid. The rate of utilization of the limiting amino acid at unit concentration (tmoles per gram per hour per m) differed by a factor of 27 between extremes. These observations reflect the variation in the capacity of this streptococcal cell to take up and use different amino acids. PMID:14255710

  4. Metabolism of Vertebrate Amino Sugars with N-Glycolyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Kalyan; Gregg, Christopher J.; Chow, Renee; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Although N-acetyl groups are common in nature, N-glycolyl groups are rare. Mammals express two major sialic acids, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Although humans cannot produce Neu5Gc, it is detected in the epithelial lining of hollow organs, endothelial lining of the vasculature, fetal tissues, and carcinomas. This unexpected expression is hypothesized to result via metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from mammalian foods. This accumulation has relevance for diseases associated with such nutrients, via interaction with Neu5Gc-specific antibodies. Little is known about how ingested sialic acids in general and Neu5Gc in particular are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the gastrointestinal and systemic fate of Neu5Gc-containing glycoproteins (Neu5Gc-glycoproteins) or free Neu5Gc in the Neu5Gc-free Cmah−/− mouse model. Ingested free Neu5Gc showed rapid absorption into the circulation and urinary excretion. In contrast, ingestion of Neu5Gc-glycoproteins led to Neu5Gc incorporation into the small intestinal wall, appearance in circulation at a steady-state level for several hours, and metabolic incorporation into multiple peripheral tissue glycoproteins and glycolipids, thus conclusively proving that Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated from food. Feeding Neu5Gc-glycoproteins but not free Neu5Gc mimics the human condition, causing tissue incorporation into human-like sites in Cmah−/− fetal and adult tissues, as well as developing tumors. Thus, glycoproteins containing glycosidically linked Neu5Gc are the likely dietary source for human tissue accumulation, and not the free monosaccharide. This human-like model can be used to elucidate specific mechanisms of Neu5Gc delivery from the gut to tissues, as well as general mechanisms of metabolism of ingested sialic acids. PMID:22692204

  5. Comparison of Amino Acids Physico-Chemical Properties and Usage of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins, Hydrophilins and WHy Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  6. Comparison of amino acids physico-chemical properties and usage of late embryogenesis abundant proteins, hydrophilins and WHy domain.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  7. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF SEVEN IRREGULAR AND THREE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Henry; Miller, Bryan W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Lee, Janice C.; Cote, Stephanie; Kennicutt, Robert C. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed E-mail: stephanie.cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.c E-mail: bmiller@gemini.ed

    2009-11-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H II regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H II region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, allowing a 'direct' determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies, and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate 'tidal dwarf' galaxies lie well off this relation: UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sight as the M81 tidal debris field. We propose that these H II regions formed from previously enriched gas which was stripped from nearby massive galaxies (e.g., NGC 3077 and M81) during a recent tidal interaction.

  8. Fe-Group Elements in the Metal-Poor Star HD 84937: Abundances and their Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Chris; Cowan, John J.; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Pignatari, Marco; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Wood, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    We have derived accurate relative abundances of the Fe-group elements Sc through Zn in the very metal-poor main-sequence turnoff star HD 84937. For this study we analyzed high resolution, high signal-to-noise HST/STIS and VLT/UVES spectra over a total wavelength range 2300-7000 Å. We employed only recent or newly-applied reliable laboratory transition data for all species. Abundances from more than 600 lines of non-Fe species were combined with about 550 Fe lines in HD 84937 to yield abundance ratios of high precision. From parallel analyses of solar photospheric spectra we also derived new solar abundances of these elements. This in turn yielded internally-consistent relative HD 84937 abundances with respect to the Sun. For seven of the ten Fe-group elements the HD 84937 abundances were from both neutral and ionized transitions. In all of these cases the neutral and ionized species yield the same abundances within the measurement uncertainties. Therefore standard Saha ionization balance appears to hold in the HD 84937 atmosphere. We derived metallicity [Fe/H] = -2.32 with sample standard deviation of 0.06. Solid evidence is seen for departures from the solar abundance mix in HD 84937, for example [Co/Fe] = +0.14, [Cu/Fe] = -0.83, and <[Sc,Ti,V/Fe]> = +0.31. Combining our Sc, Ti, and V abundances for this star with those from large-sample spectroscopic surveys suggests that these elements are positively correlated in stars with [Fe/H] < -2. HD 84937 is unusually enriched in Sc, Ti, and V. Our analysis strongly suggests that different types of supernovae with a large scatter of explosion energies and asymmetries contributed to the creation of the Fe-group elements early in the Galaxy's history.This work has been supported in part by NASA grant NNX10AN93G (J.E.L.), by NSF grants AST-1211055 (J.E.L.), AST-1211585 (C.S.), PHY-1430152 (through JINA, J.J.C. and M.P.), EU MIRGCT-2006-046520 (M.P.), and by the ``Lendlet-2014'' Programme of the Hungarian Academy of

  9. Charge transfer through amino groups-small molecules interface improving the performance of electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havare, Ali Kemal; Can, Mustafa; Tozlu, Cem; Kus, Mahmut; Okur, Salih; Demic, Şerafettin; Demirak, Kadir; Kurt, Mustafa; Icli, Sıddık

    2016-05-01

    A carboxylic group functioned charge transporting was synthesized and self-assembled on an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. A typical electroluminescent device [modified ITO/TPD (50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (2 nm)/(120 nm)] was fabricated to investigate the effect of the amino groups-small molecules interface on the characteristics of the device. The increase in the surface work function of ITO is expected to facilitate the hole injection from the ITO anode to the Hole Transport Layer (HTL) in electroluminescence. The modified electroluminescent device could endure a higher current and showed a much higher luminance than the nonmodified one. For the produced electroluminescent devices, the I-V characteristics, optical characterization and quantum yields were performed. The external quantum efficiency of the modified electroluminescent device is improved as the result of the presence of the amino groups-small molecules interface.

  10. Population Signatures in Planetary Nebulae from Abundances of Fe-group and Neutron-Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Sterling, N. C.

    2015-08-01

    There are two categories of elements for which abundances are measured in planetary nebulae (PNe). The first are species whose abundances may be modified by nuclear reactions in the star prior to PN formation, such as He, C, N, and nuclei made by slow neutron captures (Karakas & Lattanzio 2014, PASA, 31, 30). In contrast, elements unaffected by evolution should indicate the star’s initial composition. These include S, Ar, Cl, and (with certain exceptions) O and Ne, most of which are alpha species. A long-missing piece of the puzzle has been the abundances of the Fe-group elements. We cannot determine a meaningful elemental abundance from the gas-phase Fe lines seen in PNe, since Fe is heavily depleted into dust. Another approach is to use a different element as a proxy for Fe. Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) identified a line at 3.625 μm as due to Zn, the least refractory Fe-group element. Observations of this line in Milky Way PNe yield -1 ≤ [Zn/H] ≤ 0 (Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein 2014, MNRAS, 441, 3161; Dinerstein et al. 2015, in preparation). Substituting Zn for Fe, PNe can be placed in the [alpha/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagram used to characterize stellar populations. Dividing our sample into probable thin and thick disk members using the kinematic criterion of Peimbert’s Type II and III classes (1978, IAU Symp. 76, 215), we find that they occupy similar regions in [alpha/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] phase space as the stars of those populations. Elevated [alpha/Fe] values at subsolar [Fe/H], which tend to be higher for thick than thin disk PNe, cause degeneracies that make alpha species ambiguous metallicity indicators. This is important for self-enrichment studies, since if the initial abundance of an element is lower than projected from an alpha species, internal synthesis may be required to produce even a solar final abundance. Low observed abundances of the n-capture element Se suggest that many Type III PNe may have subsolar initial abundances of n

  11. The contribution of adenines in the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme improved by the 6-amino group modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yang; He, Junlin

    2016-09-15

    In the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme, its five adenine residues are moderate conservative, but with highly conserved functional groups like 6-amino group and 7-nitrogen atom. It is this critical conservation that these two groups could be modified for better contribution. With 2'-deoxyadenosine analogues, several functional groups were introduced at the 6-amino group of the five adenine residues. 3-Aminopropyl substituent at 6-amino group of A15 resulted in a five-fold increase of kobs. More efficient DNAzymes are expected by delicate design of the linkage and the external functional groups for this 6-amino group of A15. With this modification approach, other functional groups or residues could be optimized for 10-23 DNAzyme. PMID:27506560

  12. Modification of sodium and gating currents by amino group specific cross-linking and monofunctional reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Drews, G; Rack, M

    1988-01-01

    To test the possible role of lysine residues in Na channel function the effects of several imidoesters on Na and gating currents were studied in voltage-clamped single frog nerve fibers. Mono- and bisimidoesters were used. These reagents modify amino groups exclusively and do not change the net charge. The three bisimidoesters used easily introduce cross-links between neighboring amino groups. Their structure is almost identical; only the length of the spacers between the two amino-reactive groups is different. An irreversible reduction of Na currents and gating currents was observed with the longest (dimethyl suberimidate [DMS]) and the shortest (dimethyl adipimidate [DMA]) of the cross-linkers used. Of the three cross-linking reagents only the shortest made Na current inactivation slow and incomplete. The steady-state inactivation curve, h infinity (E), was shifted by greater than 25 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction by each of the reagents. The voltage dependence of activation, however, remained unchanged. Furthermore, the effects of two different monoimidoesters (ethyl acetimidate [EAI] and isethionyl acetimidate [IAI]) on gating currents were tested. EAI can penetrate a membrane, whereas IAI is membrane impermeant. IAI was almost without effect, whereas EAI caused a considerable reduction of the gating currents. EAI and DMS reduced the Qoff/Qon ratio without affecting the decay of the Na currents. The results show that lysine residues are critically involved in Na channel gating. PMID:2850028

  13. Histochemical demonstration of primary amino groups with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA): optimization of the method.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, G

    1989-01-01

    2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA) was used for the histochemical demonstration of primary amino groups. The Schiff-bases formed exhibited a double-banded maximum absorption at lambda = 420 nm and lambda = 400 nm, respectively. The dependence of the equilibrium of the Schiff-base formation upon the concentration of HNA, the reaction medium, especially upon its pH-value, was investigated with Ehrlich ascites tumour cells and rat liver parenchymal cells. Optimum conditions were elaborated for the histochemical reaction running either in absolute ethanol (HNA-EtOH) or in a mixture of ethanol and acetate buffer pH = 4 (HNA-pH4), the equilibrium of the reactions adjusted after 10 d and 1 d, respectively. The HNA-pH4-method can be used for the histochemical demonstration of primary alpha-, delta-, and epsilon-amino groups of proteins. The HNA-EtOH-method comprises primary amino groups of proteins and of other substances insoluble in absolute ethanol. Both histochemical methods proved to be reproducible. PMID:2514550

  14. Administration of Exogenous Growth Hormone Is Associated with Changes in Plasma and Intracellular Mammary Amino Acid Profiles and Abundance of the Mammary Gland Amino Acid Transporter SLC3A2 in Mid-Lactation Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Sciascia, Quentin L.; Pacheco, David; McCoard, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) identify changes in plasma and mammary intracellular amino acid (AA) profiles in dairy cows treated with growth hormone (GH), and (2) evaluate the expression of mammary gland genes involved in the transport of AA identified in (1). Eight non-pregnant (n = 4 per group) lactating dairy cows were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of either a slow-release formulation of commercially available GH (Lactotropin 500 mg) or physiological saline solution. Six days after treatment, cows were milked and blood collected from the jugular vein for the analysis of free AA in the plasma. Cows were euthanized and mammary tissue harvested. Treatment with GH increased milk, protein, fat and lactose yields, with no effect on dry matter intake. Plasma concentrations of lysine and group I AA decreased significantly, and arginine, methionine, tyrosine and arginine-family AA tended to decrease in GH-treated cows. Concentrations of intracellular glycine, serine and glutamate increased significantly, with a trend for decreased arginine observed in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows. A trend for increased concentrations of intracellular total AA, NEAA and arginine-family AA were observed in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows. Variance in the concentration of plasma methionine, tyrosine, valine, alanine, ornithine, BCAA, EAA was significantly different between treatments. Variance in the concentration of intracellular lysine, valine, glutamine, EAA and group II was significantly different between treatments. AA changes were associated with increased mRNA abundance of the mammary gland AA transporter SLC3A2. We propose that these changes occur to support increased milk protein and fatty acid production in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows via potential mTOR pathway signaling. PMID:26226162

  15. Archaea of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group are abundant, diverse and widespread in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Kyoko; Lloyd, Karen G; F Biddle, Jennifer; Amann, Rudolf; Teske, Andreas; Knittel, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Members of the highly diverse Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG) are globally distributed in various marine and continental habitats. In this study, we applied a polyphasic approach (rRNA slot blot hybridization, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and catalyzed reporter deposition FISH) using newly developed probes and primers for the in situ detection and quantification of MCG crenarchaeota in diverse types of marine sediments and microbial mats. In general, abundance of MCG (cocci, 0.4 μm) relative to other archaea was highest (12–100%) in anoxic, low-energy environments characterized by deeper sulfate depletion and lower microbial respiration rates (P=0.06 for slot blot and P=0.05 for qPCR). When studied in high depth resolution in the White Oak River estuary and Hydrate Ridge methane seeps, changes in MCG abundance relative to total archaea and MCG phylogenetic composition did not correlate with changes in sulfate reduction or methane oxidation with depth. In addition, MCG abundance did not vary significantly (P>0.1) between seep sites (with high rates of methanotrophy) and non-seep sites (with low rates of methanotrophy). This suggests that MCG are likely not methanotrophs. MCG crenarchaeota are highly diverse and contain 17 subgroups, with a range of intragroup similarity of 82 to 94%. This high diversity and widespread distribution in subsurface sediments indicates that this group is globally important in sedimentary processes. PMID:22551871

  16. Evaluation of functional groups on amino acids in cyclic tetrapeptides in histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Bhuiyan, Mohammed P I; Islam, Md Nurul; Nsiama, Tienabe Kipassa; Oishi, Naoto; Kato, Tamaki; Nishino, Norikazu; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-06-01

    The naturally occurring cyclic tetrapeptide, chlamydocin, originally isolated from fungus Diheterospora chlamydosphoria, consists of α-aminoisobutyric acid, L-phenylalanine, D-proline and an unusual amino acid (S)-2-amino-8-((S)-oxiran-2-yl)-8-oxooctanoic acid (Aoe) and inhibits the histone deacetylases (HDACs), a class of regulatory enzymes. The epoxyketone moiety of Aoe is the key functional group for inhibition. The cyclic tetrapeptide scaffold is supposed to play important role for effective binding to the surface of enzymes. In place of the epoxyketone group, hydroxamic acid and sulfhydryl group have been applied to design inhibitor ligands to zinc atom in catalytic site of HDACs. In the research for more potent HDAC inhibitors, we replaced the epoxyketone moiety of Aoe with different functional groups and synthesized a series of chlamydocin analogs as HDAC inhibitors. Among the functional groups, methoxymethylketone moiety showed as potent inhibition as the hydroxamic acid. On the contrary, we confirmed that borate, trifruoromethylketone, and 2-aminoanilide are almost inactive in HDAC inhibition. PMID:21638021

  17. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  18. Synthesis of Novel Cellulose Carbamates Possessing Terminal Amino Groups and Their Bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Ganske, Kristin; Wiegand, Cornelia; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Heinze, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellulose phenyl carbonates are an excellent platform to synthesize a broad variety of soluble and functional cellulose carbamates. In this study, the synthesis of cellulose carbamates with terminal amino groups, namely ω-aminoethylcellulose- and ω-aminoethyl-p-aminobenzyl-cellulose carbamate, is discussed. The products are well soluble and their structures can be clearly described by NMR spectroscopy. The cellulose carbamates exhibit a bactericide and fungicide activity in vitro. The ω-aminoethylcellulose carbamate possesses a strong activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus (IC50 of 0.02 mg mL(-1) and 0.05 mg mL(-1)). The antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity can be improved by p-amino-benzylamine (ABA) as an additional substituent. The mixed cellulose carbamate exhibits a high biocompatibility (LC50 of 3.18 mg mL(-1)) and forms films on cotton and PES, which exhibit a strong activity against S. aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:26612063

  19. NMR contour maps as a new parameter of carboxyl's OH groups in amino acids recognition: A reason of tRNA-amino acid conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, Majid; Wayne, Robert; Boggs, James E.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we have applied a statistical method by computing statistical nucleus-independent chemical shifts (SNICS) in point of probes motions within a spatial shielding and de-shielding spaces around the OH groups of some amino acids. NMR contour maps as a new parameter have been created for amino-acyl-tRNA conjugation, by using a computational method to identify this model theoretically, it is critical to understand the reasons for tRNA-amino acid conjugation. DFT, NMR, 3D Gaussian distribution and Monte Carlo methods have been applied for Methionine, Serine, Histidine, Glycine and Glutamine to investigate the structural stability in the active parts of the amino acid-tRNA linkage by chemical shielding effects.

  20. Galaxy interactions in compact groups - II. Abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Yun, Min S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star-forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of H II regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star-forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three H II regions harbour an oxygen abundance ˜0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star-forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km s-1 with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. H I observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broad-band optical images from Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System) suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star-forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence points towards infalling and collapsing extraplanar gas clouds at the disc-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star-forming disc locally, and on sub-kpc scales.

  1. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  2. Bacterial Growth, Necromass Turnover, And Endospore Abundance In The Deep Subseafloor Sediments Of The Greenland Shelf Using D:L Amino Acid Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhatre, S. S.; Braun, S.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface realm is colonized by a large number of microorganisms- about 3 × 1029. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize at a much slower rate than model organisms in nutrient rich cultures. The aim of this work was to use recently developed D:L-amino acid racemization model for studying the turnover times of microbial biomass and microbial necromass in a ~12,000 years old Greenland shelf marine sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers of aspartic acid. The percentage amino acid carbon content (%TAAC) and the percentage amino acid nitrogen content (%TAAN) were used for determining the degradation state of the organic matter. Endospores quantified using DPA quantification method were found to be as abundant as vegetative cells. The microbial necromass turnover times were thousand years, and biomass turnover times were in the range of tens to hundred years. Studies with deeper sediment cores will further improve our understanding of the energetic limits of life in the deep biosphere.

  3. Expanded haloes, abundance matching and too-big-to-fail in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.; Di Cintio, Arianna

    2015-07-01

    Observed kinematical data of 40 Local Group (LG) members are used to derive the dark matter halo mass of such galaxies. Haloes are selected from the theoretically expected LG mass function and two different density profiles are assumed, a standard universal cuspy model and a mass-dependent profile which accounts for the effects of baryons in modifying the dark matter distribution within galaxies. The resulting relations between stellar and halo mass are compared with expectations from abundance matching. Using a universal cuspy profile, the ensemble of LG galaxies is fit in relatively low-mass haloes, leaving `dark' many massive haloes of Mhalo ≳ 1010 M⊙: this reflects the `too-big-to-fail' problem and results in a Mstar-Mhalo relation that differs from abundance matching predictions. Moreover, the star formation efficiency of isolated LG galaxies increases with decreasing halo mass when adopting a cuspy model. By contrast, using the mass-dependent density profile, dwarf galaxies with Mstar ≳ 106 M⊙ are assigned to more massive haloes, which have a central cored distribution of dark matter: the `too-big-to-fail' problem is alleviated, the resultant Mstar-Mhalo relation follows abundance matching predictions down to the completeness limit of current surveys, and the star formation efficiency of isolated members decreases with decreasing halo mass, in agreement with theoretical expectations. Finally, the cusp/core space of LG galaxies is presented, providing a framework to understand the non-universality of their density profiles.

  4. Structural Insight into Amino Group-carrier Protein-mediated Lysine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ayako; Tomita, Takeo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of lysine by Thermus thermophilus, the metabolite α-ketoglutarate is converted to the intermediate α-aminoadipate (AAA), which is protected by the 54-amino acid acidic protein LysW. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of LysZ from T. thermophilus (TtLysZ), an amino acid kinase that catalyzes the second step in the AAA to lysine conversion, which was in a complex with LysW at a resolution of 1.85 Å. A crystal analysis coupled with isothermal titration calorimetry of the TtLysZ mutants for TtLysW revealed tight interactions between LysZ and the globular and C-terminal extension domains of the LysW protein, which were mainly attributed to electrostatic forces. These results provided structural evidence for LysW acting as a protecting molecule for the α-amino group of AAA and also as a carrier protein to guarantee better recognition by biosynthetic enzymes for the efficient biosynthesis of lysine. PMID:25392000

  5. Life strategies of a ubiquitous and abundant subsurface archaeal group Bathyarchaeota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Li, M.; Perumal, V.; Feng, X.; Sievert, S. M.; Wang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Archaea belonging to the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota Group (MCG, "Candidatus Bathyarchaeota") are widespread and abundant in the deep biosphere, yet their life strategies and ecological roles remain elusive. Metagenomic sequencing of a sample enriched in Bathyarchaeota (up to 74%) that originated from Guaymas Basin deep-sea vent sediments revealed 6 partial to nearly completed Bathyarchaeota genomic bins. ranging ~900kb-3.3Mb. The Bathyarchaeota bin size ranged from approximately 0.9 to 3.3 Mb, with coverage ranging from approximately 10× to 28×. The phylogeny based on 110 concatenated conserved archaeal single copy genes confirmed the placement of Bathyarchaeota into a novel archaeal phylum. Genes encoding for enzymes involved in the degradation of organic polymers such as protein, cellulose, chitin, and aromatic compounds, were identified. In addition, genes encoding glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation pathways and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (except citrate synthase) were present in all genomic bins highlighting the heterotrophic life style of Bathyarchaeota. The presence of a wide variety of transporters of organic compounds further supports the versatile heterotrophic metabolism of Bathyarchaeota. This study highlights the life strategies of a ubiquitous and abundant subsurface archaeal group that thrives under energy-limited conditions, and expands the metabolic potentials of Archaea that play important roles in carbon cycling in marine sediments.

  6. Direct synthesis of coated gold nanoparticles mediated by polymers with amino groups.

    PubMed

    Scaravelli, Roberta Cristina Barros; Dazzi, Robson Luiz; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; Machado, Giovanna; Giacomelli, Cristiano; Schmidt, Vanessa

    2013-05-01

    The single-step/single-phase synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic core-shell gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), facilitated by amino-functionalized amphiphilic block copolymers that simultaneously play the roles of reductant and stabilizer, was investigated in this study. Experiments were devised with emphasis on the pH-responsive poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2,3-dihydroxypropyl methacrylate)-b-poly[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate] triblock copolymer, which allows direct chemical cross-linking of the micellar structures to be performed. The polymer structure-reactivity relationship associated with the AuNP formation was established using a set of six structurally related macromolecules. AuNP formation was dependent on the aqueous dissociation equilibrium involving tertiary amino groups, the Au(III) speciation, and electrochemical redox potentials. The effects of these parameters on the synthesis of AuNPs change as the solution pH is increased from pH 3.3 (molecularly dissolved polymer chains; no AuNP formation) to 6.8 or higher (polymer chains self-assembled into spherical micelles; stable gold sols are produced), and Au(III) reduction potentials shift toward the cathodic region while the oxidation potential of deprotonated amino groups decreases. Sigmoidal nanoparticle growth kinetics was observed in all cases after a characteristic induction period. Stable, well-defined, uniform polymer-coated gold colloids with localized surface plasmon resonance centered at 53 0nm can be conveniently produced in one-pot, two-reactant, no work-up reactions when the stoichiometry is [N]/[Au]=3.5-25.0. PMID:23465190

  7. Density and abundance of badger social groups in England and Wales in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Johanna; Wilson, Gavin J.; MacArthur, Roy; Delahay, Richard J.; McDonald, Robbie A.

    2014-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, European badgers Meles meles are a protected species and an important wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis. We conducted a survey of badger dens (main setts) in 1614 1 km squares across England and Wales, between November 2011 and March 2013. Using main setts as a proxy for badger social groups, the estimated mean density of badger social groups in England and Wales was 0.485 km-2 (95% confidence interval 0.449-0.521) and the estimated abundance of social groups was 71,600 (66,400-76,900). In the 25 years since the first survey in 1985-88, the annual rate of increase in the estimated number of badger social groups was 2.6% (2.2-2.9%), equating to an 88% (70-105%) increase across England and Wales. In England, we estimate there has been an increase of 103% (83-123%) in badger social groups, while in Wales there has been little change (-25 to +49%).

  8. Ube2W conjugates ubiquitin to α-amino groups of protein N-termini

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Michael H.; Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis G.; Salmen, Helena; Hay, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    The covalent attachment of the protein ubiquitin to intracellular proteins by a process known as ubiquitylation regulates almost all major cellular systems, predominantly by regulating protein turnover. Ubiquitylation requires the co-ordinated action of three enzymes termed E1, E2 and E3, and typically results in the formation of an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal carboxy group of ubiquitin and the ϵ-amino group of a target lysine residue. However, ubiquitin is also known to conjugate to the thiol of cysteine residue side chains and the α-amino group of protein N-termini, although the enzymes responsible for discrimination between different chemical groups have not been defined. In the present study, we show that Ube2W (Ubc16) is an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with specific protein N-terminal mono-ubiquitylation activity. Ube2W conjugates ubiquitin not only to its own N-terminus, but also to that of the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) in a manner dependent on the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 (RING finger protein 4). Furthermore, N-terminal mono-ubiquitylation of SUMO-2 primes it for poly-ubiquitylation by the Ubc13–UEV1 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 variant 1) heterodimer, showing that N-terminal ubiquitylation regulates protein fate. The description in the present study is the first of an E2-conjugating enzyme with N-terminal ubiquitylation activity, and highlights the importance of E2 enzymes in the ultimate outcome of E3-mediated ubiquitylation. PMID:23560854

  9. Ube2W conjugates ubiquitin to α-amino groups of protein N-termini.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Michael H; Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis G; Salmen, Helena; Hay, Ronald T

    2013-07-01

    The covalent attachment of the protein ubiquitin to intracellular proteins by a process known as ubiquitylation regulates almost all major cellular systems, predominantly by regulating protein turnover. Ubiquitylation requires the co-ordinated action of three enzymes termed E1, E2 and E3, and typically results in the formation of an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal carboxy group of ubiquitin and the ϵ-amino group of a target lysine residue. However, ubiquitin is also known to conjugate to the thiol of cysteine residue side chains and the α-amino group of protein N-termini, although the enzymes responsible for discrimination between different chemical groups have not been defined. In the present study, we show that Ube2W (Ubc16) is an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with specific protein N-terminal mono-ubiquitylation activity. Ube2W conjugates ubiquitin not only to its own N-terminus, but also to that of the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) in a manner dependent on the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 (RING finger protein 4). Furthermore, N-terminal mono-ubiquitylation of SUMO-2 primes it for poly-ubiquitylation by the Ubc13-UEV1 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 variant 1) heterodimer, showing that N-terminal ubiquitylation regulates protein fate. The description in the present study is the first of an E2-conjugating enzyme with N-terminal ubiquitylation activity, and highlights the importance of E2 enzymes in the ultimate outcome of E3-mediated ubiquitylation. PMID:23560854

  10. Testing surrogacy assumptions: can threatened and endangered plants be grouped by biological similarity and abundances?

    PubMed

    Che-Castaldo, Judy P; Neel, Maile C

    2012-01-01

    There is renewed interest in implementing surrogate species approaches in conservation planning due to the large number of species in need of management but limited resources and data. One type of surrogate approach involves selection of one or a few species to represent a larger group of species requiring similar management actions, so that protection and persistence of the selected species would result in conservation of the group of species. However, among the criticisms of surrogate approaches is the need to test underlying assumptions, which remain rarely examined. In this study, we tested one of the fundamental assumptions underlying use of surrogate species in recovery planning: that there exist groups of threatened and endangered species that are sufficiently similar to warrant similar management or recovery criteria. Using a comprehensive database of all plant species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and tree-based random forest analysis, we found no evidence of species groups based on a set of distributional and biological traits or by abundances and patterns of decline. Our results suggested that application of surrogate approaches for endangered species recovery would be unjustified. Thus, conservation planning focused on individual species and their patterns of decline will likely be required to recover listed species. PMID:23240051

  11. Multi-Molar Absorption of CO2 by the Activation of Carboxylate Groups in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Feng; Huang, Kuan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Zi-Qi; Zhu, Xiang; Tao, Duan-Jian; Jiang, De-En; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-13

    A new strategy for multi-molar absorption of CO2 is reported based on activating a carboxylate group in amino acid ionic liquids. It was illustrated that introducing an electron-withdrawing site to amino acid anions could reduce the negative inductive effect of the amino group while simultaneously activating the carboxylate group to interact with CO2 very efficiently. An extremely high absorption capacity of CO2 (up to 1.69 mol mol(-1) ) in aminopolycarboxylate-based amino acid ionic liquids was thus achieved. The evidence of spectroscopic investigations and quantum-chemical calculations confirmed the interactions between two kinds of sites in the anion and CO2 that resulted in superior CO2 capacities. PMID:27136274

  12. Differential Abundance of Microbial Functional Groups along the Elevation Gradient from the Coast to the Luquillo Mountains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial communities respond to multiple abiotic and biotic factors that change along elevation gradients. We compare changes in microbial community composition in soil and review previous research on differential abundance of microbial functional groups along an elevation gradi...

  13. The effect of dietary amino acid abundance and isotopic composition on the growth rate, metabolism and tissue δ13C of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; McCullagh, James S O; Focken, Ulfert

    2011-06-28

    The aim of the present study was to test whether the dietary non-essential/conditionally essential amino acid composition has an effect on growth and protein utilisation and on δ13C of individual amino acids in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout were reared on six purified diets containing only synthetic amino acids in place of protein. Diet 1 mimicked the amino acid composition of fishmeal, in diet 2, cysteine (Cys), glycine (Gly), proline (Pro) and tyrosine (Tyr) were isonitrogenously replaced by their precursor amino acids serine (Ser), glutamic acid (Glu) and phenylalanine (Phe), and in diet 3, alanine (Ala), asparagine and aspartate, Cys, Gly, Pro, Ser and Tyr were isonitrogenously replaced by Glu. Diets 4, 5 and 6 resembled diets 1, 2 and 3 except that Glu contained 0·1 % 13C-enriched Glu. A control group was reared on a fishmeal-based diet. A total of forty-two trout (4·7 (sd 0·57) g) were fed one of the diets at a level of 3·5 % body mass for 10 weeks in a flow-through system. Dietary non-essential amino acid composition significantly influenced protein gain (P < 0·025) and δ13C of Ala, arginine (Arg), Gly, histidine (His), Phe and Tyr. Non-enriched Glu was predominantly found in trout fed 13C-enriched Glu, which is consistent with the fact that Glu has been shown to be used extensively in the gut as an energy source but is less consistent with the enrichment of Pro in fish fed diet 6 compared with fish fed diet 3. Further research is required to better understand the mechanisms that lead to the alteration of amino acid δ13C between diet and body tissues. PMID:21418707

  14. The abundance and organization of polypeptides associated with antigens of the Rh blood group system.

    PubMed

    Gardner, B; Anstee, D J; Mawby, W J; Tanner, M J; von dem Borne, A E

    1991-06-01

    Twelve murine monoclonal antibodies, which react with human red cells of common Rh phenotype but give weak or negative reactions with Rh null erythrocytes, were used in quantitative binding assays and competitive binding assays to investigate the abundance and organization of polypeptides involved in the expression of antigens of the Rh blood group system. Antibodies of the R6A-type (R6A, BRIC-69, BRIC-207) and the 2D10-type (MB-2D10, LA18.18, LA23.40) recognize related structures and 100,000-200,000 molecules of each antibody bind maximally to erythrocytes of common Rh phenotype. Antibodies of the BRIC-125 type (BRICs 32, 122, 125, 126, 168, 211) recognize structures that are unrelated to those recognized by R6A-type and 2D10-type antibodies and between 10,000 and 50,000 antibody molecules bind maximally to erythrocytes of the common Rh phenotype. The binding of antibodies of the R6A-type and the 2D10-type, but not of antibodies of the BRIC-125-type could be partially inhibited by human anti-D antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) and a murine anti-e-like antibody. These results are consistent with evidence (Moore & Green 1987; Avent et al., 1988b) that the Rh blood group antigens are associated with a complex that comprises two groups of related polypeptides of M(r) 30,000 and M(r) 35,000-100,000, respectively, and suggest that there are 1-2 x 10(5) copies of this complex per erythrocyte. The polypeptide recognized by antibodies of the BRIC-125 type is likely to be associated with this complex. PMID:9259831

  15. The effect of deuterium substitution in the amino group on the internal-rotation barrier of acetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Eizi; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Seto, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    Peptide molecules XCO-NYY' are characterized by low potential barrier V3 to internal rotation of a methyl group substituted for X and/or Y. A most conspicuous example is acetamide, for which V3 was previously reported to be 25.043857(19) cm -1[8]. The present study intended to clarify why V3 is so low in acetamide, by examining the effect of the out-of-plane bending or inversion of the amino group on the molecular structure through deuterium substitution for amino hydrogens. The potential barrier V3 in acetamide was found to decrease by 2.630, 2.986, and 5.532 cm -1, when H's at cis, trans, and both positions in the amino group were replaced by deuterium atoms, respectively. The reduction was proportional to the effective mass of the out-of-plane bending mode of the amino group (hereafter referred to as the amino inversion), which was in turn ascribed to the change in electronic resonance character of the peptide linkage. The amino inversion is coupled with the CH 3 internal rotation, producing an interaction term proportional to τ sin 3 α, where τ and α denote the amino inversion and methyl internal rotation angles, respectively. This coupling term, when the inversion is treated by second-order perturbation, yields a V6 term in the internal-rotation potential function of the methyl group, in agreement with the finding of Ilyushin et al. [8], who derived an unusually large V6 term of -10.044874(73) cm -1. It is quite interesting that even a small perturbation such as deuterium substitution causes a substantial change in electronic structure of the peptide linkage.

  16. A volume-limited sample of X-ray galaxy groups and clusters - III. Central abundance drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, E. K.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of a search and study of central abundance drops in a volume-limited sample (z ≤ 0.071) of 101 X-ray galaxy groups and clusters. These are best observed in nearby, and so best resolved, groups and clusters, making our sample ideal for their detection. Out of the 65 groups and clusters in our sample for which we have abundance profiles, 8 of them have certain central abundance drops, with possible central abundance drops in another 6. All sources with central abundance drops have X-ray cavities, and all bar one exception have a central cooling time of ≤1 Gyr. These central abundance drops can be generated if the iron injected by stellar mass-loss processes in the core of these sources is in grains, which then become incorporated in the central dusty filaments. These, in turn, are dragged outwards by the bubbling feedback process in these sources. We find that data quality significantly affects the detection of central abundance drops, inasmuch as a higher number of counts in the central 20 kpc of a source makes it easier to detect a central abundance drop, as long as these counts are more than ˜13 000. On the other hand, the magnitude of the central abundance drop does not depend on the number of these counts, though the statistical significance of the measured drop does. Finally, in line with the scenario briefly outlined above, we find that, for most sources, the location of X-ray cavities acts as an upper limit to the location of the peak in the radial metallicity distribution.

  17. DISTINCTIVE LOCALIZATION OF GROUP 3 LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT SYNTHESIZING CELLS DURING BRINE SHRIMP DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Yong; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Bong Hee; Kim, Kyung Joo; Jo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Suhng Wook; Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Boo Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, their functions, roles, and localizations during developmental stages in arthropods remain unknown. LEA proteins protect crucial proteins against osmotic stress during the development and growth of various organisms. Thus, in this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to determine the crucial regions protected against osmotic stress as well as the distinctive localization of group 3 (G3) LEA(+) cells during brine shrimp development. Several cell types were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA, including neurons, muscular cells, APH-1(+) cells, and renal cells. The G3 LEA(+) neuronal cell bodies outside of the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles to the central body, but those inside the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles toward the deutocerebrum without innervating the central body. The cell bodies inside the mushroom body received axons of the G3 LEA(+) sensory cells at the medial ventral cup of the nauplius eye. Several glands were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA during the nauplius stages of brine shrimp, including the sinus, antennal I and II, salt, and three ectodermal glands. This study provides the first demonstration of the formation of G3 LEA(+) sinus glands at the emergence stages of brine shrimp. These results suggest that G3 LEA protein is synthesized in several cell types. In particular, specific glands play crucial roles during the emergence and nauplius stages of brine shrimp. PMID:25781424

  18. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2016-01-01

    The abundances of three Fe Group elements (V, Cr, and Fe) in 9 early main-sequence band B stars in the LMC, 7 in the SMC , and two in the Magellanic Bridge have been determined from archival FUSE observations and the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC. Lines from the Fe group elements, except for a few weak multiplets of Fe III, are not observable in the optical spectral region. The best set of lines in the FUSE spectral region are Fe III (UV1), V III 1150 Å, and Cr III 1137 Å. The abundances of these elements in early B stars are a marker for recent SNe Ia activity, as a single exploding white dwarf can deliver 0.5 solar masses of Ni-56 that decays into Fe to the ISM. The Fe group abundances in an older population of stars primarily reflect SNe II activity, in which a single explosion delivers only 0.07 solar masses of Ni-56 to the ISM (the rest remains trapped in the neutron star). The abundances of the Fe group elements in early B stars not only track SNe Ia activity but are also important for computing evolutionary tracks for massive stars. In general, the Fe abundance relative to the sun's value is comparable to the mean abundances for the lighter elements in the Clouds/Bridge but the values of [V,Cr/Fe]sun are smaller. This presentation will discuss the spatial distribution of the Fe Group elements in the Magellanic Clouds, and compare it with our galaxy in which the abundance of Fe declines with radial distance from the center. Support from NASA grants NAG5-13212, NNX10AD66G, STScI HST-GO-13346.22, and USC's Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  19. Enhancing Energetic Properties and Sensitivity by Incorporating Amino and Nitramino Groups into a 1,2,4-Oxadiazole Building Block.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongxing; Gao, Haixiang; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-01-18

    A single nitrogen-rich heterocyclic ring with many energetic groups is expected to exhibit excellent detonation performance. We report an effective approach for the synthesis of 3-amino-5-nitramino-1,2,4-oxadiazole, which has nitramino and amino groups in the same building block. The single-crystal X-ray structure shows layered hydrogen-bonding pairs as well as the presence of a water molecule which ensure insensitivity. Through incorporation of a cation, the hydrazinium or hydroxylammonium salts exhibit good energetic performance and acceptable sensitivities. PMID:26617389

  20. Grouping of amino acids and recognition of protein structurally conserved regions by reduced alphabets of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Wei

    2007-06-01

    Sequence alignment is a common method for finding protein structurally conserved/similar regions. However, sequence alignment is often not accurate if sequence identities between to-be-aligned sequences are less than 30%. This is because that for these sequences, different residues may play similar structural roles and they are incorrectly aligned during the sequence alignment using substitution matrix consisting of 20 types of residues. Based on the similarity of physicochemical features, residues can be clustered into a few groups. Using such simplified alphabets, the complexity of protein sequences is reduced and at the same time the key information encoded in the sequences remains. As a result, the accuracy of sequence alignment might be improved if the residues are properly clustered. Here, by using a database of aligned protein structures (DAPS), a new clustering method based on the substitution scores is proposed for the grouping of residues, and substitution matrices of residues at different levels of simplification are constructed. The validity of the reduced alphabets is confirmed by relative entropy analysis. The reduced alphabets are applied to recognition of protein structurally conserved/similar regions by sequence alignment. The results indicate that the accuracy or efficiency of sequence alignment can be improved with the optimal reduced alphabet with N around 9. PMID:17609897

  1. Light and heavy dansyl reporter groups in food chemistry: amino acid assay in beverages.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Di Donna, Leonardo; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    5-Dimethylamino-1-sulfonyl naphthalene (DNS, commonly referred as dansyl) is a functionality, bearing well-established properties in directing the fragmentation, by mass spectrometry (MS), of the corresponding ionized sulfonylated derivatives. This property is shared also by its labeled analogs. The use of d(0)/d(6) DNS derivatives is now exploited in the application of the well-established isotope dilution mass spectrometric approach in the assay of complex mixtures. A new method for the quantitation of amino acids (AAs) in beverages is therefore presented, which relies on liquid chromatographic separation of their N-dansylated derivatives followed by comparative electrospray tandem MS/MS of the d(0)/d(6) isobaric mixtures. Labeled and unlabeled DNS derivatives of the selected AAs are readily available by microwave-assisted synthetic protocols. The novelty of the method is represented by the use of heavy and light DNS-isotopologue providing suitable reporter groups. Multiple-reaction monitoring has been applied in the assay of AAs in wine, pineapple juice and bergamot juice with good-to-excellent results as proved by both relative standard deviation, lower than 15%, and by the accuracy values in the range 90-110%. PMID:22791261

  2. Coordinative Properties of Highly Fluorinated Solvents with Amino and Ether Groups

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Paul G.; Lugert, Elizabeth C.; Rábai, József; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    In spite of the widespread use of perfluorinated solvents with amino and ether groups in a variety of application fields, the coordinative properties of these compounds are poorly known. It is generally assumed that the electron withdrawing perfluorinated moieties render these functional groups rather inert, but little is known quantitatively about the extent of their inertness. This paper reports on the interactions between inorganic monocations and perfluorotripentylamine and 2H-perfluoro-5,8,11-trimethyl-3,6,9,12-tetraoxapentadecane, as determined with fluorous liquid-membrane cation-selective electrodes doped with tetrakis[3,5-bis(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]borate salts. The amine does not undergo measurable association with any ion tested, and its formal pKa is shown to be smaller than -0.5. This is consistent with the nearly planar structure of the amine at its nitrogen center, as obtained with density functional theory calculations. The tetraether interacts very weakly with Na+ and Li+. Assuming 1:1 stoichiometry, formal association constants were determined to be 2.3 and 1.5 M-1, respectively. This disproves an earlier proposition that the Lewis base character in such compounds may be non-existent. Due to the extremely low polarity of fluorous solvents and the resulting high extent of ion pair formation, a fluorophilic electrolyte salt with perfluoroalkyl substituents on both the cation and the anion had to be developed for these experiments. In its pure form, this first fluorophilic electrolyte salt is an ionic liquid with a glass transition temperature, Tg, of -18.5 °C. Interestingly, the molar conductivity of solutions of this salt increases very steeply in the high concentration range, making it a particularly effective electrolyte salt. PMID:16316244

  3. A simple method for N-15 labelling of exocyclic amino groups in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Acedo, Montse; Fàbrega, Carme; Aviño, Anna; Goodman, Myron; Fagan, Patricia; Wemmer, David; Eritja, Ramon

    1994-01-01

    The use of the ammonia deprotection step to introduce 15N labels at specific exocyclic amino positions of adenine, cytosine, guanine or 2-aminopurine of oligodeoxynucleotides is described. PMID:8065910

  4. Site-Specific Labeling of Protein Lysine Residues and N-Terminal Amino Groups with Indoles and Indole-Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Larda, Sacha Thierry; Pichugin, Dmitry; Prosser, Robert Scott

    2015-12-16

    Indoles and indole-derivatives can be used to site-specifically label proteins on lysine and N-terminal amino groups under mild, nondenaturing reaction conditions. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and α-lactalbumin were labeled with indole, fluoroindole, or fluoroindole-2-carboxylate via electrophilic aromatic substitutions to lysine side chain Nε- and N-terminal amino imines, formed in situ in the presence of formaldehyde. The reaction is highly site-selective, easily controlled by temperature, and does not eliminate the native charge of the protein, unlike many other common lysine-specific labeling strategies. (19)F NMR was used to monitor reaction progression, and in the case of HEWL, unique resonances for each labeled side chain could be resolved. We demonstrate that the indole tags are highly selective for primary amino groups. (19)F NMR demonstrates that each lysine exhibits a different rate of conjugation to indoles making it possible to employ these tags as a means of probing surface topology by NMR or mass spectrometry. Given the site-specificity of this tagging method, the mildness of the reaction conditions (aqueous, buffered, or unbuffered) and the low stoichiometry required for the reaction, indole-derivatives should serve as a valuable addition to the bioconjugation toolkit. We propose that labeling lysine side chains and N-terminal amino groups with indoles is a versatile and general strategy for bioconjugations with substituted indoles having broad implications for protein functionalization. PMID:26587689

  5. Basicity of the Amino Groups of the Aminoglycoside Amikacin Using Capillary Electrophoresis and coupled CE-MS-MS techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Ravi S.; Glink, Peter T.; Chapman, Robert G.; Mcdonald, J C.; Jensen, Pamela K. ); Gao, Hongying; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Smith, Richard D. ); Whitesides, George M.

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the use of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and coupled CE and mass spectrometric techniques (CE-MS-MS) to measure the values of the pKa of the amino groups of small molecules -- of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin, and of its acetylated derivatives. These values of pKa (8.4, 6.7, 9.7, and 8.4) were determined by measuring the electrophoretic mobilities of the molecules as a function of pH; they are within 0.7 units of certain values reported in the literature (by 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopies), and resolved ambiguities left by these earlier studies. The observed variation in the values of pKa of an amino group in different acetylated derivatives also indicated the complex dependence of the degree of ionization on the environment of the ionizable group.

  6. Development of a complex amino acid supplement, Fatigue Reviva™, for oral ingestion: initial evaluations of product concept and impact on symptoms of sub-health in a group of males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A new dietary supplement, Fatigue Reviva™, has been recently developed to address issues related to amino acid depletion following illness or in conditions of sub-health where altered amino acid homeostasis has been associated with fatigue. Complex formulations of amino acids present significant challenges due to solubility and taste constraints. This initial study sets out to provide an initial appraisal of product palatability and to gather pilot evidence for efficacy. Methods Males reporting symptoms of sub-health were recruited on the basis of being free from any significant medical or psychological condition. Each participant took an amino acid based dietary supplement (Fatigue Reviva™) daily for 30 days. Comparisons were then made between pre- and post-supplement general health symptoms and urinary amino acid profiles. Results Seventeen men took part in the study. Following amino acid supplementation the total Chalder fatigue score improved significantly (mean ± SEM, 12.5 ± 0.9 versus 10.0 ± 1.0, P<0.03). When asked whether they thought that the supplement had improved their health, 65% of participants responded positively. A subgroup of participants reported gastrointestinal symptoms which were attributed to the supplement and which were believed to result from the component fructooligosaccharide. Analysis of urinary amino acids revealed significant alterations in the relative abundances of a number of amino acids after supplementation including an increase in valine, isoleucine and glutamic acid and reduced levels of glutamine and ornithine. Discriminant function analysis of the urinary amino acid data revealed significant differences between the pre- and post-supplement urine excretion profiles. Conclusions The results indicated that Fatigue Reviva™ was palatable and that 65% of the study group reported that they felt the product had improved their health. The product could provide an effective tool for the management of unexplained

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of guanine nucleotides labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, A; Sakamoto, H; Palibroda, N; Chiriac, M; Sarfati, R; Smith, J M; Craescu, C T; Bârzu, O

    1995-02-10

    GMP and dGMP labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring was obtained enzymatically from NH4Cl (> 99 at.% 15N) and from IMP or dIMP, respectively, by several reactions involving IMP-dehydrogenase, GMP-synthetase, adenylate kinase, and creatine kinase. The first three enzymes were obtained by overexpression in Escherichia coli of the corresponding genes. The isotope content of the primary amino group of guanine determined by mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis of nucleotides was found higher than 98 at.% 15N. The proton NMR spectrum of [15N]GMP in solution in the absence of nitrogen decoupling showed a doublet with a coupling constant of 92 Hz. When nitrogen decoupling was used during the acquisition time, the doublet was replaced by a single peak at 6.47 ppm, indicating that the corresponding proton is bound to 15N. PMID:7778777

  8. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Three Early B Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. J.; Adelman, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The photospheric abundances of V, Cr, and Fe have been determined for three sharp-lined early B stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud using FUV spectra obtained from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Kurucz LTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis codes ATLAS9/SYNTHE. The program stars include NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30 (star designations are from Robertson 1974, A&AS, 15, 261). The calculations were carried through with model parameters close to those adopted by Korn et al. (2000, A&A, 353, 655). Values of Teff, log g, ξ T, and v sin I are 25000/4.0/0/30, 20000/3.1/6/25, and 23500/3.3/14/30 for NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30, respectively. The abundances quoted below are in sequence for the latter stars. The vanadium abundances, [V/H], determined from V III λ λ 1150,1152 (UV 2), are -0.6, -0.9, and -0.9 dex. Cr was determined from Cr III λ λ 1118,1136. Values of -0.5, -0.8, and -0.7 dex were found. Uncertainties in the V and Cr abundances are ˜0.3 dex. The Fe abundance is primarily from 7 lines of Fe III (UV 1) in the region λ λ 1122-32. Values are -0.8±0.3, ˜-1.1, and -0.4±0.3. Since there is no evidence for N enhancement in the program stars ([N/H] ˜ -0.9, -1.0, and -0.6 from the N III doublet at 1183,1184 Å) the photospheric abundances have probably not been altered by mixing of processed material from the star's interior and the derived abundances represent pristine values for the two young clusters in the LMC. It should be noted that the N and Fe abundances derived for NGC1818/D1 are about 0.5 dex lower than those determined by Korn et al. from much weaker optical lines. We will discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy. The generally low abundances for the Fe group elements in these young cluster B stars imply that supernova activity has been minimal in the regions of the LMC in which the stars were formed. GJP appreciates support from NASA grant NAG5-13212.

  9. A Remarkable Oxidative Cascade That Replaces the Riboflavin C8 Methyl with an Amino Group during Roseoflavin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jhulki, Isita; Chanani, Prem K; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-07-13

    Roseoflavin is a naturally occurring riboflavin analogue with antibiotic properties. It is biosynthesized from riboflavin in a reaction involving replacement of the C8 methyl with a dimethylamino group. Herein we report the identification of a flavin-dependent enzyme that converts flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and glutamate to 8-amino-FMN via the intermediacy of 8-formyl-FMN. A mechanistic proposal for this remarkable transformation is proposed. PMID:27331868

  10. Natural (15)N Abundance in Key Amino Acids from Lamb Muscle: Exploring a New Horizon in Diet Authentication and Assessment of Feed Efficiency in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Gonzalo; Ortigues-Marty, Isabelle; Schiphorst, Anne-Marie; Robins, Richard J; Tea, Illa; Prache, Sophie

    2016-05-25

    Natural (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) varies between individual amino acids (AAs). We hypothesized that δ(15)N of nontransaminating and essential AAs ("source" AAs, such as phenylalanine) present in animal tissues could be used as a marker of dietary origin, whereas δ(15)N of transaminating AAs ("trophic" AAs, such as glutamic acid) could give more detailed insights into animal feed efficiency. Two diets based on dehydrated Lucerne pellets were tested in growing lambs, which promoted different feed efficiencies. No dietary effects were noted on δ(15)N of any AAs analyzed in lamb muscle. In addition, δ(15)N of phenylalanine was unexpectedly similar to that of glutamic acid, suggesting that δ(15)N of AAs is significantly derived from the metabolism of the rumen microbiota and, thus, are not suited for diet authentication in ruminants. In contrast, the δ(15)N of transaminating AAs facilitates an improved prediction of animal feed efficiency compared to the classical isotopic bulk N analysis. PMID:27148901

  11. Heliothine caterpillars differ in abundance of a gut lumen aminoacylase (L-ACY-1)-Suggesting a relationship between host preference and fatty acid amino acid conjugate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Emily H; Seidl-Adams, Irmgard; Tumlinson, James H

    2012-03-01

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the oral secretions of Lepidopteran larvae are responsible for eliciting plant defense responses. FACs are present despite fitness costs which suggests that they are important for larval survival. In previous work, an aminoacylase (L-ACY-1) was identified as the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of FACs within the larvae gut. This gene is present in three related Heliothine species: Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Heliothis subflexa. Transcript levels in gut tissues are predictive of protein abundance and enzyme activity in the frass. H. zea has the least amount of L-ACY-1 present in gut tissue and frass, while H. virescens has intermediate protein levels and H. subflexa has the highest amount of L-ACY-1 in gut tissue as well as in frass samples. These species differ in their host range and protein intake targets, and recently, it has been shown that FACs, the substrates of L-ACY-1, are involved in nitrogen metabolism. The correlation between protein intake and degree of host range specialization suggests that this aminoacylase may allow specialized larvae to obtain nitrogen requirements despite limitations in diet heterogeneity. PMID:22266147

  12. Platinum group element abundances in the upper continental crust revisited - New constraints from analyses of Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Hu, Zhaochu; Gao, Shan; Campbell, Ian H.; Gong, Hujun

    2012-09-01

    Platinum group element (PGE) abundances in the upper continental crust (UCC) are poorly constrained with published values varying by up to an order of magnitude. We evaluated the validity of using loess to estimate PGE abundances in the UCC by measuring these elements in seven Chinese loess samples using a precise method that combines NiS fire assay with isotope dilution. Major and trace elements of the Chinese loess show a typical upper crustal composition and PGE abundances are consistent with literature data on Chinese loess, except for Ru, which is a factor of 10 lowe than published values. We suggest that the high Ru data and RuN/IrN values of Chinese loess reported by Peucker-Ehrenbrink and Jahn (2001) (Geochem. Geophys. Geosys.2, 2001GC000172) are an analytical artifact, rather than a true geochemical characteristic of loess because likely sources of loess are not significantly enriched in Ru and transport and deposition processes cannot preferentially enrich Ru in loess. The effect of eolian fractionation on PGE abundances in loess appears to be limited because Chinese loess from different locations shows similar PGE patterns and concentrations. This conclusion is supported by strong positive correlations between the PGE (except for Pt) and other compatible elements such as Fe2O3, Ni, Cr, Co. Using a compilation of PGE data for loess from China, Argentina and Europe, including our data but excluding one sample with an anomalously high Pt content, we propose average PGE abundances for global loess of Ir = 0.022 ppb (ng/g), Ru = 0.030 ppb, Rh = 0.018 ppb, Pt = 0.599 ppb, and Pd = 0.526 ppb, and suggest that these are the best current estimates for the PGE abundances of the UCC.

  13. Abundance and Relative Distribution of Frankia Host Infection Groups Under Actinorhizal Alnus glutinosa and Non-actinorhizal Betula nigra Trees.

    PubMed

    Samant, Suvidha; Huo, Tian; Dawson, Jeffrey O; Hahn, Dittmar

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to assess the abundance and relative distribution of host infection groups of the root-nodule forming, nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia in four soils with similar physicochemical characteristics, two of which were vegetated with a host plant, Alnus glutinosa, and two with a non-host plant, Betula nigra. Analyses of DAPI-stained cells at three locations, i.e., at a distance of less than 1 m (near stem), 2.5 m (middle crown), and 3-5 m (crown edge) from the stems of both tree species revealed no statistically significant differences in abundance. Frankiae generally accounted for 0.01 to 0.04 % of these cells, with values between 4 and 36 × 10(5) cells (g soil)(-1). In three out of four soils, abundance of frankiae was significantly higher at locations "near stem" and/or "middle crown" compared to "crown edge," while numbers at these locations were not different in the fourth soil. Frankiae of the Alnus host infection group were dominant in all samples accounting for about 75 % and more of the cells, with no obvious differences with distance to stem. In three of the soils, all of these cells were represented by strain Ag45/Mut15. In the fourth soil that was vegetated with older A. glutinosa trees, about half of these cells belonged to a different subgroup represented by strain ArI3. In all soils, the remaining cells belonged to the Elaeagnus host infection group represented by strain EAN1pec. Casuarina-infective frankiae were not found. Abundance and relative distribution of Frankia host infection groups were similar in soils under the host plant A. glutinosa and the non-host plant B. nigra. Results did thus not reveal any specific effects of plant species on soil Frankia populations. PMID:26143359

  14. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues. PMID:26572799

  15. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  16. Synthesis, physical properties and cytotoxicity of stilbene-triazine derivatives containing amino acid groups as fluorescent whitening agents.

    PubMed

    Wan, Maosheng; Zhou, Shaoli; Jiao, Peifu; Cao, Chengbo; Guo, Jing

    2013-09-01

    A series of novel stilbene-triazine derivatives containing amino acid groups were synthesized and screened to evaluate their cytotoxicity. The UV absorptions of the derivatives were in the range of 240-450 nm. The absorption peaks of the cis-isomers and trans-isomers were in 281-291 nm and 353-361 nm, respectively. Their fluorescence emission peaks of the derivatives were located in the range of 400-650 nm. The whiteness data indicated that all the stilbene-triazine-amino acid derivatives showed excellent whitening effect on cotton fiber compared to untreated cotton. The preliminary cytotoxicity of these derivatives on a mouse fibroblast cell line (L-929 cells) was also investigated. The results showed that the compounds (7a-h) were nontoxic to L-929 cells as fluorescent whitening agents. PMID:23748838

  17. Group 11 complexes with amino acid derivatives: Synthesis and antitumoral studies.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Lourdes; Meireles, Margarida; Kasper, Cornelia; Laguna, Antonio; Villacampa, M Dolores; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-01

    Gold(I), gold(III), silver(I) and copper(I) complexes with modified amino acid esters and phosphine ligands have been prepared in order to test their cytotoxic activity. Two different phosphine fragments, PPh3 and PPh2py (py=pyridine), have been used. The amino acid esters have been modified by introducing an aromatic amine as pyridine that coordinates metal fragments through the nitrogen atom, giving complexes of the type [M(L)(PR3)](+) or [AuCl3(L)] (L=l-valine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L1), l-alanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L2), l-phenylalanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl-ester) (L3); M=Au(I), Ag(I), Cu(I), PR3=PPh3, PPh2py). The in vitro cytotoxic activity of metal complexes was tested against four tumor human cell lines and one tumor mouse cell line. A metabolic activity test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, MTT) was used and IC50 values were compared with those obtained for cisplatin. Several complexes displayed significant cytotoxic activities. In order to determine whether antiproliferation and cell death are associated with apoptosis, NIH-3T3 cells were exposed to five selected complexes (Annexin V+ FITC, PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry. These experiments showed that the mechanism by which the complexes inhibit cell proliferation inducing cell death in NIH-3T3 cells is mainly apoptotic. PMID:26780577

  18. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  19. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  20. Direct Stereocontrolled Synthesis of 3-Amino-3-deoxy-β-Mannopyranosides: Importance of the Nitrogen Protecting Group on Stereoselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Crich, David; Xu, Huadong

    2008-01-01

    The highly stereocontrolled synthesis of the 3-amino-3-deoxy-β-mannopyranosides is achieved by means of thioglycoside donors protected with a 4,6-O-benzylidene or alkylidene acetal and a benzylidene imine group. Among the various nitrogen protecting groups investigated only the Schiff’s base was found to give high β-selectivity. N-Phthalimido and N-acetamido protected donors were found to be highly α-selective, whereas 3-azido-3-deoxy glycosyl donors gave intermediate selectivity. The reasons for the protecting group dependency are discussed in terms of the change in the O2-C2-C3-N3 torsional interaction on conversion of the covalent glycosyl triflates to the transient oxacarbenium ions. PMID:17567072

  1. Oxidation of amino groups by hydroxyl radicals in relation to the oxidation degree of the alpha-carbon.

    PubMed

    Leitner, N Karpel Vel; Berger, P; Legube, B

    2002-07-15

    Nitrogen organic compounds constitute a large class of aqueous pollutants. These compounds include not only azoic structures, nitrogen heterocycles, and nitrous groups but also amides and amines. This work consisted in studying the OH* induced oxidation of simple primary amines in dilute aqueous solution with special attention to mineralization of the nitrogen group as a function of the nature of the alpha-carbon. H2O2/UV and gamma-irradiation processes were used for the production of OH* radicals, and the molecules studied were one alpha-amino acid i.e., glycine (HOOCCH2NH2), and two primary amides i.e., acetamide (CH3CONH2) and oxamic acid (HOOCCONH2). It was shown that the oxidation of glycine leads to the formation of ammonia, whereas the acetamide molecule is first oxidized into oxamic acid ending in complete mineralization with production of nitrates. Reaction mechanisms are proposed which account for the observed inorganic nitrogen end product depending on the oxidation degree of the carbon atoms of the molecules. It follows that the present study will allow for prediction of the fate of nitrogen resulting from the oxidation of primary amino groups by OH* radicals. PMID:12141487

  2. Transferring the purine 2-amino group from guanines to adenines in DNA changes the sequence-specific binding of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, C; Waring, M J

    1995-01-01

    The proposition that the 2-amino group of guanine plays a critical role in determining how antibiotics recognise their binding sites in DNA has been tested by relocating it, using tyrT DNA derivative molecules substituted with inosine plus 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP). Irrespective of their mode of interaction with DNA, such GC-specific antibiotics as actinomycin, echinomycin, mithramycin and chromomycin find new binding sites associated with DAP-containing sequences and are excluded from former canonical sites containing I.C base pairs. The converse is found to be the case for a group of normally AT-selective ligands which bind in the minor groove of the helix, such as netropsin: their preferred sites become shifted to IC-rich clusters. Thus the binding sites of all these antibiotics strictly follow the placement of the purine 2-amino group, which accordingly must serve as both a positive and negative effector. The footprinting profile of the 'threading' intercalator nogalamycin is potentiated in DAP plus inosine-substituted DNA but otherwise remains much the same as seen with natural DNA. The interaction of echinomycin with sites containing the TpDAP step in doubly substituted DNA appears much stronger than its interaction with CpG-containing sites in natural DNA. Images PMID:7731800

  3. Lanthanide-Catalyzed Reversible Alkynyl Exchange by Carbon-Carbon Single-Bond Cleavage Assisted by a Secondary Amino Group.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yinlin; Zhang, Fangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Xigeng

    2016-09-12

    Lanthanide-catalyzed alkynyl exchange through C-C single-bond cleavage assisted by a secondary amino group is reported. A lanthanide amido complex is proposed as a key intermediate, which undergoes unprecedented reversible β-alkynyl elimination followed by alkynyl exchange and imine reinsertion. The in situ homo- and cross-dimerization of the liberated alkyne can serve as an additional driving force to shift the metathesis equilibrium to completion. This reaction is formally complementary to conventional alkyne metathesis and allows the selective transformation of internal propargylamines into those bearing different substituents on the alkyne terminus in moderate to excellent yields under operationally simple reaction conditions. PMID:27510403

  4. Dipolar Dyes with a Pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinoxaline Skeleton Containing a Cyano Group and a Bridged Tertiary Amino Group: Synthesis, Solvatofluorochromism, and Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Łukasz G; Deperasińska, Irena; Poronik, Yevgen M; Jun, Yong Woong; Banasiewicz, Marzena; Kozankiewicz, Bolesław; Ahn, Kyo Han; Gryko, Daniel T

    2016-06-01

    Two strongly polarized dipolar chromophores possessing a cyclic tertiary amino group at one terminus of the molecule and a CN group at the opposite terminus were designed and synthesized. Their rigid skeleton contains the rarely studied pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinoxaline ring system. The photophysical properties of these regioisomeric dyes were different owing to differing π conjugation between the CN group and the electron-donor moiety. These dipolar molecules showed very intense emission, strong solvatofluorochromism, and sufficient two-photon brightness for bioimaging. One of these regioisomeric dyes, namely, 11-carbonitrile-2,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-1H-3a,8,13,13b-tetraazabenzo[b]cyclohepta[1,2,3-jk]fluorene, was successfully utilized in two-photon imaging of mouse organ tissues and showed distinct tissue morphology with high resolution. PMID:27027726

  5. Role of the alpha-amino group of protein in ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Heller, H; Eytan, E; Kaklij, G; Rose, I A

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin to NH2 groups of proteins is required for protein breakdown. We now show that the selective modification of NH2-terminal alpha-NH2 groups of globin and lysozyme prevents their degradation by the ubiquitin proteolytic system from reticulocytes. The conjugation by ubiquitin of epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues, usually seen in multiples, was also inhibited in alpha-NH2-blocked proteins. Naturally occurring N alpha-acetylated proteins are not degraded by the ubiquitin system at a significant rate, while their nonacetylated counterparts from other species are good substrates. This suggests that one function of N alpha-acetylation of cellular proteins is to prevent their degradation by the ubiquitin system. alpha-NH2-blocked proteins can have their activity as substrates for degradation increased by incorporation of alpha-NH2 groups through the introduction of polyalanine side chains. Proteins in which most epsilon-NH2 groups are blocked but the alpha-NH2 group is free are degraded by the ubiquitin system, but at a reduced rate. It is therefore suggested that the exposure of a free NH2 terminus of proteins is required for degradation and probably initiates the formation of ubiquitin conjugates committed for degradation. Images PMID:6095265

  6. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  7. On the Formation of Amide Polymers via Carbonyl-Amino Group Linkages in Energetically Processed Ices of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstel, Marko; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Jones, Brant M.; Sun, Bing J.; Lee, Huan C.; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the formation of organic amide polymers via carbonyl-amino group linkages in carbon monoxide and ammonia bearing energetically processed ices of astrophysical relevance. The first group comprises molecules with one carboxyl group and an increasing number of amine moieties starting with formamide (45 u), urea (60 u), and hydrazine carboxamide (75 u). The second group consists of species with two carboxyl (58 u) and up to three amine groups (73 u, 88 u, and 103 u). The formation and polymerization of these linkages from simple inorganic molecules via formamide und urea toward amide polymers is discussed in an astrophysical and astrobiological context. Our results show that long chain molecules, which are closely related to polypeptides, easily form by energetically processing simple, inorganic ices at very low temperatures and can be released into the gas phase by sublimation of the ices in star-forming regions. Our experimental results were obtained by employing reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, coupled with soft, single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization; they are complemented by theoretical calculations.

  8. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of the abundance of virulent exoproteins of group A streptococcus caused by environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadahiro; Hasegawa, Tadao; Torii, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Shimokata, Kaoru; Ohta, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Group A streptococci regulate the expression of virulence factors in response to environmental change. In order to investigate this mechanism, the growth of group A streptococci and the abundance of virulent exoprotein production in culture supernatant were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D electrophoresis) under several culture conditions. Judging from alterations in their growth, group A streptococci were affected by various environmental stresses. Under high O(2) and low CO(2 )concentrations, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin F (SpeF) significantly decreased, and the streptococcal inhibitor of complement (Sic) increased. At 30 degrees C, increases in endo-beta- N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoS) and alpha-amylase were also detected, while at 41 degrees C EndoS became undetectable and SpeB and SpeF decreased. Sic, SpeF and mitogenic factor 3 (Mf3) decreased when cells were cultured in higher NaCl concentrations, and EndoS disappeared following culture of the cells in high glucose concentration. An increase in acid phosphatase and a decrease in several other proteins were detected when the cells were cultivated in high iron concentrations. These results suggest that group A streptococci have a versatile adaptation system that responds to several environmental stresses by altering the level of exoprotein production. PMID:14673516

  9. The group A streptococcal dipeptide permease (Dpp) is involved in the uptake of essential amino acids and affects the expression of cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Leonard, B A

    1998-06-01

    The majority of characterized bacterial dipeptide permeases (Dpp) are membrane-associated complexes of five proteins belonging to the ABC-transporter family. They have been found to be involved in the uptake of essential amino acids, haem production, chemotaxis and sporulation. A 5.8 kb genomic DNA fragment of the serotype M49 group A streptococcal (GAS) strain CS101 was sequenced and found to contain five putative GAS Dpp genes (dppA to dppE). Deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 17-54% similarity to corresponding ABC-transporter sequences. The operon organization of the five genes was confirmed by transcriptional analysis, and a shorter, more abundant, dppA-only transcript was detected similar to that found in the GAS oligopeptide permease (Opp) system. Insertional inactivation was used to create serotype M2 and M49 strains that did not express the dppD and dppEATPase genes or nearly the entire operon. In feeding experiments with di- to hexapeptides, the wild-type strain grew with each peptide tested. The dpp mutants were unable to grow on dipeptides, whereas hexapeptides did not sustain the growth of opp mutants. Expression of the dpp operon was induced approximately fourfold in late exponential growth phase. In addition, a striking increase in the dppA to dppA-E ratio from 5:1 to more than 20:1 occurred during late exponential growth phase in complex medium. Growth in chemically defined medium (CDM) supplemented with various dipeptides specifically induced the expression of dpp and reduced both the dppA to dppA-E and oppA to oppA-F mRNA ratios. Expression of the virulence factor SpeB (major cysteine protease) was reduced eightfold in dpp mutants, whereas dpp expression was decreased about fourfold in a Mga virulence regulator mutant. Taken together, these data indicate a correlation between levels of intracellular essential amino acids and the regulation of virulence factor expression. PMID:9680220

  10. Modification of amino groups in EF-Tu.GTP and the ternary complex EF-Tu.GTP.valyl-tRNAVal.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, B; Leberman, R

    1984-06-15

    In an attempt to describe the binding region of EF-Tu . GTP for aminoacyl-tRNA, the epsilon-amino groups of the lysine residues of the protein molecule in the GTP and ternary complexes were modified with ethyl acetimidate. Using [14C]ethyl acetimidate, tryptic digestion, fractionation of peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography, and amino acid analysis, all reactive lysine residues could be unambiguously identified. 19 of the 23 lysine residues of EF-Tu were labelled under conditions for ternary complex stability. Of these only 8 showed differences in reactivity between free and complexed EF-Tu . GTP. In the ternary complex lysine residues 208 and 390 [Jones, M. D., Petersen, T. E., Nielsen, K. M., Magnusson, S., Sotterup-Jensen, L., Gausing, K. and Clark, B. F. C. (1980) Eur. J. Biochem. 108, 507-526] showed an increase in reactivity (60% and 30% respectively) and residues 2, 4, 237, 248, 263, and 282 showed a decrease in reactivity (between 85% and 37%) compared to the values observed with EF-Tu . GTP. The greatest changes in reactivity were observed for lysine residues 2, 4 and 263. These data can be combined with the available structural information to identify possible areas of contact between the protein and nucleic acid moieties in the ternary complex. PMID:6430701

  11. Supramolecular control of polyplex dissociation and cell transfection: efficacy of amino groups and threading cyclodextrins in biocleavable polyrotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Kanda, Daizo; Katoono, Ryo; Yui, Nobuhiko; Ooya, Tooru; Maruyama, Atsushi; Akita, Hidetaka; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2008-10-21

    A novel strategy for gene delivery using biocleavable polyrotaxanes, in which dimethylaminoethyl-modified alpha-cyclodextrins (DMAE-alpha-CDs) are threaded onto a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain capped with benzyloxycarbonyl-L-tyrosine via disulfide linkages (DMAE-SS-PRX), involves the formation of a stable polyion complex (polyplex) against a counter polyanion and the intracellular plasmid DNA (pDNA) release from the polyplex accompanied by the supramolecular dissociation of DMAE-SS-PRXs. In this study, we prepared biocleavable polyrotaxanes with different numbers of threading alpha-CD and amino (DMAE) groups to enhance the transfection activity of DMAE-SS-PRXs. 29DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX, in which the numbers of alpha-CD molecules and amino groups were 18 and 29 respectively, exhibited a high transfection activity compared with other PRXs. The transfection activity of DMAE-SS-PRXs seems to be related to the efficacy of pDNA release from those polyplexes, which was controlled by the number of alpha-CD and/or amino groups in the polyrotaxane carrier. Most of the DMAE-SS-PRX polyplexes released the pDNA only in the presence of both 10 mM DTT and of the counter-polyanion, as expected, except for 14DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX, which released pDNA in the absence of dextran sulfate once the DTT had been added to the polyplex solution. The transfection activity of 14DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX was significantly lower than that of 29DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX regardless of the above features. Confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) observation suggested that the specific result for 14DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX might be due to a premature release of pDNA from the most dissociative 14DMAE-alpha18-SS-PRX polyplex in the cytosol. Therefore, transfection activity seems to be related to an appropriate timing of pDNA release. PMID:18700157

  12. Analytical methods to determine phosphonic and amino acid group-containing pesticides.

    PubMed

    Stalikas, C D; Konidari, C N

    2001-01-12

    A comprehensive view on the possibilities of the most recently developed chromatographic methods and emerging techniques in the analysis of pesticides glyphosate, glufosinate, bialaphos and their metabolites is presented. The state-of-the-art of the individual pre-treatment steps (extraction, pre-concentration, clean-up, separation, quantification) of the employed analytical methods for this group of chemicals is reviewed. The advantages and drawbacks of the described analytical methods are discussed and the present status and future trends are outlined. PMID:11217016

  13. Annual trend patterns of phytoplankton species abundance belie homogeneous taxonomical group responses to climate in the NE Atlantic upwelling.

    PubMed

    Bode, Antonio; Estévez, M Graciela; Varela, Manuel; Vilar, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton is a sentinel of marine ecosystem change. Composed by many species with different life-history strategies, it rapidly responds to environment changes. An analysis of the abundance of 54 phytoplankton species in Galicia (NW Spain) between 1989 and 2008 to determine the main components of temporal variability in relation to climate and upwelling showed that most of this variability was stochastic, as seasonality and long term trends contributed to relatively small fractions of the series. In general, trends appeared as non linear, and species clustered in 4 groups according to the trend pattern but there was no defined pattern for diatoms, dinoflagellates or other groups. While, in general, total abundance increased, no clear trend was found for 23 species, 14 species decreased, 4 species increased during the early 1990s, and only 13 species showed a general increase through the series. In contrast, series of local environmental conditions (temperature, stratification, nutrients) and climate-related variables (atmospheric pressure indices, upwelling winds) showed a high fraction of their variability in deterministic seasonality and trends. As a result, each species responded independently to environmental and climate variability, measured by generalized additive models. Most species showed a positive relationship with nutrient concentrations but only a few showed a direct relationship with stratification and upwelling. Climate variables had only measurable effects on some species but no common response emerged. Because its adaptation to frequent disturbances, phytoplankton communities in upwelling ecosystems appear less sensitive to changes in regional climate than other communities characterized by short and well defined productive periods. PMID:26283032

  14. The quantification of the histochemical protein staining with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA) demonstrating primary amino groups of proteins.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, G

    1991-01-01

    The usefulness of the HNA-pH4-1d staining, which histochemically demonstrates primary protein amino groups under the conditions used, for the microphotometric quantification of proteins was investigated. A correlation (r = 0.986) has been found between the mean protein contents of fresh frozen and fixed sections prepared from different tissues of rats and the corresponding mean integrated extinction values determined histophotometrically after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A histophotometric extinction of E = 0.284 corresponded to 10(-12) g protein. The mean integrated extinction values determined cytophotometrically of different single cells and nuclei stained using the tetrazonium coupling method for proteins correlated (r = 0.989) with corresponding extinction values measured after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A cytophotometric extinction after HNA-pH4-1d staining of E = 0.130 correspond to 10(-12) g protein. PMID:2048388

  15. Infrared and Raman spectra of N-acetyl- L-amino acid methylamides with aromatic side groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Hasegawa, Kodo; Miyazawa, Tatsuo

    Infrared and Raman spectra of N-acetyl- L-phenylalanine methylamide, N-acetyl- L-tyrosine methylamide and N-acetyl- L-tryptophan methylamide, as model compounds of aromatic amino acid residues in proteins, were measured in the solid state and in methanol solutions. Vibrational assignments of the spectra were made by utilizing the deuteration effect and by comparison with the spectra of related compounds which include toluene, p-cresol and 3-methylindole. The amide I, III and IV bands were strong in Raman scattering, but other characteristic amide bands were ill-defined. In the Raman spectra of methanol solutions, only the bands due to the aromatic side group vibrations were markedly observed, but those due to the peptide backbone vibrations were very weak, suggesting the coexistence of various molecular conformations in solution.

  16. Sniffing for Clues to the Dinosaurs Demise: Measurement of Osmium Isotope Compositions and Platinum Group Element Abundances in Volcanic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, K. W.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Mather, T.; Pyle, D.; Martin, R.; Gauthier, P.; Aiuppa, A.

    2005-12-01

    Platinum Group Elements (PGE: Os, Ir, Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd) and osmium isotopes measured in marine and terrestrial sediment, snow and ice records are important paleo-tracers of riverine, hydrothermal, extraterrestrial, volcanic and anthropogenic inputs into the global surficial environment. For instance, the marine Os isotope record across the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary (KTB) indicates that the onset of the main phase of Deccan volcanism and the transient late Maastrichtian warming preceded the large extraterrestrial impact and the related KTB mass extinction by several hundred thousand years [Ravizza and Peucker-Ehrenbrink, 2003]. Distinguishing extraterrestrial from volcanic PGE sources has been difficult due to the similarity in Os isotopic compositions, complex PGE fractionations, and our lack of knowledge of the Os isotopic composition and PGE abundances in volcanic aerosols. These difficulties have fueled vigorous debate about extraterrestrial vs. volcanic triggers of mass extinctions in the geologic record. To assess the volcanic contribution to the global Re-Os-PGE cycle we have initiated a study of Os isotopic compositions and PGE abundances in volcanic emissions from volcanoes around the globe. Here we report preliminary data on PGE abundances and Os isotopes measured in gas and aerosol filter samples from Vulcan Masaya, Nicaragua and Mt Etna, Italy. Samples were analyzed by ID-ICPMS (ThermoFinnigan ELEMENT 2 and NEPTUNE) at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Osmium isotope compositions of the filters are unradiogenic (0.1272 to 0.187). Osmium concentrations range from 28 to 97 pg/cubic meter and are 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those measured by Krahenbuhl et al. [1992] during the spring 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa just after the lava fountaining phase. Normalized PGE abundance patterns are fractionated relative to carbonaceous chondrites and two important features distinguish the pattern from other important PGE sources: 1) Os/Ir is much higher

  17. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  18. The abundance and activation of mTORC1 regulators in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs are modulated by insulin, amino acids, and age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulin (INS) and amino acid (AA) -induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. This study aimed to determine the effects of the post-prandial rise in INS and AA on the activation and abu...

  19. Abundance of amino acid transporters involved in mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulinand amino acid-induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated that members of the System A transporter (SNAT2), the System N transporter (SNAT3), the Sy...

  20. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, E; Kieft, R; Albright, B; Stephens, N A; Hajduk, S L

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  1. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Receptor Abolishes TLF-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, E.; Kieft, R.; Albright, B.; Stephens, N. A.; Hajduk, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  2. Insulin increases mRNA abundance of the amino acid transporter SLC7A5/LAT1 via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Dillon K.; Drummond, Micah J.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Borack, Michael S.; Jennings, Kristofer; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Amino acid transporters (AATs) provide a link between amino acid availability and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation although the direct relationship remains unclear. Previous studies in various cell types have used high insulin concentrations to determine the role of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and AAT mRNA abundance. However, this approach may limit applicability to human physiology. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and whether lower insulin concentrations stimulate AAT mRNA abundance in muscle cells. We hypothesized that lower insulin concentrations would increase mRNA abundance of select AAT via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in C2C12 myotubes. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) significantly increased phosphorylation of the mTORC1 downstream effectors p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and ribosomal protein S6 (S6). A low rapamycin dose (2.5 nmol/L) significantly reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated S6K1 and S6 phosphorylation. A high rapamycin dose (50 nmol/L) further reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated phosphorylation of S6K1 and S6. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) increased mRNA abundance of SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P ≤ 0.043) and SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≤ 0.021) at 240 min and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P = 0.039) at 30 min. High rapamycin prevented an increase in SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P = 0.075) and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P ≥ 0.06) mRNA abundance whereas both rapamycin doses prevented an increase in SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≥ 0.902) mRNA abundance. We conclude that a low insulin concentration increases SLC7A5/LAT1 mRNA abundance in an mTORC1‐dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:24760501

  3. The Synthesis of a Dipeptide from its Component Amino Acids: Protecting Groups in the Elementary Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Paul E.; Campbell, Andrew

    1982-01-01

    A simple, three-step procedure for synthesizing a dipeptide from its component amino acids is described. The dipeptide synthesized uses inexpensive amino acids having hydrocarbon side-chains and can be observed in E/Z forms by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each step in the synthesis produces white crystalline products using standard…

  4. A new reactivity mode for the diazo group: diastereoselective 1,3-aminoalkylation reaction of β-amino-α-diazoesters to give triazolines.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Gulevich, Anton V; Wink, Donald J; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2014-08-18

    A novel mode of reactivity for the diazo group, the 1,3-addition of a nucleophile and an electrophile to the diazo group, has been realized in the intramolecular aminoalkylation of β-amino-α-diazoesters to form tetrasubstituted 1,2,3-triazolines. The reaction exhibited a broad scope, good functional group tolerance, and excellent diastereoselectivity. In addition, a new Au-catalyzed intramolecular transannulation reaction of the obtained propargyl triazolines to give pyrroles has been discovered. PMID:24986811

  5. A New Reactivity Mode of Diazo-Group: Diastereoselective 1,3-Aminoalkylation Reaction of β-Amino-α-Diazoesters Towards Triazolines**

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Gulevich, Anton V.; Wink, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel reactivity mode of a diazo-group, the 1,3-addition of a nucleophile and an electrophile to the diazo-group, has been realized in the intramolecular aminoalkylation of β-amino-α-diazoesters to form tetrasubstituted 1,2,3-triazolines. The reaction proved to have a broad scope, good functional group tolerance, and excellent diastereoselectivity. In addition, a new Au-catalyzed intramolecular transannulation reaction of the obtained propargyl triazolines into pyrroles has been discovered. PMID:24986811

  6. Functionalisation of mesoporous silica gel with 2-[(phosphonomethyl)-amino]acetic acid functional groups. Characterisation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarola, Dario; Mitev, Dimitar P.; Marlin, Lucile; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P.; Paull, Brett; Onida, Barbara; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Carlo, Rosa Maria De; Sarzanini, Corrado; Nesterenko, Pavel N.

    2014-01-01

    A new complexing adsorbent was prepared by chemical modification of mesoporous silica Kieselgel 60 (dp = 37-63 μm, average pore size 6 nm, specific surface area 425 m2 g-1) with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 2-[(phosphonomethyl)amino]acetic acid (PMA), commonly known as glyphosate. The prepared adsorbent was fully characterised using elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), acid-base potentiometric titration, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K (BET), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The concentration of bonded PMA groups calculated from the nitrogen content was 0.38 mmol per gram. The adsorption of transition metal ions on PMA functionalised silica (HEPMAS) was studied from aqueous solutions having different pH and the following selectivity was established, Zn(II) < Co(II) < Cd(II) < Mn(II) < Ni(II) < Cu(II). The calculated values of distribution coefficients D for the adsorption of ecotoxic metal ions on HEPMAS are 5.0 × 104, 4.9 × 105 and 2.6 × 104 for Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively.

  7. Correlating Mineralogy and Amino Acid Contents of Milligram-Scale Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrite Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron, S.; Berger, Eve L.; Locke, Darren R.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, have been found to be indigenous in most of the carbonaceous chondrite groups. The abundances of amino acids, as well as their structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that there is a link between parent-body conditions, mineralogy and the synthesis and preservation of amino acids (and likely other organic molecules). However, elucidating specific causes for the observed differences in amino acid composition has proven extremely challenging because samples analyzed for amino acids are typically much larger ((is) approximately 100 mg powders) than the scale at which meteorite heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences, (is) approximately 1-mg or smaller samples). Thus, the effects of differences in mineralogy on amino acid abundances could not be easily discerned. Recent advances in the sensitivity of instrumentation have made possible the analysis of smaller samples for amino acids, enabling a new approach to investigate the link between mineralogical con-text and amino acid compositions/abundances in meteorites. Through coordinated mineral separation, mineral characterization and highly sensitive amino acid analyses, we have performed preliminary investigations into the relationship between meteorite mineralogy and amino acid composition. By linking amino acid data to mineralogy, we have started to identify amino acid-bearing mineral phases in different carbonaceous meteorites. The methodology and results of analyses performed on the Murchison meteorite are presented here.

  8. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA. PMID:25244376

  9. Use of phthaloyl protecting group for the automated synthesis of 3'-[(hydroxypropyl)amino] and 3'-[(hydroxypropyl)triglycyl] oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Vu, H; Joyce, N; Rieger, M; Walker, D; Goldknopf, I; Hill, T S; Jayaraman, K; Mulvey, D

    1995-01-01

    The chemical stability of oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing 3'-propanolamine was investigated. Invariably, all the ODNs synthesized from Fmoc-protected 3-aminopropane-1,2-diol-CPG support gave a mixture of three compounds at the end of automated synthesis as analyzed by denaturing PAGE and HPLC. On the basis of analytical procedures, these compounds were identified to be 3'-[N-acetyl-N-(hydroxypropyl)amino],3'-[(hydroxypropyl)amino], and 3'-hydroxyl ODNs. The instability of the amino protecting group under the synthesis conditions was responsible for this observed heterogeneity. In order to evaluate the stability, a comparative study on the chemical stability of the ODN containing amino-protecting groups such as [(9-fluorenylmethyl)oxy]carbonyl (Fmoc), trifluoroacetyl (TFA), and phthaloyl was undertaken. The results indicate that the phthaloyl group provided the best stability for the synthesis of 3' amine-modified ODNs, and the protecting group is cleaved and deprotected in concentrated ammonium hydroxide:40% aqueous methylamine, 1:1, for 5-10 min, at 56 degrees C. The 3'-hydroxypropyl)triglycyl] ODN conjugates were also synthesized from Fmoc- and phthaloyl-protected (hydroxypropyl)triglycine-CPG supports. PMID:8974460

  10. Richness and abundance of the cardini group of Drosophila (Diptera, Drosophilidae) in the Caatinga and Atlantic Forest biomes in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Cláudia; Silva, Diva Maria Izabel O; Oliveira, Geórgia F; Monteiro, Liv S; Montes, Martín A; Garcia, Ana Cristina L

    2014-12-01

    Brazil has a high diversity of flies of the genus Drosophila, and part of this richness is represented by the cardini group. We analyzed the fluctuations in the richness and abundance of this group, in environments that had never previously been studied in the northeastern region of Brazil. Among the 28,204 drosophilids sampled, 1,294 belonged to the cardini group and were represented by D. polymorpha, D. cardini, D. neocardini and D. cardinoides. Occurrences of D. neocardini and D. cardinoides were registered for the first time in the Caatinga. In this biome, D. cardini stood out as having the highest abundance, and D. polymorpha was not observed. In the coastal Atlantic Forest, D. cardini was not registered, but D. polymorpha was found in all the localities investigated. Mangrove swamps were the environment with the lowest abundance and richness of the cardini group. The High-altitude Forest presented the highest richness of this group. We suggest that the high abundance of D. polymorpha in the High-altitude Forest and in the coastal Atlantic Forest may be a reflection of the historical relationship between these two environments. PMID:25590710

  11. Richness and abundance of the cardini group of Drosophila (Diptera, Drosophilidae) in the Caatinga and Atlantic Forest biomes in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Cláudia; Silva, Diva Maria Izabel O; Oliveira, Geórgia F; Monteiro, Liv S; Montes, Martín A; Garcia, Ana Cristina L

    2014-11-11

    Brazil has a high diversity of flies of the genus Drosophila, and part of this richness is represented by the cardini group. We analyzed the fluctuations in the richness and abundance of this group, in environments that had never previously been studied in the northeastern region of Brazil. Among the 28,204 drosophilids sampled, 1,294 belonged to the cardini group and were represented by D. polymorpha, D. cardini, D. neocardini and D. cardinoides. Occurrences of D. neocardini and D. cardinoides were registered for the first time in the Caatinga. In this biome, D. cardini stood out as having the highest abundance, and D. polymorpha was not observed. In the coastal Atlantic Forest, D. cardini was not registered, but D. polymorpha was found in all the localities investigated. Mangrove swamps were the environment with the lowest abundance and richness of the cardini group. The High-altitude Forest presented the highest richness of this group. We suggest that the high abundance of D. polymorpha in the High-altitude Forest and in the coastal Atlantic Forest may be a reflection of the historical relationship between these two environments. PMID:25387390

  12. Synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotide with aliphatic amino or phosphate group at the 5' end by the phosphotriester method on a polystyrene support.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T; Sakata, T; Fujimoto, K; Ikehara, M

    1987-01-01

    Lipophilic protecting groups mTrNH(CH2)n X (mTr:monomethoxytrityl, X = NH,O,S, n = 2,3,4,6) were attached to the 5'-phosphoryl group of 3'-O-protected thymidine. When the diamine derivatives (X = NH2) were used, the time course of the stability of mTr groups on the amino group and the phosphoramidate linkage with 80% aq. AcOH was measured. It was found that the mTr group was removed from the amino group rapidly and that the phosphoramidate linkage was more stable. It's stability depended upon the length of the CH2 linker. Oligonucleotides with an aliphatic amino group at their 5'-ends were synthesized by the phosphotriester method on a polystyrene support using protected nucleotides with P-O or P-S linkages. In the case of product with a P-S linkage, 5'-O-phosphorylated nonadecanucleotide was also prepared by I2-H2O treatment. PMID:3627986

  13. Aryl(silyl)amino group stabilized hydridosilanediols: synthesis and characterization and use for preparation of alumino(hydrido)siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Jiancheng; Chen, Shimin; Liu, Weiping; Ye, Qingsong; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-04-21

    Aryl(silyl)amino group stabilized hydridosilanediols RSiH(OH)2 (R = N(SiMe2Ph)-2,6-iPr2C6H3 (), N(SiMe3)-2,6-iPr2C6H3 (), and N(SiMe2Ph)-2,4,6-Me3C6H2 ()) were prepared from the controlled hydrolysis of the related RSiHCl2 () each in the presence of aniline as the HCl acceptor. Reactions of with AlMe3, AliBu3, AlH(iBu)2, and AlH3·NMe3, respectively, yielded alumino(hydrido)siloxanes [2,6-iPr2C6H3N(SiMe2Ph)Si(H)OAlMe(THF)]2 (), [2,6-iPr2C6H3N(SiMe2Ph)Si(H)OAliBu(THF)]2 (), [2,6-iPr2C6H3N(SiMe2Ph)Si(H)O2]3[Al(THF)]2 (), and [2,6-iPr2C6H3N(SiMe2Ph)Si(H)OAlH(THF)]2 (). The reaction of with AlMe3 gave [2,6-iPr2C6H3N(SiMe3)Si(H)OAlMe(THF)]2 (), a compound similar to . Compounds are characterized by NMR ((1)H, (13)C, and (29)Si) and IR spectroscopy and CHN elemental analysis, of which and are further studied by X-ray crystallography. Compounds and feature cyclic structures all with the skeleton core of Si2O4Al2 while compound exhibits a bicyclic structure having a core of Si3O6Al2. Melting point measurements indicated that are thermally stable bearing the geminal SiH and SiOH groups. Compounds and are thermally stable as well with the O atom-bridged SiH and AlR (R = Me, iBu, or H) groups. PMID:26975000

  14. Amino(oxo)acetate moiety: A new functional group to improve the cytotoxicity of betulin derived carbamates.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lucie; Perl, Vincent; Wiemann, Jana; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Csuk, René

    2016-06-15

    While 3-O-acetylated betulin derivatives carrying a carbamate moiety at position C-28 are of rather low cytotoxicity for human tumor cell lines, the corresponding C-3 amino(oxo) acetates show good cytotoxicity. For example, an EC50 as low as 2.0μM was found for (3β) 28-{[(hexylamino)carbonyl]oxy}lup-20(29)-en-3-yl amino(oxo)acetate (16) employing the ovarian cancer cell line A2780. PMID:27142753

  15. Polythiophene-g-poly(ethylene glycol) with Lateral Amino Groups as a Novel Matrix for Biosensor Construction.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Huseyin; Bozokalfa, Guliz; Asker, Duygu N; Demir, Bilal; Guler, Emine; Odaci Demirkol, Dilek; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2015-09-23

    In the ever-expanding field of conducting polymer research, functionalized graft hybrid copolymers have gained considerable interest in the biomedical engineering and biosensing applications, particularly. In the present work, a new biosensor based on conducting graft copolymer for the detection of phenolic compounds was developed. Thereby, a robust and novel material, namely "polythiophene-g-poly(ethylene glycol) with lateral amino groups" (PT-NH2-g-PEG) hybrid conducting polymer was synthesized via Suzuki condensation polymerization and characterized with (1)H NMR analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and fluorescence spectroscopy. PT-NH2-g-PEG architecture was then applied as an immobilization matrix to accomplish extended biosensing function. In a typical process, Laccase was utilized as a model enzyme for the detection of phenolic compounds. Detailed surface characterization of PT-NH2-g-PEG/Lac was performed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements. Optimum pH and polymer amount were found to be pH 6.5 and 0.5 mg polymer, respectively, with the linear range of 0.0025-0.05 mM and 132.45 μA/mM sensitivity. The kinetic parameters of PT-NH2-g-PEG/Lac are 0.026 mM for Km(app) and 7.38 μA for Imax, respectively. Furthermore, the PT-NH2-g-PEG/Lac biofilm was retained 82% of its activity for 12 days indicating excellent recovery as tested with artificial wastewater. PMID:26323569

  16. Platinum-group element abundance and distribution in chromite deposits of the Acoje Block, Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacuta, G.C., Jr.; Kay, R.W.; Gibbs, A.K.; Lipin, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) occur in ore-grade concentration in some of the chromite deposits related to the ultramafic section of the Acoje Block of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex. The deposits are of three types: Type 1 - associated with cumulate peridotites at the base of the crust; Type 2 - in dunite pods from the top 1 km of mantle harzburgite; and Type 3 - like Type 2, but in deeper levels of the harzburgite. Most of the deposites have chromite compositions that are high in Cr with Cr/(Cr + Al) (expressed as chromium index, Cr#) > 0.6; high-Al (Cr# Pd, thought to be characteristic of PGE-barren deposits) and positive slope (Ir < Pd, characteristic of PGE-rich deposits). Iridium, Ru and Os commonly occur as micron-size laurite (sulfide) inclusions in unfractured chromite. Laurite and native Os are also found as inclusions in interstitial sulfides. Platinum and Pd occur as alloy inclusions (and possibly as solid solution) in interstitial Ni-Cu sulfides and as tellurobismuthides in serpentine and altered sulfides. Variability of PGE distribution may be explained by alteration, crystal fractionation or partial melting processes. Alteration and metamorphism were ruled out, because PGE contents do not correlate with degree of serpentinization or the abundance and type (hydroxyl versus non-hydroxyl) of silicate inclusions in chromite. Preliminary Os isotopic data do not support crustal contamination as a source of the PGEs in the Acoje deposits. The anomalous PGE concentrations in Type 1 high-Cr chromite deposits are attributed to two stages of enrichment: an early enrichment of their mantle source from previous melting events and a later stage of sulfide segregation accompanying chromite crystallization. High-Al chromite deposits which crystallized from basalts derived from relatively low degrees of melting owe their low PGE content to partitioning of PGEs in sulfides and alloys that remain in the mantle. High-Cr deposits crystallized from melts that were

  17. Impact of primary amine group from aminophospholipids and amino acids on marine phospholipids stability: non-enzymatic browning and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Nielsen, N S; Baron, C P; Diehl, B W K; Jacobsen, C

    2013-11-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the oxidative stability and non-enzymatic browning reactions of marine PL in the presence or in the absence of primary amine group from aminophospholipids and amino acids. Marine phospholipids liposomal dispersions were prepared from two authentic standards (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and two purified PL from marine sources with and without addition of amino acids (leucine, methionine and lysine). Samples were incubated at 60°C for 0, 2, 4 and 6days. Non-enzymatic browning reactions were investigated through measurement of (i) Strecker derived volatiles, (ii) yellowness index (YI), (iii) hydrophobic and (iv) hydrophilic pyrroles content. The oxidative stability of the samples was assessed through measurement of secondary lipid derived volatile oxidation products. The result showed that the presence of PE and amino acids caused the formation of pyrroles, generated Strecker derived volatiles, decreased the YI development and lowered lipid oxidation. The lower degree of lipid oxidation in liposomal dispersions containing amino acids might be attributed to antioxidative properties of pyrroles or amino acids. PMID:23790862

  18. The pattern of change in the abundances of specific bacterioplankton groups is consistent across different nutrient-enriched habitats in Crete.

    PubMed

    Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Pitta, Paraskevi; Kasapidis, Panagiotis; Karakassis, Ioannis; Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D

    2014-07-01

    A common source of disturbance for coastal aquatic habitats is nutrient enrichment through anthropogenic activities. Although the water column bacterioplankton communities in these environments have been characterized in some cases, changes in α-diversity and/or the abundances of specific taxonomic groups across enriched habitats remain unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial community changes at three different nutrient-enriched and adjacent undisturbed habitats along the north coast of Crete, Greece: a fish farm, a closed bay within a town with low water renewal rates, and a city port where the level of nutrient enrichment and the trophic status of the habitat were different. Even though changes in α-diversity were different at each site, we observed across the sites a common change pattern accounting for most of the community variation for five of the most abundant bacterial groups: a decrease in the abundance of the Pelagibacteraceae and SAR86 and an increase in the abundance of the Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Cryomorphaceae in the impacted sites. The abundances of the groups that increased and decreased in the impacted sites were significantly correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the total heterotrophic bacterial counts and the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and/or dissolved nitrogen and chlorophyll α, indicating that the common change pattern was associated with nutrient enrichment. Our results provide an in situ indication concerning the association of specific bacterioplankton groups with nutrient enrichment. These groups could potentially be used as indicators for nutrient enrichment if the pattern is confirmed over a broader spatial and temporal scale by future studies. PMID:24747897

  19. The Pattern of Change in the Abundances of Specific Bacterioplankton Groups Is Consistent across Different Nutrient-Enriched Habitats in Crete

    PubMed Central

    Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Pitta, Paraskevi; Kasapidis, Panagiotis; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    A common source of disturbance for coastal aquatic habitats is nutrient enrichment through anthropogenic activities. Although the water column bacterioplankton communities in these environments have been characterized in some cases, changes in α-diversity and/or the abundances of specific taxonomic groups across enriched habitats remain unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial community changes at three different nutrient-enriched and adjacent undisturbed habitats along the north coast of Crete, Greece: a fish farm, a closed bay within a town with low water renewal rates, and a city port where the level of nutrient enrichment and the trophic status of the habitat were different. Even though changes in α-diversity were different at each site, we observed across the sites a common change pattern accounting for most of the community variation for five of the most abundant bacterial groups: a decrease in the abundance of the Pelagibacteraceae and SAR86 and an increase in the abundance of the Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Cryomorphaceae in the impacted sites. The abundances of the groups that increased and decreased in the impacted sites were significantly correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the total heterotrophic bacterial counts and the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and/or dissolved nitrogen and chlorophyll α, indicating that the common change pattern was associated with nutrient enrichment. Our results provide an in situ indication concerning the association of specific bacterioplankton groups with nutrient enrichment. These groups could potentially be used as indicators for nutrient enrichment if the pattern is confirmed over a broader spatial and temporal scale by future studies. PMID:24747897

  20. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories.

    PubMed

    Elsila, Jamie E; Aponte, José C; Blackmond, Donna G; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Glavin, Daniel P

    2016-06-22

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplified by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large l-enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to ∼60%) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work. PMID:27413780

  1. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplified by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large l-enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to ∼60%) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work. PMID:27413780

  2. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  3. Platinum Group Element (PGE) Abundances in Lava Flows Generated by the Hawaiian Plume: Insights into Plume Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Neal, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Picritic and high-MgO (7.7-24 wt.%) basalt samples from Detroit (/sim81-76 Ma) and Koko (/sim48 Ma) Seamounts along the ESC have been analyzed for PGEs (Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt) allowing an examination of how the PGEs in lavas from the Hawaiian plume have changed over time. Major and trace element (including the PGEs) concentrations were quantified by ICP methods at the University of Notre Dame. See Ely et al. (1999, Chem. Geol. 157:219) for the PGE analytical method. Bennett et al. (2000) analyzed Hawaiian picrites and found PGE abundances slightly greater than average MORB and comparable to the low-PGE basaltic komatiites. These authors modeled the PGE abundances of these picrites by using variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting, such that Koolau (low PGE contents) formed from a relatively sulfide-rich source and Loihi (high PGEs) from a sulfide-poor source. Our PGE data from Detroit Seamount show slightly higher PGE abundances than Loihi and Kilauea, suggesting these picrites formed from a source lacking residual sulfide. These results suggest that, if the model of Bennett et al. (2000) is correct, the dilution of plume lava with MORB source, as hypothesized on the basis of depleted isotope ratios and lower trace element abundances than modern Hawaii (Keller et al., 2000, Nature 405:603; Kinman & Neal, 2002, Eos 83:F1282; Regelous et al., 2003, JPet 44:113), was not the controlling factor in PGE abundances. However, since MORB PGE concentrations are not substantially different than low-PGE Hawaiian picrites, incorporation of MORB material within the Hawaiian plume at Detroit Seamount would not have drastically reduced the PGE abundances. Koko Seamount has relatively high PGE concentrations (/sim3-12 times greater than those from Detroit lavas). This may be the result of a lack of residual sulfide facilitated by higher degrees of partial melting. Although our initial data are consistent with variable degrees of partial melting and/or source

  4. 1H NMR investigation of the hetero-association of phenanthridine dyes with Daunomycin: effect of substitution of amino with azido groups in the dye chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselkov, Dennis A.; Karawajew, Leonid; Veselkov, Alexei N.; Davies, David B.

    1H NMR spectroscopy at 500 Mhz has been used to determine the structures and thermodynamics in aqueous salt solution of the hetero-association of Daunomycin (DAU) with a series of phenanthridine dyes having different numbers of amino/azido groups in the chromophore, together with the self-association of the phenthridine dyes under the same solution conditions (0.1 M phosphate buffer, pD 7.1, 298 K). The NMR measurements have been analyzed using statistical-thermodynamical models of both self-association and hetero- association in which no limitation is set on the size of molecular stacks. In this work the magnitudes of the self-association parameters of Ethidium Bromide (EB) and its azido-derivatives, 8-azido-Ethidium Bromide (EMB) and 3,8-diazido-Ethidium Chloride (EDC), show a successive decrease with mono- and di-substitition of the 3,8-amino groups of EB. A similar pattern is observed for the equilibrium constants for hetero-association of the phenanthridines with DAU. The thermodynamical and structural parameters of hetero-association of the phenanthridines with DAU are consistent with an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the 3,8 amino-groups of EB and the 9MeCO group of DAU contributing to the stability of the hetero-complex in aqueous solution.

  5. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    PubMed

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  6. Ambient-Temperature Spin-State Switching Achieved by Protonation of the Amino Group in [Fe(H2Bpz2)2(bipy-NH2)].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Nihei, Masayuki; Wen, Gao-Ju; Sun, Bai-Wang; Oshio, Hiroki

    2016-08-15

    Magnetism of a complex [Fe(H2Bpz2)2(bipy-NH2)] (H2Bpz2 = dihydrobis(1-pyrazolyl)borate, bipy-NH2 = 4,4'-diamino-2,2'-bipyridine) has been altered from paramagnetic to spin-crossover (SCO) behavior, through protonation of one amino group of bipy-NH2 with CF3SO3H. Complete SCO transition, both in solid state and in solution, occurs at ambient temperature. PMID:27472267

  7. NA1, NA1, NA1-trimethylinsulin--an insulin analogue with a quaternary amino group at the A1 terminus.

    PubMed

    Drewes, S E; Magojo, H E; Gliemann, J

    1981-06-01

    By utilizing the differing reactivity of the amino groups in aqueous organic solvents, des-GlyA1-NB1,N epsilon B29-(Msc)2-insulin was prepared. Its reaction with the phenyl ester of N,N,N-trimethylglycine in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide afforded the crystalline NA1,NA1,NA1-trimethylinsulin analogue. In the fat cell assay this analogue has an activity of 49% and, in the mouse convulsion assay, it is 70%. PMID:7024089

  8. Amino-functionalized (meth)acryl polymers by use of a solvent-polarity sensitive protecting group (Br-t-BOC)

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Monir; Herrmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Summary We describe the synthesis of bromo-tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Br-t-BOC)-amino-protected monomers 2-((1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-yl)oxycarbonylamino)ethyl (meth)acrylate 3a,b. For this purpose, 2-isocyanatoethyl (meth)acrylate 1a,b was reacted with 1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-ol (2a). The free radical polymerization of (Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylates 3a,b yielded poly((Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 6a,b bearing protected amino side groups. The subsequent solvolysis of the Br-t-BOC function led to the new polymers poly(2-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 8a,b with protonated free amino groups. The monomers and the resulting polymers were thoroughly characterized by 1H NMR, IR, GPC and DSC methods. The kinetics of the deprotection step was followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The solvent polarity and neighboring group effects on the kinetics of deprotection are discussed. PMID:26977183

  9. Amino-functionalized (meth)acryl polymers by use of a solvent-polarity sensitive protecting group (Br-t-BOC).

    PubMed

    Ritter, Helmut; Tabatabai, Monir; Herrmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of bromo-tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Br-t-BOC)-amino-protected monomers 2-((1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-yl)oxycarbonylamino)ethyl (meth)acrylate 3a,b. For this purpose, 2-isocyanatoethyl (meth)acrylate 1a,b was reacted with 1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-ol (2a). The free radical polymerization of (Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylates 3a,b yielded poly((Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 6a,b bearing protected amino side groups. The subsequent solvolysis of the Br-t-BOC function led to the new polymers poly(2-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 8a,b with protonated free amino groups. The monomers and the resulting polymers were thoroughly characterized by (1)H NMR, IR, GPC and DSC methods. The kinetics of the deprotection step was followed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The solvent polarity and neighboring group effects on the kinetics of deprotection are discussed. PMID:26977183

  10. The role of the ring nitrogen and the amino group in the solvent dependence of the excited-state dynamics of 3-aminoquinoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Debashis; Datta, Anindya

    2006-08-01

    The nonradiative rate in 3-aminoquinoline is found to exhibit anomalous solvent dependence, being rather fast in nonpolar solvents and remarkably slower in more polar and especially, more protic ones. The cause of such behavior is investigated by studying the dependence of fluorescence spectral and temporal parameters on the solvent properties such as polarity and hydrogen bonding ability. Complementary quantum mechanical calculations have been performed and the picture that emerges from these studies is that of an excited state with a short radiative lifetime due to the flipping of the amino group. This state is selectively populated in nonpolar, nonhydrogen bonding solvents, but is destabilized with respect to the more polar intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state in polar solvents and even more so in protic solvents and dimethylsulfoxide. The slower nonradiative rates in the ICT state is attributed to the more restricted motion of the amino group in this state. The role of hydrogen bonding of the amino group and the ring nitrogen in stabilization/destabilization of the ICT state and therefore on the nonradiative rate is also explored.

  11. A natural protecting group strategy to carry an amino acid starter unit in the biosynthesis of macrolactam polyketide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2011-11-16

    Macrolactam antibiotics are an important class of macrocyclic polyketides that contain a unique nitrogen-containing starter unit. In the present study, a set of starter biosynthetic enzymes in the macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin was characterized. We found that the protection-deprotection strategy of the aminoacyl-ACP intermediate was critical in this system. On the basis of bioinformatics, the described pathway is also proposed as a common method for carrying amino acids in the biosynthesis of other macrolactam antibiotics. PMID:22010945

  12. The Benzyl Ester Group of Amino Acid Monomers Enhances Substrate Affinity and Broadens the Substrate Specificity of the Enzyme Catalyst in Chemoenzymatic Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose Manuel; Yazawa, Kenjiro; Tateishi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-11

    The chemoenzymatic polymerization of amino acid monomers by proteases involves a two-step reaction: the formation of a covalent acyl-intermediate complex between the protease and the carboxyl ester group of the monomer and the subsequent deacylation of the complex by aminolysis to form a peptide bond. Although the initiation with the ester group of the monomer is an important step, the influence of the ester group on the polymerization has not been studied in detail. Herein, we studied the effect of the ester groups (methyl, ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters) of alanine and glycine on the synthesis of peptides using papain as the catalyst. Alanine and glycine were selected as monomers because of their substantially different affinities toward papain. The efficiency of the polymerization of alanine and glycine benzyl esters was much greater than that of the other esters. The benzyl ester group therefore allowed papain to equally polymerize alanine and glycine, even though the affinity of alanine toward papain is substantially higher. The characterization of the copolymers of alanine and glycine in terms of the secondary structure and thermal properties revealed that the thermal stability of the peptides depends on the amino acid composition and resultant secondary structure. The current results indicate that the nature of the ester group drastically affects the polymerization efficiency and broadens the substrate specificity of the protease. PMID:26620763

  13. The influence of amino group on PCDTBT-based and P3HT-based polymer solar cells: Hole trapping processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wanzhu; Zhong, Chengmei; Duan, Chunhui; Hu, Zhicheng; Dong, Sheng; Cao, Derong; Lei, Ming; Huang, Fei; Cao, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on aliphatic-amino-functionalized materials presented low performance with negligibly small efficiency, the prime mechanism of which is found to be hole trapping induced by the amine end groups. We propose that such hole trapping behavior depends on the relative energetic position of the hole transport states and the trapping states. Herein, we comparatively study the photovoltaic properties of PSCs based on amino-functionalized fullerene derivative blended with poly [N-9'-heptadecanyl-2, 7-carbazole-alt-5, 5-(4', 7'-di-2-thienyl-2', 1', 3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) or poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The former polymer has a lower-positioning highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level, whereas the latter has a comparable HOMO level relative to the ionization state of tertiary aliphatic amine in energy. Our investigation confirms our proposition, revealing an ultrafast trapping process in PCDTBT:amino-group-functionalized fullerene derivative film, which seriously crippled hole transport, consequently results in very poor device performance. In contrast, trapping process is almost negligible in P3HT systems.

  14. Preparation of biologically intact radioiodinated hyaluronan of high specific radioactivity: coupling of /sup 125/I-tyramine-cellobiose to amino groups after partial N-deacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, L.B.; Laurent, T.C.; Smedsrod, B.

    1988-12-01

    Hyaluronan was substituted with tyramine-cellobiose on amino residues exposed after hydrazinolytic N-deacetylation of the polysaccharide. Nonsubstituted amino groups were reacetylated, and the carboxylic hydrazides were removed by treatment with HIO/sub 3/. The adduct was labeled with /sup 125/I before or after coupling to hyaluronan. N-deacetylation increased with prolonged pretreatment with hydrazine, which also reduced the chain length of hyaluronan. Hydrazinolysis for 30 min produced hyaluronan with Mr 2.2-2.9 x 10(5). This material was substituted with varying amounts of tyramine-cellobiose (from 1 per 20 to 1 per 130 disaccharides). Hyaluronan labeled in this way was recognized by Streptomyces hyaluronidase, hyaluronan affinity protein of cartilage proteoglycan, and receptors for specific endocytosis of hyaluronan in liver endothelial cells. Since tyramine-cellobiose is nondegradable and therefore is arrested intralysosomally at the site of uptake, turnover studies of hyaluronan can be easily carried out with this ligand.

  15. THE ABUNDANCES OF HYDROCARBON FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INFERRED FROM LABORATORY SPECTRA OF HYDROGENATED AND METHYLATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Steglich, M.; Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Friedrich, M.; Plass, W.; Räder, H.-J.; Müllen, K.; Henning, Th.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption spectra of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing methyl (-CH{sub 3}), methylene (CH{sub 2}), or diamond-like CH groups and IR spectra of mixtures of methylated and hydrogenated PAHs prepared by gas-phase condensation were measured at room temperature (as grains in pellets) and at low temperature (isolated in Ne matrices). In addition, the PAH blends were subjected to an in-depth molecular structure analysis by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Supported by calculations at the density functional theory level, the laboratory results were applied to analyze in detail the aliphatic absorption complex of the diffuse interstellar medium at 3.4 μm and to determine the abundances of hydrocarbon functional groups. Assuming that the PAHs are mainly locked in grains, aliphatic CH {sub x} groups (x = 1, 2, 3) would contribute approximately in equal quantities to the 3.4 μm feature (N {sub CHx}/N {sub H} ≈ 10{sup –5}-2 × 10{sup –5}). The abundances, however, may be two to four times lower if a major contribution to the 3.4 μm feature comes from molecules in the gas phase. Aromatic ≅CH groups seem to be almost absent from some lines of sight, but can be nearly as abundant as each of the aliphatic components in other directions (N{sub ≅CH}/N {sub H} ∼< 2 × 10{sup –5}; upper value for grains). Due to comparatively low binding energies, astronomical IR emission sources do not display such heavy excess hydrogenation. At best, especially in protoplanetary nebulae, CH{sub 2} groups bound to aromatic molecules, i.e., excess hydrogens on the molecular periphery only, can survive the presence of a nearby star.

  16. The abundant class III chitinase homolog in young developing banana fruits behaves as a transient vegetative storage protein and most probably serves as an important supply of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Swennen, Rony L; Van Damme, Els J M

    2002-10-01

    Analyses of the protein content and composition revealed dramatic changes in gene expression during in situ banana (Musa spp.) fruit formation/ripening. The total banana protein content rapidly increases during the first 60 to 70 d, but remains constant for the rest of fruit formation/ripening. During the phase of rapid protein accumulation, an inactive homolog of class III chitinases accounts for up to 40% (w/v) of the total protein. Concomitant with the arrest of net protein accumulation, the chitinase-related protein (CRP) progressively decreases and several novel proteins appear in the electropherograms. Hence, CRP behaves as a fruit-specific vegetative storage protein that accumulates during early fruit formation and serves as a source of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. Analyses of individual proteins revealed that a thaumatin-like protein, a beta-1,3-glucanase, a class I chitinase, and a mannose-binding lectin are the most abundant ripening-associated proteins. Because during the ripening of prematurely harvested bananas, similar changes take place as in the in situ ripening bananas, CRP present in immature fruits is a sufficient source of amino acids for a quasi-normal synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. However, it is evident that the conversion of CRP in ripening-associated proteins takes place at an accelerated rate, especially when climacteric ripening is induced by ethylene. The present report also includes a discussion of the accumulation of the major banana allergens and the identification of suitable promoters for the production of vaccines in transgenic bananas. PMID:12376669

  17. A spermine conjugated stearic acid-g-chitosan oligosaccharide polymer with different types of amino groups for efficient p53 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tingting; Wu, Jie; Yi, Hanxi; Liu, Jingwen; Lu, Binbin; Yuan, Ming; Huang, Xuan; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various amino groups on gene vector is different. In order to combine their effect in one vector and finally promote the transfection efficiency, a biogenic tetra-amine spermine was introduced to modify the stearic acid-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (CSOSA) polymer to build a new gene delivery system. The spermine linked CSOSA (SP-CSOSA) polymer consists two types of amino groups with 73.3%, 19.3% of all nitrogen atoms for primary and secondary amine groups, respectively. The SP modified CSOSA showed strong DNA condensation capability and obviously enhanced proton binding ability especially at about pH 5.0, which significantly promoted the escape of SP-CSOSA/pDNA complexes from endo-lysosoms. Moreover, the transfection efficiency at the N/P ratio of 10 could compete with that of Lipofectamine 2000 and PEI 25K, but with lower cytotoxicities. The therapeutic wild type p53 gene transfected by the SP-CSOSA polymer restored the function of aberrant p53 gene and induced obvious cell apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. We concluded that the new vector SP-CSOSA polymer proved to be a potential delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27289311

  18. A new strategy for integrating abundant oxygen functional groups into carbon felt electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Seung-Wook; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Jae-Geun; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment combining corona discharge and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the electrochemical performance of carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) have been thoroughly investigated. A high concentration of oxygen functional groups has been successfully introduced onto the surface of the carbon felt electrodes by a specially designed surface treatment, which is mainly responsible for improving the energy efficiency of VRFBs. In addition, the wettability of the carbon felt electrodes also can be significantly improved. The energy efficiency of the VRFB cell employing the surface modified carbon felt electrodes is improved by 7% at high current density (148 mA cm−2). Such improvement is attributed to the faster charge transfer and better wettability allowed by surface-active oxygen functional groups. Moreover, this method is much more competitive than other surface treatments in terms of processing time, production costs, and electrochemical performance. PMID:25366060

  19. A new strategy for integrating abundant oxygen functional groups into carbon felt electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Seung-Wook; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Jae-Geun; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The effects of surface treatment combining corona discharge and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the electrochemical performance of carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) have been thoroughly investigated. A high concentration of oxygen functional groups has been successfully introduced onto the surface of the carbon felt electrodes by a specially designed surface treatment, which is mainly responsible for improving the energy efficiency of VRFBs. In addition, the wettability of the carbon felt electrodes also can be significantly improved. The energy efficiency of the VRFB cell employing the surface modified carbon felt electrodes is improved by 7% at high current density (148 mA cm-2). Such improvement is attributed to the faster charge transfer and better wettability allowed by surface-active oxygen functional groups. Moreover, this method is much more competitive than other surface treatments in terms of processing time, production costs, and electrochemical performance.

  20. A new strategy for integrating abundant oxygen functional groups into carbon felt electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Seung-Wook; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Jae-Geun; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment combining corona discharge and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the electrochemical performance of carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) have been thoroughly investigated. A high concentration of oxygen functional groups has been successfully introduced onto the surface of the carbon felt electrodes by a specially designed surface treatment, which is mainly responsible for improving the energy efficiency of VRFBs. In addition, the wettability of the carbon felt electrodes also can be significantly improved. The energy efficiency of the VRFB cell employing the surface modified carbon felt electrodes is improved by 7% at high current density (148 mA cm(-2)). Such improvement is attributed to the faster charge transfer and better wettability allowed by surface-active oxygen functional groups. Moreover, this method is much more competitive than other surface treatments in terms of processing time, production costs, and electrochemical performance. PMID:25366060

  1. The Abundances of Hydrocarbon Functional Groups in the Interstellar Medium Inferred from Laboratory Spectra of Hydrogenated and Methylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, M.; Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Friedrich, M.; Plass, W.; Räder, H.-J.; Müllen, K.; Henning, Th.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption spectra of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing methyl (\\sbondCH3), methylene (\\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un01.eps}}CH2), or diamond-like \\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un02.eps}}CH groups and IR spectra of mixtures of methylated and hydrogenated PAHs prepared by gas-phase condensation were measured at room temperature (as grains in pellets) and at low temperature (isolated in Ne matrices). In addition, the PAH blends were subjected to an in-depth molecular structure analysis by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Supported by calculations at the density functional theory level, the laboratory results were applied to analyze in detail the aliphatic absorption complex of the diffuse interstellar medium at 3.4 μm and to determine the abundances of hydrocarbon functional groups. Assuming that the PAHs are mainly locked in grains, aliphatic CH x groups (x = 1, 2, 3) would contribute approximately in equal quantities to the 3.4 μm feature (N CHx /N H ≈ 10-5-2 × 10-5). The abundances, however, may be two to four times lower if a major contribution to the 3.4 μm feature comes from molecules in the gas phase. Aromatic \\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un03.eps} CH groups seem to be almost absent from some lines of sight, but can be nearly as abundant as each of the aliphatic components in other directions (N_{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un03.eps} CH}/N H lsim 2 × 10-5 upper value for grains). Due to comparatively low binding energies, astronomical IR emission sources do not display such heavy excess hydrogenation. At best, especially in protoplanetary nebulae, \\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un01.eps}}CH2 groups bound to aromatic molecules, i.e., excess hydrogens on the molecular periphery only, can survive the presence of a nearby star.

  2. Model-measurement comparison of functional group abundance in α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Giulia; Bernhard, Fabian A.; Henderson, Barron H.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene photooxidation under different NOx regimes is simulated using the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2 (MCM) coupled with an absorptive gas-particle partitioning module. Vapor pressures for individual compounds are estimated with the SIMPOL.1 group contribution model for determining apportionment of reaction products to each phase. We apply chemoinformatic tools to harvest functional group (FG) composition from the simulations and estimate their contributions to the overall oxygen to carbon ratio. Furthermore, we compare FG abundances in simulated SOA to measurements of FGs reported in previous chamber studies using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These simulations qualitatively capture the dynamics of FG composition of SOA formed from both α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in low-NOx conditions, especially in the first hours after start of photooxidation. Higher discrepancies are found after several hours of simulation; the nature of these discrepancies indicates sources of uncertainty or types of reactions in the condensed or gas phase missing from current model implementation. Higher discrepancies are found in the case of α-pinene photooxidation under different NOx concentration regimes, which are reasoned through the domination by a few polyfunctional compounds that disproportionately impact the simulated FG abundance in the aerosol phase. This manuscript illustrates the usefulness of FG analysis to complement existing methods for model-measurement evaluation.

  3. Isolation of L-3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH sub 2 (Antho-RNamide), a sea anemone neuropeptide containing an unusual amino-terminal blocking group

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C.J.P.; Jacob, E.; Graff, D.; Reinscheid, R.K.; Nothacker, H.P. ); Rinehart, K.L.; Staley, A.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Using a radioimmunoassay for the carboxyl-terminal sequence Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2}, the authors have purified a peptide from acetic acid extracts of the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. By classical amino acid analyses, mass spectrometry, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, the structure of this peptide was determined as 3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2}. By using reversed-phase HPLC and a chiral mobile phase, it was shown that the 3-phenyllactyl group had the L configuration. Immunocytochemical staining with antiserum against Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2} showed that L-3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2} (Antho-RNamide) was localized in neutrons of sea anemones. The L-3-phenyllactyl group has not been found earlier in neuropeptides of vertebrates or higher invertebrates. They propose that this residue renders Antho-RNamide resistant to nonspecific aminopeptidases, thereby increasing the stability of the peptide after neuronal release.

  4. A Naturally Occurring Single Amino Acid Replacement in Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Increases Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E.; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R.; Flores, Anthony R.; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C.; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M.; Olsen, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype–patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

  5. A naturally occurring single amino acid replacement in multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus significantly increases virulence.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R; Flores, Anthony R; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype-patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

  6. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  7. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  8. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  9. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  10. Effect of two methoxy groups bound to an amino-benzene donor unit for thienyl-di-vinylene bridged EO chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Miki, Hideki; Aoki, Isao; Otomo, Akira

    2013-10-01

    We report the molecular first hyperpolarizability (β) and absorption and 1H NMR spectra of electro-optic (EO) chromophores comprised of amino-benzene with two methoxy groups at meta-positions as the donor units, thienyl-di-vinylene as the π-electron bridges, and 2-(dicyanomethylene)-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran (TCF), 2-(dicyanomethylene)-3-cyano-4,5-dimethyl-5-trifluoromethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran (CF3-TCF) or 2-(dicyanomethylene)-3-cyano-4-methyl-5-phenyl-5-trifluoromethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran (CF3-phenyl-TCF) as the acceptor units. Improvement in linear and nonlinear optical properties was found in EO chromophores with two methoxy groups compared with benchmark EO chromophores without these groups and EO chromophores with one methoxy group. The data obtained from measurements of hyperpolarizability (β) and absorption and 1H NMR spectra indicate a possible mechanism that can contribute to improvement - double intra-molecular hydrogen bonding.

  11. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Baur, M E; Hayes, J M; Studley, S A; Walter, M R

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron. PMID:11539027

  12. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  13. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  14. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  15. Escherichia coli, an Intestinal Microorganism, as a Biosensor for Quantification of Amino Acid Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Chalova, Vesela I.; Sirsat, Sujata A.; O’Bryan, Corliss A.; Crandall, Philip G.; Ricke, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    In animal diets optimal amino acid quantities and balance among amino acids is of great nutritional importance. Essential amino acid deficiencies have negative impacts on animal physiology, most often expressed in sub-optimal body weight gains. Over supplementation of diets with amino acids is costly and can increase the nitrogen emissions from animals. Although in vivo animal assays for quantification of amino acid bioavailability are well established, Escherichia coli-based bioassays are viable potential alternatives in terms of accuracy, cost, and time input. E. coli inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and although more abundant in colon, a relatively high titer of E. coli can also be isolated from the small intestine, where primary absorption of amino acids and peptides occur. After feed proteins are digested, liberated amino acids and small peptides are assimilated by both the small intestine and E. coli. The similar pattern of uptake is a necessary prerequisite to establish E. coli cells as accurate amino acid biosensors. In fact, amino acid transporters in both intestinal and E. coli cells are stereospecific, delivering only the respective biological l-forms. The presence of free amino- and carboxyl groups is critical for amino acid and dipeptide transport in both biological subjects. Di-, tri- and tetrapeptides can enter enterocytes; likewise only di-, tri- and tetrapeptides support E. coli growth. These similarities in addition to the well known bacterial genetics make E. coli an optimal bioassay microorganism for the assessment of nutritionally available amino acids in feeds. PMID:22399985

  16. Facile one-step coating approach to magnetic submicron particles with poly(ethylene glycol) coats and abundant accessible carboxyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiao-lan; Zhang, Yi; Pu, Jun; Liu, Lin; Liu, Hong-bo; Li, Yuan-li; Liao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic submicron particles (MSPs) are pivotal biomaterials for magnetic separations in bioanalyses, but their preparation remains a technical challenge. In this report, a facile one-step coating approach to MSPs suitable for magnetic separations was investigated. Methods Polyethylene glycol) (PEG) was derived into PEG-bis-(maleic monoester) and maleic monoester-PEG-succinic monoester as the monomers. Magnetofluids were prepared via chemical co-precipitation and dispersion with the monomers. MSPs were prepared via one-step coating of magnetofluids in a water-in-oil microemulsion system of aerosol-OT and heptane by radical co-polymerization of such monomers. Results The resulting MSPs contained abundant carboxyl groups, exhibited negligible nonspecific adsorption of common substances and excellent suspension stability, appeared as irregular particles by electronic microscopy, and had submicron sizes of broad distribution by laser scattering. Saturation magnetizations and average particle sizes were affected mainly by the quantities of monomers used for coating magnetofluids, and steric hindrance around carboxyl groups was alleviated by the use of longer monomers of one polymerizable bond for coating. After optimizations, MSPs bearing saturation magnetizations over 46 emu/g, average sizes of 0.32 μm, and titrated carboxyl groups of about 0.21 mmol/g were obtained. After the activation of carboxyl groups on MSPs into N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, biotin was immobilized on MSPs and the resulting biotin-functionalized MSPs isolated the conjugate of streptavidin and alkaline phosphatase at about 2.1 mg/g MSPs; streptavidin was immobilized at about 10 mg/g MSPs and retained 81% ± 18% (n = 5) of the specific activity of the free form. Conclusion The facile approach effectively prepares MSPs for magnetic separations. PMID:23589687

  17. Remote sensing data to classify functional groups of vegetation and their distribution and abundance in a semiarid mountain watershed, Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughridge, R. E.; Benner, S. G.; McNamara, J. P.; Flores, A. N.

    2012-12-01

    In water-limited montane ecosystems, topography is a significant driver of energy balance and soil moisture and therefore governs the distribution and abundance of terrestrial vegetation. Few studies have made a concerted effort to quantify spatial patterns in vegetation along physiographic gradients that control microclimate such as slope, elevation, and aspect. Furthermore, spectral mixing of different vegetation species within individual visible and near-infrared remote sensing pixels makes it difficult to constrain the temporal growth and senescence of individual plant functional types. We report on a study that seeks to understand the interacting roles of topography, soil moisture, and solar radiation on the distribution of different plant functional types within the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed (DCEW). Boise State University maintains the 27 km2 watershed which is located in the Boise Front Mountains of southwest Idaho. It is qualitatively observed in DCEW that low elevations are dominated by sage-steppe ecosystems and high elevations transition to conifer forests. It is also observed that aspect has a major control in which sage-steppe is evident at high elevations on south facing slopes conversely from north facing slopes. To quantify these trends we measured percent ground cover of functional groups (i.e. forbs, grass, shrubs, etc.) at 77 sites within DCEW spanning a large gradient in the controlling biophysiographic variables. In addition, vegetation water content (VWC) and spectral reflectance from the 325 to 1075 nm wavelengths was collected for specific vegetation types at eight permanent soil moisture monitoring sites contained in DCEW throughout the 2012 green-up/senescence transition. To develop a watershed-wide classification we built a supervised multilayer perceptron (MLP) backpropagating artificial neural network (ANN) using temporal Landsat 5 images to classify 4 major groups: sage-steppe, Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and deciduous trees

  18. The tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 complex: a comparison of the reactivity of amino groups in the alpha and beta 2 subunits and in the complex by differential labeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, E.W.; Fairwell, T.

    1984-05-01

    The interaction of the alpha and beta 2 subunits of tryptophan synthase of Escherichia coli to form an alpha 2 beta 2 complex has been probed by differential labeling studies. In the first step the separate alpha or beta 2 subunit or the alpha 2 beta 2 complex was labeled by reductive methylation with trace amounts of (/sup 3/H)HCHO in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/. In the second step the /sup 3/H-labeled preparation was fully labeled under denaturing conditions with (/sup 14/C)HCHO and NaCNBH/sub 3/. Peptides containing labeled monomethyl or dimethyl amino groups were isolated after thermolytic digestion or after cyanogen bromide treatment. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of each peptide is a measure of the relative reactivity of the amino group or groups in each peptide. The most reactive amino group in the alpha subunit, lysine-109, is strongly shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex. The most reactive amino group in the beta 2 subunit, the amino-terminal threonine, is not shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex.

  19. Variations of the relative abundances of He, (C,N,O) and Fe-group nuclei in solar cosmic rays and their relationship to solar particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Biswas, S.; Fichtel, C. E.; Pellerin, C. J.; Reames, D. V.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of helium nuclei in the 24 January 1971 event and of helium and (C,N,O) nuclei in the 1 September 1971 event are combined with previous measurements to obtain the relative abundances of helium, (C,N,O), and Fe-group nuclei in these events. These data are then summarized together with previously reported results to show that, even when the same detector system using a dE/dx plus range technique is used, differences in the He/(C,N,O) value in the same energy/nucleon interval are observed in solar cosmic ray events. Further, when the He/(C,N,O) value is lower the He/(Fe-group nuclei) value is also systematically lower in these large events. When solar particle acceleration theory is analyzed, it is seen that the results suggest that, for large events, Coulomb energy loss probably does not play a major role in determining solar particle composition at higher energies (10 MeV). The variations in multicharged nuclei composition are more likely due to partial ionization during the acceleration phase.

  20. Improvement of separation efficiencies of anion-exchange chromatography using monolithic silica capillary columns modified with polyacrylates and polymethacrylates containing tertiary amino or quaternary ammonium groups.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuta; Ikegami, Tohru; Horie, Kanta; Hara, Takeshi; Jaafar, Jafariah; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2009-10-30

    Anion-exchange (AEX) columns were prepared by on-column polymerization of acrylates and methacrylates containing tertiary amino or quaternary ammonium groups on monolithic silica in a fused silica capillary modified with anchor groups. The columns provided a plate height (H) of less than 10 microm at optimum linear velocity (u) with keeping their high permeability (K=9-12 x 10(-14) m2). Among seven kinds of AEX columns, a monolithic silica column modified with poly(2-hydroxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl methacrylates) (HMPMA) showed larger retentions and better selectivities for nucleotides and inorganic anions than the others. The HMPMA column of 410 mm length produced 42,000-55,000 theoretical plates (N) at a linear velocity of 0.97 mm/s with a backpressure of 3.8 MPa. The same column could be employed for a fast separation of inorganic anions in 1.8 min at a linear velocity of 5.3 mm/s with a backpressure of 20 MPa. In terms of van Deemter plot and separation impedance, the HMPMA column showed higher performance than a conventional particle-packed AEX column. The HMPMA column showed good recovery of a protein, trypsin inhibitor, and it was applied to the separation of proteins and tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a gradient elution, to provide better separation compared to a conventional particle-packed AEX column. PMID:19683243

  1. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids Identified in Metal-Rich CH and CB Carbonaceous Chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondritesbut are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment(PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675(CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratiomass spectrometry. The (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (1316 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.22 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino acids compared to the corresponding alpha-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  2. Extraterrestrial amino acids identified in metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondrites but are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675 (CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The δ13C/12C ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (13-16 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.2-2 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of β-, γ-, and δ-amino acids compared to the corresponding α-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  3. Hydrogen-bond acidity of OH groups in various molecular environments (phenols, alcohols, steroid derivatives, and amino acids structures): experimental measurements and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Graton, Jérôme; Besseau, François; Brossard, Anne-Marie; Charpentier, Eloïse; Deroche, Arnaud; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-12

    The hydrogen-bond (H-bond) donating strengths of a series of 36 hydroxylic H-bond donors (HBDs) with N-methylpyrrolidinone have been measured in CCl4 solution by FTIR spectrometry. These data allow the definition of a H-bond acidity scale named pKAHY covering almost three pK units, corresponding to 16 kJ mol(-1). These results are supplemented by equilibrium constants determined in CH2Cl2 for one-third of the data set to study compounds showing a poor solubility in CCl4. A systematic comparison of these experimental results with theoretical data computed in the gas phase using DFT (density functional theory) calculations has also been carried out. Quantum electrostatic parameters appear to accurately describe the H-bond acidity of the hydroxyl group, whereas partial atomic charges according to the Merz-Singh-Kollman and CHelpG schemes are not suitable for this purpose. A substantial decrease of the H-bond acidity of the OH group is pointed out when the hydroxyl moiety is involved in intramolecular H-bond interactions. In such situations, the interactions are further characterized through AIM and NBO analyses, which respectively allow localizing the corresponding bond critical point and the quantification of a significant charge transfer from the available lone pair to the σ*OH antibonding orbital. Eventually, the H-bond ability of the hydroxyl groups of steroid derivatives and of lateral chains of amino acids are evaluated on the basis of experimental and/or theoretical data. PMID:24274054

  4. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  5. Poly(p-phenylene) with Poly(ethylene glycol) Chains and Amino Groups as a Functional Platform for Controlled Drug Release and Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guler, Bahar; Akbulut, Huseyin; Barlas, Firat Baris; Geyik, Caner; Demirkol, Dilek Odaci; Senisik, Ahmet Murat; Arican, Halil Armagan; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or combination of these two result in side effects, which lower the quality of life of the patients. To overcome problems with these methods, altering the drug properties by conjugating them to carrier polymers has emerged. Such polymeric carriers also hold the potential to make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Herein, poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) polymer with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and primary amino groups (PPP-NH2 -g-PEG) is synthesized and conjugated with anticancer drug Doxorubicin (DOX). pH dependent drug release experiments are performed at pH 5.3 and pH 7.4, respectively. Cell viability studies on human cervix adenocarcinoma cells show that lower doses of DOX inhibit cell proliferation when conjugated with nontoxic doses of PPP-NH2 -g-PEG polymer. Additionally, PPP-NH2 -g-PEG/Cys/DOX bioconjugate significantly increases radiosensitive properties of DOX. It is possible to use lower doses of DOX when conjugated to PPP-NH2 -g-PEG in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:26797717

  6. Modulation of Silica Nanoparticle Uptake into Human Osteoblast Cells by Variation of the Ratio of Amino and Sulfonate Surface Groups: Effects of Serum.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Shakiba; Treccani, Laura; Dringen, Ralf; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-07-01

    To study the importance of the surface charge for cellular uptake of silica nanoparticles (NPs), we synthesized five different single- or multifunctionalized fluorescent silica NPs (FFSNPs) by introducing various ratios of amino and sulfonate groups into their surface. The zeta potential values of these FFSNPs were customized from highly positive to highly negative, while other physicochemical properties remained almost constant. Irrespective of the original surface charge, serum proteins adsorbed onto the surface, neutralized the zeta potential values, and prevented the aggregation of the tailor-made FFSNPs. Depending on the surface charge and on the absence or presence of serum, two opposite trends were found concerning the cellular uptake of FFSNPs. In the absence of serum, positively charged NPs were more strongly accumulated by human osteoblast (HOB) cells than negatively charged NPs. In contrast, in serum-containing medium, anionic FFSNPs were internalized by HOB cells more strongly, despite the similar size and surface charge of all types of protein-covered FFSNPs. Thus, at physiological condition, when the presence of proteins is inevitable, sulfonate-functionalized silica NPs are the favorite choice to achieve a desired high rate of NP internalization. PMID:26030456

  7. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  8. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  9. 2-Oxindole Acts as a Synthon of 2-Aminobenzoyl Anion in the K2CO3-Catalyzed Reaction with Enones: Preparation of 1,4-Diketones Bearing an Amino Group and Their Further Transformations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chun-Bao; Zeng, Yu-Mei; Shi, Tong; Liu, Rui; Wei, Peng-Fei; Sun, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of 1,4-diketones bearing an amino group has been developed through the K2CO3-catalyzed reaction of 2-oxindoles with enones with the assistance of atmospheric O2 via sequential Michael addition-oxidation-ring-cleavage process. The further intramolecular reaction leads to the formation of benzoazepinone, quinoline, and 3-oxindole derivatives. PMID:26656574

  10. A Single Amino Acid Replacement in the Sensor Kinase LiaS Contributes to a Carrier Phenotype in Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Brittany E.; Yelamanchili, Dedipya; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high frequency of asymptomatic carriage of bacterial pathogens, we understand little about the bacterial molecular genetic underpinnings of this phenomenon. To obtain new information about the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying carriage of group A Streptococcus (GAS), we performed whole-genome sequencing of GAS strains recovered from a single individual during acute pharyngitis and subsequent asymptomatic carriage. We discovered that compared to the initial infection isolate, the strain recovered during asymptomatic carriage contained three single nucleotide polymorphisms, one of which was in a highly conserved region of a gene encoding a sensor kinase, liaS, resulting in an arginine-to-glycine amino acid replacement at position 135 of LiaS (LiaSR135G). Using gene replacement, we demonstrate that introduction of the carrier allele (liaSR135G) into a serotype-matched invasive strain increased mouse nasopharyngeal colonization and adherence to cultured human epithelial cells. The carrier mutation also resulted in a reduced ability to grow in human blood and reduced virulence in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Repair of the mutation in the GAS carrier strain restored virulence and decreased adherence to cultured human epithelial cells. We also provide evidence that the carrier mutation alters the GAS transcriptome, including altered transcription of GAS virulence genes, providing a potential mechanism for the pleiotropic phenotypic effects. Our data obtained using isogenic strains suggest that the liaSR135G mutation in the carrier strain contributes to the transition from disease to asymptomatic carriage and provides new information about this poorly described regulatory system in GAS. PMID:26283331

  11. Two single group, prospective, baseline-controlled feeding studies in infants and children with chronic diarrhea fed a hypoallergenic free amino acid-based formula

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants and children with chronic diarrhea (CD) often require specialized foods or parenteral nutrition (PN) to achieve adequate nutrient intakes to support growth and development. We assessed the efficacy of an amino acid-based formula (AAF) in supporting growth and improving symptoms in infants and children with CD from multiple etiologies. Methods Two studies were conducted: CD study in children (CD-C) and CD study in infants (CD-I). Each was a single group, baseline-controlled study in which each subject served as his/her own control. At enrollment, all subjects had CD lasting > 2 weeks and had ≥ 4 stools/day. Subjects were fed an AAF for 80 days starting at SD5, and were assessed at SD 28 and 84. Results CD-C: 18 of 19 subjects completed the study. At enrollment, the mean age was 5.6 ± 0.7 years, the most common diagnosis was short bowel syndrome (SBS) (n = 13), and 5 subjects with SBS were on PN. Subjects achieved significant increases in weight-for-age z-scores (p = 0.026). Over 50% of subjects achieved improvements in clinical outcomes targeted most frequently by their physicians. Of the five subjects on PN at enrollment, four had substantial weight gain and four had their PN requirements decreased. CD-I: 22 of 27 subjects completed the study. At enrollment, the mean age was 3.3 ± 0.3 months, the most common diagnosis was food allergy (n = 20), and no subjects were on PN. Subjects achieved significant increases in weight-for-age z-scores (p = 0.0023), significant decreases in the number of stools/day (p = 0.0012), and improvements in stool consistency (p = 0.0024). Over 80% of subjects achieved improvements in the clinical outcomes targeted most frequently by their physicians. Conclusions Infants and children with CD fed an AAF for three months displayed significant improvements in weight-for-age z-scores and clinical symptoms. Children dependent on PN also grew well and four of five decreased their

  12. Abundances of platinum group elements in native sulfur condensates from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc: Implications for PGE mineralization in porphyry deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Campbell, Ian H.; Kim, Jonguk

    2016-02-01

    Some porphyry Cu-Au deposits, which are enriched in Pd, are potentially an economic source of Pd. Magmatic volatile phases are thought to transport the platinum group elements (PGEs) from the porphyry source magma to the point of deposition. However, the compatibilities of the PGEs in magmatic volatile phases are poorly constrained. We report PGE and Re contents in native sulfur condensates and associated altered dacites from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc, in order to determine the compatibility of PGEs and Re in magmatic volatile phases, and their mobility during secondary hydrothermal alteration. The native sulfur we analyzed is the condensate of a magmatic volatile phase exsolved from the Niuatahi-Motutahi magma. The PGEs are moderately enriched in the sulfur condensates in comparison to the associated fresh dacite, with enrichment factors of 11-285, whereas Au, Cu and Re are strongly enriched with enrichment factors of ∼20,000, ∼5000 and ∼800 respectively. Although the PGEs are moderately compatible into magmatic volatile phases, their compatibility is significantly lower than that of Au, Cu and Re. Furthermore, the compatibility of PGEs decrease in the order: Ru > Pt > Ir > Pd. This trend is also observed in condensates and sublimates from other localities. PGE mineralization in porphyry Cu-Au deposits is characterized by substantially higher Pd/Pt (∼7-60) and Pd/Ir (∼100-10,500) than typical orthomagmatic sulfide deposits (e.g. Pd/Pt ∼0.6 and Pd/Ir ∼20 for the Bushveld). It has previously been suggested that the high mobility of Pd, relative to the other PGEs, may account for the preferential enrichment of Pd in porphyry Cu-Au deposits. However, the low compatibility of Pd in the volatile phase relative to the other PGEs, shown in this study, invalidates this explanation. We suggest that the PGE geochemistry of Pd-rich Cu-Au deposits is principally derived from the PGE characteristics of the magma from which the ore

  13. The G Protein-coupled Receptor Family C Group 6 Subtype A (GPRC6A) Receptor Is Involved in Amino Acid-induced Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Secretion from GLUTag Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oya, Manami; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Pais, Ramona; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although amino acids are dietary nutrients that evoke the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which amino acids regulate GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L cells remains unknown. Here, we show that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), family C group 6 subtype A (GPRC6A), is involved in amino acid-induced GLP-1 secretion from the intestinal L cell line GLUTag. Application of l-ornithine caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in GLUTag cells. Application of a GPRC6A receptor antagonist, a phospholipase C inhibitor, or an IP3 receptor antagonist significantly suppressed the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase. We found that the increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by l-ornithine correlated with GLP-1 secretion and that l-ornithine stimulation increased exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, depletion of endogenous GPRC6A by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase and GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these findings suggest that the GPRC6A receptor functions as an amino acid sensor in GLUTag cells that promotes GLP-1 secretion. PMID:23269670

  14. CNO abundances in H II regions of the Magellanic clouds and the galaxy with implications regarding the nucleosynthesis of the CNO element group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Shields, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Final abundance results of IUE observations of the UV spectra of three H II regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud and four H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud are presented. Calculated yields of carbon and oxygen derived are y(C)=.00063 and y(O)=.0016. The nucleosynthetic origin of nitrogen was evaluated as being predominantly a secondary element produced from carbon as its seed. Plotting log N/C versus log C/H yielded the rather unexpected result that log N/C decreases with lo C/H over the SMC-LMC-Orion range. The cause of this relationship is discussed.

  15. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  16. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases. PMID:26075473

  17. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  18. α-Amino Acid-Isosteric α-Amino Tetrazoles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Dömling, Alexander

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis of all 20 common natural proteinogenic and 4 otherα-amino acid-isosteric α-amino tetrazoles has been accomplished, whereby the carboxyl group is replaced by the isosteric 5-tetrazolyl group. The short process involves the use of the key Ugi tetrazole reaction followed by deprotection chemistries. The tetrazole group is bioisosteric to the carboxylic acid and is widely used in medicinal chemistry and drug design. Surprisingly, several of the common α-amino acid-isosteric α-amino tetrazoles are unknown up to now. Therefore a rapid synthetic access to this compound class and non-natural derivatives is of high interest to advance the field. PMID:26817531

  19. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  20. Symmetry scheme for amino acid codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2002-02-01

    Group theoretical concepts are invoked in a specific model to explain how only twenty amino acids occur in nature out of a possible sixty four. The methods we use enable us to justify the occurrence of the recently discovered 21st amino acid selenocysteine, and also enables us to predict the possible existence of two more, as yet undiscovered amino acids.

  1. Heparin trisaccharides with nonreducing 2-amino-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl end-groups suitable as substrates for catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, B; Chao, H

    1986-10-15

    Heparin trisaccharides having the sequence O-(2-amino-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1----4)-O-alpha-L- idopyranosyluronic acid-(1----4)-2,5-anhydro-D-[1-3H]mannitol have been prepared, as substrate models for studying sulfatases of heparan sulfate catabolism, by alpha-L-iduronidase cleavage of previously reported heparin tetrasaccharides, with additional chemical and enzymic modification as required. Three series are described, including isomeric sulfate esters of that trisaccharide with no N-substituent, with N-acetyl substitution, and with N-sulfate substitution. New features of the substrate specificity of the hydrolases used, including iduronate sulfatase, alpha-L-iduronidase, glucosamine 6-sulfate sulfatase, and heparin sulfamidase, were observed, and simple procedures for partial purification of these hydrolases are reported. The structures assigned to the trisaccharides are supported by the mode of preparation, reactions, regularities in electrophoretic behavior, and identities of the products of deamination. PMID:3791294

  2. Amino acid decarboxylations produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls in amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; León, M Mercedes; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-10-15

    The formation of 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde in mixtures of phenylalanine, a lipid oxidation product, and a second amino acid was studied to determine the role of the second amino acid in the degradation of phenylalanine produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. The presence of the second amino acid usually increased the formation of the amine and reduced the formation of the Strecker aldehyde. The reasons for this behaviour seem to be related to the α-amino group and the other functional groups (mainly amino or similar groups) present in the side-chain of the amino acid. These groups are suggested to modify the lipid-derived reactive carbonyl but not the reaction mechanism because the Ea of formation of both 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde remained unchanged in all studied systems. All these results suggest that the amine/aldehyde ratio obtained by amino acid degradation can be modified by adding free amino acids during food formulation. PMID:27173560

  3. The amino acid sequence of the peptide containing the thiol group of creatine kinase from normal and dystrophic chicken breast muscle. Comparison of some of the immunological properties of the antibodies developed in rabbits against these enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Buddha P.

    1974-01-01

    The major 14C-labelled peptides from creatine kinase from normal and dystrophic chicken muscle obtained by carboxymethylating the reactive thiol groups with iodo[2-14C]acetic acid and digestion with trypsin were purified by ion-exchange chromatography on Dowex-50 (X2) and by paper electrophoresis. The chromatographic characteristics of the 14C-labelled peptides, their electrophoretic mobilities at pH6.5, and their amino acid compositions were identical for the two enzymes. The sequence of amino acids around the essential thiol groups of creatine kinase from normal and dystrophic chicken muscle was shown to be Ile-Leu-Thr-CmCys-Pro-Ser-Asn-Leu-Gly-Thr-Gly-Leu-Arg (CmCys, carboxymethylcysteine). This sequence is almost identical with that for the creatine kinases in human and ox muscle and bovine brain and is very similar to that of arginine kinase from lobster muscle. Antibodies to the enzymes were raised in rabbits and their reaction with the creatine kinase from normal and dystrophic muscles in interfacial, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic experiments was studied. The cross-reaction between normal muscle creatine kinase and antisera against the dystrophic muscle enzyme (or vice versa) observed by immunodiffusion and by immunoelectrophoretic experiments further suggests that the enzymes from normal and dystrophic chicken muscle are similar in structure. The results of the present study, the identical amino acid sequence of the peptides containing the reactive thiol group from both the normal and dystrophic chicken muscle enzymes and the immunological similarities of the two enzymes are in accord with the similarity of the two enzymes observed by Roy et al. (1970). ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4219281

  4. Influence of methoxy- and nitro-substitutions in the aromatic ring on proton donation ability in hydrogen bond and on the amino group parameters of free and H-bonded molecules of 2-aminopyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisenko, V. E.; Krekov, S. A.; Fomenko, M. Yu.; Koll, A.; Lipkovski, P.

    2008-06-01

    Amino- and imino- forms of pyrimidine are widely presented as part of antibiotics, corrective medications for heart failures and metabolic stimulators. Hydrogen bonding is one of the fundamental interactions between biologically active molecules. This type of interactions provides flexibility, speed and variety of the biochemical processes. Proton donation properties of aminopyrimidines significantly depend on the position, number and kind of the substituent in its aromatic ring. In present work we studied the influence of the methoxy- and nitro-substitutions in the phenyl radical of pyridine and pyrimidine cycles on the proton donation ability of the amino group in hydrogen bonds as well as on its geometrical, force, electro-optical and thermodynamical characteristics in free and H-bonded (1:1 and 1:2, with various proton acceptors) molecules of primary aromatic amines. Acetonitrile, dioxane, tetrahydrofourane, dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide (whose proton accepting properties vary within a wide range) were used as proton acceptors in our research. In the region of the amino group stretching and deformation vibrations the IR spectra of free and H-bonded (1:1) molecules of 2-amino-4,6-dimethoxy- and 2-amino-5-nitropyrimidine were studied in complexes with proton acceptors in CCl 4 within the temperature range 288-328 K. The spectra of 1:2 complexes were studied in undiluted aprotic solvents. The following spectral characteristics of absorption bands in amino group stretching vibrations were determined: M(0) (zero spectral moment, integrated intensity B); M(1) (first spectral moment, band "centre of gravity"); effective half width, related to the second central moment (Δ ν1/2) eff = 2( M(2)) 1/2, frequencies of the deformation vibrations δ(HNH) of free and H-bonded molecules. It was shown that changes of the absorption band spectral characteristics of the amino group stretching and deformation vibrations in the analyzed

  5. Mechanisms of Innovation Diffusion under Information Abundance and Information Scarcity--On the Contribution of Social Networks in Group vs. Individual Extension Approaches in Semi-Arid Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darr, Dietrich; Pretzsch, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of innovation diffusion under group-oriented and individual-oriented extension. Current theoretical notions of innovation diffusion in social networks shall be briefly reviewed, and the concepts of "search" and "innovation" vis-a-vis "transfer" and "imitation" mechanisms (Hansen,…

  6. Abundance of Jackfruit ( Artocarpus heterophyllus) Affects Group Characteristics and Use of Space by Golden-Headed Lion Tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas) in Cabruca Agroforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leonardo C.; Neves, Leonardo G.; Raboy, Becky E.; Dietz, James M.

    2011-08-01

    Cabruca is an agroforest of cacao trees shaded by native forest trees. It is the predominant vegetation type throughout eastern part of the range of the golden-headed lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, an endangered primate endemic to Atlantic Forest. Understanding how lion tamarins use this agroforest is a conservation priority. To address this question, we documented the diet, home range size, group sizes and composition, density, number of litters and body condition of lion tamarins living in cabruca, and other habitats. Jackfruit, Artocarpus heterophyllus, was the most used species used by lion tamarins in cabruca and was widely available and used throughout the year. In cabruca, home range size was the smallest (22-28 ha) and density of lion tamarins was the highest (1.7 ind/ha) reported for the species. Group size averaged 7.4 individuals and was not significantly different among the vegetation types. In cabruca, groups produced one or two litters a year, and all litters were twins. Adult males in cabruca were significantly heavier than males in primary forest. Our study is the first to demonstrate that breeding groups of golden-headed lion tamarins can survive and reproduce entirely within cabruca agroforest. Jackfruit proved to be a keystone resource for lion tamarins in cabruca, and bromeliads were important as an animal prey foraging microhabitat. In cases where cabruca contains concentrated resources, such as jackfruit and bromeliads, lion tamarins may not only survive and reproduce but may fare better than in other forest types, at least for body condition and reproduction.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of 2-Amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole-Derived Hydrazones as MAO Inhibitors: Role of the Methylene Spacer Group.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rati K P; Ayyannan, Senthil R

    2016-07-19

    A series of 2-amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole-derived extended hydrazones were designed, synthesized, and investigated for their ability to inhibit monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/MAO-B). The compounds were found to exhibit inhibitory activities in the nanomolar to micromolar range. Some of the compounds showed excellent potency and selectivity against the MAO-B isoform. N'-(5-Chloro-2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)-2-(6-nitrobenzothiazol-2-ylamino)acetohydrazide (compound 31) showed the highest MAO-B inhibitory activity (IC50 =1.8±0.3 nm, selectivity index [SI]=766.67), whereas compound 6 [N'-(1-(4-bromophenyl)ethylidene)-2-(6-nitrobenzothiazol-2-ylamino)acetohydrazide] was found to be the most active MAO-A inhibitor (IC50 =0.42±0.003 μm). Kinetic studies revealed that compounds 6 and 31 exhibit competitive-type reversible inhibition against both MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies disclosed several structural aspects significant for potency and the contribution of the methylene spacer toward MAO-B inhibitory potency, with minimal or no neurotoxicity. Molecular modeling studies yielded a good correlation between experimental and theoretical inhibitory data. Binding pose analysis revealed the significance of cumulative effects of π-π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions for effective stabilization of virtual ligand-protein complexes. Further optimization studies of compound 31, including co-crystallization of inhibitor-MAO-B complexes, are essential to develop these compounds as potential therapeutic agents for MAO-B-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27332045

  9. Characterization of the Drosophila group ortholog to the amino-terminus of the alpha-thalassemia and mental retardation X-Linked (ATRX) vertebrate protein.

    PubMed

    López-Falcón, Brenda; Meyer-Nava, Silvia; Hernández-Rodríguez, Benjamín; Campos, Adam; Montero, Daniel; Rudiño, Enrique; Vázquez, Martha; Zurita, Mario; Valadez-Graham, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The human ATRX gene encodes hATRX, a chromatin-remodeling protein harboring an helicase/ATPase and ADD domains. The ADD domain has two zinc fingers that bind to histone tails and mediate hATRX binding to chromatin. dAtrx, the putative ATRX homolog in Drosophila melanogaster, has a conserved helicase/ATPase domain but lacks the ADD domain. A bioinformatic search of the Drosophila genome using the human ADD sequence allowed us to identify the CG8290 annotated gene, which encodes three ADD harboring- isoforms generated by alternative splicing. This Drosophila ADD domain is highly similar in structure and in the amino acids which mediate the histone tail contacts to the ADD domain of hATRX as shown by 3D modeling. Very recently the CG8290 annotated gene has been named dadd1. We show through pull-down and CoIP assays that the products of the dadd1 gene interact physically with dAtrxL and HP1a and all of them mainly co-localize in the chromocenter, although euchromatic localization can also be observed through the chromosome arms. We confirm through ChIP analyses that these proteins are present in vivo in the same heterochromatic regions. The three isoforms are expressed throughout development. Flies carrying transheterozygous combinations of the dadd1 and atrx alleles are semi-viable and have different phenotypes including the appearance of melanotic masses. Interestingly, the dAdd1-b and c isoforms have extra domains, such as MADF, which suggest newly acquired functions of these proteins. These results strongly support that, in Drosophila, the atrx gene diverged and that the dadd1-encoded proteins participate with dAtrx in some cellular functions such as heterochromatin maintenance. PMID:25437195

  10. Characterization of the Drosophila Group Ortholog to the Amino-Terminus of the Alpha-Thalassemia and Mental Retardation X-Linked (ATRX) Vertebrate Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Benjamín; Campos, Adam; Montero, Daniel; Rudiño, Enrique; Vázquez, Martha; Zurita, Mario; Valadez-Graham, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    The human ATRX gene encodes hATRX, a chromatin-remodeling protein harboring an helicase/ATPase and ADD domains. The ADD domain has two zinc fingers that bind to histone tails and mediate hATRX binding to chromatin. dAtrx, the putative ATRX homolog in Drosophila melanogaster, has a conserved helicase/ATPase domain but lacks the ADD domain. A bioinformatic search of the Drosophila genome using the human ADD sequence allowed us to identify the CG8290 annotated gene, which encodes three ADD harboring- isoforms generated by alternative splicing. This Drosophila ADD domain is highly similar in structure and in the amino acids which mediate the histone tail contacts to the ADD domain of hATRX as shown by 3D modeling. Very recently the CG8290 annotated gene has been named dadd1. We show through pull-down and CoIP assays that the products of the dadd1 gene interact physically with dAtrxL and HP1a and all of them mainly co-localize in the chromocenter, although euchromatic localization can also be observed through the chromosome arms. We confirm through ChIP analyses that these proteins are present in vivo in the same heterochromatic regions. The three isoforms are expressed throughout development. Flies carrying transheterozygous combinations of the dadd1 and atrx alleles are semi-viable and have different phenotypes including the appearance of melanotic masses. Interestingly, the dAdd1-b and c isoforms have extra domains, such as MADF, which suggest newly acquired functions of these proteins. These results strongly support that, in Drosophila, the atrx gene diverged and that the dadd1-encoded proteins participate with dAtrx in some cellular functions such as heterochromatin maintenance. PMID:25437195

  11. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  12. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  13. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  14. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  15. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    . [1989, ARAA, 27, 279], persists despite the addition of more O data and may betray the occurrence of a hiatus in star formation between the end of halo formation and the beginning of star formation in the disk. It is noted that the slope of the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relation for [Fe/H] >/= -1 depends on the statistical regression utilized. Hence, alleged "observed" [O/H] - age relations, which do not use truly observed O abundances (but, rather, adopt O abundances based on Fe abundances), should be regarded with caution. Systematic effects on O abundances derived from the 6300A [O I] and 7774A O I lines are considered next. While our Solar observations confirm the disagreement between the observed 7774A O I equivalent widths and LTE model calculations at low microns, we stress that Solar O abundance determinations made from flux spectra are in very good agreement with the meteoritic value. We find the 6300A [O I] equivalent width value appears to be uncertain for the Sun. Given this uncertainty, the inability of authors to reproduce each others' 6300A O abundances, and the results of recent quasi-two-stream calculations, we do not believe it can be readily claimed (as is usually done) that these abundances are more reliable than those derived from the 7774A O I triplet. In a sample of relatively metal-rich F and G dwarfs, we find no systematic difference between the 6300 and 7774A O abundances for Teff abundances are also determined for 8 open clusters or moving groups. A very clear relation between cluster age and O abundance is seen; this is in stark contrast to the lack of any relation between age and Fe abundance in the same clusters. Hence, despite possible a priori objections, O abundances may prove to be a superior chronometer (as others have suggested) in the study of Galactic chemical evolution. Somewhat surprisingly, our our [O/Fe] ratios appear to be larger for the

  16. Apical transporters for neutral amino acids: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    Absorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine involves a variety of transporters for different groups of amino acids. This is illustrated by inherited disorders of amino acid absorption, such as Hartnup disorder, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria, dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, and lysinuric protein intolerance, affecting separate groups of amino acids. Recent advances in the molecular identification of apical neutral amino acid transporters has shed a light on the molecular basis of Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria. PMID:18400692

  17. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Group 1 Is Distinguished by a Unique Amino Acid Substitution in the HpHb Receptor Implicated in Human Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sistrom, Mark; Agbebakun, Kehinde; Balmer, Oliver; Gibson, Wendy; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr) and T. b. gambiense (Tbg), causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Africa, have evolved alternative mechanisms of resisting the activity of trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs), components of innate immunity in human serum that protect against infection by other African trypanosomes. In Tbr, lytic activity is suppressed by the Tbr-specific serum-resistance associated (SRA) protein. The mechanism in Tbg is less well understood but has been hypothesized to involve altered activity and expression of haptoglobin haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR). HpHbR has been shown to facilitate internalization of TLF-1 in T.b. brucei (Tbb), a member of the T. brucei species complex that is susceptible to human serum. By evaluating the genetic variability of HpHbR in a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic context, we show that a single substitution that replaces leucine with serine at position 210 is conserved in the most widespread form of Tbg (Tbg group 1) and not found in related taxa, which are either human serum susceptible (Tbb) or known to resist lysis via an alternative mechanism (Tbr and Tbg group 2). We hypothesize that this single substitution contributes to reduced uptake of TLF and thus may play a key role in conferring serum resistance to Tbg group 1. In contrast, similarity in HpHbR sequence among isolates of Tbg group 2 and Tbb/Tbr provides further evidence that human serum resistance in Tbg group 2 is likely independent of HpHbR function. PMID:22802982

  18. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: resistance of α2-8-linked N-glycolylneuraminic acid to enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Davies, Leela R L; Pearce, Oliver M T; Tessier, Matthew B; Assar, Siavash; Smutova, Victoria; Pajunen, Maria; Sumida, Mizuki; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Finne, Jukka; Gagneux, Pascal; Pshezhetsky, Alexey; Woods, Robert; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    The sialic acid (Sia) N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and its hydroxylated derivative N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) differ by one oxygen atom. CMP-Neu5Gc is synthesized from CMP-Neu5Ac, with Neu5Gc representing a highly variable fraction of total Sias in various tissues and among different species. The exception may be the brain, where Neu5Ac is abundant and Neu5Gc is reported to be rare. Here, we confirm this unusual pattern and its evolutionary conservation in additional samples from various species, concluding that brain Neu5Gc expression has been maintained at extremely low levels over hundreds of millions of years of vertebrate evolution. Most explanations for this pattern do not require maintaining neural Neu5Gc at such low levels. We hypothesized that resistance of α2-8-linked Neu5Gc to vertebrate sialidases is the detrimental effect requiring the relative absence of Neu5Gc from brain. This linkage is prominent in polysialic acid (polySia), a molecule with critical roles in vertebrate neural development. We show that Neu5Gc is incorporated into neural polySia and does not cause in vitro toxicity. Synthetic polymers of Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc showed that mammalian and bacterial sialidases are much less able to hydrolyze α2-8-linked Neu5Gc at the nonreducing terminus. Notably, this difference was not seen with acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of polySias. Molecular dynamics modeling indicates that differences in the three-dimensional conformation of terminal saccharides may partly explain reduced enzymatic activity. In keeping with this, polymers of N-propionylneuraminic acid are sensitive to sialidases. Resistance of Neu5Gc-containing polySia to sialidases provides a potential explanation for the rarity of Neu5Gc in the vertebrate brain. PMID:22692207

  19. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  20. D-amino acid peptide residualizing agents bearing N-hydroxysuccinimido-and maleimido- functional groups and their application for trastuzumab radioiodination

    PubMed Central

    Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Chitneni, Satish; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Proteins that undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis are subject to lysosomal degradation, requiring radioiodination methods that minimize loss of radioactivity from tumor cells after this process occurs. To accomplish this, we developed the residualizing radioiodination agent N∊-(3-[*I]iodobenzoyl)-Lys5-Nα-maleimido-Gly1-d-GEEEK (Mal-d-GEEEK-[*I]IB), which enhanced tumor uptake but also increased kidney activity and necessitates generation of sulfhydryl moieties on the protein. The purpose of the current study was to synthesize and evaluate a new d-amino acid based agent that might avoid these potential problems. Methods Nα-(3-iodobenzoyl)-(5-succinimidyloxycarbonyl)-d-EEEG (NHS-IB-d-EEEG), which contains 3 d-glutamates to provide negative charge and a N-hydroxysuccinimide function to permit conjugation to unmodified proteins, and the corresponding tin precursor were produced by solid phase peptide synthesis and subsequent conjugation with appropriate reagents. Radioiodination of the anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab using NHS-IB-d-EEEG and Mal-d-GEEEK-IB were compared. Paired-label internalization assays on BT474 breast carcinoma cells and biodistribution studies in athymic mice bearing BT474M1 xenografts were performed to evaluate the two radioiodinated d-peptide trastuzumab conjugates. Results NHS-[131I]IB-d-EEEG was produced in 53.8 ± 13.4 % and conjugated to trastuzumab in 39.5 ± 7.6 % yield. Paired-label internalization assays with trastuzumab-NHS-[131I]IB-d-EEEG and trastuzumab-Mal-d-GEEEK-[125I]IB demonstrated similar intracellular trapping for both conjugates at 1 h (131I, 84.4 ± 6.1%; 125I, 88.6 ± 5.2%) through 24 h (131I, 60.7 ± 6.8%; 125I, 64.9 ± 6.9 %). In the biodistribution experiment, tumor uptake peaked at 48 h (trastuzumab-NHS-[131I]IB-d-EEEG, 29.8 ± 3.6 %ID/g; trastuzumab-Mal-d-GEEEK-[125I]IB, 45.3 ± 5.3 %ID/g) and was significantly higher for 125I at all time points. In general, normal tissue levels were lower for

  1. Highly sensitive intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic substrates for renin based on the combination of L-2-amino-3-(7-methoxy-4-coumaryl)propionic acid with 2,4-dinitrophenyl groups at various positions

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The development of renin inhibitors for the treatment of hypertension requires highly sensitive substrates to evaluate potency and to characterize the mechanism of tight-binding inhibitors. A series of intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic renin substrates, based on the N-terminal tetradecapeptide sequence of human angiotensinogen (hTDP), was synthesized using a solid-phase technique. Incorporation of the fluorescent amino acid L-Amp [L-2-amino-3-(7-methoxy-4-coumaryl)propionic acid] and the DNP (2,4-dinitrophenyl) group at various positions resulted in >90% quenching efficiency and strong product fluorescence. Shortening the hTDP sequence to an octapeptide from histidine in P5 to histidine in P3′ (substrate 3) resulted in an acceptable kcat/Km (41000 M−1·s−1) and further systematic variation gave substrate 9, DNP-Lys-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu-Val-Ile-His-L-Amp, with a kcat/Km value of 350000 M−1·s−1 and 94% quenching efficiency. The free side chain of lysine, replacing the isoleucine residue at P6 position in the angiotensinogen sequence, contributed to the increased value for kcat. The pH dependence of kcat/Km for renin and substrate 9 showed that the optimal pH is at pH 6–7. It also showed two titrating groups on the acidic side of the pH optimum, and one titrating group with a pKa of 7.8 on the alkaline side. The combination of good kinetic and spectroscopic properties resulted in a >20-fold improvement in the sensitivity of renin assay, compared with the commercial substrate Arg-Glu(EDANS)-Ile-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu-Val-Ile-His-Thr-Lys(DABCYL)-Arg {where EDANS is 5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]naphthalene-1-sulphonic acid and DABCYL is 4-(4-dimethylaminophenylazo)benzoic acid} (kcat/Km=268000 M−1· s−1, quenching efficiency <80%). The detection limit in a microplate renin assay was 60 pM, making substrate 9 well suited for the evaluation of inhibitors at picomolar concentrations. PMID:15233625

  2. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  3. Proteomics-Based Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins from Human Keratinocytes Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tackett, Alan J; Byrum, Stephanie; Avaritt, Nathan L; Sengupta, Deepanwita; Moreland, Linley W; Tchounwou, Paul B; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Arsenic is a widely distributed environmental toxicant that can cause multi-tissue pathologies. Proteomic assays allow for the identification of biological processes modulated by arsenic in diverse tissue types. Method The altered abundance of proteins from HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line exposed to arsenic was quantified using a label-free LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry workflow. Selected proteomics results were validated using western blot and RT-PCR. A functional annotation analytics strategy that included visual analytical integration of heterogeneous data sets was developed to elucidate functional categories. The annotations integrated were mainly tissue localization, biological process and gene family. Result The abundance of 173 proteins was altered in keratinocytes exposed to arsenic; in which 96 proteins had increased abundance while 77 proteins had decreased abundance. These proteins were also classified into 69 Gene Ontology biological process terms. The increased abundance of transferrin receptor protein (TFRC) was validated and also annotated to participate in response to hypoxia. A total of 33 proteins (11 increased abundance and 22 decreased abundance) were associated with 18 metabolic process terms. The Glutamate--cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the only protein annotated with the term sulfur amino acid metabolism process, had increased abundance while succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit, mitochondrial precursor (SDHB), a tumor suppressor, had decreased abundance. Conclusion A list of 173 differentially abundant proteins in response to arsenic trioxide was grouped using three major functional annotations covering tissue localization, biological process and protein families. A possible explanation for hyperpigmentation pathologies observed in arsenic toxicity is that arsenic exposure leads to increased iron uptake in the normally hypoxic human skin. The proteins mapped to metabolic process terms and

  4. Linear poly(amido amine)s with secondary and tertiary amino groups and variable amounts of disulfide linkages: synthesis and in vitro gene transfer properties.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Lok, Martin C; Jiang, Xulin; Hennink, Wim E; Feijen, Jan; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2006-11-28

    A group of novel poly(amido amine) homo- and copolymers (PAAs) containing secondary and tertiary amine groups in their main chain and different structures in the bisacrylamide segments were synthesized and evaluated as non-viral gene delivery vectors. Among these, also the disulfide-containing cystaminebisacrylamide was employed as a (co)monomer, yielding PAAs with variable amounts of bioreducible disulfide linkages in the main chain. Michael addition the trifunctional 1-(2-aminoethyl) piperazine to equimolar amounts of the appropriate bis(acrylamide) yielded linear polymers as was elucidated by their (13)C NMR spectra. The polymers possess buffering capacities between pH 5.1 and pH 7.4 higher than branched polyethylenimine (pEI) and are able to efficiently condense DNA into nanosized (<150 nm) and positively charged complexes. Transfection experiments with COS-7 cells showed that polyplexes from PAAs with disulfide linkages give significant higher transfections than those from PAAs lacking the disulfide linkage, and XTT assays showed that these polymers are essentially non-toxic. Variation of the disulfide content revealed that polyplexes of PAA copolymers with appropriate disulfide content have largely improved biophysical properties, yielding enhanced levels of gene expression along with low toxicity. The results demonstrate that bioreducible poly(amido amine)s are a very promising class of polymers for safe and efficient gene delivery. PMID:17079046

  5. The ɛ-Amino Group of Protein Lysine Residues Is Highly Susceptible to Nonenzymatic Acylation by Several Physiological Acyl-CoA Thioesters.

    PubMed

    Simic, Zeljko; Weiwad, Matthias; Schierhorn, Angelika; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial enzymes implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cancer, and metabolic syndrome are highly regulated by acetylation. However, mitochondrial acetyltransferases have not been identified. Here, we show that acetylation and also other acylations are spontaneous processes that depend on pH value, acyl-CoA concentration and the chemical nature of the acyl residue. In the case of a peptide derived from carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1, the rates of succinylation and glutarylation were up to 150 times than for acetylation. These results were confirmed by using the protein substrate cyclophilin A (CypA). Deacylation experiments revealed that SIRT3 exhibits deacetylase activity but is not able to remove any of the succinyl groups from CypA, whereas SIRT5 is an effective protein desuccinylase. Thus, the acylation landscape on lysine residues might largely depend on the enzymatic activity of specific sirtuins, and the availability and reactivity of acyl-CoA compounds. PMID:26382620

  6. How to find the optimal partner--studies of snurportin 1 interactions with U snRNA 5' TMG-cap analogues containing modified 2-amino group of 7-methylguanosine.

    PubMed

    Piecyk, Karolina; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Ferenc-Mrozek, Aleksandra; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena

    2015-08-01

    Snurportin 1 is an adaptor protein that mediates the active nuclear import of uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNA) by the importin-β receptor pathway. Its cellular activity influences the overall transport yield of small ribonucleoprotein complexes containing N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) capped U snRNA. So far little is still known about structural requirements related to molecular recognition of the trimethylguanosine moiety by snurportin in solution. Since these interactions are of a great biomedical importance, we synthesized a series of new 7-methylguanosine cap analogues with extended substituents at the exocyclic 2-amino group to gain a deeper insight into how the TMG-cap is adapted into the snurportin cap-binding pocket. Prepared chemical tools were applied in binding assays using emission spectroscopy. Surprisingly, our results revealed strict selectivity of snurportin towards the TMG-cap structure that relied mainly on its structural stiffness and compactness. PMID:26118337

  7. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  8. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  9. General role of the amino and methylsulfamoyl groups in selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-1 inhibition by 1,4-diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles and validation of a predictive pharmacometric PLS model.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Fortuna, Cosimo G; Scilimati, Antonio

    2015-04-13

    A novel set of 1,4-diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles were projected as a tool to study the effect of both the heteroaromatic triazole as a core ring and a variety of chemical groups with different electronic features, size and shape on the catalytic activity of the two COX isoenzymes. The new triazoles were synthesized in fair to good yields and then evaluated for their inhibitory activity towards COXs arachidonic acid conversion catalysis. Their COXs selectivity was also measured. A predictive pharmacometric Volsurf plus model, experimentally confirmed by the percentage (%) of COXs inhibition at the concentration of 50 μM and IC50 values of the tested compounds, was built by using a number of isoxazoles of known COXs inhibitory activity as a training set. It was found that two compounds {4-(5-methyl-4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzenamine (18) and 4-[1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-yl]benzenamine (19)} bearing an amino group (NH2) are potent and selective COX-1 inhibitors (IC50 = 15 and 3 μM, respectively) and that the presence of a methylsulfamoyl group (SO2CH3) is not a rule to have a Coxib. In fact, 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazole (23) has COX-1 IC50 = 23 μM and was found inactive towards COX-2. PMID:25768707

  10. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  11. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  12. Amino acids in a carbonaceous chondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, R. K.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hare, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A carbonaceous chondrite from the Antarctic, referred to as the Allan Hills meteorite 77306, appears to be free from terrestrial organic contamination. The presence of both protein and non-protein amino acids and an equal abundance of D- and L-enantiomers of amino acids, is testimony to the extraterrestrial nature of these compounds.

  13. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  14. Amino acid repeats and the structure and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albà, M M; Tompa, P; Veitia, R A

    2007-01-01

    Many proteins have repeats or runs of single amino acids. The pathogenicity of some repeat expansions has fueled proteomic, genomic and structural explorations of homopolymeric runs not only in human but in a wide variety of other organisms. Other types of amino acid repetitive structures exhibit more complex patterns than homopeptides. Irrespective of their precise organization, repetitive sequences are defined as low complexity or simple sequences, as one or a few residues are particularly abundant. Prokaryotes show a relatively low frequency of simple sequences compared to eukaryotes. In the latter the percentage of proteins containing homopolymeric runs varies greatly from one group to another. For instance, within vertebrates, amino acid repeat frequency is much higher in mammals than in amphibians, birds or fishes. For some repeats, this is correlated with the GC-richness of the regions containing the corresponding genes. Homopeptides tend to occur in disordered regions of transcription factors or developmental proteins. They can trigger the formation of protein aggregates, particularly in 'disease' proteins. Simple sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than the rest of the protein/gene and may have a functional impact. Therefore, they are good candidates to promote rapid evolutionary changes. All these diverse facets of homopolymeric runs are explored in this review. PMID:18753788

  15. Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Is Not Caused by Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kunde, Sachin S.; Roede, James R.; Vos, Miriam B.; Orr, Michael L.; Go, Young-Mi; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    Fructose-sweetened liquid consumption is associated with fatty liver and oxidative stress. In rodent models of fructose-mediated fatty liver, protein consumption is decreased. Additionally, decreased sulfur amino acid intake is known to cause oxidative stress. Studies were designed to test whether oxidative stress in fructose-sweetened liquid-induced fatty liver is caused by decreased ad libitum solid food intake with associated inadequate sulfur amino acid intake. C57BL6 mice were grouped as: control (ad libitum water), fructose (ad libitum 30% fructose-sweetened liquid), glucose (ad libitum 30% glucose-sweetened water) and pair-fed (ad libitum water and sulfur amino acid intake same as the fructose group). Hepatic and plasma thiol-disulfide antioxidant status were analyzed after five weeks. Fructose- and glucose-fed mice developed fatty liver. The mitochondrial antioxidant protein, thioredoxin-2, displayed decreased abundance in the liver of fructose and glucose-fed mice compared to controls. Glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox potential (EhGSSG) and abundance of the cytoplasmic antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-2, were similar among groups. We conclude that both fructose and glucose-sweetened liquid consumption results in fatty liver and upregulated thioredoxin-2 expression, consistent with mitochondrial oxidative stress; however, inadequate sulfur amino acid intake was not the cause of this oxidative stress. PMID:22254090

  16. Polymers from amino acids: development of dual ester-urethane melt condensation approach and mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Anantharaj, S; Jayakannan, M

    2012-08-13

    A new dual ester-urethane melt condensation methodology for biological monomers-amino acids was developed to synthesize new classes of thermoplastic polymers under eco-friendly and solvent-free polymerization approach. Naturally abundant L-amino acids were converted into dual functional ester-urethane monomers by tailor-made synthetic approach. Direct polycondensation of these amino acid monomers with commercial diols under melt condition produced high molecular weight poly(ester-urethane)s. The occurrence of the dual ester-urethane process and the structure of the new poly(ester-urethane)s were confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR. The new dual ester-urethane condensation approach was demonstrated for variety of amino acids: glycine, β-alanine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, and L-phenylalanine. MALDI-TOF-MS end group analysis confirmed that the amino acid monomers were thermally stable under the melt polymerization condition. The mechanism of melt process and the kinetics of the polycondensation were studied by model reactions and it was found that the amino acid monomer was very special in the sense that their ester and urethane functionality could be selectively reacted by polymerization temperature or catalyst. The new polymers were self-organized as β-sheet in aqueous or organic solvents and their thermal properties such as glass transition temperature and crystallinity could be readily varied using different l-amino acid monomers or diols in the feed. Thus, the current investigation opens up new platform of research activates for making thermally stable and renewable engineering thermoplastics from natural resource amino acids. PMID:22713137

  17. Bioorganometallic Chemistry, Part 15. A novel molecular recognition process of host, trans-[Cp*Rh({eta}{sup 1}(N3)-1-methylcytosine)({mu}-OH)]{sub 2} (OTf){sub 2}, with l-aromatic amino acid guests: selective hydrogen bonding to the {mu}-OH groups and the 1-methylcytosine ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Elduque, Anabel; Carmona, Daniel; Oro, Luis; Eisenstein, Miriam; Fish, Richard H.

    2002-11-01

    The {sup 1}H-NMR and computer docking experiments have elucidated a novel molecular recognition process of host, trans-[Cp*Rh({eta}{sup 1}(Ne)-1-methylcytosine)({mu}-OH)]{sub 2}(OTf){sub 2} (1), with L-aromatic amino acids, which is predicated on a selective hydrogen bonding regime of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} of the amino acid to one of the Rh-{mu}-OH groups, as well as to a C{double_bond}O group of one of the other 1-methycytosine ligands, while the COO{sup -} H-bonds to an NH{sub 2} of the other 1-methycytosine ligand.

  18. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  19. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  20. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  1. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  2. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  3. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  4. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  5. d-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  6. D-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-06-25

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  7. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  8. Physiological Adaptation to the Loss of Amino Acid Transport Ability

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, Ruth M.; Ogilvie-Villa, Susan

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Neurospora crassa devoid of constitutive amino acid transport ability can utilize arginine as the sole nitrogen source. Nitrogen starvation, presence of arginine, and mutational inactivation of the general permease are key factors in signaling production of an extracellular enzyme which removes the alpha-amino group from the amino acid. PMID:6214547

  9. Influence of Top-Down and Bottom-Up Manipulations on the R-BT065 Subcluster of β-Proteobacteria, an Abundant Group in Bacterioplankton of a Freshwater Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Šimek, Karel; Horňák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Mašín, Michal; Nedoma, Jiří; Gasol, Josep M.; Schauer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of nutrient availability and protistan grazing on bacterial dynamics and community composition (BCC) in different parts of the canyon-shaped Římov reservoir (Czech Republic). The effects of protistan grazing on BCC were examined using a size fractionation approach. Water from the dam area with only bacteria (<0.8 μm), bacteria and heterotrophic nanoflagellates (<5 μm), or whole water were incubated in situ inside dialysis bags. Top-down or predator manipulations (size fractionation) were also combined with bottom-up or resource manipulations, i.e., transplantation of samples to the middle and upper inflow parts of the reservoir with increased phosphorus availability. Significant genotypic shifts in BCC occurred with transplantation as indicated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Using different probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that 10 to 50% of total bacteria were members of the phylogenetically small cluster of β-proteobacteria (targeted with the probe R-BT065). These rod-shaped cells of very uniform size were vulnerable to predation but very fast growing and responded markedly to the different experimental manipulations. In all the grazer-free treatments, the members of the R-BT065 cluster showed the highest net growth rates of all studied bacterial groups. Moreover, their relative abundance was highly correlated with bacterial bulk parameters and proportions of bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) content. In contrast, increasing protistan bacterivory yielded lower proportions of R-BT065-positive and HNA bacteria substituted by increasing proportions of the class Actinobacteria, which profited from the enhanced protistan bacterivory. PMID:15870325

  10. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  11. Effect of amino acids on the toxicity of heavy metals to phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Kosakowska, A.; Falkowski, L.; Lewandowska, J.

    1988-04-01

    Sea water contains free amino acids in concentrations ranging from 20 to 100 ..mu..g dm/sup -3/. The most abundant representatives of this group of compounds in the surface water were found to be glycine, serine and ornithine. The amino acids are utilized in the phytoplankton cells as the source of nitrogen as well as carbon in the case of slow rate of photosynthesis. Heavy metals distribution in the sea water can be indispensable or delitorious for the organisms living in that environment depending on their concentration and speciation. The bioavailability as well as toxicity of the elements are strongly influenced by the organic matter dissolved in water. The effect of a number of organic compounds, including amino acids, on the toxicity of heavy metals was tested, but there were no reports elucidating compounds representing various types of structure. This paper deals with the effect of amino acids representing various structure groups on the toxicity of copper, cadmium and mercury against to Chlorella vulgaris and Anabeana variabilis.

  12. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method for the detection of cyclic β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Urajová, Petra; Hájek, Jan; Wahlsten, Matti; Jokela, Jouni; Galica, Tomáš; Fewer, David P; Kust, Andreja; Zapomělová-Kozlíková, Eliška; Delawská, Kateřina; Sivonen, Kaarina; Kopecký, Jiří; Hrouzek, Pavel

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial lipopeptides, which contain β-amino fatty acids, are an abundant group of bacterial secondary metabolites exhibiting antifungal and/or cytotoxic properties. Here we have developed an LC-HRMS/MS method for the selective detection of β-amino fatty acid containing cyclic lipopeptides. The method was optimized using the lipopeptides iturin A and puwainaphycin F, which contain fatty acids of similar length but differ in the amino acid composition of the peptide cycle. Fragmentation energies of 10-55eV were used to obtain the amino acid composition of the peptide macrocycle. However, fragmentation energies of 90-130eV were used to obtain an intense fragment specific for the β-amino fatty acid (CnH2n+2N(+)). The method allowed the number of carbons and consequently the length of the β-amino fatty acid to be estimated. We identified 21 puwainaphycin variants differing in fatty acid chain in the crude extract of cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum using this method. Analogously 11 iturin A variants were detected. The retention time of the lipopeptide variants showed a near perfect linear dependence (R(2)=0.9995) on the length of the fatty acid chain in linear separation gradient which simplified the detection of minor variants. We used the method to screen 240 cyanobacterial strains and identified lipopeptides from 8 strains. The HPLC-HRMS/MS method developed here provides a rapid and easy way to detecting novel variants of cyclic lipopeptides. PMID:26893022

  13. Exogenous amino acids as fuel in shock.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Kapadia, B; MacLean, L D

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that in shock branched-chain amino acids are preferentially oxidized resulting in continued proteolysis and stimulated gluconeogenesis. To determine if exogenous amino acids could be used as fuel in shock, dogs rendered hypotensive by controlled cardiac tamponade and normotensive controls were infused with amino acid mixtures and individual amino acids. When Nephramine, a mixture rich in branched-chain amino acids, was infused, plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose but urea output did not increase in either the control state or in shock, suggesting that these amino acids were not rapidly deaminated to serve as fuels. Travasol, which in addition contained large amounts of alanine and glycine, tripled urea output in the controls and doubled it in shock. The limit of urea production was reached in both groups at 35 mumoles urea/minute/kg. In the Travasol-infused animals plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were maintained in normotension but rose sharply in shock. When glycine alone was infused into five dogs in shock urea production rate was 30.6 + 2.1 mumoles/minute/kg; with alanine the same value was 22.5 + 2.2 mumoles/minute/kg. In both cases plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were high, suggesting that transport of these amino acids into the cell was slow in shock. In four dogs in shock glycine-14C was added to the glycine infusate as a tracer. At radioactive equilibrium 28% of the label infused appeared in CO2; another 22% appeared in glucose. It is concluded that of all the amino acids tested only glycine and alanine are deaminated rapidly enough to serve as exogenous fuels in shock. PMID:6814205

  14. Proteomic analysis of an unculturable bacterial endosymbiont (Blochmannia) reveals high abundance of chaperonins and biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongliang; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Wernegreen, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Many insect groups have coevolved with bacterial endosymbionts that live within specialized host cells. As a salient example, ants in the tribe Camponotini rely on Blochmannia, an intracellular bacterial mutualist that synthesizes amino acids and recycles nitrogen for the host. We performed a shotgun, label-free, LC/MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis to investigate the proteome of Blochmannia associated with Camponotus chromaiodes. We identified more than 330 Blochmannia proteins, or 54% coverage of the predicted proteome, as well as 244 Camponotus proteins. Using the average intensity of the top 3 “best flier” peptides along with spiking of a surrogate standard at a known concentration, we estimated the concentration (fmol/μg) of those proteins with confident identification. The estimated dynamic range of Blochmannia protein abundance spanned three orders of magnitude and covered diverse functional categories, with particularly high representation of metabolism, information transfer, and chaperones. GroEL, the most abundant protein, totaled 6% of Blochmannia protein abundance. Biosynthesis of essential amino acids, fatty acids, and nucleotides, and sulfate assimilation had disproportionately high coverage in the proteome, further supporting a nutritional role of the symbiosis. This first quantitative proteomic analysis of an ant endosymbiont illustrates a promising approach to study the functional basis of intimate symbioses. PMID:23205679

  15. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  16. Single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacidopathies are a group of rare and diverse disorders, caused by the deficiency of an enzyme or transporter involved in amino acid metabolism. For most aminoacidopathies, dietary management is the mainstay of treatment. Such treatment includes severe natural protein restriction, combined with protein substitution with all amino acids except the amino acids prior to the metabolic block and enriched with the amino acid that has become essential by the enzymatic defect. For some aminoacidopathies, supplementation of one or two amino acids, that have not become essential by the enzymatic defect, has been suggested. This so-called single amino acid supplementation can serve different treatment objectives, but evidence is limited. The aim of the present article is to provide a systematic review on the reasons for applications of single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies treated with natural protein restriction and synthetic amino acid mixtures. PMID:24422943

  17. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  18. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  19. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  20. Chemical constituents: water-soluble vitamins, free amino acids and sugar profile from Ganoderma adspersum.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma adspersum presents a rigid fruiting body owing to chitin content and having a small quantity of water or moisture. The utility of bioactive constituent of the mushroom can only be available by extraction for human usage. In this study, carbohydrate, water-soluble vitamin compositions and amino acid contents were determined in G. adspersum mushroom. The composition in individual sugars was determined by HPLC-RID, mannitol (13.04 g/100 g) and trehalose (10.27 g/100 g) being the most abundant sugars. The examination of water-soluble vitamins and free amino acid composition was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Essential amino acid constituted 67.79% of total amino acid, which is well worth the attention with regard to researchers and consumers. In addition, G. adspersum, which is also significantly rich in B group vitamins and vitamin C, can provide a wide range of notable applications in the pharmaceutics, cosmetics, food and dietary supplement industries. G. adspersum revealed its value for pharmacy and nutrition fields. PMID:25169839

  1. The immunogenicity of dinitrophenyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Frey, J R; de Weck, A L; Geleick, H; Lergier, W

    1969-11-01

    Numerous dinitrophenyl amino acid preparations injected intradermally induced contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene, delayed type skin reactions to DNP-amino acids, and anti-DNP antibodies in guinea pigs. Some DNP-amino adds induced precipitating anti-DNP antibodies in rabbits as well. Some of the DNP-ammo acids studied were regularly immunogenic, possible immunogenic impurities having been excluded by extensive purification procedures. Others were either constantly nonimmunogenic or irregularly immunogenic, e.g., their immunogenicity varying from one preparation lot to another. By means of extensive chemical analyses and the establishment of dose-response curves, we were able to demonstrate in most cases that the immunogenicity was not due to contamination with unreacted dinitrofluorobenzene or other DNP derivatives, to photodecomposition or other degradation products, or to DNP-protein contaminants. Nevertheless, the irregular immunogenicity of several DNP-amino acid preparations can only be explained by a highly immunogenic impurity (or impurities) which we were unable to detect analytically. The regular immunogenicity of some other DNP-amino acids (e.g. di-DNP-L-histidine) appears to be based on a "transconjugation" phenomenon, the DNP group being able to split off from its amino acid carrier and to conjugate secondarily with proteins in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, the interpretation of some recent data concerning the immunogenicity of low molecular weight hapten-amino acids may have to be reevaluated. PMID:4981513

  2. Amino acid composition of humic substances in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral amino acid fragments of humic and fulvic acid molecules from tundra soils have been identified and quantified. A significant weight fraction of amino acids has been found in humic acid preparations, which exceeds their content in fulvic acids. Features of the amino acid composition of humic substances along the soil profile and depending on the degree of hydromorphism and the proportions of different (neutral, basic, acidic, cyclic) groups in amino acids have been revealed. The molar ratio between the hydroxy and heterocyclic amino acids reflects the degree of humification of the soil.

  3. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  4. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Parker, E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    The recovery of meteorite fragments from the 2008 TC3 asteroid impact, collectively named Almahata Sitta, revealed a rare, anomalous polymict ureilite containing large carbonaceous grains (Jenniskens et al. 2009). Here we report the first amino acid analysis of a meteorite from an F-type asteroid as part of the Almahata Sitta meteorite sample analysis consortium. A single fragment (piece #4, 1.2 grams) was crushed to a powder, and separate 0.1 g aliquots of the same meteorite were carried through identical hot-water extraction, acid hydrolysis and desalting procedures at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine amino acid derivatives in the extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Analyses of the meteorite extracts revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 69 parts-per-billion (ppb). Glycine was the most abundant amino acid detected, however, since this protein amino acid is a common terrestrial contaminant, we are currently unable to rule out at least a partial terrestrial source. However, the D/L ratio of alanine in the meteorite was racemic, suggesting that very little terrestrial amino acid contamination. Several non-protein amino acids that are rare in the biosphere were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid (65 ± 8 ppb), D-isovaline (1.3 ± 0.1 ppb), L-isovaline (1.4 ± 0.1 ppb), and α-aminoisobutryic acid (7.1 ± 5.8 ppb). The abundance of isovaline and AIB are 1000 times lower than the abundances found in the CM2 meteorite Murchison while D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid is similar. The very low amino acid abundances and the presence of several amino acid decomposition products including methylamine, ethylamine, and isopropylamine are consistent with

  5. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  6. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  7. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550 C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached approx. 150 C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550 C. alpha-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures less than 550 C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed. Key Words: Amino acids-Exogenous delivery-Micrometeorites-Sublimation.

  8. Adsorption of amino acids by fullerenes and fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hideo; Hirata, Chika; Fujii, Kazuko; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of some amino acids and an oligopeptide by fullerene (C60) and fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs). C60 and FNWs hardly adsorbed amino acids. Most of the amino acids used have a hydrophobic side chain. Ala and Val, with an alkyl chain, were not adsorbed by the C60 or FNWs. Trp, Phe and Pro, with a cyclic structure, were not adsorbed by them either. The aromatic group of C60 did not interact with the side chain. The carboxyl or amino group, with the frame structure of an amino acid, has a positive or negative charge in solution. It is likely that the C60 and FNWs would not prefer the charged carboxyl or amino group. Tri-Ala was adsorbed slightly by the C60 and FNWs. The carboxyl or amino group is not close to the center of the methyl group of Tri-Ala. One of the methyl groups in Tri-Ala would interact with the aromatic structure of the C60 and FNWs. We compared our results with the theoretical interaction of 20 bio-amino acids with C60. The theoretical simulations showed the bonding distance between C60 and an amino acid and the dissociation energy. The dissociation energy was shown to increase in the order, Val < Phe < Pro < Asp < Ala < Trp < Tyr < Arg < Leu. However, the simulation was not consistent with our experimental results. The adsorption of albumin (a protein) by C60 showed the effect on the side chains of Try and Trp. The structure of albumin was changed a little by C60. In our study Try and Tyr were hardly adsorbed by C60 and FNWs. These amino acids did not show a different adsorption behavior compared with other amino acids. The adsorptive behavior of mono-amino acids might be different from that of polypeptides.

  9. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  10. Decarboxylative arylation of α-amino acids via photoredox catalysis: a one-step conversion of biomass to drug pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhiwei; MacMillan, David W C

    2014-04-01

    The direct decarboxylative arylation of α-amino acids has been achieved via visible light-mediated photoredox catalysis. This method offers rapid entry to prevalent benzylic amine architectures from an abundant biomass, specifically α-amino acid precursors. Significant substrate scope is observed with respect to both the amino acid and arene components. PMID:24712922

  11. Scalable synthesis of the unusual amino acid segment (ADMOA unit) of marine anti-inflammatory peptide: solomonamide A.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Nerella; Chandrasekhar, Srivari

    2015-06-14

    The most abundantly available hexose sugar, d-glucose has been converted to protected 4-amino(2'amino-4'-hydroxy phenyl)-3,5-dihydroxy-2-methyl-6-oxo hexanoic acid (protected ADMOA, 3), the unusual amino acid present in marine natural product solomonamide A in gram quantities involving easy to operate chemical transformations. PMID:25960353

  12. General Synthesis of Amino Acid Salts from Amino Alcohols and Basic Water Liberating H2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2016-05-18

    An atom-economical and environmentally friendly method to transform amino alcohols to amino acid salts using just basic water, without the need of pre-protection or added oxidant, catalyzed by a ruthenium pincer complex, is developed. Water is the solvent, the source of the oxygen atom of the carboxylic acid group, and the actual oxidant, with liberation of dihydrogen. Many important and useful natural and unnatural amino acid salts can be produced in excellent yields by applying this new method. PMID:27139983

  13. Synthesis of amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Rachel K; Khan, Tanweer A; Olsen, David B; Sleebs, Brad E

    2016-06-14

    Aspartyl proteases are important pharmacological targets. Historically aspartyl proteases have been commonly targeted with transition state derived peptidomimetics. The strategy to develop aspartyl protease inhibitors has undertaken a dramatic paradigm shift in the last 10 years. The pharmaceutical industry in 2005 disclosed several scaffolds or "head groups" that prompted the field to move beyond peptidomimetic derived inhibitors. Since the discovery of the first amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitor, the amino hydantoin, industry and academia have positioned themselves for a foothold on the new molecular space, designing a variety of related "head groups". Both the design and synthetic efforts involved in constructing these scaffolds are varied and complex. Here we highlight the synthetic strategies used to access these amino heterocycle scaffolds. PMID:27143279

  14. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  15. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  16. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  17. General and modular synthesis of isomeric 5-substituted pyridin-2-yl and 6-substituted pyridin-3-yl C-ribonucleosides bearing diverse alkyl, aryl, hetaryl, amino, carbamoyl, and hydroxy groups.

    PubMed

    Štefko, Martin; Slavětínská, Lenka; Klepetářová, Blanka; Hocek, Michal

    2011-08-19

    A general modular and practical methodology for preparation of diverse 5-substituted pyridin-2-yl and 6-substituted pyridin-3-yl C-ribonucleosides was developed. Regioselective lithiation of 2,5-dibromopyridine proceeded at position 5 or 2 depending on the solvent, and the resulting bromopyridyl lithium species underwent additions to TBS-protected ribonolactone and follow-up transformations to corresponding acetylated hemiketal intermediates 7 and 10 that were diastereoselectively reduced to give either 5-bromopyridin-2-yl or 6-bromopyridin-3-yl silyl-protected C-ribonucleosides 8 or 11 in 68% and 77% overall yields as pure β-anomers. These bromopyridyl C-nucleoside intermediates were then subjected to a series of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, aminations, aminocarbonylations, and hydroxylations to give a series of protected 1β-(5-alkyl-, 5-aryl-, 5-amino-, 5-carbamoyl-, and 5-hydroxypyridin-2-yl)-C-ribonucleosides 13a-i and β-(6-alkyl-, 6-aryl-, 6-amino-, 6-carbamoyl-, and 6-hydroxypyridin-3-yl)-C-ribonucleosides 15a-i. Deprotection of silylated nucleosides by Et(3)N·3HF, TBAF, or TFA gave a series of free C-nucleosides 14a-i and 16a-i. PMID:21739971

  18. Sources and fate of amino sugars in coastal Peruvian sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, Jutta; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2006-05-01

    Amino sugars are involved in the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles and comprise a geochemically significant fraction of marine organic material (OM). However, information on abundance and distribution of these compounds in marine sediments is scarce. Three sediment cores (<50 cm) from the coastal region off Peru were investigated for concentrations of glucosamine (GlcN), galactosamine (GalN), mannosamine (ManN), and muramic acid (Mur). The sum of the four amino sugars accounted for 1.0-2.4% of organic carbon and 1.9-3.8% of nitrogen in the sediments. At the shallowest (102 m) and the deepest site (1278 m), carbon-normalized concentrations decreased down-core, suggesting preferential degradation of amino sugars compared to bulk sedimentary OM. At the site from the center of the oxygen minimum zone (238 m), amino sugar concentrations were high throughout the core, pointing to enhanced preservation of amino sugars under anoxic conditions. GlcN (44-56 mol%) and GalN (33-42 mol%) were the dominant amino sugars in all investigated samples, while ManN (6-14 mol%) and Mur (1-4 mol%) were significantly less abundant. Mur was predominantly associated with cell wall remains rather than with living bacteria, since bacterial abundances estimated based on Mur concentrations were up to 500 times higher than cell counts reported for sediments from this area. GlcN/GalN-ratios (1.1-1.7) indicated that chitin, a polymer of GlcN, was not a major contributor to the amino sugar pool of the investigated sediments. Furthermore, GlcN/Mur-ratios (13-68) are inconsistent with a predominant contribution of intact peptidoglycan, which exhibits a 1:1-ratio. The present study includes a compilation of previously published information on distribution and abundance of amino sugars in the marine environment. Both concentrations and ratios observed in the Peruvian sediments fall in the range of values reported for OM in water column and sediments from different oceanic regions and water depths

  19. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  20. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  1. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  2. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  3. Final report on the safety assessment of amino nitrophenols as used in hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Christina L; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Alan Andersen, F

    2009-01-01

    2-Amino-3-nitrophenol, 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, 2-amino-5-nitrophenol, 4-amino-3-nitrophenol, 4-amino-2-nitrophenol, 2-amino-4-nitrophenol sulfate, 3-nitro-p-hydroxyethylaminophenol, and 4-hydroxypropylamino-3-nitrophenol are substituted aromatic compounds used as semipermanent (nonoxidative) hair colorants and as toners in permanent (oxidative) hair dye products. All ingredients in this group except 2-amino-4-nitrophenol sulfate, 2-amino-5-nitrophenol, and 4-amino-2-nitrophenol have reported uses in cosmetics at use concentrations from 2% to 9%. The available toxicity studies for these amino nitrophenol hair dyes did not suggest safety concerns except for the potential carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of 4-amino-2-nitrophenol. 2-Amino-3-nitrophenol, 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, 2-amino-4-nitrophenol sulfate, 2-amino-5-nitrophenol, 4-amino-3-nitrophenol, 3-nitro-p-hydroxyethylaminophenol, and 4-hydroxypropylamino-3-nitrophenol are safe as hair dye ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment, but the data are insufficient to make a safety determination for 4-amino-2-nitrophenol. PMID:20086194

  4. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  5. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  6. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  7. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. PMID:27511635

  8. Amino Acid Mean Excitation Energies and Directional Dependencies from Core and Bond Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-12-08

    We determine the mean excitation energies of several amino acids using a Bragg Rule developed for molecular fragments or functional groups. As the composition of the amino acids is very similar, we find that the amino acids have similar mean excitation energies (approximately 70 eV). Differences arise from variation of the side chains (-R); addition of-CH2-groups decreases the mean excitation energy. We also speculate concerning the directional dependence of the amino acid mean excitation energies.

  9. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  10. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  11. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    PubMed

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  12. Telomerization of amino acids with butadiene, catalyzed by palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Fakhretdinov, R.N.; Telin, A.G.

    1987-01-10

    The telomerization of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, ..gamma..-, and epsilon-amino acids having various structures with butadiene under the influence of the three-component palladium catalyst Pd(acac)/sub 2/-PPh/sub 3/-AlEt/sub 3/ was investigated in DMSO-toluene solution. The ..cap alpha..- and epsilon-aliphatic and also the ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-aromatic amino acids react with butadiene, giving the products from octadienylation at the amino group exclusively. Under the conditions of telomerization aliphatic ..beta..-amino acids are cleaved with the formation of unsaturated tertiary amines. In the case of aliphatic ..gamma..-amino acids it is possible to obtain telomers alkylated at the carbonyl group.

  13. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  14. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  15. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  16. Variability in the carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in plant proteins from different sources: 1 Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Anthony H; Kruger, Nicholas J; Hedges, Robert E M; McCullagh, James S O

    2016-05-01

    The natural carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids from plant leaf proteins has been measured to establish potential sources of variability. The plant leaves studied, taken from a range of plant groups (forbs, trees, grasses, and freshwater aquatic plants), showed no significant influence of either season or environment (water and light availability) on their Δδ(13)C values. Plant groups did, however, differ in carbon isotope composition, although no consistent differences were identified at the species level. A discriminant analysis model was constructed which allowed leaves from (1) nettles, (2) Pooideae, (3) other Poales, (4) trees and (5) freshwater higher plants to be distinguished from each other on the basis of their natural abundance (13)C/(12)C ratios of individual amino acids. Differences in carbon isotope composition are known to be retained, to some extent, in the tissues of their consumers, and hence an understanding of compound-specific variation in (13)C/(12)C fractional abundance in plants has the potential to provide dietary insights of value in archaeological and ecological studies. PMID:26948983

  17. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  18. Proteomic analysis of amino acid metabolism differences between wild and cultivated Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hang; Liu, Fangbing; Sun, Liwei; Liu, Jianzeng; Wang, Manying; Chen, Xuenan; Xu, Xiaohao; Ma, Rui; Feng, Kai; Jiang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to compare the relative abundance of proteins and amino acid metabolites to explore the mechanisms underlying the difference between wild and cultivated ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) at the amino acid level. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation were used to identify the differential abundance of proteins between wild and cultivated ginseng. Total amino acids in wild and cultivated ginseng were compared using an automated amino acid analyzer. The activities of amino acid metabolism-related enzymes and the contents of intermediate metabolites between wild and cultivated ginseng were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and spectrophotometric methods. Results Our results showed that the contents of 14 types of amino acids were higher in wild ginseng compared with cultivated ginseng. The amino acid metabolism-related enzymes and their derivatives, such as glutamate decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine, all had high levels of accumulation in wild ginseng. The accumulation of sulfur amino acid synthesis-related proteins, such as methionine synthase, was also higher in wild ginseng. In addition, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle-related enzymes as well as their intermediates had high levels of accumulation in wild ginseng. Conclusion This study elucidates the differences in amino acids between wild and cultivated ginseng. These results will provide a reference for further studies on the medicinal functions of wild ginseng. PMID:27158231

  19. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  20. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  1. Identification of β-phenylalanine as a non-protein amino acid in cultivated rice, Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Yokoo, Takayuki; Takata, Ryo; Yan, Jian; Matsumoto, Fuka; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Okumoto, Yutaka; Jander, Georg; Mori, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein amino acids, often analogs of the standard 20 protein amino acids, have been discovered in many plant species. Recent research with cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) identified (3R)-β-tyrosine, as well as a tyrosine amino mutase that synthesizes (3R)-β-tyrosine from the protein amino acid (2S)-α-tyrosine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assays and comparison to an authentic standard showed that β-phenylalanine is also a relatively abundant non-protein amino acid in rice leaves and that its biosynthesis occurs independently from that of β-tyrosine. PMID:27066169

  2. Amino Acid-β-Naphthylamide Hydrolysis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylamidase

    PubMed Central

    Riley, P. S.; Behal, Francis J.

    1971-01-01

    The intracellular and constitutive arylamidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was purified 528-fold by salt fractionation, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and adsorption chromatography. This enzyme hydrolyzed basic and neutral N-terminal amino acid residues from amino-β-naphthylamides, dipeptide-β-naphthylamides, and a variety of polypeptides. Only those substrates having an l-amino acid with an unsubstituted α-amino group as the N-terminal residue were susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. The molecular weight was estimated to be 71,000 daltons. The lowest Km values were associated with substrates having neutral or basic amino acid residues with large side chains with no substitution or branching on the β carbon atom. Images PMID:5001871

  3. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  4. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  5. Nature’s Starships. II. Simulating the Synthesis of Amino Acids in Meteorite Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Pearce, Ben K. D.

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are known for having high water and organic material contents, including amino acids. Here we address the origin of amino acids in the warm interiors of their parent bodies (planetesimals) within a few million years of their formation, and we connect this with the astrochemistry of their natal protostellar disks. We compute both the total amino acid abundance pattern and the relative frequencies of amino acids within the CM2 (e.g., Murchison) and CR2 chondrite subclasses based on Strecker reactions within these bodies. We match the relative frequencies to well within an order of magnitude among both CM2 and CR2 meteorites for parent body temperatures <200°C. These temperatures agree with 3D models of young planetesimal interiors. We find theoretical abundances of approximately 7 × 105 parts per billion, which is in agreement with the average observed abundance in CR2 meteorites of (4 ± 7) × 105, but an order of magnitude higher than the average observed abundance in CM2 meteorites of (2 ± 2) × 104. We find that the production of hydroxy acids could be favored over the production of amino acids within certain meteorite parent bodies (e.g., CI1, CM2) but not others (e.g., CR2). This could be due to the relatively lower NH3 abundances within CI1 and CM2 meteorite parent bodies, which leads to less amino acid synthesis. We also find that the water content in planetesimals is likely to be the main cause of variance between carbonaceous chondrites of the same subclass. We propose that amino acid abundances are primarily dependent on the ammonia and water content of planetesimals that are formed in chemically distinct regions within their natal protostellar disks.

  6. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the Parent Body of CI Type Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bota, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that beta-alanine, glycine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from approx. 600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other alpha-amino acids such as alanine, alpha-ABA, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (less than 200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L 1) alanine and beta-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Free amino acid composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit (pulp and peel) and jam.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Casal, Susana; Andrade, Paula B; Seabra, Rosa M; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2004-03-10

    Twenty-one free amino acids present in several samples of quince fruit (pulp and peel) and quince jam (homemade and industrially manufactured) were analyzed by GC/FID. The analyses showed some differences between quince pulps and peels. Generally, the highest content in total free amino acids and in glycine was found in peels. As a general rule, the three major free amino acids detected in pulps were aspartic acid, asparagine, and hydroxyproline. For quince peels, usually, the three most abundant amino acids were glycine, aspartic acid, and asparagine. Similarly, for quince jams the most important free amino acids were aspartic acid, asparagine, and glycine or hydroxyproline. This study suggests that the free amino acid analysis can be useful for the evaluation of quince jam authenticity. It seems that glycine percentage can be used for the detection of quince peel addition while high alanine content can be related to pear addition. PMID:14995121

  8. Glycinergic-Fipronil Uptake Is Mediated by an Amino Acid Carrier System and Induces the Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in Ricinus communis Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Chuan-Wei; Yu, Ai-Xin; Liu, Niu; Chen, Li; Lin, Fei; Xu, Han-Hong

    2016-05-18

    Phloem-mobile insecticides are efficient for piercing and sucking insect control. Introduction of sugar or amino acid groups to the parent compound can improve the phloem mobility of insecticides, so a glycinergic-fipronil conjugate (GlyF), 2-(3-(3-cyano-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-4-((trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-yl)ureido) acetic acid, was designed and synthesized. Although the "Kleier model" predicted that this conjugate is not phloem mobile, GlyF can be continually detected during a 5 h collection of Ricinus communis phloem sap. Furthermore, an R. communis seedling cotyledon disk uptake experiment demonstrates that the uptake of GlyF is sensitive to pH, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), temperature, and p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (pCMBS) and is likely mediated by amino acid carrier system. To explore the roles of amino acid transporters (AATs) in GlyF uptake, a total of 62 AAT genes were identified from the R. communis genome in silico. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AATs in R. communis were organized into the ATF (amino acid transporter) and APC (amino acid, polyaminem and choline transporter) superfamilies, with five subfamilies in ATF and two in APC. Furthermore, the expression profiles of 20 abundantly expressed AATs (cycle threshold (Ct) values <27) were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 h after GlyF treatment by RT-qPCR. The results demonstrated that expression levels of four AAT genes, RcLHT6, RcANT15, RcProT2, and RcCAT2, were induced by the GlyF treatment in R. communis seedlings. On the basis of the observation that the expression profile of the four candidate genes is similar to the time course observation for GlyF foliar disk uptake, it is suggested that those four genes are possible candidates involved in the uptake of GlyF. These results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of GlyF uptake as well as phloem loading from a molecular biology perspective and facilitate functional

  9. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3 prime end of the human gene

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, A.M.; Renges, H.H.; Xu, Chunfang; Peacock, R.; Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.; Laxer, G. ); Brasseur, R. ); Tikkanen, M.J. ); Buetler, R. ); Saha, N. ); Hamsten, A. ); Rosseneu, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4,311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. The authors have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions - or both of them combined - could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine{sub 4311} plus leucine{sub 2,712} representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine{sub 4,311} plus proline{sub 2,712} the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu{sub 2,712}/Ser{sub 4,311} allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. They have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2,712 and 4,311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene.

  10. Microfluidics in amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2007-07-01

    Microfluidic devices have been widely used to derivatize, separate, and detect amino acids employing many different strategies. Virtually zero-dead volume interconnections and fast mass transfer in small volume microchannels enable dramatic increases in on-chip derivatization reaction speed, while only minute amounts of sample and reagent are needed. Due to short channel path, fast subsecond separations can be carried out. With sophisticated miniaturized detectors, the whole analytical process can be integrated on one platform. This article reviews developments of lab-on-chip technology in amino acid analysis, it shows important design features such as sample preconcentration, precolumn and postcolumn amino acid derivatization, and unlabeled and labeled amino acid detection with focus on advanced designs. The review also describes important biomedical and space exploration applications of amino acid analysis on microfluidic devices. PMID:17542043

  11. Abundant type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the hippocampus of mouse Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    He, Xue Ying; Wen, Guang Yeong; Merz, George; Lin, Dawei; Yang, Ying Zi; Mehta, Penkaj; Schulz, Horst; Yang, Song Yu

    2002-02-28

    A full-length cDNA of mouse type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD10) was cloned from brain, representing the accurate nucleotide sequence information that rendered possible an accurate deduction of the amino acid sequence of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of sequences and three-dimensional models of this enzyme revealed that structures previously reported by other groups carry either a truncated or mutated amino-terminal sequence. Fusion of the first 11 residues of the wild-type enzyme to the green fluorescent protein directed the reporter protein into mitochondria. Thus, the N-terminus was identified as a mitochondrial targeting signal that accounts for the intracellular localization of the mouse enzyme. This enzyme is normally associated with mitochondria, not with the endoplasmic reticulum as suggested by its trivial name 'endoplasmic reticulum-associated amyloid-beta biding protein (ERAB)'. After its C-terminal region was used to raise rabbit anti-17 betaHSD10 antibodies, immunogold electron microscopy showed that an abundance of this enzyme could be found in hippocampal synaptic mitochondria of betaAPP transgenic mice, but not in normal controls. High levels of this enzyme may disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in synapses and contribute to synapse loss in the hippocampus of the mouse Alzheimer's disease model. PMID:11869808

  12. Regulation of renal amino acid transporters during metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moret, Caroline; Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Jiang, Jean X; Verrey, Francois; Wagner, Carsten A

    2007-02-01

    The kidney plays a major role in acid-base homeostasis by adapting the excretion of acid equivalents to dietary intake and metabolism. Urinary acid excretion is mediated by the secretion of protons and titratable acids, particularly ammonia. NH(3) is synthesized in proximal tubule cells from glutamine taken up via specific amino acid transporters. We tested whether kidney amino acid transporters are regulated in mice in which metabolic acidosis was induced with NH(4)Cl. Blood gas and urine analysis confirmed metabolic acidosis. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantify the mRNAs of 16 amino acid transporters. The mRNA of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was quantified as positive control for the regulation and that of GAPDH, as internal standard. In acidosis, the mRNA of kidney system N amino acid transporter SNAT3 (SLC38A3/SN1) showed a strong induction similar to that of PEPCK, whereas all other tested mRNAs encoding glutamine or glutamate transporters were unchanged or reduced in abundance. At the protein level, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increased abundance of SNAT3 and reduced expression of the basolateral cationic amino acid/neutral amino acid exchanger subunit y(+)-LAT1 (SLC7A7). SNAT3 was localized to the basolateral membrane of the late proximal tubule S3 segment in control animals, whereas its expression was extended to the earlier S2 segment of the proximal tubule during acidosis. Our results suggest that the selective regulation of SNAT3 and y(+)LAT1 expression may serve a major role in the renal adaptation to acid secretion and thus for systemic acid-base balance. PMID:17003226

  13. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  14. Designing amino acids to determine the local conformations of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A W

    1994-01-01

    The local conformations of proteins and peptides are determined by the amino acid sequence. However, the 20 amino acids encoded by the genome allow the peptide backbone to fold into many conformations, so that even for a small peptide it becomes very difficult to predict the three-dimensional structure. By using empirical conformational energy calculations, a set of amino acids has been designed that would be expected to constrain the conformation of a peptide or a protein to one or two local minima. Most of these amino acids are based on asymmetric substitutions at the C alpha atom of each residue. The H alpha atom of alanine was replaced by various groups: -OCH3, -NCH3, -SCH3, -CONH2, -CONHCH3, -CON(CH3)2, -NH.CO.CH3, -phenyl, or -o-(OCH3)phenyl. Several of these new amino acids are predicted to fold into unique peptide conformations such as right-handed alpha-helical, left-handed alpha-helical, or extended. In an attempt to produce an amino acid that favored the C(eq)7 conformation (torsion angles: phi = -70 degrees and psi = +70 degrees), an extra amide group was added to the C beta atom of the asparagine side chain. Conformationally restricted amino acids of this type could prove useful for developing new peptide pharmaceuticals, catalysts, or polymers. Images PMID:8146170

  15. Microbial contributions to C and N dynamics in decaying litter elucidated by amino acid and amino sugar analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobara, S.; Osono, T.; Noro, K.; Hirota, M.; Benner, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    There is still much to be revealed about carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in terrestrial soil systems. The objectives of this study were to identify molecular changes in composition during plant litter decomposition and gain insights about microbial contributions to C and N dynamics in decaying litter. Litter bag experiments with three plant species, Miscanthus sinensis, Pinus densiflora and Quercus crispula, were conducted for three years, and the concentrations of C, N, amino acids and amino sugars were determined at various times during the experiments. Mass loss (AFDW) ranged from 66-90% for the plant tissues. The weight %C remained fairly constant, whereas the weight %N increased throughout the study indicating N immobilization was occurring. The percentages of C as amino acids and amino sugars also increased throughout the study suggesting these biomolecules were largely of microbial origin. The increasing yields of amino acids and amino sugars were inversely related to overall C loss from the litter material. As microorganisms degraded the plant litter they left behind molecular signatures that were useful predictors of the extent of overall degradation. The C/N ratio of litter decreased throughout the study and was inversely related to galactosamine yields. The glucosamine/galactosamine (GlcN/GalN) ratio gradually declined to values near 2 by the end of the study. Galactoasamine is more abundant in bacteria than fungi, and the declining GlcN/GalN ratio suggest the relative contributions of bacterial to litter C and N increased relative to contributions from fungi. A cluster analysis of 0- and 36-month litters based on amino acid and amino sugar composition showed that 0-month litters of three plant species were separated from 36-month litters, suggesting common diagenetic pathways during decomposition irrespective of plant species. The microbial decomposers contribute to N immobilization and their contributions to the C and N content of litter increases

  16. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3' end of the human gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Alison M.; Renges, Helmut-H.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Peacock, Rachel; Brasseur, Robert; Laxer, Gerald; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Bütler, Réné; Saha, N.; Hamsten, Anders; Rosseneu, Maryvonne; Talmud, Philippa; Humphries, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. We have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions–or both of them combined–could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine4311 plus leucine2712 representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine4311 plus proline2712 the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu2712/Ser4311 allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. However, these differences are of smaller effect than those associated with the XbaI RFLP of the apo B gene in this sample. We have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2712 and 4311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. In addition, there is strong linkage disequilibrium with allelic association between the alleles of these sites and those of the XbaI RFLP in all the populations examined. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:1370364

  17. Addition reaction of methyl cinnamate with 2-amino-4- nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Rakhman Wibowo, Fajar; Pranoto; Robingatun Isnaeni, Siti; Ratna Kumala Sari, Meiyanti; Handayani, Sekar

    2016-02-01

    A novel compound which have one N-H fragment and nitrophenyl group has been designed and synthesized from cinnamaldehyde. The reaction was conducted in 3 step reactions to give the final product. Firstly, cinnamaldehyde was converted into cinnamic acid, which was then esterified with methyl alcohol to obtained methyl cinnamate. The last step was the addition reaction between methyl cinnamate and 2-amino-4-nitrophenol to give a cinnamaldehyde derivative, namely methyl-3-(2-hidroksi-5-nitrophenyl amino)-3- phenylpropanoate.

  18. Influence of edge on predator prey distribution and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Steven H.

    2004-03-01

    I investigated the effect of spatial configuration on distribution and abundance of invertebrate trophic groups by counting soil arthropods under boxes (21 × 9.5 cm) arranged in six different patterns that varied in the amount of edge (137-305 cm). I predicted fewer individuals from the consumer trophic group (Collembola) in box groups with greater amount of edge. This prediction was based on the assumption that predators (mites, ants, spiders, centipedes) select edge during foraging and thereby reduce abundance of the less mobile consumer group under box patterns with greater edge. Consumer abundance (Collembola) was not correlated with amount of edge. Among the predator groups, mite, ant and centipede abundance related to the amount of edge of box groups. However, in contrast to predictions, abundance of these predators was negatively correlated with amount of edge in box patterns. All Collembola predators, with the exception of ants, were less clumped in distribution than Collembola. The results are inconsistent with the view that predators used box edges to predate the less mobile consumer trophic group. Alternative explanations for the spatial patterns other than predator-prey relations include (1) a negative relationship between edge and moisture, (2) a positive relationship between edge and detritus decomposition (i.e. mycelium as food for the consumer group), and (3) a negative relationship between edge and the interstices between adjacent boxes. Landscape patterns likely affect microclimate, food, and predator-prey relations and, therefore, future experimental designs need to control these factors individually to distinguish among alternative hypotheses.

  19. Evidence from Meteorites for Multiple Possible Amino Acid Alphabets for the Origins of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A key question for the origins of life is understanding which amino acids made up the first proteins synthesized during the origins of life. The canonical set of 20 - 22 amino acids used in proteins are all alpha-amino, alpha-hydrogen isomers that, nevertheless, show considerable variability in properties including size, hydrophobicity, and ionizability. Abiotic amino acid synthesis experiments such as Miller-Urey spark discharge reactions produce a set of up to 23 amino acids, depending on starting materials and reaction conditions, with significant abundances of both alpha- and non-alpha-amino acid isomers. These two sets of amino acids do not completely overlap; of the 23 spark discharge amino acids, only 11 are used in modern proteins. Furthermore, because our understanding of conditions on the early Earth are limited, it is unclear which set(s) of conditions employed in spark discharge or hydrothermal reactions are correct, leaving us with significant uncertainty about the amino acid alphabet available for the origins of life on Earth. Meteorites, the surviving remnants of asteroids and comets that fall to the Earth, offer the potential to study authentic samples of naturally-occurring abiotic chemistry, and thus can provide an alternative approach to constraining the amino acid library during the origins of life.

  20. A Propensity for n-omega-Amino Acids in Thermally-Altered Antarctic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Martin, Mildred G.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are known to contain a wealth of indigenous organic molecules, including amino acids, which suggests that these meteorites could have been an important source of prebiotic organic material during the origins of life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. We report the detection of extraterrestrial amino acids in thermally-altered type 3 CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites and ureilites recovered from Antarctica. The amino acid concentrations of the thirteen Antarctic meteorites were generally less abundant than in more amino acid-rich CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites that experienced much lower temperature aqueous alteration on their parent bodies. In contrast to low-temperature aqueously-altered meteorites that show complete structural diversity in amino acids formed predominantly by Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis, the thermally-altered meteorites studied here are dominated by small, straight-chain, amine terminal (n-omega-amino) amino acids that are not consistent with Strecker formation. The carbon isotopic ratios of two extraterrestrial n-omega-amino acids measured in one of the CV chondrites are consistent with C-13-depletions observed previously in hydrocarbons produced by Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. The predominance of n-omega-amino acid isomers in thermally-altered meteorites hints at cosmochemical mechanisms for the preferential formation and preservation of a small subset of the possible amino acids.

  1. Amino-terminated diamond surfaces: Photoelectron emission and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di; Bandy, Jason A.; Li, Shuo; Hamers, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new approach to making stable negative electron-affinity diamond surfaces by terminating diamond with amino groups (also known as amine groups, -NH2). Previous studies have shown that negative electron affinity can be induced by terminating diamond surfaces with hydrogen, creating a surface dipole favorable toward electron emission. Here, we demonstrate that covalent tethering of positive charges in the form of protonated amino groups, -NH3+, also leads to negative electron affinity (NEA) and facile electron emission into vacuum and into water. Amino-terminated diamond was prepared using a very mild plasma discharge. Valence-band photoemission studies of the amino-terminated diamond samples show a characteristic "NEA" peak, demonstrating that the amino-terminated surface has NEA. Diamond's ability to emit electrons into water was evaluated using photochemical conversion of N2 to NH3. Time-resolved surface photovoltage studies were used to characterize charge separation at the diamond interface, and Mott-Schottky measurements were performed to characterize band-bending at the diamond-water interface. XPS studies show that the amino-terminated surfaces provide increased chemical resistance to oxidation compared with H-terminated diamond when illuminated with ultraviolet light.

  2. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  3. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  4. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  5. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  6. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Amino acid metabolism disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  7. Secondary organic aerosol-forming reactions of glyoxal with amino acids.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Smith, Kyle W; Stroik, Daniel R; Turley, Jacob J; Lee, Frances E; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Cordova, Kyle E; Ferrell, Grant R

    2009-04-15

    Glyoxal, the simplest and most abundant alpha-dicarbonyl compound in the atmosphere, is scavenged by clouds and aerosol, where it reacts with nucleophiles to form low-volatility products. Here we examine the reactions of glyoxal with five amino acids common in clouds. When glyoxal and glycine, serine, aspartic acid or ornithine are present at concentrations as low as 30/microM in evaporating aqueous droplets or bulk solutions, 1,3-disubstituted imidazoles are formed in irreversible second-order reactions detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In contrast, glyoxal reacts with arginine preferentially at side chain amino groups, forming nonaromatic five-membered rings. All reactions were accompanied by browning. The uptake of 45 ppb glyoxal by solid-phase glycine aerosol at 50% RH was also studied and found to cause particle growth and the production of imidazole measured by scanning mobility particle sizing and AMS, respectively, with a glyoxal uptake coefficient alpha = 0.0004. Comparison of reaction kinetics in bulk and in drying droplets shows that conversion of glyoxal dihydrate to monohydrate accelerates the reaction by over 3 orders of magnitude, allowing these reactions to occur at atmospheric conditions. PMID:19475956

  8. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  9. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  10. DeltapH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves: II. Evidence for Multiple Aliphatic, Neutral Amino Acid Symports.

    PubMed

    Li, Z C; Bush, D R

    1991-08-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent K(m) and K(i) values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the beta-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the alpha-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and

  11. The amino acid composition of the Sutter's Mill CM2 carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Jenniskens, Peter; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    We determined the abundances and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids in Sutter's Mill fragment #2 (designated SM2) recovered prior to heavy rains that fell April 25-26, 2012, and two other meteorite fragments, SM12 and SM51, that were recovered postrain. We also determined the abundance, enantiomeric, and isotopic compositions of amino acids in soil from the recovery site of fragment SM51. The three meteorite stones experienced terrestrial amino acid contamination, as evidenced by the low D/L ratios of several proteinogenic amino acids. The D/L ratios were higher in SM2 than in SM12 and SM51, consistent with rain introducing additional L-amino acid contaminants to SM12 and SM51. Higher percentages of glycine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid were observed in free form in SM2 and SM51 compared with the soil, suggesting that these free amino acids may be indigenous. Trace levels of D+L-β-aminoisobutyric acid (β-AIB) observed in all three meteorites are not easily explained as terrestrial contamination, as β-AIB is rare on Earth and was not detected in the soil. Bulk carbon and nitrogen and isotopic ratios of the SM samples and the soil also indicate terrestrial contamination, as does compound-specific isotopic analysis of the amino acids in the soil. The amino acid abundances in SM2, the most pristine SM meteorite analyzed here, are approximately 20-fold lower than in the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite. This may be due to thermal metamorphism in the Sutter's Mill parent body at temperatures greater than observed for other aqueously altered CM2 meteorites.

  12. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  13. Amino acid repletion does not decrease muscle protein catabolism during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dominic S C; Adeniyi, Oladipo; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Boivin, Michel A; McClelland, Sandra; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Morgan, Nancy; Gonzales, Lawrence; Wolfe, Robert; Ferrando, Arny

    2007-06-01

    Intradialytic protein catabolism is attributed to loss of amino acids in the dialysate. We investigated the effect of amino acid infusion during hemodialysis (HD) on muscle protein turnover and amino acid transport kinetics by using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine in eight patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjects were studied at baseline (pre-HD), 2 h of HD without amino acid infusion (HD-O), and 2 h of HD with amino acid infusion (HD+AA). Amino acid depletion during HD-O augmented the outward transport of amino acids from muscle into the vein. Increased delivery of amino acids to the leg during HD+AA facilitated the transport of amino acids from the artery into the intracellular compartment. Increase in muscle protein breakdown was more than the increase in synthesis during HD-O (46.7 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.001). Net balance (nmol.min(-1).100 ml (-1)) was more negative during HD-O compared with pre-HD (-33.7 +/- 1.5 vs. -6.0 +/- 2.3, P < 0.001). Despite an abundant supply of amino acids, the net balance (-16.9 +/- 1.8) did not switch from net release to net uptake. HD+AA induced a proportional increase in muscle protein synthesis and catabolism. Branched chain amino acid catabolism increased significantly from baseline during HD-O and did not decrease during HD+AA. Protein synthesis efficiency, the fraction of amino acid in the intracellular pool that is utilized for muscle protein synthesis decreased from 42.1% pre-HD to 33.7 and 32.6% during HD-O and HD+AA, respectively (P < 0.01). Thus amino acid repletion during HD increased muscle protein synthesis but did not decrease muscle protein breakdown. PMID:17264222

  14. Decomposition of Amino Diazeniumdiolates (NONOates): Molecular Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Nizamuddin; Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2014-08-23

    Although diazeniumdiolates (X[N(O)NO]-) are extensively used in biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological studies due to their ability to slowly release NO and/or its congeneric nitroxyl, the mechanisms of these processes remain obscure. In this work, we used a combination of spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational techniques to arrive at a qualitatively consistent molecular mechanism for decomposition of amino diazeniumdiolates (amino NONOates: R2N[N(O)NO]-, where R = -N(C2H5)2 (1), -N(C3H4NH2)2 (2), or -N(C2H4NH2)2 (3)). Decomposition of these NONOates is triggered by protonation of their [NN(O)NO]- group with apparent pKa and decomposition rate constants of 4.6 and 1 s-1 for 1-H, 3.5 and 83 x 10-3 s-1 for 2-H, and 3.8 and 3.3 x 10-3 s-1 for 3-H. Although protonation occurs mainly on the O atoms of the functional group, only the minor R2N(H)N(O)NO tautomer (population ~0.01%, for 1) undergoes the N-N heterolytic bond cleavage (k ~102 s-1 for 1) leading to amine and NO. Decompositions of protonated amino NONOates are strongly temperature-dependent; activation enthalpies are 20.4 and 19.4 kcal/mol for 1 and 2, respectively, which includes contributions from both the tautomerization and bond cleavage. The bond cleavage rates exhibit exceptional sensitivity to the nature of R substituents which strongly modulate activation entropy. At pH < 2, decompositions of all these NONOates are subject to additional acid catalysis that occurs through di-protonation of the [NN(O)NO]- group.

  15. Decomposition of amino diazeniumdiolates (NONOates): Molecular mechanisms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shaikh, Nizamuddin; Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2014-08-23

    Although diazeniumdiolates (X[N(O)NO]-) are extensively used in biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological studies due to their ability to release NO and/or its congeneric nitroxyl, the mechanisms of these processes remain obscure. In this work, we used a combination of spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational techniques to arrive at a quantitatively consistent molecular mechanism for decomposition of amino diazeniumdiolates (amino NONOates: R2N[N(O)NO]-, where R = —N(C2H5)2(1), —N(C3H4NH2)2(2), or —N(C2H4NH2)2(3)). Decomposition of these NONOates is triggered by protonation of their [NN(O)NO]- group with the apparent pKa and decomposition rate constants of 4.6 and 1 s-1 for 1; 3.5 and 0.083 s-1 for 2; andmore » 3.8 and 0.0033 s-1 for 3. Although protonation occurs mainly on the O atoms of the functional group, only the minor R2N(H)N(O)NO tautomer (population ~ 10-7, for 1) undergoes the N—N heterolytic bond cleavage (kd ~ 107 s-1 for 1) leading to amine and NO. Decompositions of protonated amino NONOates are strongly temperature-dependent; activation enthalpies are 20.4 and 19.4 kcal/mol for 1 and 2, respectively, which includes contributions from both the tautomerization and bond cleavage. Thus, the bond cleavage rates exhibit exceptional sensitivity to the nature of R substituents which strongly modulate activation entropy. At pH < 2, decompositions of all three NONOates that have been investigated are subject to additional acid catalysis that occurs through di-protonation of the [NN(O)NO]- group.« less

  16. Olfactory discrimination of amino acids in brown bullhead catfish.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Metelko, J; Ota, D; Pirc, V; Blejec, A

    2000-02-01

    Olfactory discrimination of amino acids was investigated in brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus). Based on the magnitude of the observed food search activity of catfish conditioned to single amino acids, the tested compounds were classified as being detected by the catfish as equal to, similar to, or different from the conditioned stimulus. L-Proline (L-Pro)-conditioned brown bullhead catfish discriminated all amino acids from L-Pro, but catfish conditioned to L-valine (L-Val) and L-isoleucine (L-Ile) did not discriminate L-Val from L-Ile nor L-Ile from L-Val; however, all other amino acids tested were always discriminated from these two compounds. Catfish conditioned to L-alanine (L-Ala) discriminated basic, acidic and several neutral amino acids with long side-chains (LCNs) from L-Ala; however, they did not always discriminate L-Ala from all neutral amino acids with short side-chains (SCNs). The L-norleucine (L-nLeu)-conditioned fish responded to L-norvaline (L-nVal), L-methionine (L-Met) and L-Ala similarly to L-nLeu, indicating that these amino acids are detected as similar or identical to L-nLeu. L-nLeu was, however, discriminated from L-Ala in L-Ala-conditioned catfish. Interestingly, L-leucine (L-Leu) was discriminated from the conditioned stimuli, L-Ala, L-Ile and L-Val, indicating independent receptors for L-Leu. Although conditioned catfish discriminated other amino acids from L-arginine hydrochloride (L-Arg), in some tests they were unable to discriminate L-Arg from L-lysine hydrochloride (L-Lys). These results imply the existence of independent olfactory receptive pathways for: (i) L-Pro; (ii) basic amino acids (L-Arg and L-Lys); (iii) L-Leu; (iv) other neutral amino acids with branched side-chains (L-Ile and L-Val); (v) neutral amino acids with long linear side-chains (L-nLeu, L-nVal and L-Met); (vi) neutral amino acids with short side-chains; and (vii) amino acids with sulfhydryl groups (L-Cys and L-homoCys). PMID:10667990

  17. Stereospecific cyclization strategies for α,ε-dihydroxy-β-amino esters: asymmetric syntheses of imino and amino sugars.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen G; Foster, Emma M; Lee, James A; Roberts, Paul M; Thomson, James E

    2014-10-17

    A range of biologically significant imino and amino sugars [1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-allitol, 3,6-dideoxy-3,6-imino-L-allonic acid, (3R,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-L-proline, 1,5-anhydro-4-deoxy-4-amino-D-glucitol, and 1,5-anhydro-4-deoxy-4-amino-L-iditol] has been prepared via stereospecific cyclization of α,ε-dihydroxy-β-amino esters. These substrates are readily prepared via conjugate addition of lithium (S)-N-benzyl-N-(α-methylbenzyl)amide to enantiopure α,β-unsaturated esters (β-substituted with cis- and trans-dioxolane units) coupled with in situ enolate oxidation with camphorsulfonyloxaziridine (CSO). Activation of the ε-hydroxyl group allowed cyclization to either the corresponding pyrrolidine or the tetrahydropyran scaffold, with the course of the cyclization process being dictated by the relative configuration of the dioxolane unit. When the α,ε-dihydroxy-β-amino ester bears a cis-dioxolane unit, cyclization occurs upon attack of the β-amino substituent to give the corresponding pyrrolidine after in situ N-debenzylation. In contrast, when the α,ε-dihydroxy-β-amino ester bears a trans-dioxolane unit, cyclization occurs upon attack of the α-hydroxyl substituent to give the corresponding tetrahydropyran. PMID:25203863

  18. Molecular cloning of mouse amino acid transport system B0, a neutral amino acid transporter related to Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Angelika; Klingel, Karin; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Rasko, John E J; Cavanaugh, Juleen; Bröer, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    Resorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine is mediated by transporters, which prefer groups of amino acids with similar physico-chemical properties. It is generally assumed that most neutral amino acids are transported across the apical membrane of epithelial cells by system B(0). Here we have characterized a novel member of the Na(+)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (B(0)AT1) isolated from mouse kidney, which shows all properties of system B(0). Flux experiments showed that the transporter is Na(+)-dependent, electrogenic, and actively transports most neutral amino acids but not anionic or cationic amino acids. Superfusion of mB(0)AT1-expressing oocytes with neutral amino acids generated inward currents, which were proportional to the fluxes observed with labeled amino acids. In situ hybridization showed strong expression in intestinal microvilli and in the proximal tubule of the kidney. Expression of mouse B(0)AT1 was restricted to kidney, intestine, and skin. It is generally assumed that mutations of the system B(0) transporter underlie autosomal recessive Hartnup disorder. In support of this notion mB(0)AT1 is located on mouse chromosome 13 in a region syntenic to human chromosome 5p15, the locus of Hartnup disorder. Thus, the human homologue of this transporter is an excellent functional and positional candidate for Hartnup disorder. PMID:15044460

  19. Metabolism of Vertebrate Amino Sugars with N-Glycolyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bergfeld, Anne K.; Pearce, Oliver M. T.; Diaz, Sandra L.; Pham, Tho; Varki, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    The two major mammalian sialic acids are N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). The only known biosynthetic pathway generating Neu5Gc is the conversion of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid into CMP-Neu5Gc, which is catalyzed by the CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase enzyme. Given the irreversible nature of this reaction, there must be pathways for elimination or degradation of Neu5Gc, which would allow animal cells to adjust Neu5Gc levels to their needs. Although humans are incapable of synthesizing Neu5Gc due to an inactivated CMAH gene, exogenous Neu5Gc from dietary sources can be metabolically incorporated into tissues in the face of an anti-Neu5Gc antibody response. However, the metabolic turnover of Neu5Gc, which apparently prevents human cells from continued accumulation of this immunoreactive sialic acid, has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we show that pre-loaded Neu5Gc is eliminated from human cells over time, and we propose a conceivable Neu5Gc-degrading pathway based on the well studied metabolism of N-acetylhexosamines. We demonstrate that murine tissue cytosolic extracts harbor the enzymatic machinery to sequentially convert Neu5Gc into N-glycolylmannosamine, N-glycolylglucosamine, and N-glycolylglucosamine 6-phosphate, whereupon irreversible de-N-glycolylation of the latter results in the ubiquitous metabolites glycolate and glucosamine 6-phosphate. We substantiate this finding by demonstrating activity of recombinant human enzymes in vitro and by studying the fate of radiolabeled pathway intermediates in cultured human cells, suggesting that this pathway likely occurs in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed degradative pathway is partially reversible, showing that N-glycolylmannosamine and N-glycolylglucosamine (but not glycolate) can serve as precursors for biosynthesis of endogenous Neu5Gc. PMID:22692205

  20. [Interaction of heparin with amino group-containing materials].

    PubMed

    Nemets, E A; Kasatov, D A; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the glass surface immobilized aminogroups nature and the experiments conditions on the interactions between heparin and aminogroups containing surface was studied using total internal reflections fluorescence. It was shown, that the nature of the terminating aminogroup, but not its mobility or the amount of the aminogroups in the main chain, is the major factor influencing the heparin adsorbtion from individual solution. Both the nature of terminating aminogroup and its mobility determine heparin adsorption on the aminogroups containing surfaces from the blood plasma proteins containing solution. Heparin irreversibly adsorbed from individual solution is not replaced by blood plasma proteins. The tertiary aminogroups containing surface adsorbs maximal quantity of the heparin. PMID:11766264

  1. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  2. High Abundance of Ions in Cosmic Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Water-rich, mixed molecular ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout interstellar molecular clouds and the Solar System. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation and particle bombardment of these abiotic ices produces complex organic species, including important biogenic molecules such as amino acids and functionalized PAHs which may have played a role in the origin of life. This ability of such water-rich, oxygen dominated ices to promote production of complex organic species is surprising and points to an important, unusual, but previously overlooked mechanism at play within the ice. Here we report the nature of this mechanism using electronic spectroscopy. VUV-irradiation of PAH/H2O ices leads to an unprecedented and efficient (greater than 70 %) conversion of the neutral PAHs to their cation form (PAH+). Further, these H2O/PAH+ ices are stabile at temperatures below 50 K, a temperature domain common throughout interstellar clouds and the Solar System. Between 50 and 125 K they react to form the complex organics. In view of this, we conclude that charged PAHs and other molecular ions should be common and abundant in many cosmic ices. The chemical, spectroscopic and physical properties of these ion-rich ices can be of fundamental importance for objects as diverse as comets, planets, and molecular clouds and may account for several poorly understood phenomena associated with each of these object classes.

  3. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  4. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  5. D-Amino acid metabolism in mammals: biosynthesis, degradation and analytical aspects of the metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Ohide, Hiroko; Miyoshi, Yurika; Maruyama, Rindo; Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi

    2011-11-01

    It was believed for long time that d-amino acids are not present in mammals. However, current technological advances and improvements in analytical instruments have enabled studies that now indicate that significant amounts of D-amino acids are present in mammals. The most abundant D-amino acids are D-serine and D-aspartate. D-Serine, which is synthesized by serine racemase and is degraded by D-amino-acid oxidase, is present in the brain and modulates neurotransmission. D-Aspartate, which is synthesized by aspartate racemase and degraded by D-aspartate oxidase, is present in the neuroendocrine and endocrine tissues and testis. It regulates the synthesis and secretion of hormones and spermatogenesis. D-Serine and D-aspartate bind to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors and function as a coagonist and agonist, respectively. The enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these D-amino acids are associated with neural diseases where the NMDA receptors are involved. Knockout mice for serine racemase and D-aspartate oxidase have been generated, and natural mutations in the d-amino-acid oxidase gene are present in mice and rats. These mutant animals display altered behaviors caused by enhanced or decreased NMDA receptor activity. In this article, we review currently available studies on D-amino acid metabolism in mammals and discuss analytical methods used to assay activity of amino acid racemases and D-amino-acid oxidases. PMID:21757409

  6. Summary and implications of reported amino acid concentrations in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Shock, E.L.; Schulte, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    A study of literature reports of the concentrations of amino acids in extracts from the Murchison meteorite shows that many of the concentration ratios are constant. There are two possible interpretations of these ratios. One is that they are controlled by the pathways through which the amino acids formed, from which it follows that the amino acids are distributed in the same proportions throughout the meteorite. The other interpretation is that the ratios result from the analytical procedures used to extract the amino acids from the meteorite. These methods rely heavily on high-temperature (100{degree}C) aqueous extraction and subsequent high-temperature acid hydrolysis. A correlation was observed in the present study between the relative concentrations of several amino acids in the meteorite extracts and their relative aqueous solubilities at 100{degree}C. The extract solutions are dilute, and far from the saturation limits, but these correlations suggest that the sampling procedure affects directly the reported concentrations for these amino acids. If the extraction process does not bias the results, and all extractable amino acids are removed from meteorite samples, then the properties of amino acids which control both their solubilities and their concentrations in the meteorite need to be established. The possibility of sampling bias needs to be tested experimentally before concluding that extraction is complete, and that the constant relative abundances indicate that the relative concentrations of amino acids are homogeneous in the meteorite.

  7. Abundance Inequality in Freshwater Communities Has an Ecological Origin.

    PubMed

    Passy, Sophia I

    2016-04-01

    The hollow-shaped species abundance distribution (SAD) and its allied rank abundance distribution (RAD)-showing that abundance is unevenly distributed among species-are some of the most studied patterns in ecology. To explain the nature of abundance inequality, I developed a novel framework identifying environmental favorability, which controls the balance between reproduction and immigration, as the ultimate source and species stress tolerance as a proximate factor. Thus, under harsh conditions, only a few tolerant species can reproduce, while some sensitive species can be present in low numbers due to chance immigration. This would lead to high abundance inequality between the two groups of species. Under benign conditions, both groups can reproduce and give rise to higher abundance equality. To test these ideas, I examined the variability in the parameters of a Poisson lognormal fit of the SAD and a square root fit of the RAD in diatom and fish communities across US streams. Indeed, as environmental favorability increased, more sensitive forms were able to establish large populations, diminishing the abundance disparity between locally common and rare species. Finally, it was demonstrated that in diatoms, the RAD belonged to the same family of relationships as those of population density with body size and regional distribution. PMID:27028078

  8. Parent Body Influences on Amino Acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Herd, C. D. K.

    2010-01-01

    The Tagish Lake meteorite is a primitive C2 carbonaceous chondrite with a mineralogy, oxygen isotope, and bulk chemical. However, in contrast to many CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, the Tagish Lake meteorite was reported to have only trace levels of indigenous amino acids, with evidence for terrestrial L-amino acid contamination from the Tagish Lake meltwater. The lack of indigenous amino acids in Tagish Lake suggested that they were either destroyed during parent body alteration processes and/or the Tagish Lake meteorite originated on a chemically distinct parent body from CI and CM meteorites where formation of amino acids was less favorable. We recently measured the amino acid composition of three different lithologies (11h, 5b, and 11i) of pristine Tagish Lake meteorite fragments that represent a range of progressive aqueous alteration in order 11h < 5b < 11i as inferred from the mineralogy, petrology, bulk isotopes, and insoluble organic matter structure. The distribution and enantiomeric abundances of the one- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids found in hot-water extracts of the Tagish Lake fragments were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detection and time of flight mass spectrometry coupled with OPA/NAC derivatization. Stable carbon isotope analyses of the most abundant amino acids in 11h were measured with gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

  9. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1995-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of 15 April 1994 to 15 April 1995.

  10. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  11. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  12. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  13. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  14. Plasma amino-acid patterns in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M Y; Marshall, A W; Milsom, J P; Sherlock, S

    1982-01-01

    Plasma amino-acid concentrations were measured in 167 patients with liver disease of varying aetiology and severity, all free of encephalopathy, and the results compared with those in 57 control subjects matched for age and sex. In the four groups of patients with chronic liver disease (26 patients with chronic active hepatitis, 23 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 11 with cryptogenic cirrhosis, and 48 with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis) plasma concentrations of methionine were significantly increased, while concentrations of the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. In the first three groups of patients plasma concentrations of aspartate, serine, and one or both of the aromatic amino-acids tyrosine and phenylalanine were also significantly increased, while in the patients with alcoholic hepatitis +/- cirrhosis plasma concentrations of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were significantly reduced. In the three groups of patients with minimal, potentially reversible liver disease (31 patients with alcoholic fatty liver, 10 with viral hepatitis, and 18 with biliary disease) plasma concentrations of proline and the three branched chain amino-acids were significantly reduced. Patients with alcoholic fatty liver also showed significantly reduced plasma phenylalanine values. Most changes in plasma amino-acid concentrations in patients with chronic liver disease may be explained on the basis of impaired hepatic function, portal-systemic shunting of blood, and hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglucagonaemia. The changes in patients with minimal liver disease are less easily explained. PMID:7076013

  15. Genome Economization in the Endosymbiont of the Wood Roach Cryptocercus punctulatus Due to Drastic Loss of Amino Acid Synthesis Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Alexander; Latorre, Amparo; Peretó, Juli; Silva, Francisco J.; Pignatelli, Miguel; Moya, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Cockroaches (Blattaria: Dictyoptera) harbor the endosymbiont Blattabacterium sp. in their abdominal fat body. This endosymbiont is involved in nitrogen recycling and amino acid provision to its host. In this study, the genome of Blattabacterium sp. of Cryptocercus punctulatus (BCpu) was sequenced and compared with those of the symbionts of Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana, BBge and BPam, respectively. The BCpu genome consists of a chromosome of 605.7 kb and a plasmid of 3.8 kb and is therefore approximately 31 kb smaller than the other two aforementioned genomes. The size reduction is due to the loss of 55 genes, 23 of which belong to biosynthetic pathways for amino acids. The pathways for the production of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine/threonine/valine, methionine, and cysteine have been completely lost. Additionally, the genes for the enzymes catalyzing the last steps of arginine and lysine biosynthesis, argH and lysA, were found to be missing and pseudogenized, respectively. These gene losses render BCpu auxotrophic for nine amino acids more than those corresponding to BBge and BPam. BCpu has also lost capacities for sulfate reduction, production of heme groups, as well as genes for several other unlinked metabolic processes, and genes present in BBge and BPam in duplicates. Amino acids and cofactors that are not synthesized by BCpu are either produced in abundance by hindgut microbiota or are provisioned via a copious diet of dampwood colonized by putrefying microbiota, supplying host and Blattabacterium symbiont with the necessary nutrients and thus permitting genome economization of BCpu. PMID:22094859

  16. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  17. Intravenous lipid and amino acids briskly increase plasma glucose concentrations in small premature infants.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Finley, S L; Ogata, E S

    1988-07-01

    We determined the glycemic response to intravenous lipid infusion alone, lipid with amino acids, or amino acids alone in 15 very small premature infants receiving constant glucose infusion during early life. Infants who received lipid or lipid and amino acids demonstrated significant increases in glucose compared with infants who received amino acids. The combination of lipid and amino acids resulted in an earlier increase than lipid alone. Although plasma insulin did not change in all three groups, infants who received amino acids alone demonstrated an appropriate increase in glucagon. These data suggest that lipid infusion, a commonly used means of providing nutrition to premature infants, may cause significant disturbances in glucoregulation, particularly when administered with amino acids. PMID:3132930

  18. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  19. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145492

  20. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  1. Heterogeneous distributions of amino acids provide evidence of multiple sources within the Almahata Sitta parent body, asteroid 2008 TC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2011-11-01

    Two new fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite and a sample of sand from the related strewn field in the Nubian Desert, Sudan, were analyzed for two to six carbon aliphatic primary amino acids by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with UV-fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FT/ToF-MS). The distribution of amino acids in fragment #25, an H5 ordinary chondrite, and fragment #27, a polymict ureilite, were compared with results from the previously analyzed fragment #4, also a polymict ureilite. All three meteorite fragments contain 180-270 parts-per-billion (ppb) of amino acids, roughly 1000-fold lower than the total amino acid abundance of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. All of the Almahata Sitta fragments analyzed have amino acid distributions that differ from the Nubian Desert sand, which primarily contains L-α-amino acids. In addition, the meteorites contain several amino acids that were not detected in the sand, indicating that many of the amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. Despite their petrological differences, meteorite fragments #25 and #27 contain similar amino acid compositions; however, the distribution of amino acids in fragment #27 was distinct from those in fragment #4, even though both are polymict ureilites from the same parent body. Unlike in CM2 and CR2/3 meteorites, there are low relative abundances of α-amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite fragments, which suggest that Strecker-type chemistry was not a significant amino acid formation mechanism. Given the high temperatures that asteroid 2008 TC3 appears to have experienced and lack of evidence for aqueous alteration on the asteroid, it is possible that the extraterrestrial amino acids detected in Almahata Sitta were formed by Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions at elevated temperatures.

  2. Seeding the Pregenetic Earth: Meteoritic Abundances of Nucleobases and Potential Reaction Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Ben K. D.; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2015-07-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a class of meteorite known for having high contents of water and organics. In this study, the abundances of the nucleobases, i.e., the building blocks of RNA and DNA, found in carbonaceous chondrites are collated from a variety of published data and compared across various meteorite classes. An extensive review of abiotic chemical reactions producing nucleobases is then performed. These reactions are then reduced to a list of 15 individual reaction pathways that could potentially occur within meteorite parent bodies. The nucleobases guanine, adenine, and uracil are found in carbonaceous chondrites in amounts of 1–500 ppb. It is currently unknown which reaction is responsible for their synthesis within the meteorite parent bodies. One class of carbonaceous meteorite dominates the abundances of both amino acids and nucleobases—the so-called CM2 (e.g., Murchison meteorite). CR2 meteorites (e.g., Graves Nunataks) also dominate the abundances of amino acids, but are the least abundant in nucleobases. The abundances of total nucleobases in these two classes are 330 ± 250 and 16 ± 13 ppb, respectively. Guanine most often has the greatest abundances in carbonaceous chondrites with respect to the other nucleobases, but is 1–2 orders of magnitude less abundant in CM2 meteorites than glycine (the most abundant amino acid). Our survey of the reaction mechanisms for nucleobase formation suggests that Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (i.e., CO, H2, and NH3 gases reacting in the presence of a catalyst such as alumina or silica) is the most likely candidate for conditions that characterize the early states of planetesimals.

  3. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  4. SoyProLow: A protein database enriched in low abundant soybean proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolan, Mona; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Matthews, Benjamin F; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2014-01-01

    Soybeans are an important legume crop that contain 2 major storage proteins, β-conglycinin and glycinin, which account about 70- 80% of total seed proteins. These abundant proteins hinder the isolation and characterization of several low abundant proteins in soybean seeds. Several protein extraction methodologies were developed in our laboratory to decrease these abundant storage proteins in seed extracts and to also decrease the amount of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), which is normally very abundant in leaf extracts. One of the extraction methodologies used 40% isopropanol and was more effective in depleting soybean storage proteins and enhancing low abundant seed proteins than similar methods using 10-80% isopropanol. Extractions performed with 40% isopropanol decreased the amount of storage proteins and revealed 107 low abundant proteins when using the combined approaches of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and Mass Spectrometry (MS). The separation of proteins was achieved by iso-electric focusing (IEF) and 2D-PAGE. The proteins were analyzed with MS techniques to provide amino acid sequence. The proteins were identified by comparing their amino acid sequences with those in different databases including NCBI-non redundant, UniprotKB and MSDB databases. In this investigation, previously published results on low abundant soybean seed proteins were used to create an online database (SoyProLow) to provide a data repository that can be used as a reference to identify and characterize low abundance proteins. This database is freely accessible to individuals using similar techniques and can be for the subsequent genetic manipulation to produce value added soybean traits. An intuitive user interface based on dynamic HTML enables users to browse the network and the profiles of the low abundant proteins. Availability http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/Soybean_low_abundance_proteins_2D_Gel_DB/Gel1.aspx PMID:25352730

  5. Molecular basis of essential amino acid transport from studies of insect nutrient amino acid transporters of the SLC6 family (NAT-SLC6)

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two protein families that represent major components of essential amino acid transport in insects have been identified. They are annotated as the SLC6 and SLC7 families of transporters according to phylogenetic proximity to characterized amino acid transporters (HUGO nomenclature). Members of these families have been identified as important apical and basolateral parts of transepithelial essential amino acid absorption in the metazoan alimentary canal. Synergistically, they play critical physiological roles as essential substrate providers to diverse metabolic processes, including generic protein synthesis. This review briefly clarifies the requirements for amino acid transport and a variety of amino acid transport mechanisms, including the aforementioned families. Further it focuses on the large group of Nutrient Amino acid Transporters (NATs), which comprise a recently identified subfamily of the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter family (NSS or SLC6). The first insect NAT, cloned from the caterpillar gut, has a broad substrate spectrum similar to mammalian B0 transporters. Several new NAT-SLC6 members have been characterized in an effort to explore mechanisms for the essential amino acid absorption in model dipteran insects. The identification and functional characterization of new B0-like and narrow specificity transporters of essential amino acids in fruit fly and mosquitoes leads to a fundamentally important insight: that NATs evolved and act together as the integrated active core of a transport network that mediates active alimentary absorption and systemic distribution of essential amino acids. This role of NATs is projected from the most primitive prokaryotes to the most complex metazoan organisms, and represents an interesting platform for unraveling the molecular evolution of amino acid transport and modeling amino acid transport disorders. The comparative study of NATs elucidates important adaptive differences between essential amino acid transportomes

  6. Combinatorics of aliphatic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Grützmann, Konrad; Böcker, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This study combines biology and mathematics, showing that a relatively simple question from molecular biology can lead to complicated mathematics. The question is how to calculate the number of theoretically possible aliphatic amino acids as a function of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain. The presented calculation is based on earlier results from theoretical chemistry concerning alkyl compounds. Mathematical properties of this number series are highlighted. We discuss which of the theoretically possible structures really occur in living organisms, such as leucine and isoleucine with a chain length of four. This is done both for a strict definition of aliphatic amino acids only involving carbon and hydrogen atoms in their side chain and for a less strict definition allowing sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen atoms. While the main focus is on proteinogenic amino acids, we also give several examples of non-proteinogenic aliphatic amino acids, playing a role, for instance, in signalling. The results are in agreement with a general phenomenon found in biology: Usually, only a small number of molecules are chosen as building blocks to assemble an inconceivable number of different macromolecules as proteins. Thus, natural biological complexity arises from the multifarious combination of building blocks. PMID:21120449

  7. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Arylation of α-Amino Acids via the Merger of Photoredox and Nickel Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhiwei; Cong, Huan; Li, Wei; Choi, Junwon; Fu, Gregory C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetric decarboxylative Csp3–Csp2 cross-coupling has been achieved via the synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis. This mild, operationally simple protocol transforms a wide variety of naturally abundant α-amino acids and readily available aryl halides into valuable chiral benzylic amines in high enantiomeric excess, thereby producing motifs found in pharmacologically active agents. PMID:26849354

  8. Stellar abundances in the solar neighborhood: The Hypatia Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Timmes, F.X.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.; Turnbull, Margaret C.

    2014-09-01

    We compile spectroscopic abundance data from 84 literature sources for 50 elements across 3058 stars in the solar neighborhood, within 150 pc of the Sun, to produce the Hypatia Catalog. We evaluate the variability of the spread in abundance measurements reported for the same star by different surveys. We also explore the likely association of the star within the Galactic disk, the corresponding observation and abundance determination methods for all catalogs in Hypatia, the influence of specific catalogs on the overall abundance trends, and the effect of normalizing all abundances to the same solar scale. The resulting stellar abundance determinations in the Hypatia Catalog are analyzed only for thin-disk stars with observations that are consistent between literature sources. As a result of our large data set, we find that the stars in the solar neighborhood may reveal an asymmetric abundance distribution, such that a [Fe/H]-rich group near the midplane is deficient in Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc II, Cr II, and Ni as compared to stars farther from the plane. The Hypatia Catalog has a wide number of applications, including exoplanet hosts, thick- and thin-disk stars, and stars with different kinematic properties.

  9. Synthesis and structural studies of amino amide salts derived from 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazole and α-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Montiel, Concepción; Tapia-Benavides, Antonio R.; Falcón-León, Martha; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Tlahuext, Hugo; Tlahuextl, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    2-{[(Ammoniumacetyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 4, 2-{[(2-ammoniumpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 5, and 2-{[(2-ammonium-3-phenylpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 6 amino amides were synthesized via condensation of 2AMBZ dihydrochloride with the corresponding amino acid. Compounds 7-12 were obtained by replacing chloride ions (in salts 4-6) with nitrate or tetrachlorozincate ions. The results of X-ray diffraction crystallographic studies indicated that the geometries, charges and sizes of the anions are essential for the formation of the strong hydrogen bond interactions of compounds 4, 5, 9-12. Moreover, in most cases, the presence of water and solvent molecules stabilizes the supramolecular structures of these compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicated that the presence of chloride or tetrachlorozincate anions increases the acidity of the benzimidazolic and amide groups more significantly than the presence of nitrate anions. However, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) computations of the crystal structures demonstrate that amino amides interact more strongly with NO3- than with Cl- and ZnCl42- anions; this difference explains the spectroscopic results.

  10. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  11. Reversible Oxygenation of α-Amino Acid–Cobalt(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xincun; Yue, Fan; Li, Hui; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Wen, Hongmei; Wang, Jide

    2016-01-01

    We systematically investigated the reversibility, time lapse, and oxygenation-deoxygenation properties of 15 natural α-amino acid–Co(II) complexes through UV-vis spectrophotometer, polarographic oxygen electrode, and DFT calculations, respectively, to explore the relationship between the coordinating structure and reversible oxygenation of α-amino acid–Co(II) complexes. Results revealed that the α-amino acid structure plays a key role in the reversible oxygenation properties of these complexes. The specific configuration of the α-amino acid group affects the eg1 electron of Co(II) transfer to the π⁎ orbit of O2; this phenomenon also favors the reversible formation and dissociation of Co–O2 bond when O2 coordinates with Co(II) complexes. Therefore, the co-coordination of amino and carboxyl groups is a determinant of Co complexes to absorb O2 reversibly. The group adjacent to the α-amino acid unit evidently influences the dioxygen affinity and antioxidation ability of the complexes. The presence of amino (or imino) and hydroxy groups adjacent to the α-amino acid group increases the oxygenation-deoxygenation rate and the number of reversible cycles. Our findings demonstrate a new mechanism to develop reversible oxygenation complexes and to reveal the oxygenation of oxygen carriers. PMID:27022316

  12. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  13. Inspiration from the mirror: D-amino acid containing peptides in biomedical approaches.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2016-06-01

    D-amino acids, the enantiomers of naturally abundant L-amino acids, bear unique stereochemistry properties that lead to the resistance towards most of the endogenous enzymes. Previous works have demonstrated applications of D-amino acids in therapeutic development with the aid of mirror-image phage display and retro-inverso peptide synthesis. In this review, we highlight the recent progress and challenges in the exploration of D-amino acids at the interface of chemistry and life science. First, we will introduce some progress made in traditional application of D-amino acids to enhance biostability of peptide therapeutics. Then, we discuss some works that explore the relatively underexplored interactions between the enzyme and D-amino acids and enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids. To highlight the enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids, we will describe several emerging works on the enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) and their potential application in selective anti-inflammatory or anticancer therapies. At the end, we briefly mention the challenges and possible future directions. PMID:27159920

  14. Amino Acid Transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1969-01-01

    Properties of the transport systems for amino acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated. Exogenous 14C-labeled amino acids were shown to equilibrate with the internal native amino acid pool prior to incorporation into protein. When added at low external concentrations, the majority of the amino acids examined entered the protein of the cell unaltered. The rates of amino acid transport, established at low concentrations with 18 commonly occurring amino acids, varied as much as 40-fold. The transport process became saturated at high external amino acid concentrations, was temperature-sensitive, and was inhibited by sodium azide and iodoacetamide. Intracellular to extracellular amino acid ratios of 100- to 300-fold were maintained during exponential growth of the population in a glucose minimal medium. When the medium became depleted of glucose, neither extracellular nor intracellular amino acids could be detected. PMID:4974392

  15. Energetic-particle abundances in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The abundances of elements and of He-3 in 90 solar electron events have been examined. It is found that the events fall into two distinct groups based upon their F/C ratio. Events in the F-rich group frequently have high He-3/He-4 ratios and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts in the parent flare. The F-poor events are associated with type IV bursts. These results on individual events support the conclusions of earlier work done with daily-averaged abundances.

  16. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  17. Surface abundances of OC supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Foschino, S.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.; Howarth, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Some O and B stars show unusually strong or weak lines of carbon and/or nitrogen. These objects are classified as OBN or OBC stars. It has recently been shown that nitrogen enrichment and carbon depletion are the most likely explanations for the existence of the ON class. Aims: We investigate OC stars (all being supergiants) to check that surface abundances are responsible for the observed anomalous line strengths. Methods: We perform a spectroscopic analysis of three OC supergiants using atmosphere models. A fourth star was previously studied by us. Our sample thus comprises all OC stars known to date in the Galaxy. We determine the stellar parameters and He, C, N, and O surface abundances. Results: We show that all stars have effective temperatures and surface gravities fully consistent with morphologically normal O supergiants. However, OC stars show little, if any, nitrogen enrichment and carbon surface abundances consistent with the initial composition. OC supergiants are thus barely chemically evolved, unlike morphologically normal O supergiants. Based on observations obtained at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 089.D-0975.

  18. Mechanisms of volatile production from non-sulfur amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Non-sulfur amino acid monomers were used to study the mechanisms of volatile production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only produced many volatiles but also increased the amounts of volatiles from non-sulfur amino acid monomers. The major reaction mechanisms involved in volatile production from each group of the amino acids by irradiation differ significantly. However, we speculate that the radiolysis of amino acid side chains were the major mechanism. In addition, Strecker degradation, especially the production of aldehydes from aliphatic group amino acids, and deamination, isomerization, decarboxylation, cyclic reaction and dehydrogenation of the initial radiolytic products were also contributed to the production of volatile compounds. Each amino acid monomers produced different odor characteristics, but the intensities of odor from all non-sulfur amino acid groups were very weak. This indicated that the contribution of volatiles produced from non-sulfur amino acids was minor. If the volatile compounds from non-sulfur amino acids, especially aldehydes, interact with other volatiles compounds such as sulfur compounds, however, they can contribute to the off-odor of irradiated meat significantly.

  19. Virulent Hessian fly larvae manipulate the free amino acid content of host wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Saltzmann, Kurt D; Giovanini, Marcelo P; Zheng, Cheng; Williams, Christie E

    2008-11-01

    Gall-forming insects induce host plants to form specialized structures (galls) that provide immature life stages of the insect access to host plant nutrients and protection from natural enemies. Feeding by larvae of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor Say) causes susceptible host wheat plants to produce a gall-like nutritive tissue that supports larval growth and development. To determine if changes in host plant free amino acid levels are associated with virulent Biotype L Hessian fly larval feeding, we quantified free amino acid levels in crown tissues of susceptible Newton wheat plants 1, 4, and 7 days after Hessian fly egg hatch. Hessian fly-infested susceptible plants were more responsive than resistant plants or uninfested controls, showing higher concentrations of alanine, glutamic acid, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and serine 4 days after egg hatch. This 4-day post-hatch time point corresponds to the maturation of nutritive tissue cells in susceptible plants and the onset of rapid larval growth. By 7 days after egg hatch, when virulent second instars are actively feeding on the contents of nutritive tissue cells, the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine were more abundant compared to uninfested controls, but the levels of other free amino acids were no longer elevated. Changes in free amino acid abundance described in this report were associated with increased levels of mRNA encoded by wheat genes involved in amino acid synthesis and transport. PMID:18841417

  20. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  1. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  2. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  3. Carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Blanford, G. E.; Keller, L. P.; Klock, W.; McKay, D. S.

    1993-04-01

    We have studied nineteen anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) using analytical electron microscopy. We have determined a method for quantitative light element EDX analysis of small particles and have applied these techniques to a group of IDPs. Our results show that some IDPs have significantly higher bulk carbon abundances than do carbonaceous chondrites. We have also identified a relationship between carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy in our set of anhydrous IDPs. In general, these particles are dominated by pyroxene, olivine, or a subequal mixture of olivine and pyroxene. The pyroxene-dominated IDPs have a higher carbon abundance than those dominated by olivines. Members of the mixed mineralogy IDPs can be grouped with either the pyroxene- or olivine-dominated particles based on their carbon abundance. The high carbon, pyroxene-dominated particles have primitive mineralogies and bulk compositions which show strong similarities to cometary dust particles. We believe that the lower carbon, olivine-dominated IDPs are probably derived from asteroids. Based on carbon abundances, the mixed-mineralogy group represents particles derived from either comets or asteroids. We believe that the high carbon, pyroxene-rich anhydrous IDPs are the best candidates for cometary dust.

  4. Formation of Meteoritic Amino Acids: Isovaline and its Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla; Dworkin, Jason

    It has been known for several decades that amino acids, and other complex organics, are found in meteorites. In particular, Murchison (CM) samples contain over seventy amino acids, these being identified by high-level chromatographic methods. Among Murchison's amino acids, isovaline stands out as being both non-biological (non-protein) and having a relatively high abundance. While approximately equal amounts of D- and L- isovaline have been reported in Murchison and other CM meteorites, this molecule's structure appears to prohibit its racemization in aqueous solutions. We recently have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of both isovaline and valine with an eye toward each molecule's formation, stability, and possible interconversions of their D and L enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovalineand valine-containing ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectral methods to assess both amino-acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied in the presence and in the absence of water-ice, and the destruction of both isovaline and valine was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have synthesized isovaline, valine, and their amino acid isomers by solid-phase radiation-chemical pathways other than the oft-invoked Strecker process. This presentation will review and summarize some of our recent findings and place them in a context of related work. - Our work has been supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Experiments were performed in the Cosmic Ice Laboratory (RLH, MHM) and the Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory (JPD) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  5. A Stable Heterocyclic Amino(phosphanylidene-σ(4) -phosphorane) Germylene.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Natalia; Baceiredo, Antoine; Saffon-Merceron, Nathalie; Hashizume, Daisuke; Lutters, Dennis; Müller, Thomas; Kato, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A new stable heterocyclic germylene, in which the divalent germanium atom lies between a nitrogen atom and a phosphanylidene phosphorane group, was synthesized. Experimental and theoretical studies revealed the peculiar effect of phosphanylidene phosphorane substituent, which is a stronger π-donor towards germanium than an amino group is. Because of the weak phosphorus-germanium π-bond, this new germylene compound shows an enhanced reactivity compared to classical N-heterocyclic germylenes. PMID:26954722

  6. Amino Acid Chemistry as a Link Between Small Solar System Bodies and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Botta, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Establishing chemical links between meteorites and small solar system bodies, such as comets and asteroids, provides a tool for investigating the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system. Carbonaceous meteorites are of particular interest, since they may have seeded the early Earth with a variety of prebiotic organic compounds including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines, which are thought to be necessary for the origin of life. Here we report the results of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analyses of the acid-hydrolyzed hot water extracts from pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna and the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray. We found that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna contained high abundances of beta-alanine and glycine, while only traces of other amino acids like alanine, alpha-amino-n-butryic acid (ABA) and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) were detected in these meteorites. Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine in Orgueil by gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry clearly indicate an extraterrestrial origin of these amino acids. The amino acid composition of Orgueil and Ivuna was strikingly different from the CM chondrites Murchison and Murray. The most notable difference was the high relative abundance of B-alanine in Orgueil and Ivuna compared to Murchison and Murray. Furthermore, AIB, which is one of the most abundant amino acids found in Murchison and Murray, was present in only trace amounts in Orgueil and Ivuna. Our amino acid data strongly suggest that the CI meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna came from a different type of parent body than the CM meteorites Murchison and Murray, possibly from an extinct comet. It is generally thought that carbonaceous meteorites are fragments of larger asteroidal bodies delivered via near Earth objects (NEO). Orbital and dynamic studies suggest that both fragments of main belt asteroids

  7. Highly specific olfactory receptor neurons for types of amino acids in the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Nikonov, Alexander A; Caprio, John

    2007-10-01

    Odorant specificity to l-alpha-amino acids was determined electrophysiologically for 93 single catfish olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) selected for their narrow excitatory molecular response range (EMRR) to only one type of amino acid (i.e., Group I units). These units were excited by either a basic amino acid, a neutral amino acid with a long side chain, or a neutral amino acid with a short side chain when tested at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M. Stimulus-induced inhibition, likely for contrast enhancement, was primarily observed in response to the types of amino acid stimuli different from that which activated a specific ORN. The high specificity of single Group I ORNs to type of amino acid was also previously observed for single Group I neurons in both the olfactory bulb and forebrain of the same species. These results indicate that for Group I neurons olfactory information concerning specific types of amino acids is processed from receptor neurons through mitral cells of the olfactory bulb to higher forebrain neurons without significant alteration in unit odorant specificity. PMID:17686913

  8. Amino acids in sheep production.

    PubMed

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs. PMID:26709661

  9. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  10. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  11. Origin of cosmic chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Umberto; Tescari, Edoardo

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, D, D+, H2, H_2^+, HD, HeH+), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman α absorbers at redshift z ≳ 2. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below ˜ 104 K, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/H] at redshifts z ˜ 2-7. Correlations between H I and H2 abundances show temporal and local variations and large spreads as a result of the increasing cosmic star formation activity from z ˜ 6 to 3. The scatter we find in the abundance ratios is compatible with the observational data and is explained by simultaneous enrichment by sources from different stellar phases or belonging to different stellar populations. Simulated synthetic spectra support the existence of metal-poor cold clumps with large optical depth at z ˜ 6 that could be potential Population III sites at low or intermediate redshift. The expected dust content is in line with recent determinations.

  12. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  13. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  14. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  15. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  16. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  17. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  18. Use of an Amino Acid Mixture in Treatment of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Bentovim, A.; Clayton, Barbara E.; Francis, Dorothy E. M.; Shepherd, Jean; Wolff, O. H.

    1970-01-01

    Twelve children with phenylketonuria diagnosed and treated from the first few weeks of life were grouped into pairs. Before the trial all of them were receiving a commercial preparation containing a protein hydrolysate low in phenylalanine (Cymogran, Allen and Hanburys Ltd.) as a substitute for natural protein. One of each pair was given an amino acid mixture instead of Cymogran for about 6 months. Use of the mixture involved considerable modification of the diet, and in particular the inclusion of greater amounts of phenylalanine-free foods. All six accepted the new mixture without difficulty, food problems were greatly reduced, parents welcomed the new preparation, and the quality of family life improved. Normal growth was maintained and with a mixture of l amino acids the plasma and urinary amino acid levels were normal. Further studies are needed before the mixture can be recommended for children under 20 months of age. PMID:5477678

  19. MP1 encodes an abundant and highly antigenic cell wall mannoprotein in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chan, C M; Lee, C; Wong, S S; Yuen, K Y

    1998-03-01

    We cloned the MP1 gene, which encodes an abundant antigenic cell wall mannoprotein from the dimorphic pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. MP1 is a unique gene without homologs in sequence databases. It codes for a protein, Mp1p, of 462 amino acid residues, with a few sequence features that are present in several cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. It contains two putative N glycosylation sites, a serine- and threonine-rich region for O glycosylation, a signal peptide, and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal sequence. Specific anti-Mp1p antibody was generated with recombinant Mp1p protein purified from Escherichia coli to allow further characterization of Mp1p. Western blot analysis with anti-Mp1p antibody revealed that Mp1p has predominant bands with molecular masses of 58 and 90 kDa and that it belongs to a group of cell wall proteins that can be readily removed from yeast cell surfaces by glucanase digestion. In addition, Mp1p is an abundant yeast glycoprotein and has high affinity for concanavalin A, a characteristic indicative of a mannoprotein. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis with immunogold staining indicated that Mp1p is present in the cell walls of the yeast, hyphae, and conidia of P. marneffei. Finally, it was observed that infected patients develop a specific antibody response against Mp1p, suggesting that this protein represents a good cell surface target for host humoral immunity. PMID:9488383

  20. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  1. An amino-imino resonance study of 2-amino-4-methylpyridinium nitrate and 2-amino-5-methylpyridinium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-Chen; Fan, Yu-Hua; Bi, Cai-Feng; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Zhong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of the amino and imino resonance forms to the ground-state structures of 2-amino-4-methylpyridinium nitrate, C(6)H(9)N(2)(+)·NO(3)(-), and the previously reported 2-amino-5-methylpyridinium nitrate [Yan, Fan, Bi, Zuo & Zhang (2012). Acta Cryst. E68, o2084], were studied using a combination of IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and density functional theory (DFT). The results show that the structures of 2-amino-4-methylpyridine and 2-amino-5-methylpyridine obtained upon protonation are best described as existing largely in the imino resonance forms. PMID:23282916

  2. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  3. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Amino acids as antioxidants for frying oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids, proteins and hydrolysates of proteins have been known to protect edible oils from oxidation. While amino acids and related materials have high potential as antioxidants for frying oil, effectiveness of each amino acid and mechanisms of their activities are not well understood yet. Propo...

  8. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) serves a key function in the digestion of dietary protein and absorption of amino acids. However, the GIT is also an important site of amino acid metabolism in the body. Methionine is an indispensable amino acid and must be supplied in the diet. In addition, consider...

  9. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra,more » and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.« less

  10. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.

  11. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our findings therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions. PMID:26658882

  12. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our findings therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions. PMID:26658882

  13. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar. PMID:24446756

  14. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  15. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine-histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  16. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  17. Amino­[(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)amino]­methaniminium 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaaban K.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Elremaily, Mahmoud A. A.; Ali, Ali. M.; Albayati, Mustafa R.

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C8H10N5 +·C7H7O3S−, consists of two amino­[(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)amino]­meth­an­im­inium cations and two 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate anions. The cations are each stabilized by intra­molecular N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the free amino groups and the imine N atoms of the benzimidazole units, forming S(6) ring motifs. In the crystal, cations and anions are linked by N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra­molecular framework. Two strong π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances = 3.4112 (14) and 3.4104 (14) Å] also occur between the centroids of the imidazole rings of like cations. PMID:24098229

  18. Amino acids and hydrocarbons approximately 3,800-Myr old in the Isua rocks, southwestern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, B.; Engel, M. H.; Zumberge, J. E.; Ogino, H.; Chang, S. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an analysis of amino acids and hydrocarbons found in the Isua banded iron formation, which contains the oldest known rocks on earth, are discussed. Similarities are pointed out between the relative amino acid abundances of the Isua rocks and those of lichens found on their surfaces, and a lack of substantial racemization indicated by the low D/L ratios in the 3800-million year old rock samples is noted. Experimental results showing the possibility of amino acid diffusion from lichens into the rocks are presented. Comparisons of the Isua rock amino acid D/L ratios with those reported for samples from other regions indicates that none of the Isua amino acids are older than a few tens of thousands to a few hundred thousand years. Analyses of the saturated hydrocarbons of the Isua samples reveals no odd carbon number preference, which may indicate antiquity, however laboratory experiments have shown that amino acids and aromatic and saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons could not have survived the metamorphic history of the Isua rocks. The evidence presented thus suggests that the amino acids and hydrocarbons found are not of the age of the sediments.

  19. Determination of amino acids in Chinese rice wine by fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Niu, Xiaoying; Yang, Danting; Ying, Yibin; Li, Bobin; Zhu, Geqing; Wu, Jian

    2010-09-01

    Chinese rice wine is abundant in amino acids. The possibility of quantitative detection of 16 free amino acids (aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, and arginine) in Chinese rice wine by Fourier transform near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was investigated for the first time in this study. A total of 98 samples from vintage 2007 rice wines with different aging times were analyzed by NIR spectroscopy in transmission mode. Calibration models were developed using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by postcolumn derivatization and diode array detection as a reference method. To validate the calibration models, full cross (leave-one-out) validation was employed. The results showed that the calibration statistics were good (rcal>0.94) for all amino acids except proline, histidine, and arginine. The correlation coefficient in cross validation (rcv) was >0.81 for 12 amino acids. The residual predictive deviation (RPD) value obtained was >1.5 in all amino acids except proline and arginine, and it was >2.0 in 6 amino acids. The results obtained in this study indicated that NIR spectroscopy could be used as an easy, rapid, and novel tool to quantitatively predict free amino acids in Chinese rice wine without sophisticated methods. PMID:20707307

  20. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  1. Sugar amino acids in designing new molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti; Srinivasu, Pothukanuri; Tapadar, Subhasish; Mohan, Bajjuri Krishna

    2005-03-01

    Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks and using them to create 'nature-like' and yet unnatural organic molecules. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. This article describes some of our works on various sugar amino acids and many other related building blocks, like furan amino acids, pyrrole amino acids etc. used in wide-ranging peptidomimetic studies. PMID:16133829

  2. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, β-alanine, 2-methylalanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, β-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  3. Polyimides containing pendent trifluoromethyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havens, S. J.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Several new polyimides containing trifluoromethyl groups were prepared from the reaction of various aromatic dianhydrides and two new diamines containing trifluoromethyl groups, 4,4'-bis(3-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenoxy)biphenyl and l,4-bis(3-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenoxy)benzene. The diamines were prepared from the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of the disodium salts of 4,4'-biphenol or hydroquinone with 3,5-dinitrobenzotrifluoride followed by hydrogenation of the resultant dinitro compounds. The thermally cured polyimides exhibited glass transition temperatures between 186 and 262 C. By thermogravimetric analysis, the polyimides exhibited 5 percent weight losses at 484-527 C in nitrogen and 452-506 C in air.

  4. Abundance patterns in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard B. C.

    1990-06-01

    Abundances of He, N, O, and Ne have been uniformly calculated for 192 planetary nebulas residing in the Galactic disk and halo, the LMC, the SMC, and M31. Direct correlations appear to exist for type I as well as non-type I objects for the following pairs of parameters: N/O-He/H, N/O-N/H, and Ne/H-O/H. Separately, type I planetaries show a weak anticorrelation between N/O and O/H, while non-type I's exhibit direct correlations between N/H and O/H and between N/O and O/H. From these patterns, it is inferred that non-type I's synthesize N via the CN cycle. Type I planetaries, on the other hand, manufacture N at least partially via the ON cycle, destroying O in the process. Neither type appears to synthesize O or Ne.

  5. Review: Taurine: A “very essential” amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is an organic osmolyte involved in cell volume regulation, and provides a substrate for the formation of bile salts. It plays a role in the modulation of intracellular free calcium concentration, and although it is one of the few amino acids not incorporated into proteins, taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the brain, retina, muscle tissue, and organs throughout the body. Taurine serves a wide variety of functions in the central nervous system, from development to cytoprotection, and taurine deficiency is associated with cardiomyopathy, renal dysfunction, developmental abnormalities, and severe damage to retinal neurons. All ocular tissues contain taurine, and quantitative analysis of ocular tissue extracts of the rat eye revealed that taurine was the most abundant amino acid in the retina, vitreous, lens, cornea, iris, and ciliary body. In the retina, taurine is critical for photoreceptor development and acts as a cytoprotectant against stress-related neuronal damage and other pathological conditions. Despite its many functional properties, however, the cellular and biochemical mechanisms mediating the actions of taurine are not fully known. Nevertheless, considering its broad distribution, its many cytoprotective attributes, and its functional significance in cell development, nutrition, and survival, taurine is undoubtedly one of the most essential substances in the body. Interestingly, taurine satisfies many of the criteria considered essential for inclusion in the inventory of neurotransmitters, but evidence of a taurine-specific receptor has yet to be identified in the vertebrate nervous system. In this report, we present a broad overview of the functional properties of taurine, some of the consequences of taurine deficiency, and the results of studies in animal models suggesting that taurine may play a therapeutic role in the management of epilepsy and diabetes. PMID:23170060

  6. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  7. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  8. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Valine, leucine and isoleucine form the small group of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) classified by their small branched hydrocarbon residues. Unlike animals, plants are able to de novo synthesize these amino acids from pyruvate, 2-oxobutanoate and acetyl-CoA. In plants, biosynthesis follows the typical reaction pathways established for the formation of these amino acids in microorganisms. Val and Ile are synthesized in two parallel pathways using a single set of enzymes. The pathway to Leu branches of from the final intermediate of Val biosynthesis. The formation of this amino acid requires a three-step pathway generating a 2-oxoacid elongated by a methylene group. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae, a homologous three-step pathway is also involved in Met chain elongation required for the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates, an important class of specialized metabolites in Brassicaceae. This is a prime example for the evolutionary relationship of pathways from primary and specialized metabolism. Similar to animals, plants also have the ability to degrade BCAAs. The importance of BCAA turnover has long been unclear, but now it seems apparent that the breakdown process might by relevant under certain environmental conditions. In this review, I summarize the current knowledge about BCAA metabolism, its regulation and its particular features in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:22303262

  9. Amino acid-containing membrane lipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Otto; González-Silva, Napoleón; López-Lara, Isabel M; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the bacterial model organism Escherichia coli only the three major membrane lipids phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin occur, all of which belong to the glycerophospholipids. The amino acid-containing phosphatidylserine is a major lipid in eukaryotic membranes but in most bacteria it occurs only as a minor biosynthetic intermediate. In some bacteria, the anionic glycerophospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin can be decorated with aminoacyl residues. For example, phosphatidylglycerol can be decorated with lysine, alanine, or arginine whereas in the case of cardiolipin, lysine or d-alanine modifications are known. In few bacteria, diacylglycerol-derived lipids can be substituted with lysine or homoserine. Acyl-oxyacyl lipids in which the lipidic part is amide-linked to the alpha-amino group of an amino acid are widely distributed among bacteria and ornithine-containing lipids are the most common version of this lipid type. Only few bacterial groups form glycine-containing lipids, serineglycine-containing lipids, sphingolipids, or sulfonolipids. Although many of these amino acid-containing bacterial membrane lipids are produced in response to certain stress conditions, little is known about the specific molecular functions of these lipids. PMID:19703488

  10. Amino Acids Hydrolyzed from Animal Carcasses Are a Good Additive for the Production of Bio-organic Fertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Ruifu; Hang, Xinnan; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins. In this study, compound liquid amino acids (CLAA) from animal carcasses were utilized as additives into matured composts to create novel BIOs containing plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). The results showed that adding CLAA and inoculating bacteria meanwhile resulted in failed solid-state fermentation (SSF) due to the higher H+ contents. While after pre-compost for 4 days before PGPR inoculation, treatments of matured chicken or pig manure added with 0.2 ml g-1 of CLAA resulted in a maximum biomass of functional strains. Illumine-MiSeq sequencing and Real-Time PCR results showed that the CLAA addition decreased the bacterial abundance and richness, altered the bacterial community structure and changed the relative abundance of some microbial groups. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste protein resources for producing economical, high-quality BIO. PMID:27574521

  11. Amino Acids Hydrolyzed from Animal Carcasses Are a Good Additive for the Production of Bio-organic Fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Ruifu; Hang, Xinnan; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins. In this study, compound liquid amino acids (CLAA) from animal carcasses were utilized as additives into matured composts to create novel BIOs containing plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). The results showed that adding CLAA and inoculating bacteria meanwhile resulted in failed solid-state fermentation (SSF) due to the higher H(+) contents. While after pre-compost for 4 days before PGPR inoculation, treatments of matured chicken or pig manure added with 0.2 ml g(-1) of CLAA resulted in a maximum biomass of functional strains. Illumine-MiSeq sequencing and Real-Time PCR results showed that the CLAA addition decreased the bacterial abundance and richness, altered the bacterial community structure and changed the relative abundance of some microbial groups. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste protein resources for producing economical, high-quality BIO. PMID:27574521

  12. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  13. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The δ13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  14. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from δ13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  15. The Effects of Parent Body Processes on Amino Acids in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of parent body processes on the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites, the water extracts from nine different powdered Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for amino acids by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-FD/ToF-MS). Four aqueously altered type 1 carbonaceous chondrites including Orgueil (C11), Meteorite Hills (MET) 01070 (CM1), Scott Glacier (SCO) 06043 (CM1), and Grosvenor Mountains (GRO) 95577 (CR1) were analyzed using this technique for the first time. Analyses of these meteorites revealed low levels of two- to five-carbon acyclic amino alkanoic acids with concentrations ranging from -1 to 2,700 parts-per-billion (ppb). The type 1 carbonaceous chondrites have a distinct distribution of the five-carbon (C5) amino acids with much higher relative abundances of the gamma- and delta-amino acids compared to the type 2 and type 3 carbonaceous chondrites, which are dominated by a-amino acids. Much higher amino acid abundances were found in the CM2 chondrites Murchison, Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94102, and Lewis Cliffs (LEW) 90500, the CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and the CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. For example, a-aminoisobutyric acid ((alpha-AIB) and isovaline were approximately 100 to 1000 times more abundant in the type 2 and 3 chondrites compared to the more aqueously altered type 1 chondrites. Most of the chiral amino acids identified in these meteorites were racemic, indicating an extraterrestrial abiotic origin. However, non-racemic isovaline was observed in the aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites Murchison, Orgueil, SCO 06043, and GRO 95577 with L-isovaline excesses ranging from approximately 11 to 19%, whereas the most pristine, unaltered carbonaceous chondrites analyzed in this study had no detectable L-isovaline excesses. These results are consistent with the

  16. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  17. Amino Acids from Icy Amines: A Radiation-Chemical Approach to Extraterrestrial Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Detections of amino acids in meteorites go back several decades, with at least 100 such compounds being reported for the Murchison meteorite alone. The presence of these extraterrestrial molecules raises questions as to their formation, abundance, thermal stability, racemization, and possible subsequent reactions. Although all of these topics have been studied in laboratories, such work often involves many variables and unknowns. This has led us to seek out model systems with which to uncover reaction products, test chemical predictions, and sited light on underlying reaction mechanisms. This presentation will describe one such study, focusing on amino-acid formation in ices.

  18. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  19. Glutamate detection by amino functionalized tetrahedral amorphous carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaivosoja, Emilia; Tujunen, Noora; Jokinen, Ville; Protopopova, Vera; Heinilehto, Santtu; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, a novel amperometric glutamate biosensor with glutamate oxidase (GlOx) immobilized directly on NH2 functionalized, platinum doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) film, has been successfully developed. First, we demonstrate that direct GlOx immobilization is more effective on amino-groups than on carboxyl- or hydroxyl-groups. Second, we show that anodizing and plasma treatments increase the amount of nitrogen and the proportion of protonated amino groups relative to amino groups on the aminosilane coating, which subsequently results in an increased amount of active GlOx on the surface. This effect, however, is found to be unstable due to unstable electrostatic interactions between GlOx and NH3(+). We demonstrate the detection of glutamate in the concentration range of 10µM-1mM using the NH2 functionalized Pt doped ta-C surface. The biosensor showed high sensitivity (2.9nA μM(-1)cm(-2)), low detection limit (10μM) and good storage stability. The electrode response to glutamate was linear in the concentrations ranging from 10µM to 500µM. In conclusion, the study shows that GlOx immobilization is most effective on aminosilane treated ta-C surface without any pre-treatments and the fabricated sensor structure is able to detect glutamate in the micromolar range. PMID:25966399

  20. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  1. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  2. Accuracy of sequence alignment and fold assessment using reduced amino acid alphabets.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Reduced or simplified amino acid alphabets group the 20 naturally occurring amino acids into a smaller number of representative protein residues. To date, several reduced amino acid alphabets have been proposed, which have been derived and optimized by a variety of methods. The resulting reduced amino acid alphabets have been applied to pattern recognition, generation of consensus sequences from multiple alignments, protein folding, and protein structure prediction. In this work, amino acid substitution matrices and statistical potentials were derived based on several reduced amino acid alphabets and their performance assessed in a large benchmark for the tasks of sequence alignment and fold assessment of protein structure models, using as a reference frame the standard alphabet of 20 amino acids. The results showed that a large reduction in the total number of residue types does not necessarily translate into a significant loss of discriminative power for sequence alignment and fold assessment. Therefore, some definitions of a few residue types are able to encode most of the relevant sequence/structure information that is present in the 20 standard amino acids. Based on these results, we suggest that the use of reduced amino acid alphabets may allow to increasing the accuracy of current substitution matrices and statistical potentials for the prediction of protein structure of remote homologs. PMID:16506243

  3. Diversity is maintained by seasonal variation in species abundance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some of the most marked temporal fluctuations in species abundances are linked to seasons. In theory, multispecies assemblages can persist if species use shared resources at different times, thereby minimizing interspecific competition. However, there is scant empirical evidence supporting these predictions and, to the best of our knowledge, seasonal variation has never been explored in the context of fluctuation-mediated coexistence. Results Using an exceptionally well-documented estuarine fish assemblage, sampled monthly for over 30 years, we show that temporal shifts in species abundances underpin species coexistence. Species fall into distinct seasonal groups, within which spatial resource use is more heterogeneous than would be expected by chance at those times when competition for food is most intense. We also detect seasonal variation in the richness and evenness of the community, again linked to shifts in resource availability. Conclusions These results reveal that spatiotemporal shifts in community composition minimize competitive interactions and help stabilize total abundance. PMID:24007204

  4. Nitrogen and amino acids in nectar modify food selection of nectarivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Peña, Nelly; Stoner, Kathryn E; Ayala-Berdon, Jorge; Flores-Ortiz, Cesar M; Duran, Angel; Schondube, Jorge E

    2013-09-01

    1. Chiropterophilic flowers secrete sugar nectar with low-Nitrogen (N hereafter) content and small amounts of amino acids, which may function to attract animals; nevertheless, the role that micronutrients have on the foraging decisions of Neotropical nectarivorous bats is unknown. 2. We offered the nectar specialist Leptonycteris yerbabueanae and the omnivore Glossophaga soricina pairs of experimental diets mimicking either the N content or the relative abundance of 17 amino acids found in the floral nectar from the main plant species visited by these bats in a tropical dry forest. We addressed the following research questions: (i) Do bats select N-containing or sugar-only nectar differently based on bats' N nutritional status? (ii) Does the presence of N in nectar affect the capacity of bats to discriminate and select other nectar traits such as sugar concentration? and (iii) Are bats able to distinguish among the flavours generated by the amino acid relative abundance present in the nectar from plants they typically encounter in nature? 3. Our results showed that: (i) bats did not consider nectar N content regardless of their N nutritional condition, (ii) the nectar specialist L. yerbabuenae showed a preference for the most concentrated sugar-only nectar but changed to be indifferent when nectar contained N, and (iii) L. yerbabuenae preferred diets without amino acids and preferred the taste of the amino acids present in the nectar of Pachycereus pecten (Cactaceae) over those present in the nectar of Ceiba aesculifolia (Bombacaceae). 4. Our results suggest that regardless of the low concentrations at which N and amino acids are present in floral nectar, their presence affects bats' food selection by interfering with the bats' ability to detect differences in sugar concentrations, and by offering particular flavours that can be perceived and selected by nectarivorous bats. We discuss the ecological implications of the presence of N and amino acids in nectar on

  5. Chemical Abundances of Solar-Type Dwarfs in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Open clusters present homogeneous samples of stars that are of the same age, distance, and initial chemical composition, making open clusters valuable observational targets for studies of stellar evolution, stellar structure, exoplanetary systems, and Galactic chemical evolution. I present an overview of my graduate dissertation research on LTE abundances of solar-type dwarfs (4200 ≲ T eff ≲ 6400 ; {K}) in the open clusters Pleiades, M34, and Hyades, as well as in the Ursa Major moving group. For the dwarfs of intermediate T eff (5500 ≲ T eff ≲ 6100 ; {K}), intracluster metal abundances are in good agreement. Conversely, we have identified excitation/ionization-related abundance anomalies among the cool dwarfs (T eff ≤ 5500 ; {K}) of all three clusters and UMa; for example, O abundances derived from the high-excitation, near-IR \\ion{O}{1} triplet show a dramatic increase with decreasing T eff, a behavior that is not predicted by current non-LTE calculations. Intercluster comparisons are suggestive of an age-related diminution of the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend, and possible causes of these observed abundance anomalies, i.e., chromospheric activity, surface inhomogeneities, etc., are explored. Using multi-component ``toy model'' stellar atmospheres, we demonstrate that the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend may be due to inhomogeneous temperature structure, possibly resulting from spots or plages, in the photospheres of cool open cluster dwarfs. I gratefully acknowledge the following agencies that have provided support during this research: NSF (through grants AST 00-86576 and AST 02-39518 to Prof. J.R. King), South Carolina Space Grant Consortium (through the Graduate Student Research Fellowship program), and the Charles Curry Foundation (through a generous grant to Clemson University).

  6. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  7. Catalysis of Glyceraldehyde Synthesis by Primary or Secondary Amino Acids Under Prebiotic Conditions as a Function of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslow, Ronald; Ramalingam, Vijayakumar; Appayee, Chandrakumar

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of an excess of D-glyceraldehyde by coupling glycolaldehyde with formaldehyde under prebiotic conditions is catalyzed by L amino acids having primary amino groups at acidic pH's, but at neutral or higher pH's they preferentially form L-glyceraldehyde. L Amino acids having secondary amino groups, such as proline, have the reverse preferences, affording excess L-glyceraldehyde at low pH but excess D-glyceraldehyde at higher pHs. Detailed mechanistic proposals make these preferences understandable. The relevance of these findings to the origin of D sugars on prebiotic Earth is described.

  8. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  9. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.; Desch, Steven J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Delgado Mena, Elisa; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G.; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofré, Paula; Santos, Nuno C.; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond the quoted error for the same elements within the same stars. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) to calculate 10 element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD 361, HD 10700, HD 121504, and HD 202206). Each group produced measurements for each star using (1) their own autonomous techniques, (2) standardized stellar parameters, (3) a standardized line list, and (4) both standardized parameters and a line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies the homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.

  10. New Insights into Amino Acid Preservation in the Early Oceans using Modern Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J.

    2015-12-01

    Protein- and non-protein-amino acids likely occupied the oceans at the time of the origin and evolution of life. Primordial soup-, hydrothermal vent-, and meteoritic-processes likely contributed to this early chemical inventory. Prebiotic synthesis and carbonaceous meteorite studies suggest that non-protein amino acids were likely more abundant than their protein-counterparts. Amino acid preservation before abiotic and biotic destruction is key to biomarker availability in paleoenvironments and remains an important uncertainty. To constrain primitive amino acid lifetimes, a 1992 archived seawater/beach sand mixture was spiked with D,L-alanine, D,L-valine (Val), α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), D,L-isovaline (Iva), and glycine (Gly). Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) showed that only D-Val and non-protein amino acids were abundant after 2250 days. The mixture was re-analyzed in 2012 using HPLC-FD and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QqQ-MS). The analytical results 20 years after the inception of the experiment were strikingly similar to those after 2250 days. To confirm that viable microorganisms were still present, the mixture was re-spiked with Gly in 2012. Aliquots were collected immediately after spiking, and at 5- and 9-month intervals thereafter. Final HPLC-FD/QqQ-MS analyses were performed in 2014. The 2014 analyses revealed that only α-AIB, D,L-Iva, and D-Val remained abundant. The disappearance of Gly indicated that microorganisms still lived in the mixture and were capable of consuming protein amino acids. These findings demonstrate that non-protein amino acids are minimally impacted by biological degradation and thus have very long lifetimes under these conditions. Primitive non-protein amino acids from terrestrial synthesis, or meteorite in-fall, likely experienced greater preservation than protein amino acids in paleo-oceanic environments. Such robust molecules may have reached a steady

  11. New Insights into Amino Acid Preservation in the Early Oceans Using Modern Analytical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Eric T.; Brinton, Karen L.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein- and non-protein-amino acids likely occupied the oceans at the time of the origin and evolution of life. Primordial soup-, hydrothermal vent-, and meteoritic-processes likely contributed to this early chemical inventory. Prebiotic synthesis and carbonaceous meteorite studies suggest that non-protein amino acids were likely more abundant than their protein-counterparts. Amino acid preservation before abiotic and biotic destruction is key to biomarker availability in paleoenvironments and remains an important uncertainty. To constrain primitive amino acid lifetimes, a 1992 archived seawater/beach sand mixture was spiked with D,L-alanine, D,L-valine (Val), alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), D,L-isovaline (Iva), and glycine (Gly). Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) showed that only D-Val and non-protein amino acids were abundant after 2250 days. The mixture was re-analyzed in 2012 using HPLC-FD and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QqQ-MS). The analytical results 20 years after the inception of the experiment were strikingly similar to those after 2250 days. To confirm that viable microorganisms were still present, the mixture was re-spiked with Gly in 2012. Aliquots were collected immediately after spiking, and at 5- and 9-month intervals thereafter. Final HPLC-FD/QqQ-MS analyses were performed in 2014. The 2014 analyses revealed that only alpha-AIB, D,L-Iva, and D-Val remained abundant. The disappearance of Gly indicated that microorganisms still lived in the mixture and were capable of consuming protein amino acids. These findings demonstrate that non-protein amino acids are minimally impacted by biological degradation and thus have very long lifetimes under these conditions. Primitive non-protein amino acids from terrestrial synthesis, or meteorite in-fall, likely experienced great-er preservation than protein amino acids in paleo-oceanic environments. Such robust molecules may have reached a

  12. Generalized estimators of avian abundance from count survey data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    I consider modeling avian abundance from spatially referenced bird count data collected according to common protocols such as capture?recapture, multiple observer, removal sampling and simple point counts. Small sample sizes and large numbers of parameters have motivated many analyses that disregard the spatial indexing of the data, and thus do not provide an adequate treatment of spatial structure. I describe a general framework for modeling spatially replicated data that regards local abundance as a random process, motivated by the view that the set of spatially referenced local populations (at the sample locations) constitute a metapopulation. Under this view, attention can be focused on developing a model for the variation in local abundance independent of the sampling protocol being considered. The metapopulation model structure, when combined with the data generating model, define a simple hierarchical model that can be analyzed using conventional methods. The proposed modeling framework is completely general in the sense that broad classes of metapopulation models may be considered, site level covariates on detection and abundance may be considered, and estimates of abundance and related quantities may be obtained for sample locations, groups of locations, unsampled locations. Two brief examples are given, the first involving simple point counts, and the second based on temporary removal counts. Extension of these models to open systems is briefly discussed.

  13. Complex formation equilibria of some beta-amino-alcohols with lead(II) and cadmium(II) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Canepari, S; Carunchio, V; Castellano, P; Messina, A

    1998-12-01

    A study of complex formation equilibria of some beta-amino-alcohols with lead(II) and cadmium(II) ions at 25 degrees C and in 0.5 M KNO(3) is reported. The amino-alcohols considered are 2-amino-1-propanol, 2-amino-1-butanol, 2-amino-1-pentanol and 2-amino-1,3-propanediol. sec-Buthylamine and 2-amino-1-methoxy-propane have been also considered for comparison. The results are discussed in terms of ligand structure, paying attention to the number of hydroxyl groups and to the length of the alkyl residual. A weak contribution of the alcoholic oxygen in the coordination of cadmium(II) and the presence of a mixed hydroxyl species in lead(II) containing systems are hypothesized. PMID:18967412

  14. Enantiomeric excesses in meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.

    1997-01-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectral analyses of the four stereoisomers of 2-amino-2,3-dimethylpentanoic acid (dl-alpha-methylisoleucine and dl-alpha-methylalloisoleucine) obtained from the Murchison meteorite show that the L enantiomer occurs in excess (7.0 and 9.1%, respectively) in both of the enantiomeric pairs. Similar results were obtained for two other alpha-methyl amino acids, isovaline and alpha-methylnorvaline, although the alpha hydrogen analogs of these amino acids, alpha-amino-n-butyric acid and norvaline, were found to be racemates. With the exception of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, these amino acids are either unknown or of limited occurrence in the biosphere. Because carbonaceous chondrites formed 4.5 billion years ago, the results are indicative of an asymmetric influence on organic chemical evolution before the origin of life.

  15. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  16. Rapid complexing of oxoacylglycerols with amino acids, peptides and aminophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kurvinen, J P; Kuksis, A; Ravandi, A; Sjövall, O; Kallio, H

    1999-03-01

    We prepared model Schiff bases from 2-[9-oxo]nonanoyl glycerol (2-MAG-ALD) and various amino compounds. 2-MAG-ALD was obtained by pancreatic lipase hydrolysis of trioleoyl glycerol and reductive ozonolysis of the resulting 2-monooleoyl glycerol. The reaction products were purified by thin-layer chromatography. Schiff bases were synthesized in greater than 50% yield by reacting 2-MAG-ALD with twofold molar excess of valine, Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester and the tripeptides glycyl-glycyl-glycine, glycyl-glycyl-histidine, and glycyl-histidyl-lysine in aqueous methanol and with 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) in chloroform/methanol for 16 h at room temperature. Prior to analysis the bases were reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride in methanol for 30 min at 4 degrees C. Reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI/MS). Reduced Schiff bases of 2-MAG-ALD with PE and amino acids were analyzed by normal-phase HPLC/ESI/MS and those with peptides by reversed-phase HPLC/ESI/MS. Single adducts were obtained in all cases and both the alpha-amino group of valine and the epsilon-amino group of Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester were reactive. Molecular ions of reaction products were the only detected ions in the negative ionization mode, whereas in the positive ion mode sodiated molecular ions were also detected. The present study suggests that 2-MAG-ALD may form Schiff base adducts with amino compounds in other aqueous media, such as the intestinal lumen and in the hydrophobic environment of cell membranes. PMID:10230725

  17. Nitrogen abundances in damped Lyalpha absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, T.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; Péroux, C.; D'Odorico, V.; Vladilo, G.

    Nitrogen is thought to have both primary and secondary origins depending on whether the seed carbon and oxygen are produced by the star itself (primary) or already present in the interstellar medium (secondary) from which star forms. Damped Lyalpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems with typical metallicities of -3.0≲ Z/Z⊙ ≲ -0.5 are excellent tools to study nitrogen production. We made a search for nitrogen in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) advanced data products (EUADP) database. In the EUADP database, we find 10 new measurements and 9 upper limits of nitrogen. We further compiled DLA/sub-DLA data from the literature with estimates available of nitrogen and alpha -elements. This yields a total of 98 systems, i.e. the largest nitrogen abundance sample investigated so far. In agreement with previous studies, we indeed find a bimodal [N/alpha ] behaviour: three-quarter systems show a mean value of [N/alpha ] =-0.87 with a scatter of 0.21 dex and one-quarter shows ratios clustered at [N/alpha ] = -1.43 with a lower dispersion of 0.13 dex. The high [N/alpha ] group is consistent with the blue compact dwarves and dwarf irregular galaxies, suggesting primary nitrogen production. The low [N/alpha ] group is the lowest ever observed in any astrophysical site and probably provides an evidence of the primary production by fast rotating massive stars in young sites. Moreover, we find a transition between the two [N/alpha ] groups around [N/H] ≃-2.5. The transition is not abrupt and there are a few systems lying in the transition region. Additional observations of DLAs/sub-DLAs below [N/H] <-2.5 would provide more clues.

  18. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  19. Amino acidis derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl; Ogino, Hiroshi; Nagy, Bartholomew; Er, Cevat

    1986-01-01

    The production of amino acids by acid treatment of Titan tholin is experimentally investigated. The synthesis of Titan tholin and the derivatization of amino acids to N-trifluoroacetyl isopropyl esters are described. The gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of the Titan tholins reveals the presence of glycine, alpha and beta alainine, and aspartic acid, and the total yield of amino acids is about 0.01.

  20. Conversion of 5-hydroxy to 5-amino and 5-alkoxypyrazolidines

    SciTech Connect

    Sviridova, L.A.; Afanas'eva, S.V.; Zelenin, K.N.; Golubeva, G.A.; Bezhan, I.P.; Bundel', Yu.G.

    1987-10-01

    1-Acyl-5-hydroxypyrazolidines readily exchange their hydroxyl group when treated with primary amines or alcohols to form the corresponding 5-amino or 5-alkoxypyrazolidines. An acid catalyst is needed for the preparation of the 5-alkoxypyrazolidines. IR Spectra were recorded on a UR-20 instrument for vaseline mulls and PMR spectra on Bruker 250 and Tesla BS-497 (100 MHz) equipment using TMS as internal standard.

  1. Heterogeneous Distributions of Amino Acids Provide Evidence of Multiple Sources Within the Almahata Sitta Parent Body, Asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2011-01-01

    Two new fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite and a sample of sand from the related strewn field in the Nubian Desert, Sudan, were analyzed for two to six carbon aliphatic primary amino acids by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with UV-fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FT/ToF-MS). The distribution of amino acids in fragment #25, an H5 ordinary chondrite, and fragment #27, a polymict ureilite, were compared with results from the previously analyzed fragment #4, also a polymict ureilite. All three meteorite fragments contain 180-270 parts-per-billion (ppb) of amino acids, roughly 1000-fold lower than the total amino acid abundance of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. All of the Almahata Sitta fragments analyzed have amino acid distributions that differ from the Nubian Desert sand, which primarily contains L-alpha-amino acids. In addition, the meteorites contain several amino acids that were not detected in the sand, indicating that many of the amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. Despite their petrological differences, meteorite fragments #25 and #27 contain similar amino acid compositions; however, the distribution of amino acids in fragment #27 was distinct from those in fragment #4, even though both arc polymict ureilites from the same parent body. Unlike in CM2 and CR2/3 meteorites, there are low relative abundances of alpha-amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite fragments, which suggest that Strecker-type chemistry was not a significant amino acid formation mechanism. Given the high temperatures that asteroid 2008 TC3 appears to have experienced and lack of evidence for aqueous alteration on the asteroid, it is possible that the extraterrestrial amino acids detected in Almahata Sitta were formed by Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions at elevated temperatures.

  2. Embryonic Protein Undernutrition by Albumen Removal Programs the Hepatic Amino Acid and Glucose Metabolism during the Perinatal Period in an Avian Model

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Els; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Soler Vasco, Laura; Buyse, Johan; Decuypere, Eddy; Arckens, Lutgarde; Everaert, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Different animal models have been used to study the effects of prenatal protein undernutrition and the mechanisms by which these occur. In mammals, the maternal diet is manipulated, exerting both direct nutritional and indirect hormonal effects. Chicken embryos develop independent from the hen in the egg. Therefore, in the chicken, the direct effects of protein deficiency by albumen removal early during incubation can be examined. Prenatal protein undernutrition was established in layer-type eggs by the partial replacement of albumen by saline at embryonic day 1 (albumen-deprived group), compared to a mock-treated sham and a non-treated control group. At hatch, survival of the albumen-deprived group was lower compared to the control and sham group due to increased early mortality by the manipulation. No treatment differences in yolk-free body weight or yolk weight could be detected. The water content of the yolk was reduced, whereas the water content of the carcass was increased in the albumen-deprived group, compared to the control group, indicating less uptake of nutrients from the yolk. At embryonic day 16, 20 and at hatch, plasma triiodothyronine (T3), corticosterone, lactate or glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen content were not affected by treatment. At embryonic day 20, the plasma thyroxine (T4) concentrations of the albumen-deprived embryos was reduced compared to the control group, indicating a decreased metabolic rate. Screening for differential protein expression in the liver at hatch using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed not only changed abundance of proteins important for amino acid metabolism, but also of enzymes related to energy and glucose metabolism. Interestingly, GLUT1, a glucose transporter, and PCK2 and FBP1, two out of three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis were dysregulated. No parallel differences in gene expressions causing the differences in protein abundance could be detected pointing to post

  3. Regulation of the proteome by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Goron, Arthur; Seve, Michel; Moinard, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Besides their main contribution as substrates for protein synthesis, amino acids as signaling molecules could exert some regulatory functions on protein synthesis and/or proteolysis that have been emphasized in a number of recent studies. Several publications have highlighted supplemental roles of those amino acids in protein metabolism as well as in immunity, heat shock response, or apoptosis processes. In this way, via their regulatory properties, selected amino acids (such as leucine, glutamine, arginine, citrulline, or methionine) directly influence the proteome. In this review, we are proposing an overview of the regulation of the proteome by amino acids in mammals. PMID:26786846

  4. Oceanic heterotrophic dinoflagellates: distribution, abundance, and role as microzooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objectives of this thesis were to determine the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream system off Cape Hatteras and to assess the potential grazing impact of these microheterotrophs in plankton communities. A list of species encountered in this study and their trophic status based on epifluorescence is presented, as well as observations on the presence of external or internal symbionts. The abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream region off Cape Hatteras was determined from bimonthly net tow samples over a year and from whole water samples in March. Their average abundance was twice that of net ciliates in the net plankton and ten times that of ciliates in the nanoplankton. An isotope technique was developed to measure grazing rates of individual dinoflaggellates and other microzooplankton which cannot be separated in natural populations on the basis of size. /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-bicarbonate were used to label natural heterotrophic (bacteria and bacterivores) and autotrophic (phytoplankton and herbivores) food, respectively. Estimates of the grazing impact of heterotrophic kinoflagellates relative to other groups of heterotrophs on phytoplankton and bacteria were made by combining abundance data and clearance rates. Such calculations suggested that heterotrophic dinoflagellates may be an important group of grazers in oceanic waters.

  5. Element abundances in solar (He-3) rich events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Meyer, J.-P.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a survey of over 228 (He-3)-rich events, with He-3/H-4 of more than 0.1, observed by the ISEE-3 spacecraft from 1978 August through 1991 April. In these events the elements above C are enhanced relative to the corresponding abundances in the corona and the degree of enhancement increases with Z or A. The flare-to-flare variations in abundances are different in character from those seen in large proton events. For example, using Fe/C as a parameter to describe these variations, the slope of the least-squares fits to ln(X/C) vs ln(Fe/C), where X is the intensity of N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, or S. Slopes of these abundance-correlation lines are much steeper for the (He-3)-rich events than for a sample of 36 large proton events, especially for Ne and heavier ions. The event-to-event variations for the (He-3)-rich events distinguish 3 groups of elements, He-O, Ne-S, and Fe. The abundances of all of the species within each group seem to vary in unison.

  6. Relationship between amino acid usage and amino acid evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoxuan; Xie, Zhengqing; Tan, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-02-25

    Amino acid usage varies from species to species. A previous study has found a universal trend in amino acid gain and loss in many taxa and a one-way model of amino acid evolution in which the number of new amino acids increases as the number of old amino acids decreases was proposed. Later studies showed that this pattern of amino acid gain and loss is likely to be compatible with the neutral theory. The present work aimed to further study this problem by investigating the evolutionary patterns of amino acids in 8 primates (the nucleotide and protein alignments are available online http://gattaca.nju.edu.cn/pub_data.html). First, the number of amino acids gained and lost was calculated and the evolution trend of each amino acid was inferred. These values were found to be closely related to the usage of each amino acid. Then we analyzed the mutational trend of amino acid substitution in human using SNPs, this trend is highly correlated with fixation trend only with greater variance. Finally, the trends in the evolution of 20 amino acids were evaluated in human on different time scales, and the increasing rate of 5 significantly increasing amino acids was found to decrease as a function of time elapsed since divergence, and the dS/dN ratio also found to increase as a function of time elapsed since divergence. These results suggested that the observed amino acid substitution pattern is influenced by mutation and purifying selection. In conclusion, the present study shows that usage of amino acids is an important factor capable of influencing the observed pattern of amino acid evolution, and also presented evidences suggesting that the observed universal trend of amino acid gain and loss is compatible with neutral evolution. PMID:25527119

  7. Modelling community dynamics based on species-level abundance models from detection/nondetection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Royle, J. Andrew; Kuboi, Kouji; Tada, Tsuneo; Ikeno, Susumu; Makino, Shun'ichi

    2011-01-01

    1. In large-scale field surveys, a binary recording of each species' detection or nondetection has been increasingly adopted for its simplicity and low cost. Because of the importance of abundance in many studies, it is desirable to obtain inferences about abundance at species-, functional group-, and community-levels from such binary data. 2. We developed a novel hierarchical multi-species abundance model based on species-level detection/nondetection data. The model accounts for the existence of undetected species, and variability in abundance and detectability among species. Species-level detection/nondetection is linked to species- level abundance via a detection model that accommodates the expectation that probability of detection (at least one individuals is detected) increases with local abundance of the species. We applied this model to a 9-year dataset composed of the detection/nondetection of forest birds, at a single post-fire site (from 7 to 15 years after fire) in a montane area of central Japan. The model allocated undetected species into one of the predefined functional groups by assuming a prior distribution on individual group membership. 3. The results suggest that 15–20 species were missed in each year, and that species richness of communities and functional groups did not change with post-fire forest succession. Overall abundance of birds and abundance of functional groups tended to increase over time, although only in the winter, while decreases in detectabilities were observed in several species. 4. Synthesis and applications. Understanding and prediction of large-scale biodiversity dynamics partly hinge on how we can use data effectively. Our hierarchical model for detection/nondetection data estimates abundance in space/time at species-, functional group-, and community-levels while accounting for undetected individuals and species. It also permits comparison of multiple communities by many types of abundance-based diversity and similarity

  8. Analysis of Saccharides by the Addition of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J.; Gulfen, Mustafa; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the detection sensitivity improvement of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of neutral saccharides in a positive ion mode by the addition of various amino acids. Saccharides of a broad molecular weight range were chosen as the model compounds in the present study. Saccharides provide strong noncovalent interactions with amino acids, and the complex formation enhances the signal intensity and simplifies the mass spectra of saccharides. Polysaccharides provide a polymer-like ESI spectrum with a basic subunit difference between multiply charged chains. The protonated spectra of saccharides are not well identified because of different charge state distributions produced by the same molecules. Depending on the solvent used and other ions or molecules present in the solution, noncovalent interactions with saccharides may occur. These interactions are affected by the addition of amino acids. Amino acids with polar side groups show a strong tendency to interact with saccharides. In particular, serine shows a high tendency to interact with saccharides and significantly improves the detection sensitivity of saccharide compounds.

  9. The complex amino acid diet of Francisella in infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barel, Monique; Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, is a highly infectious bacterium for a large number of animal species and can be transmitted to humans by various means. The bacterium is able to infect a variety of cell types but replicates in mammalian hosts mainly in the cytosol of infected macrophages. In order to resist the stressful and nutrient-restricted intracellular environments, it encounters during its systemic dissemination, Francisella has developed dedicated stress resistance mechanisms and adapted its metabolic and nutritional needs. Recent data form our laboratory and from several other groups have shown that Francisella simultaneously relies on multiple host amino acid sources during its intracellular life cycle. This review will summarize how intracellular Francisella use different amino acid sources, and their role in phagosomal escape and/or cytosolic multiplication and systemic dissemination. We will first summarize the data that we have obtained on two amino acid transporters involved in Francisella phagosomal escape and cytosolic multiplication i.e., the glutamate transporter GadC and the asparagine transporter AnsP, respectively. The specific contribution of glutamate and asparagine to the physiology of the bacterium will be evoked. Then, we will discuss how Francisella has adapted to obtain and utilize host amino acid resources, and notably the contribution of host transporters and autophagy process in the establishment of a nutrient-replete intracellular niche. PMID:25705612

  10. Analysis of the biologic differences between porcine circovirus type 2 Group-1 and Group-2 viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylogenetically, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) isolates have been divided into two subgroups: Group-1 and Group-2. Although the genomic nucleotide sequences of Group-1 and Group-2 viruses differ by less than 5 percent, distinct amino acid residue motifs have been noted in the coding sequences o...

  11. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  14. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  15. Copper-Catalyzed Amino Lactonization and Amino Oxygenation of Alkenes Using O-Benzoylhydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Hemric, Brett N; Shen, Kun; Wang, Qiu

    2016-05-11

    A copper-catalyzed amino lactonization of unsaturated carboxylic acids has been achieved as well as the analogous intermolecular three-component amino oxygenation of olefins. The transformation features mild conditions and a remarkably broad substrate scope, offering a novel and efficient approach to construct a wide range of amino lactones as well as 1,2-amino alcohol derivatives. Mechanistic studies suggest that the reaction proceeds via a distinctive O-benzoylhydroxylamine-promoted electrophilic amination of alkenes. PMID:27114046

  16. Integrated evaluation of malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids and polysaccharides in fresh and processed ginseng.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin-Yi; Fan, Yong; Yu, Qing-Tao; Ge, Ya-Zhong; Yan, Chen-Pu; Alolga, Raphael N; Li, Ping; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-03-25

    Many analytical methods have been developed to characterize ginsenosides in ginseng. Relatively less attention has been paid to the malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids and polysaccharides in various processing ginsengs. In this study, malonyl ginsenosides were characterized by LC-Q-TOF/MS. In positive mode, the most abundant ions at m/z 425.38 were observed corresponding to the protopanoxadiol-type ginsenosides. A rich diagnostic ion at 835.48 was shown representing the malonyl ginsenosides with at least two glucosides. Twelve malonyl ginsenosides were rapidly screened using 835.48-835.49 to restructure ion chromatograms. In negative mode, besides the high deprotonated ion, a neutral loss of 44 Da (CO2) was found. High-energy collision-induced dissociation at 50 V produced the most abundant product ion [M-H-malonyl](-) by a neutral loss of 86 Da. Determination of 17 common amino acids was performed on an automatic amino acid analyzer. Arginine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were abundant. The contents of amino acids were 9.1% in fresh ginseng and 3.1% in black ginseng. Phenol-sulfuric acid method was applied to analysis of polysaccharides. The contents of polysaccharides were 29.1% in fresh ginseng and 11.1% in black ginseng. The optimal growth age for the accumulation of constituents was supposed to be 5-6 years. In conclusion, the contents of malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids, and polysaccharides, based on decreasing order, ranked as follows: fresh ginseng>frozen ginseng>white ginseng>stoved ginseng>red ginseng>black ginseng. Processing should be paid more attention for the quality control of ginseng products. PMID:25575174

  17. [Plasma amino acids profile of healthy pregnant adolescents in Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Pablo; Castejón, Haydée V; Argotte, María G; Gómez, Gisela; Bohorquez, Lissette; Urrieta, Jesús R

    2003-06-01

    One hundred female adolescents (13-18 y) were clinical and anthropometrically studied to select only those with adequate nutrition. Most adolescents belonged to IV socio-economic stratum families (worker class). Height, weight, age, body mass index and medial arm circumference were used as anthropometric parameters. After screening, only 41 non pregnant girls (control) and 42 pregnant girls with adequate nutrition were selected to analyze plasma amino acids. Fasting peripheral venous blood was drawn, and plasma amino acids were analyzed by HPLC. Amino acid concentrations were expressed as umol/L +/- SE. SAS/STAT program was used for statistical analysis. Amino acid values of control adolescent group were found in ranges reported by other investigators, with slight variations, mostly in diminution, presumably due to nutritional, metabolic or genetic conditions of people living in tropical regions. In pregnant healthy adolescents, distributed according to gestational age: < 32 weeks (n = 30) and > 32 weeks (n = 12), a diminution of total molar plasma amino acids was found, by comparing with control values. Ten amino acids (Pro, Gly, Gln, Arg, Ser, Orn, Tau, Leu, Thr and Val) appeared significantively diminished throughout gestation, being Gly. Gln and Arg most affected since earlier weeks. During the 2nd period. Thr and Val increased their grade of affectation; whereas some amino acids values (Orn, Pro and Tau) tended to recuperate. Several of affected amino acids are gluconegoenic, thus, they could be utilized to supply the energy required by the pregnant adolescent against her double stress: the fetus development and her own development. The plasma amino acid values reported in both, healthy non pregnant and pregnant adolescents, could be taken as regional referential profile of plasma amino acids in this poblational group for further research on adolescent and fetal--maternal malnutrition. PMID:14528605

  18. Abundance Gradients in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato De Alencar

    This dissertation presents the analysis of spatially resolved ASCA satellite X-ray spectra for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, Abell 2199, Abell 3571 and Abell 1060). The abundance distributions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571 are shown to be centrally enhanced. The distribution of elemental abundance ratios, combined with calculations of supernovae rates, shows that the central abundance enhancement in these galaxy clusters is dominated by supernova, Type 1a iron, while the outer parts are dominated by supernovae Type II iron and the most likely mechanism proposed to produce this central iron is ram-pressure stripping, rather than accumulated stellar mass loss from the central dominant galaxy. At least 50% (by mass) of the iron in the central regions is from supernovae Type Ia, varying slightly from cluster to cluster. Although the analysis of Abell 1060 reveals no significant central abundance enhancement, supernovae Type Ia are shown to contribute significantly to the iron content of the central regions. However, accumulated stellar mass loss from the two central dominant galaxies in this cluster can account for all of the supernovae Type la iron in the central regions. The nickel to iron abundance ratio shows that delayed detonation explosion models for supernovae Type la are inconsistent with the observed abundance ratios in the inner regions of Abell 496, Abell 2199 and Abell 3571. A comparison of the distributions of iron mass and the luminosity of early type galaxies in four clusters, three of them having central abundance enhancements (Virgo, Abell 496 and Centaurus) and one having a flat abundance distribution (Coma), indicates that the iron mass traces the luminosity of early type galaxies in abundance gradient clusters better than in flat abundance clusters. This suggests that abundance gradients can be washed out by cluster mergers.

  19. Energetic particle abundances in solar electron events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive search of the ISEE 3 energetic particle data for solar electron events with associated increases in elements with atomic number Z = 6 or greater are reported. A sample of 90 such events was obtained. The events support earlier evidence of a bimodal distribution in Fe/O or, more clearly, in Fe/C. Most of the electron events belong to the group that is Fe-rich in comparison with the coronal abundance. The Fe-rich events are frequently also He-3-rich and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts and impulsive solar flares. Fe-poor events are associated with type IV bursts and with interplanetary shocks. With some exceptions, event-to-event enhancements in the heavier elements vary smoothly with Z and with Fe/C. In fact, these variations extend across the full range of events despite inferred differences in acceleration mechanism. The origin of source material in all events appears to be coronal and not photospheric.

  20. Numerical resolution limits on subhalo abundance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; White, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) inserts galaxies into dark matter only simulations of the growth of cosmic structure in a way that requires minimal assumptions about galaxy formation. A galaxy is placed at the potential minimum of each distinct self-bound subhalo with a luminosity which is a monotonically increasing function of the maximum mass (or circular velocity) attained over the subhalo's earlier history. Galaxy and subhalo properties are linked by matching model and observed luminosity functions. Simulated structures can then be compared in detail with observation, for example, through galaxy correlation statistics, group catalogues or galaxy-galaxy lensing. Robust astrophysical conclusions can be drawn from such a comparison only on scales which are unaffected by the numerical limitations of the simulation. Here, we compare results for the Millennium Simulation (MS) with subhaloes defined using the SUBFIND to those obtained applying identical analysis to the much higher resolution Millennium-II. Correlation statistics on scales between 200 and 2 Mpc converge to within 20 per cent only for subhaloes with masses at infall corresponding to at least 1000 simulation particles in the MS. Numerically converged results can be obtained to much lower infall particle number, if galaxies are followed even after their associated subhaloes have been tidally disrupted, as in most recent semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations. This allows robust comparison between simulation and observation over a wider dynamic range in mass than for a SHAM analysis which ignores such `orphan' galaxies.

  1. Amino acid profile and oxidizable vitamin content of Synsepalum dulcificum berry (miracle fruit) pulp.

    PubMed

    Njoku, Njideka E; Ubbaonu, Collins N; Alagbaoso, Serah O; Eluchie, Chioma N; Umelo, Munachiso C

    2015-05-01

    The amino acid profile of the Synsepalum dulcificum berry was studied. Among the essential amino acid observed, leucine (2.35 g/100 g protein) was the highest while methionine (0.31 g/100 g protein) was the lowest. The nonessential amino acids were also discovered, with glutamic acid (3.43 g/100 g protein) being the highest and glycine (0.38 g/100 g protein), the lowest. The study of the oxidizable vitamins revealed that vitamin C (1.33 mg/100 g) was more abundant than vitamin A (2.54 µg) and vitamin E (0.78 mg/100 g). This information will hopefully enhance the fruits acceptability by more people and thus, generally promote its utilization and appreciation in our diets. PMID:25988000

  2. Amino acid profile and oxidizable vitamin content of Synsepalum dulcificum berry (miracle fruit) pulp

    PubMed Central

    Njoku, Njideka E; Ubbaonu, Collins N; Alagbaoso, Serah O; Eluchie, Chioma N; Umelo, Munachiso C

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid profile of the Synsepalum dulcificum berry was studied. Among the essential amino acid observed, leucine (2.35 g/100 g protein) was the highest while methionine (0.31 g/100 g protein) was the lowest. The nonessential amino acids were also discovered, with glutamic acid (3.43 g/100 g protein) being the highest and glycine (0.38 g/100 g protein), the lowest. The study of the oxidizable vitamins revealed that vitamin C (1.33 mg/100 g) was more abundant than vitamin A (2.54 µg) and vitamin E (0.78 mg/100 g). This information will hopefully enhance the fruits acceptability by more people and thus, generally promote its utilization and appreciation in our diets. PMID:25988000

  3. Amino acid analysis in micrograms of meteorite sample by nanoliquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Martin, Mildred G; Burton, Aaron S; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids and their enantiomers in a 360 microgram sample of Murchison meteorite were unambiguously identified and quantified using chemical derivatization and nanoliquid chromatography coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques. The distribution and abundance of amino acids were similar to past studies of Murchison meteorite but the samples used here were three orders of magnitude lower. The analytical method was also highly sensitive, and some amino acid reference standards were successfully detected at a level of ∼200 attomoles (on column). These results may open up the possibility for investigating other less studied, sample-limited extraterrestrial samples (e.g., micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary particles) for biologically-relevant organic molecules. PMID:24529954

  4. Composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) seeds: phenolics, organic acids and free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Seabra, Rosa M; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2005-04-01

    Phenolic compounds, organic acids and free amino acids of quince seeds were determined by HPLC/DAD, HPLC/UV and GC/FID, respectively. Quince seeds presented a phenolic profile composed of 3-O-caffeoylquinic, 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids, lucenin-2, vicenin-2, stellarin-2, isoschaftoside, schaftoside, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-glucosyl chrysoeriol and 6-C-glucosyl-8-C-pentosyl chrysoeriol. Six identified organic acids constituted the organic acid profile of quince seeds: citric, ascorbic, malic, quinic, shikimic and fumaric acids. The free amino acid profile was composed of 21 identified free amino acids and the three most abundant were glutamic and aspartic acids and asparagine. PMID:15702641

  5. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  6. Hydrophobicity, expressivity and aromaticity are the major trends of amino-acid usage in 999 Escherichia coli chromosome-encoded genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lobry, J R; Gautier, C

    1994-01-01

    Multivariate analysis of the amino-acid compositions of 999 chromosome-encoded proteins from Escherichia coli showed that three main factors influence the variability of amino-acid composition. The first factor was correlated with the global hydrophobicity of proteins, and it discriminated integral membrane proteins from the others. The second factor was correlated with gene expressivity, showing a bias in highly expressed genes towards amino-acids having abundant major tRNAs. Just as highly expressed genes have reduced codon diversity in protein coding sequences, so do they have a reduced diversity of amino-acid choice. This showed that translational constraints are important enough to affect the global amino-acid composition of proteins. The third factor was correlated with the aromaticity of proteins, showing that aromatic amino-acid content is highly variable. PMID:8065933

  7. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of naturally occurring D-amino acids in sake.

    PubMed

    Gogami, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kaori; Oikawa, Tadao

    2011-11-01

    We measured all of the D- and L-amino acids in 141 bottles of sakes using HPLC. We used two precolumn derivatization methods of amino acid enantiomer detection with o-phthalaldehyde and N-acetyl-L-cysteine, as well as (+)-1-(9-fluorenyl)ethyl chloroformate/1-aminoadamantane and one postcolumn derivatization method with o-phthalaldehyde and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. We found that the sakes contained the D-amino acids forms of Ala, Asn, Asp, Arg, Glu, Gln, His, Ile, Leu, Lys, Ser, Tyr, Val, Phe, and Pro. We were not able to detect D-Met, D-Thr D-Trp in any of the sakes analyzed. The most abundant D-Ala, D-Asp, and D-Glu ranged from 66.9 to 524.3 μM corresponding to relative 34.4, 12.0, and 14.6% D-enantiomer. The basic parameters that generally determine the taste of sake such as the sake meter value (SMV; "Nihonshudo"), acidity ("Sando"), amino acid value ("Aminosando"), alcohol content by volume, and rice species of raw material show no significant relationship to the D-amino acid content of sake. The brewing water ("Shikomimizu") and brewing process had effects on the D-amino acid content of the sakes: the D-amino acid contents of the sakes brewed with deep-sea water "Kaiyoushinosousui", "Kimoto yeast starter", "Yamahaimoto", and the long aging process "Choukijukusei" are high compared with those of other sakes analyzed. Additionally, the D-amino acid content of sakes that were brewed with the adenine auxotroph of sake yeast ("Sekishoku seishu kobo", Saccharomyces cerevisiae) without pasteurization ("Hiire") increased after storage at 25 °C for three months. PMID:21555255

  8. Abundances of 30 Elements in 23 Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2002-03-01

    We report the abundances of 30 elements in 23 metal-poor ([Fe/H]<-1.7) giants. These are based on 7774 equivalent widths and spectral synthesis of 229 additional lines. Hyperfine splitting is taken into account when appropriate. Our choice of model atmospheres has the most influence on the accuracy of our abundances. We consider the effect of different model atmospheres on our results. In addition to the random errors in Teff, logg, and microturbulent velocity, there are several sources of systematic error. These include using Teff determined from Fe I lines rather than colors, ignoring non-LTE effects on the Fe I/Fe II ionization balance, using models with solar [α/Fe] ratios, and using Kurucz models with overshooting. Of these, only the use of models with solar [α/Fe] ratios had a negligible effect. However, while the absolute abundances can change by greater than 0.10 dex, the relative abundances, especially between closely allied atoms such as the rare earth group, often show only small (less than 0.03 dex) changes. We found that some strong lines of Fe I, Mn I, and Cr I consistently gave lower abundances by ~0.2 dex, a number larger than the quoted errors in the gf-values. After considering a model with depth-dependent microturbulent velocity and a model with hotter temperatures in the upper layers, we conclude that the latter did a better job of resolving the problem and agreeing with observational evidence for the structure of stars. The error analysis includes the effects of correlation of Teff, logg, and ξ errors, which is crucial for certain element ratios, such as [Mg/Fe]. The abundances presented here are being analyzed and discussed in a separate series of papers.

  9. First Stellar Abundances in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautvaišienė, Gražina; Geisler, Doug; Wallerstein, George; Borissova, Jura; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pagel, Bernard E. J.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Smith, Verne

    2007-12-01

    Chemical abundances in three M supergiants in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 have been determined using high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the ESO 8.2 m Kueyen telescope. A detailed synthetic-spectrum analysis has been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, La, and Eu. We find the overall metallicity of the stars to be [Fe/H] = -0.67 ± 0.09 and the age 9-13 Myr, which is in excellent agreement with the present-day values in the age-metallicity relationship model of IC 1613 by Skillman et al. We have found that the three supergiants investigated have a mean [α/Fe] equal to about -0.1, which is lower than seen in Galactic stars at the same metallicity and is in agreement with the results obtained in other dwarf irregular galaxies. The oxygen abundances are in agreement with the upper values of the nebular oxygen determinations in IC 1613. The abundance ratios of s- and r-process elements to iron are enhanced relative to solar by about 0.3 dex. The abundance pattern of the elements studied is similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud, except for Co and Ni, which are underabundant in the SMC. The observed elemental abundances are generally in very good agreement with the recent chemical evolution model of Yuk and Lee. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope and the 2.2 m Telescope of the European Southern Observatory within the Observing Programs 70.B-0361(A) and 072.D-0113(D).

  10. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  11. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive...

  12. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  13. The biogeography of abundant and rare bacterioplankton in the lakes and reservoirs of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lemian; Yang, Jun; Yu, Zheng; Wilkinson, David M

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria play key roles in the ecology of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, little is known about their diversity and biogeography, especially in the rare microbial biosphere of inland freshwater ecosystems. Here we investigated aspects of the community ecology and geographical distribution of abundant and rare bacterioplankton using high-throughput sequencing and examined the relative influence of local environmental variables and regional (spatial) factors on their geographical distribution patterns in 42 lakes and reservoirs across China. Our results showed that the geographical patterns of abundant and rare bacterial subcommunities were generally similar, and both of them showed a significant distance-decay relationship. This suggests that the rare bacterial biosphere is not a random assembly, as some authors have assumed, and that its distribution is most likely subject to the same ecological processes that control abundant taxa. However, we identified some differences between the abundant and rare groups as both groups of bacteria showed a significant positive relationship between sites occupancy and abundance, but the abundant bacteria exhibited a weaker distance-decay relationship than the rare bacteria. Our results implied that rare subcommunities were mostly governed by local environmental variables, whereas the abundant subcommunities were mainly affected by regional factors. In addition, both local and regional variables that were significantly related to the spatial variation of abundant bacterial community composition were different to those of rare ones, suggesting that abundant and rare bacteria may have discrepant ecological niches and may play different roles in natural ecosystems. PMID:25748371

  14. On the reported optical activity of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Cronin, J.R.; Ho, M.-S.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lawless, J.G.; Miller, S.L.; Oro, J.; Steinberg, S.

    1983-01-01

    In analyses of extracts from the Murchison meteorite (a carbonaceous chondrite), Engel and Nagy1 reported an excess of L-enantiomers for several protein amino acids but found that the non-protein amino acids were racemic. They suggested that the excess of L-isomers might have resulted from an asymmetric synthesis or decomposition. Their results disagree with those obtained previously2-4 and they claim this is due to improved methodology. In fact, their extraction method and analytical procedure (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) was similar to those used in the original report2 of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite except that they used specific ion monitoring in the GC-MS measurements. We found the results of Engel and Nagy odd in that likely contaminants (the protein amino acids ala, leu, glu, asp and pro) were nonracemic while unlikely contaminants (isovaline and ??-amino-n-butyric acid) were racemic. For example, Engel and Nagy report that the leucine is ???90% L-enantiomer in the water-extracted sample whereas isovaline (??-methyl-??-aminobutyric acid) is racemic. It would be most unusual for an abiotic stereoselective decomposition or synthesis of amino acids to occur with protein amino acids but not with non-protein amino acids. We now show here that the explanation of terrestrial contamination is consistent with their results and is much more probable. ?? 1983 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-10-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids. PMID:25985129

  16. Plasma and cerebrosponal fluid amino acid levels in diabetic ketoacidosis before and after corrective therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T T; Assal J-P; Manzano, F M; Kozak, G P; Cahill, G F

    1975-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism in diabetic ketoacidosis, arterial and venous blood samples as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained from six patients before and after initiation of corrective therapy. Levels of CSF glutamine were decreased while alanine alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine and leucine were increased significantly compared to a control group composed of six normal, postabsorptive adults free of any neurologic disease. Following therapy, CSF levels of alanine, alpha-amino-n-butyrate, valine, isoleucine, and leucine declined while glutamine levels did not change. Admission arterial plasma levels of the glycogenic amino acids were lower than normal while the branched-chain amino acids were elevated. Plasma alanine and glutamine arterio-venous (A-V) differences across forearm tissue were larger. After four hours of corrective therapy, arterial plasma levels of most of the amino acids had declined sharply and A-V differences for glutamine and alanine were markedly reduced (p smaller than.025 and p smaller than.01, paired t, respectively). Coincident with the decrease in A-V amino acid differences, plasma glucagon and free fatty acid levels declined significantly. These data suggest that the effect exerted by insulin-saline-bicarbonate therapy on amino acid metabolism is manifested by diminished A-V plasma alanine and glutamine differences across forearm tissue. Thus, the role played by the splanchnic bed both before and following corrective measures may be secondary to substrate availability. PMID:805076

  17. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg(2+)-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C-O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface. PMID:27619990

  18. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  19. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  20. Chromatographic method for determination of the free amino acid content of chamomile flowers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoli; Zhao, Dongsheng; Li, Xinxia; Meng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the free amino acid contents of chamomile flowers using reverse-phase high-performance column chromatography preceded by pre-column derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC), and to determine the reliability of this method. Materials and Methods: Derivatization with reconstituted AQC was used to prepare the samples and standards for injection into the chromatography column. The peaks were analyzed by fluorescence detection (λ excitation, 250 nm; λ emission, 395 nm. Results: Alanine, proline, and leucine were the most abundant amino acids, whereas tyrosine and methionine were the least abundant. The linearity of the method was found to be good with amino acid concentrations of 0.012-0.36 μM. The precision was 0.05-1.36%; average recovery, 91.12-129.41%; and limit of detection, 0.006-0.058 μM. Conclusion: The method is reliable for determining the free amino acid content of different types of chamomile flowers. PMID:25709230

  1. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  2. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  3. Animal models of human amino acid responses.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2004-06-01

    The principal differences between experimental animals and humans with regard to amino acid responses are 1) growing animals partition most of their amino acid intake to protein accretion, whereas growing children partition most of their intake to maintenance; 2) invasive assessment procedures are common in animals but very limited in humans; and 3) humans can describe how they feel in response to amino acid levels or balances, whereas animals cannot. New (pharmacologic) uses of amino acids have been and are being discovered (e.g., cysteine, arginine, leucine, glutamine), and this makes it imperative that tolerance limits be established. Work with pigs suggests that excessive intake of methionine and tryptophan present the biggest problems, whereas excessive intake of threonine, glutamate, and the branched-chain amino acids seems to be well tolerated. PMID:15173445

  4. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Source abundances of ultra heavy elements derived from UHCRE measurements.

    PubMed

    Domingo, C; Font, J; Baixeras, C; Fernandez, F

    1996-11-01

    A total of 205 tracks have been located, measured, and positively identified as originating from Ultra Heavy (Z > or = 65) cosmic ray ions with energies over 2 GeV/amu in the 10 UHCRE plastic track detector (mainly Lexan polycarbonate) stacks studied by our Group. About 40 values of reduced etch rate S have been obtained along each of these tracks. A method based on determining the gradient of S, together with calibration in accelerators, is used to determine the charge of each ion resulting in one of such tracks to obtain the charge spectrum of the recorded Ultra Heavy ions. The abundance ratio of ions with 87 < or = Z < or = 100 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 as well as that of ions with 81 < or = Z < or = 86 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 80 are calculated at 0.016 and 0.32, respectively, which agree with the values obtained from measurements in the HEAO-3 and Ariel-6 experiments. The abundance ratio of ions with 70 < or = Z < or = 73 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 is also calculated, but its value (0.074) did not seem to be significant because of our detectors' low registration efficiency in the charge range 70 < or = Z < or = 73. A computer program developed by our Group, based on the Leaky Box cosmic ray propagation model, has been used to determine the source abundances of cosmic ray nuclei with Z > or = 65 inferred from the abundances measured in the UHCRE. It appeared that r-process synthesized elements were overabundant compared to the Solar System abundances, as predicted by other authors. PMID:11540515

  6. Relative Amino Acid Concentrations as a Signature for Parent Body Processes of Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kminek, Gerhard; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Most meteorites are thought to have originated from objects in the asteroid belt. Carbonaceous chondrites, which contain significant amounts of organic carbon including complex organic compounds, have also been suggested to be derived from comets. The current model for the synthesis of organic compounds found in carbonaceous chondrites includes the survival of interstellar organic compounds and the processing of some of these compounds on the meteoritic parent body. The amino acid composition of five CM carbonaceous chondrites, two CIs, one CR, and one CV3 have been measured using hot water extraction-vapor hydrolysis, OPA/NAC derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Total amino acid abundances in the bulk meteorites as well as the amino acid concentrations relative to glycine = 1.0 for beta-alanine, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and D-alanine were determined. Additional data for three Antarctic CM meteorites were obtained from the literature. All CM meteorites analyzed in this study show a complex distribution of amino acids and a high variability in total concentration ranging from approx. 15,300 to approx. 5800 parts per billion (ppb), while the CIs show a total amino acid abundance of approx. 4300 ppb. The relatively (compared to glycine) high AIB content found in all the CMs is a strong indicator that Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis is the dominant pathway for the formation of amino acids found in these meteorites. The data from the Antarctic CM carbonaceous chondrites are inconsistent with the results from the other CMs, perhaps due to influences from the Antarctic ice that were effective during their residence time. In contrast to CMs, the data from the CI carbonaceous chondrites indicate that the Strecker synthesis was not active on their parent bodies.

  7. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  8. Genetics of Amino Acid Taste and Appetite.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Glendinning, John I; Inoue, Masashi; Li, Xia; Manita, Satoshi; McCaughey, Stuart A; Murata, Yuko; Reed, Danielle R; Tordoff, Michael G; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-07-01

    The consumption of amino acids by animals is controlled by both oral and postoral mechanisms. We used a genetic approach to investigate these mechanisms. Our studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in voluntary amino acid consumption, and these differences depend on sensory and nutritive properties of amino acids. Like humans, mice perceive some amino acids as having a sweet (sucrose-like) taste and others as having an umami (glutamate-like) taste. Mouse strain differences in the consumption of some sweet-tasting amino acids (d-phenylalanine, d-tryptophan, and l-proline) are associated with polymorphisms of a taste receptor, type 1, member 3 gene (Tas1r3), and involve differential peripheral taste responsiveness. Strain differences in the consumption of some other sweet-tasting amino acids (glycine, l-alanine, l-glutamine, and l-threonine) do not depend on Tas1r3 polymorphisms and so must be due to allelic variation in other, as yet unknown, genes involved in sweet taste. Strain differences in the consumption of l-glutamate may depend on postingestive rather than taste mechanisms. Thus, genes and physiologic mechanisms responsible for strain differences in the consumption of each amino acid depend on the nature of its taste and postingestive properties. Overall, mouse strain differences in amino acid taste and appetite have a complex genetic architecture. In addition to the Tas1r3 gene, these differences depend on other genes likely involved in determining the taste and postingestive effects of amino acids. The identification of these genes may lead to the discovery of novel mechanisms that regulate amino acid taste and appetite. PMID:27422518

  9. Interactions of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine with selected amino acids and with albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliber, Marta; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Effect of selected amino acids (glycine, L-histidine, L-cysteine, L-serine, L-tryptophan) and albumin on the spectroscopic properties and photostability of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine (ZnPcOC) was explored in the phosphate buffer at a pH of 7.0. The photodegradation of ZnPcOC alone and in the presence of amino acids or albumin has been investigated in aqueous phase using UV-366 nm and daylight irradiation. Kinetic analysis showed that the interaction with amino acids or albumin enhances the photostability of ZnPcOC. To answer the question of how zinc phthalocyanine interacts with amino acids extensive DFT calculations were performed. Analysis of the optimized geometry features of ZnPcOC: amino acids complexes in the gas phase and in water environment as well as the BSSE corrected interaction energies indicates that the more likely is the formation of equatorial complexes in which H-bonds are formed between the COOH groups of the phthalocyanine and carboxyl or amino groups of amino acids. UV-Vis spectra calculated by employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) are also consistent with this conclusion.

  10. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  11. Trifluoroselenomethionine: A New Unnatural Amino Acid.

    PubMed

    Block, Eric; Booker, Squire J; Flores-Penalba, Sonia; George, Graham N; Gundala, Sivaji; Landgraf, Bradley J; Liu, Jun; Lodge, Stephene N; Pushie, M Jake; Rozovsky, Sharon; Vattekkatte, Abith; Yaghi, Rama; Zeng, Huawei

    2016-09-15

    Trifluoroselenomethionine (TFSeM), a new unnatural amino acid, was synthesized in seven steps from N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-l-aspartic acid tert-butyl ester. TFSeM shows enhanced methioninase-induced cytotoxicity, relative to selenomethionine (SeM), toward HCT-116 cells derived from human colon cancer. Mechanistic explanations for this enhanced activity are computationally and experimentally examined. Comparison of TFSeM and SeM by selenium EXAFS and DFT calculations showed them to be spectroscopically and structurally very similar. Nonetheless, when two different variants of the protein GB1 were expressed in an Escherichia coli methionine auxotroph cell line in the presence of TFSeM and methionine (Met) in a 9:1 molar ratio, it was found that, surprisingly, 85 % of the proteins contained SeM residues, even though no SeM had been added, thus implying loss of the trifluoromethyl group from TFSeM. The transformation of TFSeM into SeM is enzymatically catalyzed by E. coli extracts, but TFSeM is not a substrate of E. coli methionine adenosyltransferase. PMID:27383291

  12. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  13. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  14. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  15. Crystal structure of 4-amino-1-benzyl-1,2,4-triazolin-5-one.

    PubMed

    Laus, Gerhard; Kahlenberg, Volker; Schottenberger, Herwig

    2014-10-01

    The title compound, C9H10N4O, was obtained unintentionally by hydrolysis of 4-amino-1-benzyl-5-methyl-sulfanyl-1,2,4-triazolium tetra-fluoro-borate in the presence of sodium azide. In the crystal, alternating layers of polar amino-triazolinone and apolar benzene moieties are observed. N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amino and carbonyl groups form infinite chains along [010]. These infinite chains are linked by additional C-H⋯O contacts. PMID:25484684

  16. Prebiotic thermal polymerization of crystals of amino acids via the diketopiperazine reaction.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, F G; Ramos-Bernal, S; Negrón-Mendoza, A

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we continue our studies on the thermal prebiotic oligomerization of amino acids. The next step is to consider all four types of electromagnetic interactions that our model may admit. In addition, only the polymerization of amino acids via the formation of diketopiperazine, which arises from the cyclodehydration of two amino acids, will be considered. By assuming that only one residue group of two will predominate in the diketopiperazine molecule, it is possible to reduce the three-body problem to a simpler situation with the two objects that we have already solved. PMID:17980955

  17. Common amino acid domain among endopolygalacturonases of ascomycete fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Keon, J P; Waksman, G

    1990-01-01

    The endopolygalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.15) enzymes produced in vitro by three ascomycete fungi, Aspergillus niger, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum were studied by using thin-layer isoelectric focusing and activity stain overlay techniques. The polygalacturonases from A. niger and S. sclerotiorum consisted of numerous isoforms, whereas the endopolygalacturonase from C. lindemuthianum consisted of a single protein species. The most abundant endopolygalacturonase isoform produced by each of these organisms was purified and characterized. Biochemical parameters, including molecular weight, isoelectric point, kinetic parameters, temperature and pH optima, and thermal stability, were determined. Considerable differences in physical and chemical properties were demonstrated among these fungal polygalacturonases. Antibodies raised against individual proteins exhibited little cross-reaction, suggesting that these enzymes differ structurally as well as biochemically. In contrast, the analysis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the three proteins showed extensive homology, particularly in a region labeled domain 1 in which 84% of the amino acids were conserved. Images PMID:2403258

  18. Hyperdimensional analysis of amino acid pair distributions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Svend B; Mortensen, Rasmus J; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Arnason, Omar; Söring, Jón; Petersen, Steffen B

    2011-01-01

    Our manuscript presents a novel approach to protein structure analyses. We have organized an 8-dimensional data cube with protein 3D-structural information from 8706 high-resolution non-redundant protein-chains with the aim of identifying packing rules at the amino acid pair level. The cube contains information about amino acid type, solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence distance, secondary structure and sequence length. We are able to pose structural queries to the data cube using program ProPack. The response is a 1, 2 or 3D graph. Whereas the response is of a statistical nature, the user can obtain an instant list of all PDB-structures where such pair is found. The user may select a particular structure, which is displayed highlighting the pair in question. The user may pose millions of different queries and for each one he will receive the answer in a few seconds. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the data cube as well as the programs, we have selected well known structural features, disulphide bridges and salt bridges, where we illustrate how the queries are posed, and how answers are given. Motifs involving cysteines such as disulphide bridges, zinc-fingers and iron-sulfur clusters are clearly identified and differentiated. ProPack also reveals that whereas pairs of Lys residues virtually never appear in close spatial proximity, pairs of Arg are