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Sample records for abundant centre hypothesis

  1. Environmental Domains and Range-Limiting Mechanisms: Testing the Abundant Centre Hypothesis Using Southern African Sandhoppers

    PubMed Central

    Baldanzi, Simone; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Cannicci, Stefano; Porri, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Predicting shifts of species geographical ranges is a fundamental challenge for conservation ecologists given the great complexity of factors involved in setting range limits. Distributional patterns are frequently modelled to “simplify” species responses to the environment, yet the central mechanisms that drive a particular pattern are rarely understood. We evaluated the distributions of two sandhopper species (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae), Talorchestia capensis and Africorchestia quadrispinosa along the Namibian and South African coasts, encompassing three biogeographic regions influenced by two different oceanographic systems, the Benguela and Agulhas currents. We aimed to test whether the Abundant Centre Hypothesis (ACH) can explain the distributions of these species’ abundances, sizes and sex ratios and examined which environmental parameters influence/drive these distributions. Animals were collected during a once-off survey at 29 sites over c.3500 km of coastline. The ACH was tested using a non-parametric constraint space analysis of the goodness of fit of five hypothetical models. Distance Based Linear Modelling (DistLM) was performed to evaluate which environmental traits influenced the distribution data. Abundance, size and sex ratio showed different patterns of distribution. A ramped model fitted the abundance (Ramped North) and size (Ramped South) distribution for A. quadrispinosa. The Inverse Quadratic model fitted the size distribution of T. capensis. Beach slope, salinity, sand temperature and percentage of detritus found on the shore at the time of collection played important roles in driving the abundance of A. quadrispinosa. T. capensis was mainly affected by salinity and the morphodynamic state of the beach. Our results provided only some support for the ACH predictions. The DistLM confirmed that the physical state of the beach is an important factor for sandy beach organisms. The effect of salinity and temperature suggest metabolic

  2. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  3. Abundance matters: a field experiment testing the more individuals hypothesis for richness–productivity relationships

    PubMed Central

    Yee, D. A.; Juliano, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The more individuals hypothesis (MIH) postulates that productivity increases species richness by increasing mean equilibrium population size, thereby reducing the probability of local extinction. We tested the MIH for invertebrates colonizing microcosms that simulated tree holes by manipulating productivity through additions of leaf or animal detritus and subsequently determining the relationships among richness, total abundance, abundance per species, and measures of productivity. We quantified productivity as the rate of microorganism protein synthesis, microorganism metabolic rate, nutrient ion concentration, and type and amount of detritus. Microcosms with animal detritus attracted more species, more individuals per species, and more total individuals than did microcosms with similar amounts of leaf detritus. Relationships between richness or abundance and productivity varied with date. Richness in June increased as a linear function of productivity, whereas the power function predicted by the MIH fit best in July. Abundance in June and July was best described by a power function of productivity, but the linear function predicted by the MIH fit best in September. Abundance per species was best described by a power function of productivity in June and July. Path analysis showed that the indirect effect of productivity through abundance on richness that is predicted by MIH was important in all months, and that direct links between productivity and richness were unnecessary. Our results support many of the predictions of the MIH, but they also suggest that the effects of abundance on richness may be more complex than expected. PMID:17401581

  4. Distribution-abundance relationship for passerines breeding in Tunisian oases: test of the sampling hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Slaheddine; Boulinier, Thierry

    2004-05-01

    The positive relationship between local abundance and distribution of species is a widely recognized pattern in community ecology. However, it has been suggested that this relationship can simply be an artefact of sampling because locally rare species are less detectable then locally abundant ones, and hence their distribution can easily be underestimated. Here, we use count data to investigate the relationship between distribution and abundance of passerines breeding in a sample of oases from southern Tunisia, and we provide a test of the sampling artefact hypothesis. In particular, we checked for a difference in detection probability between localized and widespread species, and we tested if increasing the sampling effort affects the significance of the relationship. A significant positive relationship between the average local abundance of passerine species and the proportion of occupied oases was found. The use of a capture-recapture approach allowed us to estimate and to compare the detection probabilities of localized and widespread species subsets. We found that localized species were locally less detectable than widespread species, which is consistent with the main assumption of the sampling artefact hypothesis. However, increasing the detection probability of species by conducting more counts did not affect the significance of the relationship, which did not give support to the sampling artefact hypothesis. Our work implies that sampling contributed to the distribution-abundance relationship we found, but that it is unlikely that such a relationship could entirely be explained by an artefact of sampling. It also underlines the insight that can be gained by using probabilistic approaches of estimating species number and detection probability when attempting to disentangle sampling from ecological effects in community ecology studies.

  5. Assessing the ceRNA hypothesis with quantitative measurements of miRNA and target abundance

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Rémy; Agarwal, Vikram; Stefano, Joanna; Bartel, David P; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies have reported that competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) can act as sponges for a microRNA (miRNA) through their binding sites and that changes in ceRNA abundances from individual genes can modulate the miRNA’s activity. Consideration of this hypothesis would benefit from knowing the quantitative relationship between a miRNA and its endogenous target sites. Here, we altered intracellular target-site abundance through expression of a miR-122 target in hepatocytes and livers, and analyzed the effects on miR-122 target genes. Target repression was released in a threshold-like manner at high target-site abundance (≥1.5×105 added target sites per cell), and this threshold was insensitive to the effective levels of the miRNA. Furthermore, in response to extreme metabolic liver disease models, global target-site abundance of hepatocytes did not change sufficiently to affect miRNA-mediated repression. Thus, modulation of miRNA target abundance is unlikely to cause significant effects on gene expression and metabolism through a ceRNA effect. PMID:24793693

  6. Can the source–sink hypothesis explain macrofaunal abundance patterns in the abyss? A modelling test

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Sarah M.; Smith, Craig R.; Thurnherr, Andreas M.

    2015-01-01

    Low food availability is a major structuring force in deep-sea benthic communities, sustaining only very low densities of organisms in parts of the abyss. These low population densities may result in an Allee effect, whereby local reproductive success is inhibited, and populations are maintained by larval dispersal from bathyal slopes. This slope–abyss source–sink (SASS) hypothesis suggests that the abyssal seafloor constitutes a vast sink habitat with macrofaunal populations sustained only by an influx of larval ‘refugees' from source areas on continental slopes, where higher productivity sustains greater population densities. Abyssal macrofaunal population densities would thus be directly related to larval inputs from bathyal source populations. We evaluate three predictions derived from the SASS hypothesis: (i) slope-derived larvae can be passively transported to central abyssal regions within a single larval period, (ii) projected larval export from slopes to the abyss reproduces global patterns of macrofaunal abundance and (iii) macrofaunal abundance decreases with distance from the continental slope. We find that abyssal macrofaunal populations are unlikely to be sustained solely through influx of larvae from slope sources. Rather, local reproduction probably sustains macrofaunal populations in relatively high-productivity abyssal areas, which must also be considered as potential larval source areas for more food-poor abyssal regions. PMID:25948686

  7. Can the source-sink hypothesis explain macrofaunal abundance patterns in the abyss? A modelling test.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sarah M; Smith, Craig R; Thurnherr, Andreas M

    2015-06-01

    Low food availability is a major structuring force in deep-sea benthic communities, sustaining only very low densities of organisms in parts of the abyss. These low population densities may result in an Allee effect, whereby local reproductive success is inhibited, and populations are maintained by larval dispersal from bathyal slopes. This slope-abyss source-sink (SASS) hypothesis suggests that the abyssal seafloor constitutes a vast sink habitat with macrofaunal populations sustained only by an influx of larval 'refugees' from source areas on continental slopes, where higher productivity sustains greater population densities. Abyssal macrofaunal population densities would thus be directly related to larval inputs from bathyal source populations. We evaluate three predictions derived from the SASS hypothesis: (i) slope-derived larvae can be passively transported to central abyssal regions within a single larval period, (ii) projected larval export from slopes to the abyss reproduces global patterns of macrofaunal abundance and (iii) macrofaunal abundance decreases with distance from the continental slope. We find that abyssal macrofaunal populations are unlikely to be sustained solely through influx of larvae from slope sources. Rather, local reproduction probably sustains macrofaunal populations in relatively high-productivity abyssal areas, which must also be considered as potential larval source areas for more food-poor abyssal regions. PMID:25948686

  8. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability.

  9. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability. PMID:25352979

  10. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability. PMID:25352979

  11. Energy density and variability in abundance of pigeon guillemot prey: Support for the quality-variability trade-off hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Abookire, A.A.; Robards, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    1. The quality-variability trade-off hypothesis predicts that (i) energy density (kJ g-1) and spatial-temporal variability in abundance are positively correlated in nearshore marine fishes; and (ii) prey selection by a nearshore piscivore, the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba Pallas), is negatively affected by variability in abundance. 2. We tested these predictions with data from a 4-year study that measured fish abundance with beach seines and pigeon guillemot prey utilization with visual identification of chick meals. 3. The first prediction was supported. Pearson's correlation showed that fishes with higher energy density were more variable on seasonal (r = 0.71) and annual (r = 0.66) time scales. Higher energy density fishes were also more abundant overall (r = 0.85) and more patchy at a scale of 10s of km (r = 0.77). 4. Prey utilization by pigeon guillemots was strongly non-random. Relative preference, defined as the difference between log-ratio transformed proportions of individual prey taxa in chick diets and beach seine catches, was significantly different from zero for seven of the eight main prey categories. 5. The second prediction was also supported. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to summarize variability in correlated prey characteristics (energy density, availability and variability in abundance). Two PCA scores explained 32% of observed variability in pigeon guillemot prey utilization. Seasonal variability in abundance was negatively weighted by these PCA scores, providing evidence of risk-averse selection. Prey availability, energy density and km-scale variability in abundance were positively weighted. 6. Trophic interactions are known to create variability in resource distribution in other systems. We propose that links between resource quality and the strength of trophic interactions may produce resource quality-variability trade-offs.

  12. Hypothesis-testing proposed control of strain weakening by crustal quartz abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, A. R.; Schutt, D.; Putirka, K. D.; Jean, M. M.; Pérez-Gussinyé, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé (Nature, 2011) observed a surprising correlation of low crustal seismic velocity ratio, VP/V_S, with both high lithospheric temperature and Cordilleran deformation. We hypothesize that the relationship is most plausibly explained by a robust dynamical feedback in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration, and further weakening. Strain-weakening by such a feedback mechanism not only would explain Wilson-cycle stationarity and spatial distributions of deformation, but it also would lend insight into the timing and distribution of thermal uplift. Here we test the hypothesis by examining heat transfer processes in the Cordillera. Preliminary modeling of western US thermal structure, assuming crustal heat production that linearly relates surface heat flow to surface radiogenic heating, suggests that nearly half of all thermal transfer in Cordilleran lithosphere is advective. We will test the effects of uncertainty in crustal heat-production by examining alternative thermal models with upper mantle temperatures derived from Pn and Rayleigh phase velocity measurements, as well as heat production modeled for compositions inferred from crustal VP/V_S. Assuming the estimate proves robust, advective heat transfer in the Cordillera is roughly an order-of-magnitude higher than can be explained by McKenzie-style stretching at geodetically-observed strain rates. This implies a very significant role for mass transfer via melts and other fluids. Spatial frequency distributions of NAVDAT volcanism in the western US suggest a strong bias toward extrusion in quartz-rich crust, opposite the relationship expected if spatial expressions of volcanism were primarily controlled by melt/crustal relative buoyancy. High 3He/4He ratios indicative of a mantle contribution similarly suggest a bias toward regions of quartz-rich crust. Both of these observations are

  13. Predator Diversity and Abundance Provide Little Support for the Enemies Hypothesis in Forests of High Tree Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Andreas; Both, Sabine; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Schmid, Bernhard; Zhou, Hongzhang; Assmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Predatory arthropods can exert strong top-down control on ecosystem functions. However, despite extensive theory and experimental manipulations of predator diversity, our knowledge about relationships between plant and predator diversity—and thus information on the relevance of experimental findings—for species-rich, natural ecosystems is limited. We studied activity abundance and species richness of epigeic spiders in a highly diverse forest ecosystem in subtropical China across 27 forest stands which formed a gradient in tree diversity of 25–69 species per plot. The enemies hypothesis predicts higher predator abundance and diversity, and concomitantly more effective top-down control of food webs, with increasing plant diversity. However, in our study, activity abundance and observed species richness of spiders decreased with increasing tree species richness. There was only a weak, non-significant relationship with tree richness when spider richness was rarefied, i.e. corrected for different total abundances of spiders. Only foraging guild richness (i.e. the diversity of hunting modes) of spiders was positively related to tree species richness. Plant species richness in the herb layer had no significant effects on spiders. Our results thus provide little support for the enemies hypothesis—derived from studies in less diverse ecosystems—of a positive relationship between predator and plant diversity. Our findings for an important group of generalist predators question whether stronger top-down control of food webs can be expected in the more plant diverse stands of our forest ecosystem. Biotic interactions could play important roles in mediating the observed relationships between spider and plant diversity, but further testing is required for a more detailed mechanistic understanding. Our findings have implications for evaluating the way in which theoretical predictions and experimental findings of functional predator effects apply to species-rich forest

  14. A critical size and period hypothesis to explain natural regulation of salmon abundance and the linkage to climate and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, R. J.; Mahnken, Conrad

    We hypothesise that salmon year class strength is determined in two stages during the first year in the ocean. There is an early natural mortality that is mostly related to predation, which is followed by a physiologically-based mortality. Juvenile salmon that fail to reach a critical size by the end of their first marine summer do not survive the following winter. In this study we describe our initial tests of this critical size and critical period hypothesis using data from ocean surveys of juvenile salmon and from experimental feeding studies on coho. Conservative swept volume abundance estimates for juvenile coho, and possibly chinook, indicate that there is high mortality in fall and winter during their first year in the sea. Studies of otolith weight show that the length and otolith-weight relationship for young coho changes in the early fall of their first ocean year. Studies of growth and associated hormone levels in feeding studies show that slow growing juvenile coho are stunted and deficient in an insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Juvenile coho sampled in September had low IGF-I values, indicative of poor growth. The results of these studies provide evidence for the general hypothesis that growth-related mortality occurs late in the first marine year and may be important in determining the strength of the year class (brood year). The link between total mortality and climate could be operating via the availability of nutrients regulating the food supply and hence competition for food (i.e. bottom-up regulation).

  15. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-02-23

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance-ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  16. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. II. Lithium abundance analysis of the red giant clump sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamów, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Standard stellar evolution theory does not predict existence of Li-rich giant stars. Several mechanisms for Li-enrichment have been proposed to operate at certain locations inside some stars. The actual mechanism operating in real stars is still unknown. Aims: Using the sample of 348 stars from the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search, for which uniformly determined atmospheric parameters are available, with chemical abundances and rotational velocities presented here, we investigate various channels of Li enrichment in giants. We also study Li-overabundant giants in more detail in search for origin of their peculiarities. Methods: Our work is based on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph, which we use for determination of abundances and rotational velocities. The Li abundance was determined from the 7Li λ670.8 nm line, while we use a more extended set of lines for α-elements abundances. In a series of Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, we compare Li-overabundant giants with other stars in the sample. We also use available IR photometric and kinematical data in search for evidence of mass-loss. We investigate properties of the most Li-abundant giants in more detail by using multi-epoch precise radial velocities. Results: We present Li and α-elements abundances, as well as rotational velocities for 348 stars. We detected Li in 92 stars, of which 82 are giants. Eleven of them show significant Li abundance A(Li)NLTE> 1.4 and seven of them are Li-overabundant objects, according to common criterion of A(Li) > 1.5 and their location on HR diagram, including TYC 0684-00553-1 and TYC 3105-00152-1, which are two giants with Li abundances close to meteoritic level. For another 271 stars, upper limits of Li abundance are presented. We confirmed three objects with increased stellar rotation. We show that Li-overabundant giants are among the most massive stars from our sample and show larger than average

  17. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance–ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  18. EXAMINATION OF THE MASS-DEPENDENT Li DEPLETION HYPOTHESIS BY THE Li ABUNDANCES OF THE VERY METAL-POOR DOUBLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARY G166-45

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Ito, Hiroko; Tajitsu, Akito

    2012-05-20

    The Li abundances of the two components of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] -2.5) double-lined spectroscopic binary G166-45 (BD+26 Degree-Sign 2606) are determined separately based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the Subaru Telescope High Dispersion Spectrograph and its image slicer. From the photometric colors and the mass ratio, the effective temperatures of the primary and secondary components are estimated to be 6350 {+-} 100 K and 5830 {+-} 170 K, respectively. The Li abundance of the primary (A(Li) = 2.23) agrees well with the Spite plateau value, while that of the secondary is slightly lower (A(Li) = 2.11). Such a discrepancy of the Li abundances between the two components is previously found in the extremely metal-poor, double-lined spectroscopic binary CS 22876-032; however, the discrepancy in G166-45 is much smaller. The results agree with the trends found for Li abundance as a function of effective temperature (and of stellar mass) of main-sequence stars with -3.0 < [Fe/H] < -2.0, suggesting that the depletion of Li at T{sub eff} {approx} 5800 K is not particularly large in this metallicity range. The significant Li depletion found in CS 22876-032B is a phenomenon only found in the lowest metallicity range ([Fe/H] < -3).

  19. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  1. Seasonal changes in mollusc abundance in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, Banc d'Arguin (Mauritania): Testing the ‘depletion by shorebirds' hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; Saoud, Younès; van Gils, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    At temperate latitudes densities and biomass of intertidal molluscs tend to be strongly seasonal. Here we provide a comparative study on seasonality of bivalves and gastropods in the tropical intertidal seagrass-covered soft sediment environment of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania (20°N, 16°W). In this system, benthivorous shorebirds exert considerable predation pressure with strong seasonal variations. It has been proposed that during the period when (adult) shorebirds are absent (May-August) benthic biomass would be able to recover, but a first test was inconclusive. Over a full year (March 2011-February 2012), each month we sampled benthic invertebrates at sixteen permanent sites. The total of 3763 specimens comprised 20 species, representing eight orders and 19 families. Bivalves were much more common than gastropods. The bivalve Loripes lucinalis dominated the assemblage throughout the year (58% of total number), followed by Dosinia isocardia (10%), Senilia senilis (8%) and the gastropod Gibbula umbilicalis (6%). Average biomass amounted to 32 g AFDM/m2, of which the large West-African bloody cockle Senilia made up three-quarter, Loripes 16%, Gibbula 2% and Dosinia 1%. Across the 20 species, lowest densities were reached in late spring (May) and summer (Aug.), whereas highest densities occurred in autumn (Oct.). The lowest overall density of 676 specimens/m² in August more than doubled to a peak density of 1538 specimens/m² in October, most of the increase being due to strong recruitment in both Loripes (densities increasing from 322 specimens/m² in Sept. to 785 specimens/m² in Oct.) and Dosinia (densities increasing from 18 specimens/m² in Aug. to 265 specimens/m² in Sept.). Our results suggest that by the time the feathered molluscivore predators returned in high numbers to Banc d'Arguin (after their summer breeding season in the Arctic), benthic animals were at a peak. In order to quantitatively understand the seasonal changes in mollusc abundance, we

  2. Seasonal Abundance of Mango Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Ecological Implications for Their Management in Mango and Cashew Orchards in Benin (Centre & North).

    PubMed

    Vayssières, J-F; De Meyer, M; Ouagoussounon, I; Sinzogan, A; Adandonon, A; Korie, S; Wargui, R; Anato, F; Houngbo, H; Didier, C; De Bon, H; Goergen, G

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of a large-scale (six orchards) and long-term (5-yr) study on seasonal population fluctuations of fruit flies (Diptera Tephritidae) in mango (2005-2009) and cashew (2007-2009) orchards in the Borgou Department, Benin.During the five consecutive years of mango fruit fly monitoring, 25 tephritid species were captured including three species of Bactrocera, 11 of Ceratitis, and 11 of Dacus, which is represented by 2,138,150 specimens in mango orchards. We observed significant differences in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) counts between "high" and "low" mango production years from 2005 to 2008 but not in Ceratitis cosyra (Walker) counts. The native species, C. cosyra, the most abundant species during the dry season, peaked beginning of May, while the exotic species, B. dorsalis, the most abundant species during the rainy season, peaked in June. Preliminary results underlined the role of nine species of wild hosts and seven species of cultivated ones around mango orchards that played an important role in maintaining B. dorsalis in this Sudan zone all year round. The presence of C. cosyra stretched over 9 mo.During the first 14 wk of tephritid monitoring on cashew orchards situated near mango orchards, most flies (62%) were captured in traps positioned in cashew orchards, showing the strong interest of an early fly control on cashew before the mango season. According to these results, in the Sudan zone, effective and compatible control methods as proposed by the IPM package validated by the West African Fruit Fly Initiative project against mango fruit flies are proposed for a large regional tephritid control program in same zones of West Africa.

  3. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  4. Centrosomes as signalling centres

    PubMed Central

    Arquint, Christian; Gabryjonczyk, Anna-Maria; Nigg, Erich A.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes—as well as the related spindle pole bodies (SPBs) of yeast—have been extensively studied from the perspective of their microtubule-organizing roles. Moreover, the biogenesis and duplication of these organelles have been the subject of much attention, and the importance of centrosomes and the centriole–ciliary apparatus for human disease is well recognized. Much less developed is our understanding of another facet of centrosomes and SPBs, namely their possible role as signalling centres. Yet, many signalling components, including kinases and phosphatases, have been associated with centrosomes and spindle poles, giving rise to the hypothesis that these organelles might serve as hubs for the integration and coordination of signalling pathways. In this review, we discuss a number of selected studies that bear on this notion. We cover different processes (cell cycle control, development, DNA damage response) and organisms (yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates), but have made no attempt to be comprehensive. This field is still young and although the concept of centrosomes and SPBs as signalling centres is attractive, it remains primarily a concept—in need of further scrutiny. We hope that this review will stimulate thought and experimentation. PMID:25047618

  5. Physiopathological hypothesis of cellulite.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; de Godoy, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro

    2009-08-31

    A series of questions are asked concerning this condition including as regards to its name, the consensus about the histopathological findings, physiological hypothesis and treatment of the disease. We established a hypothesis for cellulite and confirmed that the clinical response is compatible with this hypothesis. Hence this novel approach brings a modern physiological concept with physiopathologic basis and clinical proof of the hypothesis. We emphasize that the choice of patient, correct diagnosis of cellulite and the technique employed are fundamental to success.

  6. Physiopathological Hypothesis of Cellulite

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; de Godoy, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro

    2009-01-01

    A series of questions are asked concerning this condition including as regards to its name, the consensus about the histopathological findings, physiological hypothesis and treatment of the disease. We established a hypothesis for cellulite and confirmed that the clinical response is compatible with this hypothesis. Hence this novel approach brings a modern physiological concept with physiopathologic basis and clinical proof of the hypothesis. We emphasize that the choice of patient, correct diagnosis of cellulite and the technique employed are fundamental to success. PMID:19756187

  7. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis)

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  8. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their "thermodynamic front" guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  9. Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-03-20

    Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a hypothesis analysis method includes providing a hypothesis, providing an indicator which at least one of supports and refutes the hypothesis, using the indicator, associating evidence with the hypothesis, weighting the association of the evidence with the hypothesis, and using the weighting, providing information regarding the accuracy of the hypothesis.

  10. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  11. Abundances in Sagittarius Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Zaggia, S.; Sbordone, L.; Santin, P.; Monaco, L.; Monai, S.; Molaro, P.; Marconi, G.; Girardi, L.; Ferraro, F.; di Marcantonio, P.; Caffau, E.; Bellazzini, M.

    The Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal is a very complex galaxy, which has undergone prolonged star formation. From the very first high resolution chemical analysis of Sgr stars, conducted using spectra obtained during the commissioning of UVES at VLT, it was clear that the star had undergone a high level of chemical processing, at variance with most of the other Local Group dwarf spheroidals. Thanks to FLAMES at VLT we now have accurate metallicities and abundances of alpha-chain elements for about 150 stars, which provide the first reliable metallicity distribution for this galaxy. Besides the already known high metallicity tail the existence of a metal-poor population has also been highlighted, although an assessment of the fraction of Sgr stars which belong to this population requires a larger sample. From our data it is also obvious that Sagittarius is a nucleated galaxy and that the centre of the nucleus coincides with M54, as already shown by Monaco et al.

  12. The dysconnection hypothesis (2016).

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Brown, Harriet R; Siemerkus, Jakob; Stephan, Klaas E

    2016-10-01

    Twenty years have passed since the dysconnection hypothesis was first proposed (Friston and Frith, 1995; Weinberger, 1993). In that time, neuroscience has witnessed tremendous advances: we now live in a world of non-invasive neuroanatomy, computational neuroimaging and the Bayesian brain. The genomics era has come and gone. Connectomics and large-scale neuroinformatics initiatives are emerging everywhere. So where is the dysconnection hypothesis now? This article considers how the notion of schizophrenia as a dysconnection syndrome has developed - and how it has been enriched by recent advances in clinical neuroscience. In particular, we examine the dysconnection hypothesis in the context of (i) theoretical neurobiology and computational psychiatry; (ii) the empirical insights afforded by neuroimaging and associated connectomics - and (iii) how bottom-up (molecular biology and genetics) and top-down (systems biology) perspectives are converging on the mechanisms and nature of dysconnections in schizophrenia. PMID:27450778

  13. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships. PMID:16173891

  14. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships.

  15. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  16. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  17. The interactive brain hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel; De Jaegher, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Enactive approaches foreground the role of interpersonal interaction in explanations of social understanding. This motivates, in combination with a recent interest in neuroscientific studies involving actual interactions, the question of how interactive processes relate to neural mechanisms involved in social understanding. We introduce the Interactive Brain Hypothesis (IBH) in order to help map the spectrum of possible relations between social interaction and neural processes. The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development and current function of social brain mechanisms, even in cases where social understanding happens in the absence of immediate interaction. We examine the plausibility of this hypothesis against developmental and neurobiological evidence and contrast it with the widespread assumption that mindreading is crucial to all social cognition. We describe the elements of social interaction that bear most directly on this hypothesis and discuss the empirical possibilities open to social neuroscience. We propose that the link between coordination dynamics and social understanding can be best grasped by studying transitions between states of coordination. These transitions form part of the self-organization of interaction processes that characterize the dynamics of social engagement. The patterns and synergies of this self-organization help explain how individuals understand each other. Various possibilities for role-taking emerge during interaction, determining a spectrum of participation. This view contrasts sharply with the observational stance that has guided research in social neuroscience until recently. We also introduce the concept of readiness to interact to describe the practices and dispositions that are summoned in situations of social significance (even if not interactive). This latter idea links interactive factors to more classical observational scenarios. PMID:22701412

  18. Mesoamerican cosmovision: an hypothesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franch, J. A.

    In the present conference the author explains a new hypothesis to interpret the cosmogonic vision of the people and the cultures from the Mesoamerican area during the precolumbian period. The hypothesis at issue consists in irregular octahedrical form, or as two pyramids jointed by the base in such a manner that the celestial pyramid has thirteen heavens in the form of platforms in such a way that the zenith is the seventh platform; on the contrary, the infraworld pyramid has nine platforms. The sequence of the heavens comes to an end in the number 13 heaven, or the West side of the world, that is to say the Omeyocan or the Tamoanchan, whereas the ninth infraworld is the Apochcalocan. This is the point of the intercommunication between the celestial world and the infraworld, the place of Death and Birth. In order to develop that hypothesis the author has a great number of ethnographic testimonies taken from Totonacs, Tzotziles, Mayas and, along with this, from Southamerican areas, as it is the case of the Kogi, of Colombia. The author has also considered the evidence that proceeds from the ancient codices as well as numerous samples of sculptures and reliefs, especially from the Aztec culture.

  19. Serotonergic hypothesis of sleepwalking.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2005-01-01

    Despite widespread prevalence of sleepwalking, its etiology and pathophysiology are not well understood. However, there is some evidence that sleepwalking can be precipitated by sleep-disordered breathing. A hypothesis is proposed that serotonergic system may be a link between sleep-disordered breathing and sleepwalking. Serotonergic neurons meet basic requirements for such a role because they are activated by hypercapnia, provide a tonic excitatory drive that gates afferent inputs to motoneurons, and the activity of serotonergic neurons can be dissociated from the level of arousal. This paper discusses also drug-induced somnambulism and co-occurrence of sleepwalking and other disorders such as migraine and febrile illness.

  20. Pretoria Centre Reaches Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    On 5 July 2014 six members of the Pretoria Centre of ASSA braved the light pollution of one of the shopping malls in Centurion to reach out to shoppers a la John Dobson and to show them the moon, Mars and Saturn. Although the centre hosts regular monthly public observing evenings, it was felt that we should take astronomy to the people rather than wait for the people to come to us.

  1. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  2. The Bliss of Motor Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control – the problem of motor redundancy – was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past ten years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of “good variance” – variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance – have been documented across a variety of natural actions. “Good variance” helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance. PMID:22246105

  3. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  4. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  5. The GSO Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Glorian, J.-M.; Génot, V.; Rouillard, A.; Petit, P.; Palacios, A.; Caux, E.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-12-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the Grand Sud-Ouest Data Centre operated for INSU (CNRS) by the OMP--IRAP and the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, in a collaboration with the OASU--LAB in Bordeaux and OREME--LUPM in Montpellier.

  6. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may now…

  7. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  8. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  9. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, I. A.; Pilyugin, L. S.; Grebel, E. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the discs of 88 galaxies using Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey (CALIFA) Data Release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the centre of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) was also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) g and r bands of the photometric maps of SDSS Data Release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the discs of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e. the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, ≲0.05 dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxies. There is evidence for a flattening of the radial abundance gradient in the central part of 18 galaxies. We also estimated the geometric parameters (coordinates of the centre, the galaxy inclination and the position angle of the major axis) of our galaxies from the analysis of the abundance map. The photometry-map-based and the abundance-map-based geometrical parameters are relatively close to each other for the majority of the galaxies but the discrepancy is large for a few galaxies with a flat radial abundance gradient.

  10. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  11. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    PubMed

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  12. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  13. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  14. International Seismological Centre

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.; Hughes, A.

    1979-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre had its origins when the British seismologist Professor John Milne returned to England from Japan in 1895 to retire at Shide on the Isle of Eight. In cooperation with the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Milne had set up a number of seismographic stations around the world and, while Tokyo, had published a Catalogue of 8,33 Earthquakes Recorded in Japan, 1885-1892. 

  15. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  16. A new hypothesis of drug refractory epilepsy: neural network hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Xi, Zhi-Qin; Wu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2011-06-01

    Drug refractory is an important clinical problem in epilepsy, affecting a substantial number of patients globally. Mechanisms underlying drug refractory need to be understood to develop rational therapies. Current two prevailing theories on drug refractory epilepsy (DRE) include the target hypothesis and the transporter hypothesis. However, those hypotheses could not be adequate to explain the mechanisms of all the DRE. Thus, we propose another possible mechanism of DRE, which is neural network hypothesis. It is hypothesized that seizure-induced alterations of brain plasticity including axonal sprouting, synaptic reorganization, neurogenesis and gliosis could contribute to the formation of abnormal neural network, which has not only avoided the inhibitory effect of endogenous antiepileptic system but also prevented the traditional antiepileptic drugs from entering their targets, eventually leading to DRE. We will illustrate this hypothesis at molecular and structural level based on our recent studies and other related researches.

  17. Vision ergonomics at recycling centres.

    PubMed

    Hemphälä, Hillevi; Kihlstedt, Annika; Eklund, Jörgen

    2010-05-01

    All municipalities in Sweden offer their inhabitants a service for disposing of large-size and hazardous waste at local recycling centres. Opening hours at these centres include hours of darkness. The aims of this study were to 1) describe user and employee experiences of lighting and signs at Swedish recycling centres, 2) measure and assess the lighting system at the two recently built recycling centres in Linköping and to assess the legibility and visibility of the signs used and 3) propose recommendations regarding lighting and signs for recycling centres. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess experiences of employees and users, and light measurements were performed. By observing users, activities with different visual demands at different areas within the recycling centres were identified. Based on the literature, standards and stakeholder experiences, recommendations regarding lighting systems and sign design, illuminance, luminance and uniformity are proposed for recycling centres.

  18. Evaluating the Stage Learning Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating the Genevan stage learning hypothesis is illustrated by analyzing Inhelder, Sinclair, and Bovet's guided learning experiments (in "Learning and the Development of Cognition." Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1974). (Author/MP)

  19. An experimental test of Darwin's naturalization hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Tan, Jiaqi; Pu, Zhichao

    2010-04-01

    One of the oldest ideas in invasion biology, known as Darwin's naturalization hypothesis, suggests that introduced species are more successful in communities in which their close relatives are absent. We conducted the first experimental test of this hypothesis in laboratory bacterial communities varying in phylogenetic relatedness between resident and invading species with and without a protist bacterivore. As predicted, invasion success increased with phylogenetic distance between the invading and the resident bacterial species in both the presence and the absence of protistan bacterivory. The frequency of successful invader establishment was best explained by average phylogenetic distance between the invader and all resident species, possibly indicating limitation by the availability of the unexploited niche (i.e., organic substances in the medium capable of supporting the invader growth); invader abundance was best explained by phylogenetic distance between the invader and its nearest resident relative, possibly indicating limitation by the availability of the unexploited optimal niche (i.e., the subset of organic substances supporting the best invader growth). These results were largely driven by one resident bacterium (a subspecies of Serratia marcescens) posting the strongest resistance to the alien bacterium (another subspecies of S. marcescens). Overall, our findings support phylogenetic relatedness as a useful predictor of species invasion success.

  20. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  1. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning styles, but lecturers…

  2. Asynchronous hatching and food limitation: a test of Lack's hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan Knight

    1988-01-01

    Lack’s (1954, 1968) hypothesis that asynchronous hatching of altricial birds is an adaptive response to unpredictable food shortages during the breeding season was examined in the highly granivorous Zebra Finch (Poephila guttata). I compared growth and survival of nestlings in asynchronous and artificially created synchronous brood reared under food-limited and food-abundant conditions in an aviary. I also examined the role of parental experience on survival and growth of nestlings. There was no differential mortality of Zebra Finch nestlings due to either asynchrony or food abundance. Young in abundant food treatments grew more rapidly, however, than those in food restricted treatments. Heaviest Zebra Finch nestlings in a brood grew more quickly than their lightest siblings when food was limited, supporting Lack’s hypothesis. Further, differential survival of light and heavy siblings occurred when food was abundant, suggesting that asynchronous hatching can be maladaptive under some ecological conditions. Nestlings reared by inexperienced parents suffered greater mortality and slower growth when food was abundant than nestlings raised by experienced parents. Prefledging mass was correlated with size at adulthood.

  3. Counselor Hypothesis-Testing Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Newman, Lisa J.

    1983-01-01

    Reports two experiments relevant to the questioning strategies counselors use in testing their hypotheses about clients. Results supported the idea that counselors are able to take a tentative hypothesis about a client and test its accuracy against additional independent, unbiased observations of the client. (LLL)

  4. On the Weyl curvature hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2013-11-15

    The Weyl curvature hypothesis of Penrose attempts to explain the high homogeneity and isotropy, and the very low entropy of the early universe, by conjecturing the vanishing of the Weyl tensor at the Big-Bang singularity. In previous papers it has been proposed an equivalent form of Einstein’s equation, which extends it and remains valid at an important class of singularities (including in particular the Schwarzschild, FLRW, and isotropic singularities). Here it is shown that if the Big-Bang singularity is from this class, it also satisfies the Weyl curvature hypothesis. As an application, we study a very general example of cosmological models, which generalizes the FLRW model by dropping the isotropy and homogeneity constraints. This model also generalizes isotropic singularities, and a class of singularities occurring in Bianchi cosmologies. We show that the Big-Bang singularity of this model is of the type under consideration, and satisfies therefore the Weyl curvature hypothesis. -- Highlights: •The singularities we introduce are described by finite geometric/physical objects. •Our singularities have smooth Riemann and Weyl curvatures. •We show they satisfy Penrose’s Weyl curvature hypothesis (Weyl=0 at singularities). •Examples: FLRW, isotropic singularities, an extension of Schwarzschild’s metric. •Example: a large class of singularities which may be anisotropic and inhomogeneous.

  5. Argument as Hypothesis-Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarefsky, David

    The argumentative perspective enables rhetoric to function in a manner analagous to science or analytic philosophy, yielding reliable knowledge about nonempirical topics, which other methods cannot address. In short, argumentation is the equivalent of hypothesis-testing. Forensics should offer laboratory experience in developing this perspective…

  6. Gender and the hygiene hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Clough, Sharyn

    2011-02-01

    The hygiene hypothesis offers an explanation for the correlation, well-established in the industrialized nations of North and West, between increased hygiene and sanitation, and increased rates of asthma and allergies. Recent studies have added to the scope of the hypothesis, showing a link between decreased exposure to certain bacteria and parasitic worms, and increased rates of depression and intestinal auto-immune disorders, respectively. What remains less often discussed in the research on these links is that women have higher rates than men of asthma and allergies, as well as many auto-immune disorders, and also depression. The current paper introduces a feminist understanding of gender socialization to the epidemiological and immunological picture. That standards of cleanliness are generally higher for girls than boys, especially under the age of five when children are more likely to be under close adult supervision, is a robust phenomenon in industrialized nations, and some research points to a cross-cultural pattern. I conclude that, insofar as the hygiene hypothesis successfully identifies standards of hygiene and sanitation as mediators of immune health, then attention to the relevant patterns of gender socialization is important. The review also makes clear that adding a feminist analysis of gender socialization to the hygiene hypothesis helps explain variation in morbidity rates not addressed by other sources and responds to a number of outstanding puzzles in current research. Alternative explanations for the sex differences in the relevant morbidity rates are also discussed (e.g., the effects of estrogens). Finally, new sources of evidence for the hygiene hypothesis are suggested in the form of cross-cultural and other natural experiments. PMID:21195519

  7. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  8. On a possible cause of discrepancy between Yohkoh and SMM calcium abundance determinations in flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, J.; Kepa, A.; Bentley, R. D.

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated problems concerning the discrepancy between estimates of absolute calcium abundances (A Ca) in solar flares as derived from soft X-ray high resolution spectra as obtained from Yohkoh and Solar Maximum Mission ( SMM) Bragg spectrometers. The analysis of these spectra allows for determination of absolute calcium abundance since both Ca XIX resonance line and neighbouring continuum are reliably measured in these experiments. The abundance determinations are possible by means of fitting the synthetic spectra to the observed ones. In previous work, we attributed part (around 50%) of the observed disagreement to a possible instrumental problem in Yohkoh. In the present research, we consider in more details possible causes of the other part of the discrepancy. We first investigate whether the estimates of (A Ca) depend substantially on the extension of the observed short wavelength wing of the Ca XIX resonance line. This problem is important in the case of the analysis of Yohkoh spectra, since the extension of the spectrum towards the short wavelengths depends on the position of the flare along North—South direction on the Sun. After verifying the robustness of results of the spectral fitting technique, we have considered possible physical scenario which may cause the observed discrepancy. The hypothesis tested was that the Ca abundance in flares is correlated with brightness in the source — namely that it is a few times higher in the centre of the source (flaring kernel) than outside. We have found that postulated model may account for a part of the noted discrepancy as the SMM spectrometer has been equipped with the 6 × 6 arcmin collimator and no collimator has been used on Yohkoh.

  9. Metabolic hypothesis for human altriciality

    PubMed Central

    Dunsworth, Holly M.; Warrener, Anna G.; Deacon, Terrence; Ellison, Peter T.; Pontzer, Herman

    2012-01-01

    The classic anthropological hypothesis known as the “obstetrical dilemma” is a well-known explanation for human altriciality, a condition that has significant implications for human social and behavioral evolution. The hypothesis holds that antagonistic selection for a large neonatal brain and a narrow, bipedal-adapted birth canal poses a problem for childbirth; the hominin “solution” is to truncate gestation, resulting in an altricial neonate. This explanation for human altriciality based on pelvic constraints persists despite data linking human life history to that of other species. Here, we present evidence that challenges the importance of pelvic morphology and mechanics in the evolution of human gestation and altriciality. Instead, our analyses suggest that limits to maternal metabolism are the primary constraints on human gestation length and fetal growth. Although pelvic remodeling and encephalization during hominin evolution contributed to the present parturitional difficulty, there is little evidence that pelvic constraints have altered the timing of birth. PMID:22932870

  10. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  11. Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Meyer, David M.

    2001-06-01

    We evaluate the stellar abundances often used to represent the total (gas plus dust) composition of the interstellar medium. Published abundances for B stars, young later type (F and G) stars, and the Sun are compared to the modeled dust-phase and measured gas-phase compositions of the interstellar medium. This study uses abundances for the five most populous elements in dust grains-C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe-and the cosmically abundant element, N. We find that B stars have metal abundances that are too low to be considered valid representations of the interstellar medium. The commonly invoked interstellar standard that is two-thirds of the solar composition is also rejected by recent observations. Young (<=2 Gyr) F and G disk stars and the Sun, however, cannot be ruled out as reliable proxies for the total interstellar composition. If their abundances are valid representations of the interstellar medium, then the apparent underabundance of carbon with respect to that required by dust models, i.e., the carbon crisis, is substantially eased.

  12. Rationality, practice variation and person-centred health policy: a threshold hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hamm, Robert M; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Hozo, Iztok; Van den Ende, Jef

    2015-12-01

    Variation in practice of medicine is one of the major health policy issues of today. Ultimately, it is related to physicians' decision making. Similar patients with similar likelihood of having disease are often managed by different doctors differently: some doctors may elect to observe the patient, others decide to act based on diagnostic testing and yet others may elect to treat without testing. We explain these differences in practice by differences in disease probability thresholds at which physicians decide to act: contextual social and clinical factors and emotions such as regret affect the threshold by influencing the way doctors integrate objective data related to treatment and testing. However, depending on a theoretical construct each of the physician's behaviour can be considered rational. In fact, we showed that the current regulatory policies lead to predictably low thresholds for most decisions in contemporary practice. As a result, we may expect continuing motivation for overuse of treatment and diagnostic tests. We argue that rationality should take into account both formal principles of rationality and human intuitions about good decisions along the lines of Rawls' 'reflective equilibrium/considered judgment'. In turn, this can help define a threshold model that is empirically testable.

  13. Rationality, practice variation and person‐centred health policy: a threshold hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Robert M.; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Hozo, Iztok; Van den Ende, Jef

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variation in practice of medicine is one of the major health policy issues of today. Ultimately, it is related to physicians' decision making. Similar patients with similar likelihood of having disease are often managed by different doctors differently: some doctors may elect to observe the patient, others decide to act based on diagnostic testing and yet others may elect to treat without testing. We explain these differences in practice by differences in disease probability thresholds at which physicians decide to act: contextual social and clinical factors and emotions such as regret affect the threshold by influencing the way doctors integrate objective data related to treatment and testing. However, depending on a theoretical construct each of the physician's behaviour can be considered rational. In fact, we showed that the current regulatory policies lead to predictably low thresholds for most decisions in contemporary practice. As a result, we may expect continuing motivation for overuse of treatment and diagnostic tests. We argue that rationality should take into account both formal principles of rationality and human intuitions about good decisions along the lines of Rawls' ‘reflective equilibrium/considered judgment’. In turn, this can help define a threshold model that is empirically testable. PMID:26639018

  14. National Centre of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Gy

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the social, political and economic background which led to the establishment of the Hungarian National Centre of Educational Technology and made essential the development of a national network of bases for promoting educational technology. (Author)

  15. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  16. RTEMS Centre - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Freitas, D.; Coutinho, M.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Sousa, J.; Dias, L.; Damjanovic, B.; Zulianello, M.; Rufino, J.

    2009-05-01

    RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System is a joint ESA/Portuguese Task Force initiative to develop a support and maintenance centre to the Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This paper gives a high level visibility of the progress, the results obtained and the future work in the RTEMS CENTRE [6] and in the RTEMS Improvement [7] projects. RTEMS CENTRE started officially in November 2006, with the RTEMS 4.6.99.2 version. A full analysis of RTEMS operating system was produced. The architecture was analysed in terms of conceptual, organizational and operational concepts. The original objectives [1] of the centre were primarily to create and maintain technical expertise and competences in this RTOS, to develop a website to provide the European Space Community an entry point for obtaining support (http://rtemscentre.edisoft.pt), to design, develop, maintain and integrate some RTEMS support tools (Timeline Tool, Configuration and Management Tools), to maintain flight libraries and Board Support Packages, to develop a strong relationship with the World RTEMS Community and finally to produce some considerations in ARINC-653, DO-178B and ECSS E-40 standards. RTEMS Improvement is the continuation of the RTEMS CENTRE. Currently the RTEMS, version 4.8.0, is being facilitated for a future qualification. In this work, the validation material is being produced following the Galileo Software Standards Development Assurance Level B [5]. RTEMS is being completely tested, errors analysed, dead and deactivated code removed and tests produced to achieve 100% statement and decision coverage of source code [2]. The SW to exploit the LEON Memory Management Unit (MMU) hardware will be also added. A brief description of the expected implementations will be given.

  17. Beyond the Black Queen Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mas, Alix; Jamshidi, Shahrad; Lagadeuc, Yvan; Eveillard, Damien; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The Black Queen Hypothesis, recently proposed to explain an evolution of dependency based on gene loss, is gaining ground. This paper focuses on how the evolution of dependency transforms interactions and the community. Using agent-based modeling we suggest that species specializing in the consumption of a common good escape competition and therefore favor coexistence. This evolutionary trajectory could open the way for novel long-lasting interactions and a need to revisit the classically accepted assembly rules. Such evolutionary events also reshape the structure and dynamics of communities, depending on the spatial heterogeneity of the common good production. Let Black be the new black! PMID:26953598

  18. A Molecular–Structure Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Boeyens, Jan C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The self-similar symmetry that occurs between atomic nuclei, biological growth structures, the solar system, globular clusters and spiral galaxies suggests that a similar pattern should characterize atomic and molecular structures. This possibility is explored in terms of the current molecular structure-hypothesis and its extension into four-dimensional space-time. It is concluded that a quantum molecule only has structure in four dimensions and that classical (Newtonian) structure, which occurs in three dimensions, cannot be simulated by quantum-chemical computation. PMID:21151437

  19. Antiaging therapy: a prospective hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi Bonjar, Mohammad Rashid; Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    This hypothesis proposes a new prospective approach to slow the aging process in older humans. The hypothesis could lead to developing new treatments for age-related illnesses and help humans to live longer. This hypothesis has no previous documentation in scientific media and has no protocol. Scientists have presented evidence that systemic aging is influenced by peculiar molecules in the blood. Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, and Harvard University in Cambridge discovered elevated titer of aging-related molecules (ARMs) in blood, which trigger cascade of aging process in mice; they also indicated that the process can be reduced or even reversed. By inhibiting the production of ARMs, they could reduce age-related cognitive and physical declines. The present hypothesis offers a new approach to translate these findings into medical treatment: extracorporeal adjustment of ARMs would lead to slower rates of aging. A prospective "antiaging blood filtration column" (AABFC) is a nanotechnological device that would fulfill the central role in this approach. An AABFC would set a near-youth homeostatic titer of ARMs in the blood. In this regard, the AABFC immobilizes ARMs from the blood while blood passes through the column. The AABFC harbors antibodies against ARMs. ARM antibodies would be conjugated irreversibly to ARMs on contact surfaces of the reaction platforms inside the AABFC till near-youth homeostasis is attained. The treatment is performed with the aid of a blood-circulating pump. Similar to a renal dialysis machine, blood would circulate from the body to the AABFC and from there back to the body in a closed circuit until ARMs were sufficiently depleted from the blood. The optimal application criteria, such as human age for implementation, frequency of treatments, dosage, ideal homeostasis, and similar concerns, should be revealed by appropriate investigations. If AABFC technology undergoes practical evaluations and gains approval

  20. In search of the hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, J S; Cooper, R S

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of racial differences sorely lack sound and explicit hypotheses. Race is a social convention, not a biological concept. Its careless use in epidemiology demonstrates a failure to generate appropriate hypotheses to study its role in health. Studies of hypertension in blacks illustrate the point. Two underlying pitfalls plague hypothesis generation: directionality involving the null and alternative hypotheses and circularity, where efforts to understand social factors have the effect of emphasizing racial differences. The proper prescription is to identify explicitly the hypotheses of interest, including their origins and implication. Images p662-a p665-a PMID:8570813

  1. North Pacific High: an hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, Kern E.

    An hypothesis is offered for the cause and maintenance of the North Pacific High (NPH). Over a broad but well defined open ocean area, in the mid-latitude North Pacific, the ocean heats the atmosphere from below, and outside the boundaries of the heat source the ocean cools the air at the sea surface. Vertical thermal convection in the air over the heat source brings down relatively cool dry air, producing a horizontal contrast mainly in relative humidity inside and outside the heat source region. Consequently relatively high density air is produced over the heat source, and if the temperature is approximately constant, then the barometric pressure will be high over the heat source as well. Being unstable, due to a horizontal pressure gradient, the high density air will try to move radially outward from the heat source, and the Coriolis force will bend the outward flow into a clockwise circulation around the center of high pressure. The heat source is provided by a broad northeastward warm surface current, previously described, that crosses mid-latitudes on the eastern side of the North Pacific at all times of the year. Given the known characteristics of the warm current, the heat source mechanism can explain the observed seasonal variations of the NPH also. A more complete substantiation (or refutation) of the general hypothesis for the origin of the NPH must await the accumulation of additional oceanic and atmospheric data.

  2. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  3. Abundance Analysis of 10 Kepler Planetary Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Zachary A.; Schuler, Simon C.; Williams, Drake; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; Ghezzi, Luan; Teske, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify possible connections between the detailed chemical abundances of stars and the existence of small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler spacecraft. We have analyzed high quality Keck/HIRES spectra of the planetary hosts Kepler-65, Kepler-93, Kepler-97, Kepler-98, Kepler-102, Kepler 128, Kepler-406, Kepler-408, Kepler-409, and Kepler-411 and derived the abundances of up to 17 elements for these stars. Results from previous studies have suggested that stellar abundance patterns or "signatures" may indicate the presence of planets, possibly terrestrial planets in particular. Should such patterns exist, they could be used to identify stars with small planets. Here we present the results of our abundance analysis of 10 stars with a variety of exoplanet systems discovered by Kepler and address the hypothesis that chemical abundance signatures can indicate the presence of small planets.This work is generously supported by NASA through a Kepler Participating Scientist grant to SCS (Grant #NNX13AH78G).

  4. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  5. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  6. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  7. Ecology: Darwin's naturalization hypothesis challenged.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Richard P; Williams, Peter A

    2002-06-01

    Naturalized plants can have a significant ecological and economic impact, yet they comprise only a fraction ot the plant species introduced by humans. Darwin proposed that introduced plant species will be less likely to establish a self-sustaining wild population in places with congeneric native species because the introduced plants have to compete with their close relatives, or are more likely to be attacked by native herbivores or pathogens, a theory known as Darwin's naturalization hypothesis. Here we analyze a complete list of seed-plant species that have been introduced to New Zealand and find that those with congeneric relatives are significantly more, not less, likely to naturalize--perhaps because they share with their native relatives traits that pre-adapt them to their new environment.

  8. A maximum hypothesis of transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Bras, Rafael L.; Lerdau, Manuel; Salvucci, Guido D.

    2007-09-01

    We hypothesize that the system of liquid water in leaf tissues and the water vapor in the atmosphere tends to evolve towards a potential equilibrium as quickly as possible by maximization of the transpiration rate. We make two assumptions in formulating the transpiration rate: (1) stomatal aperture is directly controlled by guard cell turgor (or leaf water potential); (2) CO2 flux can be used as a nonparametric equivalent of stomatal conductance for a given stomatal function (not necessarily optimal in terms of the water use efficiency for photosynthesis). Transpiration is then expressed as a function of leaf temperature, CO2 flux (as a surrogate of stomatal conductance), and sensible heat flux characterizing the transport mechanism at a given level of radiative energy input. Maximization of transpiration constrained by the energy balance equation leads to vanishing derivatives of transpiration with respect to leaf temperature and CO2 flux. We have obtained observational evidence in support of the proposed hypothesis.

  9. The selection-arena hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Stearns, S C

    1987-01-01

    The selection arena hypothesis offers one answer to a puzzling question. Why do some organisms produce many more fertilized zygotes than are actually reared to hatching, birth, or release-then neglect, discard, resorb, or eat some of them, or allow them to eat each other? It makes four assumptions: (1) zygotes are cheap; (2) after conception the investment of parental time, energy, or risk into offspring continues; (3) offspring vary in fitness; (4) variation in offspring fitness can be identified by the mother at an early stage of the life cycle. If these assumptions hold, then one general prediction follows: the parent should overproduce zygotes, identify those with lower expected fitness, then either kill and reabsorb them, let them be eaten by sibs, or simply stop feeding them in order to invest in more promising offspring. The explanation appears to apply to a wide range of phenomena whose common cause had not previously been appreciated. These include: (1) polyovulation in some bats, tenrecs, the plains viscacha, and the pronghorn antelope; (2) cases of recurrent, consecutive, spontaneous abortions in humans; (3) some cases of surplus flower production and fruit abortion; (4) sex-ratio adjustment in red deer, mice, and coypus; (5) some types of cannibalism, including possible cases in mice, sharks, and wasps. Some cases that might be explained by the selection arena hypothesis are also plausibly explained by other causes, including bet-hedging reproductive investment in the face of unpredictable food supplies, and inter-specific or inter-familial aggression as an alternative to parent-offspring or sib-sib cannibalism. PMID:2961604

  10. Observing chemical abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic resonance lines of the major elements were observed in the atmospheres of a few comets, by using vacuum ultraviolet spectrographs on board rockets or orbiting observatories. Dust-to-gas ratios were also deduced for two comets through a Finson-Probstein's analysis of their dust-tail isophotes. The geometric albedo of the dust for the phase angle alpha of the observations is not accurately known but, the dust-to-gas ratio is not overly sensitive to the actual value of this albedo. Infrared observations of the dust head of some comets show that the bulk of cometary dust must be silicates, although a minor component (5-10 percent) of carbon compounds is rather likely, because of poor dielectric properties of the grains. This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that interplanetary dust probably of cometary origin, that was collected in the stratosphere by NASA-U2 Spacecraft, is chondritic in nature. Metal abundances in the head of a sungrazing comet support the chondritic hypothesis.

  11. Some Models of Mathematics Teachers' Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B.

    There are two types of teacher centres in Great Britain, multi-purpose centres designed for all subjects of the curriculum, and topical centres which deal specifically with one area of subject matter such as mathematics, English, etc. In this paper, the five mathematics centres in London are analyzed for purpose, materials available, and…

  12. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  13. The Over-Pruning Hypothesis of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Davis, Rachael; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Charman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the "over-pruning hypothesis" of autism. The hypothesis originates in a neurocomputational model of the regressive sub-type (Thomas, Knowland & Karmiloff-Smith, 2011a, 2011b). Here we develop a more general version of the over-pruning hypothesis to address heterogeneity in the timing of manifestation of ASD,…

  14. Multijurisdictional economies, the Tiebout Hypothesis, and sorting

    PubMed Central

    Wooders, Myrna H.

    1999-01-01

    The Tiebout Hypothesis asserts that, when it is efficient to have multiple jurisdictions providing local public goods, then competition between jurisdictions for residents will lead to a near-optimal outcome. Research from cooperative game theory both provides a foundation for the hypothesis and extends the hypothesis to diverse situations where small groups of participants are effective. PMID:10485868

  15. The venom optimization hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, David; King, Glenn F

    2013-03-01

    Animal venoms are complex chemical mixtures that typically contain hundreds of proteins and non-proteinaceous compounds, resulting in a potent weapon for prey immobilization and predator deterrence. However, because venoms are protein-rich, they come with a high metabolic price tag. The metabolic cost of venom is sufficiently high to result in secondary loss of venom whenever its use becomes non-essential to survival of the animal. The high metabolic cost of venom leads to the prediction that venomous animals may have evolved strategies for minimizing venom expenditure. Indeed, various behaviors have been identified that appear consistent with frugality of venom use. This has led to formulation of the "venom optimization hypothesis" (Wigger et al. (2002) Toxicon 40, 749-752), also known as "venom metering", which postulates that venom is metabolically expensive and therefore used frugally through behavioral control. Here, we review the available data concerning economy of venom use by animals with either ancient or more recently evolved venom systems. We conclude that the convergent nature of the evidence in multiple taxa strongly suggests the existence of evolutionary pressures favoring frugal use of venom. However, there remains an unresolved dichotomy between this economy of venom use and the lavish biochemical complexity of venom, which includes a high degree of functional redundancy. We discuss the evidence for biochemical optimization of venom as a means of resolving this conundrum.

  16. Alien abduction: a medical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Forrest, David V

    2008-01-01

    In response to a new psychological study of persons who believe they have been abducted by space aliens that found that sleep paralysis, a history of being hypnotized, and preoccupation with the paranormal and extraterrestrial were predisposing experiences, I noted that many of the frequently reported particulars of the abduction experience bear more than a passing resemblance to medical-surgical procedures and propose that experience with these may also be contributory. There is the altered state of consciousness, uniformly colored figures with prominent eyes, in a high-tech room under a round bright saucerlike object; there is nakedness, pain and a loss of control while the body's boundaries are being probed; and yet the figures are thought benevolent. No medical-surgical history was apparently taken in the above mentioned study, but psychological laboratory work evaluated false memory formation. I discuss problems in assessing intraoperative awareness and ways in which the medical hypothesis could be elaborated and tested. If physicians are causing this syndrome in a percentage of patients, we should know about it; and persons who feel they have been abducted should be encouraged to inform their surgeons and anesthesiologists without challenging their beliefs.

  17. Hypothesis: neoplasms in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Martens, William; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process due to an accumulation of genetic mutations in multiple genes in diverse pathways which ultimately lead to loss of control over cell growth. It is well known that inheritance of rare germline mutations in genes involved in tumorigenesis pathways confer high lifetime risk of neoplasia in affected individuals. Furthermore, a substantial number of multiple malformation syndromes include cancer susceptibility in their phenotype. Studies of the mechanisms underlying these inherited syndromes have added to the understanding of both normal development and the pathophysiology of carcinogenesis. Myotonic dystrophy (DM) represents a group of autosomal dominant, multisystemic diseases that share the clinical features of myotonia, muscle weakness, and early-onset cataracts. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) result from unstable nucleotide repeat expansions in their respective genes. There have been multiple reports of tumors in individuals with DM, most commonly benign calcifying cutaneous tumors known as pilomatricomas. We provide a summary of the tumors reported in DM and a hypothesis for a possible mechanism of tumorigenesis. We hope to stimulate further study into the potential role of DM genes in tumorigenesis, and help define DM pathogenesis, and facilitate developing novel treatment modalities. PMID:19642006

  18. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence.

    PubMed

    Gilca, M; Stoian, I; Atanasiu, V; Virgolici, B

    2007-01-01

    The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g, those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc). This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal beta -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells), antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol), alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  19. Mary Lyon and the hypothesis of random X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    The 50th anniversary of Mary Lyon's 1961 Nature paper, proposing random inactivation in early embryonic life of one of the two X chromosomes in the cells of mammalian females, provides an opportunity to remember and celebrate the work of those involved. While the hypothesis was initially put forward by Lyon based on findings in the mouse, it was founded on earlier studies, notably the work of Susumu Ohno; it was also suggested independently by Beutler and colleagues using experimental evidence from a human X-linked disorder, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and has proved to be of as great importance for human and medical genetics as it has for general mammalian genetics. Alongside the hypothesis itself, previous cytological studies of mouse and human chromosomes, and the observations on X-linked mutants in both species deserve recognition for their essential role in underpinning the hypothesis of random X-inactivation, while subsequent research on the X-inactivation centre and the molecular mechanisms underlying the inactivation process represent some of the most outstanding contributions to human and wider mammalian genetics over the past 50 years.

  20. Women's Information Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The Women's Information Centre in Bangkok, Thailand, focuses on the creation of modules for professional skills training, awareness-building, organizing, and self-determination of women in rural areas, urban areas, and factories. It also supports women-related research. (JOW)

  1. The Tehran Book Processing Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    Establishment of the Tehran Book Processing Centre (Tebroc) was proposed in the Spring of 1968. This document is a descriptive and historical account of the center, and a description of its contributions to Iranian processing development. The center was modeled, to a certain extent, after Bro-Dart's Alanar in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Tebroc was…

  2. A hypothesis about factors that affect maximum stream temperatures across montane landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature is an important variable structuring lotic biotas, but little is known about how montane landscapes function to determine stream temperatures. We developed an a priori hypothesis that was used to predict how watershed elements would interact to affect stream temperatures. The hypothesis was tested in a series of path analyses using temperature data from 26 sites on second-order to fourth-order streams across a fifth-order Rocky Mountain watershed. Based on the performance of the first hypothesis, two revised versions of the hypothesis were developed and tested that proved to be more accurate than the original hypothesis. The most plausible of the revised hypotheses accounted for 82 percent of the variation in maximum stream temperature, had a predicted data structure that did not deviate from the empirical data structure, and was the most parsimonious. The final working hypothesis suggested that stream temperature maxima were directly controlled by a large negative effect from mean basin elevation (direct effect = -0.57, p < 0.01) and smaller effects from riparian tree abundance (direct effect = -0.28, p = 0.03), and cattle density (direct effect = 0.24, p = 0.05). Watershed slope, valley constraint, and the abundance of grass across a watershed also affected temperature maxima, but these effects were indirect and mediated through cattle density and riparian trees. Three variables included in the a priori hypothesis - watershed aspect, stream width, and watershed size - had negligible effects on maximum stream temperatures and were omitted from the final working hypothesis.

  3. Segmentation and the pairing hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bragason, Orn

    2004-09-30

    The effect of stimulus contiguity and response contingency on responding in chain schedules was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, four pigeons were trained on two simple three-link chain schedules that alternated within sessions. Initial links were correlated with a variable-interval 30s schedule, and middle and terminal links were correlated with interdependent variable-interval 30s variable-interval 30s schedules. The combined duration of the interdependent schedules summed to 60s. The two chains differed with respect to signaling of the schedule components: a two-stimulus chain had one stimulus paired with the initial link and one stimulus paired with both the middle and the terminal link, while a three-stimulus chain had a different stimulus paired with the each of the three links. The results showed that the two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain. In Experiment 2, four pigeons were exposed to three separate conditions, the two- and three-stimulus chains of Experiment 1 and a three-stimulus chain that had a 3s delay to terminal-link entry from the middle-link response that produced it. The two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain, as in Experiment 1, and a similar initial-link responding was maintained by the two-stimulus chain and the three-stimulus chain with the delay contingency. The results demonstrate that a stimulus noncontiguous with food can maintain responding that is sometimes greater than a stimulus contiguous with food, depending on the response contingency for terminal-link entry. The results are contrary to the pairing hypothesis of conditioned reinforcement.

  4. Testing the geometric clutch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Charles B

    2004-12-01

    The Geometric Clutch hypothesis is based on the premise that transverse forces (t-forces) acting on the outer doublets of the eukaryotic axoneme coordinate the action of the dynein motors to produce flagellar and ciliary beating. T-forces result from tension and compression on the outer doublets when a bend is present on the flagellum or cilium. The t-force acts to pry the doublets apart in an active bend, and push the doublets together when the flagellum is passively bent and thus could engage and disengage the dynein motors. Computed simulations of this working mechanism have reproduced the beating pattern of simple cilia and flagella, and of mammalian sperm. Cilia-like beating, with a clearly defined effective and recovery stroke, can be generated using one uniformly applied switching algorithm. When the mechanical properties and dimensions appropriate to a specific flagellum are incorporated into the model the same algorithm can simulate a sea urchin or bull sperm-like beat. The computed model reproduces many of the observed behaviors of real flagella and cilia. The model can duplicate the results of outer arm extraction experiments in cilia and predicted two types of arrest behavior that were verified experimentally in bull sperm. It also successfully predicted the experimentally determined nexin elasticity. Calculations based on live and reactivated sea urchin and bull sperm yielded a value of 0.5 nN/microm for the t-force at the switch-point. This is a force sufficient to overcome the shearing force generated by all the dyneins on one micron of outer doublet. A t-force of this magnitude should produce substantial distortion of the axoneme at the switch-point, especially in spoke or spoke-head deficient motile flagella. This concrete and verifiable prediction is within the grasp of recent advances in imaging technology, specifically cryoelectron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PMID:15567522

  5. Infantile amnesia: a neurogenic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2012-08-16

    In the late 19th Century, Sigmund Freud described the phenomenon in which people are unable to recall events from early childhood as infantile amnesia. Although universally observed, infantile amnesia is a paradox; adults have surprisingly few memories of early childhood despite the seemingly exuberant learning capacity of young children. How can these findings be reconciled? The mechanisms underlying this form of amnesia are the subject of much debate. Psychological/cognitive theories assert that the ability to maintain detailed, declarative-like memories in the long term correlates with the development of language, theory of mind, and/or sense of "self." However, the finding that experimental animals also show infantile amnesia suggests that this phenomenon cannot be explained fully in purely human terms. Biological explanations of infantile amnesia suggest that protracted postnatal development of key brain regions important for memory interferes with stable long-term memory storage, yet they do not clearly specify which particular aspects of brain maturation are causally related to infantile amnesia. Here, we propose a hypothesis of infantile amnesia that focuses on one specific aspect of postnatal brain development--the continued addition of new neurons to the hippocampus. Infants (humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents) exhibit high levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and an inability to form lasting memories. Interestingly, the decline of postnatal neurogenesis levels corresponds to the emergence of the ability to form stable long-term memory. We propose that high neurogenesis levels negatively regulate the ability to form enduring memories, most likely by replacing synaptic connections in preexisting hippocampal memory circuits.

  6. The viral hypothesis in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Elizan, T S; Casals, J

    1983-01-01

    The most crucial unanswered question in Parkinson's disease is its fundamental cause. Since Carlsson's original suggestion that dopamine may be a transmitter in the central nervous system involved in the control of motor function and that it may be involved in the Parkinsonian syndrome (Carlsson, 1959), and the now-classic paper by Ehringer and Hornykiewicz (1960) which definitively showed the significant reduction of dopamine concentration in the neostriatum of cases of idiopathic Parkinson and postencephalitic parkinsonism, the vast amount of work on the subject has focused on the biochemical and pharmacologic correlates of this dopaminergic system failure involving particularly the nigrostriatal pathways. The concept of a specific neurotransmitter deficiency associated with a specific neurological syndrome potentially amenable to replacement therapy, has appropriately generated a considerable degree of clinical and research interest for over 20 years, but, with few exceptions, there has been hardly any focused or concerted research effort on looking at direct causal factors or primary initiating events in this disease process. As in Alzheimer's disease, another of the degenerative diseases of the brain of unknown origin with a specific biochemical substrate, any etiologic hypothesis for Parkinson's disease--whether a virus, an age-related immune system dysfunction, a genetic factor, a "trophic" substance, or a toxin--would have to explain the selective involvement of specific transmitter-defined neuronal pathways, the non-specificity of the brain lesions that define the disease, and the clinical involvement of a sizeable segment of the aging population. Of the several plausible hypotheses mentioned earlier, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, we would like to critically consider the possibility of a viral cause. PMID:6583315

  7. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  8. H3+ towards and within the Galactic centre.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R

    2006-11-15

    High-resolution spectroscopy of bright infrared sources in the centre of the Galaxy has resulted in the detection of H3+ in a remarkable array of dense and diffuse clouds along the 8000 parsec long line of sight, at a wide range of distances from the centre. Most prominent among these is a previously undetected, but very large amount of warm (T approximately 250 K) and diffuse (n approximately 100 cm2) gas within a few hundred parsecs of the centre. The key to understanding the environment of the H3+ in this region is an H3+ absorption line at 3.53 microm from the metastable (3,3) rotational level, which has not been detected in dense or diffuse clouds outside of the Galactic centre (GC). We have used spectroscopy of this line along with other lines of H3+ and CO to characterize all of the clouds along the line of sight to the GC. The high abundance of H3+ in the central few hundred parsecs implies an ionization rate there that is several times larger than estimated for diffuse clouds outside the GC, and nearly two orders of magnitude greater than originally predicted for diffuse clouds.

  9. Chemical abundance of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Wehinger, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Observations of NH2, (OI) and molecular ion spectra in comets represent virtually all of the volatile fraction of a comet nucleus. Their study leads to the N2, NH3, H2O, CO2, CO content of the nucleus, and thus to important constraints on models of comet formation and chemical processing in the primitive solar nebula. The observations of Comet Halley provide the opportunity for the first comprehensive determination of the abundances in a comet nucleus. The carbon isotope abundance ratio 12 C/13 C = 65 plus or minus 8 has been determined for Comet Halley from resolved rotational line structure in the CN B-X (0,0) band. The ratio is approximately 30 pct lower than the solar system value, 89, indicating either an enhancement of 13CN or a depletion of 12CN in the comet. Scenarios consistent with the observed carbon isotope ratio are: (1) formation of the comet at the periphery of the solar nebula in a fractionation-enriched 13CN region, or hidden from 12CN enrichment sources, and (2) capture of an interestellar comet. Long-slit charge coupled device (CCD) spectra obtained at the time of the spacecraft encounter of Comet Halley have also been analyzed. Scale lengths, production rates and column densities of CH, CN, C2 and NH2 were determined.

  10. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  11. EAC: The European Astronauts Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, Andres

    The newly established European Astronauts Centre (EAC) in Cologne represents the European Astronauts Home Base and will become a centre of expertise on European astronauts activities. The paper gives an overview of the European approach to man-in-space, describes the European Astronauts Policy and presents the major EAC roles and responsibilities including the management of selection, recruitment and flight assignment of astronauts; the astronauts support and medical surveillance; the supervision of the astronauts' non-flight assignments; crew safety; the definition of the overall astronauts training programme; the scheduling and supervision of the training facilities; the implementation of Basic Training; the recruitment, training and certification of instructors, and the interface to NASA in the framework of the Space Station Freedom programme. An overview is given on the organisation of EAC, and on the European candidate astronauts selection performed in 1991.

  12. [New hypothesis on the replication of centrioles and basal bodies].

    PubMed

    Mignot, J P

    1996-12-01

    Certain morphological data, obtained in studies of the ultrastructure of centrioles and basal bodies in cells of metazoa and protists, lead us to think that the cartwheel represents of the most appropriate organization for a self-reproducing and transmissible centriolar organizer. Centrioles and basal bodies might then not be simply the centres of replication of those organizers, but also reservoirs containing several superposed centriolar organizers, which are released depending on the requirements of the cell. As an isolated cartwheel is extremely unlikely to be detected, either in conventional electron microscopy or in immunocytochemistry, it is thus the reservoir which has so far been under consideration. Such a hypothesis would permit the explanation that biogenesis de novo and biogenesis in proximity to preexisting organelles may differ only in terms of the number of morphogenetic units involved.

  13. Communicating astronomy by the Unizul Science Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesham, A.; Beesham, N.

    2015-03-01

    The University of Zululand, situated along the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, has a thriving Science Centre (USC) situated in the developing port city of Richards Bay. Over 30 000 learners visit the centre annually, and it consists of an exhibition area, an auditorium, lecture areas and offices. The shows consist of interactive games, science shows, competitions, quizzes and matriculation workshops. Outreach activities take place through a mobile science centre for schools and communities that cannot visit the centre.

  14. Motor Synergies and the Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The article offers a way to unite three recent developments in the field of motor control and coordination: (1) The notion of synergies is introduced based on the principle of motor abundance; (2) The uncontrolled manifold hypothesis is described as offering a computational framework to identify and quantify synergies; and (3) The equilibrium-point hypothesis is described for a single muscle, single joint, and multi-joint systems. Merging these concepts into a single coherent scheme requires focusing on control variables rather than performance variables. The principle of minimal final action is formulated as the guiding principle within the referent configuration hypothesis. Motor actions are associated with setting two types of variables by a controller, those that ultimately define average performance patterns and those that define associated synergies. Predictions of the suggested scheme are reviewed, such as the phenomenon of anticipatory synergy adjustments, quick actions without changes in synergies, atypical synergies, and changes in synergies with practice. A few models are briefly reviewed. PMID:20702893

  15. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  16. The Input Hypothesis: An Inside Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Theodore V.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes and discusses Krashen's "input hypothesis" as presented in his "Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition." Suggests that the input hypothesis fails to account convincingly for arrested second language acquisition in an acquisition-rich environment and that it is not directly applicable to U.S. high school and university…

  17. A Model of the Relative Income Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shane

    2010-01-01

    James Duesenberry's (1949) relative income hypothesis holds substantial empirical credibility, as well as a rich set of implications. Although present in the pages of leading economics journals, the hypothesis has become all but foreign to the blackboards of economics classrooms. To help reintegrate the concept into the undergraduate economics…

  18. Ecosystem Succession and Nutrient Retention: A Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Reiners, William A.

    1975-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented for the regulation of elemental losses from terrestrial ecosystems. Losses of elements are controlled by the net increment of biomass growth and the elemental composition of this net increment. According to this hypothesis, loss rates are highest in early succession and in steady state ecosystems. (Author/EB)

  19. The Interaction Hypothesis: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Thu Hoang

    2009-01-01

    This paper will examine the interaction hypothesis (IH) in second language acquisition (SLA). To begin with a short discussion of the confusing terms in SLA such as theory, model, hypothesis, and construct will be done so as to help readers easily understand theories in the field of SLA and related concepts. Next, what the IH is, and who proposed…

  20. Statistics and Hypothesis Testing in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maret, Timothy J.; Ziemba, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that early in their education students be taught to use basic statistical tests as rigorous methods of comparing experimental results with scientific hypotheses. Stresses that students learn how to use statistical tests in hypothesis-testing by applying them in actual hypothesis-testing situations. To illustrate, uses questions such as…

  1. Three Strategies for Elaborating the Cultivation Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, W. James

    1988-01-01

    Uses three strategies (dividing cultivation into component subprocesses, testing for an intervening variable, and contingent relationships) for elaborating the cultivation hypothesis. Finds evidence that cultivation effects do exist but that dividing the socialization process does not increase the predictive power of the cultivation hypothesis.…

  2. Current Status of the Molecular Clock Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Molecular genetics is a rapidly changing field with new developments almost from day to day. One interesting hypothesis that has come from everyone's ability to sequence proteins and/or genes is that of the molecular clock. This hypothesis postulates that homologous sequences of DNA and thus macro molecules evolve at a constant and invariable rate…

  3. Nematode abundance at the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Adam A.; Lambshead, P. John D.; Hawkins, Lawrence E.; Mitchell, Nicola; Levin, Lisa A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper supports the hypothesis that low oxygen does not influence deep-sea nematode abundance by investigating an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Oman slope in the Arabian Sea. Correlation with a number of environmental variables indicated that food quality (measured as the hydrogen index) rather than oxygen was the major predictor of nematode abundance. Nematode abundance was also positively correlated with abundance of total macrofauna, annelids, spionid polychaetes and macrofaunal tube builders. Comparison with published data showed Arabian Sea nematode abundance to be similar to that of the Porcupine Seabight and Bay of Biscay regions of the northeast Atlantic, which also receive significant quantities of phytodetritus but have no OMZ.

  4. Climatic effects on mosquito abundance in Mediterranean wetlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases is highly controversial. One of the principal points of debate is whether or not climate influences mosquito abundance, a key factor in disease transmission. Methods To test this hypothesis, we analysed ten years of data (2003–2012) from biweekly surveys to assess inter-annual and seasonal relationships between the abundance of seven mosquito species known to be pathogen vectors (West Nile virus, Usutu virus, dirofilariasis and Plasmodium sp.) and several climatic variables in two wetlands in SW Spain. Results Within-season abundance patterns were related to climatic variables (i.e. temperature, rainfall, tide heights, relative humidity and photoperiod) that varied according to the mosquito species in question. Rainfall during winter months was positively related to Culex pipiens and Ochlerotatus detritus annual abundances. Annual maximum temperatures were non-linearly related to annual Cx. pipiens abundance, while annual mean temperatures were positively related to annual Ochlerotatus caspius abundance. Finally, we modelled shifts in mosquito abundances using the A2 and B2 temperature and rainfall climate change scenarios for the period 2011–2100. While Oc. caspius, an important anthropophilic species, may increase in abundance, no changes are expected for Cx. pipiens or the salt-marsh mosquito Oc. detritus. Conclusions Our results highlight that the effects of climate are species-specific, place-specific and non-linear and that linear approaches will therefore overestimate the effect of climate change on mosquito abundances at high temperatures. Climate warming does not necessarily lead to an increase in mosquito abundance in natural Mediterranean wetlands and will affect, above all, species such as Oc. caspius whose numbers are not closely linked to rainfall and are influenced, rather, by local tidal patterns and temperatures. The final impact of changes in vector abundance on disease frequency

  5. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  6. The arsenic exposure hypothesis for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gordon; OʼBryant, Sid E

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has shown that arsenic exposure induces changes that coincide with most of the developmental, biochemical, pathologic, and clinical features of Alzheimer disease (AD) and associated disorders. On the basis of this literature, we propose the Arsenic Exposure Hypothesis for AD that is inclusive of and cooperative with the existing hypotheses. Arsenic toxicity induces hyperphosphorylation of protein tau and overtranscription of the amyloid precursor protein, which are involved in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and brain amyloid plaques, consistent with the amyloid hypothesis of AD. Arsenic exposure has been associated with cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors, which is in agreement with the vascular hypothesis of AD. Arsenic exposure invokes brain inflammatory responses, which resonates with the inflammatory hypotheses of AD. Arsenic exposure has been linked to reduced memory and intellectual abilities in children and adolescents, which provides a biologic basis for the developmental origin of health and disease hypothesis for AD. Arsenic and its metabolites generate free radicals causing oxidative stress and neuronal death, which fits the existing oxidative stress hypothesis. Taken together, the arsenic exposure hypothesis for AD provides a parsimonious testable hypothesis for the development and progression of this devastating disease at least for some subsets of individuals.

  7. Knowledge dimensions in hypothesis test problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2012-05-01

    The reformation in statistics education over the past two decades has predominantly shifted the focus of statistical teaching and learning from procedural understanding to conceptual understanding. The emphasis of procedural understanding is on the formulas and calculation procedures. Meanwhile, conceptual understanding emphasizes students knowing why they are using a particular formula or executing a specific procedure. In addition, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy offers a twodimensional framework to describe learning objectives comprising of the six revised cognition levels of original Bloom's taxonomy and four knowledge dimensions. Depending on the level of complexities, the four knowledge dimensions essentially distinguish basic understanding from the more connected understanding. This study identifiesthe factual, procedural and conceptual knowledgedimensions in hypothesis test problems. Hypothesis test being an important tool in making inferences about a population from sample informationis taught in many introductory statistics courses. However, researchers find that students in these courses still have difficulty in understanding the underlying concepts of hypothesis test. Past studies also show that even though students can perform the hypothesis testing procedure, they may not understand the rationale of executing these steps or know how to apply them in novel contexts. Besides knowing the procedural steps in conducting a hypothesis test, students must have fundamental statistical knowledge and deep understanding of the underlying inferential concepts such as sampling distribution and central limit theorem. By identifying the knowledge dimensions of hypothesis test problems in this study, suitable instructional and assessment strategies can be developed in future to enhance students' learning of hypothesis test as a valuable inferential tool.

  8. Hypothesis-free? No such thing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2008-06-01

    Finding meaningful relationships in complex datasets requires starting with the appropriate data. A hypothesis usually takes the form of a mechanistic relationship between a specific cause and a consequent effect, and this will almost always depend on experimental context. There are some circumstances when data must be gathered in the absence of context or hypothesis to characterize a system, but it is unrealistic to expect such preliminary studies to lead to significant biological insights. For this, you need a hypothesis. Systems biology might be the future of biology, but we still need hypotheses to take us where we want to go.

  9. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  10. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  11. Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis*

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In the epidemiological literature, the fetal origins hypothesis associated with David J. Barker posits that chronic, degenerative conditions of adult health, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, may be triggered by circumstance decades earlier, in utero nutrition in particular. Economists have expanded on this hypothesis, investigating a broader range of fetal shocks and circumstances and have found a wealth of later-life impacts on outcomes including test scores, educational attainment, and income, along with health. In the process, they have provided some of the most credible observational evidence in support of the hypothesis. The magnitude of the impacts is generally large. Thus, the fetal origins hypothesis has not only survived contact with economics, but has flourished. PMID:25152565

  12. Putting Down the Discovery Learning Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, David W.

    1971-01-01

    The author analyzes some of the conceptual problems which have prevented a direct test of the discovery learning hypothesis, provides an operational definition of discovery learning, and proposes an improved experimental paradigm. Appended are 38 references. (AA)

  13. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  14. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  15. Urea may regulate urea transporter protein abundance during osmotic diuresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongun; Klein, Janet D; Racine, Sandy; Murrell, Brian P; Sands, Jeff M

    2005-01-01

    Rats with diabetes mellitus have an increase in UT-A1 urea transporter protein abundance and absolute urea excretion, but the relative amount (percentage) of urea in total urinary solute is actually decreased due to the marked glucosuria. Urea-specific signaling pathways have been identified in mIMCD3 cells and renal medulla, suggesting the possibility that changes in the percentage or concentration of urea could be a factor that regulates UT-A1 abundance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that an increase in a urinary solute other than urea would increase UT-A1 abundance, similar to diabetes mellitus, whereas an increase in urine urea would not. In both inner medullary base and tip, UT-A1 protein abundance increased during NaCl- or glucose-induced osmotic diuresis but not during urea-induced osmotic diuresis. Next, rats undergoing NaCl or glucose diuresis were given supplemental urea to increase the percentage of urine urea to control values. UT-A1 abundance did not increase in these urea-supplemented rats compared with control rats. Additionally, both UT-A2 and UT-B protein abundances in the outer medulla increased during urea-induced osmotic diuresis but not in NaCl or glucose diuresis. We conclude that during osmotic diuresis, UT-A1 abundance increases when the percentage of urea in total urinary solute is low and UT-A2 and UT-B abundances increase when the urea concentration in the medullary interstitium is high. These findings suggest that a reduction in urine or interstitial urea results in an increase in UT-A1 protein abundance in an attempt to restore inner medullary interstitial urea and preserve urine-concentrating ability.

  16. Does the dopamine hypothesis explain schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lau, Chi-Ieong; Wang, Han-Cheng; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Liu, Mu-En

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine hypothesis has been the cornerstone in the research and clinical practice of schizophrenia. With the initial emphasis on the role of excessive dopamine, the hypothesis has evolved to a concept of combining prefrontal hypodopaminergia and striatal hyperdopaminergia, and subsequently to the present aberrant salience hypothesis. This article provides a brief overview of the development and evidence of the dopamine hypothesis. It will argue that the current model of aberrant salience explains psychosis in schizophrenia and provides a plausible linkage between the pharmacological and cognitive aspects of the disease. Despite the privileged role of dopamine hypothesis in psychosis, its pathophysiological rather than etiological basis, its limitations in defining symptoms other than psychosis, as well as the evidence of other neurotransmitters such as glutamate and adenosine, prompt us to a wider perspective of the disease. Finally, dopamine does explain the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but not necessarily the cause per se. Rather, dopamine acts as the common final pathway of a wide variety of predisposing factors, either environmental, genetic, or both, that lead to the disease. Other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and adenosine, may also collaborate with dopamine to give rise to the entire picture of schizophrenia. PMID:23843581

  17. Multiple hypothesis tracking for the cyber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoegler, Stefan; Blackman, Sam; Holsopple, Jared; Hirsch, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses how methods used for conventional multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) can be extended to domain-agnostic tracking of entities from non-kinematic constraints such as those imposed by cyber attacks in a potentially dense false alarm background. MHT is widely recognized as the premier method to avoid corrupting tracks with spurious data in the kinematic domain but it has not been extensively applied to other problem domains. The traditional approach is to tightly couple track maintenance (prediction, gating, filtering, probabilistic pruning, and target confirmation) with hypothesis management (clustering, incompatibility maintenance, hypothesis formation, and Nassociation pruning). However, by separating the domain specific track maintenance portion from the domain agnostic hypothesis management piece, we can begin to apply the wealth of knowledge gained from ground and air tracking solutions to the cyber (and other) domains. These realizations led to the creation of Raytheon's Multiple Hypothesis Extensible Tracking Architecture (MHETA). In this paper, we showcase MHETA for the cyber domain, plugging in a well established method, CUBRC's INFormation Engine for Real-time Decision making, (INFERD), for the association portion of the MHT. The result is a CyberMHT. We demonstrate the power of MHETA-INFERD using simulated data. Using metrics from both the tracking and cyber domains, we show that while no tracker is perfect, by applying MHETA-INFERD, advanced nonkinematic tracks can be captured in an automated way, perform better than non-MHT approaches, and decrease analyst response time to cyber threats.

  18. The European NEO Coordination Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Borgia, B.; Micheli, M.

    An operational approach to NEO (Near-Earth Object) hazard monitoring has been developed at European level within the framework of the Space Situational Awareness Program (SSA) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Through federating European assets and profiting of the expertise developed in European Universities and Research Centers, it has been possible to start the deployment of the so-called SSA NEO Segment. This initiative aims to provide a significant contribution to the worldwide effort to the discovery, follow-up and characterization of the near-Earth object population. A major achievement has been the inauguration in May 2013 of the ESA NEO Coordination Centre located at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy). The goal of the NEOCC Precursor Service operations is twofold: to make available updated information on the NEO population and the associated hazard and to contribute to optimize the NEO observational efforts. This is done by maintaining and improving a Web Portal publicly available at http://neo.ssa.esa.int and by performing follow-up observations through a network of collaborating telescopes and facilities. An overview of the SSA-NEO System and a summary of the first two years of NEOCC operations is presented.

  19. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  20. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  1. Student Centred Approaches: Teachers' Learning and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Colleen; Davies, Anne; Weaven, Mary; Hooley, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Student centred approaches to teaching and learning in mathematics is one of the reforms currently being advocated and implemented to improve mathematics outcomes for students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. The models, meanings and practices of student centred approaches explored in this paper reveal that a constructivist model…

  2. The European Centre for Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Supported by UNESCO, the European Centre for Leisure and Education is an establishment of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. The task of the Centre lies in the search for common trends of leisure and education in Europe, involving four types of activity: research, editorial, bibliographic, and documentary. It has sponsored conferences, and has…

  3. Pasture succession in the Neotropics: extending the nucleation hypothesis into a matrix discontinuity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Chris J; Dosch, Jerald J; Carson, Walter P

    2014-08-01

    The nucleation hypothesis appears to explain widespread patterns of succession in tropical pastures, specifically the tendency for isolated trees to promote woody species recruitment. Still, the nucleation hypothesis has usually been tested explicitly for only short durations and in some cases isolated trees fail to promote woody recruitment. Moreover, at times, nucleation occurs in other key habitat patches. Thus, we propose an extension, the matrix discontinuity hypothesis: woody colonization will occur in focal patches that function to mitigate the herbaceous vegetation effects, thus providing safe sites or regeneration niches. We tested predictions of the classical nucleation hypothesis, the matrix discontinuity hypothesis, and a distance from forest edge hypothesis, in five abandoned pastures in Costa Rica, across the first 11 years of succession. Our findings confirmed the matrix discontinuity hypothesis: specifically, rotting logs and steep slopes significantly enhanced woody colonization. Surprisingly, isolated trees did not consistently significantly enhance recruitment; only larger trees did so. Finally, woody recruitment consistently decreased with distance from forest. Our results as well as results from others suggest that the nucleation hypothesis needs to be broadened beyond its historical focus on isolated trees or patches; the matrix discontinuity hypothesis focuses attention on a suite of key patch types or microsites that promote woody species recruitment. We argue that any habitat discontinuities that ameliorate the inhibition by dense graminoid layers will be foci for recruitment. Such patches could easily be manipulated to speed the transition of pastures to closed canopy forests. PMID:24972697

  4. Pasture succession in the Neotropics: extending the nucleation hypothesis into a matrix discontinuity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Chris J; Dosch, Jerald J; Carson, Walter P

    2014-08-01

    The nucleation hypothesis appears to explain widespread patterns of succession in tropical pastures, specifically the tendency for isolated trees to promote woody species recruitment. Still, the nucleation hypothesis has usually been tested explicitly for only short durations and in some cases isolated trees fail to promote woody recruitment. Moreover, at times, nucleation occurs in other key habitat patches. Thus, we propose an extension, the matrix discontinuity hypothesis: woody colonization will occur in focal patches that function to mitigate the herbaceous vegetation effects, thus providing safe sites or regeneration niches. We tested predictions of the classical nucleation hypothesis, the matrix discontinuity hypothesis, and a distance from forest edge hypothesis, in five abandoned pastures in Costa Rica, across the first 11 years of succession. Our findings confirmed the matrix discontinuity hypothesis: specifically, rotting logs and steep slopes significantly enhanced woody colonization. Surprisingly, isolated trees did not consistently significantly enhance recruitment; only larger trees did so. Finally, woody recruitment consistently decreased with distance from forest. Our results as well as results from others suggest that the nucleation hypothesis needs to be broadened beyond its historical focus on isolated trees or patches; the matrix discontinuity hypothesis focuses attention on a suite of key patch types or microsites that promote woody species recruitment. We argue that any habitat discontinuities that ameliorate the inhibition by dense graminoid layers will be foci for recruitment. Such patches could easily be manipulated to speed the transition of pastures to closed canopy forests.

  5. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    PubMed

    Eogan, Maeve; McHugh, Anne; Holohan, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence. PMID:22975433

  6. The over-pruning hypothesis of autism.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael S C; Davis, Rachael; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Knowland, Victoria C P; Charman, Tony

    2016-03-01

    This article outlines the over-pruning hypothesis of autism. The hypothesis originates in a neurocomputational model of the regressive sub-type (Thomas, Knowland & Karmiloff-Smith, 2011a, 2011b). Here we develop a more general version of the over-pruning hypothesis to address heterogeneity in the timing of manifestation of ASD, including new computer simulations which reconcile the different observed developmental trajectories (early onset, late onset, regression) via a single underlying atypical mechanism; and which show how unaffected siblings of individuals with ASD may differ from controls either by inheriting a milder version of the pathological mechanism or by co-inheriting the risk factors without the pathological mechanism. The proposed atypical mechanism involves overly aggressive synaptic pruning in infancy and early childhood, an exaggeration of a normal phase of brain development. We show how the hypothesis generates novel predictions that differ from existing theories of ASD including that (1) the first few months of development in ASD will be indistinguishable from typical, and (2) the earliest atypicalities in ASD will be sensory and motor rather than social. Both predictions gain cautious support from emerging longitudinal studies of infants at-risk of ASD. We review evidence consistent with the over-pruning hypothesis, its relation to other current theories (including C. Frith's under-pruning proposal; C. Frith, 2003, 2004), as well as inconsistent data and current limitations. The hypothesis situates causal accounts of ASD within a framework of protective and risk factors (Newschaffer et al., 2012); clarifies different versions of the broader autism phenotype (i.e. the implication of observed similarities between individuals with autism and their family members); and integrates data from multiple disciplines, including behavioural studies, neuroscience studies, genetics, and intervention studies. PMID:25845529

  7. An excitatory synapse hypothesis of depression

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott M.; Kallarackal, Angy J.; Kvarta, Mark D.; Van Dyke, Adam M.; LeGates, Tara A.; Cai, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a common cause of mortality and morbidity, but the biological bases of the deficits in emotional and cognitive processing remain incompletely understood. Current antidepressant therapies are effective in only some patients and act slowly. We propose an excitatory synapse hypothesis of depression in which chronic stress and genetic susceptibility cause changes in the strength of subsets of glutamatergic synapses at multiple locations, including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, leading to a dysfunction of cortico-mesolimbic reward circuitry that underlies many of the symptoms of depression. This hypothesis accounts for current depression treatments and suggests an updated framework for the development of better therapeutic compounds. PMID:25887240

  8. Migraine: the platelet hypothesis after 10 years.

    PubMed

    Hanington, E

    1989-01-01

    The proposal that migraine is a blood disorder and caused by a primary abnormality of platelet behaviour was first put forward in 1978. This paper outlines the basis on which the proposal was made and the way in which the platelet hypothesis can account for the many facets of the disorder. It also reports further studies of platelet composition and function which have been undertaken by a large number of independent workers during the past ten years. The results of their investigations provide strong additional support for the platelet hypothesis in migraine.

  9. Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Alison; Storrs, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater Alison Bradford and Alex Storrs Towson University We analyze Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to determine the abundance of minerals near Aristarchus crater. Following the calibration of Robinson et al. (2007) we present ratio maps of images obtained in August of 2005 showing the abundance of TiO2 and other minerals in this interesting area in the middle of Oceanus Procellarum. A prominent cleft (Schroter's Valley, presumably a collapsed lava tube) makes this region of special interest for analyzing the formation of mare basalts. Reference: Robinson, M.S., et al. (2007): "High resolution mapping of TiO2 abundances on the Moon using the Hubble Space Telescope", GRL 34, L13203

  10. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  11. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  12. Hypothesis Formation and Testing in Clinical Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the influence of cognitive complexity and client observation on the quality of clinical hypotheses counselors develop and the number of questions generated to test them. Results showed no effect of these variables on hypothesis quality; but a significant interaction between client observations on the number of questions developed. (LLL)

  13. The Hypothesis of Incommensurability and Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the logical and rhetorical grounds for a multicultural pedagogy that teaches students the knowledge and skills needed to interact creatively in the public realm betwixt and between cultures. I begin by discussing the notion of incommensurability. I contend that this hypothesis was intended to perform a particular rhetorical…

  14. In Defense of Chi's Ontological Incompatibility Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotta, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This article responds to an article by A. Gupta, D. Hammer, and E. F. Redish (2010) that asserts that M. T. H. Chi's (1992, 2005) hypothesis of an "ontological commitment" in conceptual development is fundamentally flawed. In this article, I argue that Chi's theoretical perspective is still very much intact and that the critique offered by Gupta…

  15. Diagnostic Hypothesis Generation and Human Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Rick P.; Dougherty, Michael R.; Sprenger, Amber M.; Harbison, J. Isaiah

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic hypothesis-generation processes are ubiquitous in human reasoning. For example, clinicians generate disease hypotheses to explain symptoms and help guide treatment, auditors generate hypotheses for identifying sources of accounting errors, and laypeople generate hypotheses to explain patterns of information (i.e., data) in the…

  16. Hypothesis on the nature of atmospheric UFOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukharev, L. A.

    1991-08-01

    A hypothesis is developed according to which the atmospheric UFO phenomenon has an electromagnetic nature. It is suggested that an atmospheric UFO is an agglomeration of charged atmospheric dust within which there exists a slowly damped electromagnetic field. This field is considered to be the source of the observed optical effects and the motive force of the UFO.

  17. Forty Years Later: Updating the Fossilization Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2013-01-01

    A founding concept in second language acquisition (SLA) research, fossilization has been fundamental to understanding second language (L2) development. The Fossilization Hypothesis, introduced in Selinker's seminal text (1972), has thus been one of the most influential theories, guiding a significant bulk of SLA research for four decades; 2012…

  18. A Developmental Study of the Infrahumanization Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John; Bennett, Mark; Murray, Wayne S.

    2008-01-01

    Intergroup attitudes in children were examined based on Leyen's "infrahumanization hypothesis". This suggests that some uniquely human emotions, such as shame and guilt (secondary emotions), are reserved for the in-group, whilst other emotions that are not uniquely human and shared with animals, such as anger and pleasure (primary emotions), are…

  19. Sleep memory processing: the sequential hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Giuditta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    According to the sequential hypothesis (SH) memories acquired during wakefulness are processed during sleep in two serial steps respectively occurring during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. During SWS memories to be retained are distinguished from irrelevant or competing traces that undergo downgrading or elimination. Processed memories are stored again during REM sleep which integrates them with preexisting memories. The hypothesis received support from a wealth of EEG, behavioral, and biochemical analyses of trained rats. Further evidence was provided by independent studies of human subjects. SH basic premises, data, and interpretations have been compared with corresponding viewpoints of the synaptic homeostatic hypothesis (SHY). Their similarities and differences are presented and discussed within the framework of sleep processing operations. SHY’s emphasis on synaptic renormalization during SWS is acknowledged to underline a key sleep effect, but this cannot marginalize sleep’s main role in selecting memories to be retained from downgrading traces, and in their integration with preexisting memories. In addition, SHY’s synaptic renormalization raises an unsolved dilemma that clashes with the accepted memory storage mechanism exclusively based on modifications of synaptic strength. This difficulty may be bypassed by the assumption that SWS-processed memories are stored again by REM sleep in brain subnuclear quantum particles. Storing of memories in quantum particles may also occur in other vigilance states. Hints are provided on ways to subject the quantum hypothesis to experimental tests. PMID:25565985

  20. Vacuum counterexamples to the cosmic censorship hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.D.

    1981-07-01

    In cylindrically symmetric vacuum spacetimes it is possible to specify nonsingular initial conditions such that timelike singularities will (necessarily) evolve from these conditions. Examples are given; the spacetimes are somewhat analogous to one of the spherically symmetric counterexamples to the cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  1. A new hypothesis on HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Hladik, Florian

    2015-01-01

    In this opinion article, I provide the rationale for my hypothesis that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) may prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cure by promoting the survival of cells with integrated provirus. If correct, we may be closer to a cure than we realize. PMID:26380071

  2. The Marathon Group Hypothesis: An Unanswered Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Stephen E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The authors of this article contend that the Guinan and Foulds study was inadequately designed and executed, and the results indicate little of the "usefulness" of the test, much less illuminate the important hypothesis central to the investigation. Specific suggestions for further research in marathon group evaluation are made. (Author)

  3. Television Exposure Measures and the Cultivation Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, W. James; Chang, Ik Chin

    1990-01-01

    Describes study of students in grades 8 through 12 that was conducted to determine the degree to which television messages influence a person's construction of reality (the cultivation hypothesis). Research methodology that tests the effects of television exposure is examined with emphasis on the importance of demographic control variables. (38…

  4. Perceived Reality and the Cultivation Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, W. James

    1986-01-01

    Tested cultivation hypothesis by studying relationships between amount of television viewing by high school students and college students and their estimates of chances of victimization and causes of death. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to determine importance of perceived reality, demographic, and televison viewing measures…

  5. Trouble for the most attractive channel hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, B.; Roux, F. S.

    1999-01-01

    We show that the next-to-leading corrections to the kernel of the gap equation can be large and of opposite sign to the lowest order kernel, in the presence of a gauge boson mass. This calls into question the reliability of the most attractive channel hypothesis.

  6. Abundance of Zetaproteobacteria within crustal fluids in back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Sunamura, Michinari; Takano, Yoshinori; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Motoo; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Takuroh; Kobayashi, Kensei; Moroi, Arimichi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Marumo, Katsumi; Urabe, Tetsuro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    To extend knowledge of subseafloor microbial communities within the oceanic crust, the abundance, diversity and composition of microbial communities in crustal fluids at back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT) were investigated using culture-independent molecular techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Seafloor drilling was carried out at two hydrothermal fields, on- and off-ridge of the back-arc spreading centre of the SMT. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for bacterial and archaeal communities were constructed from the fluid samples collected from the boreholes. Phylotypes related to Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria (putative sulfide-oxidizers) and Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria (putative iron-oxidizers) were recovered from the fluid samples. A number of unique archaeal phylotypes were also recovered. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated the presence of active bacterial and archaeal populations in the fluids. The Zetaproteobacteria accounted for up to 32% of the total prokaryotic cell number as shown by FISH analysis using a specific probe designed in this study. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the Zetaproteobacteria play a role in iron oxidation within the oceanic crust.

  7. Abundance of Zetaproteobacteria within crustal fluids in back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Sunamura, Michinari; Takano, Yoshinori; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Motoo; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Takuroh; Kobayashi, Kensei; Moroi, Arimichi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Marumo, Katsumi; Urabe, Tetsuro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    To extend knowledge of subseafloor microbial communities within the oceanic crust, the abundance, diversity and composition of microbial communities in crustal fluids at back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT) were investigated using culture-independent molecular techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Seafloor drilling was carried out at two hydrothermal fields, on- and off-ridge of the back-arc spreading centre of the SMT. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for bacterial and archaeal communities were constructed from the fluid samples collected from the boreholes. Phylotypes related to Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria (putative sulfide-oxidizers) and Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria (putative iron-oxidizers) were recovered from the fluid samples. A number of unique archaeal phylotypes were also recovered. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated the presence of active bacterial and archaeal populations in the fluids. The Zetaproteobacteria accounted for up to 32% of the total prokaryotic cell number as shown by FISH analysis using a specific probe designed in this study. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the Zetaproteobacteria play a role in iron oxidation within the oceanic crust. PMID:19691504

  8. Einstein's Revolutionary Light-Quantum Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, Roger H.

    2005-05-01

    The paper in which Albert Einstein proposed his light-quantum hypothesis was the only one of his great papers of 1905 that he himself termed ``revolutionary.'' Contrary to widespread belief, Einstein did not propose his light-quantum hypothesis ``to explain the photoelectric effect.'' Instead, he based his argument for light quanta on the statistical interpretation of the second law of thermodynamics, with the photoelectric effect being only one of three phenomena that he offered as possible experimental support for it. I will discuss Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and his introduction of the wave-particle duality in 1909 and then turn to the reception of his work on light quanta by his contemporaries. We will examine the reasons that prominent physicists advanced to reject Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis in succeeding years. Those physicists included Robert A. Millikan, even though he provided convincing experimental proof of the validity of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. The turning point came after Arthur Holly Compton discovered the Compton effect in late 1922, but even then Compton's discovery was contested both on experimental and on theoretical grounds. Niels Bohr, in particular, had never accepted the reality of light quanta and now, in 1924, proposed a theory, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory, which assumed that energy and momentum were conserved only statistically in microscopic interactions. Only after that theory was disproved experimentally in 1925 was Einstein's revolutionary light-quantum hypothesis generally accepted by physicists---a full two decades after Einstein had proposed it.

  9. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  10. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  11. Centre for human development, stem cells & regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    The Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration (CHDSCR) was founded in 2004 as a cross-disciplinary research and translational program within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. The Centre undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells together with applied translational research for patient benefit. The Centre has vibrant and thriving multidisciplinary research programs that harness the translational strength of the Faculty together with an innovative Stem Cell PhD program, outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to deliver on this vision.

  12. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  13. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  14. The GAIA Hypothesis and Chaos in Daisyworld.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Cathal Michael

    1993-01-01

    To correctly model the climate it is necessary to include the effects of the biosphere. The Gaia hypothesis claims that the earth's living matter, air, oceans, and land form a complex system which has the capacity to regulate the earth's climate. A model developed by Lovelock and Watson to demonstrate the Gaia hypothesis is explained and the results of their work are reviewed. Only steady state behavior is observed in the Daisyworld model. The work of Zeng et al. on the presence of chaos in Daisyworld is reviewed as an introduction to our own work. The presence of oscillatory and even chaotic behavior in this Daisyworld model brings into question the Gaia hypothesis. We develop a model of two-dimensional crystal growth called Crystalworld. The Crystalworld model is similar to the Daisyworld model in that there is a coupling between the growing entities and their environment via temperature. The results of this model are similar to that of the Daisyworld model. We present the results of another modified model of Daisyworld which we developed. This modified model takes into account the finite response time of the daisies to changes in the planet's climatic conditions. With a generation time introduced into the model equations, while retaining the differential equation format, it is found that the system can show oscillatory and chaotic behavior. These results show that any climate-biosphere model must contain a time delay and that such a time delay leads to behavior which contradicts the Gaia hypothesis. In order to determine the effects of introducing more species we develop a model with two species of daisies and a parasite species. For this Parasite-Daisyworld model steady state, periodic and chaotic behavior is found. A comparison between the results of this model and that of Zeng et al. is made. The results of the Parasite-Daisyworld model show that increasing the number of species does not lead to increased regulation. This contradicts the Gaia hypothesis and

  15. Excess /sup 129/Xe in terrestrial samples: A non-primordial hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M.W.; Hudson, G.B.

    1987-03-01

    Excesses of /sup 129/Xe relative to the isotopic composition in air are observed in some terrestrial samples. Traditionally these /sup 129/Xe excesses have been thought to be related to /sup 129/I that was present in abundance in the early solar system. We propose an alternative hypothesis to explain terrestrial /sup 129/Xe excesses based on the production of /sup 129/I from the spontaneous fission of /sup 238/U.

  16. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  17. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  18. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  19. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  20. The Western European Union Satellite Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasani, Bhupendra; Mara, Simon

    1993-06-01

    In January 1993, the FALCON consortium of 13 European companies, led by Cray Systems, won the contract to supply a turnkey satellite image processing facility to the Western European Union. The project started immediately and will be installed at WEU's Data Centre in Torrejon near Madrid in December 1993. This paper discusses the development of an idea for a Regional Satellite Monitoring Agency (RSMA) which will be realized in December 1993 when the Centre becomes fully operational.

  1. Dublin centre sees light of day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John

    2008-01-01

    An innovative new centre designed to get the public interested in science and technology will open at Trinity College Dublin later this month. The centre, known as the Science Gallery, will allow scientists and the public to debate and exchange ideas through a variety of interactive exhibitions, workshops and other events. The first exhibition will be “Lightwave” - a nine-day, city-wide festival about the principles of light and the technologies used to control it.

  2. Roger Sperry and his chemoaffinity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R L

    1998-10-01

    In the early 1940s, Roger Sperry performed a series of insightful experiments on the visual system of lower vertebrates that led him to draw two important conclusions: When optic fibers were severed, the regenerating fibers grew back to their original loci in the midbrain tectum to re-establish a topographical set of connections; and the re-establishment of these orderly connections underlay the orderly behavior of the animal. From these conclusions, he inferred that each optic fiber and each tectal neuron possessed cytochemical labels that uniquely denoted their neuronal type and position and that optic fibers could utilize these labels to selectively navigate to their matching target cell. This inference was subsequently formulated into a general explanation of how neurons form ordered interconnections during development and became known as the chemoaffinity hypothesis. The origins of this hypothesis, the controversies that surrounded it for several decades and its eventual acceptance, are discussed in this article. PMID:9845045

  3. A hypothesis for delayed dynamic earthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2005-01-01

    It's uncertain whether more near-field earthquakes are triggered by static or dynamic stress changes. This ratio matters because static earthquake interactions are increasingly incorporated into probabilistic forecasts. Recent studies were unable to demonstrate all predictions from the static-stress-change hypothesis, particularly seismicity rate reductions. However, current dynamic stress change hypotheses do not explain delayed earthquake triggering and Omori's law. Here I show numerically that if seismic waves can alter some frictional contacts in neighboring fault zones, then dynamic triggering might cause delayed triggering and an Omori-law response. The hypothesis depends on faults following a rate/state friction law, and on seismic waves changing the mean critical slip distance (Dc) at nucleation zones.

  4. Exploring heterogeneous market hypothesis using realized volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Isa, Zaidi; Mohd Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous market hypothesis using high frequency data. The cascaded heterogeneous trading activities with different time durations are modelled by the heterogeneous autoregressive framework. The empirical study indicated the presence of long memory behaviour and predictability elements in the financial time series which supported heterogeneous market hypothesis. Besides the common sum-of-square intraday realized volatility, we also advocated two power variation realized volatilities in forecast evaluation and risk measurement in order to overcome the possible abrupt jumps during the credit crisis. Finally, the empirical results are used in determining the market risk using the value-at-risk approach. The findings of this study have implications for informationally market efficiency analysis, portfolio strategies and risk managements.

  5. Geochemical confirmation of the lunar magmasphere hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    The lunar magmasphere (or magma ocean) hypothesis was originally conceived to account for the enrichment of cumulus plagioclase (Al and Ca) in the main (highlands) portion of the crust. The great age of the highlands, and the complementary pattern of Eu anomalies between the highlands and the younger mare basalts, helped convince most specialists that the magmasphere hypothesis is correct. Doubts persist, however, particularly among physicists concerned about heat sources. It was shown in 1976 that a plot of Na/Ca vs. Mg/Fe for pristine highlands cumulates manifests a profound bimodality: One group, the Mg-rich rocks, plots along a normal igneous trend of inverse correlation between Na/Ca and Mg/Fe; the other group, the ferroan anorthosites (FAN), features low Na/Ca and low Mg/Fe. Only the FAN group can be plausibly linked to plag. flotation over the magmasphere.

  6. Hypothesis: microtubules, a key to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, S S; Jarvik, L F

    1989-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a clinicopathologic syndrome of unknown etiology with numerous abnormalities in neuronal and nonneuronal cells. A review of the literature suggests that a common basic intracellular defect may underlie many of the reported abnormalities. We hypothesize impairment of the microtubule (MT) system as one explanation for the pathogenesis of AD. Evidence in support of the hypothesis includes the following: MTs are ubiquitous and vital cell components, unequally distributed, with the highest concentration in the brain; various abnormalities, including the key neuropathologic lesions, can be explained by impairments of the MT system; and experiments utilizing pharmacologic agents known to disrupt MTs have reproduced certain abnormalities observed in AD. The hypothesis provides a framework for systematic investigations of MTs at the cellular and molecular levels as well as the basis for in vivo diagnostic tests for AD. PMID:2813384

  7. Roger Sperry and his chemoaffinity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R L

    1998-10-01

    In the early 1940s, Roger Sperry performed a series of insightful experiments on the visual system of lower vertebrates that led him to draw two important conclusions: When optic fibers were severed, the regenerating fibers grew back to their original loci in the midbrain tectum to re-establish a topographical set of connections; and the re-establishment of these orderly connections underlay the orderly behavior of the animal. From these conclusions, he inferred that each optic fiber and each tectal neuron possessed cytochemical labels that uniquely denoted their neuronal type and position and that optic fibers could utilize these labels to selectively navigate to their matching target cell. This inference was subsequently formulated into a general explanation of how neurons form ordered interconnections during development and became known as the chemoaffinity hypothesis. The origins of this hypothesis, the controversies that surrounded it for several decades and its eventual acceptance, are discussed in this article.

  8. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  9. The Neural Rejuvenation Hypothesis of Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yan; Nestler, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    A leading hypothesis guiding current molecular and cellular research of drug addiction conceptualizes key aspects of addiction as a form of memory, in which common neuroplasticity mechanisms that mediate normal learning and memory processes are “hijacked” by exposure to drugs of abuse to produce pathologic addiction-related memories. Such addiction-related memories are particularly robust and long-lasting and once formed, less amenable to updating. Here, we propose the Neural Rejuvenation Hypothesis of Cocaine Addiction: that repeated exposure to drugs of abuse induces some plasticity mechanisms that are normally associated with brain development within the brain’s reward circuitry, which mediate the highly efficient and unusually stable memory abnormalities that characterize addiction. PMID:24958329

  10. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  11. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  12. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft x-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the first ten months of the contract, 15 Jun. 1993 to 15 Apr. 1994.

  13. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  14. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  15. Kelvin on an old, celebrated hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    1986-07-01

    Lord Kelvin in 1901 tested an ``old and celebrated hypothesis'' that if we could see far enough into space the whole sky would be occupied with stellar disks all of perhaps the same brightness as the Sun. Kelvin was the first to solve quantitatively and correctly the riddle of a dark night sky, a riddle that had been previously solved qualitatively by Edgar Allan Poe, and is now known as Olbers' paradox.

  16. Sea otter health: challenging a pet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission.

  17. Moon origin - The impact-trigger hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1986-01-01

    Arguments in favor of the impact-trigger model of lunar origin are presented. Lunar properties favoring this hypothesis include: (1) lunar iron and volatile deficiency; (2) angular momentum of the earth-moon system; and (3) similar O isotopes, bulk iron contents, and densities of earth's mantle and the moon. It is shown that the intense early bombardment averaged during earth's formation was several billion times the present meteoritic mass flux, consistent with a giant impact.

  18. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  19. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  20. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-12-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  1. Testing the single-state dominance hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, R.; Moreno, O.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Šimkovic, F.; Faessler, A.

    2013-12-30

    We present a theoretical analysis of the single-state dominance hypothesis for the two-neutrino double-beta decay process. The theoretical framework is a proton-neutron QRPA based on a deformed Hartree-Fock mean field with BCS pairing correlations. We focus on the decays of {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd and {sup 128}Te. We do not find clear evidences for single-state dominance within the present approach.

  2. The spline probability hypothesis density filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithiravel, Rajiv; Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; McDonald, Mike; Pelletier, Michel; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam

    2012-06-01

    The Probability Hypothesis Density Filter (PHD) is a multitarget tracker for recursively estimating the number of targets and their state vectors from a set of observations. The PHD filter is capable of working well in scenarios with false alarms and missed detections. Two distinct PHD filter implementations are available in the literature: the Sequential Monte Carlo Probability Hypothesis Density (SMC-PHD) and the Gaussian Mixture Probability Hypothesis Density (GM-PHD) filters. The SMC-PHD filter uses particles to provide target state estimates, which can lead to a high computational load, whereas the GM-PHD filter does not use particles, but restricts to linear Gaussian mixture models. The SMC-PHD filter technique provides only weighted samples at discrete points in the state space instead of a continuous estimate of the probability density function of the system state and thus suffers from the well-known degeneracy problem. This paper proposes a B-Spline based Probability Hypothesis Density (S-PHD) filter, which has the capability to model any arbitrary probability density function. The resulting algorithm can handle linear, non-linear, Gaussian, and non-Gaussian models and the S-PHD filter can also provide continuous estimates of the probability density function of the system state. In addition, by moving the knots dynamically, the S-PHD filter ensures that the splines cover only the region where the probability of the system state is significant, hence the high efficiency of the S-PHD filter is maintained at all times. Also, unlike the SMC-PHD filter, the S-PHD filter is immune to the degeneracy problem due to its continuous nature. The S-PHD filter derivations and simulations are provided in this paper.

  3. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  4. Paleoindian demography and the extraterrestrial impact hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Briggs; Collard, Mark; Edinborough, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Recently it has been suggested that one or more large extraterrestrial (ET) objects struck northern North America 12,900 ± 100 calendar years before present (calBP) [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104: 16016–16021]. This impact is claimed to have triggered the Younger Dryas major cooling event and resulted in the extinction of the North American megafauna. The impact is also claimed to have caused major cultural changes and population decline among the Paleoindians. Here, we report a study in which ≈1,500 radiocarbon dates from archaeological sites in Canada and the United States were used to test the hypothesis that the ET resulted in population decline among the Paleoindians. Following recent studies [e.g., Gamble C, Davies W, Pettitt P, Hazelwood L, Richards M (2005) Camb Archaeol J 15:193–223), the summed probability distribution of the calibrated dates was used to identify probable changes in human population size between 15,000 and 9,000 calBP. Subsequently, potential biases were evaluated by modeling and spatial analysis of the dated occupations. The results of the analyses were not consistent with the predictions of extraterrestrial impact hypothesis. No evidence of a population decline among the Paleoindians at 12,900 ± 100 calBP was found. Thus, minimally, the study suggests the extraterrestrial impact hypothesis should be amended. PMID:18697936

  5. The bliss (not the problem) of motor abundance (not redundancy).

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L

    2012-03-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control-the problem of motor redundancy-was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past 10 years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of "good variance"-variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance-have been documented across a variety of natural actions. "Good variance" helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance. PMID:22246105

  6. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  7. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-12-22

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales.

  8. Testing a hypothesis of unidirectional hybridization in plants: Observations on Sonneratia, Bruguiera and Ligularia

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background When natural hybridization occurs at sites where the hybridizing species differ in abundance, the pollen load delivered to the rare species should be predominantly from the common species. Previous authors have therefore proposed a hypothesis on the direction of hybridization: interspecific hybrids are more likely to have the female parent from the rare species and the male parent from the common species. We wish to test this hypothesis using data of plant hybridizations both from our own experimentation and from the literature. Results By examining the maternally inherited chloroplast DNA of 6 cases of F1 hybridization from four genera of plants, we infer unidirectional hybridization in most cases. In all 5 cases where the relative abundance of the parental species deviates from parity, however, the direction is predominantly in the direction opposite of the prediction based strictly on numerical abundance. Conclusion Our results show that the observed direction of hybridization is almost always opposite of the predicted direction based on the relative abundance of the hybridizing species. Several alternative hypotheses, including unidirectional postmating isolation and reinforcement of premating isolation, were discussed. PMID:18485207

  9. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  10. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  11. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    PubMed

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p < 0.01), or when the dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to

  12. Temperature spans for growth: Hypothesis and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J. )

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the upper and lower temperature limits for growth of pure cultures of microorganisms have been extended at least to 110C and [minus]14C, respectively. There are no organisms which grow at both 0C and 100C and, therefore, organisms are grouped according to their ranges of growth temperatures. Thus, the questions of importance are: (1) What is the widest temperature range (temperature span) over which a single organism can grow and (2) How much can one alter the temperature spans of an organism The concept of cryptic thermophiles' is used to explain some of the published data on the latter question. A wider temperature range can be very important for organisms in various ways, since it makes an organism more versatile with regard to changes in the environment. Also, it enables the organism to utilize a wider range of ecological niches. Some aerobic and anaerobic extreme thermophiles will grow within a span of more than 40C. Furthermore, such organisms are regarded suitable for biotechnological applications as well. The following hypothesis is presented and discussed: these organisms have two sets of key enzymes, and their synthesis is regulated by temperature. Such organisms are capable of growing in two different ranges, such as the mesophilic and thermophilic ranges. The hypothesis is based on the fact that these bacteria exhibit broken Arrhenius plots, and is illustrated with 'temperature tolerant extreme thermophiles' as the major example. However, the hypothesis is not restricted to this group, but it also applicable to the 'temperature tolerant thermophiles and mesophiles'.

  13. Telomeres and longevity: testing an evolutionary hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Haussmann, Mark F; Mauck, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Identifying mechanisms that underlie variation in adult survivorship provide insight into the evolution of life history strategies and phenotypic variation in longevity. There is accumulating evidence that shortening telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, play an important role in individual variation in longevity. Given that telomeres generally shorten with age, it was surprising to find that in a population of a long-lived seabird, Leach's storm petrel, telomeres appear to lengthen with age. This unique finding suggested that the longest lived individuals are able to elongate telomeres, an interpretation we call the "elongation hypothesis." Alternatively, the "selection hypothesis" states that the longest lived individuals start with the longest telomeres and variation in telomere length decreases with age due to the selective disappearance of individuals with short telomeres. In the same population in which evidence supporting both hypotheses was uncovered, we tested mutually exclusive predictions from the elongation and selection hypotheses by measuring telomere length with the telomere restriction fragment assay in hatchling and old, adult storm petrels. As previously found, adult birds had longer telomeres on average compared with hatchlings. We also found that 3 hatchlings had mean telomere lengths exceeding that of the most extreme old bird, old birds on average had longer initial telomere lengths than hatchlings, and the variance in mean telomere length was significantly greater for hatchlings than for old birds, all predicted by the selection hypothesis. Perhaps more surprisingly, the oldest adults also show little or no accumulation of short telomeres over time, a pattern unknown in other species. Long telomeres are thought to provide a buffer against cellular senescence and be generally indicative of genome stability and overall cell health. In storm petrels, because the progressive accumulation of short telomeres appears negligible

  14. Consumer Health Information Seeking as Hypothesis Testing

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Browne, Allen C.; Kaufman, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Despite the proliferation of consumer health sites, lay individuals often experience difficulty finding health information online. The present study attempts to understand users' information seeking difficulties by drawing on a hypothesis testing explanatory framework. It also addresses the role of user competencies and their interaction with internet resources. Design Twenty participants were interviewed about their understanding of a hypothetical scenario about a family member suffering from stable angina and then searched MedlinePlus® consumer health information portal for information on the problem presented in the scenario. Participants' understanding of heart disease was analyzed via semantic analysis. Thematic coding was used to describe information seeking trajectories in terms of three key strategies: verification of the primary hypothesis, narrowing search within the general hypothesis area and bottom-up search. Results Compared to an expert model, participants' understanding of heart disease involved different key concepts, which were also differently grouped and defined. This understanding provided the framework for search-guiding hypotheses and results interpretation. Incorrect or imprecise domain knowledge led individuals to search for information on irrelevant sites, often seeking out data to confirm their incorrect initial hypotheses. Online search skills enhanced search efficiency, but did not eliminate these difficulties. Conclusions Regardless of their web experience and general search skills, lay individuals may experience difficulty with health information searches. These difficulties may be related to formulating and evaluating hypotheses that are rooted in their domain knowledge. Informatics can provide support at the levels of health information portals, individual websites, and consumer education tools. PMID:18436912

  15. Updating the Lamellar Hypothesis of Hippocampal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sloviter, Robert S.; Lømo, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Andersen et al. (1971) proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a “trisynaptic circuit” lying within transverse hippocampal “slices” or “lamellae.” In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly infinite variety of unique outputs. The lamellar hypothesis derives primary support from the “lamellar” distribution of dentate granule cell axons (the mossy fibers), which innervate dentate hilar neurons and area CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons within the confines of a thin transverse hippocampal segment. Following the initial formulation of the lamellar hypothesis, anatomical studies revealed that unlike granule cells, hilar mossy cells, CA3 pyramidal cells, and Layer II entorhinal cells all form axonal projections that are more divergent along the longitudinal axis than the clearly “lamellar” mossy fiber pathway. The existence of pathways with “translamellar” distribution patterns has been interpreted, incorrectly in our view, as justifying outright rejection of the lamellar hypothesis (Amaral and Witter, 1989). We suggest that the functional implications of longitudinally projecting axons depend not on whether they exist, but on what they do. The observation that focal granule cell layer discharges normally inhibit, rather than excite, distant granule cells suggests that longitudinal axons in the dentate gyrus may mediate “lateral” inhibition and define lamellar function, rather than undermine it. In this review, we attempt a reconsideration of the evidence that most directly impacts the physiological concept of hippocampal lamellar organization. PMID:23233836

  16. Migraine pathogenesis: the neural hypothesis reexamined.

    PubMed

    Blau, J N

    1984-05-01

    The hypothesis that migraine is a primary neurological disturbance with secondary vascular manifestations is tested by analysing the five phases of migraine attacks and the eight groups of recognised precipitating factors. Accessory evidence from cerebral blood flow and EEG recordings taken during attacks is also considered. The evidence supports the concept that the sensory cortex and hypothalamus could be initiating sites for migraine attacks, and indicates that a neurological mechanism, suggested by Liveing and Gowers 100 years ago, remains viable and needs to be considered in future research.

  17. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  18. Data Centres In The Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy has been at the forefront for the development of on-line services, and astronomers routinely retrieve data from observatory archives, information from value-added services provided by data centres, and bibliography from the ADS and electronic journals. The Virtual Observatory aims at going one step further by providing astronomers with seamless and transparent access to data and services, and data centres with a framework to publish their data and services. Many teams size the opportunity and express their willingness to provide VO services in their domains of expertise, such as data compilations or specific tools, including theory data and services. The VO allows astronomers to discover and use resources of interest for their research, and specific tools can be interfaced with more general VO portals. This means that even small teams can have a significant contribution if they choose the proper niche. VO projects are organising themselves to help these new data centres to uptake the VO framework. Traditional data centres also have a role to play in explaining the constraints linked to service quality and sustainability. The VO "Data Centre Alliance" opens exciting new prospects for increasing the sharing of knowledge throughout the community.

  19. Incident and Emergency Centre of the IAEA.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Florian; Buglova, Elena; Martincic, Rafael; Spiegelberg Planer, Rejane; Stern, Warren; Winkler, Guenther

    2010-06-01

    The Incident and Emergency Centre of the International Atomic Emergency Agency is the global focal point for preparedness, event reporting, and response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies irrespective of their cause. The Centre continuously works to develop standards and guidance for strengthening Member States' preparedness; develops practical tools and training programs to assist Member States in promptly applying the standards and guidance; and organizes a variety of training events and exercises. The Centre evaluates national plans and assists in their development; facilitates effective communication between countries; develops response procedures; and supports national exercises. The Centre provides access to multiple information resources; assesses trends that may influence crisis and consequence management plans and response; and develops and continuously enhances methodology for identifying conditions needed for early warning and response. The Centre provides around-the-clock assistance to Member States in dealing with nuclear and radiological events, including security related events through timely and efficient services and the provision of a coordinated international response to such emergencies. PMID:20445379

  20. Ant Abundance along a Productivity Gradient: Addressing Two Conflicting Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Segev, Udi; Kigel, Jaime; Lubin, Yael; Tielbörger, Katja

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals within a population or community and their body size can be associated with changes in resource supply. While these relationships may provide a key to better understand the role of abiotic vs. biotic constraints in animal communities, little is known about the way size and abundance of organisms change along resource gradients. Here, we studied this interplay in ants, addressing two hypotheses with opposite predictions regarding variation in population densities along resource gradients- the 'productivity hypothesis' and the 'productivity-based thinning hypothesis'. The hypotheses were tested in two functional groups of ground-dwelling ants that are directly primary consumers feeding on seeds: specialized seed-eaters and generalist species. We examined variations in colony density and foraging activity (a size measurement of the forager caste) in six ant assemblages along a steep productivity gradient in a semi-arid region, where precipitation and plant biomass vary 6-fold over a distance of 250km. An increase in the density or foraging activity of ant colonies along productivity gradients is also likely to affect competitive interactions among colonies, and consequently clinal changes in competition intensity were also examined. Ant foraging activity increased with productivity for both functional groups. However, colony density revealed opposing patterns: it increased with productivity for the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased for the generalist species. Competition intensity, evaluated by spatial partitioning of species at food baits and distribution of colonies, was uncorrelated with productivity in the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased with increasing productivity in the generalists. Our results provide support for two contrasting hypotheses regarding the effect of resource availability on the abundance of colonial organisms- the 'productivity hypothesis' for specialized seed-eaters and the 'productivity-based thinning

  1. Oxygen, α-element and iron abundance distributions in the inner part of the Galactic thin disc - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrievsky, S. M.; Martin, R. P.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2016-10-01

    We have derived the abundances of 36 chemical elements in one Cepheid star, ASAS 181024-2049.6, located RG = 2.53 kpc from the Galactic Centre. This star falls within a region of the inner thin disc poorly sampled in Cepheids. Our spectral analysis shows that iron, magnesium, silicon, calcium and titanium local thermodynamic equilibrium abundances in that star support the presence of a plateau-like abundance distribution in the thin disc within 5 kpc of the Galactic Centre, as previously suggested by Martin et al. If confirmed, the flattening of the abundance gradient within that region could be the result of a decrease in the star formation rate due to dynamic effects, possibly from the central Galactic bar.

  2. Learning-Related Changes in Adolescents' Neural Networks during Hypothesis-Generating and Hypothesis-Understanding Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jun-Ki; Kwon, Yongju

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen science high school students participated in this study, which investigated neural-network plasticity associated with hypothesis-generating and hypothesis-understanding in learning. The students were divided into two groups and participated in either hypothesis-generating or hypothesis-understanding type learning programs, which were…

  3. Learning-Related Changes in Adolescents' Neural Networks During Hypothesis-Generating and Hypothesis-Understanding Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Ki; Kwon, Yongju

    2010-11-01

    Fourteen science high school students participated in this study, which investigated neural-network plasticity associated with hypothesis-generating and hypothesis-understanding in learning. The students were divided into two groups and participated in either hypothesis-generating or hypothesis-understanding type learning programs, which were composed of 12 topics taught over a 12-week period. To measure change in student competence and brain networks, a paper & pencil test and an fMRI scanning session were administered before and after the training programs. Unlike the hypothesis-understanding group, a before and after training comparison for the hypothesis-generating group showed significantly strong changes in hypothesis explanation quotients and functional brain connectivity associated with hypothesis-generating. However, for the hypothesis-understanding group, the brain network related to hypothesis-understanding significantly strengthened, not from hypothesis-generating type learning, but from hypothesis-understanding type learning. These findings suggest that for hypothesis-generating and hypothesis-understanding there are at least two specialized brain network systems or processes at work in the brain. Furthermore, hypothesis-generating competence could be developed by appropriate training programs such as teaching by way of active hypothesis generation rather than present passive expository teaching practices.

  4. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  5. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis of sexual selection

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Geoffrey E.; Johnson, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Why females assess ornaments when choosing mates remains a central question in evolutionary biology. We hypothesize that the imperative for a choosing female to find a mate with nuclear oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes that are compatible with her mitochondrial OXPHOS genes drives the evolution of ornaments. Indicator traits are proposed to signal the efficiency of OXPHOS function thus enabling females to select mates with nuclear genes that are compatible with maternal mitochondrial genes in the formation of OXPHOS complexes. Species-typical pattern of ornamentation is proposed to serve as a marker of mitochondrial type ensuring that females assess prospective mates with a shared mitochondrial background. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis predicts that the production of ornaments will be closely linked to OXPHOS pathways, and that sexual selection for compatible mates will be strongest when genes for nuclear components of OXPHOS complexes are Z-linked. The implications of this hypothesis are that sexual selection may serve as a driver for the evolution of more efficient cellular respiration. PMID:23945683

  6. Einstein's Revolutionary Light--Quantum Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, R. H.

    2006-03-01

    Albert Einstein's light-quantum paper was the only one of his great papers of 1905 that he himself called ``very revolutionary''. I sketch his arguments for light quanta, his analysis of the photoelectric effect, and his introduction of the wave-particle duality into physics in 1909. I show that Robert Andrews Millikan, in common with almost all physicists at the time, rejected Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis as an interpretation of his photoelectric-effect experiments of 1915. I then trace the complex experimental and theoretical route that Arthur Holly Compton followed between 1916 and 1922 that led to his discovery of the Compton effect, a discovery that Peter Debye also made virtually simultaneously and independently. Compton's discovery, however, was challenged on experimental grounds by William Duane and on theoretical grounds by Niels Bohr in the Bohr--Kramers--Slater theory of 1924, and only after that theory was disproved experimentally the following year by Walther Bothe and Hans Geiger in Berlin and by Compton and Alfred W. Simon in Chicago was Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis generally accepted by physicists.

  7. Advent of Continents: A New Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yoshihiko; Sato, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nichols, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The straightforward but unexpected relationship presented here relates crustal thickness to magma type in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) and Aleutian oceanic arcs. Volcanoes along the southern segment of the Izu-Ogasawara arc and the western Aleutian arc (west of Adak) are underlain by thin crust (10–20 km). In contrast those along the northern segment of the Izu-Ogasawara arc and eastern Aleutian arc are underlain by crust ~35 km thick. Interestingly, andesite magmas dominate eruptive products from the former volcanoes and mostly basaltic lavas erupt from the latter. According to the hypothesis presented here, rising mantle diapirs stall near the base of the oceanic crust at depths controlled by the thickness of the overlying crust. Where the crust is thin, melting occurs at relatively low pressures in the mantle wedge producing andesitic magmas. Where the crust is thick, melting pressures are higher and only basaltic magmas tend to be produced. The implications of this hypothesis are: (1) the rate of continental crust accumulation, which is andesitic in composition, would have been greatest soon after subduction initiated on Earth, when most crust was thin; and (2) most andesite magmas erupted on continental crust could be recycled from “primary” andesite originally produced in oceanic arcs.

  8. A default Bayesian hypothesis test for mediation.

    PubMed

    Nuijten, Michèle B; Wetzels, Ruud; Matzke, Dora; Dolan, Conor V; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2015-03-01

    In order to quantify the relationship between multiple variables, researchers often carry out a mediation analysis. In such an analysis, a mediator (e.g., knowledge of a healthy diet) transmits the effect from an independent variable (e.g., classroom instruction on a healthy diet) to a dependent variable (e.g., consumption of fruits and vegetables). Almost all mediation analyses in psychology use frequentist estimation and hypothesis-testing techniques. A recent exception is Yuan and MacKinnon (Psychological Methods, 14, 301-322, 2009), who outlined a Bayesian parameter estimation procedure for mediation analysis. Here we complete the Bayesian alternative to frequentist mediation analysis by specifying a default Bayesian hypothesis test based on the Jeffreys-Zellner-Siow approach. We further extend this default Bayesian test by allowing a comparison to directional or one-sided alternatives, using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques implemented in JAGS. All Bayesian tests are implemented in the R package BayesMed (Nuijten, Wetzels, Matzke, Dolan, & Wagenmakers, 2014).

  9. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  10. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis of sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey E; Johnson, James D

    2013-10-01

    Why females assess ornaments when choosing mates remains a central question in evolutionary biology. We hypothesize that the imperative for a choosing female to find a mate with nuclear oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes that are compatible with her mitochondrial OXPHOS genes drives the evolution of ornaments. Indicator traits are proposed to signal the efficiency of OXPHOS function thus enabling females to select mates with nuclear genes that are compatible with maternal mitochondrial genes in the formation of OXPHOS complexes. Species-typical pattern of ornamentation is proposed to serve as a marker of mitochondrial type ensuring that females assess prospective mates with a shared mitochondrial background. The mitonuclear compatibility hypothesis predicts that the production of ornaments will be closely linked to OXPHOS pathways, and that sexual selection for compatible mates will be strongest when genes for nuclear components of OXPHOS complexes are Z-linked. The implications of this hypothesis are that sexual selection may serve as a driver for the evolution of more efficient cellular respiration. PMID:23945683

  11. Inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Elizabeth J; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A

    2015-02-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions.

  12. Investigations into the hypothesis of transgenic cannabis.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Fidelia

    2012-05-01

    The unusual concentration of cannabinoids recently found in marijuana samples submitted to the forensic laboratory for chemical analysis prompted an investigation into whether genetic modifications have been made to the DNA of Cannabis sativa L. to increase its potency. Traditional methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) were used to analyze herbal cannabis preparations. Our analyses support the hypothesis that marijuana samples submitted to forensic laboratories and characterized by an abnormal level of Δ(9)-THC are the product of breeding selection rather than of transgenic modifications. Further, this research has shown a risk of false positive results associated with the poor quality of the seized samples and probably due to the contamination by other transgenic vegetable products. On the other hand, based on these data, a conclusive distinction between the hypothesis of GMO plant contamination and the other of genetic modification of cannabis cannot be made requiring further studies on comparative chemical and genetic analyses to find out an explanation for the recently detected increased potency of cannabis. PMID:22211569

  13. The Malaria-High Blood Pressure Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Smeeth, Liam; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Several studies have demonstrated links between infectious diseases and cardiovascular conditions. Malaria and hypertension are widespread in many low- and middle-income countries, but the possible link between them has not been considered. Objective: In this article, we outline the basis for a possible link between malaria and hypertension and discuss how the hypothesis could be confirmed or refuted. Methods and Results: We reviewed published literature on factors associated with hypertension and checked whether any of these were also associated with malaria. We then considered various study designs that could be used to test the hypothesis. Malaria causes low birth weight, malnutrition, and inflammation, all of which are associated with hypertension in high-income countries. The hypothetical link between malaria and hypertension can be tested through the use of ecological, cohort, or Mendelian randomization studies, each of which poses specific challenges. Conclusions: Confirmation of the existence of a causative link with malaria would be a paradigm shift in efforts to prevent and control hypertension and would stimulate wider research on the links between infectious and noncommunicable disease. PMID:27151400

  14. Advent of Continents: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yoshihiko; Sato, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nichols, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The straightforward but unexpected relationship presented here relates crustal thickness to magma type in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) and Aleutian oceanic arcs. Volcanoes along the southern segment of the Izu-Ogasawara arc and the western Aleutian arc (west of Adak) are underlain by thin crust (10–20 km). In contrast those along the northern segment of the Izu-Ogasawara arc and eastern Aleutian arc are underlain by crust ~35 km thick. Interestingly, andesite magmas dominate eruptive products from the former volcanoes and mostly basaltic lavas erupt from the latter. According to the hypothesis presented here, rising mantle diapirs stall near the base of the oceanic crust at depths controlled by the thickness of the overlying crust. Where the crust is thin, melting occurs at relatively low pressures in the mantle wedge producing andesitic magmas. Where the crust is thick, melting pressures are higher and only basaltic magmas tend to be produced. The implications of this hypothesis are: (1) the rate of continental crust accumulation, which is andesitic in composition, would have been greatest soon after subduction initiated on Earth, when most crust was thin; and (2) most andesite magmas erupted on continental crust could be recycled from “primary” andesite originally produced in oceanic arcs. PMID:27669662

  15. Investigations into the hypothesis of transgenic cannabis.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Fidelia

    2012-05-01

    The unusual concentration of cannabinoids recently found in marijuana samples submitted to the forensic laboratory for chemical analysis prompted an investigation into whether genetic modifications have been made to the DNA of Cannabis sativa L. to increase its potency. Traditional methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) were used to analyze herbal cannabis preparations. Our analyses support the hypothesis that marijuana samples submitted to forensic laboratories and characterized by an abnormal level of Δ(9)-THC are the product of breeding selection rather than of transgenic modifications. Further, this research has shown a risk of false positive results associated with the poor quality of the seized samples and probably due to the contamination by other transgenic vegetable products. On the other hand, based on these data, a conclusive distinction between the hypothesis of GMO plant contamination and the other of genetic modification of cannabis cannot be made requiring further studies on comparative chemical and genetic analyses to find out an explanation for the recently detected increased potency of cannabis.

  16. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  17. The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis: A requiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinter, Nicholas; Scott, Andrew C.; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Podoll, Andrew; Koeberl, Christian; Anderson, R. Scott; Ishman, Scott E.

    2011-06-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) impact hypothesis is a recent theory that suggests that a cometary or meteoritic body or bodies hit and/or exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, causing the YD climate episode, extinction of Pleistocene megafauna, demise of the Clovis archeological culture, and a range of other effects. Since gaining widespread attention in 2007, substantial research has focused on testing the 12 main signatures presented as evidence of a catastrophic extraterrestrial event 12,900 years ago. Here we present a review of the impact hypothesis, including its evolution and current variants, and of efforts to test and corroborate the hypothesis. The physical evidence interpreted as signatures of an impact event can be separated into two groups. The first group consists of evidence that has been largely rejected by the scientific community and is no longer in widespread discussion, including: particle tracks in archeological chert; magnetic nodules in Pleistocene bones; impact origin of the Carolina Bays; and elevated concentrations of radioactivity, iridium, and fullerenes enriched in 3He. The second group consists of evidence that has been active in recent research and discussions: carbon spheres and elongates, magnetic grains and magnetic spherules, byproducts of catastrophic wildfire, and nanodiamonds. Over time, however, these signatures have also seen contrary evidence rather than support. Recent studies have shown that carbon spheres and elongates do not represent extraterrestrial carbon nor impact-induced megafires, but are indistinguishable from fungal sclerotia and arthropod fecal material that are a small but common component of many terrestrial deposits. Magnetic grains and spherules are heterogeneously distributed in sediments, but reported measurements of unique peaks in concentrations at the YD onset have yet to be reproduced. The magnetic grains are certainly just iron-rich detrital grains, whereas reported YD magnetic spherules are

  18. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  19. The GABAergic Deficit Hypothesis of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Luscher, Bernhard; Shen, Qiuying; Sahir, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to an association between major depressive disorders (MDDs) and diverse types of GABAergic deficits. Here we summarize clinical and preclinical evidence supporting a central and causal role of GABAergic deficits in the etiology of depressive disorders. Studies of depressed patients indicate that MDDs are accompanied by reduced brain concentration of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as well as alterations in the subunit composition of the principal receptors (GABAA receptors) mediating GABAergic inhibition. In addition, there is abundant evidence that GABA plays a prominent role in the brain control of stress, the most important vulnerability factor in mood disorders. Furthermore, preclinical evidence suggests that currently used antidepressant drugs designed to alter monoaminergic transmission as well as non-pharmacologic therapies may ultimately act to counteract GABAergic deficits. In particular, GABAergic transmission plays an important role in the control of hippocampal neurogenesis and neural maturation, which are now established as cellular substrates of most if not all antidepressant therapies. Lastly, comparatively modest deficits in GABAergic transmission in GABAA-receptor-deficient mice are sufficient to cause behavioral, cognitive, neuroanatomical, and neuroendocrine phenotypes as well as antidepressant drug response characteristics expected of an animal model of MDD. The GABAergic hypothesis of MDD suggests that alterations in GABAergic transmission represent fundamentally important aspects of the etiological sequelae of major depressive disorders that are reversed by monoaminergic antidepressant drug action. PMID:21079608

  20. [Evolutionary process unveiled by the maximum genetic diversity hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Min; Xia, Meng-Ying; Huang, Shi

    2013-05-01

    As two major popular theories to explain evolutionary facts, the neutral theory and Neo-Darwinism, despite their proven virtues in certain areas, still fail to offer comprehensive explanations to such fundamental evolutionary phenomena as the genetic equidistance result, abundant overlap sites, increase in complexity over time, incomplete understanding of genetic diversity, and inconsistencies with fossil and archaeological records. Maximum genetic diversity hypothesis (MGD), however, constructs a more complete evolutionary genetics theory that incorporates all of the proven virtues of existing theories and adds to them the novel concept of a maximum or optimum limit on genetic distance or diversity. It has yet to meet a contradiction and explained for the first time the half-century old Genetic Equidistance phenomenon as well as most other major evolutionary facts. It provides practical and quantitative ways of studying complexity. Molecular interpretation using MGD-based methods reveal novel insights on the origins of humans and other primates that are consistent with fossil evidence and common sense, and reestablished the important role of China in the evolution of humans. MGD theory has also uncovered an important genetic mechanism in the construction of complex traits and the pathogenesis of complex diseases. We here made a series of sequence comparisons among yeasts, fishes and primates to illustrate the concept of limit on genetic distance. The idea of limit or optimum is in line with the yin-yang paradigm in the traditional Chinese view of the universal creative law in nature.

  1. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Vance

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  2. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Vance; Surovell, Todd; Johnson, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  3. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  4. From serenity to halcyon birth centre.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article follows the journey of Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust quest for improving normal birth outcomes for a complex and diverse population. The opportunities that led to commissioning a colocated and freestanding birth centre are explored and how the design was influenced by less clinical beliefs about birth. Through the story of both birth centre developments, Kathryn Gutteridge shows the changes that have been seen in both clinical outcomes and families'comments. From a failing maternity service to a beacon of light where midwifery care and a belief that 'your birth in our home' really matters.

  5. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  6. The Criticality Hypothesis in Neural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipanah, Yahya

    There is mounting evidence that neural networks of the cerebral cortex exhibit scale invariant dynamics. At the larger scale, fMRI recordings have shown evidence for spatiotemporal long range correlations. On the other hand, at the smaller scales this scale invariance is marked by the power law distribution of the size and duration of spontaneous bursts of activity, which are referred as neuronal avalanches. The existence of such avalanches has been confirmed by several studies in vitro and in vivo, among different species and across multiple scales, from spatial scale of MEG and EEG down to single cell resolution. This prevalent scale free nature of cortical activity suggests the hypothesis that the cortex resides at a critical state between two phases of order (short-lasting activity) and disorder (long-lasting activity). In addition, it has been shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that being at criticality brings about certain functional advantages for information processing. However, despite the plenty of evidence and plausibility of the neural criticality hypothesis, still very little is known on how the brain may leverage such criticality to facilitate neural coding. Moreover, the emergent functions that may arise from critical dynamics is poorly understood. In the first part of this thesis, we review several pieces of evidence for the neural criticality hypothesis at different scales, as well as some of the most popular theories of self-organized criticality (SOC). Thereafter, we will focus on the most prominent evidence from small scales, namely neuronal avalanches. We will explore the effect of adaptation and how it can maintain scale free dynamics even at the presence of external stimuli. Using calcium imaging we also experimentally demonstrate the existence of scale free activity at the cellular resolution in vivo. Moreover, by exploring the subsampling issue in neural data, we will find some fundamental constraints of the conventional methods

  7. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity.

  8. A neuroplastic deafferentation hypothesis for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jonathan; Mirams, Jamie; Patel, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, characterised by extreme cyclical variations in mood between depression and mania, is a common, debilitating and sometimes fatal psychiatric condition with an unclear aetiology. In this paper we propose a hypothesis for the development of bipolar disorder through which neuroplastic changes in response to an index depressive episode leads to the amplification of subthreshold pleasurable stimuli that then drive conversion into a manic state. This ‘pleasure deafferentation hypothesis’ is reached through a discussion of the neuroscientific basis of deafferentation at the level of the neuron and its role in the development of various neurological and psychiatric phenomena before a case for deafferentation as applied to bipolar disorder is justified and its implications discussed. PMID:26459976

  9. Bayesian hypothesis testing for key comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wübbeler, Gerd; Bodnar, Olha; Elster, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral degrees of equivalence are the key result in the analysis of key comparison data and they are used to approve, or disapprove, calibration and measurement capabilities of the participating laboratories. To this end, it is checked whether a degree of equivalence differs significantly from zero. Proceeding in such a way can be viewed as carrying out a classical hypothesis test. We develop a Bayesian counterpart to this approach which has the advantage that it can include prior assessment of the corresponding Consultative Committee about the calibration and measurement capabilities of the participating laboratories. Simple expressions are derived and their implementation is provided in terms of MATLAB® and R programs. The novel procedure is illustrated by its application to two recent key comparisons CCL-K1 and CCM.FF-K4.1.2011.

  10. Origin of the moon - The collision hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models of lunar origin involving one or more collisions between the earth and other large sun-orbiting bodies are examined in a critical review. Ten basic propositions of the collision hypothesis (CH) are listed; observational data on mass and angular momentum, bulk chemistry, volatile depletion, trace elements, primordial high temperatures, and orbital evolution are summarized; and the basic tenets of alternative models (fission, capture, and coformation) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the thermodynamics of large impacts, rheological and dynamical problems, numerical simulations based on the CH, disk evolution models, and the chemical implications of the CH. It is concluded that the sound arguments and evidence supporting the CH are not (yet) sufficient to rule out other hypotheses.

  11. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity. PMID:26420396

  12. Testing Darwin's naturalization hypothesis in the Azores.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Hanno; Hardy, Olivier J; Silva, Luís; Barraclough, Timothy G; Savolainen, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    Invasive species are a threat for ecosystems worldwide, especially oceanic islands. Predicting the invasive potential of introduced species remains difficult, and only a few studies have found traits correlated to invasiveness. We produced a molecular phylogenetic dataset and an ecological trait database for the entire Azorean flora and find that the phylogenetic nearest neighbour distance (PNND), a measure of evolutionary relatedness, is significantly correlated with invasiveness. We show that introduced plant species are more likely to become invasive in the absence of closely related species in the native flora of the Azores, verifying Darwin's 'naturalization hypothesis'. In addition, we find that some ecological traits (especially life form and seed size) also have predictive power on invasive success in the Azores. Therefore, we suggest a combination of PNND with ecological trait values as a universal predictor of invasiveness that takes into account characteristics of both introduced species and receiving ecosystem.

  13. A Reassessment of the Mars Ocean Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    Initial work on the identification and mapping of potential ancient shorelines on Mars was based on Viking Orbiter image data (Parker et al., 1987, 1989, 1993). The Viking Orbiters were designed to locate landing site for the two landers and were not specifically intended to map the entire planet. Fortunately, they mapped the entire planet. Unfortunately, they did so at an average resolution of greater than 200m/pixel. Higher resolution images, even mosaics of interesting regions, are available, but relatively sparse. Mapping of shorelines on Earth requires both high-resolution aerial photos or satellite images and good topographic information. Three significant sources of additional data from missions subsequent to Viking are useful for reassessing the ocean hypothesis. These are: MGS MOC images; MGS MOLA topography; Odyssey THEMIS IR and VIS images; and MER surface geology at Meridiani and Gusev. Okay, my mistake: Four.

  14. A critical examination of the bioplasma hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Quickenden, T I; Tilbury, R N

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis of Zon (Physiol. Chem. and Physics 11, 501-506 (1979); 12, 357-364 (1980] that regions of semiconduction within living organisms may exhibit plasma behaviour is shown to be most unlikely. Although charge carrier concentrations may be acceptable, calculated Debye lengths are shown to be only marginally acceptable and calculated plasma frequencies are not sufficiently high to ensure that charge carrier motions are governed by electrical and magnetic forces rather than hydrodynamic considerations. For the latter reason, conventional semiconductors do not exhibit plasma behaviour except close to absolute zero and if they are free from impurities and lattice disorder. The experimental evidences presented for the existence of biological plasma (bioplasma) from the areas of Kirlian photography, mitogenetic radiation, acupuncture and studies of biological fields, are largely explainable in conventional terms without invoking the existence of biological plasma. PMID:3809263

  15. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  16. Multiple model cardinalized probability hypothesis density filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Ramona; Willett, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter propagates the first-moment approximation to the multi-target Bayesian posterior distribution while the Cardinalized PHD (CPHD) filter propagates both the posterior likelihood of (an unlabeled) target state and the posterior probability mass function of the number of targets. Extensions of the PHD filter to the multiple model (MM) framework have been published and were implemented either with a Sequential Monte Carlo or a Gaussian Mixture approach. In this work, we introduce the multiple model version of the more elaborate CPHD filter. We present the derivation of the prediction and update steps of the MMCPHD particularized for the case of two target motion models and proceed to show that in the case of a single model, the new MMCPHD equations reduce to the original CPHD equations.

  17. Ecological Hypothesis of Dentin and Root Caries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Nyvad, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances regarding the caries process indicate that ecological phenomena induced by bacterial acid production tilt the de- and remineralization balance of the dental hard tissues towards demineralization through bacterial acid-induced adaptation and selection within the microbiota - from the dynamic stability stage to the aciduric stage via the acidogenic stage [Takahashi and Nyvad, 2008]. Dentin and root caries can also be partly explained by this hypothesis; however, the fact that these tissues contain a considerable amount of organic material suggests that protein degradation is involved in caries formation. In this review, we compiled relevant histological, biochemical, and microbiological information about dentin/root caries and refined the hypothesis by adding degradation of the organic matrix (the proteolytic stage) to the abovementioned stages. Bacterial acidification not only induces demineralization and exposure of the organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces but also activation of dentin-embedded and salivary matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins. These phenomena initiate degradation of the demineralized organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces. While a bacterial involvement has never been confirmed in the initial degradation of organic material, the detection of proteolytic/amino acid-degrading bacteria and bacterial metabolites in dentin and root caries suggests a bacterial digestion and metabolism of partly degraded matrix. Moreover, bacterial metabolites might induce pulpitis as an inflammatory/immunomodulatory factor. Root and dentin surfaces are always at risk of becoming demineralized in the oral cavity, and exposed organic materials can be degraded by host-derived proteases contained in saliva and dentin itself. New approaches to the prevention and treatment of root/dentin caries are required. PMID:27458979

  18. Limb apraxia and the "affordance competition hypothesis".

    PubMed

    Rounis, Elisabeth; Humphreys, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Limb apraxia, a disorder of higher order motor control, has long been a challenge for clinical assessment and understanding (Leiguarda and Marsden, 2000). The deficits originally described in limb apraxia (Liepmann, 1920) have been classified by the nature of the errors made by the patients leading to, namely, ideational and ideomotor apraxia. The dual stream hypothesis (Goodale and Milner, 1992) has been used to explain these categories: ideational apraxia is thought to relate to a deficit in the concept of a movement (coded in the ventral stream). Patients have difficulty using objects, sequencing actions to interact with them or pantomiming their use. Ideomotor apraxia, on the other hand, is thought to arise from problems in the accurate implementation of movements within the dorsal stream. One of the limitations on understanding apraxia is the failure by the clinical literature to draw on knowledge of the factors determining actions in the environment. Here we emphasize the role of affordance. There is much recent work indicating that our responses to stimuli are strongly influenced by the actions that the objects "afford", based on their physical properties and the intentions of the actor (e.g., Tucker and Ellis, 1998). The concept of affordance, originally suggested by Gibson (1979) has been incorporated in a recent model of interactive behavior that draws from findings in non-human primates, namely the "affordance competition hypothesis" (Cisek, 2007). This postulates that interactive behavior arises by a process of competition between possible actions elicited by the environment. In this paper we argue that "affordance competition" may play a role in apraxia. We review evidence that at least some aspects of apraxia may reflect an abnormal sensitivity to competition when multiple affordances are present (Riddoch et al., 1998) and/or a poor ability to exert cognitive control over this competition when it occurs. This framework suggests a new way of

  19. Journey to the Centre of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Using the film "Journey to the Centre of a Triangle" with a group of 15-year-old pupils, the author describes how they had done some work on constructions such as angle bisector and perpendicular bisector. The pupils were given A3 papers, rulers, compasses and pencils and they were asked to recreate their favourite scence from the film. The film…

  20. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  1. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  2. The Centre Program for Project Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William H., III

    Reported is a research and development program, Project Opportunity, which involved 11 high schools in eight Southern states. Sponsors and participants were the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Ford Foundation, Berea, Centre, and Transylvania Colleges, the schools systems of Breathitt and Lee Counties and the Princeton, N.J., High…

  3. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  4. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  5. UV LED lighting for automated crystal centring.

    PubMed

    Chavas, Leonard M G; Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    A direct outcome of the exponential growth of macromolecular crystallography is the continuously increasing demand for synchrotron beam time, both from academic and industrial users. As more and more projects entail screening a profusion of sample crystals, fully automated procedures at every level of the experiments are being implemented at all synchrotron facilities. One of the major obstacles to achieving such automation lies in the sample recognition and centring in the X-ray beam. The capacity of UV light to specifically react with aromatic residues present in proteins or with DNA base pairs is at the basis of UV-assisted crystal centring. Although very efficient, a well known side effect of illuminating biological samples with strong UV sources is the damage induced on the irradiated samples. In the present study the effectiveness of a softer UV light for crystal centring by taking advantage of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) sources has been investigated. The use of UV LEDs represents a low-cost solution for crystal centring with high specificity.

  6. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  7. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    PubMed

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  8. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  9. Learning Skills Centre--Department Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Pat

    This report on an internal evaluation, which was conducted for developmental purposes, describes services provided at the Learning Skills Centres (LSC) on three separate campuses of Grant MacEwan Community College, in Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). The key questions of the evaluation addressed student and staff awareness of the existence of the LSC;…

  10. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  11. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  12. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  13. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  14. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  15. Core-satellite species hypothesis and native versus exotic species in secondary succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, Kelsey A.; Gibson, David J.; Middleton, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    A number of hypotheses exist to explain species’ distributions in a landscape, but these hypotheses are not frequently utilized to explain the differences in native and exotic species distributions. The core-satellite species (CSS) hypothesis predicts species occupancy will be bimodally distributed, i.e., many species will be common and many species will be rare, but does not explicitly consider exotic species distributions. The parallel dynamics (PD) hypothesis predicts that regional occurrence patterns of exotic species will be similar to native species. Together, the CSS and PD hypotheses may increase our understanding of exotic species’ distribution relative to natives. We selected an old field undergoing secondary succession to study the CSS and PD hypotheses in conjunction with each other. The ratio of exotic to native species (richness and abundance) was observed through 17 years of secondary succession. We predicted species would be bimodally distributed and that exotic:native species ratios would remain steady or decrease through time under frequent disturbance. In contrast to the CSS and PD hypotheses, native species occupancies were not bimodally distributed at the site, but exotic species were. The exotic:native species ratios for both richness (E:Nrichness) and abundance (E:Ncover) generally decreased or remained constant throughout supporting the PD hypothesis. Our results suggest exotic species exhibit metapopulation structure in old field landscapes, but that metapopulation structures of native species are disrupted, perhaps because these species are dispersal limited in the fragmented landscape.

  16. Iridium abundance patterns across extinction boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Oliver, P.Q.; Quintana, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are measuring elemental abundances, with emphasis on high sensitivity Ir assay, across biological crisis zones in the fossil record. Samples are measured in an automated neutron activation analysis system, with radiochemical separations for the heavy Pt-group elements and Au. They are collaborating with paleontologic and stratigraphic experts to home-in on the boundaries, and to date they have performed at least one set of measurements across the following transition and extinction boundaries: Precambrian/Cambrian(Pc/C); 2 U. Cambrian biomere boundaries; the basal Ordovician; Ordovician;/Silurian; U. Devonian Frasnian/Famennian (F/F); Devonian/Miss.; Miss./Penn.; Permian/Triassic (P/Tr); Triassic/Jurassic; L. Jurassic Toarcian; Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T); and the U. Eocene. The authors work on K/T sequences that were deposited under freshwater conditions in the western interior of North America supports the Alvarez asteroid impact hypothesis. The Earth has been struck many times in the Phanerozoic by large impactors that probably have done tremendous damage to the local environment. However, to day scientists have not found any firm chemical evidence for the association of impacts with global extinctions older than the massive terminal Cretaceous event, which might have been unique in the Phanerozoic. Although they have measured a moderate Ir and Pt anomaly in the F/F boundary zone in NW Australia, their evidence indicates that these and several other elements were enriched from seawater by bacteria. Although the authors data, except for the U. Eocene, do not support the periodic comet swarm-global extinction arguments, much more work is needed to resolve this issue.

  17. A Test of the Salience Hypothesis of Dream Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David B.; MacNeilage, Peter F.

    1974-01-01

    A test was made of the hypothesis that dream salience (subjective impact of the generated dream) would be greater for frequent than infrequent dream recallers. Analysis of the verbal reports confirmed the hypothesis. (Author)

  18. Mars' Oceanus Borealis, Ancient Glaciers, and the MEGAOUTFLO Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.; Strom, R. G.; Dohm, J. M.; Gulick, V. C.; Kargel, J. S.; Komatsu, G.; Ori, G. G.; Rice, J. W., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results from Global Surveyor corroborate the hypothesis that episodes of outburst flooding produced ponded water and climate change on Mars. This hypothesis colligates diverse facts concerning the Martian landscape and its history into a unified genetic system.

  19. Abundances and possible diffusion of elements in M 67 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önehag, Anna; Gustafsson, Bengt; Korn, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Context. The rich open cluster M 67 is known to have a chemical composition close to solar and an age of about 3.5-4.8 Gyr. It offers an important opportunity to check and develop our understanding of the physics and the evolution of solar-type stars. Aims: We present a spectroscopic study at high resolution, R ≈ 50 000, of 14 stars located on the main sequence, at the turn-off point, and on the early subgiant branch in the cluster in order to investigate its detailed chemical composition, for comparison with the Sun and solar twins in the solar neighbourhood, and to explore selective atomic diffusion of chemical elements as predicted by stellar-structure theory. Methods: We have obtained VLT/FLAMES-UVES spectra and analysed these strictly differentially in order to explore chemical-abundance similarities and differences between the M 67 stars and the Sun and among the M 67 stars themselves. Results: Individual abundances of 19 different chemical elements are obtained for the stars. They are found to agree very well with solar abundances, with abundance ratios closer to solar than those of most solar twins in the solar neighbourhood. An exception is Li, which shows considerable scatter among the cluster stars. There is a tendency for the cluster-star abundances to be more depleted than the abundances in the field stars in correlation with the condensation temperature of the elements, a tendency also found earlier for the Sun. Moreover, the heavy-element abundances are found to be reduced in the hotter stars and dwarfs by typically ≤0.05 dex, as compared to the abundances of the subgiants. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that the gas of the proto-cluster was depleted by formation and cleansing of dust before the stars formed. They also add support to the proposal that the Sun was formed in a dense stellar environment. Moreover, the observed minor reductions of heavy elements, relative to our standard star M 67-1194 and the subgiants, in the

  20. Hypothesis of demodicidosis rosacea flushing etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Mary Ann; Orduz, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Most of the patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea are characterized by flushing, oedema and telangiectasia. The etiopathogenesis of the flushing in rosacea patients is unknown. Clinically the flushing in rosacea is similar to the "Asian flushing syndrome". Most Asians have an overactive alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that tends to break down alcohol into acetaldehyde faster. People with "Asians flushing syndrome" have a genetic disorder with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2(∗)2 (ALDH2(∗)2) allele. This is the reason why they do not metabolize very well the acetaldehyde that comes from the alcohol, which means that acetaldehyde takes much longer to clear from their blood. ALDH2 enzyme is primarily responsible for oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethanol metabolism, as well as oxidation of various other endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Acetaldehyde produces the vasodilatation in the "Asian flushing syndrome". The antibodies against the GroEl chaperonin protein, a 62-kDa heat shock protein were found in the Bacillus oleronius isolated from Demodex mites, in rosacea patients. The GroEl chaperonin protein is a protein that plays a key role in normal folding of ALDH2. If the GroEl chaperonin antibodies found in patients with rosacea, cross react with the human GroEl chaperonin protein, they will not fold normally the ALDH2, and then the enzyme will not metabolize the acetaldehyde. Many of the patients with rosacea have a concomitant infection with Helicobacter pylori in their stomach. The H.pylori produces high amounts of acetaldehyde, which comes from their metabolism of ethanol or carbohydrates. As a result, high amounts of acetaldehyde will circulate for longer time in the blood, until the liver CYP2E1(p450) enzyme system finally metabilizes the acetaldehyde, during that period of time the patients will experience a flushing as well as the people with the "Asian flushing syndrome" suffer when they drink ethanol. To prove the hypothesis it is necessary

  1. Hypothesis of demodicidosis rosacea flushing etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Mary Ann; Orduz, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Most of the patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea are characterized by flushing, oedema and telangiectasia. The etiopathogenesis of the flushing in rosacea patients is unknown. Clinically the flushing in rosacea is similar to the "Asian flushing syndrome". Most Asians have an overactive alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that tends to break down alcohol into acetaldehyde faster. People with "Asians flushing syndrome" have a genetic disorder with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2(∗)2 (ALDH2(∗)2) allele. This is the reason why they do not metabolize very well the acetaldehyde that comes from the alcohol, which means that acetaldehyde takes much longer to clear from their blood. ALDH2 enzyme is primarily responsible for oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethanol metabolism, as well as oxidation of various other endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Acetaldehyde produces the vasodilatation in the "Asian flushing syndrome". The antibodies against the GroEl chaperonin protein, a 62-kDa heat shock protein were found in the Bacillus oleronius isolated from Demodex mites, in rosacea patients. The GroEl chaperonin protein is a protein that plays a key role in normal folding of ALDH2. If the GroEl chaperonin antibodies found in patients with rosacea, cross react with the human GroEl chaperonin protein, they will not fold normally the ALDH2, and then the enzyme will not metabolize the acetaldehyde. Many of the patients with rosacea have a concomitant infection with Helicobacter pylori in their stomach. The H.pylori produces high amounts of acetaldehyde, which comes from their metabolism of ethanol or carbohydrates. As a result, high amounts of acetaldehyde will circulate for longer time in the blood, until the liver CYP2E1(p450) enzyme system finally metabilizes the acetaldehyde, during that period of time the patients will experience a flushing as well as the people with the "Asian flushing syndrome" suffer when they drink ethanol. To prove the hypothesis it is necessary

  2. Vocational Hypothesis Testing in Career Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blustein, David L.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined vocational hypothesis testing by applying Snyder's hypothesis-testing research paradigm to a vocational task in two experiments. Subjects (N=106) were asked to evaluate the appropriateness of a specific occupation for themselves. Subjects tended to exhibit confirmatory hypothesis-testing strategies when relevant occupations were…

  3. In Defense of the Play-Creativity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Irwin W.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that pretend play facilitates the creative thought process in children has received a great deal of attention. In a literature review, Lillard et al. (2013, p. 8) concluded that the evidence for this hypothesis was "not convincing." This article focuses on experimental and training studies that have tested this hypothesis.…

  4. Phylogenetic structure and host abundance drive disease pressure in communities.

    PubMed

    Parker, Ingrid M; Saunders, Megan; Bontrager, Megan; Weitz, Andrew P; Hendricks, Rebecca; Magarey, Roger; Suiter, Karl; Gilbert, Gregory S

    2015-04-23

    Pathogens play an important part in shaping the structure and dynamics of natural communities, because species are not affected by them equally. A shared goal of ecology and epidemiology is to predict when a species is most vulnerable to disease. A leading hypothesis asserts that the impact of disease should increase with host abundance, producing a 'rare-species advantage'. However, the impact of a pathogen may be decoupled from host abundance, because most pathogens infect more than one species, leading to pathogen spillover onto closely related species. Here we show that the phylogenetic and ecological structure of the surrounding community can be important predictors of disease pressure. We found that the amount of tissue lost to disease increased with the relative abundance of a species across a grassland plant community, and that this rare-species advantage had an additional phylogenetic component: disease pressure was stronger on species with many close relatives. We used a global model of pathogen sharing as a function of relatedness between hosts, which provided a robust predictor of relative disease pressure at the local scale. In our grassland, the total amount of disease was most accurately explained not by the abundance of the focal host alone, but by the abundance of all species in the community weighted by their phylogenetic distance to the host. Furthermore, the model strongly predicted observed disease pressure for 44 novel host species we introduced experimentally to our study site, providing evidence for a mechanism to explain why phylogenetically rare species are more likely to become invasive when introduced. Our results demonstrate how the phylogenetic and ecological structure of communities can have a key role in disease dynamics, with implications for the maintenance of biodiversity, biotic resistance against introduced weeds, and the success of managed plants in agriculture and forestry.

  5. Neutron-capture Element Abundances in Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, A. L.; Sterling, N. C.; Madonna, S.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Roederer, I. U.; Geballe, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of 10 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC), acquired with the FIRE and GNIRS spectrometers on the 6.5 m Baade and 8.1 m Gemini South Telescopes, respectively. We detect Se and/or Kr emission lines in eight of these objects, the first detections of n-capture elements in Magellanic Cloud PNe. Our abundance analysis shows large s-process enrichments of Kr (0.6–1.3 dex) in the six PNe in which it was detected, and Se is enriched by 0.5–0.9 dex in five objects. We also estimate upper limits to Rb and Cd abundances in these objects. Our abundance results for the LMC are consistent with the hypothesis that PNe with 2–3 M ⊙ progenitors dominate the bright end of the PN luminosity function in young gas-rich galaxies. We find no significant correlations between s-process enrichments and other elemental abundances, central star temperature, or progenitor mass, though this is likely due to our small sample size. We determine S abundances from our spectra and find that [S/H] agrees with [Ar/H] to within 0.2 dex for most objects, but is lower than [O/H] by 0.2–0.4 dex in some PNe, possibly due to O enrichment via third dredge-up. Our results demonstrate that n-capture elements can be detected in PNe belonging to nearby galaxies with ground-based telescopes, allowing s-process enrichments to be studied in PN populations with well-determined distances. This paper includes data obtained with the 6.5-m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and with the Gemini-South Telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile.

  6. Mental deterioration at epilepsy onset: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Meinardi, H; Aldenkamp, A P; Nunes, B

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized a type of mental deterioration in epilepsy, characterized as a discontinued, cascading process, i.e. a sudden mental decline in a limited time interval, immediately after the onset of the seizures. The posttraumatic epilepsy model (PTE) may appear to be exceptionally useful in avoiding one of the major methodological obstacles for testing this hypothesis, i.e. the unavailability of test results obtained with the same battery of tests prior to and directly after the onset of the seizures. We propose a multicentre study in which a large group of patients are assessed, after recovering from the direct aftermath of head injury, but before the onset of PTE. This baseline provides an opportunity for longitudinal follow-up. Full recovery from head injury before the onset of PTE is to be expected in the mild and moderate groups of closed head injury patients. In this category, approximately 2000 head injured patients have to be assessed to obtain a reasonable group of approximately 100-200 PTE patients. This group will be followed during the critical period of 2-3 years after the onset of epilepsy. PMID:1414549

  7. The social brain hypothesis of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BURNS, JONATHAN

    2006-01-01

    The social brain hypothesis is a useful heuristic for understanding schizophrenia. It focuses attention on the core Bleulerian concept of autistic alienation and is consistent with well-replicated findings of social brain dysfunction in schizophrenia as well as contemporary theories of human cognitive and brain evolution. The contributions of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty and Wittgenstein allow us to arrive at a new "philosophy of interpersonal relatedness", which better reflects the "embodied mind" and signifies the end of Cartesian dualistic thinking. In this paper I review the evolution, development and neurobiology of the social brain - the anatomical and functional substrate for adaptive social behaviour and cognition. Functional imaging identifies fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal cortical networks as comprising the social brain, while the discovery of "mirror neurons" provides an understanding of social cognition at a cellular level. Patients with schizophrenia display abnormalities in a wide range of social cognition tasks such as emotion recognition, theory of mind and affective responsiveness. Furthermore, recent research indicates that schizophrenia is a disorder of functional and structural connectivity of social brain networks. These findings lend support to the claim that schizophrenia represents a costly by-product of social brain evolution in Homo sapiens. Individuals with this disorder find themselves seriously disadvantaged in the social arena and vulnerable to the stresses of their complex social environments. This state of "disembodiment" and interpersonal alienation is the core phenomenon of schizophrenia and the root cause of intolerable suffering in the lives of those affected. PMID:16946939

  8. Bayesian Hypothesis Testing for Planet Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braems, I.; Kasdin, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most important performance metrics of any space planet finding system is integration time. The time needed to make a positive detection of an extrasolar planet determines the number of systems we can observe for the life of the mission and the stability requirements of the spacecraft and optical control systems. Most astronomical detection approaches rely on fairly simple signal-to-noise calculations and a threshold determined by the ability of the human eye to extract the planet image from the background (usually a signal-to-noise ratio of five). In this paper we present an alternative approach to detection using Bayesian hypothesis testing. This optimal approach provides a quantitative measure of the probability of detection under various conditions and integration times (such as known or unknown background levels) and under different prior assumptions. We also show how the technique allows for a much higher probability of detection for shorter integration times than the previous photometric approaches. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for this work and Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique (INRIA) for its support of Ms. Braems.

  9. [Serotonin hypothesis and pulmonary artery hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kloza, Monika; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Pędzińska-Betiuk, Anna; Jackowski, Konrad; Kozłowska, Hanna

    2014-06-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, complex disease leading to the right ventricular failure and premature death. PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure, increased vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction. Pathomechanism of this disease is still unknown. It has been suggested, that endothelial dysfunction is caused by unbalance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors e.g. serotonin (5-HT). Previously, serotonin hypothesis was linked to the anorexigens, derivatives of fenfluramine, which are serotonin transporter (SERT) substrates. Nowadays, it has been proved that all elements of serotonergic system within pulmonary circulation participate in the developement of PAH. The tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph-1) catalyses synthesis of 5-HT from tryptophan in the pulmonary arterial endothelial cells. 5-HT mediates contraction of pulmonary vessels via 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT is also transported into pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via SERT and through activation of reactive oxygen species and Rho-kinase may contribute to contraction or/and, via stimulation of transcription factors, lead to proliferation and remodelling. There is also increasing number of evidence about functional interaction between 5-HT1B receptor and SERT in modulation of vasoconstriction and proliferation in pulmonary arteries. This review discusses the role of 5-HT in the development of PAH and highlights possible therapeutic targets within serotonergic system.

  10. Hypothesis exploration with visualization of variance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics (CNP) at UCLA was an investigation into the biological bases of traits such as memory and response inhibition phenotypes—to explore whether they are linked to syndromes including ADHD, Bipolar disorder, and Schizophrenia. An aim of the consortium was in moving from traditional categorical approaches for psychiatric syndromes towards more quantitative approaches based on large-scale analysis of the space of human variation. It represented an application of phenomics—wide-scale, systematic study of phenotypes—to neuropsychiatry research. Results This paper reports on a system for exploration of hypotheses in data obtained from the LA2K, LA3C, and LA5C studies in CNP. ViVA is a system for exploratory data analysis using novel mathematical models and methods for visualization of variance. An example of these methods is called VISOVA, a combination of visualization and analysis of variance, with the flavor of exploration associated with ANOVA in biomedical hypothesis generation. It permits visual identification of phenotype profiles—patterns of values across phenotypes—that characterize groups. Visualization enables screening and refinement of hypotheses about variance structure of sets of phenotypes. Conclusions The ViVA system was designed for exploration of neuropsychiatric hypotheses by interdisciplinary teams. Automated visualization in ViVA supports ‘natural selection’ on a pool of hypotheses, and permits deeper understanding of the statistical architecture of the data. Large-scale perspective of this kind could lead to better neuropsychiatric diagnostics. PMID:25097666

  11. A Matched Filter Hypothesis for Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex exerts top-down influences on several aspects of higher-order cognition by functioning as a filtering mechanism that biases bottom-up sensory information toward a response that is optimal in context. However, research also indicates that not all aspects of complex cognition benefit from prefrontal regulation. Here we review and synthesize this research with an emphasis on the domains of learning and creative cognition, and outline how the appropriate level of cognitive control in a given situation can vary depending on the organism's goals and the characteristics of the given task. We offer a Matched Filter Hypothesis for cognitive control, which proposes that the optimal level of cognitive control is task-dependent, with high levels of cognitive control best suited to tasks that are explicit, rule-based, verbal or abstract, and can be accomplished given the capacity limits of working memory and with low levels of cognitive control best suited to tasks that are implicit, reward-based, non-verbal or intuitive, and which can be accomplished irrespective of working memory limitations. Our approach promotes a view of cognitive control as a tool adapted to a subset of common challenges, rather than an all-purpose optimization system suited to every problem the organism might encounter. PMID:24200920

  12. Handedness in man: The energy availability hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yoo Kuen; Loh, Pui San

    2016-09-01

    More than 90% of the human species are right handed. Although outwardly our body appears symmetrical, a 50/50% lateralization in handedness never occurs. Neither have we seen more than 50% left handedness in any subset of the human population. By 12-15weeks of intrauterine life, as many as 6 times more fetuses are noted by ultrasound studies to be sucking on their right thumbs. Distinct difference in oxygenation leading to dissimilar energy availability between right and left subclavian arteries in place by week 9 of life may hold the clue to the lateralization of hand function and eventually, the same in the brain. We know there is a higher incidence of left handedness in males, twins, premature babies and those born to mothers who smoke. They may represent a subset with less distinct difference in oxygenation between the 2 subclavian arteries during the fetal stage. This hypothesis if correct not only closes the gap in understanding human handedness and lateralization but also opens a vista for new research to focus on in utero tissue energy availability and its impact on outcome in life. PMID:27515214

  13. The social brain hypothesis of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    The social brain hypothesis is a useful heuristic for understanding schizophrenia. It focuses attention on the core Bleulerian concept of autistic alienation and is consistent with well-replicated findings of social brain dysfunction in schizophrenia as well as contemporary theories of human cognitive and brain evolution. The contributions of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty and Wittgenstein allow us to arrive at a new "philosophy of interpersonal relatedness", which better reflects the "embodied mind" and signifies the end of Cartesian dualistic thinking. In this paper I review the evolution, development and neurobiology of the social brain - the anatomical and functional substrate for adaptive social behaviour and cognition. Functional imaging identifies fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal cortical networks as comprising the social brain, while the discovery of "mirror neurons" provides an understanding of social cognition at a cellular level. Patients with schizophrenia display abnormalities in a wide range of social cognition tasks such as emotion recognition, theory of mind and affective responsiveness. Furthermore, recent research indicates that schizophrenia is a disorder of functional and structural connectivity of social brain networks. These findings lend support to the claim that schizophrenia represents a costly by-product of social brain evolution in Homo sapiens. Individuals with this disorder find themselves seriously disadvantaged in the social arena and vulnerable to the stresses of their complex social environments. This state of "disembodiment" and interpersonal alienation is the core phenomenon of schizophrenia and the root cause of intolerable suffering in the lives of those affected.

  14. Transpiration: A Test of Optimality Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.; Lerdau, M.; Salvucci, G. D.; Wofsy, S.

    2003-12-01

    The argument is that the fundamental mechanisms behind bare soil evaporation are also responsible for plant transpiration except that stomata affect the exchange of water vapor between the evaporating surface and the atmosphere. It is hypothesized that the system of liquid water in leaf tissues and the water vapor in the atmosphere tries to evolve towards a potential equilibrium as quickly as possible by maximizing transpiration. In the proposed theory, CO2 flux is used as a non-parametric equivalent of stomatal conductance as CO2 and water vapor diffuse in and out of leaves through the same path. It is further assumed that stomatal aperture is directly controlled by guard cell turgor (or leaf water potential). Transpiration is formulated as a function of leaf temperature, leaf water potential/stomatal conductance (or CO2 flux as the surrogate), and sensible heat flux (characterizing transport mechanism) at a given level of radiative energy input. Optimization of transpiration constrained by the energy balance equation leads to vanishing derivatives of transpiration with respect to leaf temperature and CO2 flux. Effect of vapor pressure deficit on transpiration is also investigated. Preliminary tests using field experimental measurements lead to encouraging evidence in support of the hypothesis. It is found that transpiration is fairly insensitive to atmospheric humidity as suggested by several earlier studies.

  15. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  16. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed.

  17. Burnout among faculty physicians in an academic health science centre

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Gardner; Khetani, Nicole; Stephens, Derek

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout experienced by physicians is concerning because it may affect quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of burnout among physicians at an academic health science centre and to test the hypothesis that work hours are related to burnout. METHODS: All 300 staff physicians, contacted through their personal e-mail, were provided an encrypted link to an anonymous questionnaire. The primary outcome measure, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, has three subscales: personal, work related and patient related. RESULTS: The response rate for the questionnaire was 70%. Quantitative demands, insecurity at work and job satisfaction affected all three components of burnout. Of 210 staff physicians, 22% (n=46) had scores indicating personal burnout, 14% (n=30) had scores indicating work-related burnout and 8% (n=16) had scores indicating patient-related burnout. The correlation between total hours worked and total burnout was only 0.10 (P=0.14) DISCUSSION: Up to 22% of academic paediatric physicians had scores consistent with mild to severe burnout. A simple reduction in work hours is unlikely to be successful in reducing burnout and, therefore, quantitative demands, job satisfaction and work insecurity may require attention to address burnout among academic physicians. PMID:22851895

  18. Role of stable isotopes in life--testing isotopic resonance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zubarev, Roman A

    2011-04-01

    Stable isotopes of most important biological elements, such as C, H, N and O, affect living organisms. In rapidly growing species, deuterium and to a lesser extent other heavy isotopes reduce the growth rate. At least for deuterium it is known that its depletion also negatively impacts the speed of biological processes. As a rule, living organisms "resist" changes in their isotopic environment, preferring natural isotopic abundances. This preference could be due to evolutionary optimization; an additional effect could be due to the presence of the "isotopic resonance". The isotopic resonance phenomenon has been linked to the choice of earliest amino acids, and thus affected the evolution of genetic code. To test the isotopic resonance hypothesis, literature data were analyzed against quantitative and qualitative predictions of the hypothesis. Four studies provided five independent datasets, each in very good quantitative agreement with the predictions. Thus, the isotopic resonance hypothesis is no longer simply plausible; it can now be deemed likely. Additional testing is needed, however, before full acceptance of this hypothesis.

  19. Primary age-related tauopathy and the amyloid cascade hypothesis: the exception that proves the rule?

    PubMed Central

    Crary, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive data supports the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which states that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) stems from neurotoxic forms of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. But the poor correlation between Aβ plaques and neurodegeneration/cognitive impairment, the spaciotemporal disparity between Aβ and tau pathology, and the disappointing results following several large clinical trials using Aβ-targeting agents are inconsistent with this explanation. The most perplexing inconsistency is the existence of AD-type dementia patients that develop abundant neurofibrillary tangles that are indistinguishable from those in early to moderate-stage AD in the absence of compelling evidence of amyloid toxicity. This neuropathological phenotype, which is distinct from other diseases with tangles, represents a conceptual disconnect, because it does not fall within any previously established category of tauopathy and ostensibly invalidates the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Instead, recent efforts have led to consensus criteria for a new alternative diagnostic category, which presupposes that these tangle-only dementia patients represent extreme examples of a distinct primary age-related tauopathy (PART) that is universally observed, albeit to varying degrees, in the aging brain. The cause of PART is unknown, but sufficient evidence exists to hypothesize that it stems from an Aβ-independent mechanism, such as mechanical injury. Should the PART hypothesis withstand further experimental testing, it would represent a shift in the way a subset of subjects with AD neuropathological change are classified and has the potential to focus and reaffirm the amyloid cascade hypothesis.

  20. Striped bass, temperature, and dissolved oxygen: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis has a paradoxical record of distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions. This record is analyzed for consistency with a hypothesis that striped bass are squeezed between their thermal and dissolved oxygen preferences or requirements. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports an inherent thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences alone or coupled with avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathology and overfishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 139 references, 12 figures.

  1. Striped bass, temperature, and eutrophication: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The paradoxical record of striped bass distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions, is analyzed for consistency with a thermal niche-dissolved oxygen-squeeze hypothesis. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports a genetic-based thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences and avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathological symptoms and over fishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 141 references, 13 figures.

  2. New hypothesis helps explain elasmobranch "outburst" on Georges Bank in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Frisk, M G; Miller, T J; Martell, S J D; Sosebee, K

    2008-01-01

    Regime shifts are a feature of many ecosystems. During the last 40 years, intensive commercial exploitation and environmental changes have driven substantial shifts in ecosystem structure and function in the northwest Atlantic. In the Georges Bank-southern New England region, commercially important species have declined, and the ecosystem shifted to one dominated by economically undesirable species such as skates and dogfish. Aggregated abundance indices indicate a large increase of small and medium-sized elasmobranchs in the early 1980s following the decline of many commercial species. It has been hypothesized that ecological interactions such as competition and predation within the Georges Bank region were responsible for and are maintaining the "elasmobranch outburst" at the heart of the observed ecosystem shift. We offer an alternative hypothesis invoking population connectivity among winter skate populations such that the observed abundance increase is a result of migratory dynamics, perhaps with the Scotian Shelf (i.e., it is an open population). Here we critically evaluate the survey data for winter skate, the species principally responsible for the increase in total skate abundance during the 1980s on Georges Bank, to assess support for both hypotheses. We show that time series from different surveys within the Georges Bank region exhibit low coherence, indicating that a widespread population increase was not consistently shown by all surveys. Further, we argue that observed length-frequency data for Georges Bank indicate biologically unrealistic population fluctuations if the population is closed. Neither finding supports the elasmobranch outburst hypothesis. In contrast, survey time series for Georges Bank and the Scotian Shelf are negatively correlated, in support of the population connectivity hypothesis. Further, we argue that understanding the mechanisms of ecosystem state changes and population connectivity are needed to make inferences about both

  3. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    PubMed

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  4. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-12-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC has established a network of more than fifty inter-connected "CMS Centres" at CERN and in institutes in the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Europe. These facilities are used by people doing CMS detector and computing grid operations, remote shifts, data quality monitoring and analysis, as well as education and outreach. We present the computing, software, and collaborative tools and videoconferencing systems. These include permanently running "telepresence" video links (hardware-based H.323, EVO and Vidyo), Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  5. [GADV]-protein world hypothesis on the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    RNA world hypothesis is widely accepted still now, as an idea by which the origin of life might be explained. But, there are many weak points in the hypothesis. In contrast, I have proposed a more reasonable [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis, suggesting that life originated from the protein world, which was formed by pseudo-replication of [GADV]-proteins. In this communication, I will discuss about the origin of life from the point of view of the GADV hypothesis.

  6. [GADV]-Protein World Hypothesis on the Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    RNA world hypothesis is widely accepted still now, as an idea by which the origin of life might be explained. But, there are many weak points in the hypothesis. In contrast, I have proposed a more reasonable [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis, suggesting that life originated from the protein world, which was formed by pseudo-replication of [GADV]-proteins. In this communication, I will discuss about the origin of life from the point of view of the GADV hypothesis.

  7. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    PubMed

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  8. Fungiculture or Termite Husbandry? The Ruminant Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Tânia; Aanen, Duur K

    2012-01-01

    We present a new perspective for the role of Termitomyces fungi in the mutualism with fungus-growing termites. According to the predominant view, this mutualism is as an example of agriculture with termites as farmers of a domesticated fungus crop, which is used for degradation of plant-material and production of fungal biomass. However, a detailed study of the literature indicates that the termites might as well be envisioned as domesticates of the fungus. According to the "ruminant hypothesis" proposed here, termite workers, by consuming asexual fruiting bodies not only harvest asexual spores, but also lignocellulolytic enzymes, which they mix with foraged plant material and enzymes of termite and possibly bacterial origin. This mixture is the building material of the fungus garden and facilitates efficient degradation of plant material. The fungus garden thus functions as an external rumen for termites and primarily the fungi themselves benefit from their own, and gut-derived, lignocellulolytic enzymes, using the termites to efficiently mix these with their growth substrate. Only secondarily the termites benefit, when they consume the degraded, nitrogen-enriched plant-fungus mixture a second time. We propose that the details of substrate use, and the degree of complementarity and redundancy among enzymes in food processing, determine selection of horizontally transmitted fungal symbionts at the start of a colony: by testing spores on a specific, mechanically and enzymatically pre-treated growth substrate, the termite host has the opportunity to select specific fungal symbionts. Potentially, the gut-microbiota thus influence host-fungus specificity, and the selection of specific fungal strains at the start of a new colony. We argue that we need to expand the current bipartite insect-biased view of the mutualism of fungus-growing termites and include the possible role of bacteria and the benefit for the fungi to fully understand the division of labor among

  9. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction.

  10. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction. PMID:23995700

  11. Length composition and abundance of eel larvae, Anguilla anguilla (anguilliformes: Anguillidae), in the iberian basin (northeastern Atlantic) during July September 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bast, H.-D.; Strehlow, B.

    1990-09-01

    376 leptocephali of Anguilla anguilla (L., 1758) from the Iberian Basin were analysed. The observed horizontal trends of abundance and particularly the mean sizes contradict the expectations based on the hypothesis of larvae distribution exclusively by drift with Gulf and North Atlantic Currents, and support the hypothesis of an active larval migration also south of the Azores.

  12. Highly siderophile element abundances in Eoarchean komatiite and basalt protoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Elizabeth A.; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Plume-derived, Mg-rich, volcanic rocks (komatiites, high-Mg basalts, and their metamorphic equivalents) can record secular changes in the highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances of mantle sources. An apparent secular time-dependent enrichment trend in HSE abundances from Paleoarchean to Paleoproterozoic mantle-derived rocks could represent the protracted homogenization of a Late Veneer chondritic contaminant into the pre-Late Veneer komatiite source. To search for a possible time dependence of a late accretion signature in the Eoarchean mantle, we report new data from rare >3700 Myr-old mafic and ultramafic schists locked in supracrustal belts from the Inukjuak domain (Québec, Canada) and the Akilia association (West Greenland). Our analysis shows that some of these experienced HSE mobility and/or include a cumulate component (Touboul et al. in Chem Geol 383:63-75, 2014), whereas several of the oldest samples show some of the most depleted HSE abundances measured for rocks of this composition. We consider these new data for the oldest documented rocks of komatiite protolith in light of the Late Veneer hypothesis.

  13. Number of hummingbird visits determines flower mite abundance on hummingbird feeders.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Luna, Ubaldo; Vázquez González, María Magdalena; Castellanos, Ignacio; Ortiz-Pulido, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    Members of several genera of mites from the family Melicharidae (Mesostigmata) use hummingbirds as transport host to move from flower to flower, where they feed on pollen and nectar. The factors that influence hummingbird flower mite abundance on host plant flowers are not currently known. Here we tested whether hummingbird flower mite abundance on an artificial nectar source is determined by number of hummingbird visits, nectar energy content or species richness of visiting hummingbirds. We conducted experiments employing hummingbird feeders with sucrose solutions of low, medium, and high energy concentrations, placed in a xeric shrubland. In the first experiment, we recorded the number of visiting hummingbirds and the number of visiting hummingbird species, as well as the abundance of hummingbird flower mites on each feeder. Feeders with the highest sucrose concentration had the most hummingbird visits and the highest flower mite abundances; however, there was no significant effect of hummingbird species richness on mite abundance. In the second experiment, we recorded flower mite abundance on feeders after we standardized the number of hummingbird visits to them. Abundance of flower mites did not differ significantly between feeders when we controlled for hummingbird visits. Our results suggest that nectar energy concentration determines hummingbird visits, which in turn determines flower mite abundance in our feeders. Our results do not support the hypothesis that mites descend from hummingbird nostrils more on richer nectar sources; however, it does not preclude the possibility that flower mites select for nectar concentration at other spatial and temporal scales. PMID:27115500

  14. Number of hummingbird visits determines flower mite abundance on hummingbird feeders.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Luna, Ubaldo; Vázquez González, María Magdalena; Castellanos, Ignacio; Ortiz-Pulido, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    Members of several genera of mites from the family Melicharidae (Mesostigmata) use hummingbirds as transport host to move from flower to flower, where they feed on pollen and nectar. The factors that influence hummingbird flower mite abundance on host plant flowers are not currently known. Here we tested whether hummingbird flower mite abundance on an artificial nectar source is determined by number of hummingbird visits, nectar energy content or species richness of visiting hummingbirds. We conducted experiments employing hummingbird feeders with sucrose solutions of low, medium, and high energy concentrations, placed in a xeric shrubland. In the first experiment, we recorded the number of visiting hummingbirds and the number of visiting hummingbird species, as well as the abundance of hummingbird flower mites on each feeder. Feeders with the highest sucrose concentration had the most hummingbird visits and the highest flower mite abundances; however, there was no significant effect of hummingbird species richness on mite abundance. In the second experiment, we recorded flower mite abundance on feeders after we standardized the number of hummingbird visits to them. Abundance of flower mites did not differ significantly between feeders when we controlled for hummingbird visits. Our results suggest that nectar energy concentration determines hummingbird visits, which in turn determines flower mite abundance in our feeders. Our results do not support the hypothesis that mites descend from hummingbird nostrils more on richer nectar sources; however, it does not preclude the possibility that flower mites select for nectar concentration at other spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  16. Attempting to Unravel the Australian Megatsunami Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Nearly two decades of information report apparent megatsunamis along the SE coast of Australia and yet these interpretations are still highly controversial. This work has proven to be particularly influential in guiding more recent megatsunami researchers, and yet it has never been critically evaluated in the light of recent advances in tsunami research. Much of the controversy hinges upon the nature of the original observations, event chronologies, and source identification. The most recent incarnation of the megatsunami hypothesis is indicative of the controversy. A supposed impact crater to the SW of New Zealand is linked with abandoned Maori settlements, Maori legends, and high elevation beach sand deposits in New Zealand, and apparent megatsunami evidence in eastern Australia and on Lord Howe Island. A date of around AD1500 is proposed. There are two key issues here. First, is there currently any evidence for contemporaneous trans Tasman palaeotsunamis (or megatsunamis) in the Holocene? Second, how reliable is the evidence? The first issue was addressed by comparing Holocene events from the Australian and New Zealand palaeotsunami databases. Up to five possible contemporaneous events were identified, but at the same time flaws in the underpinning data were highlighted. To start with, there is no consistent approach to the interpretation of chronological information comprising the databases. A consistent recalibration of all available radiocarbon data was carried out for both databases. This was based upon information contained in the relevant original papers. No clusters of radiocarbon ages were found for apparent megatsunami deposits along the SE coast of Australia. Clusters were found however, in New Zealand for inferred local and regional events. Next, the nature and extent of physical evidence used to determine tsunami emplacement were found to be highly variable. A preliminary reassessment of the physical evidence casts doubt upon the interpretation of

  17. The Zinc Dyshomeostasis Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Chopra, Deepak; Casey, Noel; Goldstein, Lee E.; Hameroff, Stuart R.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Hallmark AD neuropathology includes extracellular amyloid plaques composed largely of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ), intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP-tau), and microtubule destabilization. Early-onset autosomal dominant AD genes are associated with excessive Aβ accumulation, however cognitive impairment best correlates with NFTs and disrupted microtubules. The mechanisms linking Aβ and NFT pathologies in AD are unknown. Here, we propose that sequestration of zinc by Aβ-amyloid deposits (Aβ oligomers and plaques) not only drives Aβ aggregation, but also disrupts zinc homeostasis in zinc-enriched brain regions important for memory and vulnerable to AD pathology, resulting in intra-neuronal zinc levels, which are either too low, or excessively high. To evaluate this hypothesis, we 1) used molecular modeling of zinc binding to the microtubule component protein tubulin, identifying specific, high-affinity zinc binding sites that influence side-to-side tubulin interaction, the sensitive link in microtubule polymerization and stability. We also 2) performed kinetic modeling showing zinc distribution in extra-neuronal Aβ deposits can reduce intra-neuronal zinc binding to microtubules, destabilizing microtubules. Finally, we 3) used metallomic imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to show anatomically-localized and age-dependent zinc dyshomeostasis in specific brain regions of Tg2576 transgenic, mice, a model for AD. We found excess zinc in brain regions associated with memory processing and NFT pathology. Overall, we present a theoretical framework and support for a new theory of AD linking extra-neuronal Aβ amyloid to intra-neuronal NFTs and cognitive dysfunction. The connection, we propose, is based on β-amyloid-induced alterations in zinc ion concentration inside neurons affecting stability of polymerized

  18. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER FARMER DEACON'S SHOP, WITH SECOND CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House (First), North side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  19. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  20. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  1. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life.

    PubMed

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London's East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell's first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory.

  2. Reaching the Students that Student-Centred Learning Cannot Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockings, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Student-centred learning has the potential to engage a more academically diverse student body than the more conventional teacher-centred approaches. In spite of the evidence in favour of student-centred learning, a recent study showed that it was ineffective for around 30% of undergraduates in a large and diverse group studying business operations…

  3. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  4. Molecular Abundances in CRL 618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Juan R.; Cernicharo, José

    2007-01-01

    In previous works we have modeled the different gas regions of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618 by studying the large number of lines from the cyanopolyynes detected in a millimeter-wave line survey of this object. In this work we retrieve the rotational temperatures (Tr) and abundance ratios R with respect to HC3N (used as reference) for all molecular species detected in the survey by running grids of models in the (R,Tr) space to find the minimum of a weighted χ2 defined for this analysis. This provides the best knowledge to date of the (polar) molecular composition of CRL 618 thanks to the uniform calibration of the whole survey and the large number of lines available from each species, allowing comparisons with predictions made by chemical models of C-rich post-AGB objects. A significantly lower value of the 12C/13C ratio has been revealed in the gas closest to central star with respect to the colder and outer envelope. It can be due to 13C-rich material, produced in a late CNO cycling occurred in the central star, being currently injected into this inner gas envelope.

  5. Do top-down or bottom-up forces determine Stephanitis pyrioides abundance in urban landscapes?

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Raupp, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the influence of habitat structural complexity on the collective effects of top-down and bottom-up forces on herbivore abundance in urban landscapes. The persistence and varying complexity of urban landscapes set them apart from ephemeral agroecosystems and natural habitats where the majority of studies have been conducted. Using surveys and manipulative experiments. We explicitly tested the effect of natural enemies (enemies hypothesis), host plant quality, and herbivore movement on the abundance of the specialist insect herbivore, Stephanitis pyrioides, in landscapes of varying structural complexity. This herbivore was extremely abundant in simple landscapes and rare in complex ones. Natural enemies were the major force influencing abundance of S. pyrioides across habitat types. Generalist predators, particularly the spider Anyphaena celer, were more abundant in complex landscapes. Predator abundance was related to greater abundance of alternative prey in those landscapes. Stephanitis pyrioides survival was lower in complex habitats when exposed to endemic natural enemy populations. Laboratory feeding trials confirmed the more abundant predators consumed S. pyrioides. Host plant quality was not a strong force influencing patterns of S. pyrioides abundance. When predators were excluded, adult S. pyrioides survival was greater on azaleas grown in complex habitats, in opposition to the observed pattern of abundance. Similarly, complexity did not affect S. pyrioides immigration and emigration rates. The complexity of urban landscapes affects the strength of top-down forces on herbivorous insect populations by influencing alternative prey and generalist predator abundance. It is possible that habitats can be manipulated to promote the suppressive effects of generalist predators.

  6. UV-radiation-induced electron emission by hormones. Hypothesis for specific communication mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2009-11-01

    The highlights of recently observed electron emission from electronically excited sexual hormones (17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone) and the phytohormone genistein in polar media are briefly reviewed. The electron yield, Q(e aq-), dependence from substrate concentration, hormone structure, polarity of solvent, absorbed energy and temperature are discussed. The hormones reactivity with e aq- and efficiency in electron transfer ensure them the ability to communicate with other biological systems in an organism. A hypothesis is presented for the explanation of the mechanisms of the distinct recognition of signals transmitted by electrons, originating from different types of hormones to receiving centres. Biological consequences of the electron emission in respect to cancer are mentioned.

  7. Raptor abundance and northern bobwhite survival and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J.; Hernandez, F.; Boal, Clint W.; Ballard, Bart M.; Bryant, Fred C.; Wester, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Predation risk has a profound influence on prey behavior and habitat use. The Rio Grande Plains ecoregion of Texas, USA, provides a unique opportunity to investigate changes in prey behavior because the ecoregion experiences a high influx of raptors every year during autumn migration. We used an 8-year data set (2000–2008) of radiocollared northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) and raptor abundance to test the hypothesis that bobwhites responded to increased raptor abundance via changes in woody-cover use at the home-range scale. Bobwhite survival was negatively correlated with raptor abundance, with red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and northern harriers (Circus cyaneus) accounting for 51% of the variability in bobwhite survival (P < 0.010). However, we documented no change in the amount of woody cover used by bobwhites in their home range between the raptor migration (6.6% ± 0.5%; n = 73 bobwhites) and non-migration periods (7.1% ± 0.4%; n = 105 bobwhites; P = 0.490). In addition, bobwhites that survived the raptor migration period used similar amounts of woody cover within their home range (6.3% ± 0.6%, n = 58 bobwhites) compared with those dying during the migration period (6.8% ± 0.4%, n = 100 bobwhites; P = 0.530). Our data suggest that bobwhites do not alter their use of woody cover at the home-range scale in response to increasing raptor abundance, but this does not preclude increased use of woody cover at the point-of-use scale.

  8. Binarity and the Abundance Discrepancy Problem in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; García-Rojas, Jorge; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The discrepancy between abundances computed using optical recombination lines and collisionally excited lines is a major unresolved problem in nebular astrophysics. Here, we show that the largest abundance discrepancies are reached in planetary nebulae with close binary central stars. We illustrate this using deep spectroscopy of three nebulae with a post common-envelope (CE) binary star. Abell 46 and Ou 5 have O2+/H+ abundance discrepancy factors larger than 50, and as high as 300 in the inner regions of Abell 46. Abell 63 has a smaller discrepancy factor around 10, which is still above the typical values in ionized nebulae. Our spectroscopic analysis supports previous conclusions that, in addition to “standard” hot ({{T}e} ˜ 104 K) gas, there exists a colder ({{T}e} ˜ 103 K), ionized component that is highly enriched in heavy elements. These nebulae have low ionized masses, between 10-3 and 10-1 M⊙ depending on the adopted electron densities and temperatures. Since the much more massive red giant envelope is expected to be entirely ejected in the CE phase, the currently observed nebulae would be produced much later, during post-CE mass loss episodes when the envelope has already dispersed. These observations add constraints to the abundance discrepancy problem. We revise possible explanations. Some explanations are naturally linked to binarity such as, for instance, high-metallicity nova ejecta, but it is difficult at this stage to depict an evolutionary scenario consistent with all of the observed properties. We also introduce the hypothesis that these nebulae are the result of tidal destruction, accretion, and ejection of Jupiter-like planets.

  9. Fear in grasslands: the effect of Eurasian kestrels on skylark abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Padilla, Jesús; Fargallo, Juan A.

    2008-05-01

    Predation has received considerable theoretical and empirical support in population regulation. The effect of predators, however, could be achieved in direct (killing) or indirect effects (such as displacement). In this paper, we explored the relationship between Eurasian kestrels Falco tinnunculus and skylarks Alauda arvensis in Mediterranean grasslands. First, we analysed the presence of skylarks in the kestrel diet over 9 years. We also compared a grassland area of experimentally increased kestrel density and a second grassland as control area to evaluate the direct or indirect effect on skylark abundance. We also considered two different habitats, grazed and ungrazed plots. If skylark abundance decreased as the kestrel breeding season progressed in high-density kestrel area compared with the control area, it would suggest a direct effect (predator hypothesis). If skylark abundance remains constant in both areas of contrasting kestrel density, it would suggest that skylarks avoid kestrels (avoidance hypothesis). We found that skylark abundance decreased in the kestrel area from the beginning of kestrel nest-box installation to recent years. The rate of skylark consumption decreased in a 9-year period as kestrel abundance increased, although the total amount skylark consumption did not show a decreasing trend. In addition, skylarks were more abundant in the kestrel-free area than in the kestrel area. Finally, we found that skylark abundance did not change through the kestrel breeding period in relation to grazing. We suggest that an increased breeding density of kestrels during their breeding period may force the skylarks to breed in other areas, which may explain the decline of their abundance.

  10. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  11. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  12. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho dos Santos, M.; Steers, I.; Szebenyi, I.; Xafi, A.; Barring, O.; Bonfillou, E.

    2012-12-01

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  13. Nicotine levels in indoor athletic centres.

    PubMed

    Michael, C M; Demetriou, E; Kosmas, V; Krashia, A; Akkelidou, D

    1996-12-01

    The levels of nicotine during athletic events were measured at six indoor athletic centres in Cyprus. Samples of air were pumped through a tube containing XAD-4 resin. Quantitation of nicotine was carried out by GC with a method detection limit of 0.03 microgram of nicotine, recovery ranged between 99.5 and 100.5%. Confirmation of the nicotine presence was carried out by GC/MS. The concentrations of nicotine measured were between 3.6 and 39.0 micrograms/Nm3 with a geometric mean range 6.5-28.3 micrograms/Nm3.

  14. The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoesel, Annelies; Hoek, Wim Z.; Pennock, Gillian M.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis suggests that multiple extraterrestrial airbursts or impacts resulted in the Younger Dryas cooling, extensive wildfires, megafaunal extinctions and changes in human population. After the hypothesis was first published in 2007, it gained much criticism, as the evidence presented was either not indicative of an extraterrestrial impact or not reproducible by other groups. Only three years after the hypothesis had been presented, a requiem paper was published. Despite this, the controversy continues. New evidence, both in favour and against the hypothesis, continues to be published.

  15. Stardust Abundance Variations among Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar grain abundances reflect the degree of processing primitive materials have experienced. This is evidenced by the wide range of silicate stardust abundances among primitive meteorites (10 to 300 ppm) [1], attributable to parent body hydrothermal processing. Stardust abundance variations are also pronounced in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs), that have not experienced parent body processing (300 to > 10,000 ppm) [2-4]. The large range in stardust abundances among CP IDPs thus reflect nebular processing. Here we present results of a systematic search for stardust among cluster CP IDPs. Our goals are to establish mineralogical trends among IDPs with different stardust abundances. This may shed light into the nature of isotopically normal presolar grains (GEMS grains?; 5) if their abundances vary similarly to that of isotopically exotic stardust grains.

  16. CNO and F abundances in the barium star HD 123396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Yong, D.; Meléndez, J.; Vásquez, S.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Barium stars are moderately rare, chemically peculiar objects, which are believed to be the result of the pollution of an otherwise normal star by material from an evolved companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Aims: We aim to derive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine abundances for the first time from the infrared spectra of the barium red giant star HD 123396 to quantitatively test AGB nucleosynthesis models for producing barium stars via mass accretion. Methods: High-resolution and high S/N infrared spectra were obtained using the Phoenix spectrograph mounted at the Gemini South telescope. The abundances were obtained through spectrum synthesis of individual atomic and molecular lines, using the MOOG stellar line analysis program, together with Kurucz's stellar atmosphere models. The analysis was classical, using 1D stellar models and spectral synthesis under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We confirm that HD 123396 is a metal-deficient barium star ([Fe/H] = -1.05), with A(C) = 7.88, A(N) = 6.65, A(O) = 7.93, and A(Na) = 5.28 on a logarithmic scale where A(H) = 12, leading to [(C+N)/Fe] ≈ 0.5. The A(CNO) group, as well as the A(Na) abundances, is in excellent agreement with those previously derived for this star using high-resolution optical data. We also found A(F) = 4.16, which implies [F/O] = 0.39, a value that is substantially higher than the F abundances measured in globular clusters of a similar metallicity, noting that there are no F measurements in field stars of comparable metallicity. Conclusions: The observed abundance pattern of the light elements (CNO, F, and Na) recovered here as well as the heavy elements (s-process) studied elsewhere suggest that the surface composition of HD 123396 is well fitted by the predicted abundance pattern of a 1.5 M⊙ AGB model star with Z = 0.001. Thus, the AGB mass transfer hypothesis offers a quantitatively viable framework.

  17. Diversity of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting cheetahs (Acinoyx jubatus) at three breeding centres in South Africa and activity patterns of questing ticks.

    PubMed

    Golezardy, Habib; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Penzhorn, Barend L

    2016-07-01

    Ticks were collected from 191 cheetahs at three breeding centres in North West and Limpopo Provinces, South Africa. Haemaphysalis elliptica, a common tick of large felids, was the most abundant species collected, while Amblyomma hebraeum and Rhipicephalus simus occurred in lower numbers. In addition to these three species, drag-sampling of the vegetation revealed the presence of Amblyomma marmoreum, Rhipicephalus (B.) decoloratus and Rhipicephalus zambeziensis. The presence of free-ranging antelopes, murid rodents and tortoises at the breeding centres probably contributed to the availability of immature tick stages on the vegetation. Diurnal and seasonal questing patterns of ixodid ticks were investigated at monthly intervals at the largest cheetah-breeding centre. Questing ticks were most abundant on the vegetation during the warm summer months. Most questing H. elliptica larvae and nymphs were collected from the vegetation in the early morning and late afternoon and fewest during the middle of the day. PMID:27020735

  18. Ammonia and nitrogen abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Comets consist of pristine material preserved from an earlier galactic epoch. Determination of the molecular, elemental, and isotopic abundances in the dust and volatile components of comet nuclei produce vital clues to the chemical evolution of both interstellar and solar nebula matter. Here the abundances of nitrogen-containing molecules in comets are considered. The molecular abundances of NH3 in four comets are summarized (Tegler 1990, Wyckoff, Tegler, and Engel, 1990). From an inventory of nitrogen-containing compounds (Wyckoff, Engel, and Tegler 1990, Wyckoff, Engel, Womack, Ferro, Tegler and Peterson, 1990), an estimate of the elemental N abundance is also presented.

  19. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  20. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  1. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  2. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  3. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  4. Abundance and distribution of iron on the moon.

    PubMed

    Lucey, P G; Taylor, G J; Malaret, E

    1995-05-26

    The abundance and distribution of iron on the moon is derived from a near-global data set from Clementine. The determined iron content of the lunar highlands crust ( approximately 3 percent iron by weight) supports the hypothesis that much of the lunar crust was derived from a magma ocean. The iron content of lower crustal material exposed by the South Pole-Aitken impact basin on the lunar farside is higher ( approximately 7 to 8 percent by weight) and consistent with a basaltic composition. This composition supports earlier evidence that the lunar crust becomes more mafic with depth. The data also suggest that the bulk composition of the moon differs from that of the Earth's mantle. This difference excludes models for lunar origin that require the Earth and moon to have the same compositions, such as fission and coaccretion, and favors giant impact and capture.

  5. The Curriculum Development Centre of Malaysia. Studies of Curriculum Development Centres in Asia 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oon-Chye, Yeoh; And Others

    The Curriculum Development Centre (CDC) of Malaysia became an operating agency in January 1973 and became a division of the Malaysia Ministry of Education in May 1974. Its establishment was the culmination of over a decade of curriculum development efforts by the Ministry of Education. The CDC was an outgrowth of both the First and Second Malaysia…

  6. The obtaining relative position of lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in selenocentric catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedjev, Yu. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Rizvanov, N. G.; Mikeev, R. R.; Varaksina, N. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    The relative position of lunar center masses relative to center of the figure in Kazan and Kiev selenocentric catalogues was customized. The expansions by spherical harmonics N=5 degree and order of the lunar function h(λ, β) with using the package ASNI USTU were executed. Module of the expansion of the local area to surfaces to full sphere was used. The parameters of cosmic missions are given for comparison (SAI; Bills, Ferrari). The normalized coefficients from expansions for eight sources hypsometric information are obtained: - Clementine (N=40), - Kazan (N=5), - Kiev (N=5), - SAI (N=10; Chuikova (1975)), - Bills, Ferrari, - Каguуа (Selena, Japan mission), - ULCN (The Uuified Lunaz Control Network 2005). The displacements of the lunar centre figure relative to lunar centre of the masses were defined from equations (Chuikova (1975)). The results of the obtaining relative position of the lunar centre masses and centre of the figure in Kazan selenocentric catalogue give good agreement with modern cosmic mission data.

  7. The cometary breakup hypothesis re-examined - A reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clube, S. V. M.; Napier, W. M.

    1987-04-01

    It is shown that the giant comet breakup hypothesis has a clear basis in astronomical fact and, contrary to LaViolette's claims, is consistent with the available geochemical evidence. The importance of further trace element studies in polar ice for testing this hypothesis is, however, emphasized.

  8. About the structure of cellulose: debating the Lindman hypothesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis advanced in this issue of Cellulose, that the solubility or insolubility characteristics of cellulose are significantly based upon amphiphilic and hydrophobic molecular interactions, is bound to shake the roots of (some of) our textbook wisdom. The hypothesis is based on the considera...

  9. Teaching Hypothesis Testing by Debunking a Demonstration of Telepathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a lesson designed to demonstrate hypothesis testing to introductory college psychology students. Explains that a psychology instructor demonstrated apparent psychic abilities to students. Reports that students attempted to explain the instructor's demonstrations through hypothesis testing and revision. Provides instructions on performing…

  10. Token Women: An Empirical Test of Kanter's Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Eve; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study compared female students in a male-dominated law school with female students in a law school where the percentage of women was higher in order to test the hypothesis that the minority-to-minority ratio is a significant determinant of minority member achievement. Results were found to support the hypothesis. (Author/BC)

  11. Assess the Critical Period Hypothesis in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    The Critical Period Hypothesis aims to investigate the reason for significant difference between first language acquisition and second language acquisition. Over the past few decades, researchers carried out a series of studies to test the validity of the hypothesis. Although there were certain limitations in these studies, most of their results…

  12. Making Knowledge Delivery Failsafe: Adding Step Zero in Hypothesis Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Xia; Zhou, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of statistical analysis is increasingly important for professionals in modern business. For example, hypothesis testing is one of the critical topics for quality managers and team workers in Six Sigma training programs. Delivering the knowledge of hypothesis testing effectively can be an important step for the incapable learners or…

  13. The Importance of Teaching Power in Statistical Hypothesis Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinsky, Alan; Schumacher, Phyllis; Quinn, John

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the importance of teaching power considerations in statistical hypothesis testing. Statistical power analysis determines the ability of a study to detect a meaningful effect size, where the effect size is the difference between the hypothesized value of the population parameter under the null hypothesis and the true value…

  14. An Exercise for Illustrating the Logic of Hypothesis Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is one of the more difficult concepts for students to master in a basic, undergraduate statistics course. Students often are puzzled as to why statisticians simply don't calculate the probability that a hypothesis is true. This article presents an exercise that forces students to lay out on their own a procedure for testing a…

  15. Longitudinal Dimensionality of Adolescent Psychopathology: Testing the Differentiation Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterba, Sonya K.; Copeland, William; Egger, Helen L.; Costello, E. Jane; Erkanli, Alaattin; Angold, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Background: The differentiation hypothesis posits that the underlying liability distribution for psychopathology is of low dimensionality in young children, inflating diagnostic comorbidity rates, but increases in dimensionality with age as latent syndromes become less correlated. This hypothesis has not been adequately tested with longitudinal…

  16. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in oceanic basalts, Pb isotope evolution and growth of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; White, W. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Hofmann, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that the mantle Pb isotope ratios reflect continued extraction of Pb into the earth's core over geologic time is evaluated by studying the depeletion of chalcophile and siderophile elements in the mantle. Oceanic basalt samples are analyzed in order to determine the Pb, Sr, and Nd isotropic compositions and the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements and incompatible lithophile elements. The data reveal that there is no systematic variation of siderophile or chalcophile element abundances relative to abundances of lithophile elements and the Pb/Ce ratio of the mantle is constant. It is suggested that the crust formation involves nonmagmatic and magmatic processes.

  17. Does interference competition with wolves limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes?

    PubMed

    Berger, Kim Murray; Gese, Eric M

    2007-11-01

    Interference competition with wolves Canis lupus is hypothesized to limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes Canis latrans, and the extirpation of wolves is often invoked to explain the expansion in coyote range throughout much of North America. We used spatial, seasonal and temporal heterogeneity in wolf distribution and abundance to test the hypothesis that interference competition with wolves limits the distribution and abundance of coyotes. From August 2001 to August 2004, we gathered data on cause-specific mortality and survival rates of coyotes captured at wolf-free and wolf-abundant sites in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP), Wyoming, USA, to determine whether mortality due to wolves is sufficient to reduce coyote densities. We examined whether spatial segregation limits the local distribution of coyotes by evaluating home-range overlap between resident coyotes and wolves, and by contrasting dispersal rates of transient coyotes captured in wolf-free and wolf-abundant areas. Finally, we analysed data on population densities of both species at three study areas across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) to determine whether an inverse relationship exists between coyote and wolf densities. Although coyotes were the numerically dominant predator, across the GYE, densities varied spatially and temporally in accordance with wolf abundance. Mean coyote densities were 33% lower at wolf-abundant sites in GTNP, and densities declined 39% in Yellowstone National Park following wolf reintroduction. A strong negative relationship between coyote and wolf densities (beta = -3.988, P < 0.005, r(2) = 0.54, n = 16), both within and across study sites, supports the hypothesis that competition with wolves limits coyote populations. Overall mortality of coyotes resulting from wolf predation was low, but wolves were responsible for 56% of transient coyote deaths (n = 5). In addition, dispersal rates of transient coyotes captured at wolf-abundant sites were 117% higher

  18. Does interference competition with wolves limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes?

    PubMed

    Berger, Kim Murray; Gese, Eric M

    2007-11-01

    Interference competition with wolves Canis lupus is hypothesized to limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes Canis latrans, and the extirpation of wolves is often invoked to explain the expansion in coyote range throughout much of North America. We used spatial, seasonal and temporal heterogeneity in wolf distribution and abundance to test the hypothesis that interference competition with wolves limits the distribution and abundance of coyotes. From August 2001 to August 2004, we gathered data on cause-specific mortality and survival rates of coyotes captured at wolf-free and wolf-abundant sites in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP), Wyoming, USA, to determine whether mortality due to wolves is sufficient to reduce coyote densities. We examined whether spatial segregation limits the local distribution of coyotes by evaluating home-range overlap between resident coyotes and wolves, and by contrasting dispersal rates of transient coyotes captured in wolf-free and wolf-abundant areas. Finally, we analysed data on population densities of both species at three study areas across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) to determine whether an inverse relationship exists between coyote and wolf densities. Although coyotes were the numerically dominant predator, across the GYE, densities varied spatially and temporally in accordance with wolf abundance. Mean coyote densities were 33% lower at wolf-abundant sites in GTNP, and densities declined 39% in Yellowstone National Park following wolf reintroduction. A strong negative relationship between coyote and wolf densities (beta = -3.988, P < 0.005, r(2) = 0.54, n = 16), both within and across study sites, supports the hypothesis that competition with wolves limits coyote populations. Overall mortality of coyotes resulting from wolf predation was low, but wolves were responsible for 56% of transient coyote deaths (n = 5). In addition, dispersal rates of transient coyotes captured at wolf-abundant sites were 117% higher

  19. Response of pigeon guillemots to variable abundance of high-lipid and low-lipid prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Prichard, A.K.; Roby, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    Populations of the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) and other piscivores have been in decline for several decades in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, and a decline in abundance of lipid-rich schooling fishes is hypothesized as the major cause. We tested this hypothesis by studying the breeding biology of pigeon guillemots during 1995-1999 while simultaneously measuring prey abundance with beach seines and bottom trawls. Our study area (Kachemak Bay, Alaska) comprises two oceanographically distinct areas. Populations of a lipid-rich schooling fish, Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), were higher in the warmer Inner Bay than in the colder Outer Bay, and sand lance abundance was higher during warm years. Populations of low-lipid content demersal fishes were similar between areas. Chick survival to age 15 days was 47% higher in the Inner Bay (high-lipid diet) than in the Outer Bay (low-lipid diet), and estimated reproductive success (chicks fledged nest-1) was 62% higher in the Inner Bay than in the Outer Bay. Chick provisioning rate (kJ chick-1 h-1) increased with the proportion of sand lance in the diet (r2=0.21), as did growth rate (g day-1) of younger (beta) chicks in two-chick broods (r2=0.14). Pigeon guillemots in the Inner Bay switched to demersal prey during years of below-average sand lance abundance, and these birds reacted to 38-fold interannual changes in sand lance abundance with reductions in beta chick growth rates, with no decline in beta chick survival. In contrast, the proportion of nests experiencing brood reduction in the Outer Bay (demersal diet) increased >300% during years of below-average demersal abundance, although demersal fish abundance varied only 4-fold among years. Our results support the hypothesis that recovery of pigeon guillemot populations from the effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is limited by availability of lipid-rich prey.

  20. Using landscape ecology to test hypotheses about large-scale abundance patterns in migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flather, C.H.; Sauer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that Neotropical migrant birds may be undergoing widespread declines due to land use activities on the breeding grounds has been examined primarily by synthesizing results from local studies. Growing concern for the cumulative influence of land use activities on ecological systems has heightened the need for large-scale studies to complement what has been observed at local scales. We investigated possible landscape effects on Neotropical migrant bird populations for the eastern United States by linking two large-scale inventories designed to monitor breeding-bird abundances and land use patterns. The null hypothesis of no relation between landscape structure and Neotropical migrant abundance was tested by correlating measures of landscape structure with bird abundance, while controlling for the geographic distance among samples. Neotropical migrants as a group were more 'sensitive' to landscape structure than either temperate migrants or permanent residents. Neotropical migrants tended to be more abundant in landscapes with a greater proportion of forest and wetland habitats, fewer edge habitats, large forest patches, and with forest habitats well dispersed throughout the scene. Permanent residents showed few correlations with landscape structure and temperate migrants were associated with habitat diversity and edge attributes rather than with the amount, size, and dispersion of forest habitats. The association between Neotropical migrant abundance and forest fragmentation differed among physiographic strata, suggesting that land-scape context affects observed relations between bird abundance and landscape structure. Finally, associations between landscape structure and temporal trends in Neotropical migrant abundance were negatively correlated with forest habitats. These results suggest that extrapolation of patterns observed in some landscapes is not likely to hold regionally, and that conservation policies must consider the variation in landscape

  1. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  2. Microsatellite instability in follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A; Child, J A; Lewis, F; Hall, N; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assay 12 microsatellite markers (APC x 2, DCC, P53 x 2, RB1, NM23, WT1, D6S260, D6S262, D6S281 and TNFa) to look for evidence of microsatellite instability in 40 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma (FCC). Evidence of novel alleles seen in the tumour tissue but not the normal uninvolved tissue was seen in seven cases (17%). In only two of these cases (5%) was more than one locus involved but in these cases multiple affected loci were seen (4/12 and 7/12 respectively). The detection of microsatellite instability indicates a DNA repair defect such as that which would be predicted to occur in cells with mutated mismatch repair genes, a novel finding in FCC lymphoma. PMID:8611453

  3. Surviving stroke in an Ebola Treatment Centre.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Paul; McCarthy, Sinead; Gibbs, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A middle aged woman presented to an Ebola Treatment Centre in West Africa with a 4-day history of fever, fatigue, joint pain and vomiting. She tested positive for Ebola virus disease (EVD) and a standard treatment platform of care was started. On day 3 of her admission, she was found to have suffered a left-sided CVA of unknown aetiology. Treatment was largely supportive within a resource-constrained environment and the added layer of providing care with extensive personal protective equipment, and human resource and safety constraints. The patient was able to clear the EVD and did regain some functional use of her arm and leg. She was discharged on day 15 of her stay, as a survivor of both stroke and Ebola. PMID:26516244

  4. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  5. Person-centred (deictic) expressions and autism.

    PubMed

    Hobson, R Peter; García-Pérez, Rosa M; Lee, Anthony

    2010-04-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as 'this'/'that', 'here'/'there' and 'come'/'go', and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants spontaneously produced deictic terms, often in conjunction with pointing. Yet only among children with autism were there participants who referred to a location that was distal to themselves with the terms 'this' or 'here', or made atypical points with unusual precision, often lining-up with an eye. In Study 2, participants with autism were less accurate in responding to instructions involving contrastive deictic terms, and fewer responded accurately to indicative head nods. PMID:19888642

  6. Academic health sciences centres laid bare.

    PubMed

    Lozon, Jeffrey C; Fox, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    Academic Health Sciences Centres (AHSCs) are an enduring feature of health systems in all developed countries. In Canada, despite the lack of precise definition and standardized organizational arrangements, the educational services and programs in health sciences offered by AHSCs, and the caregiving organizations they embrace, are critical components of the national health system. Yet, the past decade has been a period of profound change in the Canadian health system. The pace of this change and the nature of the demands on the system are unlikely to abate in the near future. Given that many of these changes have directly impacted on AHSCs, or their component parts, it is timely to review these entities and to understand more fully how these organizations have been, or may be, affected in the future. PMID:12811128

  7. Initial experience with an Underwater Manifold Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    In July 1983 comingled production from the first two completed wells of the Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Centre (the UMC), reached the Cormorant Alpha platform. This moment was the culmination of design and development effort which had begun as early as the spring of 1975. But being both the largest subsea system to become operational in the North Sea, and the first designed to the production of several subsea wells, whilst injecting into others, how would the UMC continue to perform. This paper details the operational experience gained to date with the UMC, tracing its brief history since it was first powered up in September 1982 to the present. This is discussed in the main body of the paper under the headings: Commissioning Experience; Operating Experience; Reliability and Maintenance.

  8. Beef quality assessed at European research centres.

    PubMed

    Dransfield, E; Nute, G R; Roberts, T A; Boccard, R; Touraille, C; Buchter, L; Casteels, M; Cosentino, E; Hood, D E; Joseph, R L; Schon, I; Paardekooper, E J

    1984-01-01

    Loin steaks and cubes of M. semimembranosus from eight (12 month old) Galloway steers and eight (16-18 month old) Charolais cross steers raised in England and from which the meat was conditioned for 2 or 10 days, were assessed in research centres in Belgium, Denmark, England, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Laboratory panels assessed meat by grilling the steaks and cooking the cubes in casseroles according to local custom using scales developed locally and by scales used frequently at other research centres. The meat was mostly of good quality but with sufficient variation to obtain meaningful comparisons. Tenderness and juiciness were assessed most, and flavour least, consistently. Over the 32 meats, acceptability of steaks and casseroles was in general compounded from tenderness, juiciness and flavour. However, when the meat was tough, it dominated the overall judgement; but when tender, flavour played an important rôle. Irish and English panels tended to weight more on flavour and Italian panels on tenderness and juiciness. Juciness and tenderness were well correlated among all panels except in Italy and Germany. With flavour, however, Belgian, Irish, German and Dutch panels ranked the meats similarly and formed a group distinct from the others which did not. The panels showed a similar grouping for judgements of acceptability. French and Belgian panels judged the steaks from the older Charolais cross steers to have more flavour and be more juicy than average and tended to prefer them. Casseroles from younger steers were invariably preferred although the French and Belgian panels judged aged meat from older animals equally acceptable. These regional biases were thought to be derived mainly from differences in cooking, but variations in experience and perception of assessors also contributed. PMID:22055992

  9. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  10. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  11. High-resolution abundance analysis of HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Korotin, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. HD 140283 is a reference subgiant that is metal poor and confirmed to be a very old star. The element abundances of this type of old star can constrain the nature and nucleosynthesis processes that occurred in its (even older) progenitors. The present study may shed light on nucleosynthesis processes yielding heavy elements early in the Galaxy. Aims: A detailed analysis of a high-quality spectrum is carried out, with the intent of providing a reference on stellar lines and abundances of a very old, metal-poor subgiant. We aim to derive abundances from most available and measurable spectral lines. Methods: The analysis is carried out using high-resolution (R = 81 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (800 abundances for 26 elements, and NLTE calculations for the species C i, O i, Na i, Mg i, Al i, K i, Ca i, Sr ii, and Ba ii lines. Results: The abundance analysis provided an extensive line list suitable for metal-poor subgiant stars. The results for Li, CNO, α-, and iron peak elements are in good agreement with literature. The newly NLTE Ba abundance, along with a NLTE Eu correction and a 3D Ba correction from literature, leads to [Eu/Ba] = + 0.59 ± 0.18. This result confirms a dominant r-process contribution, possibly together with a very small contribution from the main s-process, to the neutron-capture elements in HD 140283. Overabundances of the lighter heavy elements and the high abundances derived for Ba, La, and Ce favour the operation of the weak r-process in HD 140283

  12. The Centre of Mass of a Triangular Plate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusarenko, Viktor; Rojas, Roberto; Fuster, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    We present a derivation for the coordinates of the centre of mass--or centre of gravity--of a homogeneous triangular plate by using scaling and symmetry. We scale the triangular plate by a factor of 2 and divide its area into four plates identical to the original. By symmetry, we assert that the centre of mass of two identical masses lies at the…

  13. The linear hypothesis - an idea whose time has passed

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1995-12-31

    The linear no-threshold hypothesis is the basis for radiation protection standards in the United States. In the words of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), the hypothesis is: {open_quotes}In the interest of estimating effects in humans conservatively, it is not unreasonable to follow the assumption of a linear relationship between dose and effect in the low dose regions for which direct observational data are not available.{close_quotes} The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) stated the hypothesis in a slightly different manner: {open_quotes}One such basic assumption ... is that ... there is ... a linear relationship without threshold between dose and the probability of an effect. The hypothesis was necessary 50 yr ago when it was first enunciated because the dose-effect curve for ionizing radiation for effects in humans was not known. The ICRP and NCRP needed a model to extrapolate high-dose effects to low-dose effects. So the linear no-threshold hypothesis was born. Certain details of the history of the development and use of the linear hypothesis are presented. In particular, use of the hypothesis by the U.S. regulatory agencies is examined. Over time, the sense of the hypothesis has been corrupted. The corruption of the hypothesis into the current paradigm of {open_quote}a little radiation, no matter how small, can and will harm you{close_quotes} is presented. The reasons the corruption occurred are proposed. The effects of the corruption are enumerated, specifically, the use of the corruption by the antinuclear forces in the United States and some of the huge costs to U.S. taxpayers due to the corruption. An alternative basis for radiation protection standards to assure public safety, based on the weight of scientific evidence on radiation health effects, is proposed.

  14. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  15. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly reflect population sizes and trends. This study compares capture-mark-recapture (absolute abundance) and count-index (relative abundance) monitoring methods in three species (Maculinea nausithous and Iolana iolas: Lycaenidae; Minois dryas: Satyridae) in contrasted habitat types. We demonstrate that intraspecific variability in individual detectability under standard monitoring conditions is probably the rule rather than the exception, which questions the reliability of count-based indices to estimate and compare specific population abundance. Our results suggest that the accuracy of count-based methods depends heavily on the ecology and behavior of the target species, as well as on the type of habitat in which surveys take place. Monitoring programs designed to assess the abundance and trends in butterfly populations should incorporate a measure of detectability. We discuss the relative advantages and inconveniences of current monitoring methods and analytical approaches with respect to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability. PMID:22859980

  16. A physical-space approach for the probability hypothesis density and cardinalized probability hypothesis density filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdinc, Ozgur; Willett, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2006-05-01

    The probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, an automatically track-managed multi-target tracker, is attracting increasing but cautious attention. Its derivation is elegant and mathematical, and thus of course many engineers fear it; perhaps that is currently limiting the number of researchers working on the subject. In this paper, we explore a physical-space approach - a bin model - which leads us to arrive the same filter equations as the PHD. Unlike the original derivation of the PHD filter, the concepts used are the familiar ones of conditional probability. The original PHD suffers from a "target-death" problem in which even a single missed detection can lead to the apparent disappearance of a target. To obviate this, PHD originator Mahler has recently developed a new "cardinalized" version of PHD (CPHD). We are able to extend our physical-space derivation to the CPHD case as well. We stress that the original derivations are mathematically correct, and need no embellishment from us; our contribution here is to offer an alternative derivation, one that we find appealing.

  17. Biostatistics Series Module 2: Overview of Hypothesis Testing.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis testing (or statistical inference) is one of the major applications of biostatistics. Much of medical research begins with a research question that can be framed as a hypothesis. Inferential statistics begins with a null hypothesis that reflects the conservative position of no change or no difference in comparison to baseline or between groups. Usually, the researcher has reason to believe that there is some effect or some difference which is the alternative hypothesis. The researcher therefore proceeds to study samples and measure outcomes in the hope of generating evidence strong enough for the statistician to be able to reject the null hypothesis. The concept of the P value is almost universally used in hypothesis testing. It denotes the probability of obtaining by chance a result at least as extreme as that observed, even when the null hypothesis is true and no real difference exists. Usually, if P is < 0.05 the null hypothesis is rejected and sample results are deemed statistically significant. With the increasing availability of computers and access to specialized statistical software, the drudgery involved in statistical calculations is now a thing of the past, once the learning curve of the software has been traversed. The life sciences researcher is therefore free to devote oneself to optimally designing the study, carefully selecting the hypothesis tests to be applied, and taking care in conducting the study well. Unfortunately, selecting the right test seems difficult initially. Thinking of the research hypothesis as addressing one of five generic research questions helps in selection of the right hypothesis test. In addition, it is important to be clear about the nature of the variables (e.g., numerical vs. categorical; parametric vs. nonparametric) and the number of groups or data sets being compared (e.g., two or more than two) at a time. The same research question may be explored by more than one type of hypothesis test. While this may be

  18. Vehicle Detection Based on Probability Hypothesis Density Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feihu; Knoll, Alois

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the developments of vehicle detection have been significantly improved. By utilizing cameras, vehicles can be detected in the Regions of Interest (ROI) in complex environments. However, vision techniques often suffer from false positives and limited field of view. In this paper, a LiDAR based vehicle detection approach is proposed by using the Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter. The proposed approach consists of two phases: the hypothesis generation phase to detect potential objects and the hypothesis verification phase to classify objects. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated in complex scenarios, compared with the state-of-the-art. PMID:27070621

  19. Vehicle Detection Based on Probability Hypothesis Density Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feihu; Knoll, Alois

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the developments of vehicle detection have been significantly improved. By utilizing cameras, vehicles can be detected in the Regions of Interest (ROI) in complex environments. However, vision techniques often suffer from false positives and limited field of view. In this paper, a LiDAR based vehicle detection approach is proposed by using the Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter. The proposed approach consists of two phases: the hypothesis generation phase to detect potential objects and the hypothesis verification phase to classify objects. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated in complex scenarios, compared with the state-of-the-art. PMID:27070621

  20. Biostatistics Series Module 2: Overview of Hypothesis Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis testing (or statistical inference) is one of the major applications of biostatistics. Much of medical research begins with a research question that can be framed as a hypothesis. Inferential statistics begins with a null hypothesis that reflects the conservative position of no change or no difference in comparison to baseline or between groups. Usually, the researcher has reason to believe that there is some effect or some difference which is the alternative hypothesis. The researcher therefore proceeds to study samples and measure outcomes in the hope of generating evidence strong enough for the statistician to be able to reject the null hypothesis. The concept of the P value is almost universally used in hypothesis testing. It denotes the probability of obtaining by chance a result at least as extreme as that observed, even when the null hypothesis is true and no real difference exists. Usually, if P is < 0.05 the null hypothesis is rejected and sample results are deemed statistically significant. With the increasing availability of computers and access to specialized statistical software, the drudgery involved in statistical calculations is now a thing of the past, once the learning curve of the software has been traversed. The life sciences researcher is therefore free to devote oneself to optimally designing the study, carefully selecting the hypothesis tests to be applied, and taking care in conducting the study well. Unfortunately, selecting the right test seems difficult initially. Thinking of the research hypothesis as addressing one of five generic research questions helps in selection of the right hypothesis test. In addition, it is important to be clear about the nature of the variables (e.g., numerical vs. categorical; parametric vs. nonparametric) and the number of groups or data sets being compared (e.g., two or more than two) at a time. The same research question may be explored by more than one type of hypothesis test. While this may be

  1. Biostatistics Series Module 2: Overview of Hypothesis Testing.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis testing (or statistical inference) is one of the major applications of biostatistics. Much of medical research begins with a research question that can be framed as a hypothesis. Inferential statistics begins with a null hypothesis that reflects the conservative position of no change or no difference in comparison to baseline or between groups. Usually, the researcher has reason to believe that there is some effect or some difference which is the alternative hypothesis. The researcher therefore proceeds to study samples and measure outcomes in the hope of generating evidence strong enough for the statistician to be able to reject the null hypothesis. The concept of the P value is almost universally used in hypothesis testing. It denotes the probability of obtaining by chance a result at least as extreme as that observed, even when the null hypothesis is true and no real difference exists. Usually, if P is < 0.05 the null hypothesis is rejected and sample results are deemed statistically significant. With the increasing availability of computers and access to specialized statistical software, the drudgery involved in statistical calculations is now a thing of the past, once the learning curve of the software has been traversed. The life sciences researcher is therefore free to devote oneself to optimally designing the study, carefully selecting the hypothesis tests to be applied, and taking care in conducting the study well. Unfortunately, selecting the right test seems difficult initially. Thinking of the research hypothesis as addressing one of five generic research questions helps in selection of the right hypothesis test. In addition, it is important to be clear about the nature of the variables (e.g., numerical vs. categorical; parametric vs. nonparametric) and the number of groups or data sets being compared (e.g., two or more than two) at a time. The same research question may be explored by more than one type of hypothesis test. While this may be

  2. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  3. Urbanization Level and Woodland Size Are Major Drivers of Woodpecker Species Richness and Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Myczko, Łukasz; Rosin, Zuzanna M.; Skórka, Piotr; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization is a process globally responsible for loss of biodiversity and for biological homogenization. Urbanization may have a direct negative impact on species behaviour and indirect effects on species populations through alterations of their habitats, for example patch size and habitat quality. Woodpeckers are species potentially susceptible to urbanization. These birds are mostly forest specialists and the development of urban areas in former forests may be an important factor influencing their richness and abundance, but documented examples are rare. In this study we investigated how woodpeckers responded to changes in forest habitats as a consequence of urbanization, namely size and isolation of habitat patches, and other within-patch characteristics. We selected 42 woodland patches in a gradient from a semi-natural rural landscape to the city centre of Poznań (Western Poland) in spring 2010. Both species richness and abundance of woodpeckers correlated positively to woodland patch area and negatively to increasing urbanization. Abundance of woodpeckers was also positively correlated with shrub cover and percentage of deciduous tree species. Furthermore, species richness and abundance of woodpeckers were highest at moderate values of canopy openness. Ordination analyses confirmed that urbanization level and woodland patch area were variables contributing most to species abundance in the woodpecker community. Similar results were obtained in presence-absence models for particular species. Thus, to sustain woodpecker species within cities it is important to keep woodland patches large, multi-layered and rich in deciduous tree species. PMID:24740155

  4. Urbanization level and woodland size are major drivers of woodpecker species richness and abundance.

    PubMed

    Myczko, Lukasz; Rosin, Zuzanna M; Skórka, Piotr; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization is a process globally responsible for loss of biodiversity and for biological homogenization. Urbanization may have a direct negative impact on species behaviour and indirect effects on species populations through alterations of their habitats, for example patch size and habitat quality. Woodpeckers are species potentially susceptible to urbanization. These birds are mostly forest specialists and the development of urban areas in former forests may be an important factor influencing their richness and abundance, but documented examples are rare. In this study we investigated how woodpeckers responded to changes in forest habitats as a consequence of urbanization, namely size and isolation of habitat patches, and other within-patch characteristics. We selected 42 woodland patches in a gradient from a semi-natural rural landscape to the city centre of Poznań (Western Poland) in spring 2010. Both species richness and abundance of woodpeckers correlated positively to woodland patch area and negatively to increasing urbanization. Abundance of woodpeckers was also positively correlated with shrub cover and percentage of deciduous tree species. Furthermore, species richness and abundance of woodpeckers were highest at moderate values of canopy openness. Ordination analyses confirmed that urbanization level and woodland patch area were variables contributing most to species abundance in the woodpecker community. Similar results were obtained in presence-absence models for particular species. Thus, to sustain woodpecker species within cities it is important to keep woodland patches large, multi-layered and rich in deciduous tree species.

  5. The development and operation of Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre`s summer scholarship programme

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; MacDonald, N.B.; Thornborrow, C.; Brough, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Between 1987 and 1994, more than 100 students in a broad range of disciplines worked as summer scholars at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre. Many of these students have since taken their parallel computing skills into graduate work and industry, and over a quarter of EPCC`s technical staff are alumni of the Programme. This report describes the evolution and present operation of the Summer Scholarship Programme, and its costs and benefits.

  6. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Bergemann, M.; Evans, C.; Gazak, Z.; Lardo, C.; Patrick, L.; Plez, B.; Bastian, N.

    2015-09-01

    By studying a galaxy's present-day chemical abundances, we are effectively looking at its star-forming history. Cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution make predictions about the relative metal contents of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass, a trend known as the mass-metallicity relation. These predictions can be tested with observations of nearby galaxies. However, providing reliable, accurate abundance measurements at extragalactic distances is extremely challenging. In this project, we have developed a technique to extract abundance information from individual red supergiant stars at megaparsec distances. We are currently exploiting this technique using the unique capabilities of KMOS on the VLT.

  7. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of O, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  8. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  9. Genetic diversity is positively associated with fine-scale momentary abundance of an invasive ant

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Monica A M; Hoffmann, Benjamin D; Ritchie, Peter A; Lester, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Many introduced species become invasive despite genetic bottlenecks that should, in theory, decrease the chances of invasion success. By contrast, population genetic bottlenecks have been hypothesized to increase the invasion success of unicolonial ants by increasing the genetic similarity between descendent populations, thus promoting co-operation. We investigated these alternate hypotheses in the unicolonial yellow crazy ant, Anoplolepis gracilipes, which has invaded Arnhem Land in Australia's Northern Territory. We used momentary abundance as a surrogate measure of invasion success, and investigated the relationship between A. gracilipes genetic diversity and its abundance, and the effect of its abundance on species diversity and community structure. We also investigated whether selected habitat characteristics contributed to differences in A. gracilipes abundance, for which we found no evidence. Our results revealed a significant positive association between A. gracilipes genetic diversity and abundance. Invaded communities were less diverse and differed in structure from uninvaded communities, and these effects were stronger as A. gracilipes abundance increased. These results contradict the hypothesis that genetic bottlenecks may promote unicoloniality. However, our A. gracilipes study population has diverged since its introduction, which may have obscured evidence of the bottleneck that would likely have occurred on arrival. The relative importance of genetic diversity to invasion success may be context dependent, and the role of genetic diversity may be more obvious in the absence of highly favorable novel ecological conditions. PMID:23139870

  10. Archaeological data provide alternative hypotheses on Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) distribution, abundance, and variability.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Iain; Lepofsky, Dana; Moss, Madonna L; Butler, Virginia L; Orchard, Trevor J; Coupland, Gary; Foster, Fredrick; Caldwell, Megan; Lertzman, Ken

    2014-03-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), a foundation of coastal social-ecological systems, is in decline throughout much of its range. We assembled data on fish bones from 171 archaeological sites from Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington to provide proxy measures of past herring distribution and abundance. The dataset represents 435,777 fish bones, dating throughout the Holocene, but primarily to the last 2,500 y. Herring is the single-most ubiquitous fish taxon (99% ubiquity) and among the two most abundant taxa in 80% of individual assemblages. Herring bones are archaeologically abundant in all regions, but are superabundant in the northern Salish Sea and southwestern Vancouver Island areas. Analyses of temporal variability in 50 well-sampled sites reveals that herring exhibits consistently high abundance (>20% of fish bones) and consistently low variance (<10%) within the majority of sites (88% and 96%, respectively). We pose three alternative hypotheses to account for the disjunction between modern and archaeological herring populations. We reject the first hypothesis that the archaeological data overestimate past abundance and underestimate past variability. We are unable to distinguish between the second two hypotheses, which both assert that the archaeological data reflect a higher mean abundance of herring in the past, but differ in whether variability was similar to or less than that observed recently. In either case, sufficient herring was consistently available to meet the needs of harvesters, even if variability is damped in the archaeological record. These results provide baseline information prior to herring depletion and can inform modern management.

  11. Lineage tracing in the adult mouse corneal epithelium supports the limbal epithelial stem cell hypothesis with intermittent periods of stem cell quiescence☆

    PubMed Central

    Dorà, Natalie J.; Hill, Robert E.; Collinson, J. Martin; West, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) hypothesis proposes that LESCs in the corneal limbus maintain the corneal epithelium both during normal homeostasis and wound repair. The alternative corneal epithelial stem cell (CESC) hypothesis proposes that LESCs are only involved in wound repair and CESCs in the corneal epithelium itself maintain the corneal epithelium during normal homeostasis. We used tamoxifen-inducible, CreER-loxP lineage tracing to distinguish between these hypotheses. Clones of labelled cells were induced in adult CAGG-CreER;R26R-LacZ reporter mice and their distributions analysed after different chase periods. Short-lived clones, derived from labelled transient amplifying cells, were shed during the chase period and long-lived clones, derived from stem cells, expanded. At 6 weeks, labelled clones appeared at the periphery, extended centripetally as radial stripes and a few reached the centre by 14 weeks. Stripe numbers depended on the age of tamoxifen treatment. Stripes varied in length, some were discontinuous, few reached the centre and almost half had one end at the limbus. Similar stripes extended across the cornea in CAGG-CreER;R26R-mT/mG reporter mice. The distributions of labelled clones are inconsistent with the CESC hypothesis and support the LESC hypothesis if LESCs cycle between phases of activity and quiescence, each lasting several weeks. PMID:26554513

  12. ACTRIS Data Centre: An atmospheric data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Fahre Vik, A.; Logna, R.; Torseth, K.; Linné, H.; O'Connor, E.

    2012-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) is a European Project aiming at integrating European ground-based stations equipped with advanced instrumentation for studying aerosols, clouds, and short-lived gas-phase species. The ACTRIS activities result in improved atmospheric measurements data made at more than 60 European sites, from numerous instruments and includes variables measured by ground based in situ and remote sensing technologies. Core variables are in situ aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, short-lived trace gases (volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides), aerosol scattering and extinction profiles, and cloud properties. The ACTRIS data centre (ACTRIS DC) is giving free and open access to all data resulting from the activities of the infrastructure network, complemented with data from other relevant networks and data bases. The overall goal is to facilitate scientists and other user groups access to atmospheric observational data, and to provide mature products for analysis and interpretation of atmospheric composition change. The ACTRIS DC aims at substantially increasing the number of high-quality data by providing long-term observational data relevant to climate and air quality research produced with standardized or comparable procedures throughout the network. The backbone of the ACTRIS DC is the three core data bases: - EARLINET Data Base hosting aerosol lidar data from more than 30 European sites - EBAS hosting ground based atmospheric in situ data from more than 1000 sites globally - Cloudnet hosting remote sensing cloud data and products from 5 European sites Furthermore, a joint portal is developed combining information from various data sources to gain new information not presently available from standalone databases or networks. The data centre will provide tools and services to facilitate the use of measurements for broad user communities. Higher level and integrated products will be

  13. A SDMS Model: Early Warning Coordination Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Following the tsunami disaster in 2004, the General Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Kofi Annan called for a global early warning system for all hazards and for all communities. He also requested the ISDR (International Strategy fort Disaster Reduction) and its UN partners to conduct a global survey of capacities, gaps and opportunities in relation to early warning systems. The produced report, "Global survey of Early Warning Systems", concluded that there are many gaps and shortcomings and that much progress has been made on early warning systems and great capabilities are available around the world. However, it may be argued that an early warning system (EWS) may not be enough to prevent fatalities due to a natural hazard; i.e., it should be seen as part of a ‘wider' or total system. Furthermore, an EWS may work very well when assessed individually but it is not clear whether it will contribute to accomplish the purpose of the ‘total disaster management system'; i.e., to prevent fatalities. For instance, a regional EWS may only work if it is well co-ordinated with the local warning and emergency response systems that ensure that the warning is received, communicated and acted upon by the potentially affected communities. It may be argued that without these local measures being in place, a regional EWS will have little impact in saving lives. Researchers argued that unless people are warned in remote areas, the technology is useless; for instance McGuire [5] argues that: "I have no doubt that the technical element of the warning system will work very well,"…"But there has to be an effective and efficient communications cascade from the warning centre to the fisherman on the beach and his family and the bar owners." Similarly, McFadden [6] states that: "There's no point in spending all the money on a fancy monitoring and a fancy analysis system unless we can make sure the infrastructure for the broadcast system is there,"… "That's going to require a lot

  14. Kinematics and abundances of K giants in the nuclear bulge of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. Michael

    1990-10-01

    Radial velocities have been determined for 53 K giants in Baade's window, which belong to the nuclear bulge population and have abundances derived from low resolution spectra. Additional radial velocities for an overlapping sample of 71 bulge K giants show the same dependence of velocity dispersion on abundance; in both samples, the lower velocity dispersion of the metal-rich giants is found to be significant at a level above 90 percent. Extant data support the hypothesis that both M giants and IRAS bulge sources follow steep density laws similar to that which has been predicted for the metal-rick K giants. The abundance distribution of 88 K giants in Baade's window is noted to be notably well fitted by the simple, 'closed box' model of chemical evolution.

  15. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd A; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events-mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model. PMID:25642192

  16. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Demetrius, Lloyd A.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events—mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model. PMID:25642192

  17. Hypothesis Testing Using the Films of the Three Stooges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert; Davidson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The use of The Three Stooges' films as a source of data in an introductory statistics class is described. The Stooges' films are separated into three populations. Using these populations, students may conduct hypothesis tests with data they collect.

  18. Autism: demise of the innate social orienting hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark H

    2014-01-01

    Some have suggested that autism may be caused by poor orienting to social stimuli in early infancy, compounded by the resulting failures to learn from, and about, other humans. Recent results contradict this hypothesis, suggesting a need to rethink.

  19. Null but not void: considerations for hypothesis testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Pamela A; Proschan, Michael A

    2013-01-30

    Standard statistical theory teaches us that once the null and alternative hypotheses have been defined for a parameter, the choice of the statistical test is clear. Standard theory does not teach us how to choose the null or alternative hypothesis appropriate to the scientific question of interest. Neither does it tell us that in some cases, depending on which alternatives are realistic, we may want to define our null hypothesis differently. Problems in statistical practice are frequently not as pristinely summarized as the classic theory in our textbooks. In this article, we present examples in statistical hypothesis testing in which seemingly simple choices are in fact rich with nuance that, when given full consideration, make the choice of the right hypothesis test much less straightforward. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22807023

  20. Using the Gaia Hypothesis to Synthesize an Introductory Biology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gail A.

    1993-01-01

    The Gaia Hypothesis emphasizes the interactions and feedback mechanisms between the living and nonliving process that take place on Earth. Employing this concept in instruction can emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of science and give a planetary perspective of biology. (PR)

  1. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  2. Chemical abundances in Hg-Mn stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    An abundance analysis has been conducted of 21 elements in 21 Hg-Mn, two Si-Cr, and six normal stars using model atmospheres and high-dispersion spectroscopy in the visible and UV. Manganese line strengths imply abundances that correlate well with stellar effective temperature. Within the studied sample of Hg-Mn stars there appears to be no correlation of abundances of any element with projected rotational velocity. Abundances in several Hg-Mn stars show patterns that are probably consistent with diffusion but difficult to reconcile with equilibrium nucleosynthesis. In general, no combination of gross stellar physical parameters is sufficient to characterize the patterns of line strengths observed in Hg-Mb Hg-Mn stars.

  3. Testicular descent: a hypothesis and review of current controversies.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Douglas A

    2009-06-01

    Descent of the testis into the scrotum occurs by a complex multifactorial process involving the normal development of the testis, the hormonal actions of insulin like growth factor 3, testosterone, a intact hypothalamic pituitary testicular axis, the patent processus vaginalis, gubernacular outgrowth and regression and intraabdominal pressure. The paper reviews the key components of testicular descent, the current hypothesis on how testicular descent occurs and the controversies surrounding this hypothesis.

  4. The Hygiene Hypothesis and Its Inconvenient Truths about Helminth Infections.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Neima; Weatherhead, Jill; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Hotez, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Current iterations of the hygiene hypothesis suggest an adaptive role for helminth parasites in shaping the proper maturation of the immune system. However, aspects of this hypothesis are based on assumptions that may not fully account for realities about human helminth infections. Such realities include evidence of causal associations between helminth infections and asthma or inflammatory bowel disease as well as the fact that helminth infections remain widespread in the United States, especially among populations at greatest risk for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  5. On the 'fast electron hypothesis' for stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that Gurzadyan's (1988) fast-electron hypothesis for stellar flares encounters certain difficulties. The origin of the fast electrons is obscure. Negative flares and predicted ratios of X-ray to optical fluxes are not necessarily a proof of the fast-electron hypothesis. When the electrons thermalize, they will yield X-ray fluxes which are orders of magnitude too large to be consistent with observations.

  6. The abundant elements in interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the incorporation of the cosmically abundant species O, C, N, Mg, Si, Fe, and S into interstellar dust. Column densities based on Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph 3.5 km/s resolution measurements from the literature for eight individual absorbing regions toward five lines of sight are used. Corrections are applied as needed in order to account for recent improvements in oscillator strengths. In order to acquire the most accurate column densities, and check on the accuracy of the oscillator strengths, we compare column densities based on the very strong Lorentzian damped lines of C II, O I, N I, and Mg II with results for the weak lines of these species, and confirm the previously determined f-values for O I lambda 1335, C II lambda 2325, and N I lambda lambda 1159, 1160. New empirical f-values of 1.25 x 10(exp -3) and 6.25 x 10(exp -4), respectively, are derived for the Mg II weak doublet at 1239 and 1240 A. Assuming a cosmic reference abundance based on solar and B star values, we derive depletions and dust-phase abundances which suggest that more than 70% of the available Mg and Fe is incorporated into dust-grain cores, whereas only 35% of the silicon is. This implies that oxides are important constituents of the grain core population. Mg and Fe atoms are mantled onto grain cores in a ratio of 1.8 to 1, whereas approximately 4.0 Si atoms are in the mantle per Fe atom. Since Si is not expected to accrete onto silicate or graphite grains, other grain cores, perhaps oxides and/or metallic Fe, may provide mantling sites for this species. The abundances of Fe and Mg in mantles would imply that graphite grains must have a substantial coating unless oxides provide significant mantling sites for these species. The abundance of O and N in the dust phase as implied by the solar reference abundance values are difficult to reconcile with the fact that these elements are not expected to participate in mantle formation, and the 3.1 micrometer H2O ice feature is

  7. Species Abundance Patterns in Complex Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Kei

    2004-10-01

    An analytic theory of species abundance patterns (SAPs) in biological networks is presented. The theory is based on multispecies replicator dynamics equivalent to the Lotka-Volterra equation, with diverse interspecies interactions. Various SAPs observed in nature are derived from a single parameter. The abundance distribution is formed like a widely observed left-skewed lognormal distribution. As the model has a general form, the result can be applied to similar patterns in other complex biological networks, e.g., gene expression.

  8. Elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy are discussed. Relative abundances of spectroscopically accessible elements of four major shower meteors and one sporadic meteor are presented. A sporadic meteor with dominant sodium radiation and an iron-deficient sporadic meteor are analyzed. Empirical and theoretical tests for self-absorption in optical meteor plasmas have been conducted. Both ionization and incomplete dissociation are found to severely deplete certain neutral atoms from meteor plasmas.

  9. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  10. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  11. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  12. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  13. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  14. Zinc Abundances in Galactic Bulge Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, C. R.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is overabundant in metal-poor stars (Cayrel et al. 2004), being partially produced by neutron addition. It decreases with increasing metallicity, similarly to alpha-elements. In order to trace its abundance, the derivation of Zn abundance in different stellar populations, and varying metallicities, helps understanding its nucleosynthesis processes. Zn is also the main element of reference to derive the metallicity from absorption lines in quasars (QSOs), which allows to compare their evolution as a function of redshift and metallicity in metal-poor stars. In the present work, we derive Zn abundances for a sample of 56 bulge field stars, observed at high resolution with the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph. The mean wavelength coverage is 4800-6800 Å, at a resolution R ˜ 45000. The atmospheric parameters effective temperature, gravity and metallicity were derived in Zoccali et al. (2008) and Hill et al. (2011). Recently we have analysed the manganese abundances of this sample (Barbuy et al. 2013). To compute the Zn abundances we use spectrum synthesis, for the lines ZnI 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. The analysis of our data shows that the abundance of [Zn/Fe] decreases with increasing metallicity, in agreement with the data obtained from the literature. The details of Zn behaviour for the metal-rich bulge stars of the present work are under analysis.

  15. Discovery of secular variations in the atmospheric abundances of magnetic Ap stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The stars of the middle main sequence have relatively quiescent outer layers, and unusual chemical abundance patterns may develop in their atmospheres. The presence of chemical peculiarities reveal the action of such subsurface phenomena as gravitational settling and radiatively driven levitation of trace elements, and their competition with mixing processes such as turbulent diffusion. At present, little is known about the time evolution of these anomalous abundances, nor about the role that diffusion may play in maintaining them, during the main sequence lifetime of such a star. Aims: We want to establish whether abundance peculiarities change as stars evolve on the main sequence, and provide observational constraints to diffusion theory. Methods: We have performed spectral analysis of 15 magnetic Bp stars that are members of open clusters (and thus have well-known ages), with masses between about 3 and 4 M⊙. For each star, we measured the abundances of He, O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Pr and Nd. Results: We have discovered the systematic time evolution of trace elements through the main-sequence lifetime of magnetic chemically peculiar stars as their atmospheres cool and evolve towards lower gravity. During the main sequence lifetime, we observe clear and systematic variations in the atmospheric abundances of He, Ti, Cr, Fe, Pr and Nd. For all these elements, except He, the atmospheric abundances decrease with age. The abundances of Fe-peak elements converge towards solar values, while the rare-earth elements converge towards values at least 100 times more abundant than in the Sun. Helium is always underabundant compared to the Sun, evolving from about 1% up to 10% of the solar He abundance. We have attempted to interpret the observed abundance variations in the context of radiatively driven diffusion theory, which appears to provide a framework to understand some, but not all, of the anomalous abundance levels and variations that we observe. Based in part

  16. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  17. The young centre of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Faye, J.

    2016-05-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk; a transcription was later published in which the time difference is quoted as ‘one or two days’. However, a back-of-the-envelope calculation shows that the result is in fact a few years. In this paper we present this estimate alongside a more elaborate analysis yielding a difference of two and a half years. The aim is to provide a fairly complete solution to the relativity of the ‘aging’ of an object due to differences in the gravitational potential. This solution—accessible at the undergraduate level—can be used for educational purposes, as an example in the classroom. Finally, we also briefly discuss why exchanging ‘years’ for ‘days’—which in retrospect is a quite simple, but significant, mistake—has been repeated seemingly uncritically, albeit in a few cases only. The pedagogical value of this discussion is to show students that any number or observation, no matter who brought it forward, must be critically examined.

  18. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar. PMID:27302367

  19. Optimizing revenue at a cosmetic surgery centre

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Joanna M; Verheyden, Charles N; Mahabir, Raman C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for cosmetic surgery and services has diminished with recent fluctuations in the economy. To stay ahead, surgeons must appreciate and attend to the fiscal challenges of private practice. A key component of practice economics is knowledge of the common methods of payment. OBJECTIVE: To review methods of payment in a five-surgeon group practice in central Texas, USA. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of the financial records of a cosmetic surgery centre in Texas was conducted. Data were collected for the five-year period from 2003 to 2008, and included the method of payment, the item purchased (product, service or surgery) and the dollar amount. RESULTS: More than 11,000 transactions were reviewed. The most common method of payment used for products and services was credit card, followed by check and cash. For procedures, the most common form of payment was personal check, followed by credit card and financing. Of the credit card purchases for both products and procedures, an overwhelming majority of patients (more than 75%) used either Visa (Visa Inc, USA) or MasterCard (MasterCard Worldwide, USA). If the amount of the individual transaction surpassed US$1,000, the most common method of payment transitioned from credit card to personal check. CONCLUSIONS: In an effort to maximize revenue, surgeons should consider limiting the credit cards accepted by the practice and encourage payment through personal check. PMID:22942656

  20. Examination and Evaluation of Websites of Science Centres in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Bozdogan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    Science centres which have a considerable importance and functions in developed countries are intended to be popularized in Turkey. At this point considering the fact that the first contact between science centres and visitors is usually provided with websites, it is quite important that the content of these websites should be designed and…

  1. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  2. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc. (Author/JDD)

  3. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  4. Investigating Teachers' Views of Student-Centred Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2014-01-01

    Conventional learning is based on low levels of students' participation where students are rarely expected to ask questions or to challenge the theories of the academic. A paradigm shift in curriculum has resulted in implementing student-centred learning (SCL) approach, putting students as the centre of the learning process. This mode of…

  5. Opportunity Centred Learning: An Innovation in Enterprise Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem-based learning and action learning, and…

  6. Educational Development Centres: From Educational to Organisational Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnes, Anton; Stensaker, Bjorn

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to investigate the role of educational development centres, and their potential for playing a broader and more central role in quality and organisational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the results of three external evaluations of educational development centres in Denmark and Norway,…

  7. Interventional cardiology. Nonprimary PCI at centres without onsite surgical backup.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Hiroki; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    A new systematic review and meta-analysis by Lee and colleagues confirms the safety of nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at centres without onsite surgical backup. In daily clinical practice at PCI centres without onsite surgical facilities, quality assurance and improvement programmes are important to ensure high-quality care.

  8. Leading an Effective Improvement and Development Programme for Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Gill; Tyler, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the process and achievements of leadership of an improvement and development programme for children's centres in the context of public value and Ofsted inspection. It analyses how the capacity has been developed of children's centre managers to work more strategically and collectively. Distributed leadership theory is applied…

  9. Is "Object-Centred Neglect" a Homogeneous Entity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainotti, Guido; Ciaraffa, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The nature of object-centred (allocentric) neglect and the possibility of dissociating it from egocentric (subject-centred) forms of neglect are controversial. Originally, allocentric neglect was described by and in patients who reproduced all the elements of a multi-object scene, but left unfinished the left side of one or more of them. More…

  10. Problems and Prospects of Education Resource Centres in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanem, Johnson Efiong

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has good policies on Education and one of such policies is the establishment of Education Resource Centres in every State of the Federation, including the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The need is clearly articulated in the National Policy on Education. Despite the lofty plan, most of the centres are not fulfilling the need for their…

  11. Girls' Groups and Boys' Groups at a Municipal Technology Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Swedish initiative of municipal technology centres from a gender point of view. These centres provide after-school technology education for children aged 6-16. By means of an ethnographic study, the effects of the use of single-sex groups in increasing the interest of girls and boys in technical activities have been…

  12. National Centre for Research on Rural Education. Report for 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Research on Rural Education, Nedlands (Western Australia).

    The Centre was originally funded in 1980 for three years to undertake research on major issues and problems in rural education, to publish and disseminate results, and to act as a source of advice to government and private authorities as well as communities. Funding for the Centre has been extended through 1985, and its activities continue to be…

  13. Science Centres: A Resource for School and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Miranda; Mantero, Alfonso; Marasco, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    We present a science centre established in Genoa on an agreement between Municipality of Genoa and Department of Physics of University of Genoa. The aim is to offer children, young people and community an opportunity to approach science in a playful way. The centre staffs guide the visitors through the exhibits, attracting their interests towards…

  14. Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Robert; Hyde-Simon, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton is one of two research centres within the discipline of Modern Languages. Established in 2004, CALR now has more than 50 members, predominantly faculty members working in the School of Humanities/Modern Languages, as well as growing number of postgraduate researchers. The…

  15. Different Images of Science at Nordic Science Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidsson, Eva; Jakobsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Science centres aim to present science in ways that will attract visitors and enhance public interest in, and knowledge of, science. But what images and different aspects of science are visitors confronted with at Nordic science centres? This study aims to explore the different aspects of science that are displayed and the ways in which these…

  16. Child-Centred Inquiry Learning: How Mathematics Understanding Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Brough, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how mathematical understandings might emerge through student-centred inquiry. Data is drawn from a research project on student-centred curriculum integration that situated mathematics within authentic problem-solving contexts and involved students in collaboratively constructed curriculum. The project involved case studies in…

  17. "Getting Practical" and the National Network of Science Learning Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Georgina; Langley, Mark; Skilling, Gus; Walker, John

    2011-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres is a co-ordinating partner in the Getting Practical--Improving Practical Work in Science programme. The principle of training provision for the "Getting Practical" programme is a cascade model. Regional trainers employed by the national network of Science Learning Centres trained the cohort of local…

  18. Recognizing a Centre of Excellence in Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwin, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The term "Centre of Excellence" is increasingly used by Ontario's colleges with the expectation of portraying a superior level of proficiency, expertise, or investment in a particular academic discipline or program cluster. This paper proposes that the term Centre of Excellence should have a clearer definition so that when one of Ontario's…

  19. The abundance and environment of dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metuki, Ofer; Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2016-07-01

    An open question in cosmology and the theory of structure formation is to what extent does environment affect the properties of galaxies and haloes. The present paper aims at shedding light on this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of a dark matter only simulation and it addresses the issue of how the environment affects the abundance of haloes, which are assigned four attributes: their virial mass, an ambient density calculated with an aperture that scales with Rvir (ΔM), a fixed-aperture (ΔR) ambient density, and a cosmic web classification (i.e. voids, sheets, filaments, and knots, as defined by the V-web algorithm). ΔM is the mean density around a halo evaluated within a sphere of a radius of 5Rvir, where Rvir is the virial radius. ΔR is the density field Gaussian smoothed with R = 4 h-1 Mpc, evaluated at the centre of the halo. The main result of the paper is that the difference between haloes in different web elements stems from the difference in their mass functions, and does not depend on their adaptive-aperture ambient density. A dependence on the fixed-aperture ambient density is induced by the cross-correlation between the mass of a halo and its fixed-aperture ambient density.

  20. Relating mesocarnivore relative abundance to anthropogenic land-use with a hierarchical spatial count model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crimmins, Shawn M.; Walleser, Liza R.; Hertel, Dan R.; McKann, Patrick C.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing need to develop models of spatial patterns in animal abundance, yet comparatively few examples of such models exist. This is especially true in situations where the abundance of one species may inhibit that of another, such as the intensively-farmed landscape of the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the central United States, where waterfowl production is largely constrained by mesocarnivore nest predation. We used a hierarchical Bayesian approach to relate the distribution of various land-cover types to the relative abundances of four mesocarnivores in the PPR: coyote Canis latrans, raccoon Procyon lotor, red fox Vulpes vulpes, and striped skunk Mephitis mephitis. We developed models for each species at multiple spatial resolutions (41.4 km2, 10.4 km2, and 2.6 km2) to address different ecological and management-related questions. Model results for each species were similar irrespective of resolution. We found that the amount of row-crop agriculture was nearly ubiquitous in our best models, exhibiting a positive relationship with relative abundance for each species. The amount of native grassland land-cover was positively associated with coyote and raccoon relative abundance, but generally absent from models for red fox and skunk. Red fox and skunk were positively associated with each other, suggesting potential niche overlap. We found no evidence that coyote abundance limited that of other mesocarnivore species, as might be expected under a hypothesis of mesopredator release. The relationships between relative abundance and land-cover types were similar across spatial resolutions. Our results indicated that mesocarnivores in the PPR are most likely to occur in portions of the landscape with large amounts of agricultural land-cover. Further, our results indicated that track-survey data can be used in a hierarchical framework to gain inferences regarding spatial patterns in animal relative abundance.

  1. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest.

  2. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  3. Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Hatching Success as a Function of the Microbial Abundance in Nest Sand at Ostional, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Bézy, Vanessa S.; Valverde, Roldán A.; Plante, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g-1 nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g-1 g-1 nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  4. The distribution of lianas and their change in abundance in temperate forests over the past 45 years.

    PubMed

    Londré, Ronald A; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2006-12-01

    Lianas (woody vines) are an important and dynamic component of many forests throughout the world, and increases in CO2, mean winter temperature, and forest fragmentation may promote their growth and proliferation in temperate forests. In this study, we used a 45-year data set to test the hypothesis that lianas have increased in abundance and basal area in the interiors of 14 deciduous temperate forests in Wisconsin (USA) since 1959. We also censused woody plants along a gradient from the forest edge to the interior in seven of these forests to test the hypothesis that the abundance of lianas declines significantly with increasing distance from the forest edge. We found that lianas did not increase in abundance within the interiors of temperate forests in Wisconsin over the last 45 years. However, relative and absolute liana abundance decreased sharply with increasing distance from forest edges. Our findings suggest that forest fragmentation, not climate change, may be increasing the abundance of lianas in northern deciduous temperate forests, and that lianas may further increase in abundance if the severity of forest fragmentation intensifies.

  5. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  6. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  7. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  8. Rediscovering the Teacher within Indian Child-Centred Pedagogy: Implications for the Global Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Child-Centred Approach (CCA) is increasingly promoted within India and internationally as a response to the challenge of delivering quality education. From identifying and examining Indian indigenous and global concepts of CCA within traditional and contemporary child-centred pedagogic discourse, this paper reveals the complexities of…

  9. Student-Centred and Teacher-Centred Learning Environment in Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Psychological Needs, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Karin; de Brabander, Cornelis J.; Martens, Rob L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the perception of psychological needs and motivation in a student-centred and a teacher-centred learning environment are compared, using Self Determination Theory as a framework. The self-report Intrinsic Motivation Inventory was completed by 230 students (mean age 16.1 years) in pre-vocational secondary education. School records on…

  10. The Repositioning of Language Centres: An Appreciation of David Ingram's "Language Centres--Their Roles, Functions and Management"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussex, Roland

    2004-01-01

    David Ingram's "Language Centres" (2001) offers a descriptive and analytical study of meta-centres, their constitution, operation and engagement with their constituencies. This article is a combination of a review and an appreciation of Ingram's study, and--benefiting from the latitude offered by the genre of the review article--a set of…

  11. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  12. Cold GMC cores in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, D. C.; Li, Y.; Dowell, C. D.; Menten, K. M.

    1999-03-01

    We have used the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory in grating mode to map the far-infrared continuum emission (45-175 mic) toward several massive Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) cores located near the Galactic center. These sources are observed in emission at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths (>100 mic). However, at mid-infrared wavelengths (<70 mic) they are seen in absorption against the general Galactic centre background. Gray-body fits to the observed far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions give low temperatures (about 13-20 K) for the bulk of the dust in all the sources. This indicates external heating of the dust by the diffuse ISRF and suggests that the cores do not harbor high-mass star-formation sites, in spite of their large molecular mass. In addition, the grain emissivity in these sources is a very steep function of frequency (β > 2.4). The high grain emissivity exponent is consistent with the presence of dust grains covered with thick ice mantles. Molecular line observations carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) show a large velocity gradient across the most massive core, GCM0.25+0.11, indicative of streaming motions of the gas or of the presence of multiple, spatially overlapping velocity components. The observed gas kinematics may indicate that the GCM0.25+0.11 core is in an early stage of a cloud-cloud collision that may result in a future star formation episode. Recent MSX observations indicate that cold GMC cores similar to those studied with ISO are ubiquitous in the Galactic center and throughout the Galaxy. The observed intensities of the OI and CII fine structure lines imply a radiation field intensity of about 1000 times the standard ISRF intensity and a hydrogen density of about 1000 pccm\\ for the diffuse gas component in the Galactic center.

  13. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons.

  14. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  15. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons. PMID:12289844

  16. A self-organizing model of the visual development of hand-centred representations.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Mender, Bedeho M W; Paredes, Mariana; Tromans, James M; Evans, Benjamin D; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    We show how hand-centred visual representations could develop in the primate posterior parietal and premotor cortices during visually guided learning in a self-organizing neural network model. The model incorporates trace learning in the feed-forward synaptic connections between successive neuronal layers. Trace learning encourages neurons to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur close together in time. We assume that sequences of eye movements are performed around individual scenes containing a fixed hand-object configuration. Trace learning will then encourage individual cells to learn to respond to particular hand-object configurations across different retinal locations. The plausibility of this hypothesis is demonstrated in computer simulations.

  17. Dopamine and reward: the anhedonia hypothesis 30 years on.

    PubMed

    Wise, Roy A

    2008-10-01

    The anhedonia hypothesis--that brain dopamine plays a critical role in the subjective pleasure associated with positive rewards--was intended to draw the attention of psychiatrists to the growing evidence that dopamine plays a critical role in the objective reinforcement and incentive motivation associated with food and water, brain stimulation reward, and psychomotor stimulant and opiate reward. The hypothesis called to attention the apparent paradox that neuroleptics, drugs used to treat a condition involving anhedonia (schizophrenia), attenuated in laboratory animals the positive reinforcement that we normally associate with pleasure. The hypothesis held only brief interest for psychiatrists, who pointed out that the animal studies reflected acute actions of neuroleptics whereas the treatment of schizophrenia appears to result from neuroadaptations to chronic neuroleptic administration, and that it is the positive symptoms of schizophrenia that neuroleptics alleviate, rather than the negative symptoms that include anhedonia. Perhaps for these reasons, the hypothesis has had minimal impact in the psychiatric literature. Despite its limited heuristic value for the understanding of schizophrenia, however, the anhedonia hypothesis has had major impact on biological theories of reinforcement, motivation, and addiction. Brain dopamine plays a very important role in reinforcement of response habits, conditioned preferences, and synaptic plasticity in cellular models of learning and memory. The notion that dopamine plays a dominant role in reinforcement is fundamental to the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction, to most neuroadaptation theories of addiction, and to current theories of conditioned reinforcement and reward prediction. Properly understood, it is also fundamental to recent theories of incentive motivation.

  18. Reassessing the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pimplikar, Sanjay W.

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, the amyloid cascade hypothesis has dominated the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research and has provided the intellectual framework for therapeutic intervention. Although the details of the hypothesis continue to evolve, its core principle has remained essentially unaltered. It posits that the amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), are the root cause of AD. Substantial genetic and biochemical data support this view, and yet a number of findings also run contrary to its tenets. The presence of familial AD mutations in APP and presenilins, demonstration of Aβ toxicity, and studies in mouse models of AD all support the hypothesis, whereas the presence of Aβ plaques in normal individuals, the uncertain nature of the pathogenic Aβ species, and repeated disappointments with Aβ-centered therapeutic trials are inconsistent with the hypothesis. The current state of knowledge does not prove nor disprove the amyloid hypothesis, but rather points to the need for its reassessment. A view that Aβ is one of the factors, as opposed to the factor, that causes AD is more consistent with the present knowledge, and is more likely to promote comprehensive and effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:19124085

  19. Why is Trichodesmium abundant in the Kuroshio?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-12-01

    The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as an abundant and major diazotroph in the Kuroshio, but the reason for this remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since our satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. Numerical particle-tracking experiments simulated the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the Ryukyu Islands could be advected into the Kuroshio.

  20. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-10

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  1. Mobile DNA and the TE-Thrust hypothesis: supporting evidence from the primates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are increasingly being recognized as powerful facilitators of evolution. We propose the TE-Thrust hypothesis to encompass TE-facilitated processes by which genomes self-engineer coding, regulatory, karyotypic or other genetic changes. Although TEs are occasionally harmful to some individuals, genomic dynamism caused by TEs can be very beneficial to lineages. This can result in differential survival and differential fecundity of lineages. Lineages with an abundant and suitable repertoire of TEs have enhanced evolutionary potential and, if all else is equal, tend to be fecund, resulting in species-rich adaptive radiations, and/or they tend to undergo major evolutionary transitions. Many other mechanisms of genomic change are also important in evolution, and whether the evolutionary potential of TE-Thrust is realized is heavily dependent on environmental and ecological factors. The large contribution of TEs to evolutionary innovation is particularly well documented in the primate lineage. In this paper, we review numerous cases of beneficial TE-caused modifications to the genomes of higher primates, which strongly support our TE-Thrust hypothesis. PMID:21627776

  2. Stages in Learning Motor Synergies: A View Based on the Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes a novel view on stages in motor learning based on recent developments of the notion of synergies, the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point hypothesis (referent configuration) that allow to merge these notions into a single scheme of motor control. The principle of abundance and the principle of minimal final action form the foundation for analyses of natural motor actions performed by redundant sets of elements. Two main stages of motor learning are introduced corresponding to (1) discovery and strengthening of motor synergies stabilizing salient performance variable(s), and (2) their weakening when other aspects of motor performance are optimized. The first stage may be viewed as consisting of two steps, the elaboration of an adequate referent configuration trajectory and the elaboration of multi-joint (multi-muscle) synergies stabilizing the referent configuration trajectory. Both steps are expected to lead to more variance in the space of elemental variables that is compatible with a desired time profile of the salient performance variable (“good variability”). Adjusting control to other aspects of performance during the second stage (for example, esthetics, energy expenditure, time, fatigue, etc.) may lead to a drop in the “good variability”. Experimental support for the suggested scheme is reviewed. PMID:20060610

  3. Neutral theory predicts the relative abundance and diversity of genetic elements in a broad array of eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Serra, François; Becher, Verónica; Dopazo, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    It is universally true in ecological communities, terrestrial or aquatic, temperate or tropical, that some species are very abundant, others are moderately common, and the majority are rare. Likewise, eukaryotic genomes also contain classes or "species" of genetic elements that vary greatly in abundance: DNA transposons, retrotransposons, satellite sequences, simple repeats and their less abundant functional sequences such as RNA or genes. Are the patterns of relative species abundance and diversity similar among ecological communities and genomes? Previous dynamical models of genomic diversity have focused on the selective forces shaping the abundance and diversity of transposable elements (TEs). However, ideally, models of genome dynamics should consider not only TEs, but also the diversity of all genetic classes or "species" populating eukaryotic genomes. Here, in an analysis of the diversity and abundance of genetic elements in >500 eukaryotic chromosomes, we show that the patterns are consistent with a neutral hypothesis of genome assembly in virtually all chromosomes tested. The distributions of relative abundance of genetic elements are quite precisely predicted by the dynamics of an ecological model for which the principle of functional equivalence is the main assumption. We hypothesize that at large temporal scales an overarching neutral or nearly neutral process governs the evolution of abundance and diversity of genetic elements in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:23798991

  4. Neutral Theory Predicts the Relative Abundance and Diversity of Genetic Elements in a Broad Array of Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, François; Becher, Verónica; Dopazo, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    It is universally true in ecological communities, terrestrial or aquatic, temperate or tropical, that some species are very abundant, others are moderately common, and the majority are rare. Likewise, eukaryotic genomes also contain classes or “species” of genetic elements that vary greatly in abundance: DNA transposons, retrotransposons, satellite sequences, simple repeats and their less abundant functional sequences such as RNA or genes. Are the patterns of relative species abundance and diversity similar among ecological communities and genomes? Previous dynamical models of genomic diversity have focused on the selective forces shaping the abundance and diversity of transposable elements (TEs). However, ideally, models of genome dynamics should consider not only TEs, but also the diversity of all genetic classes or “species” populating eukaryotic genomes. Here, in an analysis of the diversity and abundance of genetic elements in >500 eukaryotic chromosomes, we show that the patterns are consistent with a neutral hypothesis of genome assembly in virtually all chromosomes tested. The distributions of relative abundance of genetic elements are quite precisely predicted by the dynamics of an ecological model for which the principle of functional equivalence is the main assumption. We hypothesize that at large temporal scales an overarching neutral or nearly neutral process governs the evolution of abundance and diversity of genetic elements in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:23798991

  5. Toxic Alexandrium blooms in the western Gulf of Maine: The plume advection hypothesis revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.M.; Keafer, B.A.; Geyer, W.R.; Signell, R.P.; Loder, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    The plume advection hypothesis links blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense in the western Gulf of Maine (GOM) to a buoyant plume derived from river outflows. This hypothesis was examined with cruise and moored-instrument observations in 1993 when levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins were high, and in 1994 when toxicity was low. A coupled physical-biological model simulated hydrography and A. fundyense distributions. Initial A. fundyense populations were restricted to low-salinity nearshore waters near Casco Bay, but also occurred in higher salinity waters along the plume boundary. This suggests two sources of cells - those from shallow-water cyst populations and those transported to shore from offshore blooms in the eastern segment of the Maine coastal current (EMCC). Observations confirm the role of the plume in A. fundyense transport and growth. Downwelling-favorable winds in 1993 transported the plume and its cells rapidly alongshore, enhancing toxicity and propagating PSP to the south. In 1994, sustained upwelling moved the plume offshore, resulting in low toxicity in intertidal shellfish. A. fundyense blooms were likely nutrient limited, leading to low growth rates and moderate cell abundances. These observations and mechanisms were reproduced by coupled physical-biological model simulations. The plume advection hypothesis provides a viable explanation for outbreaks of PSP in the western GOM, but should be refined to include two sources for cells that populate the plume and two major pathways for transport: one within the low-salinity plume and another where A. fundyense cells originating in the EMCC are transported along the outer boundary of the plume front with the western segment of the Maine coastal current.

  6. Type I photosynthetic reaction centres: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K

    2003-01-01

    We review recent advances in the study of the photosystem I reaction centre, following the determination of a spectacular 2.5 A resolution crystal structure for this complex of Synechococcus elongatus. Photosystem I is proving different to type II reaction centres in structure and organization, and the mechanism of transmembrane electron transfer, and is providing insights into the control of function in reaction centres that operate at very low redox potentials. The photosystem I complex of oxygenic organisms has a counterpart in non-oxygenic bacteria, the strictly anaerobic phototrophic green sulphur bacteria and heliobacteria. The most distinctive feature of these type I reaction centres is that they contain two copies of a large core polypeptide (i.e. a homodimer), rather than a heterodimeric arrangement of two related, but different, polypeptides as in the photosystem I complex. To compare the structural organization of the two forms of type I reaction centre, we have modelled the structure of the central region of the reaction centre from green sulphur bacteria, using sequence alignments and the structural coordinates of the S. elongatus Photosystem I complex. The outcome of these modelling studies is described, concentrating on regions of the type I reaction centre where important structure-function relationships have been demonstrated or inferred. PMID:12594931

  7. Chemical Abundances of Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui; Shaw, Richard A.; Stanghellini, letizia; Riley, Ben

    2015-08-01

    We present preliminary results from an optical spectroscopic survey of compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic disk. This is an ongoing optical+infrared spectral survey of 150 compact PNe to build a deep sample of PN chemical abundances. We obtained optical spectra of PNe with the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope and Goodman High-Throughput Spectrograph between 2012 and 2015. These data were used to calculate the nebulae diagnostics such as electron temperature and density for each PN, and to derive the elemental abundances of He, N, O Ne, S and Ar. These abundances are vital to understanding the nature of the PNe, and their low- to intermediate-mass progenitor stars.

  8. Abundance and chemistry of interstellar HOCO(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Brewer, M. K.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Johansson, L. E. B.

    1991-01-01

    Column densities of 10 to the 15th/sq cm toward the Galactic center and not more than 10 to the 12th/sq cm for cold dark clouds are derived from observations using an LVG model, and the chemical implications are discussed. The HOCO(+) 4(04)-3(03) line toward Sgr A is mapped. The fractional abundance of HOCO(+) in the Galactic center region was found to be three orders of magnitude larger than predicted by quiescent ion-molecule chemistry and an order of magnitude larger than predicted by an MHD shock model. It is suggested that the possibly high CO2 abundance, and consequently the observed HOCO(+) abundance in the Galactic center, may result from UV photolysis of grain mantles.

  9. Earth-Abundant Nanomaterials for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Mahmood, Asif; Liang, Zibin; Zou, Ruqiang; Guo, Shaojun

    2016-02-18

    Replacing the rare and precious platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts with earth-abundant materials for promoting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of fuel cells is of great interest in developing high-performance sustainable energy devices. However, the challenging issues associated with non-Pt materials are still their low intrinsic catalytic activity, limited active sites, and the poor mass transport properties. Recent advances in material sciences and nanotechnology enable rational design of new earth-abundant materials with optimized composition and fine nanostructure, providing new opportunities for enhancing ORR performance at the molecular level. This Review highlights recent breakthroughs in engineering nanocatalysts based on the earth-abundant materials for boosting ORR.

  10. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  11. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities.

    PubMed

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community. PMID:26565271

  12. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  13. Multiple fault condition recognition of gearbox with sequential hypothesis test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanxin; Shang, Yunfei; Sun, Kui

    2013-11-01

    A novel method for the fault condition recognition in which the recognition system interrogates a propagation channel adaptively and intelligently by using the available data is proposed based on sequential hypothesis testing. The waveform of the data in the propagation channel for the fault condition recognition is designed with the kurtosis of the measured data in time domain. The sequential hypothesis testing framework is proposed when hard decisions are made with adequate confidence. The distinguished characteristic of the channel recognition is that it operates in a closed loop and makes constant optimization in response to its changing understanding of the channel. The fault condition recognition of the gearbox is to update the multiple target hypothesis/class based on the measured data, customize waveform as the class probabilities changes, and make conclusion when the sufficient understanding of the propagation channel is achieved.

  14. The concept possession hypothesis of self-consciousness.

    PubMed

    Savanah, Stephane

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the hypothesis that concept possession is sufficient and necessary for self-consciousness. If this is true it provides a yardstick for gauging the validity of different research paradigms in which claims for self-consciousness in animals or human infants are made: a convincing demonstration of concept possession in a research subject, such as a display of inferential reasoning, may be taken as conclusive evidence of self-consciousness. Intuitively, there appears to be a correlation between intelligence in animals (which presupposes concept possession) and the existence of self-consciousness. I present three discussions to support the hypothesis: an analogy between perception and conception, where both are self-specifying; an argument that any web of concepts will always include the self-concept; and a fresh interpretation of Bermũdez (1998) showing how his theory of non-conceptual content provides strong support for the concept possession hypothesis.

  15. On Using Taylor's Hypothesis for Three-Dimensional Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBoeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, errors in using Taylor's hypothesis to transform measurements obtained in a temporal (or phase) frame onto a spatial one were evaluated. For the first time, phase-averaged ('real') spanwise and streamwise vorticity data measured on a three-dimensional grid were compared directly to those obtained using Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that even the qualitative features of the spanwise and streamwise vorticity distributions given by the two techniques can be very different. This is particularly true in the region of the spanwise roller pairing. The phase-averaged spanwise and streamwise peak vorticity levels given by Taylor's hypothesis are typically lower (by up to 40%) compared to the real measurements.

  16. Local equilibrium hypothesis and Taylor’s dissipation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    To qualitatively investigate the validity of Kolmogorov local equilibrium hypothesis and the Taylor dissipation law, we conduct direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional turbulent Kolmogorov flow. Since strong scale-by-scale (i.e. Richardson-type) energy cascade events occur quasi-periodically, the kinetic energy of the turbulence and its dissipation rate evolve quasi-periodically too. In this unsteady turbulence driven by a steady force, instantaneous values of the dissipation rate obey the scaling recently discovered in wind tunnel experiments (Vassilicos 2015 Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech. 47 95-114) instead of the Taylor dissipation law. The Taylor dissipation law does not hold because the local equilibrium hypothesis does not hold in a relatively low wave-number range. The breakdown of this hypothesis is caused by the finite time needed for the energy at such large scales to reach the dissipative scale by the scale-by-scale energy cascade.

  17. Deep and beautiful. The reward prediction error hypothesis of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo

    2014-03-01

    According to the reward-prediction error hypothesis (RPEH) of dopamine, the phasic activity of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain signals a discrepancy between the predicted and currently experienced reward of a particular event. It can be claimed that this hypothesis is deep, elegant and beautiful, representing one of the largest successes of computational neuroscience. This paper examines this claim, making two contributions to existing literature. First, it draws a comprehensive historical account of the main steps that led to the formulation and subsequent success of the RPEH. Second, in light of this historical account, it explains in which sense the RPEH is explanatory and under which conditions it can be justifiably deemed deeper than the incentive salience hypothesis of dopamine, which is arguably the most prominent contemporary alternative to the RPEH. PMID:24252364

  18. Extraversion and the EEG: II. A test of Gale's hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, J G; Mallise, L R

    1984-09-01

    The study sought to test A. Gale's hypothesis that only under moderately arousing conditions will introverts be shown to differ from extraverts in EEG defined arousal. Alpha activity was recorded for 45 subjects under each of six conditions, and extravert and introvert groups formed on the basis of subject's score on the E scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Contrary to the hypothesis, extraverts showed more prestimulus alpha activity than introverts under all conditions except opening and closing eyes on instruction where the reverse was the case. It is argued that the failure to confirm the hypothesis is not due to faults in design or execution of the study, and that future research may profit more from ignoring interactions of the sort demonstrated. PMID:6518221

  19. Alzheimer's Disease and the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, the amyloid cascade hypothesis has played the prominent role in explaining the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs) and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuronal cell death, and ultimately dementia. While there is substantial evidence supporting the hypothesis, there are also limitations: (1) SP and NFT may develop independently, and (2) SPs and NFTs may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. In addition, randomized clinical trials that tested drugs or antibodies targeting components of the amyloid pathway have been inconclusive. This paper provides a critical overview of the evidence for and against the amyloid cascade hypothesis in AD and provides suggestions for future directions. PMID:22506132

  20. Deep and beautiful. The reward prediction error hypothesis of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo

    2014-03-01

    According to the reward-prediction error hypothesis (RPEH) of dopamine, the phasic activity of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain signals a discrepancy between the predicted and currently experienced reward of a particular event. It can be claimed that this hypothesis is deep, elegant and beautiful, representing one of the largest successes of computational neuroscience. This paper examines this claim, making two contributions to existing literature. First, it draws a comprehensive historical account of the main steps that led to the formulation and subsequent success of the RPEH. Second, in light of this historical account, it explains in which sense the RPEH is explanatory and under which conditions it can be justifiably deemed deeper than the incentive salience hypothesis of dopamine, which is arguably the most prominent contemporary alternative to the RPEH.

  1. RPD-based Hypothesis Reasoning for Cyber Situation Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, John; McNeese, Michael; Mullen, Tracy; Hall, David; Fan, Xiaocong; Liu, Peng

    Intelligence workers such as analysts, commanders, and soldiers often need a hypothesis reasoning framework to gain improved situation awareness of the highly dynamic cyber space. The development of such a framework requires the integration of interdisciplinary techniques, including supports for distributed cognition (human-in-the-loop hypothesis generation), supports for team collaboration (identification of information for hypothesis evaluation), and supports for resource-constrained information collection (hypotheses competing for information collection resources). We here describe a cognitively-inspired framework that is built upon Klein’s recognition-primed decision model and integrates the three components of Endsley’s situation awareness model. The framework naturally connects the logic world of tools for cyber situation awareness with the mental world of human analysts, enabling the perception, comprehension, and prediction of cyber situations for better prevention, survival, and response to cyber attacks by adapting missions at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels.

  2. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    Introductory statistics classes teach us that we can never prove the null hypothesis; all we can do is reject or fail to reject it. However, there are times when it is necessary to try to prove the nonexistence of a difference between groups. This most often happens within the context of comparing a new treatment against an established one and showing that the new intervention is not inferior to the standard. This article first outlines the logic of "noninferiority" testing by differentiating between the null hypothesis (that which we are trying to nullify) and the "nill" hypothesis (there is no difference), reversing the role of the null and alternate hypotheses, and defining an interval within which groups are said to be equivalent. We then work through an example and show how to calculate sample sizes for noninferiority studies. PMID:14733457

  3. The effects of environmental factors on daytime sandeel distribution and abundance on the Dogger Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kooij, Jeroen; Scott, Beth E.; Mackinson, Steven

    2008-10-01

    Spring distribution and abundance of lesser sandeels during the day were linked to zooplankton densities, seabed substrate and various hydrographic factors using small scale empirical data collected in two areas on the Dogger Bank in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The results of a two-step generalized additive model (GAM) suggested that suitable seabed substrate and temperature best explain sandeel distribution (presence/absence) and that sandeel abundance (given presence) was best described by a model that included bottom temperature, difference between surface and bottom temperature and surface salinity. The current study suggests that suitable seabed substrate explains sandeel distribution in the water column. Bottom temperature and surface salinity also played an important role in explaining distribution and abundance, and we speculate that sandeels favour hydrographically dynamic areas. Contrary to our hypothesis sandeels were not strongly associated with areas of high zooplankton density. We speculate that in early spring on the western Dogger Bank plankton is still patchily distributed and that sandeels only emerge from the seabed when feeding conditions near their night-time burrowing habitat are optimal. The results also suggested that when abundance is over a threshold level, the number of sandeel schools increased rather than the schools becoming bigger. This relationship between patchiness and abundance has implications for mortality rates and hence fisheries management.

  4. Relative abundance of mesopredators and size of oak patches in the cross-timbers ecoregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Disney, M.R.; Hellgren, E.C.; Davis, C.A.; Leslie, David M.; Engle, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Mesopredators (e.g., raccoon Procyon lotor, Virginia opossum Didelphis virginiana, striped skunk Mephitis mephitis) have received considerable attention because of links to population declines in birds via increased nest predation, especially in landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic forces. Relationships of abundance of mesopredators to size of habitat patches have received less attention than relationships to other metrics of fragmentation, particularly edge characteristics. We tested the hypothesis that relative abundance of mesopredators (e.g., raccoons and Virginia opossums) was related negatively to size of forest patch. We delineated 15 patches of oak (Quercus) forest ranging from 0.2 to 55.3 ha within a grassland-woodland mosaic in the cross-timbers ecoregion of Oklahoma. Scent stations and live traps within these patches were used to index relative abundance of mesopredators in summers 2003 and 2004. Both indices of relative abundance were related weakly and negatively to area of forest patch. However, rate of capture and visitation to scent station were not correlated consistently throughout the study. Our results suggested that the two methods to index abundance provided separate information on functional and numerical responses to size of patch. Our evidence that mesopredators within the cross timbers were more likely to be in smaller patches of oak forest may have implications to success of avian nesting in these patches.

  5. Nonrandom seedling establishment corresponds with distance-dependent decline in mycorrhizal abundance in two terrestrial orchids.

    PubMed

    Waud, Michael; Wiegand, Thorsten; Brys, Rein; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-07-01

    In plant species that critically rely on mycorrhizal symbionts for germination and seedling establishment, distance-dependent decline of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil can be hypothesized to lead to significant spatial clustering as a result of nonrandom spatial patterns of seedling establishment. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the abundance and distribution of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil and how they relate to spatial patterns of adults and seedling recruitment in two related orchid species. We combined assessments of spatial variation in fungal abundance using quantitative PCR (qPCR) with spatial point pattern analyses based on long-term demographic data and cluster point process models. qPCR analyses showed that fungal abundance declined rapidly with distance from the adult host plants. Spatial point pattern analyses showed that successful recruitment in both species was clustered significantly around adult plants and that the decline in the neighborhood density of recruits around adults coincided with the decline of fungal abundance around adult plants. Overall, these results indicate that the distribution and abundance of fungal associates in the soil may have a strong impact on the aboveground distribution of its partner.

  6. Globigerinoides ruber morphotypes in the Gulf of Mexico: a test of null hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Richey, Julie N; Quinn, Terrence M; Poore, Richard Z

    2014-01-01

    Planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (G. ruber), due to its abundance and ubiquity in the tropical/subtropical mixed layer, has been the workhorse of paleoceanographic studies investigating past sea-surface conditions on a range of timescales. Recent geochemical work on the two principal white G. ruber (W) morphotypes, sensu stricto (ss) and sensu lato (sl), has hypothesized differences in seasonal preferences or calcification depths, implying that reconstructions using a non-selective mixture of morphotypes could potentially be biased. Here, we test these hypotheses by performing stable isotope and abundance measurements on the two morphotypes in sediment trap, core-top, and downcore samples from the northern Gulf of Mexico. As a test of null hypothesis, we perform the same analyses on couplets of G. ruber (W) specimens with attributes intermediate to the holotypic ss and sl morphologies. We find no systematic or significant offsets in coeval ss-sl δ(18)O, and δ(13)C. These offsets are no larger than those in the intermediate pairs. Coupling our results with foraminiferal statistical model INFAUNAL, we find that contrary to previous work elsewhere, there is no evidence for discrepancies in ss-sl calcifying depth habitat or seasonality in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Globigerinoides ruber morphotypes in the Gulf of Mexico: a test of null hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Richey, Julie N.; Quinn, Terrence M.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2014-01-01

    Planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (G. ruber), due to its abundance and ubiquity in the tropical/subtropical mixed layer, has been the workhorse of paleoceanographic studies investigating past sea-surface conditions on a range of timescales. Recent geochemical work on the two principal white G. ruber (W) morphotypes, sensu stricto (ss) and sensu lato (sl), has hypothesized differences in seasonal preferences or calcification depths, implying that reconstructions using a non-selective mixture of morphotypes could potentially be biased. Here, we test these hypotheses by performing stable isotope and abundance measurements on the two morphotypes in sediment trap, core-top, and downcore samples from the northern Gulf of Mexico. As a test of null hypothesis, we perform the same analyses on couplets of G. ruber (W) specimens with attributes intermediate to the holotypic ss and sl morphologies. We find no systematic or significant offsets in coeval ss-sl δ18O, and δ13C. These offsets are no larger than those in the intermediate pairs. Coupling our results with foraminiferal statistical model INFAUNAL, we find that contrary to previous work elsewhere, there is no evidence for discrepancies in ss-sl calcifying depth habitat or seasonality in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. INTERSTELLAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD X Per, REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-06-10

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to examine dust grain types and measure elemental abundances in the local interstellar medium (ISM). The absorption features of O, Fe, Mg, and Si along this line of sight were measured using spectra from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments, and the Spex software package. The spectra were fit with dust analogs measured in the laboratory. The O, Mg, and Si abundances were compared to those from standard references, and the O abundance was compared to that along lines of sight toward other X-ray binaries. The results are as follows. First, it was found that a combination of MgSiO{sub 3} (enstatite) and Mg{sub 1.6}Fe{sub 0.4}SiO{sub 4} (olivine) provided the best fit to the O K edge, with N(MgSiO{sub 3})/N(Mg{sub 1.6}Fe{sub 0.4}SiO{sub 4}) = 3.4. Second, the Fe L edge could be fit with models that included metallic iron, but it was not well described by the laboratory spectra currently available. Third, the total abundances of O, Mg, and Si were in very good agreement with that of recently re-analyzed B stars, suggesting that they are good indicators of abundances in the local ISM, and the depletions were also in agreement with expected values for the diffuse ISM. Finally, the O abundances found from X-ray binary absorption spectra show a similar correlation with Galactocentric distances as seen in other objects.

  9. Reliability of indicators of decline in abundance.

    PubMed

    Porszt, Erin J; Peterman, Randall M; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Cooper, Andrew B; Irvine, James R

    2012-10-01

    Although there are many indicators of endangerment (i.e., whether populations or species meet criteria that justify conservation action), their reliability has rarely been tested. Such indicators may fail to identify that a population or species meets criteria for conservation action (false negative) or may incorrectly show that such criteria have been met (false positive). To quantify the rate of both types of error for 20 commonly used indicators of declining abundance (threat indicators), we used receiver operating characteristic curves derived from historical (1938-2007) data for 18 sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. We retrospectively determined each population's yearly status (reflected by change in abundance over time) on the basis of each indicator. We then compared that population's status in a given year with the status in subsequent years (determined by the magnitude of decline in abundance across those years). For each sockeye population, we calculated how often each indicator of past status matched subsequent status. No single threat indicator provided error-free estimates of status, but indicators that reflected the extent (i.e., magnitude) of past decline in abundance (through comparison of current abundance with some historical baseline abundance) tended to better reflect status in subsequent years than the rate of decline over the previous 3 generations (a widely used indicator). We recommend that when possible, the reliability of various threat indicators be evaluated with empirical analyses before such indicators are used to determine the need for conservation action. These indicators should include estimates from the entire data set to take into account a historical baseline. PMID:22741815

  10. Lay understanding of genetics: a test of a hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M; Ponder, M

    1996-01-01

    There have been growing calls for more education in genetics for the public and in schools. However, studies of the public, school children, and those who have received genetic counselling show that understanding of scientific genetics is very limited. A hypothesis to explain this limited understanding is proposed and tested. It is argued that there is a widespread lay knowledge of inheritance which conflicts in a number of aspects with scientific explanations and which impedes the assimilation of the latter. It is suggested that this lay knowledge is derived from concepts of the social relationships of kinship. Concepts of kinship ties are sustained by everyday social activities and relationships which may make them resistant to change. A prediction which follows from the hypothesis that the lay understanding of genetics is derived from concepts of family and kinship relationships is that closeness in genetic terms will be determined by the closeness of the family ties of social relationship and social obligation. While the proportion of genes shared with parents, children, and sibs is, on average, the same, kin relationships and obligations are much stronger between parents and children than between sibs. The hypothesis was tested in a questionnaire study of two samples of adult women (n = 64 and n = 113) and one of social science students (n = 73). In all three groups a higher proportion of subjects gave the correct response for the proportion of shared genes with a father and child than with a sister, uncle, or grandmother. In the cases of sisters and uncle (and grandmother), there was a consistent tendency to underestimate the degree of genetic connection as predicted by the hypothesis. Answers to other questions are consistent with the hypothesis. The fundamental implications of the hypothesis for genetic education in the clinic and classroom are outlined. PMID:9004138

  11. OH vertical column abundance - Tropical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Burnett, Elizabeth B.

    1990-09-01

    Measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been made during the period 1987-1989 at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Moen, Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 deg N, 152 deg E). A total of 384 independent data sets was obtained. Tropical OH abundance levels average about 22 percent above corresponding mid-latitude values, with OH levels during late winter and early spring up to 50 percent above those observed at 40 deg N. Stratospheric wind and temperature data obtained from the daily NWS radiosonde data are examined for correlations with the OH results.

  12. OH vertical column abundance - Tropical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Burnett, Elizabeth B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been made during the period 1987-1989 at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Moen, Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 deg N, 152 deg E). A total of 384 independent data sets was obtained. Tropical OH abundance levels average about 22 percent above corresponding mid-latitude values, with OH levels during late winter and early spring up to 50 percent above those observed at 40 deg N. Stratospheric wind and temperature data obtained from the daily NWS radiosonde data are examined for correlations with the OH results.

  13. Abundance and chemistry of interstellar HOCO+.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Brewer, M K; Irvine, W M; Friberg, P; Johansson, L E

    1991-01-01

    We derive HOCO+ column densities approximately 10(15) cm-2 toward the Galactic center and < or = 10(12) cm-2 for cold dark clouds from observations and an LVG model. We mapped the HOCO+ 4(04)-3(03) line toward Sgr A. The fractional abundance of HOCO+ in the Galactic center region is three orders of magnitude larger than predicted by quiescent ion-molecule chemistry and an order of magnitude larger than predicted by a MHD shock model. If HOCO+ traces interstellar CO2, the implied high abundance ([CO2] approximately [CO]) in the Galactic center may result from UV photolysis of grain mantles.

  14. The evolution of abundances in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouze, J.

    This very brief review of the evolution of the abundances in the Galaxy first recalls the main observational facts regarding such abundances. After having defined what are the crucial parameters which define such model, emphasis is given to two approaches: the first analyzed by Vangioni-Flam and Audouze (1988), and Andreani et al. (1988), in which the rate of star formation is allowed to vary with time; the second approach was favored by Matteucci and Francois (1989), who invoke a multizone galactic model with infall (inflow) of external gas into the galactic disk.

  15. Visualization in a Climate Computing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Röber, Niklas; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Today, the extensive numerical simulations of climate models require elaborate visualization for understanding and communicating the results. Typical data sets of climate models are 3-dimensional, multivariate and time dependent, and can hence be very large. Interactive visual data analysis improves and accelerates the comprehension of these vast amounts of data. At DKRZ, the German Climate Computing Centre, a central high end visualization server, various domain specific visualization applications, and a remote 3D rendering solution enable users to interactively visualize their extensive model results right at their desktops. The DKRZ's visualization server is a heterogeneous Linux cluster, currently consisting of 10 state of the art visualization nodes equipped with 96 -256 GB RAM and high end NVidia GPUs. Since the parallel file system of the DKRZ's supercomputer is directly mounted over a powerful network, the model data can directly be analyzed and visualized. VirtualGL and TurboVNC are used for utilizing the server's GPUs for 3D rendering, while the TurboVNC client on the user's local computer continuously displays the resulting video stream. By using this central visualization server instead of a local computer, three main benefits are achieved: Time consuming transfers of large data sets from the supercomputer to the local computer are not needed. The hardware of the user's local workstation doesn't need to be powerful, no expensive GPU is required. Users don't have to install or buy visualization software. On the visualization server, a wide range of visualization software is installed. Avizo Green, a powerful commercial software customized for interactive 3D visualization of climate model data, is available, as well as SimVis and ParaView, which focus more on an exploratory visualization of data. SimVis and ParaView provide techniques like Linking & Brushing to emphasize or de-emphasize portions of the data. Furthermore, some domain specific 2D graphics

  16. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  17. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  18. L'asthme allergique au centre tunisien

    PubMed Central

    Joobeur, Samah; Mhamed, Saousen Cheikh; Saad, Ahmed Ben; Mribah, Hathami; Dekhil, Asma; Rouatbi, Naceur; El Kamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    L'asthme allergique pose un réel problème de santé publique vu sa prévalence et son coût de prise en charge élevés. Etudier le profil clinique, fonctionnel respiratoire, allergologique, thérapeutique et évolutif de l'asthme allergique dans une région du centre tunisien. Etude rétrospective portant sur 1132 dossiers de patients porteurs d'asthme allergique suivis dans le service de pneumologie et d'allergologie à l'hôpital de Monastir (Tunisie). L’âge moyen est de 27 ± 12,5 ans. 61,1% des patients sont âgés entre 16 et 39 ans. Une prédominance féminine est notée (56,7%). L'identification de l'allergène en cause s'est basée essentiellement sur les tests cutanés allergologiques (99,4%). Les principaux pneumallergènes identifiés sont les acariens (91,2%), suivis par les pollens (22,8%) et les phanères des animaux (12%). La classification selon la sévérité a conclu à un asthme intermittent à persistant léger chez 87.1% de nos patients. Le traitement s'est basé essentiellement sur la corticothérapie inhalée (67,6%). L'asthme dans notre étude a été jugé contrôlé dans 68,3% des cas, partiellement contrôlé dans 24,8% et non contrôlé dans 6,9% des cas. L'asthme allergique est une affection répandue qui touche essentiellement le sujet jeune en pleine activité. Une prise en charge adéquate permet de contrôler la maladie et de réduire ses répercussions sur le patient et la collectivité. PMID:26097637

  19. Recent sediment studies refute Glen Canyon Dam hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Topping, David J.; Schmidt, John C.; Hazel, Joe; Kaplinski, Matt; Melis, Theodore S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies of sedimentology hydrology, and geomorphology indicate that releases from Glen Canyon Dam are continuing to erode sandbars and beaches in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, despite attempts to restore these resources. The current strategy for dam operations is based on the hypothesis that sand supplied by tributaries of the Colorado River downstream from the dam will accumulate in the channel during normal dam operations and remain available for restoration floods. Recent work has shown that this hypothesis is false, and that tributary sand inputs are exported downstream rapidly typically within weeks or months under the current flow regime.

  20. The Hygiene Hypothesis and Its Inconvenient Truths about Helminth Infections.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Neima; Weatherhead, Jill; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Hotez, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Current iterations of the hygiene hypothesis suggest an adaptive role for helminth parasites in shaping the proper maturation of the immune system. However, aspects of this hypothesis are based on assumptions that may not fully account for realities about human helminth infections. Such realities include evidence of causal associations between helminth infections and asthma or inflammatory bowel disease as well as the fact that helminth infections remain widespread in the United States, especially among populations at greatest risk for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27632204