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Sample records for abundant cytoplasmic proteins

  1. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  2. Sertoli cell processes have axoplasmic features: an ordered microtubule distribution and an abundant high molecular weight microtubule- associated protein (cytoplasmic dynein)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Microtubules in the cytoplasm of rat Sertoli cell stage VI-VIII testicular seminiferous epithelium were studied morphometrically by electron microscopy. The Sertoli cell microtubules demonstrated axonal features, being largely parallel in orientation and predominantly spaced one to two microtubule diameters apart, suggesting the presence of microtubule-bound spacer molecules. Testis microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were isolated by a taxol, salt elution procedure. Testis MAPs promoted microtubule assembly, but to a lesser degree than brain MAPs. High molecular weight MAPs, similar in electrophoretic mobilities to brain MAP-1 and MAP-2, were prominent components of total testis MAPs, though no shared immunoreactivity was detected between testis and brain high molecular weight MAPs using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Unlike brain high molecular weight MAPs, testis high molecular weight MAPs were not heat stable. Testis MAP composition, studied on postnatal days 5, 10, 15, and 24 and in the adult, changed dramatically during ontogeny. However, the expression of the major testis high molecular weight MAP, called HMW-2, was constitutive and independent of the development of mature germ cells. The Sertoli cell origin of HMW-2 was confirmed by identifying this protein as the major MAP found in an enriched Sertoli cell preparation and in two rat models of testicular injury characterized by germ cell depletion. HMW-2 was selectively released from testis microtubules by ATP and co-purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation with MAP- 1C, a neuronal cytoplasmic dynein. The inhibition of the microtubule- activated ATPase activity of HMW-2 by vanadate and erythro-(2-hydroxy-3- nonyl)adenine and its proteolytic breakdown by vanadate-dependent UV photocleavage confirmed the dynein-like nature of HMW-2. As demonstrated by this study, the neuronal and Sertoli cell cytoskeletons share morphological, structural and functional properties. PMID:2972729

  3. gCap39 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein.

    PubMed

    Onoda, K; Yu, F X; Yin, H L

    1993-01-01

    gCap39 is a newly identified member of the Ca(2+)- and polyphosphoinositide-modulated gelsolin family of actin binding proteins which is different from gelsolin in several important respects: it caps filament ends, it does not sever filaments, it binds reversibly to actin, it is phosphorylated in vivo, and it is also present in the nucleus. gCap39 and gelsolin coexist in a variety of cells. To better understand the roles of gCap39 and gelsolin, we have compared their relative amounts and intracellular distributions. We found that gCap39 is very abundant in macrophages (accounting for 0.6% of total macrophage proteins), and is present in 12-fold molar excess to gelsolin. Both proteins are highly induced during differentiation of the promyelocytic leukemia cell line into macrophages. gCap39 is less abundant in fibroblasts (0.04% total proteins) and is present in equal molar ratio to gelsolin. The two proteins are colocalized in the cytoplasm, but gCap39 is also found in the nucleus while gelsolin is not. Nuclear gCap39 redistributes throughout the cytoplasm during mitosis and is excluded from regions containing chromosomes. Our results demonstrate that gCap39 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein which has unique as well as common functions compared with gelsolin.

  4. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Thomas; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS.

  5. Cytoplasmic protein methylation is essential for neural crest migration

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Katie L.; Lidberg, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    As they initiate migration in vertebrate embryos, neural crest cells are enriched for methylation cycle enzymes, including S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), the only known enzyme to hydrolyze the feedback inhibitor of trans-methylation reactions. The importance of methylation in neural crest migration is unknown. Here, we show that SAHH is required for emigration of polarized neural crest cells, indicating that methylation is essential for neural crest migration. Although nuclear histone methylation regulates neural crest gene expression, SAHH and lysine-methylated proteins are abundant in the cytoplasm of migratory neural crest cells. Proteomic profiling of cytoplasmic, lysine-methylated proteins from migratory neural crest cells identified 182 proteins, several of which are cytoskeleton related. A methylation-resistant form of one of these proteins, the actin-binding protein elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EF1α1), blocks neural crest migration. Altogether, these data reveal a novel and essential role for post-translational nonhistone protein methylation during neural crest migration and define a previously unknown requirement for EF1α1 methylation in migration. PMID:24379414

  6. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  7. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Richard E

    2015-05-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups.

  8. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  9. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  10. RNA-Seq profiling of single bovine oocyte transcript abundance and its modulation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan M; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular changes occurring during mammalian oocyte maturation are partly regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation (CP) and affect oocyte quality, yet the extent of CP activity during oocyte maturation remains unknown. Single bovine oocyte RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to examine changes in transcript abundance during in vitro oocyte maturation in cattle. Polyadenylated RNA from individual germinal-vesicle and metaphase-II oocytes was amplified and processed for Illumina sequencing, producing approximately 30 million reads per replicate for each sample type. A total of 10,494 genes were found to be expressed, of which 2,455 were differentially expressed (adjusted P<0.05 and fold change >2) between stages, with 503 and 1,952 genes respectively increasing and decreasing in abundance. Differentially expressed genes with complete 3’-untranslated-region sequence (279 increasing and 918 decreasing in polyadenylated transcript abundance) were examined for the presence, position, and distribution of motifs mediating CP, revealing enrichment (85%) and lack there of (18%) in up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Examination of total and polyadenylated RNA abundance by quantitative PCR validated these RNA-Seq findings. The observed increases in polyadenylated transcript abundance within the RNA-Seq data are likely due to CP, providing novel insight into targeted transcripts and resultant differential gene expression profiles that contribute to oocyte maturation. PMID:25560149

  11. RNA-Seq profiling of single bovine oocyte transcript abundance and its modulation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Juan M; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2015-02-01

    Molecular changes occurring during mammalian oocyte maturation are partly regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation (CP) and affect oocyte quality, yet the extent of CP activity during oocyte maturation remains unknown. Single bovine oocyte RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to examine changes in transcript abundance during in vitro oocyte maturation in cattle. Polyadenylated RNA from individual germinal-vesicle and metaphase-II oocytes was amplified and processed for Illumina sequencing, producing approximately 30 million reads per replicate for each sample type. A total of 10,494 genes were found to be expressed, of which 2,455 were differentially expressed (adjusted P < 0.05 and fold change >2) between stages, with 503 and 1,952 genes respectively increasing and decreasing in abundance. Differentially expressed genes with complete 3'-untranslated-region sequence (279 increasing and 918 decreasing in polyadenylated transcript abundance) were examined for the presence, position, and distribution of motifs mediating CP, revealing enrichment (85%) and lack thereof (18%) in up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Examination of total and polyadenylated RNA abundance by quantitative PCR validated these RNA-Seq findings. The observed increases in polyadenylated transcript abundance within the RNA-Seq data are likely due to CP, providing novel insight into targeted transcripts and resultant differential gene expression profiles that contribute to oocyte maturation.

  12. The cytoplasmic sites of the snRNP protein complexes are punctate structures that are responsive to changes in metabolism and intracellular architecture.

    PubMed

    Zieve, G W

    1999-02-25

    Five anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies, Y12, 7.13, KSm4, KSm6, and 128, stain similar discrete punctate structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm of hamster fibroblasts in addition to the expected intense nuclear staining. Several criteria suggest the cytoplasmic staining reflects the cytoplasmic pools of snRNP core proteins. The relative intensity of the cytoplasmic staining is similar to the 30% relative abundance of the cytoplasmic snRNP core proteins compared to the nuclear snRNP core proteins based on cell-fractionation studies. Moreover, the cytoplasmic staining is removed by the same extraction conditions that solubilize the pools of cytoplasmic snRNP core proteins. The cytoplasmic sites of staining are typically spherical but heterogeneous in diameter (0.2-0.5 microm). The larger particles greatly exceed the diameter of individual snRNP core particles and are likely to represent centers of many snRNP proteins or snRNP protein complexes. The staining, though punctate, is evenly dispersed throughout the cytoplasm with no evidence of major compartmentalization. The cytoplasmic staining pattern collapses into larger foci of intensely staining structures when cellular energy levels are depleted or when cells are exposed to hypertonic medium. Unlike the normal sites of snRNP protein cytoplasmic staining, these larger collapsed foci resist detergent extraction. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic staining identified with the anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies represents the large pools of snRNP core proteins in the cytoplasm.

  13. Nuclear Cytoplasmic Trafficking of Proteins is a Major Response of Human Fibroblasts to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Baqader, Noor O.; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Stoeber, Kai; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    We have used a subcellular spatial razor approach based on LC–MS/MS-based proteomics with SILAC isotope labeling to determine changes in protein abundances in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of human IMR90 fibroblasts subjected to mild oxidative stress. We show that response to mild tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide treatment includes redistribution between the nucleus and cytoplasm of numerous proteins not previously associated with oxidative stress. The 121 proteins with the most significant changes encompass proteins with known functions in a wide variety of subcellular locations and of cellular functional processes (transcription, signal transduction, autophagy, iron metabolism, TCA cycle, ATP synthesis) and are consistent with functional networks that are spatially dispersed across the cell. Both nuclear respiratory factor 2 and the proline regulatory axis appear to contribute to the cellular metabolic response. Proteins involved in iron metabolism or with iron/heme as a cofactor as well as mitochondrial proteins are prominent in the response. Evidence suggesting that nuclear import/export and vesicle-mediated protein transport contribute to the cellular response was obtained. We suggest that measurements of global changes in total cellular protein abundances need to be complemented with measurements of the dynamic subcellular spatial redistribution of proteins to obtain comprehensive pictures of cellular function. PMID:25133973

  14. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle.

  15. The Cytoplasmic Rhodopsin-Protein Interface: Potential for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Gardner, Eric; Riciutti, Alec; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin is a prototypic G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), interacting with the G protein, transducin, rhodopsin kinase, and arrestin. All of these proteins interact with rhodopsin at its cytoplasmic surface. Structural and modeling studies have provided in-depth descriptions of the respective interfaces. Overlap and thus competition for binding surfaces is a major regulatory mechanism for signal processing. Recently, it was found that the same surface is also targeted by small molecules. These ligands can directly interfere with the binding and activation of the proteins of the signal transduction cascade, but they can also allosterically modulate the retinal ligand binding pocket. Because the pocket that is targeted contains residues that are highly conserved across Class A GPCRs, these findings imply that it may be possible to target multiple GPCRs with the same ligand(s). This is desirable for example in complex diseases such as cancer where multiple GPCRs participate in the disease networks. PMID:21777183

  16. A Brevibacillus choshinensis system that secretes cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Horne, Irene; Williams, Michelle; Sutherland, Tara D; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2004-01-01

    Brevibacillus choshinensis has previously been shown to be a useful strain for the secretion of heterologous proteins via the Sec secretory pathway. This pathway involves the secretion of proteins prior to folding, whereas the alternative TAT (twin-arginine translocation) pathway enables pre-folded proteins to be secreted. We have modified the signal peptide of the Brevibacillus expression vector pNCMO2 to accommodate a Sec avoidance signal as well as the twin arginines required for secretion via the TAT system. Use of this modified signal peptide with the phosphotriesterase OpdA enabled B. choshinensis transformants to express and secrete the enzyme in an active and substantially pure form. The system was also used successfully to secrete two cytoplasmic proteins, the phosphotriesterase HocA from Pseudomonas monteilii and the phenylcarbamate-degrading enzyme, PCD, from Arthrobacter oxydans. The inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine and sodium azide were used to confirm that secretion was occurring via the TAT secretion pathway. The modified B. choshinensis system we have developed may have general utility in secreting a wide range of heterologous proteins in active and conveniently processed form.

  17. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  18. Considerations when quantitating protein abundance by immunoblot.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A; Veiras, Luciana C; Minas, Jacqueline N; Ralph, Donna Lee

    2015-03-15

    The development of the immunoblot to detect and characterize a protein with an antisera, even in a crude mixture, was a breakthrough with wide-ranging and unpredictable applications across physiology and medicine. Initially, this technique was viewed as a tool for qualitative, not quantitative, analyses of proteins because of the high number of variables between sample preparation and detection with antibodies. Nonetheless, as the immunoblot method was streamlined and improved, investigators pushed it to quantitate protein abundance in unpurified samples as a function of treatment, genotype, or pathology. This short review, geared at investigators, reviewers, and critical readers, presents a set of issues that are of critical importance for quantitative analysis of protein abundance: 1) Consider whether tissue samples are of equivalent integrity and assess how handling between collection and assay influences the apparent relative abundance. 2) Establish the specificity of the antiserum for the protein of interest by providing clear images, molecular weight markers, positive and negative controls, and vendor details. 3) Provide convincing evidence for linearity of the detection system by assessing signal density as a function of sample loaded. 4) Recognize that loading control proteins are rarely in the same linear range of detection as the protein of interest; consider protein staining of the gel or blot. In summary, with careful attention to sample integrity, antibody specificity, linearity of the detection system, and acceptable loading controls, investigators can implement quantitative immunoblots to convincingly assess protein abundance in their samples.

  19. Excreted Cytoplasmic Proteins Contribute to Pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Popella, Peter; Nega, Mulugeta; Luqman, Arif; Schittek, Birgit; Di Marco, Moreno; Stevanovic, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in pro- and eukaryotes, also referred to as “nonclassical protein export,” is a well-known phenomenon. However, comparatively little is known about the role of the excreted proteins in relation to pathogenicity. Here, the impact of two excreted glycolytic enzymes, aldolase (FbaA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), on pathogenicity was investigated in Staphylococcus aureus. Both enzymes bound to certain host matrix proteins and enhanced adherence of the bacterial cells to host cells but caused a decrease in host cell invasion. FbaA and GAPDH also bound to the cell surfaces of staphylococcal cells by interaction with the major autolysin, Atl, that is involved in host cell internalization. Surprisingly, FbaA showed high cytotoxicity to both MonoMac 6 (MM6) and HaCaT cells, while GAPDH was cytotoxic only for MM6 cells. Finally, the contribution of external FbaA and GAPDH to S. aureus pathogenicity was confirmed in an insect infection model. PMID:27001537

  20. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  1. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Using a Cytoplasmic Yeast Two Hybrid System

    PubMed Central

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; DeStephanis, Darla; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein interactions play an important role in many virus-encoded functions and in virus-host interactions. While a “classical” yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H) is one of the most common techniques to detect such interactions, it has a number of limitations, including a requirement for the proteins of interest to be relocated to the nucleus. Modified Y2H, such as the Sos recruitment system (SRS), which detect interactions occurring in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus, allow proteins from viruses replicating in the cytoplasm to be tested in a more natural context. In this study, a SRS was used to detect interactions involving proteins from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic non-segmented negative strand RNA (NNS) virus. All five full-length VSV proteins, as well as several truncated proteins, were screened against each other. Using the SRS, most interactions demonstrated previously involving VSV phosphoprotein, nucleocapsid (N) and large polymerase proteins were confirmed independently, while difficulties were encountered using the membrane associated matrix and glycoproteins. A human cDNA library was also screened against VSV N protein and one cellular protein, SFRS18, was identified which interacted with N in this context. The system presented can be redesigned easily for studies in other less tractable NNS viruses. PMID:21320532

  2. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  3. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  4. Mechanical slowing-down of cytoplasmic diffusion allows in vivo counting of proteins in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Burak; Landgraf, Dirk; Lai, Ghee Chuan; Bakhsi, Somenath; Arias-Castro, Juan Carlos; Yildiz, Sadik; Huh, Dann; Fernandez-Lopez, Raul; Peterson, Celeste N.; Toprak, Erdal; El Karoui, Meriem; Paulsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Many key regulatory proteins in bacteria are present in too low numbers to be detected with conventional methods, which poses a particular challenge for single-cell analyses because such proteins can contribute greatly to phenotypic heterogeneity. Here we develop a microfluidics-based platform that enables single-molecule counting of low-abundance proteins by mechanically slowing-down their diffusion within the cytoplasm of live Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. Our technique also allows for automated microscopy at high throughput with minimal perturbation to native physiology, as well as viable enrichment/retrieval. We illustrate the method by analysing the control of the master regulator of the E. coli stress response, RpoS, by its adapter protein, SprE (RssB). Quantification of SprE numbers shows that though SprE is necessary for RpoS degradation, it is expressed at levels as low as 3–4 molecules per average cell cycle, and fluctuations in SprE are approximately Poisson distributed during exponential phase with no sign of bursting. PMID:27189321

  5. Mechanical slowing-down of cytoplasmic diffusion allows in vivo counting of proteins in individual cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumus, Burak; Landgraf, Dirk; Lai, Ghee Chuan; Bakhsi, Somenath; Arias-Castro, Juan Carlos; Yildiz, Sadik; Huh, Dann; Fernandez-Lopez, Raul; Peterson, Celeste N.; Toprak, Erdal; El Karoui, Meriem; Paulsson, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Many key regulatory proteins in bacteria are present in too low numbers to be detected with conventional methods, which poses a particular challenge for single-cell analyses because such proteins can contribute greatly to phenotypic heterogeneity. Here we develop a microfluidics-based platform that enables single-molecule counting of low-abundance proteins by mechanically slowing-down their diffusion within the cytoplasm of live Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. Our technique also allows for automated microscopy at high throughput with minimal perturbation to native physiology, as well as viable enrichment/retrieval. We illustrate the method by analysing the control of the master regulator of the E. coli stress response, RpoS, by its adapter protein, SprE (RssB). Quantification of SprE numbers shows that though SprE is necessary for RpoS degradation, it is expressed at levels as low as 3-4 molecules per average cell cycle, and fluctuations in SprE are approximately Poisson distributed during exponential phase with no sign of bursting.

  6. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  7. The HEX 110 Hexamerin Is a Cytoplasmic and Nucleolar Protein in the Ovaries of Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile

    2016-01-01

    Hexamerins are insect storage proteins abundantly secreted by the larval fat body into the haemolymph. The canonical role of hexamerins consists of serving as an amino acid reserve for development toward the adult stage. However, in Apis mellifera, immunofluorescence assays coupled to confocal laser-scanning microscopy, and high-throughput sequencing, have recently shown the presence of hexamerins in other organs than the fat body. These findings have led us to study these proteins with the expectation of uncovering additional functions in insect development. We show here that a honeybee hexamerin, HEX 110, localizes in the cytoplasm and nucleus of ovarian cells. In the nucleus of somatic and germline cells, HEX 110 colocalized with a nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, suggesting a structural or even regulatory function in the nucleolus. RNase A provoked the loss of HEX 110 signals in the ovarioles, indicating that the subcellular localization depends on RNA. This was reinforced by incubating ovaries with pyronin Y, a RNA-specific dye. Together, the colocalization with fibrillarin and pyronin Y, and the sensitivity to RNase, highlight unprecedented roles for HEX110 in the nucleolus, the nuclear structure harbouring the gene cluster involved in ribosomal RNA production. However, the similar patterns of HEX 110 foci distribution in the active and inactive ovaries of queens and workers preclude its association with the functional status of these organs. PMID:26954256

  8. Guanylate binding proteins promote caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis in response to cytoplasmic LPS.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Danielle M; Hagar, Jon A; Haldar, Arun K; Mason, Ashley K; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Ernst, Robert K; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Miao, Edward A; Coers, Jörn

    2014-04-22

    IFN receptor signaling induces cell-autonomous immunity to infections with intracellular bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-inducible guanylate binding protein (Gbp) proteins stimulate caspase-11-dependent, cell-autonomous immunity in response to cytoplasmic LPS. Caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis is triggered in IFN-activated macrophages infected with the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The rapid induction of pyroptosis in IFN-activated macrophages required a cluster of IFN-inducible Gbp proteins encoded on mouse chromosome 3 (Gbp(chr3)). Induction of pyroptosis in naive macrophages by infections with the cytosol-invading ΔsdhA L. pneumophila mutant was similarly dependent on Gbp(chr3), suggesting that these Gbp proteins play a role in the detection of bacteria accessing the cytosol. Cytoplasmic LPS derived from Salmonella ssp. or Escherichia coli has recently been shown to trigger caspase-11 activation and pyroptosis, but the cytoplasmic sensor for LPS and components of the caspase-11 inflammasome are not yet defined. We found that the induction of caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis by cytoplasmic L. pneumophila-derived LPS required Gbp(chr3) proteins. Similarly, pyroptosis induced by cytoplasmic LPS isolated from Salmonella was diminished in Gbp(chr3)-deficient macrophages. These data suggest a role for Gbp(chr3) proteins in the detection of cytoplasmic LPS and the activation of the noncanonical inflammasome.

  9. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells.

  10. Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Soluble Proteins Extraction from a Small Quantity of Drosophila's Whole Larvae and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lo Piccolo, Luca; Bonaccorso, Rosa; Onorati, Maria Cristina

    2015-06-01

    The identification and study of protein's function in several model organisms is carried out using both nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts. For a long time, Drosophila's embryos have represented the main source for protein extractions, although in the last year, the importance of collecting proteins extracts also from larval tissues has also been understood. Here we report a very simple protocol, improved by a previously developed method, to produce in a single extraction both highly stable nuclear and cytoplasmic protein extracts from a small quantity of whole Drosophila's larvae or tissues, suitable for biochemical analyses like co-immunoprecipitation.

  11. Protein misfolding specifies recruitment to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Bersuker, Kirill; Brandeis, Michael; Kopito, Ron R

    2016-04-25

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) containing aggregated disease-associated proteins and polyubiquitin (poly-Ub) conjugates are universal histopathological features of neurodegenerative diseases. Ub has been proposed to target proteins to IBs for degradation via autophagy, but the mechanisms that govern recruitment of ubiquitylated proteins to IBs are not well understood. In this paper, we use conditionally destabilized reporters that undergo misfolding and ubiquitylation upon removal of a stabilizing ligand to examine the role of Ub conjugation in targeting proteins to IBs that are composed of an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin, the causative protein of Huntington's disease. We show that reporters are excluded from IBs in the presence of the stabilizing ligand but are recruited to IBs after ligand washout. However, we find that Ub conjugation is not necessary to target reporters to IBs. We also report that forced Ub conjugation by the Ub fusion degradation pathway is not sufficient for recruitment to IBs. Finally, we find that reporters and Ub conjugates are stable at IBs. These data indicate that compromised folding states, rather than conjugation to Ub, can specify recruitment to IBs.

  12. Protein misfolding specifies recruitment to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Bersuker, Kirill; Brandeis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) containing aggregated disease-associated proteins and polyubiquitin (poly-Ub) conjugates are universal histopathological features of neurodegenerative diseases. Ub has been proposed to target proteins to IBs for degradation via autophagy, but the mechanisms that govern recruitment of ubiquitylated proteins to IBs are not well understood. In this paper, we use conditionally destabilized reporters that undergo misfolding and ubiquitylation upon removal of a stabilizing ligand to examine the role of Ub conjugation in targeting proteins to IBs that are composed of an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin, the causative protein of Huntington’s disease. We show that reporters are excluded from IBs in the presence of the stabilizing ligand but are recruited to IBs after ligand washout. However, we find that Ub conjugation is not necessary to target reporters to IBs. We also report that forced Ub conjugation by the Ub fusion degradation pathway is not sufficient for recruitment to IBs. Finally, we find that reporters and Ub conjugates are stable at IBs. These data indicate that compromised folding states, rather than conjugation to Ub, can specify recruitment to IBs. PMID:27114501

  13. Identification of Missing Proteins Defined by Chromosome-Centric Proteome Project in the Cytoplasmic Detergent-Insoluble Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Li, Yaxing; Zhong, Jiayong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhipeng; Yang, Lijuan; Cao, Xin; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Tong

    2015-09-04

    Finding protein evidence (PE) for protein coding genes is a primary task of the Phase I Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). Currently, there are 2948 PE level 2-4 coding genes per neXtProt, which are deemed missing proteins in the human proteome. As most samples prepared and analyzed in the C-HPP framework were focusing on detergent soluble proteins, we posit that as a natural composition the cytoplasmic detergent-insoluble proteins (DIPs) represent a source of finding missing proteins. We optimized a workflow and separated cytoplasmic DIPs from three human lung and three human hepatoma cell lines via differential speed centrifugation. We verified that the detergent-soluble proteins (DSPs) could be sufficiently depleted and the cytoplasmic DIP isolation was partially reproducible with Spearman r > 0.70 according to two independent SILAC MS experiments. Through label-free MS, we identified 4524 and 4156 DIPs from lung and liver cells, respectively. Among them, a total of 23 missing proteins (22 PE2 and 1 PE4) were identified by MS, and 18 of them had translation evidence; in addition, six PE5 proteins were identified by MS, three with translation evidence. We showed that cytoplasmic DIPs were not an enrichment of transmembrane proteins and were chromosome-, cell type-, and tissue-specific. Furthermore, we demonstrated that DIPs were distinct from DSPs in terms of structural and physical-chemical features. In conclusion, we have found 23 missing proteins and 6 PE5 proteins from the cytoplasmic insoluble proteome that is biologically and physical-chemically different from the soluble proteome, suggesting that cytoplasmic DIPs carry comprehensive and valuable information for finding PE of missing proteins. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001694.

  14. Recruitment into stress granules prevents irreversible aggregation of FUS protein mislocalized to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Shelkovnikova, Tatyana A; Robinson, Hannah K; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Buchman, Vladimir L

    2013-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) belongs to the group of RNA-binding proteins implicated as underlying factors in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and certain other neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple FUS gene mutations have been linked to hereditary forms, and aggregation of FUS protein is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis of these diseases. In cultured cells, FUS variants with disease-associated amino acid substitutions or short deletions affecting nuclear localization signal (NLS) and causing cytoplasmic mislocalization can be sequestered into stress granules (SGs). We demonstrated that disruption of motifs responsible for RNA recognition and binding not only prevents SG recruitment, but also dramatically increases the protein propensity to aggregate in the cell cytoplasm with formation of juxtanuclear structures displaying typical features of aggresomes. Functional RNA-binding domains from TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) fused to highly aggregation-prone C-terminally truncated FUS protein restored the ability to enter SGs and prevented aggregation of the chimeric protein. Truncated FUS was also able to trap endogenous FUS molecules in the cytoplasmic aggregates. Our data indicate that RNA binding and recruitment to SGs protect cytoplasmic FUS from aggregation, and loss of this protection may trigger its pathological aggregation in vivo. PMID:24013423

  15. Digestion and depletion of abundant proteins improves proteomic coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Stein, Benjamin D.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Xu, Tao; Choi, Jeong; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Two major challenges in proteomics are the large number of proteins and their broad dynamic range within the cell. We exploited the abundance-dependent Michaelis-Menten kinetics of trypsin digestion to selectively digest and deplete abundant proteins with a method we call DigDeAPr. We validated the depletion mechanism with known yeast protein abundances and observed greater than 3-fold improvement in low abundance human protein identification and quantitation metrics. This methodology should be broadly applicable to many organisms, proteases, and proteomic pipelines. PMID:23160281

  16. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  17. Cytoplasmic Domain of Zebrafish Myelin Protein Zero: Adhesive Role Depends on β-Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, XiaoYang; Inouye, Hideyo; Gross, Abby A. R.; Hidalgo, Marla M.; Sharma, Deepak; Lee, Daniel; Avila, Robin L.; Salmona, Mario; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Solution spectroscopy studies on the cytoplasmic domain of human myelin protein zero (P0) (hP0-cyt) suggest that H-bonding between β-strands from apposed molecules is likely responsible for the tight cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin. As a follow-up to these findings, in the current study we used circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction to analyze the same type of model membranes previously used for hP0-cyt to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the zebrafish cytoplasmic apposition. This space is significantly narrower in teleosts compared with that in higher vertebrates, and can be accounted for in part by the much shorter cytoplasmic domain in the zebrafish protein (zP0-cyt). Circular dichroism measurements on zP0-cyt showed similar structural characteristics to those of hP0-cyt, i.e., the protein underwent a β→α structural transition at lipid/protein (L/P) molar ratios >50, and adopted a β-conformation at lower L/P molar ratios. X-ray diffraction was carried out on lipid vesicle solutions with zP0-cyt before and after dehydration to study the effect of protein on membrane lipid packing. Solution diffraction revealed the electron-density profile of a single membrane bilayer. Diffraction patterns of dried samples suggested a multilamellar structure with the β-folded P0-cyt located at the intermembrane space. Our findings support the idea that the adhesive role of P0 at the cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin depends on the cytoplasmic domain of P0 being in the β-conformation. PMID:17693467

  18. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  19. Cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of a herpesvirus tegument protein during cell division.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Hare, P

    2000-03-01

    We have previously shown that the herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP22 localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm of expressing cells. We have also shown that VP22 has the unusual property of intercellular spread, which involves the movement of VP22 from the cytoplasm of these expressing cells into the nuclei of nonexpressing cells. Thus, VP22 can localize in two distinct subcellular patterns. By utilizing time-lapse confocal microscopy of live cells expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged protein, we now report in detail the intracellular trafficking properties of VP22 in expressing cells, as opposed to the intercellular trafficking of VP22 between expressing and nonexpressing cells. Our results show that during interphase VP22 appears to be targeted exclusively to the cytoplasm of the expressing cell. However, at the early stages of mitosis VP22 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it immediately binds to the condensing cellular chromatin and remains bound there through all stages of mitosis and chromatin decondensation into the G(1) stage of the next cycle. Hence, in VP22-expressing cells the subcellular localization of the protein is regulated by the cell cycle such that initially cytoplasmic protein becomes nuclear during cell division, resulting in a gradual increase over time in the number of nuclear VP22-expressing cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is a feature not only of VP22 expressed in isolation but also of VP22 expressed during virus infection. Thus, VP22 utilizes an unusual pathway for nuclear targeting in cells expressing the protein which differs from the nuclear targeting pathway used during intercellular trafficking.

  20. Detection of cytoplasmic proteins from Helicobacter pylori in Colony Lift Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rengifo, Diana F; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Haas, Rainer; Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F

    2015-12-01

    Use of the Colony Lift Immunoassay has been described for several Gram negative bacteria of medical interest. In all cases detection was limited to the use of antibodies against outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the adaptation of this method for detection of the cytoplasmic CagA toxin from Helicobacter pylori.

  1. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  2. ATM is a cytoplasmic protein in mouse brain required to prevent lysosomal accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Carrolee; Ribaut-Barassin, Catherine; Zwingman, Theresa A.; Pope, Amber J.; Brown, Kevin D.; Owens, Jennie W.; Larson, Denise; Harrington, Elizabeth A.; Haeberle, Anne-Marie; Mariani, Jean; Eckhaus, Michael; Herrup, Karl; Bailly, Yannick; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    We previously generated a mouse model with a mutation in the murine Atm gene that recapitulates many aspects of the childhood neurodegenerative disease ataxia-telangiectasia. Atm-deficient (Atm−/−) mice show neurological defects detected by motor function tests including the rota-rod, open-field tests and hind-paw footprint analysis. However, no gross histological abnormalities have been observed consistently in the cerebellum of any line of Atm−/− mice analyzed in most laboratories. Therefore, it may be that the neurologic dysfunction found in these animals is associated with predegenerative lesions. We performed a detailed analysis of the cerebellar morphology in two independently generated lines of Atm−/− mice to determine whether there was evidence of neuronal abnormality. We found a significant increase in the number of lysosomes in Atm−/− mice in the absence of any detectable signs of neuronal degeneration or other ultrastructural anomalies. In addition, we found that the ATM protein is predominantly cytoplasmic in Purkinje cells and other neurons, in contrast to the nuclear localization of ATM protein observed in cultured cells. The cytoplasmic localization of ATM in Purkinje cells is similar to that found in human cerebellum. These findings suggest that ATM may be important as a cytoplasmic protein in neurons and that its absence leads to abnormalities of cytoplasmic organelles reflected as an increase in lysosomal numbers. PMID:10639172

  3. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  4. Exosomal Secretion of Cytoplasmic Prostate Cancer Xenograft-derived Proteins *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Flip H.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; van Rijswijk, Angelique; van den Bemd, Gert-Jan; van den Berg, Mirella S.; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Willemsen, Rob; Dekker, Lennard J.; Luider, Theo M.; Jenster, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Novel markers for prostate cancer (PCa) are needed because current established markers such as prostate-specific antigen lack diagnostic specificity and prognostic value. Proteomics analysis of serum from mice grafted with human PCa xenografts resulted in the identification of 44 tumor-derived proteins. Besides secreted proteins we identified several cytoplasmic proteins, among which were most subunits of the proteasome. Native gel electrophoresis and sandwich ELISA showed that these subunits are present as proteasome complexes in the serum from xenograft-bearing mice. We hypothesized that the presence of proteasome subunits and other cytoplasmic proteins in serum of xenografted mice could be explained by the secretion of small vesicles by cancer cells, so-called exosomes. Therefore, mass spectrometry and Western blotting analyses of the protein content of exosomes isolated from PCa cell lines was performed. This resulted in the identification of mainly cytoplasmic proteins of which several had previously been identified in the serum of xenografted mice, including proteasome subunits. The isolated exosomes also contained RNA, including the gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG product. These observations suggest that although their function is not clearly defined cancer-derived exosomes offer possibilities for the identification of novel biomarkers for PCa. PMID:19204029

  5. SIP, a novel ankyrin repeat containing protein, sequesters steroid receptor coactivators in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Yu, Wenhua; Shang, Yongfeng

    2007-06-06

    Steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) exert profound effects on animal development and physiology. These coactivators are nuclear proteins and transcription co-regulators that function to facilitate the transcription initiation mediated by nuclear receptors, as well as by other well-known transcription factors. However, how these co-regulators are functionally regulated is poorly understood. During genome-wide screening for SRC-interacting proteins, we identified a novel ankyrin repeat containing protein, SIP (SRC-Interacting Protein), which interacts with SRC coactivators in the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that extracellular stimuli such as the addition of estrogen, induced phosphorylation of SIP in its PEST (Proline, Glutamate, Serine, and Threonine rich) domain by casein kinase II. The phosphorylation of SIP resulted in dissociation of SRC proteins from SIP in the cytoplasm and led to subsequent nuclear translocation of SRC proteins and gene coactivation. Both gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments indicate that SIP functions to sequester SRC coactivators in the cytoplasm and buffer the availability of these coactivators, thus providing a mechanism for the regulation of the transcription regulators.

  6. Phage shock proteins B and C prevent lethal cytoplasmic membrane permeability in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Horstman, N Kaye; Darwin, Andrew J

    2012-08-01

    The bacterial phage shock protein (Psp) stress response system is activated by events affecting the cytoplasmic membrane. In response, Psp protein levels increase, including PspA, which has been implicated as the master effector of stress tolerance. Yersinia enterocolitica and related bacteria with a defective Psp system are highly sensitive to the mislocalization of pore-forming secretin proteins. However, why secretins are toxic to psp null strains, whereas some other Psp inducers are not, has not been explained. Furthermore, previous work has led to the confounding and disputable suggestion that PspA is not involved in mitigating secretin toxicity. Here we have established a correlation between the amount of secretin toxicity in a psp null strain and the extent of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to large molecules. This leads to a morphological change resembling cells undergoing plasmolysis. Furthermore, using novel strains with dis-regulated Psp proteins has allowed us to obtain unequivocal evidence that PspA is not required for secretin-stress tolerance. Together, our data suggest that the mechanism by which secretin multimers kill psp null cells is by causing a profound defect in the cytoplasmic membrane permeability barrier. This allows lethal molecular exchange with the environment, which the PspB and PspC proteins can prevent.

  7. FIE, a nuclear PRC2 protein, forms cytoplasmic complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Moran; Butenko, Yana; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Hakim, Ofir; Katz, Aviva; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Michaeli, Daphna; Fischer, Robert L; Ohad, Nir

    2016-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers that regulate developmental pathways in plants. PcGs form nuclear multi-subunit Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs). The PRC2 complex mediates gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, which consequently leads to chromatin condensation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several PRC2 complexes with different compositions were identified, each controlling a particular developmental program.The core subunit FIE is crucial for PRC2 function throughout the plant life cycle, yet accurate information on its spatial and temporal localization was absent. This study focused on identifying FIE accumulation patterns, using microscopy and biochemical approaches. Analysing endogenous FIE and transgenic gFIE-green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gFIE-GFP) showed that FIE accumulates in the nuclei of every cell type examined. Interestingly, gFIE-GFP, as well as the endogenous FIE, also localized to the cytoplasm in all examined tissues. In both vegetative and reproductive organs, FIE formed cytoplasmic high-molecular-mass complexes, in parallel to the nuclear PRC2 complexes. Moreover, size-exclusion chromatography and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays indicated that in inflorescences FIE formed a cytoplasmic complex with MEA, a PRC2 histone methyltransferase subunit. In contrast, CLF and SWN histone methyltransferases were strictly nuclear. Presence of PRC2 subunits in cytoplasmic complexes has not been previously described in plants. Our findings are in agreement with accumulating evidence demonstrating cytoplasmic localization and function of PcGs in metazoa. The cytosolic accumulation of PRC2 components in plants supports the model that PcGs have alternative non-nuclear functions that go beyond chromatin methylation.

  8. FIE, a nuclear PRC2 protein, forms cytoplasmic complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Moran; Butenko, Yana; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Hakim, Ofir; Katz, Aviva; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Michaeli, Daphna; Fischer, Robert L.; Ohad, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers that regulate developmental pathways in plants. PcGs form nuclear multi-subunit Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs). The PRC2 complex mediates gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, which consequently leads to chromatin condensation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several PRC2 complexes with different compositions were identified, each controlling a particular developmental program. The core subunit FIE is crucial for PRC2 function throughout the plant life cycle, yet accurate information on its spatial and temporal localization was absent. This study focused on identifying FIE accumulation patterns, using microscopy and biochemical approaches. Analysing endogenous FIE and transgenic gFIE–green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gFIE-GFP) showed that FIE accumulates in the nuclei of every cell type examined. Interestingly, gFIE-GFP, as well as the endogenous FIE, also localized to the cytoplasm in all examined tissues. In both vegetative and reproductive organs, FIE formed cytoplasmic high-molecular-mass complexes, in parallel to the nuclear PRC2 complexes. Moreover, size-exclusion chromatography and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays indicated that in inflorescences FIE formed a cytoplasmic complex with MEA, a PRC2 histone methyltransferase subunit. In contrast, CLF and SWN histone methyltransferases were strictly nuclear. Presence of PRC2 subunits in cytoplasmic complexes has not been previously described in plants. Our findings are in agreement with accumulating evidence demonstrating cytoplasmic localization and function of PcGs in metazoa. The cytosolic accumulation of PRC2 components in plants supports the model that PcGs have alternative non-nuclear functions that go beyond chromatin methylation. PMID:27811080

  9. A cytoplasmically anchored nuclear protein interferes specifically with the import of nuclear proteins but not U1 snRNA

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A cytoplasmically anchored mutant SV40 T antigen, FS T antigen, was shown previously to interfere specifically with the nuclear import of a heterologous nuclear protein, adenovirus 5 fiber protein, in cultured monkey cells (Schneider, J., C. Schindewolf, K. van Zee, and E. Fanning. 1988. Cell. 54:117-125; van Zee, K., F. Appel, and E. Fanning. 1991. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5137-5146). In this report, we demonstrate that FS T antigen also interferes with the nuclear import of adenovirus E1A and a peptide-albumin conjugate bearing multiple copies of the T antigen nuclear localization signal, but not with the import of U1 snRNA. A kinetic analysis indicates that nuclear import of the albumin- peptide conjugate is inhibited only when high intracellular concentrations of FS T antigen are reached. After microinjection into the cytoplasm of cultured cells, purified FS T antigen protein does not accumulate at the nuclear periphery, but rather is distributed in a punctate pattern throughout the cytoplasm. These data support a model in which cytoplasmic anchoring of FS T antigen enables the mutant protein to sequester and titrate out a cellular factor which is required for nuclear protein but not U1 snRNA import. PMID:8468344

  10. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G.; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago – TNRC6 levels. PMID:26170235

  11. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-01-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes. Images PMID:8051004

  12. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    PubMed

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-08-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes.

  13. Nucleo-cytoplasmic functions of the PDZ-LIM protein family: new insights in organ development

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Camarata, Troy; Kulisz, Andre; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent work on the PDZ-LIM protein family has revealed important activities at the cellular level, mediating signals between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, with significant impact on organ development. We review and integrate current knowledge about the PDZ-LIM protein family and propose a new functional role, sequestering nuclear factors in the cytoplasm. Characterized by their PDZ and LIM domains, the PDZ-LIM family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved proteins found throughout the animal kingdom, from worms to humans. Combining two functional domains in one protein, PDZ-LIM proteins have wide-ranging and multi-compartmental cell functions during development and homeostasis while, in contrast, misregulation can lead to cancer formation and progression. New emerging roles include interactions with integrins, T-box transcription factors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. Facilitating the assembly of protein complexes, PDZ-LIM proteins can act as signal modulators, influence actin dynamics, regulate cell architecture and control gene transcription. PMID:20091751

  14. The SARS Coronavirus 3a protein binds calcium in its cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Minakshi, Rinki; Padhan, Kartika; Rehman, Safikur; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-10-13

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a positive stranded RNA virus with ∼30kb genome. Among all open reading frames (orfs) of this virus, the orf3a is the largest, and encodes a protein of 274 amino acids, named as 3a protein. Sequence analysis suggests that the orf3a aligned to one calcium pump present in Plasmodium falciparum and the enzyme glutamine synthetase found in Leptospira interrogans. This sequence similarity was found to be limited only to amino acid residues 209-264 which form the cytoplasmic domain of the orf3a. Furthermore, this region was predicted to be involved in the calcium binding. Owing to this hypothesis, we were driven to establish its calcium binding property in vitro. Here, we expressed and purified the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein, called Cyto3a, as a recombinant His-tagged protein in the E. coli. The calcium binding nature was established by performing various staining methods such as ruthenium red and stains-all. (45)Ca overlay method was also done to further support the data. Since the 3a protein forms ion channels, we were interested to see any conformational changes occurring in the Cyot3a upon calcium binding, using fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. These studies clearly indicate a significant change in the conformation of the Cyto3a protein after binding with calcium. Our results strongly suggest that the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein of SARS-CoV binds calcium in vitro, causing a change in protein conformation.

  15. Cytoplasmic Metadherin (MTDH) provides survival advantage under conditions of stress by acting as RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangbing; Zhu, Danlin; Yang, Shujie; Wang, Xinjun; Xiong, Zhi; Zhang, Yuping; Brachova, Pavla; Leslie, Kimberly K

    2012-02-10

    Overexpression of metadherin (MTDH) has been documented in many solid tumors and is implicated in metastasis and chemoresistance. MTDH has been detected at the plasma membrane as well as in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and the function of MTDH in these locales remains under investigation. In the nucleus, MTDH acts as a transcription co-factor to induce expression of chemoresistance-associated genes. However, MTDH is predominantly cytoplasmic in prostate tumors, and this localization correlates with poor prognosis. Herein, we used endometrial cancer cells as a model system to define a new role for MTDH in the cytoplasm. First, MTDH was primarily localized to the cytoplasm in endometrial cancer cells, and the N-terminal region of MTDH was required to maintain cytoplasmic localization. Next, we identified novel binding partners for cytoplasmic MTDH, including RNA-binding proteins and components of the RNA-induced silencing complex. Nucleic acids were required for the association of MTDH with these cytoplasmic proteins. Furthermore, MTDH interacted with and regulated protein expression of multiple mRNAs, such as PDCD10 and KDM6A. Depletion of cytoplasmic MTDH was associated with increased stress granule formation, reduced survival in response to chemotherapy and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF1120, Rad51 nuclear accumulation, and cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M. Finally, in vivo tumor formation was abrogated with knockdown of cytoplasmic MTDH. Taken together, our data identify a novel function for cytoplasmic MTDH as an RNA-binding protein. Our findings implicate cytoplasmic MTDH in cell survival and broad drug resistance via association with RNA and RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in Staphylococcus is most likely not due to cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-02-01

    The excretion of cytoplasmic proteins (ECP) is a long-known phenomenon in bacteria and eukaryotes. So far, it was not possible to associate either a signal peptide-dependent or a signal peptide-independent pathway to ECP. Nevertheless 25% of the proteins found in Staphylococcus aureus supernatants were cytoplasmic proteins. Because the excreted proteins do not possess a common motive, the most widespread opinion is that ECP is due to cell lysis. This explanation seems to be too easy since several indications imply that there exists a yet unknown mechanism for ECP. Certainly, the up-regulation of autolysins as well as decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking increased ECP. However, in recent years, several evidences arose that cell lysis is not the only reason for ECP. It seems that ECP is a part of the normal cell cycle of S. aureus as it turned out that ECP with several model proteins occurs mainly during cell growth. It has common features as proteins secreted via the Sec translocon and finally the excretion site is the cross wall of dividing cells.

  17. Subcellular localization of cytoplasmic lattice-associated proteins is dependent upon fixation and processing procedures.

    PubMed

    Morency, Eric; Anguish, Lynne; Coonrod, Scott

    2011-02-16

    We and others have recently demonstrated by immuno-EM and mutation analysis that two oocyte-restricted maternal effect genes, PADI6 and MATER, localize, in part, to the oocyte cytoplasmic lattices (CPLs). During these ongoing studies, however, we found that the localization of these factors by confocal immunofluorescence (IF) analysis can vary dramatically depending upon how the oocytes and embryos are processed, with the localization pattern sometimes appearing more uniformly cytoplasmic while at other times appearing to be primarily cortical. We set out to better understand this differential staining pattern by testing a range of IF protocol parameters, changing mainly time and temperature conditions of the primary antibody solution incubation, as well as fixation methods. We found by confocal IF whole mount analysis that PADI6 and MATER localization in germinal vesicle stage oocytes is mainly cytoplasmic when the oocytes are fixed and then incubated with primary antibodies at room temperature for 1 hour, while the localization of these factors is largely limited to the cortex when the oocytes are fixed and incubated in primary antibody at 4 °C overnight. We then probed sections of fixed/embedded ovaries and isolated two-cell embryos with specific antibodies and found that, under these conditions, PADI6 and MATER were again primarily cytoplasmically localized, although the staining for these factors is slightly more cortical at the two-cell stage. Taken together, our results suggest that the localization of CPL-associated proteins by confocal IF is particularly affected by processing conditions. Further, based on our current observations, it appears that PADI6 and MATER are primarily distributed throughout the cytoplasm as opposed to the oocyte subcortex.

  18. The influenza A virus matrix protein 2 undergoes retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm and bypasses cytoplasmic proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Sanchari; Chakravarty, Chandrani; Sellathamby, Shanmugaapriya; Lal, Sunil K

    2017-04-01

    The matrix protein 2 (M2) is a spliced product of segment 7 genome of influenza A virus. Previous studies indicate its role in uncoating of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex during viral entry and in membrane scission while budding. Despite its crucial role in the viral life cycle, little is known about its subcellular distribution and dynamics. In this study, we have shown that the M2 protein is translocated from the membrane to the cytoplasm by a retrograde route via endosomes and the Golgi network. It utilizes retromer cargo while moving from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network and prevents endosome fusion with the lysosome. Further, M2 interacts with the endoplasmic-reticulum-resident AAA-ATPase p97 for its release into the cytoplasm. Our study also revealed that the M2 protein in the cellular milieu does not undergo ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. The migration of M2 through this pathway inside the infected cell suggests possible new roles that the M2 protein may have in the host cytoplasm, apart from its previously described functions.

  19. The Cytoplasmic Zinc Finger Protein ZPR1 Accumulates in the Nucleolus of Proliferating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galcheva-Gargova, Zoya; Gangwani, Laxman; Konstantinov, Konstantin N.; Mikrut, Monique; Theroux, Steven J.; Enoch, Tamar; Davis, Roger J.

    1998-01-01

    The zinc finger protein ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus after treatment of cells with mitogens. The function of nuclear ZPR1 has not been defined. Here we demonstrate that ZPR1 accumulates in the nucleolus of proliferating cells. The role of ZPR1 was examined using a gene disruption strategy. Cells lacking ZPR1 are not viable. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the loss of ZPR1 caused disruption of nucleolar function, including preribosomal RNA expression. These data establish ZPR1 as an essential protein that is required for normal nucleolar function in proliferating cells. PMID:9763455

  20. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  1. Fundamental Constraints on the Abundances of Chemotaxis Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media with lower nutrient content. We also demonstrate that the E. coli chemotaxis pathway is particularly robust to abundance variations of the motor protein FliM.

  2. Cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of the urokinase mRNA binding protein regulates message stability.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama

    2002-08-01

    Treatment of small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells or lung epithelial (Beas2B) cells with TNF-alpha or PMA induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression. Treatment of these cells with TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide but not TGF-beta increased steady-state expression of uPAmRNA. TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide caused 8-10 fold extensions of the uPAmRNA half-life in SAEC or Beas2B cells treated with DRB, a transcriptional inhibitor. These findings suggest that uPA gene expression involves a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 30 kDa uPA mRNA binding protein (uPA mRNABp) that selectively binds to a 66 nt protein binding fragment of uPA mRNA containing regulatory information for message stabilization. Binding of cytoplasmic uPA mRNABp to uPA mRNA was abolished after treatment with TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta. In addition, we found the accumulation of 30 kDa uPAmRNABp in the nuclear extracts of TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta treated cells. The uPA mRNABp starts moving to the nucleus from the cytoplasmic compartment as early as three hours after TNF-alpha treatment. Complete translocation is achieved between 12-24 h, which coincides with the maximal expression of uPA protein effected by cytokine stimulation. Treatment of Beas2B cells with NaF inhibited TNF-alpha-mediated translocation of uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and concomitant inhibition of uPA expression. TNF-alpha stabilizes uPA mRNA by translocating the uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism governing uPA mRNA stability through shuttling of uPA mRNABp between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This newly identified pathway may have evolved to regulate uPA-mediated functions of the lung epithelium in inflamation or neoplasia.

  3. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  4. Identification of Proteins Interacting with Cytoplasmic High-Mobility Group Box 1 during the Hepatocellular Response to Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianjiao; Wei, Weiwei; Dirsch, Olaf; Krüger, Thomas; Kan, Chunyi; Xie, Chichi; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Fang, Haoshu; Settmacher, Utz; Dahmen, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) occurs inevitably in liver transplantations and frequently during major resections, and can lead to liver dysfunction as well as systemic disorders. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays a pathogenic role in hepatic IRI. In the normal liver, HMGB1 is located in the nucleus of hepatocytes; after ischemia reperfusion, it translocates to the cytoplasm and it is further released to the extracellular space. Unlike the well-explored functions of nuclear and extracellular HMGB1, the role of cytoplasmic HMGB1 in hepatic IRI remains elusive. We hypothesized that cytoplasmic HMGB1 interacts with binding proteins involved in the hepatocellular response to IRI. In this study, binding proteins of cytoplasmic HMGB1 during hepatic IRI were identified. Liver tissues from rats with warm ischemia reperfusion (WI/R) injury and from normal rats were subjected to cytoplasmic protein extraction. Co-immunoprecipitation using these protein extracts was performed to enrich HMGB1-protein complexes. To separate and identify the immunoprecipitated proteins in eluates, 2-dimensional electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry detection were performed. Two of the identified proteins were verified using Western blotting: betaine–homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1 (BHMT) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH). Therefore, our results revealed the binding of HMGB1 to BHMT and CTH in cytoplasm during hepatic WI/R. This finding may help to better understand the cellular response to IRI in the liver and to identify novel molecular targets for reducing ischemic injury. PMID:28275217

  5. High content of a nuclear pore complex protein in cytoplasmic annulate lamellae of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Cordes, V C; Reidenbach, S; Franke, W W

    1995-11-01

    The Xenopus laevis oocyte and egg represent an established model system to study nucleocytoplasmic transport and the assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) and its pore complexes (PC). PCs, however, are not restricted to the NE but are also known to occur in cytoplasmic annulate lamellae (AL) in a variety of cells, including the Xenopus oocyte. However, the proportion of PCs found in such AL relative to those located in the NE, is unknown. In this study we have analyzed and quantified cytoplasmic AL in the full-grown (stage VI) Xenopus oocyte by immunolocalization at the light and electron microscopic level. Moreover, we have developed a method to enrich AL from enucleated oocytes, and have quantified a PC marker protein, nucleoporin p62, in both cytoplasmic AL and the NE. For this purpose we have used a specific monoclonal antibody (A225) which recognizes an epitope localized between amino acids 251 and 268 of Xenopus p62. We show that the number of PCs and p62 molecules present in AL far exceeds that of the NE. The possible implications of these findings to nucleocytoplasmic transport and nuclear PC (NPC) assembly are discussed.

  6. Two chitinase-like proteins abundantly accumulated in latex of mulberry show insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant latex is the cytoplasm of highly specialized cells known as laticifers, and is thought to have a critical role in defense against herbivorous insects. Proteins abundantly accumulated in latex might therefore be involved in the defense system. Results We purified latex abundant protein a and b (LA-a and LA-b) from mulberry (Morus sp.) and analyzed their properties. LA-a and LA-b have molecular masses of approximately 50 and 46 kDa, respectively, and are abundant in the soluble fraction of latex. Western blotting analysis suggested that they share sequence similarity with each other. The sequences of LA-a and LA-b, as determined by Edman degradation, showed chitin-binding domains of plant chitinases at the N termini. These proteins showed small but significant chitinase and chitosanase activities. Lectin RCA120 indicated that, unlike common plant chitinases, LA-a and LA-b are glycosylated. LA-a and LA-b showed insecticidal activities when fed to larvae of the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Conclusions Our results suggest that the two LA proteins have a crucial role in defense against herbivorous insects, possibly by hydrolyzing their chitin. PMID:20109180

  7. Holophytochrome-Interacting Proteins in Physcomitrella: Putative Actors in Phytochrome Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Anna Lena; Mailliet, Katharina; Hughes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also used database information to study their expression patterns relative to those of phy4. We discuss the likely functional characteristics of these holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP’s) and their possible roles in signaling. PMID:27242820

  8. Regulated membrane protein entry into flagella is facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules and does not require IFT.

    PubMed

    Belzile, Olivier; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J

    2013-08-05

    The membrane protein composition of the primary cilium, a key sensory organelle, is dynamically regulated during cilium-generated signaling [1, 2]. During ciliogenesis, ciliary membrane proteins, along with structural and signaling proteins, are carried through the multicomponent, intensely studied ciliary diffusion barrier at the base of the organelle [3-8] by intraflagellar transport (IFT) [9-18]. A favored model is that signaling-triggered accumulation of previously excluded membrane proteins in fully formed cilia [19-21] also requires IFT, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, in studies of regulated entry of a membrane protein into the flagellum of Chlamydomonas, we show that cells use an IFT-independent mechanism to breach the diffusion barrier at the flagellar base. In resting cells, a flagellar signaling component [22], the integral membrane polypeptide SAG1-C65, is uniformly distributed over the plasma membrane and excluded from the flagellar membrane. Flagellar adhesion-induced signaling triggers rapid, striking redistribution of the protein to the apical ends of the cells concomitantly with entry into the flagella. Protein polarization and flagellar enrichment are facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules. Using a conditional anterograde IFT mutant, we demonstrate that the IFT machinery is not required for regulated SAG1-C65 entry into flagella. Thus, integral membrane proteins can negotiate passage through the ciliary diffusion barrier without the need for a motor.

  9. Tumour suppressor death-associated protein kinase targets cytoplasmic HIF-1α for Th17 suppression

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ting-Fang; Chuang, Ya-Ting; Hsieh, Wan-Chen; Chang, Pei-Yun; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Mo, Shu-Ting; Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Chen, Ruey-Hwa; Kimchi, Adi; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2016-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a tumour suppressor. Here we show that DAPK also inhibits T helper 17 (Th17) and prevents Th17-mediated pathology in a mouse model of autoimmunity. We demonstrate that DAPK specifically downregulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). In contrast to the predominant nuclear localization of HIF-1α in many cell types, HIF-1α is located in both the cytoplasm and nucleus in T cells, allowing for a cytosolic DAPK–HIF-1α interaction. DAPK also binds prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) and increases HIF-1α-PHD2 association. DAPK thereby promotes the proline hydroxylation and proteasome degradation of HIF-1α. Consequently, DAPK deficiency leads to excess HIF-1α accumulation, enhanced IL-17 expression and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional knockout of HIF-1α restores the normal differentiation of Dapk−/− Th17 cells and prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development. Our results reveal a mechanism involving DAPK-mediated degradation of cytoplasmic HIF-1α, and suggest that raising DAPK levels could be used for treatment of Th17-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:27312851

  10. Enrichment of low-abundance brain proteins by preparative electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Juranville, Jean François

    2003-02-15

    Detection of low-copy-number gene products is essential for the development of novel drugs, however, it represents a major drawback of proteomics and simultaneously a scientific challenge. We studied the enrichment of rat brain cytosolic proteins by preparative electrophoresis using the PrepCell apparatus. The electrophoresis was performed in the presence of 0.1% lithium dodecyl sulfate. The proteins eluted from the gel were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass specrometry. Lithium dodecyl sulfate was easily exchanged against agents compatible with isoelectric focusing. Low-abundance proteins, which had not been found before, including neuronal-specific and calcium-binding proteins, were detected. In particular, low-molecular-mass proteins, such as hippocalcin, visinin-like proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins were strongly enriched by preparative electrophoresis.

  11. Two distinct SSB protein families in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Venclovas, Česlovas

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Eukaryote-infecting nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) feature some of the largest genomes in the viral world. These viruses typically do not strongly depend on the host DNA replication systems. In line with this observation, a number of essential DNA replication proteins, such as DNA polymerases, primases, helicases and ligases, have been identified in the NCLDVs. One other ubiquitous component of DNA replisomes is the single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein. Intriguingly, no NCLDV homologs of canonical OB-fold-containing SSB proteins had previously been detected. Only in poxviruses, one of seven NCLDV families, I3 was identified as the SSB protein. However, whether I3 is related to any known protein structure has not yet been established. Results: Here, we addressed the case of ‘missing’ canonical SSB proteins in the NCLDVs and also probed evolutionary origins of the I3 family. Using advanced computational methods, in four NCLDV families, we detected homologs of the bacteriophage T7 SSB protein (gp2.5). We found the properties of these homologs to be consistent with the SSB function. Moreover, we implicated specific residues in single-stranded DNA binding. At the same time, we found no evolutionary link between the T7 gp2.5-like NCLDV SSB homologs and the poxviral SSB protein (I3). Instead, we identified a distant relationship between I3 and small protein B (SmpB), a bacterial RNA-binding protein. Thus, apparently, the NCLDVs have the two major distinct sets of SSB proteins having bacteriophage and bacterial origins, respectively. Contact: venclovas@ibt.lt Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23097418

  12. Novel hexamerization motif is discovered in a conserved cytoplasmic protein from Salmonella typhimurium.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, T.; Cuff, M.; Wu, R.; Kim, Y.; Holzle, D.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Inst. of Mathematical Problems of Biology

    2007-01-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Stm3548 of unknown function obtained from a strain of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 2.25 A. The asymmetric unit contains a hexamer of structurally identical monomers. The monomer is a globular domain with a long beta-hairpin protrusion that distinguishes this structure. This beta-hairpin occupies a central position in the hexamer, and its residues participate in the majority of interactions between subunits of the hexamer. We suggest that the structure of Stm3548 presents a new hexamerization motif. Because the residues participating in interdomain interactions are highly conserved among close members of protein family DUF1355 and buried solvent accessible area for the hexamer is significant, the hexamer is most likely conserved as well. A light scattering experiment confirmed the presence of hexamer in solution.

  13. Cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins and the control of complex brain function.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Jennifer C; Richter, Joel D

    2012-08-01

    The formation and maintenance of neural circuits in the mammal central nervous system (CNS) require the coordinated expression of genes not just at the transcriptional level, but at the translational level as well. Recent evidence shows that regulated messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is necessary for certain forms of synaptic plasticity, the cellular basis of learning and memory. In addition, regulated translation helps guide axonal growth cones to their targets on other neurons or at the neuromuscular junction. Several neurologic syndromes have been correlated with and indeed may be caused by aberrant translation; one important example is the fragile X mental retardation syndrome. Although translation in the CNS is regulated by multiple mechanisms and factors, we focus this review on regulatory mRNA-binding proteins with particular emphasis on fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding (CPEB) because they have been shown to be at the nexus of translational control and brain function in health and disease.

  14. In Vitro Assay for the Rap GTPase-Activating Protein Activity of the Purified Cytoplasmic Domain of Plexin.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Heath G; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors that bind semaphorins and regulate essential processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. The cytoplasmic regions of plexins contain a functionally essential GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain, which initiates downstream signaling by specifically inactivating the Rap GTPase. Here we describe the methods for expression and purification of the plexin cytoplasmic region in E. coli, and characterization of its GAP activity using a photometric assay. We also provide a protocol for measuring GAP activity of single-chain constructs with Rap covalently linked to the plexin cytoplasmic region.

  15. G2E3 IS A NUCLEO-CYTOPLASMIC SHUTTLING PROTEIN WITH DNA DAMAGE RESPONSIVE LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F.

    2007-01-01

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as an ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:17239372

  16. G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with DNA damage responsive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F. . E-mail: dfc@uab.edu

    2007-02-15

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as a ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage.

  17. Intercourse between cell wall and cytoplasm exemplified by arabinogalactan proteins and cortical microtubules.

    PubMed

    Driouich, Azeddine; Baskin, Tobias I

    2008-12-01

    How does a plant cell sense and respond to the status of its cell wall? Intercourse between cell wall and cytoplasm has long been supposed to involve arabinogalactan proteins, in part because many of them are anchored to the plasma membrane. Disrupting arabinogalactan proteins has recently been shown to disrupt the array of cortical microtubules present just inside the plasma membrane, implying that microtubules and arabinogalactan proteins interact. In this article, we assess possibilities for how this interaction might be mediated. First, we consider microdomains in the plasma membrane (lipid rafts), which have been alleged to link internal and external regions of the plasma membrane; however, the characteristics and even the existence of these domains remains controversial. Next, we point out that disrupting the synthesis of cellulose also can disrupt microtubules and consider whether arabinogalactan proteins are part of a network linking microtubules and nascent microfibrils. Finally, we outline several signaling cascades that could transmit information from arabinogalactan proteins to microtubules through channels of cellular communication. These diverse possibilities highlight the work that remains to be done before we can understand how plant cells communicate across their membranes.

  18. Periodic expression of Sm proteins parallels formation of nuclear Cajal bodies and cytoplasmic snRNP-rich bodies.

    PubMed

    Smoliński, Dariusz J; Wróbel, Bogdan; Noble, Anna; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Górska-Brylass, Alicja

    2011-11-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a fundamental role in pre-mRNA processing in the nucleus. The biogenesis of snRNPs involves a sequence of events that occurs in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Despite the wealth of biochemical information about the cytoplasmic assembly of snRNPs, little is known about the spatial organization of snRNPs in the cytoplasm. In the cytoplasm of larch microsporocytes, a cyclic appearance of bodies containing small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and Sm proteins was observed during anther meiosis. We observed a correlation between the occurrence of cytoplasmic snRNP bodies, the levels of Sm proteins, and the dynamic formation of Cajal bodies. Larch microsporocytes were used for these studies. This model is characterized by natural fluctuations in the level of RNA metabolism, in which periods of high transcriptional activity are separated from periods of low transcriptional activity. In designing experiments, the authors considered the differences between the nuclear and cytoplasmic phases of snRNP maturation and generated a hypothesis about the direct participation of Sm proteins in a molecular switch triggering the formation of Cajal bodies.

  19. Dominant-negative effect on adhesion by myelin Po protein truncated in its cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The myelin Po protein is believed to hold myelin together via interactions of both its extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. We have already shown that the extracellular domains of Po can interact in a homophilic manner (Filbin, M.T., F.S. Walsh, B.D. Trapp, J.A. Pizzey, and G.I. Tennekoon. 1990. Nature (Lond.). 344:871-872). In addition, we have shown that for this homophilic adhesion to take place, the cytoplasmic domain of Po must be intact and most likely interacting with the cytoskeleton; Po proteins truncated in their cytoplasmic domains are not adhesive (Wong, M.H., and M.T. Filbin, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:1089-1097). To determine if the presence of these truncated forms of Po could have an effect on the functioning of the full-length Po, we coexpressed both molecules in CHO cells. The adhesiveness of CHO cells expressing both full-length Po and truncated Po was then compared to cells expressing only full-length Po. In these coexpressors, both the full-length and the truncated Po proteins were glycosylated. They reached the surface of the cell in approximately equal amounts as shown by an ELISA and surface labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, the amount of full-length Po at the cell surface was equivalent to other cell lines expressing only full-length Po that we had already shown to be adhesive. Therefore, there should be sufficient levels of full-length Po at the surface of these coexpressors to measure adhesion of Po. However, as assessed by an aggregation assay, the coexpressors were not adhesive. By 60 min they had not formed large aggregates and were indistinguishable from the control transfected cells not expressing Po. In contrast, in the same time, the cells expressing only the full-length Po had formed large aggregates. This indicates that the truncated forms of Po have a dominant-negative effect on the adhesiveness of the full-length Po. Furthermore, from cross-linking studies, full-length Po, when expressed alone but not when

  20. Soluble expression of disulfide bond containing proteins FGF15 and FGF19 in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is the human ortholog of mouse FGF15, and both proteins function as an endocrine signal to regulate various liver functions. FGF15/FGF19 protein contains two disulfide bonds. It is unfavorable to form disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cytoplasm because of the bacterial cytoplasmic reducing environment. Modification of the cytoplasmic reducing environment and/or co-expression of protein chaperones are common strategies to express disulfide bond containing proteins in E. coli. In the current study, we report a method to produce soluble FGF15/FGF19 protein in cytoplasm of E. coli. Several commercial available strains with the disruption of thiol-redox pathways, and/or co-expression of redoxase or refolding chaperones were used to develop this novel method for expression of FGF15/FGF19 in E. coli. Mutation of the thiol-disulfide bond reducing pathway in E. coli or N-terminal fusion of thioredox (TRX) alone is not enough to support disulfide bond formation in FGF15/19 proteins. However, TRX fusion protein improved FGF19 solubility in strains of thiol-redox system mutants. In addition, DsbC co-expressed in thiol-redox system mutants alone improved and further enhanced FGF19 solubility with combination of TRX fusion tag. The soluble FGF19 proteins were easily purified through Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, and the purified protein maintained its biological activities, confirmed by suppressing hepatic Cyp7a1 gene transcription in mice and by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway in HepG2 cells. In contrast, soluble FGF15 protein in cytoplasm remained very low using these strategies. In summary, we have successfully developed a method to express functional FGF19 protein in prokaryotic cells, and this strategy may be adapted for the expression of other disulfide-containing proteins.

  1. Relocalization of nuclear ALY proteins to the cytoplasm by the tomato bushy stunt virus P19 pathogenicity protein.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, Joachim F; Canto, Tomas; Marshall, David; MacFarlane, Stuart A

    2004-08-01

    The P19 protein of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) is a multifunctional pathogenicity determinant involved in suppression of posttranscriptional gene silencing, virus movement, and symptom induction. Here, we report that P19 interacts with the conserved RNA-binding domain of an as yet uncharacterized family of plant ALY proteins that, in animals, are involved in export of RNAs from the nucleus and transcriptional coactivation. We show that the four ALY proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome and two ALY proteins from Nicotiana benthamiana are localized to the nucleus. Moreover, and in contrast to animal ALY, all but one of the proteins are also in the nucleolus, with distinct subnuclear localizations. Infection of plants by TBSV or expression of P19 from Agrobacterium results in relocation of three of the six ALY proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm demonstrating specific targeting of the ALY proteins by P19. The differential effects on subcellular localization indicate that, in plants, the various ALY proteins may have different functions. Interaction with and relocalization of ALY is prevented by mutation of P19 at residues previously shown to be important for P19 function in plants. Down-regulation of expression of two N. benthamiana ALY genes by virus-induced gene silencing did not interfere with posttranscriptional gene silencing. Targeting of ALY proteins during TBSV infection may therefore be related to functions of P19 in addition to its silencing suppression activity.

  2. Regulation of fusion activity by the cytoplasmic domain of a paramyxovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tong, S; Li, M; Vincent, A; Compans, R W; Fritsch, E; Beier, R; Klenk, C; Ohuchi, M; Klenk, H-D

    2002-09-30

    SER virus is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Rubulavirus, which has been isolated from pigs. It is very closely related to SV5 virus serologically, in protein profile, and in nucleotide sequence. However, unlike SV5, SER induces minimal syncytium formation in infected CV-1 or BHK cells. Fluorescence transfer experiments between labeled erythrocytes and infected MDBK cells revealed that SER also induces hemifusion and pore formation with reduced efficiency. The virion polypeptide profiles of SER and SV5 are very similar, except that the SER F1 subunit shows an apparent molecular weight that is about 2 kDa higher than that of SV5. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed the SER F (551 aa) to be longer than SV5 F (529 aa) by 22 residues in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) domain. The HN and M gene sequences of the viruses were found to be very similar. The SER F showed minimal fusion activity when coexpressed with either SV5 or SER HN. In contrast, SV5 F was highly fusogenic when coexpressed with either HN protein, indicating that the restricted fusion capacity of SER virus is a property of its F protein. Truncation in the CT of SER F by 22 residues completely rescued its ability to cause syncytium formation, whereas other truncations rescued syncytium formation partially. These results demonstrate that an elongated CT of a paramyxovirus F protein suppresses its membrane fusion activity.

  3. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, R.G.; Gennis, R.B.

    1982-04-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a/sub 1/, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain.

  4. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gennis, R B

    1982-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a1, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. Images PMID:6277868

  5. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  6. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  7. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  8. Nonsense codons can reduce the abundance of nuclear mRNA without affecting the abundance of pre-mRNA or the half-life of cytoplasmic mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J; Maquat, L E

    1993-01-01

    The abundance of the mRNA for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is decreased to approximately 20% of normal by frameshift and nonsense mutations that cause translation to terminate at a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the reading frame. Results of previous studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D suggested that the decrease is not attributable to an increased rate of cytoplasmic mRNA decay. However, the step in TPI RNA metabolism that is altered was not defined, and the use of actinomycin D, in affecting all polymerase II-transcribed genes, could result in artifactual conclusions. In data presented here, the nonsense codon-mediated reduction in the level of TPI mRNA is shown to be characteristic of both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of the cell, indicating that the altered metabolic step is nucleus associated. Neither aberrancies in gene transcription nor aberrancies in RNA splicing appear to contribute to the reduction since there were no accompanying changes in the amount of nuclear run-on transcription, the level of any of the six introns in TPI pre-mRNA, or the size of processed mRNA in the nucleus. Deletion of all splice sites that reside downstream of a nonsense codon does not abrogate the reduction, indicating that the reduction takes place independently of the splicing of a downstream intron. Experiments that placed TPI gene expression under the control of the human c-fos promoter, which can be transiently activated by the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells, verified that there is no detectable effect of a nonsense codon on the turnover of cytoplasmic mRNA. Images PMID:8441420

  9. Detection of the Wolbachia Protein WPIP0282 in Mosquito Spermathecae: Implications for Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, John F.; Fallon, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is a conditional sterility induced by the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis that infects reproductive tissues in many arthropods. Although CI provides a potential tool to control insect vectors of arthropod-borne diseases, the molecular basis for CI induction is unknown. We hypothesized that a Wolbachia-encoded, CI-inducing factor would be enriched in sperm recovered from spermathecae of female mosquitoes. Using SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, we detected peptides from the 56 kDa hypothetical protein, encoded by wPip_0282, associated with sperm transferred to females by Wolbachia infected males. We also detected peptides from the same protein in Wolbachia infected ovaries. Homologs of wPip_0282 and the co-transcribed downstream gene, wPip_0283, occur as multiple divergent copies in genomes of CI-inducing strains of Wolbachia. The operon is located in a genomic context that includes mobile genetic elements. The absence of wPip_0282 and wPip_0283 homologs from genomes of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes, as well as other members of the Rickettsiales, suggests a role as a candidate CI effector. PMID:23856508

  10. The cytoplasmic domain of influenza M2 protein interacts with caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Wu, Fan; Lu, Lu; Huang, Jing-He; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2009-06-15

    The cytoplasmic domain of influenza M2 protein (M2c) consists of 54 amino acid (aa) residues from aa44 to aa97. In this paper, M2c and its deletion mutant M2c(delta47-55) were expressed using prokaryotic expression system. First, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assay showed that M2c had multimerization potential mediated by aa47-55. Then, M2c, instead of M2c(delta47-55), directed eGFP from the whole cell localization to a predominately perinuclear region in CHO cells, which indicated that aa47-55 of M2c mediated the localization. Moreover, M2c colocalized with caveolin-1 (Cav) when CHO cells were cotransfected with Cav. A caveolin-1 binding motif phixxxxphixxphi (phi represents aromatic amino acid residues) in aa47-55 of M2c was found by sequence alignment and analysis. Further overlay ELISA result showed that M2c, but not M2c(delta47-55), bound to prokaryotically expressed cholesterol-free Cav(2-101), which illustrated the interaction could be cholesterol-independent. That was the first report of cellular protein bound to M2c.

  11. Characterization, occurrence, and molecular cloning of a 39-kilodalton Brucella abortus cytoplasmic protein immunodominant in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Denoel, P A; Vo, T K; Tibor, A; Weynants, V E; Trunde, J M; Dubray, G; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antisera recognizing a 39-kDa protein (P39) of brucellin, a cytoplasmic extract from Brucella melitensis rough strain B115, were produced. The P39 was purified by anion-exchange chromatography. Eleven of fourteen Brucella-infected cows whose infections had been detected by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) test with brucellergen also developed a DTH reaction when purified P39 was used as the trigger. The T-cell proliferative responses to P39 of peripheral blood lymphocytes from Brucella-infected cows were also positive. None of the animals infected with other bacterial species that are presumed to induce immunological cross-reactions with Brucella spp. reacted to P39, either in DTH tests or in lymphocyte proliferation assays. A lambda gt11 genomic library of Brucella abortus was screened with a monoclonal antibody specific for P39, and the gene coding for this protein was subsequently isolated. The nucleotide sequence of the P39 gene was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence is in accordance with the sequence of an internal peptide isolated from P39. PMID:9009303

  12. Membrane protein assembly: two cytoplasmic phosphorylated serine sites of Vpu from HIV-1 affect oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Pei; Lin, Meng-Han; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ma, Che; Fischer, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral protein U (Vpu) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a short integral membrane protein which is known to self-assemble within the lipid membrane and associate with host factors during the HIV-1 infectivity cycle. In this study, full-length Vpu (M group) from clone NL4-3 was over-expressed in human cells and purified in an oligomeric state. Various single and double mutations were constructed on its phosphorylation sites to mimic different degrees of phosphorylation. Size exclusion chromatography of wild-type Vpu and mutants indicated that the smallest assembly unit of Vpu was a dimer and over time Vpu formed higher oligomers. The rate of oligomerization increased when (i) the degree of phosphorylation at serines 52 and 56 was decreased and (ii) when the ionic strength was increased indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of Vpu affects oligomerization. Coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulations with models of wild-type and mutant Vpu in a hydrated lipid bilayer supported the experimental data in demonstrating that, in addition to a previously known role in downregulation of host factors, the phosphorylation sites of Vpu also modulate oligomerization. PMID:27353136

  13. GNL3L Is a Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Shuttling Protein: Role in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Thoompumkal, Indu Jose; Subba Rao, Malireddi Rama Krishna; Kumaraswamy, Anbarasu; Krishnan, Rehna; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    GNL3L is an evolutionarily conserved high molecular weight GTP binding nucleolar protein belonging to HSR1-MMR1 subfamily of GTPases. The present investigation reveals that GNL3L is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to Leptomycin B. Deletion mutagenesis reveals that the C-terminal domain (amino acids 501-582) is necessary and sufficient for the export of GNL3L from the nucleus and the exchange of hydrophobic residues (M567, L570 and 572) within the C-terminal domain impairs this process. Results from the protein-protein interaction analysis indicate that GNL3L interaction with CRM1 is critical for its export from the nucleus. Ectopic expression of GNL3L leads to lesser accumulation of cells in the 'G2/M' phase of cell cycle whereas depletion of endogenous GNL3L results in 'G2/M' arrest. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis followed by BrdU labeling assay indicates that significantly increased DNA synthesis occurs in cells expressing nuclear export defective mutant (GNL3L∆NES) compared to the wild type or nuclear import defective GNL3L. Furthermore, increased hyperphosphorylation of Rb at Serine 780 and the upregulation of E2F1, cyclins A2 and E1 upon ectopic expression of GNL3L∆NES results in faster 'S' phase progression. Collectively, the present study provides evidence that GNL3L is exported from the nucleus in CRM1 dependent manner and the nuclear localization of GNL3L is important to promote 'S' phase progression during cell proliferation.

  14. New proteins involved in sulfur trafficking in the cytoplasm of Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Stockdreher, Yvonne; Sturm, Marga; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dobler, Nadine; Zigann, Renate; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-05-02

    The formation of periplasmic sulfur globules is an intermediate step during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in various sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. The mechanism of how this sulfur is activated and crosses the cytoplasmic membrane for further oxidation to sulfite by the dissimilatory reductase DsrAB is incompletely understood, but it has been well documented that the pathway involves sulfur trafficking mediated by sulfur-carrying proteins. So far sulfur transfer from DsrEFH to DsrC has been established. Persulfurated DsrC very probably serves as a direct substrate for DsrAB. Here, we introduce further important players in oxidative sulfur metabolism; the proteins Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 are strictly conserved in the Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, and Acidithiobacillaceae families of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and are linked to genes encoding complexes involved in sulfur oxidation (Dsr or Hdr) in the latter two. Here we show via relative quantitative real-time PCR and microarray analysis an increase of mRNA levels under sulfur-oxidizing conditions for rhd_2599, tusA, and dsrE2 in Allochromatium vinosum. Transcriptomic patterns for the three genes match those of major genes for the sulfur-oxidizing machinery rather than those involved in biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. TusA appears to be one of the major proteins in A. vinosum. A rhd_2599-tusA-dsrE2-deficient mutant strain, although not viable in liquid culture, was clearly sulfur oxidation negative upon growth on solid media containing sulfide. Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 bind sulfur atoms via conserved cysteine residues, and experimental evidence is provided for the transfer of sulfur between these proteins as well as to DsrEFH and DsrC.

  15. Topology of Protein Interaction Network Shapes Protein Abundances and Strengths of Their Functional and Nonspecific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Heo, M.; Shakhnovich, E.

    2011-03-08

    How do living cells achieve sufficient abundances of functional protein complexes while minimizing promiscuous nonfunctional interactions? Here we study this problem using a first-principle model of the cell whose phenotypic traits are directly determined from its genome through biophysical properties of protein structures and binding interactions in a crowded cellular environment. The model cell includes three independent prototypical pathways, whose topologies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks are different, but whose contributions to the cell fitness are equal. Model cells evolve through genotypic mutations and phenotypic protein copy number variations. We found a strong relationship between evolved physical-chemical properties of protein interactions and their abundances due to a 'frustration' effect: Strengthening of functional interactions brings about hydrophobic interfaces, which make proteins prone to promiscuous binding. The balancing act is achieved by lowering concentrations of hub proteins while raising solubilities and abundances of functional monomers. On the basis of these principles we generated and analyzed a possible realization of the proteome-wide PPI network in yeast. In this simulation we found that high-throughput affinity capture-mass spectroscopy experiments can detect functional interactions with high fidelity only for high-abundance proteins while missing most interactions for low-abundance proteins.

  16. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. - Highlights: • KCTD5 nuclear translocation depends upon M phase and protein oligomerization. • Identification of MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193 as KCTD5 interaction partners. • Formation of trimeric complexes of KCTD5/cullin3 with MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193B. • KCTD5 is not involved in polyubiquitylation of MCM7 replication factor. • The KCTD5/cullin3 complex stabilizes ZNF711 transcription factor.

  17. Distinct Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Fractions of Drosophila Heterochromatin Protein 1: Their Phosphorylation Levels and Associations with Origin Recognition Complex Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Fanti, Laura; Pak, Daniel T.S.; Botchan, Michael R.; Pimpinelli, Sergio; Kellum, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    The distinct structural properties of heterochromatin accommodate a diverse group of vital chromosome functions, yet we have only rudimentary molecular details of its structure. A powerful tool in the analyses of its structure in Drosophila has been a group of mutations that reverse the repressive effect of heterochromatin on the expression of a gene placed next to it ectopically. Several genes from this group are known to encode proteins enriched in heterochromatin. The best characterized of these is the heterochromatin-associated protein, HP1. HP1 has no known DNA-binding activity, hence its incorporation into heterochromatin is likely to be dependent upon other proteins. To examine HP1 interacting proteins, we isolated three distinct oligomeric species of HP1 from the cytoplasm of early Drosophila embryos and analyzed their compositions. The two larger oligomers share two properties with the fraction of HP1 that is most tightly associated with the chromatin of interphase nuclei: an underphosphorylated HP1 isoform profile and an association with subunits of the origin recognition complex (ORC). We also found that HP1 localization into heterochromatin is disrupted in mutants for the ORC2 subunit. These findings support a role for the ORC-containing oligomers in localizing HP1 into Drosophila heterochromatin that is strikingly similar to the role of ORC in recruiting the Sir1 protein to silencing nucleation sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:9679132

  18. Poly (A) Binding Protein Cytoplasmic 1 Is a Novel Co-Regulator of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Dar, Javid A.; Dong, Jun; Wang, Dan; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Wang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the steroid receptor superfamily that regulates gene expression in a ligand-dependent manner. The NTD of the AR plays a key role in AR transactivation including androgen-independent activation of the AR in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. We recently reported that amino acids (a.a.) 50-250 of the NTD are capable of modulating AR nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. To further explore the mechanism associated with a.a. 50-250, GFP pull-down assays were performed in C4-2 CRPC cells transfected with GFP tagged a.a. 50-250 of the AR. Mass spectrometry analysis of the pulled down proteins identified poly (A) binding protein cytoplasmic 1 (PABPC1) interaction with this region of the AR. In silico analysis of gene expression data revealed PABPC1 up-regulation in prostate cancer tissue specimens and this up-regulation correlates to increased disease recurrence. Co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of PABPC1 with a.a. 50-250 of the NTD of the AR. Knockdown of PABPC1 decreased nuclear AR protein levels and inhibited androgen activation of the AR target PSA in LNCaP and C4-2 cells. Additionally, knockdown of PABPC1 inhibited transactivation of the PSA promoter by NAR (AR lacking the LBD) and attenuated proliferation of AR-positive prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that PABPC1 is a novel co-regulator of the AR and may be a potential target for blocking activation of the AR in CRPC. PMID:26176602

  19. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins protect human hepatoma cells during acute desiccation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Chakraborty, Nilay; Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2012-12-18

    Expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins is highly correlated with desiccation tolerance in anhydrobiotic animals, selected land plants, and bacteria. Genes encoding two LEA proteins, one localized to the cytoplasm/nucleus (AfrLEA2) and one targeted to mitochondria (AfrLEA3m), were stably transfected into human HepG2 cells. A trehalose transporter was used for intracellular loading of this disaccharide. Cells were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to low water content (<0.12 g H(2)O/g dry weight) with a recently developed spin-drying technique. Immediately on rehydration, control cells without LEA proteins or trehalose exhibited 0% membrane integrity, compared with 98% in cells loaded with trehalose and expressing AfrLEA2 or AfrLEA3m; surprisingly, AfrLEA3m without trehalose conferred 94% protection. Cell proliferation across 7 d showed an 18-fold increase for cells dried with AfrLEA3m and trehalose, compared with 27-fold for nondried controls. LEA proteins dramatically enhance desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells and offer the opportunity for engineering biostability in the dried state.

  20. Sequences in the cytoplasmic tail of the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope protein that prevent its incorporation into lentivirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulopoulos, I; Cannon, P M

    2001-05-01

    Pseudotyping retrovirus and lentivirus vectors with different viral fusion proteins is a useful strategy to alter the host range of the vectors. Although lentivirus vectors are efficiently pseudotyped by Env proteins from several different subtypes of murine leukemia virus (MuLV), the related protein from gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) does not form functional pseudotypes. We have determined that this arises because of an inability of GaLV Env to be incorporated into lentivirus vector particles. By exploiting the homology between the GaLV and MuLV Env proteins, we have mapped the determinants of incompatibility in the GaLV Env. Three modifications that allowed GaLV Env to pseudotype human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles were identified: removal of the R peptide (C-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain), replacement of the whole cytoplasmic tail with the corresponding MuLV region, and mutation of two residues upstream of the R peptide cleavage site. In addition, we have previously proposed that removal of the R peptide from MuLV Env proteins enhances their fusogenicity by transmitting a conformational change to the ectodomain of the protein (Y. Zhao et al., J. Virol. 72:5392-5398, 1998). Our analysis of chimeric MuLV/GaLV Env proteins provides further evidence in support of this model and suggests that proper Env function involves both interactions within the cytoplasmic tail and more long-range interactions between the cytoplasmic tail, the membrane-spanning region, and the ectodomain of the protein.

  1. Uni-directional ciliary membrane protein trafficking by a cytoplasmic retrograde IFT motor and ciliary ectosome shedding

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Muqing; Ning, Jue; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Belzile, Olivier; Wang, Qian; Dutcher, Susan K; Liu, Yanjie; Snell, William J

    2015-01-01

    The role of the primary cilium in key signaling pathways depends on dynamic regulation of ciliary membrane protein composition, yet we know little about the motors or membrane events that regulate ciliary membrane protein trafficking in existing organelles. Recently, we showed that cilium-generated signaling in Chlamydomonas induced rapid, anterograde IFT-independent, cytoplasmic microtubule-dependent redistribution of the membrane polypeptide, SAG1-C65, from the plasma membrane to the periciliary region and the ciliary membrane. Here, we report that the retrograde IFT motor, cytoplasmic dynein 1b, is required in the cytoplasm for this rapid redistribution. Furthermore, signaling-induced trafficking of SAG1-C65 into cilia is unidirectional and the entire complement of cellular SAG1-C65 is shed during signaling and can be recovered in the form of ciliary ectosomes that retain signal-inducing activity. Thus, during signaling, cells regulate ciliary membrane protein composition through cytoplasmic action of the retrograde IFT motor and shedding of ciliary ectosomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05242.001 PMID:25688564

  2. Uni-directional ciliary membrane protein trafficking by a cytoplasmic retrograde IFT motor and ciliary ectosome shedding.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Ning, Jue; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Belzile, Olivier; Wang, Qian; Dutcher, Susan K; Liu, Yanjie; Snell, William J

    2015-02-17

    The role of the primary cilium in key signaling pathways depends on dynamic regulation of ciliary membrane protein composition, yet we know little about the motors or membrane events that regulate ciliary membrane protein trafficking in existing organelles. Recently, we showed that cilium-generated signaling in Chlamydomonas induced rapid, anterograde IFT-independent, cytoplasmic microtubule-dependent redistribution of the membrane polypeptide, SAG1-C65, from the plasma membrane to the periciliary region and the ciliary membrane. Here, we report that the retrograde IFT motor, cytoplasmic dynein 1b, is required in the cytoplasm for this rapid redistribution. Furthermore, signaling-induced trafficking of SAG1-C65 into cilia is unidirectional and the entire complement of cellular SAG1-C65 is shed during signaling and can be recovered in the form of ciliary ectosomes that retain signal-inducing activity. Thus, during signaling, cells regulate ciliary membrane protein composition through cytoplasmic action of the retrograde IFT motor and shedding of ciliary ectosomes.

  3. Cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Allan, Victoria J

    2011-10-01

    The organization and function of eukaryotic cells rely on the action of many different molecular motor proteins. Cytoplasmic dynein drives the movement of a wide range of cargoes towards the minus ends of microtubules, and these events are needed, not just at the single-cell level, but are vital for correct development. In the present paper, I review recent progress on understanding dynein's mechanochemistry, how it is regulated and how it binds to such a plethora of cargoes. The importance of a number of accessory factors in these processes is discussed.

  4. Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, R S; Zhao, M H; Hamilton, M I; Brownlee, A; Chapman, P; Pounder, R E; Wakefield, A J; Lockwood, C M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a constituent of primary neutrophil granules, is a potent natural antibiotic and an antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) antigen in cases of vasculitis in which the target antigen is neither myeloperoxidase (MPO) nor proteinase-3 (PR3). AIM: To investigate BPI as a possible target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: ANCAs were detected by routine immunofluorescence (IIF) and solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed for antibodies to the purified neutrophil granule proteins; MPO, PR3, cathepsin-G, lactoferrin, and BPI in serum samples from 88 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (36 with Crohn's disease, 52 with ulcerative colitis). Thirty patients with bacterial enteritis acted as controls. RESULTS: Significantly more patients with ulcerative colitis were ANCA positive by IIF (60%) than patients with Crohn's disease (28%) or infectious enteritis (23%) (p < 0.001). IgG anti-BPI antibodies were present in 29% of patients with ulcerative colitis, 14% of patients with Crohn's disease, and 23% of patients with infectious enteritis, occurring in 44% of those patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were ANCA positive by IIF. Antibodies to other ANCA antigens were rare. The presence of ANCAs was not related to either disease activity or extent; presence of anti-BPI antibodies was significantly related to both a lower serum albumin concentration (p = 0.001) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.02) in patients with ulcerative colitis, and to colonic involvement in patients with Crohn's disease (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: BPI is a significant minority target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease that seems related to colonic Crohn's disease and disease activity in ulcerative colitis. Anti-BPI antibodies occur in infectious enteritis. PMID:9155585

  5. Macrophage fusion is controlled by the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo; Davidson, Dominique; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Vacher, Jean; Veillette, André

    2013-06-01

    Macrophages can undergo cell-cell fusion, leading to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and osteoclasts. This process is believed to promote the proteolytic activity of macrophages toward pathogens, foreign bodies, and extracellular matrices. Here, we examined the role of PTP-PEST (PTPN12), a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, in macrophage fusion. Using a macrophage-targeted PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we determined that PTP-PEST was not needed for macrophage differentiation or cytokine production. However, it was necessary for interleukin-4-induced macrophage fusion into multinucleated giant cells in vitro. It was also needed for macrophage fusion following implantation of a foreign body in vivo. Moreover, in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, PTP-PEST was required for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-triggered macrophage fusion into osteoclasts. PTP-PEST had no impact on expression of fusion mediators such as β-integrins, E-cadherin, and CD47, which enable macrophages to become fusion competent. However, it was needed for polarization of macrophages, migration induced by the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), and integrin-induced spreading, three key events in the fusion process. PTP-PEST deficiency resulted in specific hyperphosphorylation of the protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 and the adaptor paxillin. Moreover, a fusion defect was induced upon treatment of normal macrophages with a Pyk2 inhibitor. Together, these data argue that macrophage fusion is critically dependent on PTP-PEST. This function is seemingly due to the ability of PTP-PEST to control phosphorylation of Pyk2 and paxillin, thereby regulating cell polarization, migration, and spreading.

  6. Nuclear LSm8 affects number of cytoplasmic processing bodies via controlling cellular distribution of Like-Sm proteins

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Ivan; Podolská, Kateřina; Blažíková, Michaela; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Svoboda, Petr; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Processing bodies (P-bodies) are dynamic cytoplasmic structures involved in mRNA degradation, but the mechanism that governs their formation is poorly understood. In this paper, we address a role of Like-Sm (LSm) proteins in formation of P-bodies and provide evidence that depletion of nuclear LSm8 increases the number of P-bodies, while LSm8 overexpression leads to P-body loss. We show that LSm8 knockdown causes relocalization of LSm4 and LSm6 proteins to the cytoplasm and suggest that LSm8 controls nuclear accumulation of all LSm2–7 proteins. We propose a model in which redistribution of LSm2–7 to the cytoplasm creates new binding sites for other P-body components and nucleates new, microscopically visible structures. The model is supported by prolonged residence of two P-body proteins, DDX6 and Ago2, in P-bodies after LSm8 depletion, which indicates stronger interactions between these proteins and P-bodies. Finally, an increased number of P-bodies has negligible effects on microRNA-mediated translation repression and nonsense mediated decay, further supporting the view that the function of proteins localized in P-bodies is independent of visible P-bodies. PMID:22875987

  7. Differential bicodon usage in lowly and highly abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Degeneracy in the genetic code implies that different codons can encode the same amino acid. Usage preference of synonymous codons has been observed in all domains of life. There is much evidence suggesting that this bias has a major role on protein elongation rate, contributing to differential expression and to co-translational folding. In addition to codon usage bias, other preference variations have been observed such as codon pairs. In this paper, I report that codon pairs have significant different frequency usage for coding either lowly or highly abundant proteins. These usage preferences cannot be explained by the frequency usage of the single codons. The statistical analysis of coding sequences of nine organisms reveals that in many cases bicodon preferences are shared between related organisms. Furthermore, it is observed that misfolding in the drug-transport protein, encoded by MDR1 gene, is better explained by a big change in the pause propensity due to the synonymous bicodon variant, rather than by a relatively small change in codon usage. These findings suggest that codon pair usage can be a more powerful framework to understand translation elongation rate, protein folding efficiency, and to improve protocols to optimize heterologous gene expression. PMID:28289571

  8. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary.

    PubMed

    Arata, Yukinobu; Hiroshima, Michio; Pack, Chan-Gi; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Motegi, Fumio; Nakazato, Kenichi; Shindo, Yuki; Wiseman, Paul W; Sawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Brandão, Hugo B; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  9. A single gene from yeast for both nuclear and cytoplasmic polyadenylate-binding proteins: domain structure and expression.

    PubMed

    Sachs, A B; Bond, M W; Kornberg, R D

    1986-06-20

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins have been purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and antisera have been used to isolate a gene that encodes them. The gene occurs in a single copy on chromosome 5 and gives rise to a unique, unspliced 2.1 kb transcript. The nuclear protein appears to be derived from the cytoplasmic one by proteolytic cleavage into 53 and 17 kd polypeptides that remain associated during isolation. DNA sequence determination reveals four tandemly arrayed 90 amino acid regions of homology that probably represent poly(A)-binding domains. A 55 residue A-rich region upstream of the initiator methionine codon in the mRNA shows an affinity for poly(A)-binding protein comparable to that of poly(A)180-220, raising the possibility of feedback regulation of translation.

  10. The EspB Protein of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Is Targeted to the Cytoplasm of Infected HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathleen A.; O’Connell, Colin B.; Luther, Paul W.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    1998-01-01

    The EspB protein of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is exported via a type III secretion apparatus. EspB is critical for signaling the host cell and for the development of the attaching and effacing lesion characteristic of EPEC infection. We used cellular fractionation and confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the cellular location of EspB during infection of HeLa cells. Both methods indicated that EspB is targeted to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Using mutants, we found that EspB targeting to the host cell cytoplasm requires the type III secretion apparatus and the secreted proteins EspA and EspD, but not intimin. These results provide insights into the function of the type III secretion apparatus of EPEC and the functions of the Esp proteins. PMID:9784563

  11. Zeptosens' protein microarrays: a novel high performance microarray platform for low abundance protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Michael; Schick, Eginhard; Bopp, Martin A; Schneider, Michael J; Oroszlan, Peter; Ehrat, Markus

    2002-04-01

    Protein microarrays are considered an enabling technology, which will significantly expand the scope of current protein expression and protein interaction analysis. Current technologies, such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry, allowing the identification of biologically relevant proteins, have a high resolving power, but also considerable limitations. As was demonstrated by Gygi et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2000,97, 9390-9395), most spots in 2-DE, observed from whole cell extracts, are from high abundance proteins, whereas low abundance proteins, such as signaling molecules or kinases, are only poorly represented. Protein microarrays are expected to significantly expedite the discovery of new markers and targets of pharmaceutical interest, and to have the potential for high-throughput applications. Key factors to reach this goal are: high read-out sensitivity for quantification also of low abundance proteins, functional analysis of proteins, short assay analysis times, ease of handling and the ability to integrate a variety of different targets and new assays. Zeptosens has developed a revolutionary new bioanalytical system based on the proprietary planar waveguide technology which allows us to perform multiplexed, quantitative biomolecular interaction analysis with highest sensitivity in a microarray format upon utilizing the specific advantages of the evanescent field fluorescence detection. The analytical system, comprising an ultrasensitive fluorescence reader and microarray chips with integrated microfluidics, enables the user to generate a multitude of high fidelity data in applications such as protein expression profiling or investigating protein-protein interactions. In this paper, the important factors for developing high performance protein microarray systems, especially for targeting low abundant messengers of relevant biological information, will be discussed and the performance of the system will

  12. Distinctive serum protein profiles involving abundant proteins in lung cancer patients based upon antibody microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-Min; Kuick, Rork; Orchekowski, Randal P; Misek, David E; Qiu, Ji; Greenberg, Alissa K; Rom, William N; Brenner, Dean E; Omenn, Gilbert S; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M

    2005-01-01

    Background Cancer serum protein profiling by mass spectrometry has uncovered mass profiles that are potentially diagnostic for several common types of cancer. However, direct mass spectrometric profiling has a limited dynamic range and difficulties in providing the identification of the distinctive proteins. We hypothesized that distinctive profiles may result from the differential expression of relatively abundant serum proteins associated with the host response. Methods Eighty-four antibodies, targeting a wide range of serum proteins, were spotted onto nitrocellulose-coated microscope slides. The abundances of the corresponding proteins were measured in 80 serum samples, from 24 newly diagnosed subjects with lung cancer, 24 healthy controls, and 32 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two-color rolling-circle amplification was used to measure protein abundance. Results Seven of the 84 antibodies gave a significant difference (p < 0.01) for the lung cancer patients as compared to healthy controls, as well as compared to COPD patients. Proteins that exhibited higher abundances in the lung cancer samples relative to the control samples included C-reactive protein (CRP; a 13.3 fold increase), serum amyloid A (SAA; a 2.0 fold increase), mucin 1 and α-1-antitrypsin (1.4 fold increases). The increased expression levels of CRP and SAA were validated by Western blot analysis. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to construct Diagonal Linear Discriminant Analysis (DLDA) classifiers. At a cutoff where all 56 of the non-tumor samples were correctly classified, 15/24 lung tumor patient sera were correctly classified. Conclusion Our results suggest that a distinctive serum protein profile involving abundant proteins may be observed in lung cancer patients relative to healthy subjects or patients with chronic disease and may have utility as part of strategies for detecting lung cancer. PMID:16117833

  13. Aberrant cytoplasmic expression of the p16 protein in breast cancer is associated with accelerated tumour proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Emig, R.; Magener, A.; Ehemann, V.; Meyer, A.; Stilgenbauer, F.; Volkmann, M.; Wallwiener, D.; Sinn, H. P.

    1998-01-01

    The p16 protein plays an important role in the transition of cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. We have studied the prevalence of p16 protein expression in breast carcinomas in a prospective series of 368 invasive and 52 non-invasive malignancies, as well as in 88 locally recurring tumours and three tumour cell lines. p16 protein expression was evaluated immunohistochemically on paraffin sections using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-p16 antibodies, and by immunoblotting of tumour cell suspensions. Tumour cell lines were also subjected to polymerase chain reaction-single strand polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis and direct DNA sequencing. The results were compared with established prognostic parameters, DNA flow cytometry and p53 protein expression. In 33 (9%) invasive and two (4%) intraductal carcinomas, a cytoplasmic accumulation of the p16 protein was seen. These cases were characterized by poor histological grade of differentiation, loss of of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors and frequent overexpression of the p53 protein. In addition, breast carcinomas with aberrant p16 expression demonstrated a high proliferative activity, with median S-phase fractions 74% higher than in the control group and the median Ki67 fractions elevated to 75%. A genetic alteration of the p16 gene was not detectable in three analysed cell lines with cytoplasmic p16 expression applying PCR-SSCP and direct DNA sequencing. These results indicate that cytoplasmic accumulation of the p16 protein identifies a subset of highly malignant breast carcinomas with accelerated tumour proliferation and other unfavourable parameters in breast cancer. The described protein accumulation is apparently not caused by an alteration of the p16 gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9862580

  14. Live cell cytoplasm staining and selective labeling of intracellular proteins by non-toxic cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, F; Palamà, I E; Baroncini, M; Barbieri, A; Bongini, A; Bizzarri, R; Gigli, G; Barbarella, G

    2014-03-14

    A structurally correlated series of cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores, characterized by intense green or red fluorescence inside live mouse embryonic fibroblasts, was developed. The fluorophores displayed rapid internalization, excellent retention inside the cells, and high optical stability in the cytosolic environment and did not alter cell viability and reproducibility. Depending on the molecular structure, they experienced distinct fate inside the cells: from bright and lasting staining of the cytoplasm to selective tagging of a small set of globular proteins.

  15. Cytoplasmic sequestration of FUS/TLS associated with ALS alters histone marks through loss of nuclear protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Tibshirani, Michael; Tradewell, Miranda L; Mattina, Katie R; Minotti, Sandra; Yang, Wencheng; Zhou, Hongru; Strong, Michael J; Hayward, Lawrence J; Durham, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS/TLS (FUS) have been linked to the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although predominantly nuclear, this heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein (hnRNP) has multiple functions in RNA processing including intracellular trafficking. In ALS, mutant or wild-type (WT) FUS can form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. Asymmetric arginine methylation of FUS by the class 1 arginine methyltransferase, protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of FUS. In motor neurons of primary spinal cord cultures, redistribution of endogenous mouse and that of ectopically expressed WT or mutant human FUS to the cytoplasm led to nuclear depletion of PRMT1, abrogating methylation of its nuclear substrates. Specifically, hypomethylation of arginine 3 of histone 4 resulted in decreased acetylation of lysine 9/14 of histone 3 and transcriptional repression. Distribution of neuronal PRMT1 coincident with FUS also was detected in vivo in the spinal cord of FUS(R495X) transgenic mice. However, nuclear PRMT1 was not stable postmortem obviating meaningful evaluation of ALS autopsy cases. This study provides evidence for loss of PRMT1 function as a consequence of cytoplasmic accumulation of FUS in the pathogenesis of ALS, including changes in the histone code regulating gene transcription.

  16. The Yin Yang-1 (YY1) protein undergoes a DNA-replication-associated switch in localization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the onset of S phase.

    PubMed

    Palko, Linda; Bass, Hank W; Beyrouthy, Maroun J; Hurt, Myra M

    2004-01-26

    The essential Yin Yang-1 gene (YY1) encodes a ubiquitous, conserved, multifunctional zinc-finger transcription factor in animals. The YY1 protein regulates initiation, activation, or repression of transcription from a variety of genes required for cell growth, development, differentiation, or tumor suppression, as well as from genes in some retroviruses and DNA viruses. Among the specific functions attributed to YY1 is a role in cell-cycle-specific upregulation of the replication-dependent histone genes. The YY1 protein binds to the histone alpha element, a regulatory sequence found in all replication-dependent histone genes. We therefore examined the abundance, DNA-binding activity and localization of the YY1 protein throughout the cell cycle in unperturbed, shake-off-synchronized Chinese hamster ovary and HeLa cells. We found that, whereas the DNA-binding activity of YY1 increased dramatically early in S phase, the YY1 mRNA and protein levels did not. YY1 changed subcellular distribution patterns during the cell cycle, from mainly cytoplasmic at G1 to mainly nuclear at early and middle S phase, then back to primarily cytoplasmic later in S phase. Nuclear accumulation of YY1 near the G1/S boundary coincided with both an increase in YY1 DNA-binding activity and the coordinate up-regulation of the replication-dependent histone genes. The DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin caused a nearly complete loss of nuclear YY1, whereas addition of caffeine or 2-aminopurine to aphidicolin-treated cells restored both DNA synthesis and YY1 localization in the nucleus. These findings reveal a mechanism by which YY1 localization is coupled to DNA synthesis and responsive to cell-cycle signaling pathways. Taken together, our results provide insight into how YY1 might participate in the cell-cycle control over a variety of nuclear events required for cell division and proliferation.

  17. A Protein Allergen Microarray Detects Specific IgE to Pollen Surface, Cytoplasmic, and Commercial Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A.; Conrad, Donald F.; Preuss, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Background Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts). To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. Conclusions/Significance These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual responses over time

  18. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection by a variety of viruses alters the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of certain host cell proteins. In our continued search for interacting factors, we reported the re-localization of RNA helicase A (RHA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus ...

  19. The intermediate filament protein vimentin binds specifically to a recombinant integrin {alpha}2/{beta}1 cytoplasmic tail complex and co-localizes with native {alpha}2/{beta}1 in endothelial cell focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kreis, Stephanie; Schoenfeld, Hans-Joachim; Melchior, Chantal; Steiner, Beat; Kieffer, Nelly . E-mail: kieffer@cu.lu

    2005-04-15

    Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short {alpha} and {beta} cytoplasmic tails will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which integrins mediate bi-directional signaling across the plasma membrane. Integrin {alpha}2{beta}1 is a major collagen receptor but to date, only few proteins have been shown to interact with the {alpha}2 cytoplasmic tail or with the {alpha}2{beta}1 complex. In order to identify novel binding partners of a {alpha}2{beta}1cytoplasmic domain complex, we have generated recombinant GST-fusion proteins, incorporating the leucine zipper heterodimerization cassettes of Jun and Fos. To ascertain proper functionality of the recombinant proteins, interaction with natural binding partners was tested. GST-{alpha}2 and GST-Jun {alpha}2 bound His-tagged calreticulin while GST-{beta}1 and GST-Fos {beta}1 proteins bound talin. In screening assays for novel binding partners, the immobilized GST-Jun {alpha}2/GST-Fos {beta}1 heterodimeric complex, but not the single subunits, interacted specifically with endothelial cell-derived vimentin. Vimentin, an abundant intermediate filament protein, has previously been shown to co-localize with {alpha}v{beta}3-positive focal contacts. Here, we provide evidence that this interaction also occurs with {alpha}2{beta}1-enriched focal adhesions and we further show that this association is lost after prolonged adhesion of endothelial cells to collagen.

  20. Cytoplasmic protein quality control degradation mediated by parallel actions of the E3 ubiquitin ligases Ubr1 and San1

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jarrod W.; Cheung, Samantha K.; Hampton, Randolph Y.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain proteostasis by quality control (QC) degradation. These pathways can specifically target a wide variety of distinct misfolded proteins, and so are important for management of cellular stress. Although a number of conserved QC pathways have been described in yeast, the E3 ligases responsible for cytoplasmic QC are unknown. We now show that Ubr1 and San1 mediate chaperone-dependent ubiquitination of numerous misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This action of Ubr1 is distinct from its role in the “N-end rule.” In this capacity, Ubr1 functions to protect cells from proteotoxic stresses. Our phenotypic and biochemical studies of Ubr1 and San1 indicate that two strategies are employed for cytoplasmic QC: chaperone-assisted ubiquitination by Ubr1 and chaperone-dependent delivery to nuclear San1. The broad conservation of Ubr ligases and the relevant chaperones indicates that these mechanisms will be important in understanding both basic and biomedical aspects of cellular proteostasis. PMID:20080635

  1. Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Gibbons, Ian R.; Hays, Thomas S.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Porter, Mary E.; Schroer, Trina A.; Vaughan, Kevin T.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.; Vallee, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms. PMID:16260502

  2. Nuclear and mitochondrial inheritance in yeast depends on novel cytoplasmic structures defined by the MDM1 protein.

    PubMed

    McConnell, S J; Yaffe, M P

    1992-07-01

    The mdml mutation causes temperature-sensitive growth and defective transfer of nuclei and mitochondria into developing buds of yeast cells at the nonpermissive temperature. The MDM1 gene was cloned by complementation, and its sequence revealed an open reading frame encoding a potential protein product of 51.5 kD. This protein displays amino acid sequence similarities to hamster vimentin and mouse epidermal keratin. Gene disruption demonstrated that MDM1 is essential for mitotic growth. Antibodies against the MDM1 protein recognized a 51-kD polypeptide that was localized by indirect immunofluorescence to a novel pattern of spots and punctate arrays distributed throughout the yeast cell cytoplasm. These structures disappeared after shifting mdm1 mutant cells to the nonpermissive temperature, although the cellular level of MDM1 protein was unchanged. Affinity-purified antibodies against MDM1 also specifically recognized intermediate filaments by indirect immunofluorescence of animal cells. These results suggest that novel cytoplasmic structures containing the MDM1 protein mediate organelle inheritance in yeast.

  3. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  4. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening.

  5. Roles for the cytoplasmic tails of the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins in budding of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5.

    PubMed

    Waning, David L; Schmitt, Anthony P; Leser, George P; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-09-01

    The efficient release of many enveloped viruses from cells involves the coalescence of viral components at sites of budding on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This coalescence is believed to require interactions between the cytoplasmic tails of surface glycoproteins and the matrix (M) protein. For the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5), the cytoplasmic tail of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein has been shown previously to be important for normal virus budding. To investigate a role for the cytoplasmic tail of the fusion (F) protein in virus assembly and budding, we generated a series of F cytoplasmic tail-truncated recombinant viruses. Analysis of these viruses in tissue culture indicated that the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein was dispensable for normal virus replication and budding. To investigate further the requirements for assembly and budding of SV5, we generated two double-mutant recombinant viruses that lack 8 amino acids of the predicted 17-amino-acid HN protein cytoplasmic tail in combination with truncation of either 10 or 18 amino acids from the predicted 20-amino-acid F protein cytoplasmic tail. Both of the double mutant recombinant viruses displayed a replication defect in tissue culture and a budding defect, the extent of which was dependent on the length of the remaining F cytoplasmic tail. Taken together, this work and our earlier data on virus-like particle formation (A. P. Schmitt, G. P. Leser, D. L. Waning, and R. A. Lamb, J. Virol. 76:3953-3964, 2002) suggest a redundant role for the cytoplasmic tails of the HN and F proteins in virus assembly and budding.

  6. Transcriptional and translational control of cytoplasmic proteins after serum stimulation of quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G; Thomas, G; Luther, H

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins from quiescent and serum-stimulated Swiss 3T3 cells was compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Four new proteins of Mrs 26,000, 28,000, 45,000, and 47,000 designated N26, N28, N45, and N47, which were not detectable in quiescent cells, appeared 60 min after addition of serum. During the same period, the amount of [35S]methionine incorporated into 10 proteins present in quiescent cells, ranging in Mr from 23,000 to 98,000 and designated Q23-98, increased up to 6-fold, whereas the amount incorporated into three other proteins decreased by a factor of approximately 2. Of the new proteins, N26 was no longer detectable, and the amount of [35S]methionine incorporated into N47 was significantly reduced by 150 min. During this same time, a fifth new protein, N56, appeared, and there was a large increase in the amount of radioactivity incorporated into another protein, Q121. The increases in nine of the proteins were either strongly or completely inhibited by actinomycin D, arguing that the expression of these proteins was under transcriptional control. In contrast, the increases in seven other proteins were unaffected by actinomycin D, suggesting that their expression was under translational control. These proteins will serve as useful markers for determining how cells progress through early lag phase. Images PMID:6946510

  7. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates.

  8. Identification of the sequence determinants mediating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of TIAR and TIA-1 RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Delestienne, Nathalie; Huez, Georges; Kruys, Véronique; Gueydan, Cyril

    2005-12-01

    TIAR and TIA-1 are two closely related RNA-binding proteins which possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) followed by an auxiliary region. These proteins are involved in several mechanisms of RNA metabolism, including alternative hnRNA splicing and regulation of mRNA translation. Here we characterize the subcellular localization of these proteins in somatic cells. We demonstrate that TIAR and TIA-1 continuously shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and belong to the class of RNA-binding proteins whose nuclear import is transcription-dependent. We identified RRM2 and the first half of the auxiliary region as important determinants for TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation. In contrast, the nuclear export of TIAR and TIA-1 is mediated by RRM3. Both RRMs contribute to TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation or export by their RNA-binding capacity. Indeed, whereas mutations of the highly conserved RNP2 or RNP1 peptides in RRM2 redistribute TIAR to the cytoplasm, similar modifications in RRM3 abolish TIAR nuclear export. Moreover, TIAR and TIA-1 nuclear accumulation is a Ran-GTP-dependent pathway, in contrast to its nuclear export which is unaffected by Ran-GTP depletion and which is independent of the major CRM1-exporting pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of TIAR and TIA-1 RNA-binding domains for their subcellular localization and provides the first evidence for distinct functions of TIAR and TIA-1 RRMs.

  9. Pex13p is an SH3 protein of the peroxisome membrane and a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTs1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J; Kalish, J E; Morrell, J C; Bjorkman, J; Urquhart, A J; Crane, D I

    1996-10-01

    Import of newly synthesized PTS1 proteins into the peroxisome requires the PTS1 receptor (Pex5p), a predominantly cytoplasmic protein that cycles between the cytoplasm and peroxisome. We have identified Pex13p, a novel integral peroxisomal membrane from both yeast and humans that binds the PTS1 receptor via a cytoplasmically oriented SH3 domain. Although only a small amount of Pex5p is bound to peroxisomes at steady state (< 5%), loss of Pex13p further reduces the amount of peroxisome-associated Pex5p by approximately 40-fold. Furthermore, loss of Pex13p eliminates import of peroxisomal matrix proteins that contain either the type-1 or type-2 peroxisomal targeting signal but does not affect targeting and insertion of integral peroxisomal membrane proteins. We conclude that Pex13p functions as a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTS1 receptor.

  10. A model for the cytoplasmic domain of the influenza A virus M2 channel by analogy to the HIV-1 Vpu protein.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, José W; Czabotar, Peter E; Hay, Alan J; Taylor, William R

    2002-12-01

    A model for the cytoplasmic domain of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was formulated based primarily on the cytoplasmic domain of the Vpu protein of HIV-1 using sequence similarity and structure prediction techniques. The model consists of a pair of antiparallel helices followed by a strand parallel to the first helix. Structural analogies with other proteins contribute support for features of the model and suggest ways in which the M2 cytoplasmic domain can interact with other viral and cellular factors.

  11. Differential repression of specific mRNA in erythroblast cytoplasm: a possible role for free mRNP proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Akhayat, O; Goldenberg, S; Scherrer, K

    1983-01-01

    Two types of in vivo untranslated 'free' mRNA-protein particles (mRNP) were isolated from duck erythroblast cytoplasm and characterised. Both types, namely the highly purified globin mRNA-specific '20S' mRNP and the '35S' mRNP containing a heterogenous non-globin mRNA population, are not translatable in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, but yield active mRNA upon deproteinisation. In vivo, 90% of globin mRNA is translated, but the majority of mRNA types are found in the inactive mRNP fraction, including fully repressed mRNA species. Searching for the factors controlling differential mRNA repression, we characterised and compared the protein composition of globin and '35S' mRNP using two dimensional gel electrophoresis, in vivo labelling with [35S]methionine and in vivo phosphorylation. The major proteins ubiquitously bound to globin or any other mRNA in the polyribosomes (e.g., the 73 K mol. wt. poly(A) binding protein) were not detected in purified inactive mRNP. In the latter some polypeptides appear to be associated with only one of the two inactive mRNA types while some others are common to both mRNPs. Furthermore, different rates of synthesis and phosphorylation characterize the protein populations of the two types of repressed mRNP. The specificity in composition and metabolism of the populations of polypeptides associated with different subpopulations of inactive cytoplasmic mRNA, as shown here, argues in favour of a role of mRNP proteins in mRNA recognition and selective translational repression, possibly in association with the ScRNA previously found as components of the free mRNP and able to inhibit protein synthesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6641704

  12. Cytoplasmic calcium measurement in rotavirus enterotoxin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (NSP4-EGFP) expressing cells loaded with Fura-2.

    PubMed

    Berkova, Z; Morris, A P; Estes, M K

    2003-07-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its analogs are standard markers of protein expression and intracellular localization of proteins. The fluorescent properties of GFP complicate accurate measurement of intracellular calcium using calcium sensitive fluorophores, which show a great degree of spectral overlap with GFP, or their K(d) values are too high for accurate measurement of subtle changes in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations. Here we describe a simple modification of the standard microscope-based Fura-2 calcium-imaging technique which permits the quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium levels in cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion proteins. Longpass emission filtering of the Fura-2 signal in cells expressing an EGFP fusion protein is sufficient to eliminate the EGFP-Fura-2 emission spectra overlap and allows quantitative calibration of intracellular calcium. To validate this technique, we investigated the ability of rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4-EGFP to elevate intracellular calcium levels in mammalian HEK 293 cells. We show here that inducible intracellular expression of NSP4-EGFP fusion protein elevates basal intracellular calcium more than two-fold by a phospholipase C (PLC) independent mechanism.

  13. Retention of OsNMD3 in the cytoplasm disturbs protein synthesis efficiency and affects plant development in rice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanyun; Liu, Xiangling; Li, Rui; Gao, Yaping; Xu, Zuopeng; Zhang, Baocai; Zhou, Yihua

    2014-07-01

    The ribosome is the basic machinery for translation, and biogenesis of ribosomes involves many coordinated events. However, knowledge about ribosomal dynamics in higher plants is very limited. This study chose a highly conserved trans-factor, the 60S ribosomal subunit nuclear export adaptor NMD3, to characterize the mechanism of ribosome biogenesis in the monocot plant Oryza sativa (rice). O. sativa NMD3 (OsNMD3) shares all the common motifs and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm via CRM1/XPO1. A dominant negative form of OsNMD3 with a truncated nuclear localization sequence (OsNMD3(ΔNLS)) was retained in the cytoplasm, consequently interfering with the release of OsNMD3 from pre-60S particles and disturbing the assembly of ribosome subunits. Analyses of the transactivation activity and cellulose biosynthesis level revealed low protein synthesis efficiency in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants. Pharmaceutical treatments demonstrated structural alterations in ribosomes in the transgenic plants. Moreover, global expression profiles of the wild-type and transgenic plants were investigated using the Illumina RNA sequencing approach. These expression profiles suggested that overexpression of OsNMD3(ΔNLS) affected ribosome biogenesis and certain basic pathways, leading to pleiotropic abnormalities in plant growth. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that OsNMD3 is important for ribosome assembly and the maintenance of normal protein synthesis efficiency.

  14. Preferential cytoplasmic location of FtsZ, a protein essential for Escherichia coli septation.

    PubMed

    Pla, J; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Vicente, M; Aldea, M

    1991-07-01

    An ftsZ thermonull mutant has been constructed in which the ftsZ gene has been deleted from the Escherichia coli chromosome while maintaining a wild-type copy of the gene in a thermosensitive plasmid. Under conditions in which the ftsZ+ allele is unable to be replicated at the same pace as the chromosome, the cells become non-viable and grow as filaments, indicating that, contrary to other reports, FtsZ performs a function essential for cell survival. Antibodies raised against FtsZ have been used to detect the cellular location of FtsZ and its contents per cell. Fractionation experiments indicate that most of the total FtsZ present in the cell stays in the cytoplasm.

  15. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA.

  16. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  17. Soluble expression of recombinant proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Mortensen, Kim Kusk

    2005-01-01

    Pure, soluble and functional proteins are of high demand in modern biotechnology. Natural protein sources rarely meet the requirements for quantity, ease of isolation or price and hence recombinant technology is often the method of choice. Recombinant cell factories are constantly employed for the production of protein preparations bound for downstream purification and processing. Eschericia coli is a frequently used host, since it facilitates protein expression by its relative simplicity, its inexpensive and fast high density cultivation, the well known genetics and the large number of compatible molecular tools available. In spite of all these qualities, expression of recombinant proteins with E. coli as the host often results in insoluble and/or nonfunctional proteins. Here we review new approaches to overcome these obstacles by strategies that focus on either controlled expression of target protein in an unmodified form or by applying modifications using expressivity and solubility tags. PMID:15629064

  18. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  19. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation.

  20. Seminal fluid proteins differ in abundance between genetic lineages of honeybees.

    PubMed

    Baer, Boris; Zareie, Reza; Paynter, Ellen; Poland, Veronica; Millar, A Harvey

    2012-10-22

    Seminal fluid is transferred to the females' reproductive tract as part of the ejaculate and contains highly complex molecular machinery that is of central importance for male and female reproductive success. Interspecific studies suggest rapid evolutionary changes in the sequences of some seminal fluid proteins and also highlight the importance of specific seminal fluid proteins for sperm function and paternity success. Much less work has been conducted to study if variation in the steady-state abundance of seminal fluid proteins occurs within a species, which could provide a foundation for future selection to act upon. Here we used a unique breeding program of the honeybee Apis mellifera to provide evidence for quantified differences in seminal fluid protein abundances between three genetic lineages that have been bred for ~20 generations. We found the same subset of seminal fluid proteins to be present in all lines, but protein abundance or protein modification state varied significantly for 16% of the protein spots investigated. Protein spots with changed abundances were identified using mass spectrometry, with the abundance of a number documented from other species to be correlated with male fertility, reproductive success or immune-competence. We conclude that significant alterations in the abundance or modification state of specific proteins in seminal fluid can be linked to different genotypes in honeybees.

  1. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces cytoplasmic accumulation of TIA-1/TIAR and both synthesis and cytoplasmic accumulation of tristetraprolin, two cellular proteins that bind and destabilize AU-rich RNAs.

    PubMed

    Esclatine, Audrey; Taddeo, Brunella; Roizman, Bernard

    2004-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 causes a shutoff of cellular protein synthesis through the degradation of RNA that is mediated by the virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein encoded by the U(L)41 gene. We reported elsewhere that the Vhs-dependent degradation of RNA is selective, and we identified RNAs containing AU-rich elements (AREs) that were upregulated after infection but degraded by deadenylation and progressive 3'-to-5' degradation. We also identified upregulated RNAs that were not subject to Vhs-dependent degradation (A. Esclatine, B. Taddeo, L. Evans, and B. Roizman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:3603-3608, 2004). Among the latter was the RNA encoding tristetraprolin, a protein that binds AREs and is known to be associated with the degradation of RNAs containing AREs. Prompted by this observation, we examined the status of the ARE binding proteins tristetraprolin and TIA-1/TIAR in infected cells. We report that tristetraprolin was made and accumulated in the cytoplasm of wild-type virus-infected human foreskin fibroblasts as early as 2 h and in HEp-2 cells as early as 6 h after infection. The amounts of tristetraprolin that accumulated in the cytoplasm of cells infected with a mutant virus lacking U(L)41 were significantly lower than those in wild-type virus-infected cells. The localization of tristetraprolin was not modified in cells infected with a mutant lacking the gene encoding infected cell protein 4 (ICP4). TIA-1 and TIAR are two other proteins that are associated with the regulation of ARE-containing RNAs and that normally reside in nuclei. In infected cells, they started to accumulate in the cytoplasm after 6 h of infection. In cells infected with the mutant virus lacking U(L)41, TIA-1/TIAR accumulated in the cytoplasm in granular structures reminiscent of stress granules in a significant percentage of the cells. In addition, an antibody to tristetraprolin coprecipitated the Vhs protein from lysates of cells late in infection. The results indicate that the Vhs

  2. Transplanted photoreceptor precursors transfer proteins to host photoreceptors by a mechanism of cytoplasmic fusion

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep S.; Balmer, Jasmin; Barnard, Alun R.; Aslam, Sher A.; Moralli, Daniela; Green, Catherine M.; Barnea-Cramer, Alona; Duncan, Isabel; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor transplantation is a potential future treatment for blindness caused by retinal degeneration. Photoreceptor transplantation restores visual responses in end-stage retinal degeneration, but has also been assessed in non-degenerate retinas. In the latter scenario, subretinal transplantation places donor cells beneath an intact host outer nuclear layer (ONL) containing host photoreceptors. Here we show that host cells are labelled with the donor marker through cytoplasmic transfer—94±4.1% of apparently well-integrated donor cells containing both donor and host markers. We detect the occurrence of Cre-Lox recombination between donor and host photoreceptors, and we confirm the findings through FISH analysis of X and Y chromosomes in sex-discordant transplants. We do not find evidence of nuclear fusion of donor and host cells. The artefactual appearance of integrated donor cells in host retinas following transplantation is most commonly due to material transfer from donor cells. Understanding this novel mechanism may provide alternate therapeutic strategies at earlier stages of retinal degeneration. PMID:27901042

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus polyadenylated nuclear RNA: a structural scaffold for nuclear, cytoplasmic and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Rausch, Jason W; Smith, Rodman; Miller, Jennifer T; Whitby, Denise; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2017-04-05

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA facilitates lytic infection, modulating the cellular immune response by interacting with viral and cellular proteins and DNA. Although a number nucleoprotein interactions involving PAN have been implicated, our understanding of binding partners and PAN RNA binding motifs remains incomplete. Herein, we used SHAPE-mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) to probe PAN in its nuclear, cytoplasmic or viral environments or following cell/virion lysis and removal of proteins. We thus characterized and put into context discrete RNA structural elements, including the cis-acting Mta responsive element and expression and nuclear retention element (1,2). By comparing mutational profiles in different biological contexts, we identified sites on PAN either protected from chemical modification by protein binding or characterized by a loss of structure. While some protein binding sites were selectively localized, others were occupied in all three biological contexts. Individual binding sites of select KSHV gene products on PAN RNA were also identified in in vitro experiments. This work constitutes the most extensive structural characterization of a viral lncRNA and interactions with its protein partners in discrete biological contexts, providing a broad framework for understanding the roles of PAN RNA in KSHV infection.

  4. Neutrophil anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody proteins: bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin, and elastase as serological markers of inflammatory bowel and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakidi, Kallirroi S.; Tsianos, Vasileios E.; Karvounis, Evaggelos; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly defined yet, environmental, genetic and other factors contribute to the onset of the disease. Apart from the clinical and histopathological findings, several serological biomarkers are also employed to detect IBD. One of the most thoroughly studied biomarker is anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA). We herein provide an overview of the current knowledge on the use of ANCA and certain ANCA proteins, such as bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin G and elastase, as serological markers for IBD and other diseases. PMID:27366026

  5. Human cytomegalovirus gene UL21a encodes a short-lived cytoplasmic protein and facilitates virus replication in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Anthony R; Yu, Dong

    2010-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene UL21a was recently annotated by its conservation in chimpanzee cytomegalovirus. Two large-scale mutagenic analyses showed that mutations in overlapping UL21a/UL21 resulted in a severe defect of virus growth in fibroblasts. Here, we characterized UL21a and demonstrated its role in HCMV infection. We mapped a UL21a-specific transcript of approximately 600 bp that was expressed with early kinetics. UL21a encoded pUL21a, a protein of approximately 15 kDa, which was unstable and localized predominantly to the cytoplasm during HCMV infection or when expressed alone. Interestingly, pUL21a was drastically stabilized in the presence of proteasome inhibitor MG132, but its instability was independent of a functional ubiquitin-mediated pathway, suggesting that pUL21a underwent proteasome-dependent, ubiquitin-independent degradation. A UL21a deletion virus was attenuated in primary human newborn foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) and embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC-5), whereas a marker-rescued virus and mutant viruses lacking the neighboring or overlapping genes UL20, UL21, or UL21.5-UL23 replicated at wild-type levels. The growth defect of UL21a-deficient virus in MRC-5 cells was more pronounced than that in HFFs. At a high multiplicity of infection, the UL21a deletion virus synthesized viral proteins with wild-type kinetics but had a two- to threefold defect in viral DNA replication. More importantly, although pUL21a was not detected in the virion, progeny virions produced by the mutant virus were approximately 10 times less infectious than wild-type virus, suggesting that UL21a is required for HCMV to establish efficient productive infection. We conclude that UL21a encodes a short-lived cytoplasmic protein and facilitates HCMV replication in fibroblasts.

  6. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D-glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF-κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose-treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF-κB were also increased in the high glucose-treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF-κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF-κB. PMID:27599553

  7. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the β1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor–induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor. PMID:11807099

  8. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-21

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the beta1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor-induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor.

  9. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  10. Nonclathrin coat protein gamma, a subunit of coatomer, binds to the cytoplasmic dilysine motif of membrane proteins of the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, C; Pavel, J; Coccia, F; Draken, E; Wegehingel, S; Tschochner, H; Wieland, F

    1996-01-01

    Coatomer, a cytosolic heterooligomeric protein complex that consists of seven subunits [alpha-, beta-, beta'-, gamma-, delta-, epsilon-, and zeta-COP (nonclathrin coat protein)], has been shown to interact with dilysine motifs typically found in the cytoplasmic domains of various endoplasmic-reticulum-resident membrane proteins [Cosson, P. & Letourneur, F. (1994) Science 263, 1629-1631]. We have used a photo-cross-linking approach to identify the site of coatomer that is involved in binding to the dilysine motifs. An octapeptide corresponding to the C-terminal tail of Wbp1p, a component of the yeast N-oligosaccharyltransferase complex, has been synthesized with a photoreactive phenylalanine at position -5 and was radioactively labeled with [125I]iodine at a tyrosine residue introduced at the N terminus of the peptide. Photolysis of isolated coatomer in the presence of this peptide and immunoprecipitation of coatomer from photo-cross-linked cell lysates reveal that gamma-COP is the predominantly labeled protein. From these results, we conclude that coatomer is able to bind to the cytoplasmic dilysine motifs of membrane proteins of the early secretory pathway via its gamma-COP subunit, whose complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence is also presented. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700856

  11. Photosynthetic control of Arabidopsis leaf cytoplasmic translation initiation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Daventure, Marlène; Jossier, Mathieu; Zivy, Michel; Hodges, Michael; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation is the carbon source for plant anabolism, including amino acid production and protein synthesis. The biosynthesis of leaf proteins is known for decades to correlate with photosynthetic activity but the mechanisms controlling this effect are not documented. The cornerstone of the regulation of protein synthesis is believed to be translation initiation, which involves multiple phosphorylation events in Eukaryotes. We took advantage of phosphoproteomic methods applied to Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes harvested under controlled photosynthetic gas-exchange conditions to characterize the phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal proteins (RPs) and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs). The analyses detected 14 and 11 new RP and eIF phosphorylation sites, respectively, revealed significant CO2-dependent and/or light/dark phosphorylation patterns and showed concerted changes in 13 eIF phosphorylation sites and 9 ribosomal phosphorylation sites. In addition to the well-recognized role of the ribosomal small subunit protein RPS6, our data indicate the involvement of eIF3, eIF4A, eIF4B, eIF4G and eIF5 phosphorylation in controlling translation initiation when photosynthesis varies. The response of protein biosynthesis to the photosynthetic input thus appears to be the result of a complex regulation network involving both stimulating (e.g. RPS6, eIF4B phosphorylation) and inhibiting (e.g. eIF4G phosphorylation) molecular events.

  12. Cytoskeletal architecture of isolated mitotic spindle with special reference to microtubule-associated proteins and cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N; Takemura, R; Hisanaga, S

    1985-11-01

    We have studied cytoskeletal architectures of isolated mitotic apparatus from sea urchin eggs using quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. This method revealed the existence of an extensive three-dimensional network of straight and branching crossbridges between spindle microtubules. The surface of the spindle microtubules was almost entirely covered with hexagonally packed, small, round button-like structures which were very uniform in shape and size (approximately 8 nm in diameter), and these microtubule buttons frequently provided bases for crossbridges between adjacent microtubules. These structures were removed from the surface of microtubules by high salt (0.6 M NaCl) extraction. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and microtubules isolated from mitotic spindles which were mainly composed of a large amount of 75-kD protein and some high molecular mass (250 kD, 245 kD) proteins were polymerized in vitro and examined by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. The surfaces of microtubules were entirely covered with the same hexagonally packed round buttons, the arrangement of which is intimately related to that of tubulin dimers. Short crossbridges and some longer crossbridges were also observed. High salt treatment (0.6 M NaCl) extracted both 75-kD protein and high molecular weight proteins and removed microtubule buttons and most of crossbridges from the surface of microtubules. Considering the relatively high amount of 75-kD protein among MAPs isolated from mitotic spindles, it is concluded that these microtubule buttons probably consist of 75-kD MAP and that some of the crossbridges in vivo could belong to MAPs. Another kind of granule, larger in size (11-26 nm in diameter), was also on occasion associated with the surface of microtubules of mitotic spindles. A fine sidearm sometimes connected the larger granule to adjacent microtubules. Localization of cytoplasmic dynein ATPase in the mitotic spindle was investigated by electron microscopic

  13. Integrin Cytoplasmic Tail Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors essential for multicellular life. They connect cells to the extracellular environment and transduce chemical and mechanical signals to and from the cell. Intracellular proteins that bind the integrin cytoplasmic tail regulate integrin engagement of extracellular ligands as well as integrin localization and trafficking. Cytoplasmic integrin-binding proteins also function downstream of integrins, mediating links to the cytoskeleton and to signaling cascades that impact cell motility, growth, and survival. Here, we review key integrin-interacting proteins and their roles in regulating integrin activity, localization, and signaling. PMID:24467163

  14. A differential protein solubility approach for the depletion of highly abundant proteins in plasma using ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Mills, Ian G; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-12-21

    Depletion of highly abundant proteins is an approved step in blood plasma analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, we explored a precipitation and differential protein solubility approach as a fractionation strategy for abundant protein removal from plasma. Total proteins from plasma were precipitated with 90% saturated ammonium sulfate, followed by differential solubilization in 55% and 35% saturated ammonium sulfate solutions. Using a four hour liquid chromatography (LC) gradient and an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, a total of 167 and 224 proteins were identified from the 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate fractions, whereas 235 proteins were found in the remaining protein fractions with at least two unique peptides. SDS-PAGE and exclusive total spectrum counts from LC-MS/MS analyses clearly showed that majority of the abundant plasma proteins were solubilized in 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate solutions, indicating that the remaining protein fraction is of potential interest for identification of less abundant plasma proteins. Serum albumin, serotransferrin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transthyretin were the abundant proteins that were highly enriched in 55% ammonium sulfate fractions. Immunoglobulins, complement system proteins, and apolipoproteins were among other abundant plasma proteins that were enriched in 35% ammonium sulfate fractions. In the remaining protein fractions a total of 40 unique proteins were identified of which, 32 proteins were identified with at least 10 exclusive spectrum counts. According to PeptideAtlas, 9 of these 32 proteins were estimated to be present at low μg ml(-1) (0.12-1.9 μg ml(-1)) concentrations in the plasma, and 17 at low ng ml(-1) (0.1-55 ng ml(-1)) range.

  15. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  17. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

  18. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-03-04

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC's potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ∼2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories, we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies.

  19. The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and enzymatically active in cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Metzner, Anja; Brehm, Maria A; Labiadh, Sena; Brauer, Helena; Grabinski, Nicole; Mayr, Georg W; Jücker, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in hematopoietic cells. SHIP1 mediates its regulatory function after relocalization from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane where it converts its substrate PI(3,4,5)P(3) to PI(3,4)P(2) thereby terminating PI3-kinase mediated signaling. In addition, SHIP1 converts Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) to Ins(1,3,4)P(3) thereby regulating inositol phosphate metabolism. Here we report, that SHIP1 can be detected in nuclear puncta of Jurkat cells by confocal microscopy after expression of SHIP1 from a tetracycline inducible vector. SHIP1-containing nuclear puncta partially co-localize with FLASH, a multifunctional nuclear protein that has been linked to apoptotic signaling and transcriptional control. Nuclear localization was confirmed for endogenously expressed SHIP1 in the myeloid leukemia cell line TF1. In addition, enzymatically active SHIP1 was found in nuclear fractions of Jurkat cells with a similar specific activity as cytoplasmic SHIP1. Further analysis revealed that SHIP1 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein which is actively imported into and exported out of the nucleus. Nuclear import is mediated by two canonical nuclear localization signals (NLS) i.e. K(327)KSK and K(547)KLR. Mutational inactivation of each NLS motif inhibited nuclear import and reduced the proliferation of cells indicating a functional role of nuclear SHIP1 for cell growth. Our data indicate that SHIP1 is partly localized in the nucleus and suggest that SHIP1 plays a role for nuclear phosphoinositide and/or nuclear inositol phosphate signaling.

  20. Spindle-E cycling between nuage and cytoplasm is controlled by Qin and PIWI proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andress, Arlise; Bei, Yanxia; Fonslow, Bryan R.; Giri, Ritika; Wu, Yilong; Yates, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are silenced in germ cells by a mechanism in which PIWI proteins generate and use PIWI-interacting ribonucleic acid (piRNA) to repress expression of TE genes. piRNA biogenesis occurs by an amplification cycle in microscopic organelles called nuage granules, which are localized to the outer face of the nuclear envelope. One cofactor required for amplification is the helicase Spindle-E (Spn-E). We found that the Spn-E protein physically associates with the Tudor domain protein Qin and the PIWI proteins Aubergine (Aub) and Argonaute3 (Ago3). Spn-E and Qin proteins are mutually dependent for their exit from nuage granules, whereas Spn-E and both Aub and Ago3 are mutually dependent for their entry or retention in nuage. The result is a dynamic cycling of Spn-E and its associated factors in and out of nuage granules. This implies that nuage granules can be considered to be hubs for active, mobile, and transient complexes. We suggest that this is in some way coupled with the execution of the piRNA amplification cycle. PMID:27091448

  1. The COG and COPI complexes interact to control the abundance of GEARs, a subset of Golgi integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Oka, Toshihiko; Ungar, Daniel; Hughson, Frederick M; Krieger, Monty

    2004-05-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a soluble hetero-octamer associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the Golgi. Mammalian somatic cell mutants lacking the Cog1 (ldlB) or Cog2 (ldlC) subunits exhibit pleiotropic defects in Golgi-associated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing that suggest COG is involved in the localization, transport, and/or function of multiple Golgi processing proteins. We have identified a set of COG-sensitive, integral membrane Golgi proteins called GEARs (mannosidase II, GOS-28, GS15, GPP130, CASP, giantin, and golgin-84) whose abundances were reduced in the mutant cells and, in some cases, increased in COG-overexpressing cells. In the mutants, some GEARs were abnormally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and were degraded by proteasomes. The distributions of the GEARs were altered by small interfering RNA depletion of epsilon-COP in wild-type cells under conditions in which COG-insensitive proteins were unaffected. Furthermore, synthetic phenotypes arose in mutants deficient in both epsilon-COP and either Cog1 or Cog2. COG and COPI may work in concert to ensure the proper retention or retrieval of a subset of proteins in the Golgi, and COG helps prevent the endoplasmic reticulum accumulation and degradation of some GEARs.

  2. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait.

  3. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    West, Ewan; Osborne, Craig; Nolan, William; Bate, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage. PMID:26043272

  4. Probing short-range protein Brownian motion in the cytoplasm of living cells.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Piazza, Vincenzo; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-12-23

    The translational motion of molecules in cells deviates from what is observed in dilute solutions. Theoretical models provide explanations for this effect but with predictions that drastically depend on the nanoscale organization assumed for macromolecular crowding agents. A conclusive test of the nature of the translational motion in cells is missing owing to the lack of techniques capable of probing crowding with the required temporal and spatial resolution. Here we show that fluorescence-fluctuation analysis of raster scans at variable timescales can provide this information. By using green fluorescent proteins in cells, we measure protein motion at the unprecedented timescale of 1 μs, unveiling unobstructed Brownian motion from 25 to 100 nm, and partially suppressed diffusion above 100 nm. Furthermore, experiments on model systems attribute this effect to the presence of relatively immobile structures rather than to diffusing crowding agents. We discuss the implications of these results for intracellular processes.

  5. Probing short-range protein Brownian motion in the cytoplasm of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Piazza, Vincenzo; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The translational motion of molecules in cells deviates from what is observed in dilute solutions. Theoretical models provide explanations for this effect but with predictions that drastically depend on the nanoscale organization assumed for macromolecular crowding agents. A conclusive test of the nature of the translational motion in cells is missing owing to the lack of techniques capable of probing crowding with the required temporal and spatial resolution. Here we show that fluorescence-fluctuation analysis of raster scans at variable timescales can provide this information. By using green fluorescent proteins in cells, we measure protein motion at the unprecedented timescale of 1 μs, unveiling unobstructed Brownian motion from 25 to 100 nm, and partially suppressed diffusion above 100 nm. Furthermore, experiments on model systems attribute this effect to the presence of relatively immobile structures rather than to diffusing crowding agents. We discuss the implications of these results for intracellular processes. PMID:25532887

  6. Probing short-range protein Brownian motion in the cytoplasm of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Rienzo, Carmine; Piazza, Vincenzo; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    The translational motion of molecules in cells deviates from what is observed in dilute solutions. Theoretical models provide explanations for this effect but with predictions that drastically depend on the nanoscale organization assumed for macromolecular crowding agents. A conclusive test of the nature of the translational motion in cells is missing owing to the lack of techniques capable of probing crowding with the required temporal and spatial resolution. Here we show that fluorescence-fluctuation analysis of raster scans at variable timescales can provide this information. By using green fluorescent proteins in cells, we measure protein motion at the unprecedented timescale of 1 μs, unveiling unobstructed Brownian motion from 25 to 100 nm, and partially suppressed diffusion above 100 nm. Furthermore, experiments on model systems attribute this effect to the presence of relatively immobile structures rather than to diffusing crowding agents. We discuss the implications of these results for intracellular processes.

  7. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  8. Identification of Cytoplasmic Proteins Interacting with the Mammary Cell Transforming Domain of Ese-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    and Nordheim, A. 1993. Gene regulation by Ets proteins. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1155:346-356. 7. Chang, C , Scott, G, Kuo, W, Xiong, X, Suzdaltseva, Y...families, consisting of 27 ETS genes in humans, 26 in mice, 10 in Caenorhabditis elegans and 9 in Drosophila that can be structurally categorized...transcription factor genes in prostate cancer. Science 310, 644–648 40 Chen, C . et al. (2005) ERM is required for transcriptional control of the

  9. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  10. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J

    2015-03-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction.

  11. Cytoplasmic Heme-Binding Protein (HutX) from Vibrio cholerae Is an Intracellular Heme Transport Protein for the Heme-Degrading Enzyme, HutZ.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yukari; Tanzawa, Takehito; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ishimori, Koichiro; Uchida, Takeshi

    2016-02-16

    HutZ is a cytoplasmic heme-binding protein from Vibrio cholerae. Although we have previously identified HutZ as a heme-degrading enzyme [Uchida, T., et al. (2012) Chem. Commun. 48, 6741-6743], the heme transport protein for HutZ remained unknown. To identify the heme transport protein for HutZ, we focused on the heme utilization operon, hutWXZ. To this end, we constructed an expression system for HutX in Escherichia coli and purified it to homogeneity. An absorption spectral analysis demonstrated that HutX binds heme with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a dissociation constant of 7.4 nM. The crystal structure of HutX displays a fold similar to that of the homologous protein, ChuX, from E. coli O157:H7. A structural comparison of HutX and ChuX, and resonance Raman spectra of heme-HutX, suggest that the axial ligand of the ferric heme is Tyr90. The heme bound to HutX is transferred to HutZ with biphasic dissociation kinetics of 8.3 × 10(-2) and 1.5 × 10(-2) s(-1), values distinctly larger than those for transfer from HutX to apomyoglobin. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed that HutX interacts with HutZ with a dissociation constant of ∼400 μM. These results suggest that heme is transferred from HutX to HutZ via a specific protein-protein interaction. Therefore, we can conclude that HutX is a cytoplasmic heme transport protein for HutZ.

  12. pFPL Vectors for High-Throughput Protein Localization in Fungi: Detecting Cytoplasmic Accumulation of Putative Effector Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoyan; Hurtado, Oscar; Wang, Baohua; Wu, Congqing; Yi, Mihwa; Giraldo, Martha; Valent, Barbara; Goodin, Michael; Farman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    As part of a large-scale project whose goal was to identify candidate effector proteins in Magnaporthe oryzae, we developed a suite of vectors that facilitate high-throughput protein localization experiments in fungi. These vectors utilize Gateway recombinational cloning to place a gene's promoter and coding sequences upstream and in frame with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), monomeric red fluorescence protein (mRFP), and yellow fluorescent protein or a nucleus-targeted mCHERRY variant. The respective Gateway cassettes were incorporated into Agrobacterium-based plasmids to allow efficient fungal transformation using hygromycin or geneticin resistance selection. mRFP proved to be more sensitive than the GFP spectral variants for monitoring proteins secreted in planta; and extensive testing showed that Gateway-derived fusion proteins produced localization patterns identical to their "directly fused" counterparts. Use of plasmid for fungal protein localization (pFPL) vectors with two different selectable markers provided a convenient way to label fungal cells with different fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the utility of the pFPL vectors for identifying candidate effector proteins and we highlight a number of important factors that must be taken into consideration when screening for proteins that are translocated across the host plasma membrane.

  13. Long-term memory: disruption by inhibitors of protein synthesis and cytoplasmic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, J.F.; Landry, D.W.; Bennett, E.L.; Jarvik, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Colchicine (60 ..mu..g/kg), an inhibitor of axoplasmic transport, administered subcutaneously to mice has no detectable effect on retention when given shortly after active avoidance training, nor did a pertaining injection of anisomycin (ANI) have an amnesic effect. However, when ANI was administered shortly prior to training and colchicine was administered after training, retention performance was impaired. The amnesic effect was dependent on the time at which colchicine was administered. The amnesic effect was also obtained when ANI was combined with either vinblastine (6 ..mu..g/kg) or podophyllotoxin (3 ..mu..g/kg), drugs that inhibit axoplasmic transport. Intracerebral injections of colchicine (60 ng to 60 pg) caused amnesia in subjects pretreated with ANI, but not in subjects pretreated with saline. Lumicolchicine, an isomer of colchicine, which has similar central nervous system effects but has a low binding affinity for microtubule protein, did not impair retention in ANI pretreated mice. It is suggested that axonal transport of recently synthesized protein is required for long-term memory storage.

  14. Ultrastructural and biochemical evidence for the presence of mature steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the cytoplasm of human luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, Walter D; Kohen, Paulina; Castro, Olga; Muñoz, Alex; Strauss, Jerome F; Devoto, Luigi

    2005-10-20

    The distribution of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) inside thecal and granulosa-lutein cells of human corpus luteum (CL) was assessed by immunoelectron microscopy. We found greater levels of StAR immunolabeling in steroidogenic cells from early- and mid-than in late luteal phase CL and lower levels in cells from women treated with a GnRH antagonist in the mid-luteal phase. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed significant levels of StAR antigen in the mitochondria and in the cytoplasm of luteal cells. The 30 kDa mature StAR protein was present in both mitochondria and cytosol (post-mitochondrial) fractions from homogenates of CL at different ages, whereas cytochrome c and mitochondrial HSP70 were detected only in the mitochondrial fraction. Therefore, we hypothesized that either appreciable processing of StAR 37 kDa pre-protein occurs outside the mitochondria, or mature StAR protein is selectively released into the cytoplasm after mitochondrial processing. The presence of mature StAR in the cytoplasm is consonant with the notion that StAR acts on the outer mitochondrial membrane to effect sterol import, and that StAR may interact with other cytoplasmic proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, including hormone sensitive lipase.

  15. The human actin-related protein hArp5: nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and involvement in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Kumiko; Kamo, Mariko; Oma, Yukako; Matsuda, Ryo; Uchida, Takafumi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Winsor, Barbara; Harata, Masahiko

    2009-01-15

    Certain actin-related proteins (Arps) of budding yeast are localized in the nucleus, and have essential roles as stoichiometric components of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and chromatin remodeling complexes. On the other hand, identification of vertebrate nuclear Arps and their functional analyses are just beginning. We show that human Arp5 (hArp5) proteins are localized in the nucleus, and that arp5Delta yeast cells are partially complemented by hArp5. Thus, hArp5 is a novel member of the nuclear Arps of vertebrates, which possess evolutionarily conserved functions from yeast to humans. We show here that hArp5 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, after the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), cell growth and the accumulation of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) are impaired by hArp5 depletion. Association of hArp5 with the hIno80 chromatin remodeling enzyme and decrease of chromatin-bound hIno80 by hArp5-depletion indicate that hArp5 may have a role in the recruitment of the hINO80 complex to chromatin. Overexpression of hArp5 and hIno80 enhanced gamma-H2AX accumulation. These observations suggest that hArp5 is involved in the process of DSB repair through the regulation of the chromatin remodelling machinery.

  16. A comparison of depletion versus equalization for reducing high-abundance proteins in human serum.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Carolina; Santos, Hugo M; Ruíz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J; Capelo-Martínez, José-Luis

    2011-11-01

    In this work three methods to diminish the content of most highly abundant proteins in human serum have been studied and compared. Protein depletion with ACN or DTT and protein equalization with the ProteoMiner(™) (PM) have been assessed by 1-D gel electrophoresis and MS. After treatment 5, 18 and 9 major proteins within the 20 most abundant proteins in serum were identified for the ACN, DTT and PM methods, respectively. The ACN method was efficient for depleting high molecular weight proteins, over 75 KDa, resulting in 10±4% (n=3) of the total protein content remaining in the depleted serum. In addition, 75% of the proteins belonging to the group of the 20 most abundant proteins were not detected, making this depletion strategy a cheap alternative to expensive commercial tools regularly used for removing high abundance proteins from serum. The ACN extract was found rich in apolipoproteins. The dithithreitol method promotes the precipitation of proteins rich in disulfide bonds, mainly albumin, with 73±7% (n=3) of the total protein content remaining in the depleted serum, which was found rich in immunoglobulins. The PM method compresses the dynamic range of the serum proteins, rendering an extract containing 16±2% (n=3) of the total initial protein content. The extract was found to be rich in both apolipoproteins and immunoglobulins. As a general rule the DTT and PM methods provide a compression of the dynamic range of serum protein concentrations while the ACN method allows an effective depletion of the protein fraction above 72 KDa.

  17. CYTOPLASMIC MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Slautterback, David B.

    1963-01-01

    Small cytoplasmic tubules are present in the interstitial cells and cnidoblasts of hydra. They are referred to here as "microtubules." These tubular elements have an outside diameter of 180 A and an inside diameter of 80 A. By difference, the membranous wall is estimated to be 50 A thick. The maximum length of the microtubules cannot be determined from thin sections but is known to exceed 1.5 µ. In the interstitial cells the microtubules are found in the intercellular bridges, free in the cytoplasm and in association with the centrioles. In the cnidoblast they form a framework around the developing nematocyst and in late stages are related to the cnidocil forming a tight skein in the basal part of the cell. Especially in this cell, confluence of microtubules with small spherical vesicles of the Golgi complex has been observed. It is proposed that these tubules function in the transport of water, ions, or small molecules. PMID:14079495

  18. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne; Heilbronn, Regine

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference in the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.

  19. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  20. Cytoplasmic Relocalization of TAR DNA-Binding Protein 43 Is Not Sufficient to Reproduce Cellular Pathologies Associated with ALS In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wobst, Heike J.; Wesolowski, Steven S.; Chadchankar, Jayashree; Delsing, Louise; Jacobsen, Steven; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Dunlop, John; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Moss, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the gene TARDBP, which encodes TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), are a rare cause of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). While the majority of mutations are found in the C-terminal glycine-rich domain, an alanine to valine amino acid change at position 90 (A90V) in the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of TDP-43 has been described. This sequence variant has previously been shown to cause cytoplasmic mislocalization of TDP-43 and decrease protein solubility, leading to the formation of insoluble aggregates. Since the A90V mutation has been described both in patients as well as healthy controls, its pathogenic potential in ALS and FTD remains unclear. Here we compare properties of overexpressed A90V to the highly pathogenic M337V mutation. Though both mutations drive mislocalization of the protein to the cytoplasm to the same extent, M337V produces more significant damage in terms of protein solubility, levels of pathogenic phosphorylation, and formation of C-terminal truncated protein species. Furthermore, the M337V, but not the A90V mutant, leads to a downregulation of histone deacetylase 6 and Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein. We conclude that in the absence of another genetic or environmental ‘hit’ the A90V variant is not sufficient to cause the deleterious phenotypes associated with ALS and FTD, despite prominent cytoplasmic protein relocalization of TDP-43. PMID:28286471

  1. HCC-DETECT: a combination of nuclear, cytoplasmic, and oncofetal proteins as biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; El-Far, Mohamed; Malak, Camelia A Abdel; Omran, Mohamed M; Shiha, Gamal E; Farid, Khaled; Barakat, Lamiaa A; Albannan, Mohamed S; Attallah, Ahmed A; Abdelrazek, Mohamed A; Elbendary, Mohamed S; Sabry, Refaat; Hamoda, Gehan A; Elshemy, Mohamed M; Ragab, Abdallah A; Foda, Basma M; Abdallah, Sanaa O

    2015-09-01

    Currently, the search for suitable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers is very intensive. Besides, efficacy and cost/effectiveness of screening and surveillance of cirrhotics for the diagnosis of HCC is still debated. So, the present study is concerned with the evaluation of cytokeratin-1 (CK-1) and nuclear matrix protein-52 (NMP-52) for identifying HCC. Two-hundred and eighty individuals categorized into three groups [liver fibrosis (F1-F3), cirrhosis (F4), and HCC] constituted this study. Western blot was used for identifying CK-1 and NMP-52 in serum samples. As a result, a single immunoreactive band was shown at 67 and 52 kDa corresponding to CK-1 and NMP-52, respectively. Both CK-1 and NMP-52 bands were cut and electroeluted separately. These markers were quantified in sera using ELISA. Patients with HCC were associated with higher concentrations of CK-1 and NMP-52 than those without HCC with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). CK-1 showed an area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83 with 75 % sensitivity and 82 % specificity while NMP-52 yielded 0.72 AUC with 62 % sensitivity and 70 % specificity for identifying HCC. HCC-DETECT comprising CK-1 and NMP-52 together with AFP was then constructed yielding 0.90 AUC for identifying HCC with 80 % sensitivity and 92 % specificity. HCC-DETECT was then tested for separating HCC from F1-F3 showing 0.94 AUC with 80 % sensitivity and 93 % specificity. In conclusion, CK-1 in conjunction with NMP-52 and AFP could have a potential role for improving the detection of HCC with a high degree of accuracy.

  2. Structural determinants for binding of sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) to the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1).

    PubMed

    Stiegler, Amy L; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Weizhi; Boggon, Titus J

    2014-09-05

    Sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) is a member of the family of cytoplasmic sorting nexin adaptor proteins that regulate endosomal trafficking of cell surface proteins. SNX17 localizes to early endosomes where it directly binds NPX(Y/F) motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of its target receptors to mediate their rates of endocytic internalization, recycling, and/or degradation. SNX17 has also been implicated in mediating cell signaling and can interact with cytoplasmic proteins. KRIT1 (Krev interaction trapped 1), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein associated with cerebral cavernous malformations, has previously been shown to interact with SNX17. Here, we demonstrate that SNX17 indeed binds directly to KRIT1 and map the binding to the second Asn-Pro-Xaa-Tyr/Phe (NPX(Y/F)) motif in KRIT1. We further characterize the interaction as being mediated by the FERM domain of SNX17. We present the co-crystal structure of SNX17-FERM with the KRIT1-NPXF2 peptide to 3.0 Å resolution and demonstrate that the interaction is highly similar in structure and binding affinity to that between SNX17 and P-selectin. We verify the molecular details of the interaction by site-directed mutagenesis and pulldown assay and thereby confirm that the major binding site for SNX17 is confined to the NPXF2 motif in KRIT1. Taken together, our results verify a direct interaction between SNX17 and KRIT1 and classify KRIT1 as a SNX17 binding partner.

  3. Assessment of the natural variation of low abundant metabolic proteins in soybean seeds using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we investigated the distribution of the low abundant proteins that are involved in soybean seed development in four wild and twelve cultivated soybean genotypes. We found proteomic variation of these proteins within and...

  4. Fragile X-like behaviors and abnormal cortical dendritic spines in cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihoon; Chen, Hogmei; Gennarino, Vincenzo A; Richman, Ronald; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene and loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) cause fragile X syndrome (FXS), a genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and autistic behaviors. FMRP is an mRNA-binding protein regulating neuronal translation of target mRNAs. Abnormalities in actin-rich dendritic spines are major neuronal features in FXS, but the molecular mechanism and identity of FMRP targets mediating this phenotype remain largely unknown. Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) was identified as an interactor of FMRP, and its mRNA is a highly ranked FMRP target in mouse brain. Importantly, Cyfip2 is a component of WAVE regulatory complex, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that Cyfip2 could be implicated in the dendritic spine phenotype of FXS. Here, we generated and characterized Cyfip2-mutant (Cyfip2(+/-)) mice. We found that Cyfip2(+/-) mice exhibited behavioral phenotypes similar to Fmr1-null (Fmr1(-/y)) mice, an animal model of FXS. Synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines were normal in Cyfip2(+/-) hippocampus. However, dendritic spines were altered in Cyfip2(+/-) cortex, and the dendritic spine phenotype of Fmr1(-/y) cortex was aggravated in Fmr1(-/y); Cyfip2(+/-) double-mutant mice. In addition to the spine changes at basal state, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced dendritic spine regulation was impaired in both Fmr1(-/y) and Cyfip2(+/-) cortical neurons. Mechanistically, mGluR activation induced mRNA translation-dependent increase of Cyfip2 in wild-type cortical neurons, but not in Fmr1(-/y) or Cyfip2(+/-) neurons. These results suggest that misregulation of Cyfip2 function and its mGluR-induced expression contribute to the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS.

  5. Membrane structure correlates to function of LLP2 on the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 protein.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Alexander L; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Benamram, Zachary; Michel, Jonathan A; Jablin, Michael S; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Montelaro, Ronald C; Nagle, John F; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2013-08-06

    Mutation studies previously showed that the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP2) sequence of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein inhibited viral-initiated T-cell death and T-cell syncytium formation, at which time in the HIV life cycle the gp41 protein is embedded in the T-cell membrane. In striking contrast, the mutants did not affect virion infectivity, during which time the gp41 protein is embedded in the HIV envelope membrane. To examine the role of LLP2/membrane interactions, we applied synchrotron x-radiation to determine structure of hydrated membranes. We focused on WT LLP2 peptide (+3 charge) and MX2 mutant (-1 charge) with membrane mimics for the T-cell and the HIV-1 membranes. To investigate the influence of electrostatics, cholesterol content, and peptide palmitoylation, we also studied three other LLP2 variants and HIV-1 mimics without negatively charged lipids or cholesterol as well as extracted HIV-1 lipids. All LLP2 peptides bound strongly to T-cell membrane mimics, as indicated by changes in membrane structure and bending. In contrast, none of the weakly bound LLP2 variants changed the HIV-1 membrane mimic structure or properties. This correlates well with, and provides a biophysical basis for, previously published results that reported lack of a mutant effect in HIV virion infectivity in contrast to an inhibitory effect in T-cell syncytium formation. It shows that interaction of LLP2 with the T-cell membrane modulates biological function.

  6. Different forms of soluble cytoplasmic mRNA binding proteins and particles in Xenopus laevis oocytes and embryos

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the formation of maternally stored mRNPs during Xenopus laevis development, we searched for soluble cytoplasmic proteins of the oocyte that are able to selectively bind mRNAs, using as substrate radiolabeled mRNA. In vitro mRNP assembly in solution was followed by UV-cross-linking and RNase digestion, resulting in covalent tagging of polypeptides by nucleotide transfer. Five polypeptides of approximately 54, 56 60, 70, and 100 kD (p54, p56, p60, p70, and p100) have been found to selectively bind mRNA and assemble into mRNPs. These polypeptides, which correspond to previously described native mRNP components, occur in three different particle classes of approximately 4.5S, approximately 6S, and approximately 15S, as also determined by their reactions with antibodies against p54 and p56. Whereas the approximately 4.5S class contains p42, p60, and p70, probably each in the form of individual molecules or small complexes, the approximately 6S particles appears to consist only of p54 and p56, which occur in a near-stoichiometric ratio suggestive of a heterodimer complex. The approximately 15S particles contain, in addition to p54 and p56, p60 and p100 and this is the single occurring form of RNA-binding p100. We have also observed changes in the in vitro mRNA binding properties of these polypeptides during oogenesis and early embryonic development, in relation to their phosphorylation state and to the activity of an approximately 15S particle-associated protein kinase, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the developmental translational regulation of maternal mRNAs. PMID:1670777

  7. System wide analyses have underestimated protein abundances and the importance of transcription in mammals.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyi Jessica; Bickel, Peter J; Biggin, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Large scale surveys in mammalian tissue culture cells suggest that the protein expressed at the median abundance is present at 8,000-16,000 molecules per cell and that differences in mRNA expression between genes explain only 10-40% of the differences in protein levels. We find, however, that these surveys have significantly underestimated protein abundances and the relative importance of transcription. Using individual measurements for 61 housekeeping proteins to rescale whole proteome data from Schwanhausser et al. (2011), we find that the median protein detected is expressed at 170,000 molecules per cell and that our corrected protein abundance estimates show a higher correlation with mRNA abundances than do the uncorrected protein data. In addition, we estimated the impact of further errors in mRNA and protein abundances using direct experimental measurements of these errors. The resulting analysis suggests that mRNA levels explain at least 56% of the differences in protein abundance for the 4,212 genes detected by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), though because one major source of error could not be estimated the true percent contribution should be higher. We also employed a second, independent strategy to determine the contribution of mRNA levels to protein expression. We show that the variance in translation rates directly measured by ribosome profiling is only 12% of that inferred by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), and that the measured and inferred translation rates correlate poorly (R(2) = 0.13). Based on this, our second strategy suggests that mRNA levels explain ∼81% of the variance in protein levels. We also determined the percent contributions of transcription, RNA degradation, translation and protein degradation to the variance in protein abundances using both of our strategies. While the magnitudes of the two estimates vary, they both suggest that transcription plays a more important role than the earlier studies implied and translation a much smaller

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Age Specific Variation in the Abundance of Human Female Parotid Salivary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Lu, Bingwen; Hagen, Fred K; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human saliva is a protein-rich, easily accessible source of potential local and systemic biomarkers to monitor changes that occur under pathological conditions; however little is known about the changes in abundance associated with normal aging. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic profiling of pooled saliva collected from the parotid glands of healthy female subjects, divided into two age groups 1 and 2 (20–30 and 55–65 years old, respectively). Hydrophobic charge interaction chromatography was used to separate high from low abundant proteins prior to characterization of the parotid saliva using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Collectively, 532 proteins were identified in the two age groups. Of these proteins, 266 were identified exclusively in one age group, while 266 proteins were common to both groups. The majority of the proteins identified in the two age groups belonged to the defense and immune response category. Of note, several defense related proteins (e.g. lysozyme, lactoferrin and histatin-1) were significantly more abundant in group 2 as determined by G-test. Selected representative mass spectrometric findings were validated by western blot analysis. Our study reports the first quantitative analysis of differentially regulated proteins in ductal saliva collected from young and older female subjects. This study supports the use of high-throughput proteomics as a robust discovery tool. Such results provide a foundation for future studies to identify specific salivary proteins which may be linked to age-related diseases specific to women. PMID:19764810

  9. ICAP-1, a Novel β1 Integrin Cytoplasmic Domain–associated Protein, Binds to a Conserved and Functionally Important NPXY Sequence Motif of β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David D.; Wong, Carol; Smith, Healy; Liu, Jenny

    1997-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of integrins are essential for cell adhesion. We report identification of a novel protein, ICAP-1 (integrin cytoplasmic domain– associated protein-1), which binds to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain. The interaction between ICAP-1 and β1 integrins is highly specific, as demonstrated by the lack of interaction between ICAP-1 and the cytoplasmic domains of other β integrins, and requires a conserved and functionally important NPXY sequence motif found in the COOH-terminal region of the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain. Mutational studies reveal that Asn and Tyr of the NPXY motif and a Val residue located NH2-terminal to this motif are critical for the ICAP-1 binding. Two isoforms of ICAP-1, a 200–amino acid protein (ICAP-1α) and a shorter 150–amino acid protein (ICAP-1β), derived from alternatively spliced mRNA, are expressed in most cells. ICAP-1α is a phosphoprotein and the extent of its phosphorylation is regulated by the cell–matrix interaction. First, an enhancement of ICAP-1α phosphorylation is observed when cells were plated on fibronectin-coated but not on nonspecific poly-l-lysine–coated surface. Second, the expression of a constitutively activated RhoA protein that disrupts the cell–matrix interaction results in dephosphorylation of ICAP-1α. The regulation of ICAP-1α phosphorylation by the cell–matrix interaction suggests an important role of ICAP-1 during integrin-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:9281591

  10. [Molecular cloning of some components of the translation apparatus of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and a list of its cytoplasm ic proteins genes].

    PubMed

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Baranova, G M; Wood, V; Gwilliam, R G; Shematorova, E K; Korol'chuk, O L; Lebedenko, E N

    1999-06-01

    Full-length cDNAs of four new genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins L14 and L20 (large ribosomal subunit) and S1 and S27 (small ribosomal subunit) were isolated and sequenced during the analysis of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. One of the Sz. pombe genes encoding translation elongation factor EF-2 was also cloned and its precise position on chromosome I established. A unified nomenclature was proposed, and the list of all known genetic determinants encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Sz. pombe was compiled. By now, 76 genes/cDNAs encoding different ribosomal proteins have been identified in the fission yeast genome. Among them, 35 genes are duplicated and three homologous genes are identified for each of the ribosomal proteins L2, L16, P1, and P2.

  11. Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 Modulation of Adolescent Rat Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase C Translocation and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, J. L.; Kolitz, E. B.; Pal, R.; Rogow, J. A.; Werner, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol consumption typically begins during adolescence, a developmental period which exhibits many age-dependent differences in ethanol behavioral sensitivity. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is largely implicated in ethanol-behaviors, and our previous work indicates that regulation of novel PKC isoforms likely contributes to decreased high-dose ethanol sensitivity during adolescence. The cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) signaling cascade selectivity modulates novel and atypical PKC isoform activity, as well as adolescent ethanol hypnotic sensitivity. Therefore, the current study was designed to ascertain adolescent cPLA2 activity both basally and in response to ethanol, as well as it's involvement in ethanol-induced PKC isoform translocation patterns. cPLA2 expression was elevated during adolescence, and activity was increased only in adolescents following high-dose ethanol administration. Novel, but not atypical PKC isoforms translocate to cytosolic regions following high-dose ethanol administration. Inhibiting cPLA2 with AACOCF3 blocked ethanol-induced PKC cytosolic translocation. Finally, inhibition of novel, but not atypical, PKC isoforms when cPLA2 activity was elevated, modulated adolescent high-dose ethanol-sensitivity. These data suggest that the cPLA2/PKC pathway contributes to the acute behavioral effects of ethanol during adolescence. PMID:25791059

  12. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  13. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  14. Krit 1 interactions with microtubules and membranes are regulated by Rap1 and integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein-1.

    PubMed

    Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Gautier, Romain; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Chardin, Pierre; Faurobert, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The small G protein Rap1 regulates diverse cellular processes such as integrin activation, cell adhesion, cell-cell junction formation and cell polarity. It is crucial to identify Rap1 effectors to better understand the signalling pathways controlling these processes. Krev interaction trapped 1 (Krit1), a protein with FERM (band four-point-one/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain, was identified as a Rap1 partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen, but this interaction was not confirmed in subsequent studies. As the evidence suggests a role for Krit1 in Rap1-dependent pathways, we readdressed this question. In the present study, we demonstrate by biochemical assays that Krit1 interacts with Rap1A, preferentially its GTP-bound form. We show that, like other FERM proteins, Krit1 adopts two conformations: a closed conformation in which its N-terminal NPAY motif interacts with its C-terminus and an opened conformation bound to integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein (ICAP)-1, a negative regulator of focal adhesion assembly. We show that a ternary complex can form in vitro between Krit1, Rap1 and ICAP-1 and that Rap1 binds the Krit1 FERM domain in both closed and opened conformations. Unlike ICAP-1, Rap1 does not open Krit1. Using sedimentation assays, we show that Krit1 binds in vitro to microtubules through its N- and C-termini and that Rap1 and ICAP-1 inhibit Krit1 binding to microtubules. Consistently, YFP-Krit1 localizes on cyan fluorescent protein-labelled microtubules in baby hamster kidney cells and is delocalized from microtubules upon coexpression with activated Rap1V12. Finally, we show that Krit1 binds to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-P(2)-containing liposomes and that Rap1 enhances this binding. Based on these results, we propose a model in which Krit1 would be delivered by microtubules to the plasma membrane where it would be captured by Rap1 and ICAP-1.

  15. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function.

  16. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Sampath K.; Lukowski, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl−/HCO3− exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. PMID:26582474

  17. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  18. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods.

  19. Homooligomerization of the cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor zeta chain and of other proteins containing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Alexander; Aivazian, Dikran; Stern, Lawrence

    2004-02-24

    Antigen receptors on T cells, B cells, mast cells, and basophils all have cytoplasmic domains containing one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor engagement in an early and obligatory event in the signaling cascade. How clustering of receptor extracellular domains leads to phosphorylation of cytoplasmic domain ITAMs is not known, and little structural or biochemical information is available for the ITAM-containing cytoplasmic domains. Here we investigate the conformation and oligomeric state of several immune receptor cytoplasmic domains, using purified recombinant proteins and a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques. We show that all of the cytoplasmic domains of ITAM-containing signaling subunits studied are oligomeric in solution, namely, T cell antigen receptor zeta, CD3epsilon, CD3delta, and CD3gamma, B cell antigen receptor Igalpha and Igbeta, and Fc receptor FcepsilonRIgamma. For zeta(cyt), the oligomerization behavior is best described by a two-step monomer-dimer-tetramer fast dynamic equilibrium with dissociation constants in the order of approximately 10 microM (monomer-dimer) and approximately 1 mM (dimer-tetramer). In contrast to the other ITAM-containing proteins, Igalpha(cyt) forms stable dimers and tetramers even below 10 microM. Circular dichroic analysis reveals the lack of stable ordered structure of the cytoplasmic domains studied, and oligomerization does not change the random-coil-like conformation observed. The random-coil nature of zeta(cyt) was also confirmed by heteronuclear NMR. Phosphorylation of zeta(cyt) and FcepsilonRIgamma(cyt) does not significantly alter their oligomerization behavior. The implications of these results for transmembrane signaling and cellular activation by immune receptors are discussed.

  20. Regulation of cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryo by rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI)

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the rho family, a member of the ras p21- related small GTP-binding protein superfamily, regulates cell morphology, cell motility, and smooth muscle contraction through the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is also known to be essential for cytoplasmic division of cells (cytokinesis). In this study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named rho GDI, its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named smg GDS, and botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in the cytoplasmic division using Xenopus embryos. The sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was not affected by microinjection into the embryos of either smg GDS or the guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound form of rhoA p21, one member of the rho family, but completely inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. Under these conditions, nuclear division occurred normally but the furrow formation, which was induced by the contractile ring consisting of actomyosin just beneath the plasma membrane, was impaired. Comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 prevented the rho GDI action. Moreover, the sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was inhibited by microinjection into the embryos of the rhoA p21 pre-ADP- ribosylated by C3 which might serve as a dominant negative inhibitor of endogenous rho p21. These results indicate that rho p21 together with its regulatory proteins regulates the cytoplasmic division through the actomyosin system. PMID:8436590

  1. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L. Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Poulin, Gino B.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  2. Active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as one of the development mechanisms of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Artur; Kopczyński, Janusz; Wypiórkiewicz, Elżbieta; Góźdź, Stanisław; Meżyk, Ryszard; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2013-04-01

    HER2-positive breast cancer (HER2+) occurs in approximately 15-20% of all breast cancers. Biologically this cancer subtype is characterized by an aggressive clinical course (often spread to regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis), and after successful treatment high risk of recurrence. Deregulation of the cell cycle is the basis for cancer aggressiveness. The RB protein is one of the key regulators of the cell cycle. There are only a few published studies on the expression and localization of RB protein in the cells of HER2-positive breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the expression and localization of RB protein in HER2-positive breast cancers compared to breast cancers showing no expression of HER2. We used 50 tissue samples from HER2 positive breast cancer and 21 tissue samples derived from patients with HER2 negative breast cancer. The RB protein expression was measured by immunohistochemical techniques in tissue microarray format. Cytoplasmic RB expression was observed in 29 out of 50 (58%) HER2 positive breast cancers. In this group only cytoplasmic expression was observed. There was no case with nuclear expression. In contrast, in the HER2-negative breast cancer control group, in no case RB expression was observed in the cytoplasm (0/21, 0%). All 21 samples (100%) showed expression of RB protein in the nucleus (p < 0.0001). We can speculate that lack of expression suggests alternative mechanisms in the development of HER2 positive breast cancer. We hypothesize that HER2 overexpression is in some way associated with active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This may be an indirect mechanism of inactivation of tumor suppressor protein in breast cancer exhibiting overexpression of HER2.

  3. Leukemia-Associated Nup214 Fusion Proteins Disturb the XPO1-Mediated Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Transport Pathway and Thereby the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through nuclear pore complexes is mediated by nuclear transport receptors. Previous reports have suggested that aberrant nuclear-cytoplasmic transport due to mutations or overexpression of nuclear pore complexes and nuclear transport receptors is closely linked to diseases. Nup214, a component of nuclear pore complexes, has been found as chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia. Among various Nup214 fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 have been shown to be engaged in tumorigenesis, but their oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the functions of the Nup214 fusion proteins by focusing on their effects on nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. We found that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 interact with exportin-1 (XPO1)/CRM1 and nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)/TAP, which mediate leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-dependent protein export and mRNA export, respectively. SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 decreased the XPO1-mediated nuclear export of NES proteins such as cyclin B and proteins involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway by tethering XPO1 onto nuclear dots where Nup214 fusion proteins are localized. We also demonstrated that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 expression inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription by abnormal tethering of the complex containing p65 and its inhibitor, IκB, in the nucleus. These results suggest that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 perturb the regulation of gene expression through alteration of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport system. PMID:27114368

  4. The NapF protein of the Escherichia coli periplasmic nitrate reductase system: demonstration of a cytoplasmic location and interaction with the catalytic subunit, NapA.

    PubMed

    Nilavongse, Arjaree; Brondijk, T Harma C; Overton, Tim W; Richardson, David J; Leach, Emily R; Cole, Jeffrey A

    2006-11-01

    The periplasmic nitrate reductase of Escherichia coli is important during anaerobic growth in low-nitrate environments. The nap operon encoding this nitrate reductase comprises seven genes including a gene, napF, that encodes a putative cytoplasmic iron-sulphur protein of uncertain subcellular location and function. In this study, N-terminal sequence analysis, cell fractionation coupled with immunoblotting and construction of LacZ and PhoA fusion proteins were used together to establish that NapF is located in the E. coli cytoplasm. A bacterial two-hybrid protein-protein interaction system was used to demonstrate that NapF interacted in the cytoplasm with the terminal oxidoreductase NapA, but that it did not self-associate or interact with other electron-transport components of the Nap system, NapC, NapG or NapH, or with another cytoplasmic component, NapD. NapF, purified as a His(6)-tagged protein, exhibited spectral properties characteristic of an iron-sulphur protein. This protein was able to pull down NapA from soluble extracts of E. coli. A growth-based assay for NapF function in intact cell cultures was developed and applied to assess the effect of mutation of a number of conserved amino acids. It emerged that neither a highly conserved N-terminal double-arginine motif, nor a conserved proline motif, is essential for NapF-dependent growth. The combined data indicate that NapF plays one or more currently unidentified roles in the post-translational modification of NapA prior to the export of folded NapA via the twin-arginine translocation pathway into the periplasm.

  5. Leukemia-Associated Nup214 Fusion Proteins Disturb the XPO1-Mediated Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Transport Pathway and Thereby the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shoko; Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through nuclear pore complexes is mediated by nuclear transport receptors. Previous reports have suggested that aberrant nuclear-cytoplasmic transport due to mutations or overexpression of nuclear pore complexes and nuclear transport receptors is closely linked to diseases. Nup214, a component of nuclear pore complexes, has been found as chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia. Among various Nup214 fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 have been shown to be engaged in tumorigenesis, but their oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the functions of the Nup214 fusion proteins by focusing on their effects on nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. We found that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 interact with exportin-1 (XPO1)/CRM1 and nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)/TAP, which mediate leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-dependent protein export and mRNA export, respectively. SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 decreased the XPO1-mediated nuclear export of NES proteins such as cyclin B and proteins involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway by tethering XPO1 onto nuclear dots where Nup214 fusion proteins are localized. We also demonstrated that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 expression inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription by abnormal tethering of the complex containing p65 and its inhibitor, IκB, in the nucleus. These results suggest that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 perturb the regulation of gene expression through alteration of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport system.

  6. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  7. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-25

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  8. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  9. Evaluation of two high-abundance protein depletion kits and optimization of downstream isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fanghua; Hou, Tieying; Huang, Dehong; Xue, Zhifeng; Liang, Dongyan; Li, Qiuming; Lin, Weimiao

    2015-11-01

    Disease biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes are most likely within an extremely low concentration range and are thus masked by the presence of high‑abundance proteins. Therefore, removing high‑abundance proteins is the main challenge for identifying disease biomarkers. In addition, the solution obtained from high‑abundance protein depletion kits contains a rich array of compounds, which interfere with isoelectric focusing (IEF). In the present study, the effect of two commercial kits was evaluated and the downstream IEF protocol was optimized. High‑resolution results could be obtained according to the following conditions: The ProteoPrep Blue Albumin and IgG Depletion kit depleted albumin and IgG; immobilized pH gradient strips (typically 18 cm) were rehydrated with sample buffer containing 250 µg serum proteins at 30 v for 6 h, 60 v for 6 h, 200 v for 2 h, 500 v for 2 h, 1,000 v for 2 h, 5,000 v for 2 h, 10,000 v for 2 h and then focusing at 10,000 v up to 110 k vhs. In addition, the protein spots identified by matrix‑assisted laser desorption ionization time‑of‑flight mass spectrometry demonstrated that all proteins had a low abundance. The present study not only provides a definite and effective method for removing high‑abundance proteins, but also provides a proper protocol (protocol C) for downstream IEF. The present study includes a comprehensive investigation of serum proteomics, which paves the way for serum protein research.

  10. Enzymatic activities of Ura2 and Ura1 proteins (aspartate carbamoyltransferase and dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase) are present in both isolated membranes and cytoplasm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vorísek, J; Techniková, Z; Schwippel, J; Benoist, P

    2002-03-30

    Computational analysis predicted three potential hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices within the Ura2 multidomain protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the C-terminal subdomain of which catalyses the second step of uridine-monophosphate biosynthesis by its L-aspartate carbamoyltransferase activity (EC 2.1.3.2). The fourth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis is catalysed by dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (Ura1 protein; EC 1.3.99.11), which was similarly characterized as a peripheral membrane protein. Ex situ, the activities of the investigated enzymes were associated both with isolated yeast membranes, fractionated by differential centrifugation to remove intact nuclei, and with soluble cytoplasmic proteins.

  11. Mapping Protein Abundance Patterns in the Brain Using Voxelation Combined with Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2009-01-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps. PMID:19654045

  12. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  13. Differential abundance of egg white proteins in laying hens treated with corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jimin; Choi, Yang-Ho

    2014-12-24

    Stressful environments can affect not only egg production and quality but also gene and protein abundance in the ovary and oviduct in laying hens. The oviductal magnum of laying hens is the organ responsible for the synthesis and secretion of egg white proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary corticosterone as a stress model on the abundance of proteins in the egg white and of mRNA and proteins in the magnum in laying hens. After a 14-day acclimation, 40 laying hens were divided into two groups which were provided for the next 14 days with either control (Control) or corticosterone (Stress) diet containing at 30 mg/kg. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased feed intake (P ≤ 0.05) and decreased egg production. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS using eggs obtained on days 0 and 5 revealed differential abundance of egg white proteins by Stress: transiently expressed in neural precursors (TENP), hemopexin (HPX), IgY-Fcυ3-4, and extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP) were decreased while ovoinhibitor and ovalbumin-related protein X (OVAX) were increased on days 5 vs 0 (P ≤ 0.05). Expression of mRNAs and proteins was also significantly modulated in the magnum of hens in Stress on day 14 (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, the current study provides the first evidence showing that dietary corticosterone modulates protein abundance in the egg white in laying hens, and it suggests that environmental stress can differentially modify expression of egg white proteins in laying hens.

  14. Autophagic adapter protein NBR1 is localized in Lewy bodies and glial cytoplasmic inclusions and is involved in aggregate formation in α-synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Saori; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mori, Fumiaki; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    Macroautophagy is a dynamic process whereby cytoplasmic components are initially sequestered within autophagosomes. Recent studies have shown that the autophagosome membrane can selectively recognize ubiquitinated proteins and organelles through interaction with adapter proteins such as p62 and NBR1. Both proteins are structurally similar at the amino acid level, and bind with ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins. Although p62 is incorporated into a wide spectrum of pathological inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases, abnormalities of NBR1 have not been reported in these diseases. Our immunohistochemical examination revealed that the vast majority of Lewy bodies (LBs) in Parkinson's disease and dementia with LBs (DLB) as well as of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy (MSA) were positive for NBR1. Neuronal and glial inclusions in tauopathies and TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa proteinopathies were rarely immunolabeled, or were unstained. Using cultured cells bearing LB-like inclusions, formation of α-synuclein aggregates was repressed in cells with NBR1 knockdown. Immunoblot analysis showed that the level of NBR1 was significantly increased by 2.5-fold in MSA, but not in DLB. These findings suggest that NBR1 is involved in the formation of cytoplasmic inclusions in α-synucleinopathy.

  15. Changes in the Cytoplasmic Composition of Amino Acids and Proteins Observed in Staphylococcus aureus during Growth under Variable Growth Conditions Representative of the Human Wound Site

    PubMed Central

    Alreshidi, Mousa M.; Dunstan, R. Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a high proportion of nosocomial infections. This study was conducted to assess the bacterial responses in the cytoplasmic composition of amino acids and ribosomal proteins under various environmental conditions designed to mimic those on the human skin or within a wound site: pH6-8, temperature 35–37°C, and additional 0–5% NaCl. It was found that each set of environmental conditions elicited substantial adjustments in cytoplasmic levels of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, alanine and glycine (P< 0.05). These alterations generated characteristic amino acid profiles assessed by principle component analysis (PCA). Substantial alterations in cytoplasmic amino acid and protein composition occurred during growth under conditions of higher salinity stress implemented via additional levels of NaCl in the growth medium. The cells responded to additional NaCl at pH 6 by reducing levels of ribosomal proteins, whereas at pH 8 there was an upregulation of ribosomal proteins compared with the reference control. The levels of two ribosomal proteins, L32 and S19, remained constant across all experimental conditions. The data supported the hypothesis that the bacterium was continually responding to the dynamic environment by modifying the proteome and optimising metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27442022

  16. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A; Jerez, Carlos A

    2015-12-04

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium.

  17. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  18. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  19. High Expression of Cry1Ac Protein in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) by Combining Independent Transgenic Events that Target the Protein to Cytoplasm and Plastids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjeet Kumar; Paritosh, Kumar; Kant, Uma; Burma, Pradeep Kumar; Pental, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic cotton was developed using two constructs containing a truncated and codon-modified cry1Ac gene (1,848 bp), which was originally characterized from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki strain HD73 that encodes a toxin highly effective against many lepidopteran pests. In Construct I, the cry1Ac gene was cloned under FMVde, a strong constitutively expressing promoter, to express the encoded protein in the cytoplasm. In Construct II, the encoded protein was directed to the plastids using a transit peptide taken from the cotton rbcSIb gene. Genetic transformation experiments with Construct I resulted in a single copy insertion event in which the Cry1Ac protein expression level was 2-2.5 times greater than in the Bacillus thuringiensis cotton event Mon 531, which is currently used in varieties and hybrids grown extensively in India and elsewhere. Another high expression event was selected from transgenics developed with Construct II. The Cry protein expression resulting from this event was observed only in the green plant parts. No transgenic protein expression was observed in the non-green parts, including roots, seeds and non-green floral tissues. Thus, leucoplasts may lack the mechanism to allow entry of a protein tagged with the transit peptide from a protein that is only synthesized in tissues containing mature plastids. Combining the two events through sexual crossing led to near additive levels of the toxin at 4-5 times the level currently used in the field. The two high expression events and their combination will allow for effective resistance management against lepidopteran insect pests, particularly Helicoverpa armigera, using a high dosage strategy.

  20. High Expression of Cry1Ac Protein in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) by Combining Independent Transgenic Events that Target the Protein to Cytoplasm and Plastids

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amarjeet Kumar; Paritosh, Kumar; Kant, Uma; Burma, Pradeep Kumar; Pental, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic cotton was developed using two constructs containing a truncated and codon-modified cry1Ac gene (1,848 bp), which was originally characterized from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki strain HD73 that encodes a toxin highly effective against many lepidopteran pests. In Construct I, the cry1Ac gene was cloned under FMVde, a strong constitutively expressing promoter, to express the encoded protein in the cytoplasm. In Construct II, the encoded protein was directed to the plastids using a transit peptide taken from the cotton rbcSIb gene. Genetic transformation experiments with Construct I resulted in a single copy insertion event in which the Cry1Ac protein expression level was 2–2.5 times greater than in the Bacillus thuringiensis cotton event Mon 531, which is currently used in varieties and hybrids grown extensively in India and elsewhere. Another high expression event was selected from transgenics developed with Construct II. The Cry protein expression resulting from this event was observed only in the green plant parts. No transgenic protein expression was observed in the non-green parts, including roots, seeds and non-green floral tissues. Thus, leucoplasts may lack the mechanism to allow entry of a protein tagged with the transit peptide from a protein that is only synthesized in tissues containing mature plastids. Combining the two events through sexual crossing led to near additive levels of the toxin at 4–5 times the level currently used in the field. The two high expression events and their combination will allow for effective resistance management against lepidopteran insect pests, particularly Helicoverpa armigera, using a high dosage strategy. PMID:27391960

  1. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  2. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-07-12

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling.

  3. Clinical associations and characterisation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and azurocidin.

    PubMed

    Cooper, T; Savige, J; Nassis, L; Paspaliaris, B; Neeson, P; Neil, J; Knight, K R; Daskalakis, M; Doery, J C

    2000-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) and azurocidin (AZ) are recently described target antigens of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). In this study, BPI-ANCA were demonstrated most often in patients with ulcerative colitis (36/92, 39%), Crohn's disease (17/66, 26%) and cystic fibrosis (11/14, 79%), but also in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (8/40, 20%), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (111/65, 17%) and mixed connective tissue disease (4/18, 22%). BPI-ANCA were also common in sera containing antinuclear (ANA) (9/43, 21%) or antidouble-stranded (ds) DNA (7/28, 25%) antibodies. There was no increased frequency of abnormal alpha1-antitrypsin (alphal1AT) phenotypes in patients with BPI-ANCA, and BPI-ANCA were not more common in individuals with an abnormal phenotype. The predominant IgG subclasses were IgG1 and IgG3; IgA but not IgM was present. Both IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA were high affinity antibodies, and the affinity of IgG antibodies did not change with time in the sera tested. Four of the five sera (80%) containing BPI-ANCA did not bind to denatured, reduced BPI, suggesting that most BPI-ANCA recognised conformational epitopes. AZ-ANCA were demonstrated in 2/11 patients (18%) with Wegener's granulomatosis, 3/12 (25%) with cystic fibrosis and 3/14 (21%) with chronic active hepatitis. AZ-ANCA were present in 5/25 sera (25%) with ANA, but the levels were only marginally elevated. AZ-ANCA were uncommon in patients with inflammatory bowel and rheumatological diseases, and in sera containing other autoantibodies. Again, there was no association with abnormal alpha1-AT phenotypes. BPI represents a major ANCA target antigen in patients with rheumatological as well as inflammatory bowel disease and cystic fibrosis, but AZ-ANCA are uncommon.

  4. The Rieske protein from Paracoccus denitrificans is inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin-arginine translocase.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Julie; Bauer, Brigitte; Zwicker, Klaus; Ludwig, Bernd; Anderka, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    The Rieske [2Fe-2S] protein (ISP) is an essential subunit of cytochrome bc(1) complexes in mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains. Based on the presence of two consecutive arginines, it was argued that the ISP of Paracoccus denitrificans, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, is inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Here, we provide experimental evidence that membrane integration of the bacterial ISP indeed relies on the Tat translocon. We show that targeting of the ISP depends on the twin-arginine motif. A strict requirement is established particularly for the second arginine residue (R16); conservative replacement of the first arginine (R15K) still permits substantial ISP transport. Comparative sequence analysis reveals characteristics common to Tat signal peptides in several bacterial ISPs; however, there are distinctive features relating to the fact that the presumed ISP Tat signal simultaneously serves as a membrane anchor. These differences include an elevated hydrophobicity of the h-region compared with generic Tat signals and the absence of an otherwise well-conserved '+5'-consensus motif lysine residue. Substitution of the +5 lysine (Y20K) compromises ISP export and/or cytochrome bc(1) stability to some extent and points to a specific role for this deviation from the canonical Tat motif. EPR spectroscopy confirms cytosolic insertion of the [2Fe-2S] cofactor. Mutation of an essential cofactor binding residue (C152S) decreases the ISP membrane levels, possibly indicating that cofactor insertion is a prerequisite for efficient translocation along the Tat pathway.

  5. Identification of low-abundance proteins in serum via the isolation of HSP72 complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masako; Shiota, Masayuki; Nakao, Takafumi; Uemura, Ryo; Nishi, Satoshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Maki; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Inagaki, Azusa; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Gi, Min; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi

    2016-03-16

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is an intracellular molecular chaperone that is overexpressed in tumor cells, and has also been detected in extracellular regions such as the blood. HSP72 forms complexes with peptides and proteins that are released from tumors. Accordingly, certain HSP72-binding proteins/peptides present in the blood of cancer patients may be derived from tumor cells. In this study, to effectively identify low-abundance proteins/peptides in the blood as tumor markers, we established a method for isolating HSP72-binding proteins/peptides from serum. Nine HSP72-specific monoclonal antibodies were conjugated to N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide-activated Sepharose beads (NHq) and used to isolate HSP72 complexes from serum samples. Precipitated proteins were then identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. Notably, this approach enabled the isolation of low-abundance proteins from serum without albumin removal. Moreover, by subjecting the serum samples of ten patients with multiple myeloma (MM) to NHq analysis, we identified 299 proteins present in MM HSP72 complexes, including 65 intracellular proteins. Among the intracellular proteins detected, 21 were present in all serum samples tested, while 11 were detected in both the conditioned media from cultured multiple myeloma cells and serum from MM patients. These results suggest that the NHq method can be applied to discover candidate tumor markers.

  6. Purification and Characterization of Abundant Secreted Protein in Suspension-Cultured Pumpkin Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Enoki, Keiko; Kouchi, Bonko; Sasaki, Takuji

    1990-01-01

    The abundant secreted protein with molecular weight of 32,000 was purified from the culture medium of suspension-cultured pumpkin (Cucurbita sp.) cells. Two steps, ammonium sulfate fractionation and Sepharose 6B column chromatography, were sufficient for purification to homogeneity. Antibodies against the pure protein were used to show that a protein of the same size is made by callus cells. There is considerable homology between the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of this secreted protein and chitinase isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667554

  7. Three major nucleolar proteins migrate from nucleolus to nucleoplasm and cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. exposed to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rong; Zhang, Huaning; Li, Shaoshan; Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2014-09-01

    Results from our previous investigation indicated that Al could affect the nucleolus and induce extrusion of silver-staining nucleolar particles containing argyrophilic proteins from the nucleolus into the cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. So far, the nucleolar proteins involved have not been identified. It is well known that nucleophosmin (B23), nucleolin (C23), and fibrillarin are three major and multifunctional nucleolar proteins. Therefore, effects of Al on B23, C23, and fibrillarin in root tip cells of V. faba exposed to 100 μM Al for 48 h were observed and analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. The results from this work demonstrated that after 100 μM of Al treatment for 48 h, B23 and C23 migrated from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm and fibrillarin from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. In some cells, fibrillarin was present only in the cytoplasm. Western blotting data revealed higher expression of the three major nucleolar proteins in Al-treated roots compared with the control and that the B23 content increased markedly. These findings confirmed our previous observations.

  8. The nuclear protein Sam68 is redistributed to the cytoplasm and is involved in PI3K/Akt activation during EV71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Cong, Haolong; Song, Lei; Tien, Po

    2014-02-13

    Nuclear proteins can be triggered to be redistributed to the cytoplasm to assist with EV71 virus replication. This process is frequently involved in cellular signal transduction upon virus infection. In this study, we have demonstrated that a new nuclear protein, 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis protein (Sam68), was translocated to the cytoplasm and was co-localized with EV71 during virus infection. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation assay confirmed that virus 3C protease triggered the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of Sam68 expression using ShRNA significantly inhibited virus replication, suggesting that Sam68 may be a host factor involved in EV71 life cycle. In addition, EV71-induced Akt phosphorylation involved a PI3K-dependent mechanism. Sam68 is known to be an upstream regulator of PI3K and our immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that Sam68 interacted directly with the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K and mediated PI3K/Akt activation during EV71 infection. On the contrary, silencing of Sam68 dramatically abrogated Akt phosphorylation. These data, plus the fact that Sam68 is known to be a signaling adaptor protein, indicated that Sam68 is a signal molecule with a functional role in the PI3K/Akt signal pathway during EV71 infection.

  9. The cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3 regulates the activity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae G-protein-coupled alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, William; Eilers, Markus; Ying, Weiwen; Konopka, James B

    2002-01-01

    The binding of alpha-factor to its receptor (Ste2p) activates a G-protein-signaling pathway leading to conjugation of MATa cells of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. We conducted a genetic screen to identify constitutively activating mutations in the N-terminal region of the alpha-factor receptor that includes transmembrane domains 1-5. This approach identified 12 unique constitutively activating mutations, the strongest of which affected polar residues at the cytoplasmic ends of transmembrane domains 2 and 3 (Asn84 and Gln149, respectively) that are conserved in the alpha-factor receptors of divergent yeast species. Targeted mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling studies, suggested that Gln149 is oriented toward the core of the transmembrane helix bundle where it may be involved in mediating an interaction with Asn84. These residues appear to play specific roles in maintaining the inactive conformation of the protein since a variety of mutations at either position cause constitutive receptor signaling. Interestingly, the activity of many mammalian G-protein-coupled receptors is also regulated by conserved polar residues (the E/DRY motif) at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3. Altogether, the results of this study suggest a conserved role for the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3 in regulating the activity of divergent G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:11861550

  10. The DEAD-box helicase Ded1 from yeast is an mRNP cap-associated protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Senissar, Meriem; Saux, Agnès Le; Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Adam, Céline; Banroques, Josette; Tanner, N. Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box helicase Ded1 is an essential yeast protein that is closely related to mammalian DDX3 and to other DEAD-box proteins involved in developmental and cell cycle regulation. Ded1 is considered to be a translation-initiation factor that helps the 40S ribosome scan the mRNA from the 5′ 7-methylguanosine cap to the AUG start codon. We used IgG pull-down experiments, mass spectrometry analyses, genetic experiments, sucrose gradients, in situ localizations and enzymatic assays to show that Ded1 is a cap-associated protein that actively shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. NanoLC-MS/MS analyses of purified complexes show that Ded1 is present in both nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNPs. Ded1 physically interacts with purified components of the nuclear CBC and the cytoplasmic eIF4F complexes, and its enzymatic activity is stimulated by these factors. In addition, we show that Ded1 is genetically linked to these factors. Ded1 comigrates with these proteins on sucrose gradients, but treatment with rapamycin does not appreciably alter the distribution of Ded1; thus, most of the Ded1 is in stable mRNP complexes. We conclude that Ded1 is an mRNP cofactor of the cap complex that may function to remodel the different mRNPs and thereby regulate the expression of the mRNAs. PMID:25013175

  11. Garlic virus X 11-kDa protein granules move within the cytoplasm and traffic a host protein normally found in the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; Yan, Fei; Guo, Wei; Zheng, Hongying; Lin, Lin; Peng, Jiejun; Adams, Michael J; Chen, Jianping

    2011-09-01

    The subcellular localization of the 11-kDa protein (p11) encoded by ORF3 of Garlic virus X (GarVX; genus Allexivirus, family Alphaflexiviridae) was examined by confocal microscopy. Granules with intense fluorescence were visible on the endoplasmic reticulum when p11 fused with green or red fluorescent protein (GFP or RFP) was expressed in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the p11-RFP granules moved in the cytoplasm, along the cell periphery and through the cell membranes to adjacent cells. A 17-kDa protein (p17) of garlic interacting with p11 was identified by yeast two-hybridization and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. When p17 fused to GFP was expressed in epidermal cells of N. benthamiana, it localized to the nucleolus. However, in the presence of GarVX p11, the distribution of p17 changed to that of p11, but did not appear to affect the pattern of movement of p11.

  12. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance

    PubMed Central

    Haab, Brian B.; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method of obtaining multiple protein measurements from low volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also protein post-translational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect the modifications. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions, both in normal and disease biology. The methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple, specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents have made significant progress. Here we describe practical approaches to develop, optimize and use antibody array assays to determine both protein abundances and glycosylation states. We cover the use of low-volume arrays to reduce sample consumption and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization. These methods could be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may be changing or affect protein function. PMID:24510592

  13. Identification of abundant proteins and potential allergens in Culicoides nubeculosus salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Heesom, K J; Mawby, W J; Mellor, P S; Russell, C L

    2008-03-15

    IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity reactions to the bites of insects are a common cause of skin disease in horses. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is most frequently associated with bites of Culicoides spp. and occurs in all parts of the world where horses and Culicoides coexist. The main allergens that cause IBH are probably some of the abundant proteins in the saliva of Culicoides associated with blood feeding. Western blots of Culicoides proteins separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis detected strong IgE responses in all horses with IBH to antigens in protein extracts from wild caught Culicoides, but only weak responses to salivary antigens from captive bred C. nubeculosus which may reflect important differences among allergens from different species of Culicoides or differences between thorax and salivary gland antigens. 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify several of the abundant proteins in the saliva of C. nubeculosus. These included maltase, members of the D7 family, and several small, basic proteins associated with blood feeding. The most frequently detected IgE-binding proteins were in a group of proteins with pI>8.5 and mass 40-50kDa. Mass spectrometry identified two of these allergenic proteins as similar to hyaluronidase and a heavily glycosylated protein of unknown function that have previously been identified in salivary glands of C. sonorensis.

  14. A New Coarse-Grained Model for E. coli Cytoplasm: Accurate Calculation of the Diffusion Coefficient of Proteins and Observation of Anomalous Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sabeeha; McClendon, Christopher L.; Hsu, Monica T.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained model of the E. coli cytoplasm is developed by describing the proteins of the cytoplasm as flexible units consisting of one or more spheres that follow Brownian dynamics (BD), with hydrodynamic interactions (HI) accounted for by a mean-field approach. Extensive BD simulations were performed to calculate the diffusion coefficients of three different proteins in the cellular environment. The results are in close agreement with experimental or previously simulated values, where available. Control simulations without HI showed that use of HI is essential to obtain accurate diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion inside the crowded cellular medium was investigated with Fractional Brownian motion analysis, and found to be present in this model. By running a series of control simulations in which various forces were removed systematically, it was found that repulsive interactions (volume exclusion) are the main cause for anomalous diffusion, with a secondary contribution from HI. PMID:25180859

  15. mTOR pathway activation in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumour cells: pomalidomide enhances cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of mTOR protein

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmelli, Tommasina; Giugliano, Emilia; Brunetto, Vanessa; Rapa, Ida; Cappia, Susanna; Giorcelli, Jessica; Rrodhe, Sokol; Papotti, Mauro; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a protein kinase that plays a central role in regulating critical cellular processes. We evaluated the activation and cellular localization of the mTOR pathway in multiple myeloma (MM) and analyzed the role of pomalidomide in regulating mTOR. By immunohistochemistry cytoplasmic p-mTOR stained positive in 57 out 101 (57.6%) cases with a nuclear p-mTOR localization in 14 out 101 samples (13.8%). In the 70 MM samples analyzed for the entire pathway, p-mTOR expression significantly correlated with p-AKT, p-P70S6K, and p-4E-BP1 suggesting that the AKT/mTOR pathway is activated in a subset of MM patients. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mTOR protein is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus at baseline in MM cell lines and in plasma cells of 13 MM patients and that pomalidomide facilitated the shift of the mTOR protein in the nucleus. By western blotting, treatment with pomalidomide increased nuclear mTOR and p-mTOR expression levels in the nucleus with a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic fractions while does not seem to affect significantly AKT phosphorylation status. In MM cells the anti-myeloma activity of pomalidomide may be mediated by the regulation of the mTOR pathway. PMID:26097872

  16. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance.

    PubMed

    Haab, Brian B; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-09-24

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method for obtaining multiple protein measurements from small volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also posttranslational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect them. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions in both normal and disease biology. Significant progress has been made in developing methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents. This unit describes practical approaches for developing, optimizing, and using antibody array assays to determine both protein abundance and glycosylation state. Low-volume arrays can be used to reduce sample consumption, and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization is discussed. These methods can be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may change and/or affect protein function.

  17. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  18. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  19. Trans-splicing Into Highly Abundant Albumin Transcripts for Production of Therapeutic Proteins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Mansfield, S Gary; Cote, Colette A; Jiang, Ping Du; Weng, Ke; Amar, Marcelo JA; Brewer, Bryan H; Remaley, Alan T; McGarrity, Gerard J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Puttaraju, M

    2008-01-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has emerged as an exciting mode of RNA therapy. Here we describe a novel trans-splicing strategy, which targets highly abundant pre-mRNAs, to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. First, we used a pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM) that mediated trans-splicing of human apolipoprotein A-I (hapoA-I) into the highly abundant mouse albumin exon 1. Hydrodynamic tail vein injection of the hapoA-I PTM plasmid in mice followed by analysis of the chimeric transcripts and protein, confirmed accurate and efficient trans-splicing into albumin pre-mRNA and production of hapoA-I protein. The versatility of this approach was demonstrated by producing functional human papillomavirus type-16 E7 (HPV16-E7) single-chain antibody in C57BL/6 mice and functional factor VIII (FVIII) and phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Altogether, these studies demonstrate that trans-splicing to highly abundant albumin transcripts can be used as a general platform to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. PMID:19066600

  20. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  1. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  2. Antiviral protein Ski8 is a direct partner of Spo11 in meiotic DNA break formation, independent of its cytoplasmic role in RNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arora, Charanjit; Kee, Kehkooi; Maleki, Shohreh; Keeney, Scott

    2004-02-27

    Meiotic recombination initiates with double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by Spo11 in conjunction with accessory proteins whose roles are not understood. Two-hybrid analysis reveals a network of interactions connecting the yeast DSB proteins to one another. Of these proteins, Ski8 was known to function in cytoplasmic RNA metabolism, suggesting that its role in recombination might be indirect. However, obligate partners of Ski8 in RNA metabolism are dispensable for recombination and Ski8 relocalizes to the nucleus and associates with chromosomes specifically during meiosis. Interaction of Ski8 with Spo11 is essential for DSB formation and Ski8 relocalization. Thus, Ski8 plays distinct roles in RNA metabolism and, as a direct partner of Spo11, in DSB formation. Ski8 works with Spo11 to recruit other DSB proteins to meiotic chromosomes, implicating Ski8 as a scaffold protein mediating assembly of a multiprotein complex essential for DSB formation.

  3. GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 interacts with RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 and suppresses cell death and defense responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Plants use a variety of innate immune regulators to trigger cell death and defense responses against pathogen attack. We identified pepper (Capsicum annuum) GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (CaGRP1) as a RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 (CaPIK1)-interacting partner, based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation analyses as well as gene silencing and transient expression analysis. CaGRP1 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a glycine-rich region at the C-terminus. The CaGRP1 protein had DNA- and RNA-binding activity in vitro. CaGRP1 interacted with CaPIK1 in planta. CaGRP1 and CaGRP1-CaPIK1 complexes were localized to the nucleus in plant cells. CaPIK1 phosphorylated CaGRP1 in vitro and in planta. Transient coexpression of CaGRP1 with CaPIK1 suppressed the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response, accompanied by a reduced CaPIK1-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The RNA recognition motif region of CaGRP1 was responsible for the nuclear localization of CaGRP1 as well as the suppression of the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response. CaGRP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection; however, CaPIK1-silenced plants were more susceptible to Xcv. CaGRP1 interacts with CaPIK1 and negatively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defense responses by suppressing ROS accumulation.

  4. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL37 Protein Tyrosine Residues Conserved among All Alphaherpesviruses Are Required for Interactions with Glycoprotein K, Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment, and Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Chouljenko, Dmitry V.; Jambunathan, Nithya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Naderi, Misagh; Brylinski, Michal; Caskey, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein functions in virion envelopment at trans-Golgi membranes, as well as in retrograde and anterograde transport of virion capsids. Recently, we reported that UL37 interacts with glycoprotein K (gK) and its interacting partner protein UL20 (N. Jambunathan, D. Chouljenko, P. Desai, A. S. Charles, R. Subramanian, V. N. Chouljenko, and K. G. Kousoulas, J Virol 88:5927–5935, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00278-14), facilitating cytoplasmic virion envelopment. Alignment of UL37 homologs encoded by alphaherpesviruses revealed the presence of highly conserved residues in the central portion of the UL37 protein. A cadre of nine UL37 site-specific mutations were produced and tested for their ability to inhibit virion envelopment and infectious virus production. Complementation analysis revealed that replacement of tyrosines 474 and 480 with alanine failed to complement the UL37-null virus, while all other mutated UL37 genes complemented the virus efficiently. The recombinant virus DC474-480 constructed with tyrosines 474, 476, 477, and 480 mutated to alanine residues produced a gK-null-like phenotype characterized by the production of very small plaques and accumulation of capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Recombinant viruses having either tyrosine 476 or 477 replaced with alanine produced a wild-type phenotype. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that replacement of all four tyrosines with alanines substantially reduced the ability of gK to interact with UL37. Alignment of HSV UL37 with the human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus UL37 homologs revealed that Y480 was conserved only for alphaherpesviruses. Collectively, these results suggest that the UL37 conserved tyrosine 480 residue plays a crucial role in interactions with gK to facilitate cytoplasmic virion envelopment and infectious virus production. IMPORTANCE The HSV-1 UL37 protein is conserved among all herpesviruses, functions in both

  5. Functional Interaction between the Cytoplasmic ABC Protein LptB and the Inner Membrane LptC Protein, Components of the Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machinery in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandra M.; Benedet, Mattia; Maccagni, Elisa A.; Sperandeo, Paola; Villa, Riccardo; Dehò, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The assembly of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) requires the transenvelope Lpt (lipopolysaccharide transport) complex, made in Escherichia coli of seven essential proteins located in the inner membrane (IM) (LptBCFG), periplasm (LptA), and OM (LptDE). At the IM, LptBFG constitute an unusual ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, composed by the transmembrane LptFG proteins and the cytoplasmic LptB ATPase, which is thought to extract LPS from the IM and to provide the energy for its export across the periplasm to the cell surface. LptC is a small IM bitopic protein that binds to LptBFG and recruits LptA via its N- and C-terminal regions, and its role in LPS export is not completely understood. Here, we show that the expression level of lptB is a critical factor for suppressing lethality of deletions in the C-terminal region of LptC and the functioning of a hybrid Lpt machinery that carries Pa-LptC, the highly divergent LptC orthologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that LptB overexpression stabilizes C-terminally truncated LptC mutant proteins, thereby allowing the formation of a sufficient amount of stable IM complexes to support growth. Moreover, the LptB level seems also critical for the assembly of IM complexes carrying Pa-LptC which is otherwise defective in interactions with the E. coli LptFG components. Overall, our data suggest that LptB and LptC functionally interact and support a model whereby LptB plays a key role in the assembly of the Lpt machinery. IMPORTANCE The asymmetric outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria contains in its outer leaflet an unusual glycolipid, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS largely contributes to the peculiar permeability barrier properties of the OM that prevent the entry of many antibiotics, thus making Gram-negative pathogens difficult to treat. In Escherichia coli the LPS transporter (the Lpt machine) is made of seven essential proteins (LptABCDEFG) that form a

  6. Absence of the Yeast Hsp31 Chaperones of the DJ-1 Superfamily Perturbs Cytoplasmic Protein Quality Control in Late Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Ingo; Norell, Derrick; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock proteins Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33 and Hsp34 belong to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily which includes the human protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as the most prominent member. Mutations in the DJ-1 gene are directly linked to autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 acts as an oxidative stress-induced chaperone preventing aggregation and fibrillation of α-synuclein, a critical factor in the development of the disease. In vivo assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the model substrate ΔssCPY*Leu2myc (ΔssCL*myc) as an aggregation-prone misfolded cytoplasmic protein revealed an influence of the Hsp31 chaperone family on the steady state level of this substrate. In contrast to the ubiquitin ligase of the N-end rule pathway Ubr1, which is known to be prominently involved in the degradation process of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins, the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family does not impair the degradation of newly synthesized misfolded substrate. Also degradation of substrates with strong affinity to Ubr1 like those containing the type 1 N-degron arginine is not affected by the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family. Epistasis analysis indicates that one function of the Hsp31 chaperone family resides in a pathway overlapping with the Ubr1-dependent degradation of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This pathway gains relevance in late growth phase under conditions of nutrient limitation. Additionally, the Hsp31 chaperones seem to be important for maintaining the cellular Ssa Hsp70 activity which is important for Ubr1-dependent degradation. PMID:26466368

  7. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  8. Interactions of actin, myosin, and a new actin-binding protein of rabbit pulmonary macrophages. II. Role in cytoplasmic movement and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1976-03-01

    Actin and myosin of rabbit pulmonary macrophages are influenced by two other proteins. A protein cofactor is required for the actin activation of macrophage myosin Mg2 ATPase activity, and a high molecular weight actin-binding protein aggregates actin filaments (Stossel T.P., and J.H. Hartwig. 1975. J. Biol. Chem. 250:5706-5711)9 When warmed in 0.34 M sucrose solution containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol, these four proteins interact cooperatively. Acin-binding protein in the presence of actin causes the actin to form a gel, which liquifies when cooled. The myosin contracts the gel into an aggregate, and the rate of aggregation is accelerated by the cofactor. Therefore, we believe that these four proteins also effec the temperature-dependent gelation and aggregation of crude sucrose extracts pulmonary macrophages containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol. The gelled extracts are composed of tangled filaments. Relative to homogenates of resting macrophages, the distribution of actin-binding protein in homogenates of phagocytizing macrophages is altered such that 2-6 times more actin-binding protein is soluble. Sucrose extracts of phagocytizing macrophages gel more rapidly than extracts of resting macrophages. Phagocytosis by pulmonary macrophages involves the formation of peripheral pseudopods containing filaments. The findings suggest that the actin-binding protein initiates a cooperative interaction of contractile proteins to generate cytoplasmic gelation, and that phagocytosis influences the behavior of the actin-binding protein.

  9. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins: versatile players in the plant adaptation to water limiting environments.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Luis Reyes, José; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-04-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families; each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility.

  10. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis.

  11. Global Analysis of Condition-specific Subcellular Protein Distribution and Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sunhee; Smith, Jennifer J.; von Haller, Priska D.; Dilworth, David J.; Sitko, Katherine A.; Miller, Leslie R.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Goodlett, David R.; Aitchison, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular control of protein activities by modulation of their abundance or compartmentalization is not easily measured on a large scale. We developed and applied a method to globally interrogate these processes that is widely useful for systems-level analyses of dynamic cellular responses in many cell types. The approach involves subcellular fractionation followed by comprehensive proteomic analysis of the fractions, which is enabled by a data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry approach that samples every available mass to charge channel systematically to maximize sensitivity. Next, various fraction-enrichment ratios are measured for all detected proteins across different environmental conditions and used to group proteins into clusters reflecting changes in compartmentalization and relative conditional abundance. Application of the approach to characterize the response of yeast proteins to fatty acid exposure revealed dynamics of peroxisomes and novel dynamics of MCC/eisosomes, specialized plasma membrane domains comprised of membrane compartment occupied by Can1 (MCC) and eisosome subdomains. It also led to the identification of Fat3, a fatty acid transport protein of the plasma membrane, previously annotated as Ykl187. PMID:23349476

  12. Phosphorylation of Golgi Peripheral Membrane Protein Grasp65 Is an Integral Step in the Formation of the Human Cytomegalovirus Cytoplasmic Assembly Compartment.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G Michael; Grabski, Robert; Sanchez, Veronica; Britt, William J

    2016-10-04

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the largest member of the Herpesviridae and represents a significant cause of disease. During virus replication, HCMV alters cellular functions to facilitate its replication, including significant reorganization of the secretory and endocytic pathways of the infected cell. A defining morphologic change of the infected cell is the formation of a membranous structure in the cytoplasm that is designated the virion assembly compartment (AC), which consists of virion structural proteins surrounded by cellular membranes. The loss of normal Golgi compartment morphology and its relocalization from a juxtanuclear ribbonlike structure to a series of concentric rings on the periphery of the AC represents a readily recognized reorganization of cellular membranes in the HCMV-infected cell. Although trafficking of viral proteins to this compartment is required for the assembly of infectious virions, the functional significance of the reorganization of intracellular membranes like the Golgi membranes into the AC in the assembly of infectious virus remains understudied. In this study, we determined that Golgi membrane ribbon fragmentation increased during the early cytoplasmic phase of virion assembly and that Golgi membrane fragmentation in infected cells was dependent on the phosphorylation of an integral cis-Golgi protein, Grasp65. Inhibition of Golgi membrane fragmentation and of its reorganization into the AC resulted in decreased production of infectious particles and alteration of the incorporation of an essential protein into the envelope of the mature virion. These results demonstrated the complexity of the virus-host cell interactions required for efficient assembly of this large DNA virus.

  13. Complex alternative cytoplasmic protein isoforms of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 generated through noncanonical translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Toptan, Tuna; Fonseca, Lidia; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) protein is constitutively expressed in all KSHV-infected cells, as well as in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA1 is a multifunctional KSHV oncoprotein containing multiple repeat sequences that is important for viral episome maintenance and the regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. We characterize here multiple LANA1 isoforms and show that ∼50% of LANA1 is naturally generated as N-terminally truncated shoulder proteins that are detected on SDS-PAGE as faster-migrating shoulder bands designated LANA1(S). Higher-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream at noncanonical sites within the N-terminal region, whereas lower-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream within the central repeat 1 domain. LANA1(S) proteins lack an N-terminal nuclear localization signal motif, and some isoforms differ from full-length, canonical LANA1 by localizing to perinuclear and cytoplasmic sites. Although LANA1 has until now been assumed to be solely active in the nucleus, this finding indicates that this major KSHV oncoprotein may have cytoplasmic activities as well. KSHV overcomes its limited genetic coding capacity by generating alternatively initiated protein isoforms that may have distinct biological functions.

  14. The RNA-binding protein TIAR is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during Fas-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J L; Tian, Q; Kedersha, N; Robertson, M; Anderson, P

    1995-02-28

    We have determined the structure, intracellular localization, and tissue distribution of TIAR, a TIA-1-related RNA-binding protein. Two related isoforms of TIAR, migrating at 42 and 50 kDa, are expressed in primate cells. Unlike TIA-1, which is found in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes, TIAR is concentrated in the nucleus of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Because TIAR can trigger DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes, it is a candidate effector of apoptotic cell death. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that the expression and intracellular localization of TIAR change dramatically during Fas-mediated apoptosis. TIAR moves from the nucleus to the cytoplasm within 30 min of Fas ligation. Redistribution of TIAR precedes the onset of DNA fragmentation and is not a nonspecific consequence of nuclear disintegration. Cytoplasmic redistribution of TIAR is not observed during cellular activation triggered by mitogens such as concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. Our results suggest that cytoplasmic redistribution of TIAR may be a general feature of the apoptotic program.

  15. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  16. Identification of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) protein putative interactors using phage display.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Lloyd, Taylor D; Schäfermeyer, Kim R; Kumar, Santosh; Downie, Allan Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seeds without functional SEED MATURATION PROTEIN1 (SMP1), a boiling soluble protein predicted to be of intrinsic disorder, presumed to be a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT (LEA) family protein based on sequence homology, do not enter secondary dormancy after 3 days at 40 °C. We hypothesized that SMP1 may protect a heat labile protein involved in the promotion of secondary dormancy. Recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28, its soybean (Glycine max), LEA4 homologue, protected the labile GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYROGENASE enzyme from heat stress, as did a known protectant, Bovine Serum Albumin, whether the LEA protein was in solution or attached to the bottom of microtiter plates. Maintenance of a biological function for both recombinant LEA proteins when immobilized encouraged a biopanning approach to screen for potential protein interactors. Phage display with two Arabidopsis seed, T7 phage, cDNA libraries, normalized for transcripts present in the mature, dehydrated, 12-, 24-, or 36-h imbibed seeds, were used in biopans against recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28. Phage titer increased considerably over four rounds of biopanning for both LEA proteins, but not for BSA, at both 25 and at 41 °C, regardless of the library used. The prevalence of multiple, independent clones encoding portions of specific proteins repeatedly retrieved from different libraries, temperatures and baits, provides evidence suggesting these LEA proteins are discriminating which proteins they protect, a novel finding. The identification of putative LEA-interacting proteins provides targets for reverse genetic approaches to further dissect the induction of secondary dormancy in seeds in response to heat stress.

  17. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis.

  18. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-06

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  19. Cytoplasmic Localization of HTLV-1 HBZ Protein: A Biomarker of HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP)

    PubMed Central

    Baratella, Marco; Forlani, Greta; Raval, Goutham U.; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Gout, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Accolla, Roberto S.

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1 is the causative agent of a severe form of adult T cell leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL), and of a chronic progressive neuromyelopathy designated HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Two important HTLV-1-encoded proteins, Tax-1 and HBZ, play crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of the oncogenic process. Less information is instead available on the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to HAM/TSP. More importantly, no single specific biomarker has been described that unambiguously define the status of HAM/TSP. Here we report for the first time the finding that HBZ, described until now as an exclusive nuclear protein both in chronically infected and in ATL cells, is instead exclusively localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients suffering of HAM/TSP. Interestingly, at the single cell level, HBZ and Tax-1 proteins are never found co-expressed in the same cell, suggesting the existence of mechanisms of expression uncoupling of these two important HTLV-1 viral products in HAM/TSP patients. Cells expressing cytoplasmic HBZ were almost exclusively found in the CD4+ T cell compartment that was not, at least in a representative HAM/TSP patient, expressing the CD25 marker. Less than 1 percent CD8+ T cells were fond positive for HBZ, while B cells and NK cells were found negative for HBZ in HAM/TSP patients. Our results identify the cytoplasmic localization of HBZ in HAM/TSP patient as a possible biomarker of this rather neglected tropical disease, and raise important hypotheses on the role of HBZ in the pathogenesis of the neuromyelopathy associated to HTLV-1 infection. PMID:28095504

  20. The polypyrimidine tract-binding protein affects coronavirus RNA accumulation levels and relocalizes viral RNAs to novel cytoplasmic domains different from replication-transcription sites.

    PubMed

    Sola, Isabel; Galán, Carmen; Mateos-Gómez, Pedro A; Palacio, Lorena; Zúñiga, Sonia; Cruz, Jazmina L; Almazán, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis

    2011-05-01

    The coronavirus (CoV) discontinuous transcription mechanism is driven by long-distance RNA-RNA interactions between transcription-regulating sequences (TRSs) located at the 5' terminal leader (TRS-L) and also preceding each mRNA-coding sequence (TRS-B). The contribution of host cell proteins to CoV transcription needs additional information. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) was reproducibly identified in association with positive-sense RNAs of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) TRS-L and TRS-B by affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. A temporal regulation of PTB cytoplasmic levels was observed during infection, with a significant increase from 7 to 16 h postinfection being inversely associated with a decrease in viral replication and transcription. Silencing the expression of PTB with small interfering RNA in two cell lines (Huh7 and HEK 293T) led to a significant increase of up to 4-fold in mRNA levels and virus titer, indicating a negative effect of PTB on CoV RNA accumulation. During CoV infection, PTB relocalized from the nucleus to novel cytoplasmic structures different from replication-transcription sites in which stress granule markers T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR) colocalized. PTB was detected in these modified stress granules in TGEV-infected swine testis cells but not in stress granules induced by oxidative stress. Furthermore, viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs were detected in association with PTB and TIAR. These cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes might be involved in posttranscriptional regulation of virus gene expression.

  1. Cytoplasmic Localization of HTLV-1 HBZ Protein: A Biomarker of HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    PubMed

    Baratella, Marco; Forlani, Greta; Raval, Goutham U; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Gout, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Tosi, Giovanna; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1 is the causative agent of a severe form of adult T cell leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL), and of a chronic progressive neuromyelopathy designated HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Two important HTLV-1-encoded proteins, Tax-1 and HBZ, play crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of the oncogenic process. Less information is instead available on the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to HAM/TSP. More importantly, no single specific biomarker has been described that unambiguously define the status of HAM/TSP. Here we report for the first time the finding that HBZ, described until now as an exclusive nuclear protein both in chronically infected and in ATL cells, is instead exclusively localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients suffering of HAM/TSP. Interestingly, at the single cell level, HBZ and Tax-1 proteins are never found co-expressed in the same cell, suggesting the existence of mechanisms of expression uncoupling of these two important HTLV-1 viral products in HAM/TSP patients. Cells expressing cytoplasmic HBZ were almost exclusively found in the CD4+ T cell compartment that was not, at least in a representative HAM/TSP patient, expressing the CD25 marker. Less than 1 percent CD8+ T cells were fond positive for HBZ, while B cells and NK cells were found negative for HBZ in HAM/TSP patients. Our results identify the cytoplasmic localization of HBZ in HAM/TSP patient as a possible biomarker of this rather neglected tropical disease, and raise important hypotheses on the role of HBZ in the pathogenesis of the neuromyelopathy associated to HTLV-1 infection.

  2. Interactions of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Human and Simian Retroviral Transmembrane Proteins with Components of the Clathrin Adaptor Complexes Modulate Intracellular and Cell Surface Expression of Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Erdtmann, Lars; Delamarre, Lelia; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Sonigo, Pierre; Dokhelar, Marie Christine; Benarous, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of the transmembrane (TM) envelope proteins (TM-CDs) of most retroviruses have a Tyr-based motif, YXXØ, in their membrane-proximal regions. This signal is involved in the trafficking and endocytosis of membrane receptors via clathrin-associated AP-1 and AP-2 adaptor complexes. We have used CD8-TM-CD chimeras to investigate the role of the Tyr-based motif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM-CDs in the cell surface expression of the envelope glycoprotein. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies showed that this motif is a major determinant of the cell surface expression of the CD8-HTLV chimera. The YXXØ motif also plays a key role in subcellular distribution of the envelope of lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, these viruses, which encode TM proteins with a long cytoplasmic domain, have additional determinants distal to the YXXØ motif that participate in regulating cell surface expression. We have also used the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro binding assays to demonstrate that all three retroviral YXXØ motifs interact with the μ1 and μ2 subunits of AP complexes and that the C-terminal regions of HIV-1 and SIV TM proteins interact with the β2 adaptin subunit. The TM-CDs of HTLV-1, HIV-1, and SIV also interact with the whole AP complexes. These results clearly demonstrate that the cell surface expression of retroviral envelope glycoproteins is governed by interactions with adaptor complexes. The YXXØ-based signal is the major determinant of this interaction for the HTLV-1 TM, which contains a short cytoplasmic domain, whereas the lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV have additional determinants distal to this signal that are also involved. PMID:9882340

  3. Association of the Cytoplasmic Membrane Protein XpsN with the Outer Membrane Protein XpsD in the Type II Protein Secretion Apparatus of Xanthomonas campestris pv. Campestris

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsien-Ming; Wang, Kuan-Cheng; Liu, Yi-Ling; Yew, Hsin-Yan; Chen, Ling-Yun; Leu, Wei-Ming; Chen, David Chanhen; Hu, Nien-Tai

    2000-01-01

    An xps gene cluster composed of 11 open reading frames is required for the type II protein secretion in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Immediately upstream of the xpsD gene, which encodes an outer membrane protein that serves as the secretion channel by forming multimers, there exists an open reading frame (previously designated ORF2) that could encode a protein of 261 amino acid residues. Its N-terminal hydrophobic region is a likely membrane-anchoring sequence. Antibody raised against this protein could detect in the wild-type strain of X. campestris pv. campestris a protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 36 kDa by Western blotting. Its aberrant slow migration in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels might be due to its high proline content. We designated this protein XpsN. By constructing a mutant strain with an in-frame deletion of the chromosomal xpsN gene, we demonstrated that it is required for the secretion of extracellular enzyme by X. campestris pv. campestris. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that the XpsN protein was tightly associated with the membrane. Sucrose gradient sedimentation followed by immunoblot analysis revealed that it primarily appeared in the cytoplasmic membrane fractions. Immune precipitation experiments indicated that the XpsN protein was coprecipitated with the XpsD protein. In addition, the XpsN protein was co-eluted with the (His)6-tagged XpsD protein from the metal affinity chromatography column. All observations suggested that the XpsN protein forms a stable complex with the XpsD protein. In addition, immune precipitation analysis of the XpsN protein with various truncated XpsD proteins revealed that the C-terminal region of the XpsD protein between residues 650 and 759 was likely to be involved in complex formation between the two. PMID:10692359

  4. mraW, an essential gene at the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli codes for a cytoplasmic protein with methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Carrión, M; Gómez, M J; Merchante-Schubert, R; Dongarrá, S; Ayala, J A

    1999-01-01

    Three new open reading frames, mraZ, mraW and mraR (also called ftsL), were revealed by DNA sequencing immediately upstream of gene pbpB in the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli. We have found that mraW and mraZ are active genes, coding for two proteins with relative molecular masses of 34 800 and 17 300, respectively. MraW is a cytoplasmic protein that under overproduction condition is also loosely bound to the membrane. Soluble MraW was purified up to 90% by a single high performance electrophoresis (HPEC) step from an extract of an overproducing strain. The protein exhibits a S-adenosyl-dependent methyltransferase activity on membrane-located substrates.

  5. Species-specific epitopes exist on the cytoplasmic amino-terminal domain of erythrocyte band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Kimura, A; Uda, T; Nakashima, S; Ikeda, H; Yasuda, S; Osawa, M; Tsuji, T

    1992-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (P3-9H, P3-1F, P3-2H, P3-4A, and P3-4C) to human erythrocyte band 3 were produced using human erythrocyte membranes as the immunogen. All epitopes defined by these antibodies were found on the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte band 3. The antibodies crossreacted variously with erythrocyte band 3 of primates (chimpanzee, orangutan, Rhesus monkey, Japanese monkey, spider monkey, and capuchin monkey) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. P3-9H did not crossreact with erythrocyte band 3 of any primate examined; P3-1F crossreacted only with that of chimpanzee; P3-2H crossreacted with erythrocyte band 3 of chimpanzee, spider monkey, and capuchin monkey; and P3-4A and P3-4C crossreacted with erythrocyte band 3 of all primates examined. These results suggest that evolutional changes in primates are accumulated in the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and that species-specific epitopes exist on this domain.

  6. The cytoplasmic tail domain of the vacuolar protein sorting receptor Vps10p and a subset of VPS gene products regulate receptor stability, function, and localization.

    PubMed

    Cereghino, J L; Marcusson, E G; Emr, S D

    1995-09-01

    VPS10 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a type I transmembrane receptor protein required for the sorting of the soluble vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). To characterize the essential structural features and intercompartmental transport itinerary of the CPY receptor, we have constructed mutant forms of Vps10p that alter the carboxyterminal cytoplasmic tail of the protein. In addition, we have analyzed the effect these mutations as well as mutations in several VPS genes have on the function, stability, and localization of Vps10p. Although wild-type Vps10p is very stable over a 3-h chase period, overproduction of Vps10p results in PEP4-dependent degradation of the receptor. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that overexpressed receptor is delivered to the vacuole. A mutant form of Vps10p, in which 157 residues of the 164-residue cytoplasmic tail domain have been deleted, missorts CPY and is degraded rapidly. Additional mutations in the carboxy-terminus of Vps10p, including a deletion of a putative retention/recycling signal (FYVF), also result in CPY missorting and PEP4-dependent receptor instability. Because the cytoplasmic tail domain may interact with other factors, possibly VPS gene products, Vps10p stability was examined in a number of vps mutants. As was observed with the late Golgi protein Kex2p, Vps10p is unstable in a vps1 mutant. However, instability of Vps10p is even more severe in the class E vps mutants. Double mutant analyses demonstrate that this rapid degradation is dependent upon vacuolar proteases and a functional vacuolar ATPase. Fractionation studies of Vps10p in class E vps mutant strains indicate that the turnover of Vps10p occurs in a compartment other than the vacuole. These data are consistent with a model in which the cytoplasmic tail of Vps10p directs cycling of the receptor between a late Golgi sorting compartment and a prevacuolar endosome-like compartment, an exaggerated form of which is present in the vps class E mutants.

  7. Assessment of Label-Free Quantification in Discovery Proteomics and Impact of Technological Factors and Natural Variability of Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Al Shweiki, Mhd Rami; Mönchgesang, Susann; Majovsky, Petra; Thieme, Domenika; Trutschel, Diana; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2017-04-07

    We evaluated the state of label-free discovery proteomics focusing especially on technological contributions and contributions of naturally occurring differences in protein abundance to the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates in this highly peptide-centric technology. First, the performance of popular quantitative proteomics software, Proteome Discoverer, Scaffold, MaxQuant, and Progenesis QIP, was benchmarked using their default parameters and some modified settings. Beyond this, the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates was decomposed into variability introduced by the entire technology itself and variable protein amounts inherent to individual plants of the Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 accession. The technical component was considerably higher than the biological intersample variability, suggesting an effect on the degree and validity of reported biological changes in protein abundance. Surprisingly, the biological variability, protein abundance estimates, and protein fold changes were recorded differently by the software used to quantify the proteins, warranting caution in the comparison of discovery proteomics results. As expected, ∼99% of the proteome was invariant in the isogenic plants in the absence of environmental factors; however, few proteins showed substantial quantitative variability. This naturally occurring variation between individual organisms can have an impact on the causality of reported protein fold changes.

  8. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction. PMID:26304848

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of FliJ, a cytoplasmic component of the flagellar type III protein-export apparatus from Salmonella sp.

    PubMed Central

    Ibuki, Tatsuya; Shimada, Masafumi; Minamino, Tohru; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    The axial component proteins of the bacterial flagellum are synthesized in the cytoplasm and then translocated into the central channel of the flagellum by the flagellar type III protein-export apparatus for self-assembly at the distal growing end of the flagellum. FliJ is an essential cytoplasmic component of the export apparatus. In this study, Salmonella FliJ with an extra three residues (glycine, serine and histidine) attached to the N-terminus as the remainder of a His tag (GSH-FliJ) was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 300 as a precipitant. GSH-FliJ crystals grew in the hexagonal space group P6122 or P6522. While the native crystals diffracted to 3.3 Å resolution, the diffraction resolution limit of mercury derivatives was extended to 2.1 Å. Anomalous and isomorphous difference Patterson maps of the mercury-derivative crystal showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating the usefulness of the derivative data for structure determination. PMID:19153455

  10. Caffeine prevents kidney stone formation by translocation of apical surface annexin A1 crystal-binding protein into cytoplasm: In vitro evidence

    PubMed Central

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Recent large 3 cohorts have shown that caffeinated beverage consumption was associated with lower risk of kidney stone disease. However, its protective mechanisms remained unknown and had not been previously investigated. We thus evaluated protective effects of caffeine (1 μM–10 mM) on calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stone formation, using crystallization, crystal growth, cell-crystal adhesion, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assays. The results showed that caffeine reduced crystal number but, on the other hand, increased crystal size, resulting in unchanged crystal mass, consistent with crystal growth that was not affected by caffeine. However, caffeine significantly decreased crystal-binding capacity of MDCK renal tubular cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting and immunofluorescence study of COM crystal-binding proteins revealed significantly decreased level of annexin A1 on apical surface and its translocation into cytoplasm of the caffeine-treated cells, but no significant changes in other COM crystal-binding proteins (annexin A2, α-enolase, HSP70, and HSP90) were observed. Moreover, caffeine decreased intracellular [Ca2+] but increased [Ca2+] secretory index. Taken together, our findings showed an in vitro evidence of the protective mechanism of caffeine against kidney stone formation via translocation of annexin A1 from apical surface into cytoplasm to reduce the crystal-binding capacity of renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:27924845

  11. Low-abundant protein extraction from complex protein sample using a novel continuous aqueous two-phase systems device.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Villegas, Patricia; Espitia-Saloma, Edith; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Aguilar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a novel continuous aqueous two-phase system prototype for the recovery of biomolecules. The prototype is an alternative platform for protein recovery and α-amylase from soybean extracts was used as a model system. The system was selected as an example of low-abundant protein present in complex mixtures. Compared with batch systems, continuous operation in this prototype seems to increase partition coefficient with higher recovery efficiencies. Processing time is reduced at least three times in the continuous system when compared to batch mode, while hold up (volumetric quantity of the opposing phase in a determined phase sample) decreases with decreasing phases flow. Furthermore, similar partition coefficient (Kp > 4) with a higher top phase enzyme recovery (81%) is also obtained in this system probably due to better contact surface between phases, compared with that obtained in batch (79%). A continuous aqueous two-phase system process with purification factor 40-fold higher than batch experiments was achieved. These preliminary results exhibit the potential of continuous systems for the recovery of low-abundant proteins from complex mixtures. The promising performance of this prototype can raise the attention of the industry for the adoption of aqueous two-phase system processes.

  12. Cold-Regulated Cereal Chloroplast Late Embryogenesis Abundant-Like Proteins. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    NDong, Christian; Danyluk, Jean; Wilson, Kenneth E.; Pocock, Tessa; Huner, Norman P.A.; Sarhan, Fathey

    2002-01-01

    Cold acclimation and freezing tolerance are the result of complex interaction between low temperature, light, and photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure. Previous results have shown that expression of the Wcs19 gene is correlated with PSII excitation pressure measured in vivo as the relative reduction state of PSII. Using cDNA library screening and data mining, we have identified three different groups of proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) 3-L1, LEA3-L2, and LEA3-L3, sharing identities with WCS19. These groups represent a new class of proteins in cereals related to group 3 LEA proteins. They share important characteristics such as a sorting signal that is predicted to target them to either the chloroplast or mitochondria and a C-terminal sequence that may be involved in oligomerization. The results of subcellular fractionation, immunolocalization by electron microscopy and the analyses of target sequences within the Wcs19 gene are consistent with the localization of WCS19 within the chloroplast stroma of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale). Western analysis showed that the accumulation of chloroplastic LEA3-L2 proteins is correlated with the capacity of different wheat and rye cultivars to develop freezing tolerance. Arabidopsis was transformed with the Wcs19 gene and the transgenic plants showed a significant increase in their freezing tolerance. This increase was only evident in cold-acclimated plants. The putative function of this protein in the enhancement of freezing tolerance is discussed. PMID:12114590

  13. Dissecting DNA damage response pathways by analyzing protein localization and abundance changes during DNA replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Johnny M.; Yimit, Askar; Lee, Anna Y.; Riffle, Michael; Costanzo, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Hendry, Jason A.; Ou, Jiongwen; Moffat, Jason; Boone, Charles; Davis, Trisha N.; Nislow, Corey; Brown, Grant W.

    2012-01-01

    Re-localization of proteins is a hallmark of the DNA damage response. We use high-throughput microscopic screening of the yeast GFP fusion collection to develop a systems-level view of protein re-organization following drug-induced DNA replication stress. Changes in protein localization and abundance reveal drug-specific patterns of functional enrichments. Classification of proteins by sub-cellular destination allows the identification of pathways that respond to replication stress. We analyzed pairwise combinations of GFP fusions and gene deletion mutants to define and order two novel DNA damage responses. In the first, Cmr1 forms subnuclear foci that are regulated by the histone deacetylase Hos2 and are distinct from the typical Rad52 repair foci. In a second example, we find that the checkpoint kinases Mec1/Tel1 and the translation regulator Asc1 regulate P-body formation. This method identifies response pathways that were not detected in genetic and protein interaction screens, and can be readily applied to any form of chemical or genetic stress to reveal cellular response pathways. PMID:22842922

  14. Enrichment of low-abundance proteins from bovine and porcine serum samples for proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ramell, Anna; Bassols, Anna

    2010-12-01

    One of the main applications of serum proteomics is the identification of new biomarkers for animal disease or animal production. However, potential obstacles to these studies are the poor performance of affinity serum depletion methods based on human antigens when using animal samples, and loss of minor serum components bound to albumin and other proteins. In the present study, we have analyzed the efficiency and reproducibility of the ProteoMiner® beads with bovine and porcine serum samples, and compared to a traditional immunoaffinity-based albumin and IgG depletion system specific for human samples. The ProteoMiner kit is based on the use of a combinatorial peptide binding library and intends to enrich low-abundance proteins.

  15. Discrepancy between mRNA and protein abundance: insight from information retrieval process in computers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Degeng

    2008-12-01

    Discrepancy between the abundance of cognate protein and RNA molecules is frequently observed. A theoretical understanding of this discrepancy remains elusive, and it is frequently described as surprises and/or technical difficulties in the literature. Protein and RNA represent different steps of the multi-stepped cellular genetic information flow process, in which they are dynamically produced and degraded. This paper explores a comparison with a similar process in computers-multi-step information flow from storage level to the execution level. Functional similarities can be found in almost every facet of the retrieval process. Firstly, common architecture is shared, as the ribonome (RNA space) and the proteome (protein space) are functionally similar to the computer primary memory and the computer cache memory, respectively. Secondly, the retrieval process functions, in both systems, to support the operation of dynamic networks-biochemical regulatory networks in cells and, in computers, the virtual networks (of CPU instructions) that the CPU travels through while executing computer programs. Moreover, many regulatory techniques are implemented in computers at each step of the information retrieval process, with a goal of optimizing system performance. Cellular counterparts can be easily identified for these regulatory techniques. In other words, this comparative study attempted to utilize theoretical insight from computer system design principles as catalysis to sketch an integrative view of the gene expression process, that is, how it functions to ensure efficient operation of the overall cellular regulatory network. In context of this bird's-eye view, discrepancy between protein and RNA abundance became a logical observation one would expect. It was suggested that this discrepancy, when interpreted in the context of system operation, serves as a potential source of information to decipher regulatory logics underneath biochemical network operation.

  16. Abundantly and rarely expressed Lhc protein genes exhibit distinct regulation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Klimmek, Frank; Sjödin, Andreas; Noutsos, Christos; Leister, Dario; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We have analyzed gene regulation of the Lhc supergene family in poplar (Populus spp.) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using digital expression profiling. Multivariate analysis of the tissue-specific, environmental, and developmental Lhc expression patterns in Arabidopsis and poplar was employed to characterize four rarely expressed Lhc genes, Lhca5, Lhca6, Lhcb7, and Lhcb4.3. Those genes have high expression levels under different conditions and in different tissues than the abundantly expressed Lhca1 to 4 and Lhcb1 to 6 genes that code for the 10 major types of higher plant light-harvesting proteins. However, in some of the datasets analyzed, the Lhcb4 and Lhcb6 genes as well as an Arabidopsis gene not present in poplar (Lhcb2.3) exhibited minor differences to the main cooperative Lhc gene expression pattern. The pattern of the rarely expressed Lhc genes was always found to be more similar to that of PsbS and the various light-harvesting-like genes, which might indicate distinct physiological functions for the rarely and abundantly expressed Lhc proteins. The previously undetected Lhcb7 gene encodes a novel plant Lhcb-type protein that possibly contains an additional, fourth, transmembrane N-terminal helix with a highly conserved motif. As the Lhcb4.3 gene seems to be present only in Eurosid species and as its regulation pattern varies significantly from that of Lhcb4.1 and Lhcb4.2, we conclude it to encode a distinct Lhc protein type, Lhcb8.

  17. TAZ Protein Accumulation Is Negatively Regulated by YAP Abundance in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Finch-Edmondson, Megan L.; Strauss, Robyn P.; Passman, Adam M.; Sudol, Marius; Yeoh, George C.; Callus, Bernard A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway regulates cell growth and survival and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. YAP and TAZ are transcriptional coactivators that function as effectors of this signaling pathway. Aberrant YAP and TAZ activity is reported in several human cancers, and normally the expression and nuclear localization of these proteins is tightly regulated. We sought to establish whether a direct relationship exists between YAP and TAZ. Using knockdown and overexpression experiments we show YAP inversely regulates the abundance of TAZ protein by proteasomal degradation. Interestingly this phenomenon was uni-directional since TAZ expression did not affect YAP abundance. Structure/function analyses suggest that YAP-induced TAZ degradation is a consequence of YAP-targeted gene transcription involving TEAD factors. Subsequent investigation of known regulators of TAZ degradation using specific inhibitors revealed a role for heat shock protein 90 and glycogen synthase kinase 3 but not casein kinase 1 nor LATS in YAP-mediated TAZ loss. Importantly, this phenomenon is conserved from mouse to human; however, interestingly, different YAP isoforms varied in their ability to degrade TAZ. Since shRNA-mediated TAZ depletion in HeLa and D645 cells caused apoptotic cell death, we propose that isoform-specific YAP-mediated TAZ degradation may contribute to the contradicting roles reported for YAP overexpression. This study identifies a novel mechanism of TAZ regulation by YAP, which has significant implications for our understanding of Hippo pathway regulation, YAP-isoform specific signaling, and the role of these proteins in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26432639

  18. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  19. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  20. Phosphorylation of Golgi Peripheral Membrane Protein Grasp65 Is an Integral Step in the Formation of the Human Cytomegalovirus Cytoplasmic Assembly Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, G. Michael; Grabski, Robert; Sanchez, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the largest member of the Herpesviridae and represents a significant cause of disease. During virus replication, HCMV alters cellular functions to facilitate its replication, including significant reorganization of the secretory and endocytic pathways of the infected cell. A defining morphologic change of the infected cell is the formation of a membranous structure in the cytoplasm that is designated the virion assembly compartment (AC), which consists of virion structural proteins surrounded by cellular membranes. The loss of normal Golgi compartment morphology and its relocalization from a juxtanuclear ribbonlike structure to a series of concentric rings on the periphery of the AC represents a readily recognized reorganization of cellular membranes in the HCMV-infected cell. Although trafficking of viral proteins to this compartment is required for the assembly of infectious virions, the functional significance of the reorganization of intracellular membranes like the Golgi membranes into the AC in the assembly of infectious virus remains understudied. In this study, we determined that Golgi membrane ribbon fragmentation increased during the early cytoplasmic phase of virion assembly and that Golgi membrane fragmentation in infected cells was dependent on the phosphorylation of an integral cis-Golgi protein, Grasp65. Inhibition of Golgi membrane fragmentation and of its reorganization into the AC resulted in decreased production of infectious particles and alteration of the incorporation of an essential protein into the envelope of the mature virion. These results demonstrated the complexity of the virus-host cell interactions required for efficient assembly of this large DNA virus. PMID:27703074

  1. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhua; Zhang, Bo; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Davidson, Mercy M; Hei, Tom K

    2017-03-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on cytoplasmic organelles is often underestimated because the general dogma considers direct DNA damage in the nuclei to be the primary cause of radiation induced toxicity. Using a precision microbeam irradiator, we examined the changes in mitochondrial dynamics and functions triggered by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation with α-particles. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation led to activation of autophagy, which degraded dysfunctional mitochondria in order to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. The activation of autophagy was cytoplasmic irradiation-specific and was not detected in nuclear irradiated cells. This autophagic process was oxyradical-dependent and required the activity of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1). The resultant mitochondrial fission induced phosphorylation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) which leads to further activation of the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 with concomitant inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to initiate autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy resulted in delayed DNA damage repair and decreased cell viability, which supports the cytoprotective function of autophagy. Our results reveal a novel mechanism in which dysfunctional mitochondria are degraded by autophagy in an attempt to protect cells from toxic effects of targeted cytoplasmic radiation.

  2. Investigation of SnSPR1, a novel and abundant surface protein of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deqing; Howe, Daniel K

    2008-04-15

    An expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project has produced over 15,000 partial cDNA sequences from the equine pathogen Sarcocystis neurona. While many of the sequences are clear homologues of previously characterized genes, a significant number of the S. neurona ESTs do not exhibit similarity to anything in the extensive sequence databases that have been generated. In an effort to characterize parasite proteins that are novel to S. neurona, a seemingly unique gene was selected for further investigation based on its abundant representation in the collection of ESTs and the predicted presence of a signal peptide and glycolipid anchor addition on the encoded protein. The gene was expressed in E. coli, and monospecific polyclonal antiserum against the recombinant protein was produced by immunization of a rabbit. Characterization of the native protein in S. neurona merozoites and schizonts revealed that it is a low molecular weight surface protein that is expressed throughout intracellular development of the parasite. The protein was designated Surface Protein 1 (SPR1) to reflect its display on the outer surface of merozoites and to distinguish it from the ubiquitous SAG/SRS surface antigens of the heteroxenous Coccidia. Interestingly, infection assays in the presence of the polyclonal antiserum suggested that SnSPR1 plays some role in attachment and/or invasion of host cells by S. neurona merozoites. The work described herein represents a general template for selecting and characterizing the various unidentified gene sequences that are plentiful in the EST databases for S. neurona and other apicomplexans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the value of investigating these novel sequences since it can offer new candidates for diagnostic or vaccine development while also providing greater insight into the biology of these parasites.

  3. Interaction of cellular proteins with BCL-xL targeted to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in adenovirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, T; Vijayalingam, S; Kuppuswamy, M; Chinnadurai, G

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus-mediated apoptosis was suppressed when cellular anti-apoptosis proteins (BCL-2 and BCL-xL) were substituted for the viral E1B-19K. For unbiased proteomic analysis of proteins targeted by BCL-xL in adenovirus-infected cells and to visualize the interactions with target proteins, BCL-xL was targeted to cytosolic inclusion bodies utilizing the orthoreovirus µNS protein sequences. The chimeric protein was localized in non-canonical cytosolic factory-like sites and promoted survival of virus-infected cells. The BCL-xL-associated proteins were isolated from the cytosolic inclusion bodies in adenovirus-infected cells and analyzed by LC-MS. These proteins included BAX, BAK, BID, BIK and BIM as well as mitochondrial proteins such as prohibitin 2, ATP synthase and DNA-PKcs. Our studies suggested that in addition to the interaction with various pro-apoptotic proteins, the association with certain mitochondrial proteins such as DNA-PKcs and prohibitins might augment the survival function of BCL-xL in virus infected cells.

  4. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  5. [Construction of a two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation system for high abundance proteins depletion in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaochun; Zhang, Xueyang; Gao, Mingxia; Yan, Guoquan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-09-01

    High abundance proteins existing in human plasma severely impede the detection of low abundance proteins. This is one of the most difficult problems encountered in plasma proteomics research. We developed a two-dimensional liquid chromatography system with strong anion exchange chromatography-reversed-phase liquid chromatography (SAX-RPLC) for the extensive separation of plasma proteins and selective depletion of high abundance proteins. TSKgel SuperQ-5PW was selected as the first dimensional separation column for crude human plasma fractionation and Jupiter C4 column was selected as the second dimensional separation column. Separation gradients of the two-dimensional liquid chromatography system were optimized to ensure an extensive separation of plasma proteins. Ten peaks with high signal intensities ( >20 mAU) at 215 nm during the second dimensional separation were collected and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). As a result, 32 proteins, all of which were reported to be high abundance proteins in plasma, including human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and so on were successfully identified. This system provides an effective method for future depletion of more high abundance proteins and in-depth research in human plasma proteomics.

  6. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  7. The intermediate filament protein keratin 8 is a novel cytoplasmic substrate for c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Stepulak, Andrzej; Holmström, Tim H; Omary, M Bishr; Eriksson, John E

    2002-03-29

    Keratins 8 (K8) and 18 are the primary intermediate filaments of simple epithelia. Phosphorylation of keratins at specific sites affects their organization, assembly dynamics, and their interaction with signaling molecules. A number of keratin in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation sites have been identified. One example is K8 Ser-73, which has been implicated as an important phosphorylation site during mitosis, cell stress, and apoptosis. We show that K8 is strongly phosphorylated on Ser-73 upon stimulation of the pro-apoptotic cytokine receptor Fas/CD95/Apo-1 in HT-29 cells. Kinase assays showed that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was also activated with activation kinetics corresponding to that of K8 phosphorylation. Furthermore, K8 was also phosphorylated on Ser-73 by JNK in vitro, yielding similar phosphopeptide maps as the in vivo phosphorylated material. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that part of JNK is associated with K8 in vivo, correlating with decreased ability of JNK to phosphorylate the endogenous c-Jun. Taken together, K8 is a new cytoplasmic target for JNK in Fas receptor-mediated signaling. The functional significance of this phosphorylation could relate to regulation of JNK signaling and/or regulation of keratin dynamics.

  8. Linking cytoplasmic dynein and transport of Rab8 vesicles to the midbody during cytokinesis by the doublecortin domain-containing 5 protein.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Anna; Reiner, Orly

    2011-12-01

    Completion of mitosis requires microtubule-dependent transport of membranes to the midbody. Here, we identified a role in cytokinesis for doublecortin domain-containing protein 5 (DCDC5), a member of the doublecortin protein superfamily. DCDC5 is a microtubule-associated protein expressed in both specific and dynamic fashions during mitosis. We show that DCDC5 interacts with cytoplasmic dynein and Rab8 (also known as Ras-related protein Rab-8A), as well as with the Rab8 nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8 (also known as Rab-3A-interacting protein). Following DCDC5 knockdown, the durations of the metaphase to anaphase transition and cytokinesis, and the proportion of multinucleated cells increases, whereas cell viability decreases. Furthermore, knockdown of DCDC5 or addition of a dynein inhibitor impairs the entry of Golgi-complex-derived Rab8-positive vesicles to the midbody. These findings suggest that DCDC5 plays an important role in mediating dynein-dependent transport of Rab8-positive vesicles and in coordinating late cytokinesis.

  9. AtGRP2, a cold-induced nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein, has a role in flower and seed development.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana Flores; Bocca, Silvia Nora; Ramos, Rose Lucia Braz; Barrôco, Rosa Maria; Magioli, Claudia; Jorge, Vanessa Cardeal; Coutinho, Tatiana Cardoso; Rangel-Lima, Camila Martins; De Rycke, Riet; Inzé, Dirk; Engler, Gilbert; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2007-05-01

    The glycine-rich protein AtGRP2 is one of the four members of the cold-shock domain (CSD) protein family in Arabidopsis. It is characterized by the presence of a nucleic acid-binding CSD domain, two glycine-rich domains and two CCHC zinc-fingers present in nucleic acid-binding proteins. In an attempt to further understand the role of CSD/GRP proteins in plants, we have proceeded to the functional characterization of the AtGRP2 gene. Here, we demonstrate that AtGRP2 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein involved in Arabidopsis development with a possible function in cold-response. Expression analysis revealed that the AtGRP2 gene is active in meristematic tissues, being modulated during flower development. Down-regulation of AtGRP2 gene, using gene-silencing techniques resulted in early flowering, altered stamen number and affected seed development. A possible role of AtGRP2 as an RNA chaperone is discussed.

  10. Characterization of Phaseolus vulgaris cDNA clones responsive to water deficit: identification of a novel late embryogenesis abundant-like protein.

    PubMed

    Colmenero-Flores, J M; Campos, F; Garciarrubio, A; Covarrubias, A A

    1997-11-01

    Six cDNA clones from Phaseolus vulgaris, whose expression is induced by water deficit and ABA treatment (rsP cDNAs) were identified and characterized. The sequence analyses of the isolated clones suggest that they encode two types of late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a class-1 cytoplasmic low-molecular-weight heat shock protein (lmw-HSP), a lipid transfer protein (LTP), and two different proline-rich proteins (PRP). One of the putative LEA proteins identified corresponds to a novel 9.3 kDa LEA-like protein. During the plant response to a mild water deficit (psi w = -0.35 MPa) all genes identified present a maximal expression at around 16 or 24 h of treatment, followed by a decline in expression levels. Rehydration experiments revealed that those genes encoding PRPs and LTP transiently re-induce or maintain their expression when water is added to the soil after a dehydration period. This is not the case for the lea genes whose transcripts rapidly decrease, reaching basal levels a few hours after rehydration (4 h). Under water deficit and ABA treatments, the highest levels of expression for most of the genes occur in the root, excluding the ltp gene whose maximum expression levels are found in the aerial regions of the plant. This indicates that for these genes, both water deficit and ABA-dependent expression are under organ-specific control. The data presented here support the importance of these proteins during the plant response to water deficit.

  11. Abundance of Plasma Antioxidant Proteins Confers Tolerance to Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Gayatri; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Ganju, Lilly

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Padhy, Gayatri, Niroj Kumar Sethy, Lilly Ganju, and Kalpana Bhargava. Abundance of plasma antioxidant proteins confers tolerance to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure. High Alt Med Biol 14:289–297, 2013—Systematic identification of molecular signatures for hypobaric hypoxia can aid in better understanding of human adaptation to high altitude. In an attempt to identify proteins promoting hypoxia tolerance during acute exposure to high altitude, we screened and identified hypoxia tolerant and susceptible rats based on hyperventilation time to a simulated altitude of 32,000 ft (9754 m). The hypoxia tolerance was further validated by estimating 8-isoprotane levels and protein carbonyls, which revealed that hypoxia tolerant rats possessed significant lower plasma levels as compared to susceptible rats. We used a comparative plasma proteome profiling approach using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF for both groups, along with an hypoxic control group. This resulted in the identification of 19 differentially expressed proteins. Seven proteins (TTR, GPx-3, PON1, Rab-3D, CLC11, CRP, and Hp) were upregulated in hypoxia tolerant rats, while apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) was upregulated in hypoxia susceptible rats. We further confirmed the consistent higher expression levels of three antioxidant proteins (PON1, TTR, and GPx-3) in hypoxia-tolerant animals using ELISA and immunoblotting. Collectively, these proteomics-based results highlight the role of antioxidant enzymes in conferring hypoxia tolerance during acute hypobaric hypoxia. The expression of these antioxidant enzymes could be used as putative biomarkers for screening altitude adaptation as well as aiding in better management of altered oxygen pathophysiologies. PMID:24067188

  12. Accumulation of Group 3 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins in Zea mays Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Estela B.; Sollinger, John; White, Constance; Rivin, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Several different types of proteins that are modulated by abscisic acid (ABA) accumulate in developing embryos of maize (Zea mays L.). Some of these proteins are specific to the developing seed, such as the storage globulin, GLB1, whereas others are involved in general responses to water deficit. Here we describe a maize protein family of this second type, a Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (MLG3). Like other proteins of this class, MLG3 polypeptides are ABA-responsive. They are found in maturing seeds and in dehydrating plant tissues. Antigenically related proteins are found in other cereals. To distinguish the regulation of developmentally programmed ABA responses from those that are environmentally induced, we compared the ontological pattern and accumulation requirements of MLG3 polypeptides with those we previously described for GLB1. GLB1 accumulation begins early in the maturation phase and specifically requires high levels of ABA and the participation of the Viviparous-1 (Vp1) gene product. Vp1 is required for other ABA-modulated events in maize seed development as well. In experiments using vp1 mutants and mutants deficient in ABA synthesis (vp5 mutation), we show that MLG3 accumulation also is dependent upon ABA, but it shows striking differences from GLB1. MLG3 accumulates much later in embryogenesis, coincident with the onset of dehydration. In contrast to GLB1, MLG3 proteins can be induced by de novo ABA synthesis in response to culturing in high osmoticum. Unlike GLB1, MLG3 has no specific requirement for the Vp1 gene product. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668930

  13. Increased expression and localization of the RNA-binding protein HuD and GAP-43 mRNA to cytoplasmic granules in DRG neurons during nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K D; Merhege, M A; Morin, M; Bolognani, F; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I

    2003-09-01

    The neuronal-specific RNA-binding protein, HuD, binds to a U-rich regulatory element of the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the GAP-43 mRNA and delays the onset of its degradation. We have recently shown that overexpression of HuD in embryonic rat cortical cells accelerated the time course of normal neurite outgrowth and resulted in a twofold increase in GAP-43 mRNA levels. Given this evidence, we sought to investigate the involvement of HuD during nerve regeneration. It is known that HuD protein and GAP-43 mRNA are expressed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rat and that GAP-43 is upregulated in DRG neurons during regeneration. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and levels of HuD and GAP-43 mRNA in DRG neurons following sciatic nerve injury using a combination of in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative RT-PCR. GAP-43 and HuD expression increased in the ipsilateral DRG during the first 3 weeks of regeneration, with peak values seen at 7 days postcrush. At this time point, the levels of HuD and GAP-43 mRNAs in the ipsilateral DRG increased by twofold and sixfold, respectively, relative to the contralateral DRG. Not only were the temporal patterns of expression of HuD protein and GAP-43 mRNA similar, but also they were found to colocalize in the cytoplasm of DRG neurons. Moreover, both molecules were distributed in cytoplasmic granules containing ribosomal RNA. In conclusion, our results suggest that HuD is involved in the upregulation of GAP-43 expression observed at early stages of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  15. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  16. Fimbrin is a homologue of the cytoplasmic phosphoprotein plastin and has domains homologous with calmodulin and actin gelation proteins.

    PubMed

    de Arruda, M V; Watson, S; Lin, C S; Leavitt, J; Matsudaira, P

    1990-09-01

    Fimbrin is an actin-bundling protein found in intestinal microvilli, hair cell stereocilia, and fibroblast filopodia. The complete protein sequence (630 residues) of chicken intestine fimbrin has been determined from two full-length cDNA clones. The sequence encodes a small amino-terminal domain (115 residues) that is homologous with two calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and a large carboxy-terminal domain (500 residues) consisting of a fourfold-repeated 125-residue sequence. This repeat is homologous with the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin and the amino-terminal domains of dystrophin, actin-gelation protein, and beta-spectrin. The presence of this duplicated domain in fimbrin links actin bundling proteins and gelation proteins into a common family of actin cross-linking proteins. Fimbrin is also homologous in sequence with human L-plastin and T-plastin. L-plastin is found in only normal or transformed leukocytes where it becomes phosphorylated in response to IL 1 or phorbol myristate acetate. T-plastin is found in cells of solid tissues where it does not become phosphorylated. Neoplastic cells derived from solid tissues express both isoforms. The differences in expression, sequence, and phosphorylation suggest possible functional differences between fimbrin isoforms.

  17. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase cytoplasmic tail binding protein-1 (MTCBP-1) acts as an eukaryotic aci-reductone dioxygenase (ARD) in the methionine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Wakako; Gotoh, Isamu; Uekita, Takamasa; Seiki, Motoharu

    2005-06-01

    MTCBP-1 was identified as a protein that binds the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14). Since MTCBP-1 has a putative beta-barrel structure, it is presumably a member of the recently proposed cupin superfamily that contains tremendously diverged functions of proteins in spite of their well-conserved beta-barrel structure. MTCBP-1 shows significant homology to the bacterial aci-reductone dioxygenase (ARD) in the cupin family, which is an enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway (MTA cycle). Since it is difficult to speculate the functions of cupin proteins simply based on their sequence homology, we examined whether the eukaryotic ARD homologs surely function in the methionine metabolism. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, yeast could grow when substrate of MTA cycle was provided. Disruption of the yeast ARD homolog, YMR009w gene, abolished ability of the cells to grow in this culture condition. Re-expression of either the YMR009w or MTCBP-1 gene restored the cell growth. Mutation analysis revealed that the glutamic acid residue in the beta-barrel fold and the N-terminal extension from the beta-barrel fold were found to be important for the activity to restore the growth. Thus, MTCBP-1 isolated as a binding protein for MT1-MMP was demonstrated to function as an ARD-like enzyme in the MTA cycle in yeast.

  18. TssK Is a Trimeric Cytoplasmic Protein Interacting with Components of Both Phage-like and Membrane Anchoring Complexes of the Type VI Secretion System*

    PubMed Central

    Zoued, Abdelrahim; Durand, Eric; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Brunet, Yannick R.; Douzi, Badreddine; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Journet, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine that mediates bacteria-host or bacteria-bacteria interactions. The T6SS core apparatus assembles from 13 proteins that form two sub-assemblies: a phage-like complex and a trans-envelope complex. The Hcp, VgrG, TssE, and TssB/C subunits are structurally and functionally related to components of the tail of contractile bacteriophages. This phage-like structure is thought to be anchored to the membrane by a trans-envelope complex composed of the TssJ, TssL, and TssM proteins. However, how the two sub-complexes are connected remains unknown. Here we identify TssK, a protein that establishes contacts with the two T6SS sub-complexes through direct interactions with TssL, Hcp, and TssC. TssK is a cytoplasmic protein assembling trimers that display a three-armed shape, as revealed by TEM and SAXS analyses. Fluorescence microscopy experiments further demonstrate the requirement of TssK for sheath assembly. Our results suggest a central role for TssK by linking both complexes during T6SS assembly. PMID:23921384

  19. Enhanced Detection of Low-Abundance Human Plasma Proteins by Integrating Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation and Immunoaffinity Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haipeng; Yu, Jia; Qiao, Rui; Zhou, Mi; Yang, Yongtao; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The enormous depth complexity of the human plasma proteome poses a significant challenge for current mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies in terms of detecting low-level proteins in plasma, which is essential for successful biomarker discovery efforts. Typically, a single-step analytical approach cannot reduce this intrinsic complexity. Current simplex immunodepletion techniques offer limited capacity for detecting low-abundance proteins, and integrated strategies are thus desirable. In this respect, we developed an improved strategy for analyzing the human plasma proteome by integrating polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation with immunoaffinity depletion. PEG fractionation of plasma proteins is simple, rapid, efficient, and compatible with a downstream immunodepletion step. Compared with immunodepletion alone, our integrated strategy substantially improved the proteome coverage afforded by PEG fractionation. Coupling this new protocol with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, 135 proteins with reported normal concentrations below 100 ng/mL were confidently identified as common low-abundance proteins. A side-by-side comparison indicated that our integrated strategy was increased by average 43.0% in the identification rate of low-abundance proteins, relying on an average 65.8% increase of the corresponding unique peptides. Further investigation demonstrated that this combined strategy could effectively alleviate the signal-suppressive effects of the major high-abundance proteins by affinity depletion, especially with moderate-abundance proteins after incorporating PEG fractionation, thereby greatly enhancing the detection of low-abundance proteins. In sum, the newly developed strategy of incorporating PEG fractionation to immunodepletion methods can potentially aid in the discovery of plasma biomarkers of therapeutic and clinical interest. PMID:27832179

  20. Cytoplasmic and nuclear localizations are important for the hypersensitive response conferred by maize autoactive Rp1-D21 protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance (R-) genes have been isolated from many plant species. Most encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized programmed cell death termed the hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. Despite their structural similarities, d...

  1. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Tapley, Erin C; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect-live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus.

  2. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Courtney R.; Tapley, Erin C.; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect—live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus. PMID:25057012

  3. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S.; Hickman, Heather D.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    broadly, given the wide use of fluorescent proteins, their ubiquitous and abundant fragmentation must be considered when interpreting experiments using these extremely useful probes. PMID:25971973

  4. Measurement of Cytoplasmic Streaming in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Williams, Lucy; Palacios, Isabel; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    During stage 9 of Drosophila melanogastor oogenesis flow of the oocyte cytoplasm, driven by kinesin 1 motor protein is observed. This cytoplasmic streaming is analyzed by PIV in both wild type and kinesin light chain mutants, revealing striking statistical differences. Further measurements of the rheology of the oocyte allow for estimations of the mechanical energy needed to generate the observed flows.

  5. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein targets to the perimeter of inclusion bodies and facilitates filament formation by a cytoplasmic tail-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Baviskar, Pradyumna S; Hotard, Anne L; Moore, Martin L; Oomens, Antonius G P

    2013-10-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) fusion (F) protein cytoplasmic tail (CT) and matrix (M) protein are key mediators of viral assembly, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A complementation assay was developed to systematically examine the role of the F protein CT in infectious virus production. The ability of F mutants with alanine substitutions in the CT to complement an F-null virus in generating infectious progeny was quantitated by flow cytometry. Two CT regions with impact on infectious progeny production were identified: residues 557 to 566 (CT-R1) and 569 to 572 (CT-R2). Substitutions in CT-R1 decreased infectivity by 40 to 85% and increased the level of F-induced cell-cell fusion but had little impact on assembly of viral surface filaments, which are believed to be virions. Substitutions in CT-R2, as well as deletion of the entire CT, abrogated infectious progeny production and impaired viral filament formation. However, CT-R2 mutations did not block but rather delayed the formation of viral filaments, which continued to form at a low rate and contained the viral M protein and nucleoprotein (N). Microscopy analysis revealed that substitutions in CT-R2 but not CT-R1 led to accumulation of M and F proteins within and at the perimeter of viral inclusion bodies (IBs), respectively. The accumulation of M and F at IBs and coincident strong decrease in filament formation and infectivity upon CT-R2 mutations suggest that F interaction with IBs is an important step in the virion assembly process and that CT residues 569 to 572 act to facilitate release of M-ribonucleoprotein complexes from IBs.

  6. The Helicobacter pylori Anti-Sigma Factor FlgM Is Predominantly Cytoplasmic and Cooperates with the Flagellar Basal Body Protein FlhA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Melanie; Borchert, Sophie; Niehus, Eike; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Gripp, Eugenia; Bajceta, Afrodita; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Hughes, Kelly T.; Josenhans, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires flagellar motility and orientation to persist actively in its habitat. A particular feature of flagella in most Helicobacter species including H. pylori is a membraneous flagellar sheath. The anti-sigma factor FlgM of H. pylori is unusual, since it lacks an N-terminal domain present in other FlgM homologs, e.g., FlgM of Salmonella spp., whose regulatory function is intimately coupled to its secretion through the flagellar type III secretion system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the localization and secretion of the short H. pylori FlgM in the presence of a flagellar sheath and to elucidate its interaction with other flagellar proteins, such as the basal body protein FlhA, which was previously shown to cooperate with FlgM for regulation. H. pylori FlgM was only released into the medium in minor amounts in wild-type bacteria, where the bulk amount of the protein was retained in the cytoplasm. Some FlgM was detected in the flagellar fraction. FlgM was expressed in flhA mutants and was less soluble and differentially localized in bacterial fractions of the flhA mutant in comparison to wild-type bacteria. FlgM-green fluorescent protein and FlgM-V5 translational fusions were generated and expressed in H. pylori. FlgM displayed a predominantly polar distribution and interacted with the C-terminal domain of FlhA (FlhAC). We suggest that, in H. pylori, FlgM secretion may not be paramount for its regulatory function and that protein interactions at the flagellar basal body may determine the turnover and localization of functional FlgM. PMID:19465658

  7. UVB-mediated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase enhances resistance of normal human keratinocytes to apoptosis by stabilizing cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Nadine; Valerie, Kristoffer; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Huot, Jacques

    2002-07-01

    Human keratinocytes respond to UV rays by developing a fast adaptive response that contributes to maintaining their functions and survival. We investigated the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in transducing the UV signals in normal human keratinocytes. We found that UVA, UVB or UVC induced a marked and persistent activation of p38, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase were less or not activated respectively. Inhibition of p38 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p38 or with SB203580 impaired cell viability and led to an increase in UVB-induced apoptosis. This sensitization to apoptosis was independent of caspase activities. Inhibition of p38 did not sensitize transformed HaCaT keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis. In normal keratinocytes, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p53 increased UVB-induced cell death, pointing to a role for p53. In these cells, UVB triggered a p38-dependent phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-15. This phosphorylation was associated with an SB203580-sensitive accumulation of p53, even in the presence of a serine phosphatase inhibitor. Accumulated p53 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, independently of CRM1 nuclear export. In HaCaT cells, p53 was localized exclusively in the nucleus and its distribution and level were not affected by UVB or p38 inhibition. However, UVB induced an SB203580-insensitive phosphorylation on Ser-15 of mutated p53. Overall, our results suggest that, in normal human keratinocytes, protection against UVB depends on p38-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 and is tightly associated with the cytoplasmic sequestration of wild-type p53. We conclude that the p38/p53 pathway plays a key role in the adaptive response of normal human keratinocytes against UV stress.

  8. Cytoplasmic Retention of Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A) Induces Alzheimer-like Abnormal Hyperphosphorylation of Tau*

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Wei, Jianshe; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fei; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), and related tauopathies. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which in turn is modulated by endogenous inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A). In AD brain, I2PP2A is translocated from neuronal nucleus to cytoplasm, where it inhibits PP2A activity and promotes abnormal phosphorylation of Tau. Here we describe the identification of a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal region of I2PP2A containing a conserved basic motif, 179RKR181, which is sufficient for directing its nuclear localization. The current study further presents an inducible cell model (Tet-Off system) of AD-type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau by expressing I2PP2A in which the NLS was inactivated by 179RKR181 → AAA along with 168KR169 → AA mutations. In this model, the mutant NLS (mNLS)-I2PP2A (I2PP2AAA-AAA) was retained in the cell cytoplasm, where it physically interacted with PP2A and inhibited its activity. Inhibition of PP2A was associated with the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau, which resulted in microtubule network instability and neurite outgrowth impairment. Expression of mNLS-I2PP2A activated CAMKII and GSK-3β, which are Tau kinases regulated by PP2A. The immunoprecipitation experiments showed the direct interaction of I2PP2A with PP2A and GSK-3β but not with CAMKII. Thus, the cell model provides insights into the nature of the potential NLS and the mechanistic relationship between I2PP2A-induced inhibition of PP2A and hyperphosphorylation of Tau that can be utilized to develop drugs preventing Tau pathology. PMID:25128526

  9. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Abundance, but Not mRNA Expression, Correlates With Estrone-3-Sulfate Transport in Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Transporter mRNA and protein expression data are used to extrapolate in vitro transporter kinetics to in vivo drug disposition predictions. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) possesses broad substrate specificity; therefore, understanding BCRP expression-activity relationships are necessary for the translation to in vivo. Bidirectional transport of estrone-3-sulfate (E-3-S), a BCRP probe, was evaluated with respect to relative BCRP mRNA expression and absolute protein abundance in 10- and 29-day cultured Caco-2 cells. BCRP mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR against a housekeeper gene, Cyclophilin A. The BCRP protein abundance in total membrane fractions was quantified by targeted proteomics, and [(3)H]-E-3-S bidirectional transport was determined in the presence or absence of Ko143, a potent BCRP inhibitor. BCRP mRNA expression was 1.5-fold higher in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (n = 3), whereas a 2.4-fold lower (p < 0.001) BCRP protein abundance was observed in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (1.28 ± 0.33 and 3.06 ± 0.22 fmol/μg protein, n = 6, respectively). This correlated to a 2.45-fold lower (p < 0.01) efflux ratio for E-3-S in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (8.97 ± 2.51 and 3.32 ± 0.66, n = 6, respectively). Caco-2 cell BCRP protein abundance, but not mRNA levels, correlates with BCRP activity, suggesting that extrapolation strategies incorporating BCRP protein abundance-activity relationships may be more successful.

  10. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  11. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Schafer, Elizabeth A.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2012-03-30

    Picornavirus infection can lead to disruption of nuclear pore traffic, shut-off of cell translation machinery, and cleavage of proteins involved in cellular signal transduction and the innate response to infection. Here, we demonstrated that the FMDV 3C{sup pro} induced the cleavage of nuclear RNA-binding protein Sam68 C-terminus containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Consequently, it stimulated the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. The siRNA knockdown of Sam68 resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in viral titers, which prompted us to study the effect of Sam68 on FMDV post-entry events. Interestingly, Sam68 interacts with the internal ribosomal entry site within the 5 Prime non-translated region of the FMDV genome, and Sam68 knockdown decreased FMDV IRES-driven activity in vitro suggesting that it could modulate translation of the viral genome. The results uncover a novel role for Sam68 in the context of picornaviruses and the proteolysis of a new cellular target of the FMDV 3C{sup pro}.

  12. Lyar, a cell growth-regulating zinc finger protein, was identified to be associated with cytoplasmic ribosomes in male germ and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Kahori; Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Oshima, Kenzi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Nadano, Daita

    2014-10-01

    Translational control is a basic mechanism for gene regulation in cells and important for tissue growth and development in mammals. Deregulation of the mechanism thus causes diseases such as cancer. Considering the importance of the ribosome as a factory of polypeptide synthesis, some new factors have been expected to be associated with the ribosome and involved in translational control. Our proteomic survey for these factors identified a zinc finger protein, Lyar, in cytoplasmic ribosomes of the rodent testis. Subcellular fractionation of the testis provided data supporting association of Lyar with ribosomes. Lyar was then suggested to be included in the 60S large subunit, but not in polysomes, by ultracentrifugation of testicular ribosomes. While analysis of tissue distribution of Lyar has indicated its testis-predominant expression, Lyar mRNA was expressed in the cancer cells originated from tissues other than testis, and Lyar promoted proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells. Furthermore, translation was increased by Lyar in vitro, pointing out the first experimental link between this protein and translation. Taken together, Lyar seems to be a new player in translational control and a potential target for cancer therapy.

  13. The rate of nuclear cytoplasmic protein transport is determined by the casein kinase II site flanking the nuclear localization sequence of the SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rihs, H P; Jans, D A; Fan, H; Peters, R

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Rihs, H.-P. and Peters, R. (1989) EMBO J., 8, 1479-1484] that the nuclear transport of recombinant proteins in which short fragments of the SV40 T-antigen are fused to the amino terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase is dependent on both the nuclear localization sequence (NLS, T-antigen residues 126-132) and a phosphorylation-site-containing sequence (T-antigen residues 111-125). While the NLS determines the specificity, the rate of transport is controlled by the phosphorylation-site-containing sequence. The present study furthers this observation and examines the role of the various phosphorylation sites. Purified, fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins were injected into the cytoplasm of Vero or hepatoma (HTC) cells and the kinetics of nuclear transport measured by laser microfluorimetry. By replacing serine and threonine residues known to be phosphorylated in vivo, we identified the casein kinase II (CK-II) site S111/S112 to be the determining factor in the enhancement of the transport. Either of the residues 111 or 112 was sufficient to elicit the maximum transport enhancement. The other phosphorylation sites (S120, S123, T124) had no influence on the transport rate. Examination of the literature suggested that many proteins harboring a nuclear localization sequence also contain putative CK-II sites at a distance of approximately 10-30 amino acid residues from the NLS. CK-II has been previously implicated in the transmission of growth signals to the nucleus. Our results suggest that CK-II may exert this role by controlling the rate of nuclear protein transport. Images PMID:1848177

  14. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  15. Cytoplasmic localized infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by bovine herpesvirus 1 inhibits beta interferon promoter activity and reduces IRF3 (interferon response factor 3) protein levels

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Leticia Frizzo; Gaudreault, Natasha; Jones, Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), an alpha-herpesvirinae subfamily member, establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Periodically, BHV-1 reactivates from latency, infectious virus is spread, and consequently virus transmission occurs. BHV-1 acute infection causes upper respiratory track infections and conjunctivitis in infected cattle. As a result of transient immunesuppression, BHV-1 infections can also lead to life-threatening secondary bacterial pneumonia that is referred to as bovine respiratory disease. The infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by BHV-1 reduces human beta-interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, in part, by inducing degradation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) and interacting with IRF7. In contrast to humans, cattle contain three IFN-β genes. All three bovine IFN-β proteins have anti-viral activity: but each IFN-β gene has a distinct transcriptional promoter. We have recently cloned and characterized the three bovine IFN-β promoters. Relative to the human IFN-β promoter, each of the three IFN-β promoters contain differences in the four positive regulatory domains that are required for virus-induced activity. In this study, we demonstrate that bICP0 effectively inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity following transfection of low passage bovine cells with interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) or IRF7. A bICP0 mutant that localizes to the cytoplasm inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity as efficiently as wt bICP0. The cytoplasmic localized bICP0 protein also induced IRF3 degradation with similar efficiency as wt bICP0. In summary, these studies suggested that cytoplasmic localized bICP0 plays a role in inhibiting the IFN-β response during productive infection. PMID:21689696

  16. Identification and isolation of cDNA clones encoding the abundant secreted proteins in the saliva proteome of Culicoides nubeculosus.

    PubMed

    Russell, C L; Heesom, K J; Arthur, C J; Helps, C R; Mellor, P S; Day, M J; Torsteinsdottir, S; Björnsdóttir, T S; Wilson, A D

    2009-06-01

    Culicoides spp. are vectors of several infectious diseases of veterinary importance and a major cause of allergy in horses and other livestock. Their saliva contains a number of proteins which enable blood feeding, enhance disease transmission and act as allergens. We report the construction of a novel cDNA library from Culicoides nubeculosus linked to the analysis of abundant salivary gland proteins by mass spectrometry. Fifty-four novel proteins sequences are described including those of the enzymes maltase, hyaluronidase and two serine proteases demonstrated to be present in Culicoides salivary glands, as well as several members of the D7 family and protease inhibitors with putative anticoagulant activity. In addition, several families of abundant proteins with unknown function were identified including some of the major candidate allergens that cause insect bite hypersensitivity in horses.

  17. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-01-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490–535) and PARS-II (aa 590–650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50. PMID:27698494

  18. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Shie-Shan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-10-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490-535) and PARS-II (aa 590-650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50.

  19. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-07-19

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex ("cortical flow") is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region ("cytoplasmic flow") is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos.

  20. Combining subproteome enrichment and Rubisco depletion enables identification of low abundance proteins differentially regulated during plant defense.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Ivy; Naumann, Kai; Roth, Udo; Wolf, Noreen; Mackey, David; Dangl, Jeffery L; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis conditionally expressing the bacterial avrRpm1 type III effector under the control of a dexamethasone-responsive promoter were used for proteomics studies. This model system permits study of an individual effector without interference from additional bacterial components. Coupling of different prefractionation approaches to high resolution 2-DE facilitated the discovery of low abundance proteins - enabling the identification of proteins that have escaped detection in similar experiments. A total of 34 differentially regulated protein spots were identified. Four of these (a remorin, a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), an RNA-binding protein, and a C2-domain-containing protein) are potentially early signaling components in the interaction between AvrRpm1 and the cognate disease resistance gene product, resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1). For the remorin and RNA-binding protein, involvement of PTM and post-transcriptional regulation are implicated, respectively.

  1. High throughput screening for compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation identifies new role for N-glycans in regulating sarcolemmal protein abundance and laminin binding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Paula V; Pang, Mabel; Marshall, Jamie L; Kung, Raymond; Nelson, Stanley F; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wells, Lance; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H; Baum, Linda G

    2012-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder characterized by loss of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells to extracellular matrix. Dystrophin binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein β-dystroglycan (β-DG), which associates with cell surface α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that binds laminin in the extracellular matrix. β-DG can also associate with utrophin, and this differential association correlates with specific glycosylation changes on α-DG. Genetic modification of α-DG glycosylation can promote utrophin binding and rescue dystrophic phenotypes in mouse dystrophy models. We used high throughput screening with the plant lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) to identify compounds that altered muscle cell surface glycosylation, with the goal of finding compounds that increase abundance of α-DG and associated sarcolemmal glycoproteins, increase utrophin usage, and increase laminin binding. We identified one compound, lobeline, from the Prestwick library of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds that fulfilled these criteria, increasing WFA binding to C2C12 cells and to primary muscle cells from wild type and mdx mice. WFA binding and enhancement by lobeline required complex N-glycans but not O-mannose glycans that bind laminin. However, inhibiting complex N-glycan processing reduced laminin binding to muscle cell glycoproteins, although O-mannosylation was intact. Glycan analysis demonstrated a general increase in N-glycans on lobeline-treated cells rather than specific alterations in cell surface glycosylation, consistent with increased abundance of multiple sarcolemmal glycoproteins. This demonstrates the feasibility of high throughput screening with plant lectins to identify compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation and identifies a novel role for N-glycans in regulating muscle cell function.

  2. High Throughput Screening for Compounds That Alter Muscle Cell Glycosylation Identifies New Role for N-Glycans in Regulating Sarcolemmal Protein Abundance and Laminin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Paula V.; Pang, Mabel; Marshall, Jamie L.; Kung, Raymond; Nelson, Stanley F.; Stalnaker, Stephanie H.; Wells, Lance; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.; Baum, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder characterized by loss of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells to extracellular matrix. Dystrophin binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein β-dystroglycan (β-DG), which associates with cell surface α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that binds laminin in the extracellular matrix. β-DG can also associate with utrophin, and this differential association correlates with specific glycosylation changes on α-DG. Genetic modification of α-DG glycosylation can promote utrophin binding and rescue dystrophic phenotypes in mouse dystrophy models. We used high throughput screening with the plant lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) to identify compounds that altered muscle cell surface glycosylation, with the goal of finding compounds that increase abundance of α-DG and associated sarcolemmal glycoproteins, increase utrophin usage, and increase laminin binding. We identified one compound, lobeline, from the Prestwick library of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds that fulfilled these criteria, increasing WFA binding to C2C12 cells and to primary muscle cells from wild type and mdx mice. WFA binding and enhancement by lobeline required complex N-glycans but not O-mannose glycans that bind laminin. However, inhibiting complex N-glycan processing reduced laminin binding to muscle cell glycoproteins, although O-mannosylation was intact. Glycan analysis demonstrated a general increase in N-glycans on lobeline-treated cells rather than specific alterations in cell surface glycosylation, consistent with increased abundance of multiple sarcolemmal glycoproteins. This demonstrates the feasibility of high throughput screening with plant lectins to identify compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation and identifies a novel role for N-glycans in regulating muscle cell function. PMID:22570487

  3. High-frequency retrotransposition of a marked I factor in Drosophila melanogaster correlates with a dynamic expression pattern of the ORF1 protein in the cytoplasm of oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Seleme, M; Busseau, I; Malinsky, S; Bucheton, A; Teninges, D

    1999-01-01

    To study the expression of the I factor, a non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposon responsible for I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, we have tagged the ORF1 protein (ORF1p) by inserting the HA epitope in its N-terminal region. In transgenic flies, this modification is compatible with a high rate of autonomous transposition and allows direct estimation of the transposition frequency. I factor transposes in the germline of females (SF) that are daughters from crosses between I strain males (which contain active copies of the I factor) and R strain females (which do not). We analyzed the expression pattern of ORF1p by indirect immunofluorescence. Its expression correlates with retrotransposition. During oogenesis ORF1p appears unexpectedly as a cytoplasmic product, which accumulates with a specific pattern into the oocyte. A comparison of the expression patterns under conditions that modify the transposing activity of the element clarifies some aspects of I-factor functioning in the transposition process. PMID:9927467

  4. FTD/ALS-associated poly(GR) protein impairs the Notch pathway and is recruited by poly(GA) into cytoplasmic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dejun; Abdallah, Abbas; Li, Zhaodong; Lu, Yubing; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2015-10-01

    C9ORF72 repeat expansion is the most common genetic mutation in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Abnormal dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) generated from repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of repeat-containing RNAs are thought to be pathogenic; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Here we report that (GR)80 and (PR)80 are toxic in neuronal and non-neuronal cells in Drosophila. In contrast to reported shorter poly(GR) forms, (GR)80 is mostly localized throughout the cytosol without detectable accumulation in the nucleolus, accompanied by suppression of Notch signaling and cell loss in the wing. Some Notch target genes are also downregulated in brains and iPSC-derived cortical neurons of C9ORF72 patients. Increased Notch expression largely suppressed (GR)80-induced cell loss in the wing. When co-expressed in Drosophila, HeLa cells, or human neurons, (GA)80 recruited (GR)80 into cytoplasmic inclusions, partially decreasing the toxicity of (GR)80 and restoring Notch signaling in Drosophila. Thus, different DPRs have opposing roles in cell loss and we identify the Notch pathway as one of the receptor signaling pathways that might be compromised in C9ORF72 FTD/ALS.

  5. Highly abundant defense proteins in human sweat as revealed by targeted proteomics and label free quantification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Csősz, Éva; Emri, Gabriella; Kalló, Gergő; Tsaprailis, George; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The healthy human skin with its effective antimicrobial defense system forms an efficient barrier against invading pathogens. There is evidence suggesting that the composition of this chemical barrier varies between diseases, making the easily-collected sweat an ideal candidate for biomarker discoveries. OBJECTIVE Our aim was to provide information about the normal composition of the sweat, and to study the chemical barrier found at the surface of skin. METHODS Sweat samples from healthy individuals were collected during sauna bathing, and the global protein panel was analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry. SRM-based targeted proteomic methods were designed and stable isotope labeled reference peptides were used for method validation. RESULTS 95 sweat proteins were identified, 20 of them were novel proteins. It was shown that dermcidin is the most abundant sweat protein, and along with apolipoprotein D, clusterin, prolactin inducible protein and serum albumin, they make up 91% of secreted sweat proteins. The roles of these highly abundant proteins were reviewed; all of which have protective functions, highlighting the importance of sweat glands in composing the first line of innate immune defense system, and maintaining the epidermal barrier integrity. CONCLUSION Our findings in regards to the proteins forming the chemical barrier of the skin as determined by label free quantification and targeted proteomics methods are in accordance with previous studies, and can be further used as a starting point for non-invasive sweat biomarker research. PMID:26307449

  6. Calpain-mediated Processing of p53-associated Parkin-like Cytoplasmic Protein (PARC) Affects Chemosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells by Promoting p53 Subcellular Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Michael G.; Xue, Kai; Liu, Jiayin; McBride, Heidi; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to cisplatin (CDDP)-based therapy is a major hurdle to the successful treatment of human ovarian cancer (OVCA), and the chemoresistant phenotype in OVCA cells is associated with Akt-attenuated p53-mediated apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic functions of p53 involve both transcription-dependent and -independent signaling pathways, and dysfunctional localization and/or inactivation of p53 contribute to the development of chemoresistance. PARC is a cytoplasmic protein regulating p53 subcellular localization and subsequent function. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating PARC. Although PARC contains putative caspase-3 cleavage sites, and CDDP is known to induce the activation of caspases and calpains and induce proteasomal degradation of anti-apoptotic proteins, if and how PARC is regulated by CDDP in OVCA are unknown. Here, we present evidence that CDDP promotes calpain-mediated PARC down-regulation, mitochondrial and nuclear p53 accumulation, and apoptosis in chemosensitive but not resistant OVCA cells. Inhibition of Akt is required to sensitize chemoresistant cells to CDDP in a p53-dependent manner, an effect enhanced by PARC down-regulation. CDDP-induced PARC down-regulation is reversible by inhibition of calpain but not of caspases or the 26 S proteasome. Furthermore, in vitro experiments confirm the ability of calpain in mediating Ca2+-dependent PARC down-regulation. The role of Ca2+ in PARC down-regulation was further confirmed as ionomycin-induced PARC down-regulation in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. The data presented here implicate the regulation of p53 subcellular localization and apoptosis by PARC as a contributing factor in CDDP resistance in OVCA cells and Ca2+/calpain in PARC post-translational processing and chemosensitivity. PMID:22117079

  7. An efficient protocol towards site-specifically clickable nanobodies in high yield: cytoplasmic expression in Escherichia coli combined with intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Ta, Duy Tien; Redeker, Erik Steen; Billen, Brecht; Reekmans, Gunter; Sikulu, Josephine; Noben, Jean-Paul; Guedens, Wanda; Adriaensens, Peter

    2015-10-01

    In this study, several expression strategies were investigated in order to develop a generic, highly productive and efficient protocol to produce nanobodies modified with a clickable alkyne function at their C-terminus via the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique. Hereto, the nanobody targeting the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (NbVCAM1) was used as a workhorse. The highlights of the protocol can be ascribed to a cytoplasmic expression of the nanobody-intein-chitin-binding domain fusion protein in the Escherichia coli SHuffle(®) T7 cells with a C-terminal extension, i.e. LEY, EFLEY or His6 spacer peptide, in the commonly used Luria-Bertani medium. The combination of these factors led to a high yield (up to 22 mg/l of culture) and nearly complete alkynation efficiency of the C-terminally modified nanobody via IPL. This yield can even be improved to ∼45 mg/l in the EnPresso(®) growth system but this method is more expensive and time-consuming. The resulting alkynated nanobodies retained excellent binding capacity towards the recombinant human VCAM1. The presented protocol benefits from time- and cost-effectiveness, which allows a feasible production up-scaling of generic alkynated nanobodies. The production of high quantities of site-specifically modified nanobodies paves the way to new biosurface applications that demand for a homogeneously oriented nanobody coupling. Prospectively, the alkynated nanobodies can be covalently coupled to a multitude of azide-containing counterparts, e.g. contrast labeling agents, particles or surfaces for numerous innovative applications.

  8. The activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis requires tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C activation

    PubMed Central

    Radford, D J; Lord, J M; Savage, C O S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and tyrosine kinases was examined in human neutrophils. Using the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C, the kinetics of ANCA-induced superoxide (O2−) production were characterized and subsequently manipulated by specific inhibitors of PKC and tyrosine kinases. With this approach, ANCA IgG, but not normal IgG or ANCA F(ab′)2 fragments caused a time and dose dependent release of O2− from TNF-α primed neutrophils. The kinetics of ANCA-induced O2− production showed an initial 10–15 min lag phase compared to the N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine response, suggesting differences in the signalling pathways recruited by these two stimuli. Inhibitor studies revealed that ANCA-activation involved members of both the Ca2+-dependent and -independent PKC isoforms and also tyrosine kinases. ANCA IgG resulted in the translocation of the βII isoform of PKC at a time corresponding to the end of the lag phase of O2− production, suggesting that PKC activity may be instrumental in processes regulating the activity of the NADPH oxidase in response to ANCA. Tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins also peaked 10–15 min after stimulation with ANCA but not normal IgG. These data suggest that PKC and tyrosine kinases regulate O2− production from neutrophils stimulated with autoantibodies from patients with systemic vasculitis. PMID:10540175

  9. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-03-06

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3'UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3(-/-) mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally.

  10. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3′UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3−/− mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally. PMID:28262838

  11. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  12. Two different late embryogenesis abundant proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana contain specific domains that inhibit Escherichia coli growth.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Zamudio, Fernando; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2006-04-07

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins constitute a set of proteins widespread in the plant kingdom that show common physicochemical properties such as high hydrophilicity and high content of small amino acid residues such as glycine, alanine, and serine. Typically, these proteins accumulate in response to water deficit conditions imposed by the environment or during plant normal development. In this work, we show that the over-expression in Escherichia coli of proteins of the LEA 2 and the LEA 4 families from Arabidopsis thaliana leads to inhibition of bacterial growth and that this effect is dependent on discrete regions of the proteins. Our data indicate that their antimicrobial effect is achieved through their interaction with intracellular targets. The relevance of the cationic nature and the predicted structural organization of particular protein domains in this detrimental effect on the bacteria growth process is discussed.

  13. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling.

  14. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  15. Physical and functional association of a serine-threonine protein kinase to the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 form of the human tumor necrosis factor receptor in human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    Darnay, B G; Reddy, S A; Aggarwal, B B

    1994-08-05

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binds two distinct cell surface receptors designated p60 and p80. Our previous studies indicate that a protein kinase from U-937 cells binds to and phosphorylates the p60 receptor. While the p80 receptor is phosphorylated in vivo, no association of a protein kinase has been described. We employed a fusion protein comprising of glutathione S-transferase and the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 receptor (GST-p80CD) to identify cellular proteins that might associate with this receptor. From 35S- and 32P-labeled cells, a protein of 59 kDa bound specifically to GST-p80CD. In vitro kinase reactions indicated that serine/threonine protein kinase activity associated with GST-p80CD and causes its phosphorylation. Additionally, a 59-kDa phosphoprotein was also identified after kinase reactions of proteins bound to GST-p80CD. This kinase activity required either Mg2+ or Mn2+ for optimal activity, and it phosphorylated myelin basic protein, histone H2B, and also the cytoplasmic domain of the p60 receptor. Treatment of cells with TNF increased the p80 receptor-associated kinase activity by 200%. In summary, our results provide evidence of a novel ligand-activated serine/threonine protein kinase that associates with the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 receptor and causes the phosphorylation of both forms of the TNF receptor. This p80 TNF receptor-associated protein and the associated kinase described here are referred to as p80-TRAP and p80-TRAK, respectively.

  16. The relative protein abundance of UGT1A alternative splice variants as a key determinant of glucuronidation activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Mélanie; Roberge, Joannie; Falardeau, Sarah-Ann; Villeneuve, Lyne; Guillemette, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most significant components of the functional complexity of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs), particularly for the UGT1A gene, which represents one of the best examples of a drug-metabolizing gene regulated by AS. Shorter UGT1A isoforms [isoform 2 (i2)] are deficient in glucuronic acid transferase activity but function as negative regulators of enzyme activity through protein-protein interaction. Their abundance, relative to active UGT1A enzymes, is expected to be a determinant of the global transferase activity of cells and tissues. Here we tested whether i2-mediated inhibition increases with greater abundance of the i2 protein relative to the isoform 1 (i1) enzyme, using the extrahepatic UGT1A7 as a model and a series of 23 human embryonic kidney 293 clonal cell lines expressing variable contents of i1 and i2 proteins. Upon normalization for i1, a significant reduction of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin glucuronide formation was observed for i1+i2 clones (mean of 53%) compared with the reference i1 cell line. In these clones, the i2 protein content varied greatly (38-263% relative to i1) and revealed two groups: 17 clones with i2 < i1 (60% ± 3%) and 6 clones with i2 ≥ i1 (153% ± 24%). The inhibition induced by i2 was more substantial for clones displaying i2 ≥ i1 (74.5%; P = 0.001) compared with those with i2 < i1 (45.5%). Coimmunoprecipitation supports a more substantial i1-i2 complex formation when i2 exceeds i1. We conclude that the relative abundance of regulatory i2 proteins has the potential to drastically alter the local drug metabolism in the cells, particularly when i2 surpasses the protein content of i1.

  17. Regulation of the nuclear genes encoding the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetases of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C M; Rajbhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    We show that the nuclear genes for the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) of Neurospora crassa are distinct in their encoded proteins, codon usage, mRNA levels, and regulation. The 4.2-kilobase-pair region representing the structural gene for cytoplasmic LeuRS and flanking regions has been sequenced. The positions of the 5' and 3' ends of mRNA and of a single 62-base-pair intron have been mapped. The methionine-initiated open reading frame encoded a protein of 1,123 amino acids and displayed a strong codon bias. Although cytoplasmic LeuRS shares with mitochondrial LeuRS some general features common to most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, there is little amino acid sequence similarity between them, mRNA levels for cytoplasmic LeuRS were much higher than those for mitochondrial LeuRS. This observation and the strong codon bias in the cytoplasmic LeuRS gene may contribute to a greater abundance of cytoplasmic LeuRS than mitochondrial LeuRS. The genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial LeuRS are regulated independently. The cytoplasmic LeuRS gene is regulated by the cross-pathway control system in N. crassa, which is analogous to general amino acid control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytoplasmic LeuRS mRNA levels are induced by amino acid starvation resulting from the addition of aminotriazole. Part of this increase is due to utilization of new transcription start sites. In contrast, the mitochondrial LeuRS gene is not induced by amino acid limitation. However, the mitochondrial LeuRS mRNA levels did increase dramatically upon inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis by chloramphenicol or ethidium bromide or in the temperature-sensitive strain leu-5 carrying a mutation in the mitochondrial LeuRS structural gene. Images PMID:2532300

  18. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  19. Complete thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the isomer-specific interaction between Pin1-WW domain and the amyloid precursor protein cytoplasmic tail phosphorylated at Thr668.

    PubMed

    De, Soumya; Greenwood, Alexander I; Rogals, Monique J; Kovrigin, Evgenii L; Lu, Kun Ping; Nicholson, Linda K

    2012-10-30

    Peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerization acts as an effective molecular timer that plays significant roles in biological and pathological processes. Enzymes such as Pin1 catalyze cis-trans isomerization, accelerating the otherwise slow isomerization rate into time scales relevant for cellular signaling. Here we have combined NMR line shape analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters describing the trans-specific interaction between the binding domain of Pin1 (WW domain) and a key cis-trans molecular switch in the amyloid precursor protein cytoplasmic tail. A three-state model, in which the cis-trans isomerization equilibrium is coupled to the binding equilibrium through the trans isomer, was found to fit the data well. The trans isomer binds the WW domain with ∼22 μM affinity via very fast association (approaching the diffusion limit) and dissociation rates. The common structural and electrostatic characteristics of Pin1 substrates, which contain a phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motif, suggest that very rapid binding kinetics are a general feature of Pin1 interactions with other substrates. The fast binding kinetics of the WW domain allows rapid response of Pin1 to the dynamic events of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in the cell that alter the relative populations of diverse Pin1 substrates. Furthermore, our results also highlight the vastly different rates at which slow uncatalyzed cis-trans isomerization and fast isomer-specific binding events occur. These results, along with the experimental methods presented herein, should guide future experiments aimed at the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of cis-trans molecular switches and isomer-specific interactions involved in various biological processes.

  20. Method optimization for proteomic analysis of soybean leaf: Improvements in identification of new and low-abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; de Almeida Soares, Eduardo; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers

    2012-01-01

    The most critical step in any proteomic study is protein extraction and sample preparation. Better solubilization increases the separation and resolution of gels, allowing identification of a higher number of proteins and more accurate quantitation of differences in gene expression. Despite the existence of published results for the optimization of proteomic analyses of soybean seeds, no comparable data are available for proteomic studies of soybean leaf tissue. In this work we have tested the effects of modification of a TCA-acetone method on the resolution of 2-DE gels of leaves and roots of soybean. Better focusing was obtained when both mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used in the extraction buffer simultaneously. Increasing the number of washes of TCA precipitated protein with acetone, using a final wash with 80% ethanol and using sonication to ressuspend the pellet increased the number of detected proteins as well the resolution of the 2-DE gels. Using this approach we have constructed a soybean protein map. The major group of identified proteins corresponded to genes of unknown function. The second and third most abundant groups of proteins were composed of photosynthesis and metabolism related genes. The resulting protocol improved protein solubility and gel resolution allowing the identification of 122 soybean leaf proteins, 72 of which were not detected in other published soybean leaf 2-DE gel datasets, including a transcription factor and several signaling proteins. PMID:22802721

  1. The EFF-1A Cytoplasmic Domain Influences Hypodermal Cell Fusions in C. elegans But Is Not Dependent on 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinn-Thomas, Jessica H.; del Campo, Jacob J.; Wang, Jianjun; Mohler, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory and biophysical mechanisms of cell-cell fusion are largely unknown despite the fundamental requirement for fused cells in eukaryotic development. Only two cellular fusogens that are not of clear recent viral origin have been identified to date, both in nematodes. One of these, EFF-1, is necessary for most cell fusions in Caenorhabditis elegans. Unregulated EFF-1 expression causes lethality due to ectopic fusion between cells not developmentally programmed to fuse, highlighting the necessity of tight fusogen regulation for proper development. Identifying factors that regulate EFF-1 and its paralog AFF-1 could lead to discovery of molecular mechanisms that control cell fusion upstream of the action of a membrane fusogen. Bioinformatic analysis of the EFF-1A isoform’s predicted cytoplasmic domain (endodomain) previously revealed two motifs that have high probabilities of interacting with 14-3-3 proteins when phosphorylated. Mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites within these motifs caused measurable loss of eff-1 gene function in cell fusion in vivo. Moreover, a human 14-3-3 isoform bound to EFF-1::GFP in vitro. We hypothesized that the two 14-3-3 proteins in C. elegans, PAR-5 and FTT-2, may regulate either localization or fusion-inducing activity of EFF-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Timing of fusion events was slightly but significantly delayed in animals unable to produce full-length EFF-1A. Yet, mutagenesis and live imaging showed that phosphoserines in putative 14-3-3 binding sites are not essential for EFF-1::GFP accumulation at the membrane contact between fusion partner cells. Moreover, although the EFF-1A endodomain was required for normal rates of eff-1-dependent epidermal cell fusions, reduced levels of FTT-2 and PAR-5 did not visibly affect the function of wild-type EFF-1 in the hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance Deletion of the EFF-1A endodomain noticeably affects the timing of hypodermal cell fusions in vivo. However

  2. Reciprocal Regulation of Aquaporin-2 Abundance and Degradation by Protein Kinase A and p38-MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nedvetsky, Pavel I.; Tabor, Vedrana; Tamma, Grazia; Beulshausen, Sven; Skroblin, Philipp; Kirschner, Aline; Mutig, Kerim; Boltzen, Mareike; Petrucci, Oscar; Vossenkämper, Anna; Wiesner, Burkhard; Bachmann, Sebastian; Rosenthal, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) modulates the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in the renal collecting duct to maintain homeostasis of body water. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R), increasing cAMP, which promotes the redistribution of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane. cAMP also increases AQP2 transcription, but whether altered degradation also modulates AQP2 protein levels is not well understood. Here, elevation of cAMP increased AQP2 protein levels within 30 minutes in primary inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells ectopically expressing AQP2, and in mouse kidneys. Accelerated transcription or translation did not explain this increase in AQP2 abundance. In IMCD cells, cAMP inhibited p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) via activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of p38-MAPK associated with decreased phosphorylation (serine 261) and polyubiquitination of AQP2, preventing proteasomal degradation. Our results demonstrate that AVP enhances AQP2 protein abundance by altering its proteasomal degradation through a PKA- and p38-MAPK–dependent pathway. PMID:20724536

  3. A cytoplasmic 57-kDa protein that is required for translation of picornavirus RNA by internal ribosomal entry is identical to the nuclear pyrimidine tract-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hellen, C U; Witherell, G W; Schmid, M; Shin, S H; Pestova, T V; Gil, A; Wimmer, E

    1993-01-01

    Initiation of translation of the RNA genomes of picornaviruses such as poliovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus is cap-independent and results from interaction of ribosomes with a segment of the 5' noncoding region of these mRNAs termed the internal ribosomal entry site. Genetic and biochemical studies have previously shown that a 57-kDa cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein (p57) plays an essential role in this translation mechanism. We have now found that p57 shares physical, biochemical, and antigenic properties with the pyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), a nuclear protein that has been implicated in various processes involving pre-mRNA. These data indicate that p57 and PTB are the same protein. Purified recombinant PTB bound specifically to a bulged hairpin within the internal ribosomal entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus and had a much lower affinity for a mutated derivative of this hairpin and for unrelated RNAs. Immunodepletion of p57/PTB from a HeLa cell-free lysate inhibited translation of poliovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus mRNAs but had no effect on translation of beta-globin mRNA, confirming the essential role of p57 in translation by internal ribosomal entry. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8395052

  4. Minireview series on the thirtieth anniversary of research on O-GlcNAcylation of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins: Nutrient regulation of cellular metabolism and physiology by O-GlcNAcylation.

    PubMed

    Hart, Gerald W

    2014-12-12

    The dynamic cycling of N-acetylglucosamine (termed O-GlcNAcylation) on serine or threonine residues of nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins serves as a nutrient sensor, both independently and also via its interplay with other post-translational modifications, to regulate signaling, transcription, and cellular physiology. Emerging evidence suggests that dysregulation of this ubiquitous post-translational modification contributes to the etiology of some the most important human chronic diseases.

  5. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  6. Secretome profiling of highly virulent Mycobacterium bovis 04-303 strain reveals higher abundance of virulence-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Romero, Fernando; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Castañón-Arreola, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in farms, wildlife and causes sporadic disease in humans. Despite the high similitude in genome sequence between M. bovis strains, some strains like the wild boar 04-303 isolate show a highly virulent phenotype in animal models. Comparative studies will contribute to link protein expression with the virulence phenotype. In vitro, the 04-303 strain was more phagocytized by J774A.1 macrophages in comparison with 444 strain (a cow isolate with the same genotype) and BCG. The secretome of these strains showed a significant proportion of shared proteins (368 spots). Among the proteins only visualized in the secretome of the 04-303 strain, we identify the nine most abundant proteins by LC-MS/MS. The most relevant were EsxA and EsxB proteins, which are encoded in the RD1 region, deleted in BCG strains. These proteins are the major virulence factor of M. tuberculosis. The other proteins identified belong to functional categories of virulence, detoxification, and adaptation; lipid metabolism; and cell wall and cell processes. The relatively high proportion of proteins involved in the cell wall and cell process is consistent with the previously described variation among M. bovis genomes.

  7. Ultra sensitive affinity chromatography on avidin-functionalized PMMA microchip for low abundant post-translational modified protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Murray, Kermit; Soper, Steven; Feng, June

    2012-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins play essential roles in cellular physiology and disease. The identification of protein substrates and detection of modification site helps understand PTM-mediated regulation in essential biological pathways and functions in various diseases. However, PTM proteins are typically present only at trace levels, making them difficult to identify in mass spectrometry based proteomics. In this paper, we report a novel and sensitive affinity chromatography on the avidin-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip for enrichment of nanogram (ng) amount of PTMs. The chemical modification of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces yield avidin-terminated PMMA surfaces after UV radiation and consecutive EDC mediated coupling (amide reaction). This functionalized PMMA micro-device was developed to identify and specifically trap biotinylated PTM proteins of low abundance from complex protein mixture. Here we selected carbonylated protein as a representative PTM to illustrate the wide application of this affinity microchip for any PTMs converted into a tractable tag after derivatization. The surface topography, surface functional group mapping and elemental composition changes after each modification step of the treatment process were systematically measured qualitatively and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative study of biotinlated carbonylated protein capture recovery and elution efficiency of the device was also studied. We also envision that this subproteome enrichment micro-device can be assembled with other lab-on-a-chip components for follow-up protein analysis.

  8. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 3: developmental changes in spermatid flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet and interaction of sperm with the zona pellucida and egg plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Hermo, Louis; Pelletier, R-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G; Smith, Charles E

    2010-04-01

    Spermiogenesis constitutes the steps involved in the metamorphosis of spermatids into spermatozoa. It involves modification of several organelles in addition to the formation of several structures including the flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet. The flagellum is composed of a neck region and middle, principal, and end pieces. The axoneme composed of nine outer microtubular doublets circularly arranged to form a cylinder around a central pair of microtubules is present throughout the flagellum. The middle and principal pieces each contain specific components such as the mitochondrial sheath and fibrous sheath, respectively, while outer dense fibers are common to both. A plethora of proteins are constituents of each of these structures, with each playing key roles in functions related to the fertility of spermatozoa. At the end of spermiogenesis, a portion of spermatid cytoplasm remains associated with the released spermatozoa, referred to as the cytoplasmic droplet. The latter has as its main feature Golgi saccules, which appear to modify the plasma membrane of spermatozoa as they move down the epididymal duct and hence may be partly involved in male gamete maturation. The end product of spermatogenesis is highly streamlined and motile spermatozoa having a condensed nucleus equipped with an acrosome. Spermatozoa move through the female reproductive tract and eventually penetrate the zona pellucida and bind to the egg plasma membrane. Many proteins have been implicated in the process of fertilization as well as a plethora of proteins involved in the development of spermatids and sperm, and these are high lighted in this review.

  9. Cytoplasmic myosin from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Myosin is identified and purified from three different established Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (Schneider's lines 2 and 3 and Kc). Purification entails lysis in a low salt, sucrose buffer that contains ATP, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, precipitation with actin in the absence of ATP, gel filtration in a discontinuous KI-KCl buffer system, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Yield of pure cytoplasmic myosin is 5-10%. This protein is identified as myosin by its cross-reactivity with two monoclonal antibodies against human platelet myosin, the molecular weight of its heavy chain, its two light chains, its behavior on gel filtration, its ATP-dependent affinity for actin, its characteristic ATPase activity, its molecular morphology as demonstrated by platinum shadowing, and its ability to form bipolar filaments. The molecular weight of the cytoplasmic myosin's light chains and peptide mapping and immunochemical analysis of its heavy chains demonstrate that this myosin, purified from Drosophila cell lines, is distinct from Drosophila muscle myosin. Two-dimensional thin layer maps of complete proteolytic digests of iodinated muscle and cytoplasmic myosin heavy chains demonstrate that, while the two myosins have some tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic peptides in common, most peptides migrate with unique mobility. One-dimensional peptide maps of SDS PAGE purified myosin heavy chain confirm these structural data. Polyclonal antiserum raised and reacted against Drosophila myosin isolated from cell lines cross-reacts only weakly with Drosophila muscle myosin isolated from the thoraces of adult Drosophila. Polyclonal antiserum raised against Drosophila muscle myosin behaves in a reciprocal fashion. Taken together our data suggest that the myosin purified from Drosophila cell lines is a bona fide cytoplasmic myosin and is very likely the product of a different myosin gene than the muscle myosin heavy chain gene that has been previously identified and characterized. PMID

  10. Envelope proteins of spleen necrosis virus form infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pseudotype vector particles, but fail to incorporate upon substitution of the cytoplasmic domain with that of Gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Stitz, Jörn; Wolfrum, Nina; Buchholz, Christian J; Cichutek, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    The wild-type (wt) envelope (Env) proteins of spleen necrosis virus (SNV), together with the transmembrane (TM) protein fused to antibody domains (scFv), have been used for the generation of stable packaging cell lines releasing pseudotyped cell targeting vectors derived from SNV and Murine leukemia virus (MLV). As a first step towards assessing whether HIV-1(SNV/TM-scFv) packaging cells could be established for the production of lentiviral cell targeting vectors, it is reported here that infectious HIV-1-derived particles pseudotyped with wt SNV Env proteins could be generated. Using novel chimeric SNV-derived Env proteins encompassing wt and engineered cytoplasmic domains (C-tail) of the Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) TM protein, it was further shown that the wt C-tail not only excludes the GaLV TM protein from incorporation into HIV-1 particles, but confers this phenotype to other retroviral envelopes upon C-terminal fusion.

  11. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery.

  12. Relationship between nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA in Drosophilia cells.

    PubMed

    Levy, B; McCarthy, B J

    1976-06-01

    Polyadenylated RNA was isolated from nuclei of cultured Drosophila cells, Schneider's line 2, and used as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA probe. Hybridization experiments were performed to study the relationship between nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA. About two-thirds of the nuclear polyadenylated RNA sequences exist in the cytoplasm. Experiments with fractionated cDNA probes demonstrated that RNA sequences that are frequent in the nucleus are also abundant in the cytoplasm. These findings are consistent with a precursor-product relationship in which some polyadenylated molecules in the nucleus are destined for the cytoplasm while other sequences are polyadenylated but not transferred.

  13. Major cytoplasmic membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, induces protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Blander, S J; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the capacity of the major cytoplasmic membrane protein (MCMP) of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, to induce protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. We purified MCMP to homogeneity from L. pneumophila by buffer extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and molecular sieve chromatography. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP developed a strong cell-mediated immune response to the immunogen manifest by marked cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP and then challenged with a lethal aerosol dose of L. pneumophila exhibited a high level of protective immunity. Altogether, in four independent experiments, 55 of 64 (86%) animals immunized three times with 0.6-40 micrograms MCMP including 11 of 11 (100%) animals immunized three times with 40 micrograms MCMP survived aerosol challenge with L. pneumophila compared with 1 of 29 (3%) sham-immunized control animals (P < 0.0001, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel X2 statistic for pooled data). To our knowledge, MCMP is the first member of the hsp 60 family of proteins shown to induce protective immunity to a microbial pathogen. MCMP has potential as a vaccine against Legionnaires' disease. Since MCMP is a genus common antigen, vaccination with a combination of MCMPs derived from different Legionella species has the potential of inducing protective immunity against all the major Legionella species causing human disease. Images PMID:8432872

  14. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  15. Determination of accurate protein monoisotopic mass with the most abundant mass measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Chang, C Allen; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2013-09-01

    While recent developments in mass spectrometry enable direct evaluation of monoisotopic masses (M(mi)) of smaller compounds, protein M(mi) is mostly determined based on its relationship to average mass (Mav). Here, we propose an alternative approach to determining protein M(mi) based on its correlation with the most abundant mass (M(ma)) measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry. To test this supposition, we first empirically calculated M(mi) and M(ma) of 6158 Escherichia coli proteins, which helped serendipitously uncover a linear correlation between these two protein masses. With the relationship characterized, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to measure M(ma) of protein samples in its ion cluster with the highest signal in the mass spectrum. Generally, our method produces a short series of likely M(mi) in 1-Da steps, and the probability of each likely M(mi) is assigned statistically. It is remarkable that the mass error of this M(mi) is as miniscule as a few parts per million, indicating that our method is capable of determining protein M(mi) with high accuracy. Benefitting from the outstanding performance of modern mass spectrometry, our approach is a significant improvement over others and should be of great utility in the rapid assessment of protein primary structures.

  16. Identification in Pea Seed Mitochondria of a Late-Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Able to Protect Enzymes from Drying1

    PubMed Central

    Grelet, Johann; Benamar, Abdelilah; Teyssier, Emeline; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Grunwald, Didier; Macherel, David

    2005-01-01

    Late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic proteins that accumulate to a high level in desiccation-tolerant tissues and are thus prominent in seeds. They are expected to play a protective role during dehydration; however, functional evidence is scarce. We identified a LEA protein of group 3 (PsLEAm) that was localized within the matrix space of pea (Pisum sativum) seed mitochondria. PsLEAm revealed typical LEA features such as high hydrophilicity and repeated motifs, except for the N-terminal transit peptide. Most of the highly charged protein was predicted to fold into amphiphilic α-helixes. PsLEAm was expressed during late seed development and remained in the dry seed and throughout germination. Application of the stress hormone abscisic acid was found to reinduce the expression of PsLEAm transcripts during germination. PsLEAm could not be detected in vegetative tissues; however, its expression could be reinduced in leaves by severe water stress. The recombinant PsLEAm was shown to protect two mitochondrial matrix enzymes, fumarase and rhodanese, during drying in an in vitro assay. The overall results constitute, to our knowledge, the first characterization of a LEA protein in mitochondria and experimental evidence for a beneficial role of a LEA protein with respect to proteins during desiccation. PMID:15618423

  17. Effects of EPA and DHA on lipid droplet accumulation and mRNA abundance of PAT proteins in caprine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Modina, Silvia; Sartorelli, Paola; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effects on caprine monocytes of two ω-3 PUFAs, namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipid droplet formation, an emerging process of fundamental importance in innate immunity regulation. The mRNA abundance of PAT protein family (PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN3), involved in the formation and trafficking of the droplets, was also assessed. The effects of EPA and DHA on monocyte apoptosis were studied as well. The number of lipid droplets per cell was found to be dependent on both type and concentration of fatty acid. ω-3 PUFAs upregulated PLIN3 and PLIN2 gene expression, as well as apoptosis rate. The present findings suggest that PUFA might modify innate immune functions of goat monocytes by interfering with the formation of lipid droplets and by upregulating proteins belonging to PAT protein family.

  18. The nuclear RNA binding protein RBP33 influences mRNA and spliced leader RNA abundance in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Olivera; Trikin, Roman; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Doiron, Nicholas; Jakob, Martin; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) containing proteins are important regulators of gene expression in trypanosomes. Here we expand our current knowledge on the exclusively nuclear localized RRM domain containing protein RBP33 of Trypanosoma brucei. Overexpression of RBP33 leads to a quick growth arrest in G2/M in bloodstream form cells likely due to an overall mRNA- and spliced leader abundance decrease while the ribosomal RNAs remain unaffected. The recombinant RBP33 binds to poly(A) and random sequence RNA in vitro confirming its role as a RNA binding protein. Finally super-resolution microscopy detects RBP33 in small punctae throughout the nucleus and surrounding the nucleolus, however the signal is depleted inside the nucleolus.

  19. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies.

  20. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  1. Isolation and characterization of multiple abundant lipid transfer protein isoforms in developing sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ah Mi; Lee, Saet Buyl; Cho, Sung Ho; Hwang, Inhwan; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Suh, Mi Chung

    2008-02-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is an important oilseed crop; approximately 50% of the seed dry weight is storage oil. In a previous report, developing sesame seed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) revealed that ESTs encoding lipid transfer protein (LTPs) were one of the most abundant groups of sesame ESTs. LTP functions in the transfer of wax or cutin monomers and in the defense response against pathogen attack. To study the biological role of the abundant LTP isoforms in developing seeds, 122 ESTs out of 3328 sesame ESTs were analyzed against Arabidopsis and rice proteome databases. LTP fraction, which was partially purified from developing sesame seeds, actively transferred fluorescent phospholipids and bound to fatty acids. Full-length cDNAs of five out of 21 LTP isoforms were isolated and named SiLTP1-SiLTP5. The predicted amino acid sequences of the five SiLTPs harbor typical characteristics of LTPs, including conserved arrangement of cysteine residues. Northern blot analysis revealed that the five SiLTP isoforms were most abundantly expressed in developing seeds, but were also detected in flower tissues. Also, SiLTP3 and SiLTP4 transcripts were expressed in leaves and seed-pot walls, respectively. In addition, SiLTP2 and SiLTP4 transcripts were significantly induced in 6-day-old sesame seedlings by application of NaCl, mannitol, and abscisic acid (ABA). Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that SiLTP1 and SiLTP2 were secreted by different pathways. Taken together, the abundant LTPs in developing sesame seeds are involved in lipid transfer into the extracellular matrix. Possible biological roles of SiLTPs related to organ-specific expression and abiotic stresses are discussed.

  2. Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R. Paul; Scott, Karen P.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  3. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  4. Diversity, abundance, and sex-specific expression of chemosensory proteins in the reproductive organs of the locust Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Hong; Ban, Li-Ping; Iovinella, Immacolata; Zhao, Li-Jing; Gao, Qian; Felicioli, Antonio; Sagona, Simona; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Paolo; Zhang, Long; Dani, Francesca Romana

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small soluble proteins often associated with chemosensory organs in insects but include members involved in other functions, such as pheromone delivery and development. Although the CSPs of the sensory organs have been extensively studied, little is known on their functions in other parts of the body. A first screening of the available databases has identified 70 sequences encoding CSPs in the oriental locust Locusta migratoria manilensis. Applying proteomic analysis, we have identified 17 of them abundantly expressed in the female reproductive organs, but only one (CSP91) in male organs. Bacterially expressed CSP91 binds fatty acids with a specificity for oleic and linoleic acid, as well as medium-length alcohols and esters. The same acids have been detected as the main gas chromatographic peaks in the dichloromethane extracts of reproductive organs of both sexes. The abundance and the number of CSPs in female reproductive organs indicates important roles for these proteins. We cannot exclude that different functions can be associated with each of the 17 CSPs, including delivery of semiochemicals, solubilization of hormones, direct control of development, or other unknown tasks.

  5. An Odorant-Binding Protein Is Abundantly Expressed in the Nose and in the Seminal Fluid of the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Niccolini, Alberto; Serra, Andrea; Gazzano, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers “urinary” and “salivary” and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3) expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose. PMID:25391153

  6. Effects of heat stress on proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of heat shock protein messenger ribonucleic acid in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Hathaway, M R; Dayton, W R

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that heat stress (HS) negatively affects growth rate in swine. Although reduced feed intake undoubtedly plays a significant role in this reduction, studies in laboratory animals and other nonswine species indicate muscle growth also is affected by HS-related alterations in muscle physiology. Evidence is now emerging that heat shock proteins (Hsp), produced in response to HS and other types of cellular stress, may play an important role in regulating the rate and efficiency of muscle growth. Because muscle satellite cells play a crucial role in postnatal muscle growth, the effects of HS on rates of satellite cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation play an important role in determining the rate and extent of muscle growth. Consequently, in the current study we have examined the effects of mild HS (40.5°C for 48 h) on the rates of proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation and on quantities of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA and protein in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells (PSC). Mild HS of PSC cultures resulted in 2.5-, 1.4-, and 6.5-fold increases (P < 0.05) in the abundance of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA, respectively, relative to control cultures. Abundance of Hsp 90, 70, and 25/27 proteins was also increased in HS PSC cultures compared with those in control cultures. Proliferation rates in HS PSC cultures were 35% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. Protein synthesis rates in HS-fused PSC cultures were 85% greater (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures, and protein degradation rates in HS-fused PSC were 23% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. In light of the crucial role satellite cells play in postnatal muscle growth, the HS-induced changes we have observed in rates of proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of Hsp mRNA and Hsp protein in PSC cultures indicate that mild HS affects the physiology of PSC in ways that could affect muscle growth in swine.

  7. Conformation of a group 2 late embryogenesis abundant protein from soybean. Evidence of poly (L-proline)-type II structure.

    PubMed

    Soulages, Jose L; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C

    2003-03-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (L-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (L-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12 degrees C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80 degrees C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt alpha-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic alpha-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation

  8. Differential Role of β1C and β1A Integrin Cytoplasmic Variants in Modulating Focal Adhesion Kinase, Protein Kinase B/AKT, and Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Mara; Steger, Craig A.; Bennett, Anton M.; Wu, J. Julie; Languino, Lucia R.

    2000-01-01

    The integrin cytoplasmic domain modulates cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and intracellular signaling. The β1 integrin subunits, β1C and β1A, that contain variant cytoplasmic domains differentially affect cell proliferation; β1C inhibits proliferation, whereas β1A promotes it. We investigated the ability of β1C and β1A to modulate integrin-mediated signaling events that affect cell proliferation and survival in Chinese hamster ovary stable cell lines expressing either human β1C or human β1A. The different cytodomains of either β1C or β1A did not affect either association with the endogenous α2, αV, and α5 subunits or cell adhesion to fibronectin or TS2/16, a mAb to human β1. Upon engagement of endogenous and exogenous integrins by fibronectin, cells expressing β1C showed significantly inhibited extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) 2 activation compared with β1A stable cell lines. In contrast, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and Protein Kinase B/AKT activity were not affected. Selective engagement of the exogenously expressed β1C by TS2/16 led to stimulation of Protein Kinase B/AKT phosphorylation but not of ERK2 activation; in contrast, β1A engagement induced activation of both proteins. We show that Ras activation was strongly reduced in β1C stable cell lines in response to fibronectin adhesion and that expression of constitutively active Ras, Ras 61 (L), rescued β1C-mediated down-regulation of ERK2 activation. Inhibition of cell proliferation in β1C stable cell lines was attributable to an inhibitory effect of β1C on the Ras/MAP kinase pathway because expression of activated MAPK kinase rescued β1C antiproliferative effect. These findings show that the β1C variant, by means of a unique signaling mechanism, selectively inhibits the MAP kinase pathway by preventing Ras activation without affecting either survival signals stimulated by integrins or cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. These findings

  9. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  10. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  11. Effects of estradiol on ischemic factor-induced astrocyte swelling and AQP4 protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Wallace, Breanna K; Wise, Phyllis M; O'Donnell, Martha E

    2011-07-01

    In the early hours of ischemic stroke, cerebral edema forms as Na, Cl, and water are secreted across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and astrocytes swell. We have shown previously that ischemic factors, including hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), stimulate BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) and Na/H exchanger (NHE) activities and that inhibiting NKCC and/or NHE by intravenous bumetanide and/or HOE-642 reduces edema and infarct in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Estradiol also reduces edema and infarct in this model and abolishes ischemic factor stimulation of BBB NKCC and NHE. There is evidence that NKCC and NHE also participate in ischemia-induced swelling of astrocytes. However, little is known about estradiol effects on astrocyte cell volume. In this study, we evaluated the effects of AVP (100 nM), hypoxia (7.5% O(2)), aglycemia, hypoxia (2%)/aglycemia [oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)], and estradiol (1-100 nM) on astrocyte cell volume using 3-O-methyl-d-[(3)H]glucose equilibration methods. We found that AVP, hypoxia, aglycemia, and OGD (30 min to 5 h) each significantly increased astrocyte cell volume, and that estradiol (30-180 min) abolished swelling induced by AVP or hypoxia, but not by aglycemia or OGD. Bumetanide and/or HOE-642 also abolished swelling induced by AVP but not aglycemia. Abundance of aquaporin-4, known to participate in ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, was significantly reduced following 7-day but not 2- or 3-h estradiol exposures. Our findings suggest that hypoxia, aglycemia, and AVP each contribute to ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, and that the edema-attenuating effects of estradiol include reduction of hypoxia- and AVP-induced astrocyte swelling and also reduction of aquaporin-4 abundance.

  12. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-12-22

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress.

  13. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-19

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers.

  14. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress. PMID:28004781

  15. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  16. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    PubMed Central

    Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  17. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  18. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients.

  19. RACK1 scaffold proteins influence miRNA abundance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Speth, Corinna; Willing, Eva-Maria; Rausch, Stephanie; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Laubinger, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate plant development by post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DCL1 processes precursors (pri-miRNAs) to miRNA duplexes, which associate with AGO1. Additional proteins act in concert with DCL1 (e.g. HYL1 and SERRATE) or AGO1 to facilitate efficient and precise pri-miRNA processing and miRNA loading, respectively. In this study, we show that the accumulation of plant microRNAs depends on RECEPTOR FOR ACTIVATED C KINASE 1 (RACK1), a scaffold protein that is found in all higher eukaryotes. miRNA levels are reduced in rack1 mutants, and our data suggest that RACK1 affects the microRNA pathway via several distinct mechanisms involving direct interactions with known microRNA factors: RACK1 ensures the accumulation and processing of some pri-miRNAs, directly interacts with SERRATE and is part of an AGO1 complex. As a result, mutations in RACK1 lead to over-accumulation of miRNA target mRNAs, which are important for ABA responses and phyllotaxy, for example. In conclusion, our study identified complex functioning of RACK1 proteins in the Arabidopsis miRNA pathway; these proteins are important for miRNA production and therefore plant development.

  20. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies with Cytoplasmic Fluorescence Pattern.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Seema; Minz, Ranjana Walker; Goyal, Lekha; Sharma, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    We report here two rare cases of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-positive Wegener's granulomatosis (limited variant) which deceptively produced a cytoplasmic (C-ANCA) pattern on indirect immunofluorescence.

  1. Differences in Abundances of Cell-Signalling Proteins in Blood Reveal Novel Biomarkers for Early Detection Of Clinical Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rocha de Paula, Mateus; Gómez Ravetti, Martín; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Background In November 2007 a study published in Nature Medicine proposed a simple test based on the abundance of 18 proteins in blood to predict the onset of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) two to six years before these symptoms manifest. Later, another study, published in PLoS ONE, showed that only five proteins (IL-1, IL-3, EGF, TNF- and G-CSF) have overall better prediction accuracy. These classifiers are based on the abundance of 120 proteins. Such values were standardised by a Z-score transformation, which means that their values are relative to the average of all others. Methodology The original datasets from the Nature Medicine paper are further studied using methods from combinatorial optimisation and Information Theory. We expand the original dataset by also including all pair-wise differences of z-score values of the original dataset (“metafeatures”). Using an exact algorithm to solve the resulting Feature Set problem, used to tackle the feature selection problem, we found signatures that contain either only features, metafeatures or both, and evaluated their predictive performance on the independent test set. Conclusions It was possible to show that a specific pattern of cell signalling imbalance in blood plasma has valuable information to distinguish between NDC and AD samples. The obtained signatures were able to predict AD in patients that already had a Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) with up to 84% of sensitivity, while maintaining also a strong prediction accuracy of 90% on a independent dataset with Non Demented Controls (NDC) and AD samples. The novel biomarkers uncovered with this method now confirms ANG-2, IL-11, PDGF-BB, CCL15/MIP-1; and supports the joint measurement of other signalling proteins not previously discussed: GM-CSF, NT-3, IGFBP-2 and VEGF-B. PMID:21479255

  2. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  3. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  4. Human Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) regulates cytoplasmic lipid droplet abundance: A potential target for indirect-acting anti-dengue virus agents

    PubMed Central

    Hyrina, Anastasia; Meng, Fanrui; McArthur, Steven J.; Eivemark, Sharlene; Nabi, Ivan R.; Jean, François

    2017-01-01

    Viral hijacking and manipulation of host-cell biosynthetic pathways by human enveloped viruses are shared molecular events essential for the viral lifecycle. For Flaviviridae members such as hepatitis C virus and dengue virus (DENV), one of the key subsets of cellular pathways that undergo manipulation is the lipid metabolic pathways, underlining the importance of cellular lipids and, in particular, lipid droplets (LDs) in viral infection. Here, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes that act as key regulators of lipid homeostasis and LD formation could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with all DENV serotypes (1–4) circulating around the world. Using PF-429242, an active-site-directed inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P, we demonstrate that inhibition of SKI-1/S1P enzymatic activity in human hepatoma Huh-7.5.1 cells results in a robust reduction of the LD numbers and LD-positive areas and provides a means of effectively inhibiting infection by DENV (1–4). Pre-treatment of Huh-7.5.1 cells with PF-429242 results in a dose-dependent inhibition of DENV infection [median inhibitory dose (EC50) = 1.2 microM; median cytotoxic dose (CC50) = 81 microM; selectivity index (SI) = 68)] and a ~3-log decrease in DENV-2 titer with 20 microM of PF-429242. Post-treatment of DENV-2 infected Huh-7.5.1 cells with PF-429242 does not affect viral RNA abundance, but it does compromise the assembly and/or release of infectious virus particles. PF-429242 antiviral activity is reversed by exogenous oleic acid, which acts as an inducer of LD formation in PF-429242-treated and non-treated control cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that human SKI-1/S1P is a potential target for indirect-acting pan-serotypic anti-DENV agents and reveal new therapeutic opportunities associated with the use of lipid-modulating drugs for controlling DENV infection. PMID:28339489

  5. Protein localization in Escherichia coli cells: comparison of the cytoplasmic membrane proteins ProP, LacY, ProW, AqpZ, MscS, and MscL.

    PubMed

    Romantsov, Tatyana; Battle, Andrew R; Hendel, Jenifer L; Martinac, Boris; Wood, Janet M

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revealed that the phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) and FlAsH-labeled transporters ProP and LacY are concentrated at the poles of Escherichia coli cells. The proportion of CL among E. coli phospholipids can be varied in vivo as it is decreased by cls mutations and it increases with the osmolality of the growth medium. In this report we compare the localization of CL, ProP, and LacY with that of other cytoplasmic membrane proteins. The proportion of cells in which FlAsH-labeled membrane proteins were concentrated at the cell poles was determined as a function of protein expression level and CL content. Each tagged protein was expressed from a pBAD24-derived plasmid; tagged ProP was also expressed from the chromosome. The osmosensory transporter ProP and the mechanosensitive channel MscS concentrated at the poles at frequencies correlated with the cellular CL content. The lactose transporter LacY was found at the poles at a high and CL-independent frequency. ProW (a component of the osmoregulatory transporter ProU), AqpZ (an aquaporin), and MscL (a mechanosensitive channel) were concentrated at the poles in a minority of cells, and this polar localization was CL independent. The frequency of polar localization was independent of induction (at arabinose concentrations up to 1 mM) for proteins encoded by pBAD24-derived plasmids. Complementation studies showed that ProW, AqpZ, MscS, and MscL remained functional after introduction of the FlAsH tag (CCPGCC). These data suggest that CL-dependent polar localization in E. coli cells is not a general characteristic of transporters, channels, or osmoregulatory proteins. Polar localization can be frequent and CL independent (as observed for LacY), frequent and CL dependent (as observed for ProP and MscS), or infrequent (as observed for AqpZ, ProW, and MscL).

  6. BacS: an abundant bacteroid protein in Rhizobium etli whose expression ex planta requires nifA.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Olivia J; Davila, Guillermo; Romero, David; Noel, K Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 bacteroids from bean nodules possessed an abundant 16-kDa protein (BacS) that was found in the membrane pellet after cell disruption. This protein was not detected in bacteria cultured in tryptone-yeast extract. In minimal media, it was produced at low oxygen concentration but not in a mutant whose nifA was disrupted. N-terminal sequencing of the protein led to isolation of a bacS DNA fragment. DNA hybridization and nucleotide sequencing revealed three copies of the bacS gene, all residing on the main symbiotic plasmid of strain CFN42. A stretch of 304 nucleotides, exactly conserved upstream of all three bacS open reading frames, had very close matches with the NifA and sigma 54 consensus binding sequences. The only bacS homology in the genetic sequence databases was to three hypothetical proteins of unknown function, all from rhizobial species. Mutation and genetic complementation indicated that each of the bacS genes gives rise to a BacS polypeptide. Mutants disrupted or deleted in all three genes did not produce the BacS polypeptide but were Nod+ and Fix+ on Phaseolus vulgaris.

  7. Cytoplasmic tail domain of glycoprotein B is essential for HHV-6 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Nora F.; Jasirwan, Chyntia; Kanemoto, Satoshi; Wakata, Aika; Wang, Bochao; Hata, Yuuki; Nagamata, Satoshi; Kawabata, Akiko; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-03-15

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) glycoprotein B (gB) is an abundantly expressed viral glycoprotein required for viral entry and cell fusion, and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. The present study examined the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). A gB CTD deletion mutant was constructed which, in contrast to its revertant, could not be reconstituted. Moreover, deletion of gB cytoplasmic tail impaired the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Taken together, these results suggest that gB CTD is critical for HHV-6 propagation and important for intracellular transportation. - Highlights: • Glycoprotein B (gB) is highly conserved among herpesviruses. • HHV-6 gB is also abundantly expressed in virions. • In the present study, we showed the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). • We found that deletion of gB CTD impairs the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), and CTD of gB is critical for HHV-6 propagation.

  8. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4g H2O g DW–1. Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds. PMID:24043848

  9. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Manuel; Ahrné, Erik; Baron, Anna P.; Glatter, Timo; Fava, Luca L.; Santamaria, Anna; Nigg, Erich A.; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA) and independent (DIA) mass spectrometric (MS) workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3) of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014) [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964. PMID:26550600

  10. Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Proteomic Signatures of Exponentially Growing Cells of the Psychrophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Boris; Kock, Holger; Glagla, Susanne; Albrecht, Dirk; Voigt, Birgit; Markert, Stephanie; Gardebrecht, Antje; Bode, Rüdiger; Danchin, Antoine; Feller, Georges; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The psychrophilic model bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis is characterized by remarkably fast growth rates under low-temperature conditions in a range from 5°C to 20°C. In this study the proteome of cellular compartments, the cytoplasm and periplasm, of P. haloplanktis strain TAC125 was analyzed under exponential growth conditions at a permissive temperature of 16°C. By means of two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, a first inventory of the most abundant cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins expressed in a peptone-supplemented minimal medium was established. By this approach major enzymes of the amino acid catabolism of this marine bacterium could be functionally deduced. The cytoplasmic proteome showed a predominance of amino acid degradation pathways and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes but also the protein synthesis machinery. Furthermore, high levels of cold acclimation and oxidative stress proteins could be detected at this moderate growth temperature. The periplasmic proteome was characterized by a significant abundance of transporters, especially of highly expressed putative TonB-dependent receptors. This high capacity for protein synthesis, efficient amino acid utilization, and substrate transport may contribute to the fast growth rates of the copiotrophic bacterium P. haloplanktis in its natural environments. PMID:21183643

  11. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi.

  12. Dynamin-related proteins Vps1p and Dnm1p control peroxisome abundance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuravi, Kasinath; Nagotu, Shirisha; Krikken, Arjen M; Sjollema, Klaas; Deckers, Markus; Erdmann, Ralf; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2006-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three dynamin-related-proteins, Vps1p, Dnm1p and Mgm1p. Previous data from glucose-grown VPS1 and DNM1 null mutants suggested that Vps1p, but not Dnm1p, plays a role in regulating peroxisome abundance. Here we show that deletion of DNM1 also results in reduction of peroxisome numbers. This was not observed in glucose-grown dnm1 cells, but was evident in cells grown in the presence of oleate. Similar observations were made in cells lacking Fis1p, a protein involved in Dnm1p function. Fluorescence microscopy of cells producing Dnm1-GFP or GFP-Fis1p demonstrated that both proteins had a dual localization on mitochondria and peroxisomes. Quantitative analysis revealed a greater reduction in peroxisome number in oleate-induced vps1 cells relative to dnm1 or fis1 cells. A significant fraction of oleate-induced vps1 cells still contained two or more peroxisomes. Conversely, almost all cells of a dnm1 vps1 double-deletion strain contained only one, enlarged peroxisome. This suggests that deletion of DNM1 reinforces the vps1 peroxisome phenotype. Time-lapse imaging indicated that during budding of dnm1 vps1 cells, the single peroxisome present in the mother cell formed long protrusions into the developing bud. This organelle divided at a very late stage of the budding process, possibly during cytokinesis.

  13. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Phytosiderophore Production in Boron-Tolerant Barley1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-01-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a ‘Clipper’ × ‘Sahara’ doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  14. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  15. Cytoplasmic Drosha activity generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lisheng; Chen, Kevin; Youngren, Brenda; Kulina, Julia; Yang, Acong; Guo, Zhengyu; Li, Jin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    RNase III enzyme Drosha interacts with DGCR8 to form the Microprocessor, initiating canonical microRNA (miRNA) maturation in the nucleus. Here, we re-evaluated where Drosha functions in cells using Drosha and/or DGCR8 knock out (KO) cells and cleavage reporters. Interestingly, a truncated Drosha mutant located exclusively in the cytoplasm cleaved pri-miRNA effectively in a DGCR8-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that in vitro generated pri-miRNAs when transfected into cells could be processed to mature miRNAs in the cytoplasm. These results indicate the existence of cytoplasmic Drosha (c-Drosha) activity. Although a subset of endogenous pri-miRNAs become enriched in the cytoplasm of Drosha KO cells, it remains unclear whether pri-miRNA processing is the main function of c-Drosha. We identified two novel in-frame Drosha isoforms generated by alternative splicing in both HEK293T and HeLa cells. One isoform loses the putative nuclear localization signal, generating c-Drosha. Further analysis indicated that the c-Drosha isoform is abundant in multiple cell lines, dramatically variable among different human tissues and upregulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that c-Drosha plays a unique role in gene regulation. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation on the miRNA pathway and provide novel insights into the ever-evolving functions of Drosha. PMID:27471035

  16. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, G D

    2009-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase-ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener's granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  17. Fabrication of diverse pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica for selective removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Lan, Jingfeng; Li, Huihui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2017-01-01

    In proteomic studies, poor detection of low abundant proteins is a major problem due to the presence of highly abundant proteins. Therefore, the specific removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins prior to analysis is necessary. In response to this problem, a series of pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica materials composed of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid units were designed and synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. These functional mesoporous silica materials were characterized and their ability for adsorption and separation of proteins was evaluated. Possessing a pH-sensitive feature, the synthesized functional materials showed selective adsorption of some proteins in aqueous or buffer solutions at certain pH values. The specific removal of a particular protein from a mixed protein solution was subsequently studied. The analytical results confirmed that all the target proteins (bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, and lysozyme) can be removed by the proposed materials from a five-protein mixture in a single operation. Finally, the practical application of this approach was also evaluated by the selective removal of certain proteins from real biological samples. The results revealed that the maximum removal efficiencies of ovalbumin and lysozyme from egg white sample were obtained as 99% and 92%, respectively, while the maximum removal efficiency of human serum albumin from human serum sample was about 80% by the proposed method. It suggested that this treatment process reduced the complexity of real biological samples and facilitated the identification of hidden proteins in chromatograms.

  18. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association.

  19. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  20. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  1. Plant cytoplasm preserved by lightning.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    2004-10-01

    Usually only an organism with hard parts may be preserved in the fossil record. Cytoplasm, which is a physiologically active part of a plant, is rarely seen in the fossil record. Two Cretaceous plant fossils older than 100 million years with exceptional preservation of cytoplasm are reported here. Some cytoplasm is well preserved with subcellular details while other cytoplasm is highly hydrolyzed in the cortex of the same fossil even though both of preservations may be less than 2 microm away. The unique preservation pattern, sharp contrast of preservation in adjacent cells and the exceptional preservation of cytoplasm in the cortex suggest that lightning should play an important role in the preservation of cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic membranes may be more stable than the cell contents. Interpreting the preservation needs knowledge scattering in several formerly unrelated fields of science, including geophysics, botany, biophysics, cytology and microwave fixation technology. This new interpretation of fossilization will shed new light on preservation of cytoplasm and promote cytoplasm fossils from a position of rarity to a position of common research objects available for biological research. The importance of the identification of cytoplasm in fossil lies not in itself but in how much it influences the future research in paleobotany.

  2. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Radice, A; Sinico, R A

    2005-02-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a sensitive and specific marker for ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis. Using indirect immunofluorescence on ethanol-fixed neutrophils, two major fluoroscopic patterns can be recognised: a diffuse cytoplasmic staining (C-ANCA), and a perinuclear/nuclear staining (P-ANCA). In patients with vasculitis, more of 90% of C-ANCA are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) whereas approximately 80-90% of P-ANCA recognise myelperoxidase (MPO-ANCA). Although C-ANCA (PR3-ANCA) is preferentially associated with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), and P-ANCA (MPO-ANCA) with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), idiopathic necrotising crescentic glomerulonephritis (iNCGN) and Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), there is not absolute specificity. Between 10-20% of patients with classical WG show P-ANCA (MPO-ANCA), and even a larger percentage of patients with MPA or CSS have C-ANCA (PR3-ANCA). Furthermore, it should be stressed that approximately 10-20% of patients with WG or MPA (and 40-50% of cases of CSS) have negative assay for ANCA. The best diagnostic performance is obtained when indirect immunofluorescence is combined with PR3 and MPO-specific ELISAs. ANCA with different and unknown antigen specificity are found in a variety of conditions other than AASV, including inflammatory bowel diseases, other autoimmune diseases, and infections where their clinical significance is unclear. ANCA levels are useful to monitor disease activity but should not be used by themselves to guide treatment. A significant increase in ANCA titres, or the reappearance of ANCA, should alert the clinicians and lead to a stricter patient control.

  3. The X11L/X11{beta}/MINT2 and X11L2/X11{gamma}/MINT3 scaffold proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sumioka, Akio; Saito, Yuhki; Sakuma, Megumi; Araki, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2008-03-10

    The X11/MINT family proteins are adaptor scaffolding proteins involved in formation of multiprotein complexes, and trafficking and metabolism of membrane proteins such as the beta-amyloid precursor protein. We found that a significant portion of X11L and X11L2 are recovered in nuclear fraction of mouse brain homogenates. EGFP-X11s were not detected in the nucleus of N2a neuroblastoma cells; however, administration of leptomycin B (LMB) induced substantial nuclear accumulation of EGFP-X11L and EGFP-X11L2, while EGFP-X11 showed little accumulation. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) analysis indicated that EGFP-X11L2 and EGFP-X11L are shuttled between the cytoplasm and nucleus, the former more effectively than the latter. We identified a nuclear export signal (NES) in the N-terminus of X11L2, mutation of which induces nuclear accumulation of EGFP-X11L2 in the absence of LMB. X11L2 fused to the Gal4 DNA binding domain (DBD) showed transcriptional activity, suggesting that X11L2 could function as a transcriptional activator if tethered near a promoter. Interestingly, attenuation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of GAL4-DBD-X11L2 by mutating the NES or attaching the SV40 nuclear localization signal significantly decreased the apparent transcriptional activity. Our observations suggest that X11L2 functions in the nucleus by a mechanism distinct from conventional transactivators.

  4. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data types has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.

  5. The primary structure of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein heavy chain, a cytoplasmic motor enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Tanaka, Y; Nonaka, S; Aizawa, H; Kawasaki, H; Nakata, T; Hirokawa, N

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding the heavy chain of rat brain cytoplasmic dynein have been isolated. The isolated cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 13,932 bp encoding 4644 aa (M(r), 532,213). The deduced protein sequence of the heavy chain of rat brain dynein shows significant similarity to sea urchin flagellar beta-dynein (27.0% identical) and to Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein (53.5% identical) throughout the entire sequence. The heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein contains four putative nucleotide-binding consensus sequences [GX4GK(T/S)] in the central one-third region that are highly similar to those of sea urchin and Dictyostelium dyneins. The N-terminal one-third of the heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein shows high similarity (43.8% identical) to that of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein but poor similarity (19.4% identical) to that of sea urchin flagellar dynein. These results suggested that the C-terminal two-thirds of the dynein molecule is conserved and plays an essential role in microtubule-dependent motility activity, whereas the N-terminal regions are different between cytoplasmic and flagellar dyneins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7690137

  6. Antibacterial properties of the sperm-binding proteins and peptides of human epididymis 2 (HE2) family; salt sensitivity, structural dependence and their interaction with outer and cytoplasmic membranes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yenugu, Suresh; Hamil, Katherine G; Birse, Charles E; Ruben, Steven M; French, Frank S; Hall, Susan H

    2003-01-01

    During passage through the epididymis, sperm interact with secreted epididymal proteins that promote maturation, including the acquisition of motility and fertilization competence. Viewed previously as distinct from sperm maturation, host defence capabilities are now recognized functions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2) family of sperm-binding proteins. We analysed the potent dose and time-dependent bactericidal activity of recombinant HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 and found that the full-length proteins (10 microg/ml or approximately 1 microM) caused more than a 50% decrease in Escherichia coli colony forming units within 15 min. By contrast, human beta-defensin-1, at a similar concentration, required more than 90 min to exhibit similar antibacterial activity. The epididymis-specific lipocalin, LCN6, failed to kill bacteria. Higher concentrations (25-100 microg/ml) of HE2 proteins and a longer duration of treatment resulted in near total inhibition of bacterial growth. The C-terminal peptides of HE2alpha, HEbeta1 and HEbeta2 proteins exhibited antibacterial activity similar to their full-length counterparts, indicating that the antibacterial activity of HE2 proteins resides in these C-terminal regions. Antibacterial activities of HE2 proteins and peptides were slightly inhibited by NaCl concentrations of up to 150 mM, while human beta-defensin-1 activity was nearly eliminated. Reduction and alkylation of disulphide bonds in HE2 proteins and their C-terminal peptides abolished their antibacterial activity. Consistent with the ability to kill bacteria, full-length HE2 proteins and C-terminal peptides caused rapid dose-dependent permeabilization of outer and cytoplasmic E. coli membranes. A much longer exposure time was required for human beta-defensin-1-mediated permeabilization of membranes, suggesting a possible difference in mode of action compared with the HE2 antibacterial peptides. PMID:12628001

  7. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Xavier; Guilabert, Antonio; Font, Josep

    2006-07-29

    Much like other autoantibodies (eg, anti-double stranded DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies in Goodpasture's syndrome), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have provided doctors with a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides, including Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and their localised forms (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. Present treatments for ANCA-associated vasculitis are not free from side-effects and as many as 50% of patients relapse within 5 years. Accurate understanding of the key pathogenic points of ANCA-associated vasculitis can undoubtedly provide a more rational therapeutic approach.

  8. Acyl homoserine lactone changes the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids associated with stationary phase in Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Felipe Alves; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Carrijo, Lanna Clícia; Bento, Cláudia Braga Pereira; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell-cell communication mechanism mediated by signaling molecules known as autoinducers (AIs) that lead to differential gene expression. Salmonella is unable to synthesize the AI-1 acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), but is able to recognize AHLs produced by other microorganisms through SdiA protein. Our study aimed to evaluate the influence of AI-1 on the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids of Salmonella Enteritidis. The presence of N-dodecyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) did not interfere on the growth or the total amount of extracted proteins of Salmonella. However, the abundance of the proteins PheT, HtpG, PtsI, Adi, TalB, PmgI (or GpmI), Eno, and PykF enhanced while the abundance of the proteins RplB, RplE, RpsB, Tsf, OmpA, OmpC, OmpD, and GapA decreased when Salmonella Enteritidis was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of C12-HSL. Additionally, the bacterium produced less succinic, lactic, and acetic acids in the presence of C12-HSL. However, the concentration of extracellular formic acid reached 20.46 mM after 24 h and was not detected when the growth was in the absence of AI-1. Considering the cultivation period for protein extraction, their abundance, process and function, as well as the levels of organic acids, we observed in cells cultivated in presence of C12-HSL a correlation with what is described in the literature as entry into the stationary phase of growth, mainly related to nitrogen and amino acid starvation and acid stress. Further studies are needed in order to determine the specific role of the differentially abundant proteins and extracellular organic acids secreted by Salmonella in the presence of quorum sensing signaling molecules.

  9. The Alternative Splicing of Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding Protein 2 Drives Anoikis Resistance and the Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan M; Vu, Ngoc T; Griffin, Brian P; Gentry, Amanda E; Archer, Kellie J; Chalfant, Charles E; Park, Margaret A

    2015-10-16

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an anomalous subset of breast cancer with a greatly reduced (30%) 5-year survival rate. The enhanced mortality and morbidity of TNBC arises from the high metastatic rate, which requires the acquisition of AnR, a process whereby anchorage-dependent cells become resistant to cell death induced by detachment. In this study TNBC cell lines were selected for AnR, and these cell lines demonstrated dramatic enhancement in the formation of lung metastases as compared with parental cells. Genetic analysis of the AnR subclones versus parental cells via next generation sequencing and analysis of global alternative RNA splicing identified that the mRNA splicing of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding 2 (CPEB2), a translational regulator, was altered in AnR TNBC cells. Specifically, increased inclusion of exon 4 into the mature mRNA to produce the CPEB2B isoform was observed in AnR cell lines. Molecular manipulations of CPEB2 splice variants demonstrated a key role for this RNA splicing event in the resistance of cells to anoikis. Specifically, down-regulation of the CPEB2B isoform using siRNA re-sensitized the AnR cell lines to detachment-induced cell death. The ectopic expression of CPEB2B in parental TNBC cell lines induced AnR and dramatically increased metastatic potential. Importantly, alterations in the alternative splicing of CPEB2 were also observed in human TNBC and additional subtypes of human breast cancer tumors linked to a high metastatic rate. Our findings demonstrate that the regulation of CPEB2 mRNA splicing is a key mechanism in AnR and a driving force in TNBC metastasis.

  10. Internal Sense of Direction: Sensing and Signaling from Cytoplasmic Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kieran D.; Lacal, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemoreceptors sense environmental signals and drive chemotactic responses in Bacteria and Archaea. There are two main classes of chemoreceptors: integral inner membrane and soluble cytoplasmic proteins. The latter were identified more recently than integral membrane chemoreceptors and have been studied much less thoroughly. These cytoplasmic chemoreceptors are the subject of this review. Our analysis determined that 14% of bacterial and 43% of archaeal chemoreceptors are cytoplasmic, based on currently sequenced genomes. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors appear to share the same key structural features as integral membrane chemoreceptors, including the formations of homodimers, trimers of dimers, and 12-nm hexagonal arrays within the cell. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors exhibit varied subcellular locations, with some localizing to the poles and others appearing both cytoplasmic and polar. Some cytoplasmic chemoreceptors adopt more exotic locations, including the formations of exclusively internal clusters or moving dynamic clusters that coalesce at points of contact with other cells. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors presumably sense signals within the cytoplasm and bear diverse signal input domains that are mostly N terminal to the domain that defines chemoreceptors, the so-called MA domain. Similar to the case for transmembrane receptors, our analysis suggests that the most common signal input domain is the PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain, but a variety of other N-terminal domains exist. It is also common, however, for cytoplasmic chemoreceptors to have C-terminal domains that may function for signal input. The most common of these is the recently identified chemoreceptor zinc binding (CZB) domain, found in 8% of all cytoplasmic chemoreceptors. The widespread nature and diverse signal input domains suggest that these chemoreceptors can monitor a variety of cytoplasmically based signals, most of which remain to be determined. PMID:25428939

  11. Expression profiles of 12 late embryogenesis abundant protein genes from Tamarix hispida in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caiqiu; Liu, Yali; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Kaimin; Wang, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA) genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12) were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA) in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work.

  12. Anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of low-abundance proteins using quantum dot aggregated hollow microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tang, Dianping; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2013-02-11

    A new anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay protocol for detection of IgG1, as a model protein, was designed by using CdS quantum dot (QD) layer-by-layer assembled hollow microspheres (QDHMS) as molecular tags. Initially, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 specific antibodies were anchored on amorphous magnetic beads preferably selective to capture F(ab) of IgG1 analyte from the sample. For detection, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 (F(c)-specific) antibodies were covalently coupled to the synthesized QDHMS. In a sandwich-type immunoassay format, subsequent anodic-stripping voltammetric detection of cadmium released under acidic conditions from the coupled QDs was conducted at an in situ prepared mercury film electrode. The immunoassay combines highly efficient magnetic separation with signal amplification by the multilayered QD labels. The dynamic concentration range spanned from 1.0 fg mL(-1) to 1.0 μg mL(-1) of IgG1 with a detection limit of 0.1 fg mL(-1). The electrochemical immunoassay showed good reproducibility, selectivity, and stability. The analysis of clinical serum specimens revealed good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The new immunoassay is promising for enzyme-free, and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance biomarkers.

  13. A family of abundant plasma membrane-associated glycoproteins related to the arabinogalactan proteins is unique to flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a family of abundant peripheral plasma membrane glycoproteins that is unique to flowering plants. They are identified by a monoclonal antibody, MAC 207, that recognizes an epitope containing L-arabinose and D-glucuronic acid. Immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling studies locate the MAC 207 epitope to the outer surface of the plasma membrane both in protoplasts and in intact tissues. In some cells MAC 207 also binds to the vacuolar membrane, probably reflecting the movement of the plasma membrane glycoproteins in the endocytic pathway. The epitope recognized by MAC 207 is also present on a distinct soluble proteoglycan secreted into the growth medium by carrot (Daucus carota) suspension culture cells. Biochemical evidence identifies this neutral proteoglycan as a member of the large class of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), and suggests a structural relationship between it and the plasma membrane glycoproteins. AGPs have the property of binding to beta-glycans, and we therefore propose that one function of the AGP-related, plasma membrane-associated glycoproteins may be to act as cell surface attachment sites for cell wall matrix polysaccharides. PMID:2469683

  14. Novel WDR72 Mutation and Cytoplasmic Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S.-K.; Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Kang, H.-Y.; Yildirim, M.; Bahar Tuna, E.; Gencay, K.; Hwang, Y.-H.; Nam, K.H.; De La Garza, R.J.; Hu, J.C.-C.; Simmer, J.P.; Kim, J.-W.

    2010-01-01

    The proven candidate genes for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) are AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, KLK4, FAM83H, and WDR72. We performed mutation analyses on seven families with hypomaturation AI. A novel WDR72 dinucleotide deletion mutation (g.57,426_57,427delAT; c.1467_ 1468delAT; p.V491fsX497) was identified in both alleles of probands from Mexico and Turkey. Haplotype analyses showed that the mutations arose independently in the two families. The disease perfectly segregated with the genotype. Only persons with both copies of the mutant allele were affected. Their hypomineralized enamel suffered attrition and orange-brown staining following eruption. Expression of WDR72 fused to green fluorescent protein showed a cytoplasmic localization exclusively and was absent from the nucleus. We conclude that WDR72 is a cytoplasmic protein that is critical for dental enamel formation. PMID:20938048

  15. Compartmentalization of membrane trafficking, glucose transport, glycolysis, actin, tubulin and the proteasome in the cytoplasmic droplet/Hermes body of epididymal sperm.

    PubMed

    Au, Catherine E; Hermo, Louis; Byrne, Elliot; Smirle, Jeffrey; Fazel, Ali; Kearney, Robert E; Smith, Charles E; Vali, Hojatollah; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Simon, Paul H G; Mandato, Craig; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J M

    2015-08-01

    Discovered in 1909 by Retzius and described mainly by morphology, the cytoplasmic droplet of sperm (renamed here the Hermes body) is conserved among all mammalian species but largely undefined at the molecular level. Tandem mass spectrometry of the isolated Hermes body from rat epididymal sperm characterized 1511 proteins, 43 of which were localized to the structure in situ by light microscopy and two by quantitative electron microscopy localization. Glucose transporter 3 (GLUT-3) glycolytic enzymes, selected membrane traffic and cytoskeletal proteins were highly abundant and concentrated in the Hermes body. By electron microscope gold antibody labelling, the Golgi trafficking protein TMED7/p27 localized to unstacked flattened cisternae of the Hermes body, as did GLUT-3, the most abundant protein. Its biogenesis was deduced through the mapping of protein expression for all 43 proteins during male germ cell differentiation in the testis. It is at the terminal step 19 of spermiogenesis that the 43 characteristic proteins accumulated in the nascent Hermes body.

  16. Integration of multi-omics data of a genome-reduced bacterium: Prevalence of post-transcriptional regulation and its correlation with protein abundances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; van Noort, Vera; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Hennrich, Marco L; Wodke, Judith A H; Yus, Eva; Alibés, Andreu; Roma, Guglielmo; Mende, Daniel R; Pesavento, Christina; Typas, Athanasios; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer

    2016-02-18

    We developed a comprehensive resource for the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae comprising 1748 consistently generated '-omics' data sets, and used it to quantify the power of antisense non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), lysine acetylation, and protein phosphorylation in predicting protein abundance (11%, 24% and 8%, respectively). These factors taken together are four times more predictive of the proteome abundance than of mRNA abundance. In bacteria, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and ncRNA transcription were both found to increase with decreasing genomic GC-content and genome size. Thus, the evolutionary forces constraining genome size and GC-content modify the relative contributions of the different regulatory layers to proteome homeostasis, and impact more genomic and genetic features than previously appreciated. Indeed, these scaling principles will enable us to develop more informed approaches when engineering minimal synthetic genomes.

  17. Interleukin (IL)-1 in rat parturition: IL-1 receptors 1 and 2 and accessory proteins abundance in pregnant rat uterus at term - regulation by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tomohito; Takeda, Jun; Fang, Xin; Bronson, Heather; Olson, David M

    2016-07-01

    The role of interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in parturition is typically noted by changes in its concentrations. Studying the expression of its receptor family, IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) 1, IL-1R2, IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), and its predominantly brain isoform, IL-1RAcPb, during late gestation in the uterus in the Long-Evans rat is another. We assessed changes in their mRNA and protein relative abundance in the uterus and compared IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance in uterus, cervix, ovaries, placenta, and whole blood of Long-Evans rats during late gestation or in RU486 and progesterone-treated dams using quantitative real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. IL-1R1, IL-1RAcP, and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance significantly increased in the uterus at delivery whereas IL-1R2 mRNA abundance significantly decreased. IL-1R1 protein increased at term and IL-1R2 protein decreased at term compared to nonpregnant uteri. IL1-RAcPb mRNA abundance was less than IL-1RAcP, but in the lower uterine segment it was the highest of all tissues examined. RU486 stimulated preterm delivery and an increase in IL-1R1 mRNA abundance whereas progesterone administration extended pregnancy and suppressed the increase in IL-1R1. These data suggest that changes in uterine sensitivity to IL-1 occur during late gestation and suggest another level of regulation for the control of delivery. The roles for IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb need to be determined, but may relate to different intracellular signaling pathways.

  18. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Resistance to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress at the Last Stages of Growth and Development of Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Revealed by Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María C.; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiological agents of the neglected, stigmatizing disease termed american cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). ACL is a zoonosis and rodents are the main reservoirs. Most cases of ACL are reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. The biological cycle of the parasite is digenetic because sand fly vectors transmit the motile promastigote stage to the mammalian host dermis during blood meal intakes. The amastigote stage survives within phagocytes of the mammalian host. The purpose of this study is detection and identification of changes in protein abundance by 2DE/MALDI-TOF/TOF at the main growth phases of L. amazonensis promastigotes in axenic culture and the differentiation process that takes place simultaneously. The average number of proteins detected per gel is 202 and the non-redundant cumulative number is 339. Of those, 63 are differentially abundant throughout growth and simultaneous differentiation of L. amazonensis promastigotes. The main finding is that certain proteins involved in resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stress are more abundant at the last stages of growth and differentiation of cultured L. amazonensis promastigotes. These proteins are the arginase, a light variant of the tryparedoxin peroxidase, the iron superoxide dismutase, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A and a light HSP70 variant. These data taken together with the decrease of the stress-inducible protein 1 levels are additional evidence supporting the previously described pre-adaptative hypothesis, which consists of preparation in advance towards the amastigote stage. PMID:27776144

  19. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Erhui; An, Sufang; Gong, Fangping; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs), mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin), exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa) and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  20. Novel origin of lamin-derived cytoplasmic intermediate filaments in tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Hering, Lars; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Reichelt, Julian; Magin, Thomas M; Mayer, Georg

    2016-02-03

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including nuclear lamins and cytoplasmic IF proteins, are essential cytoskeletal components of bilaterian cells. Despite their important role in protecting tissues against mechanical force, no cytoplasmic IF proteins have been convincingly identified in arthropods. Here we show that the ancestral cytoplasmic IF protein gene was lost in the entire panarthropod (onychophoran + tardigrade + arthropod) rather than arthropod lineage and that nuclear, lamin-derived proteins instead acquired new cytoplasmic roles at least three times independently in collembolans, copepods, and tardigrades. Transcriptomic and genomic data revealed three IF protein genes in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, one of which (cytotardin) occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of epidermal and foregut epithelia, where it forms belt-like filaments around each epithelial cell. These results suggest that a lamin derivative has been co-opted to enhance tissue stability in tardigrades, a function otherwise served by cytoplasmic IF proteins in all other bilaterians.

  1. Nonsense but not missense mutations can decrease the abundance of nuclear mRNA for the mouse major urinary protein, while both types of mutations can facilitate exon skipping.

    PubMed Central

    Belgrader, P; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms by which nonsense codons affect RNA metabolism in mammalian cells, nonsense mutations were generated within the gene for the secretory major urinary protein (MUP) of mice. The translation of MUP mRNA normally begins within exon 1 and terminates within exon 6, the penultimate exon. Through the use of Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and assays that couple reverse transcription and PCR, a nonsense mutation within codon 50 of exon 2 or codon 143 of exon 5 was found to reduce the abundance of fully spliced, nuclear MUP mRNA to 10 to 20% of normal without an additional reduction in the abundance of cytoplasmic mRNA. In contrast, a nonsense mutation within codon 172 of exon 5 was found to have no effects on the abundance of MUP mRNA. These findings suggest that a boundary between nonsense mutations that do and do not reduce the abundance of nuclear mRNA exists within the exon preceding the exon that harbors the normal site of translation termination. In this way, the boundary is analogous to the boundary that exists within the penultimate exon of the human gene for the cytosolic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase. Assays for exon skipping, i.e., the removal of an exon as a part of the flanking introns during the process of splicing, reveal that 0.1, 2.0, and 0.1% of MUP mRNA normally lack exon 5, exon 6, and exons 5 plus 6, respectively. Relative to normal, the two nonsense mutations within exon 5 increase the abundance of RNA lacking exon 5 on average 20-fold and increase the abundance of RNA lacking exons 5 plus 6 on average 5-fold. Since only one of these nonsense mutations also reduces the abundance of fully spliced nuclear mRNA to 10 to 20% of normal, the two mechanisms by which a nonsense mutation can alter nuclear RNA metabolism must be distinct. The analysis of missense mutations within codons 143 and 172, some of which retain the nonsense mutation, indicates that the reduction in the abundance of fully spliced nuclear m

  2. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in Purkinje cell dendrites: Evidence that factors other than binding to microtubules are involved in determining its cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, A.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Mariani, J. )

    1990-07-15

    We have studied the distribution of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the Purkinje cell dendrites of rats whose cerebella were exposed to X-irradiation during the second postnatal week. The Purkinje cells of such animals have abnormally elongated apical primary processes that branch in the other molecular layer rather than close to the cell body as in normal tissue. The results show that in these distorted dendrites the MAP2 distribution is shifted distally relative to the normal pattern, in which MAP2 is distributed evenly throughout the dendritic tree. Tubulin and other microtubule-associated proteins, such as MAP1, are not affected and remain evenly distributed throughout the dendritic tree despite the anatomical distortion. We conclude that the distribution of MAP2 in Purkinje cells is not determined solely by its binding to tubulin. Other factors must be involved and these appear to be related to dendritic morphology and possibly to branching.

  3. Plasmodium knowlesi Skeleton-Binding Protein 1 Localizes to the ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ Stipplings in the Cytoplasm of Monkey and Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lucky, Amuza Byaruhanga; Sakaguchi, Miako; Katakai, Yuko; Kawai, Satoru; Yahata, Kazuhide; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, exports protein products to the infected erythrocyte to introduce modifications necessary for the establishment of nutrient acquisition and surface display of host interaction ligands. Erythrocyte remodeling impacts parasite virulence and disease pathology and is well documented for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but has been less described for other Plasmodium species. For P. falciparum, the exported protein skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is involved in the trafficking of erythrocyte surface ligands and localized to membranous structures within the infected erythrocyte, termed Maurer's clefts. In this study, we analyzed SBP1 orthologs across the Plasmodium genus by BLAST analysis and conserved gene synteny, which were also recently described by de Niz et al. (2016). To evaluate the localization of an SBP1 ortholog, we utilized the zoonotic malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assay of transgenic P. knowlesi parasites expressing epitope-tagged recombinant PkSBP1 revealed a punctate staining pattern reminiscent of Maurer's clefts, following infection of either monkey or human erythrocytes. The recombinant PkSBP1-positive puncta co-localized with Giemsa-stained structures, known as ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ stipplings. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that recombinant PkSBP1 localizes within or on the membranous structures akin to the Maurer's clefts. The recombinant PkSBP1 expressed in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes co-localized with PfSBP1 at the Maurer's clefts, indicating an analogous trafficking pattern. A member of the P. knowlesi 2TM protein family was also expressed and localized to membranous structures in infected monkey erythrocytes. These results suggest that the trafficking machinery and induced erythrocyte cellular structures of P. knowlesi are similar following infection of both monkey and human erythrocytes, and are conserved with P. falciparum. PMID:27732628

  4. Quality control of a cytoplasmic protein complex: chaperone motors and the ubiquitin-proteasome system govern the fate of orphan fatty acid synthase subunit Fas2 of yeast.

    PubMed

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H

    2015-02-20

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2.

  5. Using iTRAQ® Combined with Tandem Affinity Purification to Enhance Low-abundance Proteins Associated with Somatically-mutated EGFR Core Complexes in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haura, Eric B.; Müller, André; Brietwieser, Florian P.; Li, Jiannong; Grebien, Florian; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we report a novel use for the iTRAQ® reagent combined with a peptide mass inclusion list to enhance the signal of low-abundance proteins during analysis by mass spectrometry. C-tagged-SH-EGFR was retrovirally-transduced into two mutant lung cancer cell lines (HCC827 and PC9) and the core protein complexes enriched by tandem affinity purification. Tryptically-digested peptides were derivatised with iTRAQ® and analysed by higher-energy collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. The data revealed that UBS3B is a member of the EGFR core complex in the HCC827 cell line, that was not apparent by standard, unbiased one-dimensional shotgun analysis and collision-induced dissociation. The expression level of UBS3B, however, was 6 to 10 times lower than that observed in the PC9 cell line. Thus, using iTRAQ® in this fashion allows the identification of low-abundance interactors when combined with samples where the same protein has a higher abundance. Ultimately, this approach may uncover proteins that were previously unknown or only suspected as members of core protein complexes. PMID:20945942

  6. Dexamethasone and Acetate Modulate Cytoplasmic Leptin in Bovine Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Shinichi; Hirota, Shohei; Tokutake, Yukako; Rose, Michael T.; Katoh, Kazuo; Aso, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal and nutrient signals regulate leptin synthesis and secretion. In rodents, leptin is stored in cytosolic pools of adipocytes. However, not much information is available regarding the regulation of intracellular leptin in ruminants. Recently, we demonstrated that leptin mRNA was expressed in bovine intramuscular preadipocyte cells (BIP cells) and that a cytoplasmic leptin pool may be present in preadipocytes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of cytoplasmic leptin protein in BIP cells during differentiation as well as the effects of various factors added to the differentiation medium on its expression in BIP cells. Leptin mRNA expression was observed only at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, whereas the cytoplasmic leptin concentration was the highest on day 0 and decreased gradually thereafter. Cytoplasmic leptin was detected at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, but not at 4 days after adipogenic induction. The cytoplasmic leptin concentration was reduced in BIP cells at 4 days after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas cytoplasmic leptin was not observed at 8 days after treatment. In contrast, acetate significantly enhanced the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in BIP cells at 8 days after treatment, although acetate alone did not induce adipocyte differentiation in BIP cells. These results suggest that dexamethasone and acetate modulate the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in bovine preadipocytes. PMID:25049989

  7. Dynamics of Galectin-3 in the Nucleus and Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Spronk, Kimberly J.; Voss, Patricia G.; Patterson, Ronald J.; Wang, John L.; Arnoys, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes selected studies on galectin-3 (Gal3) as an example of the dynamic behavior of a carbohydrate-binding protein in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. Within the 15-member galectin family of proteins, Gal3 (Mr ~30,000) is the sole representative of the chimera subclass in which a proline- and glycine-rich NH2-terminal domain is fused onto a COOH-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain responsible for binding galactose-containing glycoconjugates. The protein shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus on the basis of targeting signals that are recognized by importin(s) for nuclear localization and exportin-1 (CRM1) for nuclear export. Depending on the cell type, specific experimental conditions in vitro, or tissue location, Gal3 has been reported to be exclusively cytoplasmic, predominantly nuclear, or distributed between the two compartments. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic distribution of the protein must reflect, then, some balance between nuclear import and export, as well as mechanisms of cytoplasmic anchorage or binding to a nuclear component. Indeed, a number of ligands have been reported for Gal3 in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Most of the ligands appear to bind Gal3, however, through protein-protein interactions rather than through protein-carbohydrate recognition. In the cytoplasm, for example, Gal3 interacts with the apoptosis repressor Bcl-2 and this interaction may be involved in Gal3’s anti-apoptotic activity. In the nucleus, Gal3 is a required pre-mRNA splicing factor; the protein is incorporated into spliceosomes via its association with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex. Although the majority of these interactions occur via the carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal3 and saccharide ligands such as lactose can perturb some of these int