Science.gov

Sample records for abundant field evidence

  1. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  2. Evidences of abundant hemocyanin variants in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianliang; Guo, Lingling; Lu, Xin; Lu, Hui; Wang, Fan; Zhong, Mingqi; Chen, Jiehui; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-09-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) is a multifunctional immune molecule present in mollusks and arthropods and functions as an important antigen non-specific immune protein. Our previous evidences demonstrated that Litopenaeus vannamei HMC might display extensive molecular diversities. In this study, bioinformatics analysis showed dozens of variant sequences of the HMC subunit with higher molecular weight from L. vannamei (LvHMC). Three variant fragments, named as LvHMCV1-3, which shared 85-99% nucleotide identity with that of the classical form of LvHMC (AJ250830.1), were cloned and characterized. Spatial expression profiles showed that LvHMCV1-3 had different tissue-specific distribution, which were affected by stimulation with six pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K12, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, with each variant fragment showing a specific stress pattern to different bacterial pathogens. Full length cDNA of LvHMCV3 was further cloned and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 92% identity with that of LvHMC, possessed a conserved structure characteristic of the HMC family and could be clustered into one branch along with other arthropod HMC in a phylogenetic tree. In addition, the recombinant protein of LvHMCV3 (rLvHMCV3) showed obvious agglutination activities against three aquaculture pathogenic bacteria including E. coli K12, V. parahaemolyticus and S.aureus at concentrations ranging from 31.25-62.5g/mL. It also showed obvious antibacterial activity against V. parahaemolyticus at concentrations 0.02-0.5mg/mL, and possessed the best inhibitive effects compared with those of rLvHMCV4 and rLvHMC. Co-injection of V. parahaemolyticus and rLvHMCV3 in L. vannamei showed significant decrease of the mortality rate at 24-72h after injection. Therefore, these studies suggested that L. vannamei had abundant HMC variants, which possessed obvious resistance to pathogenic

  3. Convergence and divergence in a long-term old-field succession: the importance of spatial scale and species abundance.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Peng; Cadotte, Marc W; Meiners, Scott J; Pu, Zhichao; Fukami, Tadashi; Jiang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Whether plant communities in a given region converge towards a particular stable state during succession has long been debated, but rarely tested at a sufficiently long time scale. By analysing a 50-year continuous study of post-agricultural secondary succession in New Jersey, USA, we show that the extent of community convergence varies with the spatial scale and species abundance classes. At the larger field scale, abundance-based dissimilarities among communities decreased over time, indicating convergence of dominant species, whereas incidence-based dissimilarities showed little temporal tend, indicating no sign of convergence. In contrast, plots within each field diverged in both species composition and abundance. Abundance-based successional rates decreased over time, whereas rare species and herbaceous plants showed little change in temporal turnover rates. Initial abandonment conditions only influenced community structure early in succession. Overall, our findings provide strong evidence for scale and abundance dependence of stochastic and deterministic processes over old-field succession. PMID:27373449

  4. GINGA LAC and Einstein SSS X-ray Spectral Evidence of Abundance Gradients in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E., III; Day, C. S. R.; Hatsukade, I.; Hughes, J. P.

    1993-12-01

    We jointly analyzed the Ginga LAC and Einstein SSS spectra of four cooling flow clusters: A496, A1795, A2142 & A2199. We took advantage of the two instruments' different fields of view (6 arcmin diameter for the SSS, 1times 2 degrees for the LAC) to determine whether there were spatial gradients in temperature, abundances and X-ray absorbing column densities. Each cluster has firm evidence of a relatively cool central component. The inclusion of such cool components in the joint spectral analysis leads to somewhat higher global temperature determinations than are derived from the higher energy LAC data alone. The abundances appear to be centrally enhanced in at least two (A496, A2142) and possibly three (A2199) of the four clusters. In these cases, the central cool component typically has abundances which exceed solar values. We also confirm the presence of large amounts of cold absorbing matter in three of the four clusters (A496, A1795 & A2199) and show that it is likely to be intrinsic to the cluster cooling flows.

  5. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.; Bild, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  6. Macroalgal mats and species abundance: a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, S. C.

    1987-11-01

    A field experiment was carried out whereby the density of macroalgae ( Enteromorpha spp.) was manipulated and the resultant changes in sediment infaunal density were monitored. Four densities of Enteromorpha spp. were used: 0,0·3, 1, and 3 kg FW m -2, corresponding to control, low-, medium-, and high-density plots. The experiment ran from May to October 1985 and was sampled on three occasions. By July, the density of Corophium volutator was reduced at all weed levels when compared to control plots, whereas densities of Hydrobia ulvae, Macoma balthica, Nereis diversicolor, and Capitella capitata, all increased. Samples taken in October when the weed mats were buried in the sediment showed fewer differences than in July. Macoma, Nereis, and Capitella were still significantly more abundant at medium and high weed densities. Corophium showed no significant treatment effect. There was, however, a highly significant difference in population size structure for Corophium. Measurements of sediment redox potential and silt content under medium- and high-density plots revealed rapid anoxia with a significant increase in siltation.

  7. A RADIAL VELOCITY AND CALCIUM TRIPLET ABUNDANCE SURVEY OF FIELD SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Rich, R. Michael; Mallery, Ryan C.; Howard, Christian D.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of a pilot wide-field radial velocity and metal abundance survey of red giants in 10 fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The targets lie at projected distances of 0.9 and 1.9 kpc from the SMC center (m - M = 18.79) to the north, east, south, and west. Two more fields are to the east at distances of 3.9 and 5.1 kpc. In this last field, we find only a few to no SMC giants, suggesting that the edge of the SMC in this direction lies approximately at 6 kpc from its center. In all eastern fields, we observe a double peak in the radial velocities of stars, with a component at the classical SMC recession velocity of {approx}160 km s{sup -1} and a high-velocity component at about 200 km s{sup -1}, similar to observations in H I. In the most distant field (3.9 kpc), the low-velocity component is at 106 km s{sup -1}. The metal abundance distribution in all fields is broad and centered at about [Fe/H] {approx}-1.25, reaching to solar and possibly slightly supersolar values and down to [Fe/H] of about -2.5. In the two innermost (0.9 kpc) northern and southern fields, we observe a secondary peak at metallicities of about {approx}-0.6. This may be evidence of a second episode of star formation in the center, possibly triggered by the interactions that created the Stream and Bridge.

  8. Virioplankton Abundance in Trophic Gradients of an Upwelling Field

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, G.C.; Granato, A.; Figueiredo, A.R.; Ebecken, N.F.F.

    2009-01-01

    This work correlates time series of biological and physical variables to the marine viruses across trophic gradients within Arraial do Cabo upwelling system, Southeast of Brazil. The objective is to investigate the major controlling factors of virioplankton dynamics among different water masses. It was used an in situ and ex situ flow cytometry for accessing the plankton community. Viruses were highly correlated to bacteria and phytoplankton, but although the lack of direct correlation with physicals, upwelling turned out to be the main contributing factor to the highest values of viral abundance and virus:bacterial ratio. Our data suggest that the lowest temperature of upwelled South Atlantic Central Waters would help to maintain a high viral abundance and higher temperatures of Coastal and Tropical Waters might be another ecological niche allowing the co-existence. PMID:24031434

  9. Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Predation on Animal Prey Abundance: Evidence from UK Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Alison R.; Davies, Zoe G.; Tyler, Claire; Staddon, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Background Controlling vertebrate predators is one of the most widespread forms of wildlife management and it continues to cause conflict between stakeholders worldwide. It is important for managers and policy-makers to make decisions on this issue that are based on the best available scientific evidence. Therefore, it is first important to understand if there is indeed an impact of vertebrate predators on prey, and then to quantify this impact. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the UK as a case study, we use a meta-analytical approach to review the available evidence to assess the effect of vertebrate predation on animal prey abundance. We find a significant effect of predators on prey abundance across our studies. On average, there is a 1.6 fold increase in prey abundance in the absence of predation. However, we show significant heterogeneity in effect sizes, and discuss how the method of predator control, whether the predator is native or non-native, and aspects of study design, may be potential causes. Conclusions/Significance Our results allow some cautious policy recommendations to be made regarding the management of predator and prey populations. Meta-analysis is an important tool for understanding general patterns in the effect of predators on prey abundance across studies. Such an approach is especially valuable where management decisions need to be made in the absence of site-specific information. PMID:18545690

  10. Reconstructing magma reservoir dynamics from field evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, R.; Muntener, O.; Ulmer, P.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructing the dynamics within magma reservoirs during and after emplacement greatly enhance our understanding of their formation and evolution. By determining the length and timescales over which magma remains mobile within magma reservoirs, fluxes of magma that is possibly extractable can be quantified, providing a link between plutonic and volcanic systems, and constraints on the likelihood of a pluton feeding volcanic eruptions. However, the general absence of marker beds and uncertainties regarding at which crystal fractions super-solidus foliation patterns are recorded make it difficult to reconstruct and quantify deformation inside plutons, especially the deformation that occurred at low crystal fractions. Here we present a case study of the Listino Ring Structure (LRS) of the Adamello Batholith in N-Italy, a 300-500 m-wide semi-circular zone of intensely foliated tonalite containing abundant evidence for magmatic deformation and magma mingling (Brack, 1984). The differences in the interaction between felsic and mafic magmas recorded in the form of mafic dikes, sheets and enclaves can be used to determine spatial and/or temporal differences of magma rheology during evolution of the reservoir. Detailed field mapping shows a clear difference in intrusion style between the southern and eastern sides of the LRS, as mafic magma intrudes into different felsic host magmas. An attempt is made to quantify these differences in terms of the physical state of the host magmas, using a variety of analyses pertaining to the breakup of mafic dikes into enclaves, the assimilation of phenocrysts from the host magma by the mafic magma, and the back-veining of mafic dikes and enclaves. The common component of these analyses is a parametrization of the phase petrology of the magmas as a function of temperature, which allows for the determination of melt fraction and composition at super-solidus conditions, from which physical properties such as density and viscosity can be

  11. Species Composition and Abundance of Stink Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Minnesota Field Corn.

    PubMed

    Koch, Robert L; Pahs, Tiffany

    2015-04-01

    In response to concerns of increasing significance of stink bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in northern states, a survey was conducted over 2 yr in Minnesota to characterize the Pentatomidae associated with field corn, Zea mays L. Halyomorpha halys (Stål), an exotic species, was not detected in this survey, despite continued detection of this species as an invader of human-made structures in Minnesota. Five species of Pentatomidae (four herbivorous; one predatory) were collected from corn. Across years, Euschistus variolarius (Palisot de Beauvois) and Euschistus servus euschistoides (Vollenhoven) had the greatest relative abundances and frequencies of detection. In 2012, the abundance of herbivorous species exceeded 25 nymphs and adults per 100 plants (i.e., an economic threshold) in 0.48% of fields. However, the abundance of herbivorous species did not reach economic levels in any fields sampled in 2013. The frequency of detection of herbivorous species and ratio of nymphs to adults was highest during reproductive growth stages of corn. The predator species, Podisus maculiventris (Say), was detected in 0 to 0.32% of fields. These results provide baseline information on the species composition and abundance of Pentatomidae in Minnesota field corn, which will be necessary for documentation of changes to this fauna as a result of the invasion of H. halys and to determine if some native species continue to increase in abundance in field crops. PMID:26313176

  12. Evidence for the expression of abundant microRNAs in the locust genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Wei, Yuanyuan; Yang, Meiling; Zhang, Jianzhen; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    Substantial accumulation of neutral sequences accounts for genome size expansion in animal genomes. Numerous novel microRNAs (miRNAs), which evolve in a birth and death manner, are considered evolutionary neutral sequences. The migratory locust is an ideal model to determine whether large genomes contain abundant neutral miRNAs because of its large genome size. A total of 833 miRNAs were discovered, and several miRNAs were randomly chosen for validation by Northern blot and RIP-qPCR. Three additional verification methods, namely, processing-dependent methods of miRNA biogenesis using RNAi, evolutionary comparison with closely related species, and evidence supported by tissue-specific expression, were applied to provide compelling results that support the authenticity of locust miRNAs. We observed that abundant local duplication events of miRNAs, which were unique in locusts compared with those in other insects with small genome sizes, may be responsible for the substantial acquisition of miRNAs in locusts. Together, multiple evidence showed that the locust genome experienced a burst of miRNA acquisition, suggesting that genome size expansion may have considerable influences of miRNA innovation. These results provide new insight into the genomic dynamics of miRNA repertoires under genome size evolution. PMID:26329925

  13. Evidence of increasing antibiotic resistance gene abundances in archived soils since 1940.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Charles W; Dolfing, Jan; Ehlert, Phillip A I; Graham, David W

    2010-01-15

    Mass production and use of antibiotics and antimicrobials in medicine and agriculture have existed for over 60 years, and has substantially benefited public health and agricultural productivity throughout the world. However, there is growing evidence that resistance to antibiotics (AR) is increasing both in benign and pathogenic bacteria, posing an emerging threat to public and environmental health in the future. Although evidence has existed for years from clinical data of increasing AR, almost no quantitative environmental data exist that span increased industrial antibiotic production in the 1950s to the present; i.e., data that might delineate trends in AR potentially valuable for epidemiological studies. To address this critical knowledge gap, we speculated that AR levels might be apparent in historic soil archives as evidenced by antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) abundances over time. Accordingly, DNA was extracted from five long-term soil-series from different locations in The Netherlands that spanned 1940 to 2008, and 16S rRNA gene and 18 ARG abundances from different major antibiotic classes were quantified. Results show that ARG from all classes of antibiotics tested have significantly increased since 1940, but especially within the tetracyclines, with some individual ARG being >15 times more abundant now than in the 1970s. This is noteworthy because waste management procedures have broadly improved and stricter rules on nontherapeutic antibiotic use in agriculture are being promulgated. Although these data are local to The Netherlands, they suggest basal environmental levels of ARG still might be increasing, which has implications to similar locations around the world. PMID:20025282

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FORMATION OF THE GALACTIC BULGE FROM Na, Al, AND HEAVY-ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN PLAUT's FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Fulbright, Jon P. E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: jfulb@skysrv.pha.jhu.edu

    2012-04-20

    We report chemical abundances of Na, Al, Zr, La, Nd, and Eu for 39 red giant branch (RGB) stars and 23 potential inner disk red clump stars located in Plaut's low-extinction window. We also measure lithium for a super Li-rich RGB star. The abundances were determined by spectrum synthesis of high-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 25,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N {approx} 50-100 pixel{sup -1}) spectra obtained with the Blanco 4 m telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. For the bulge RGB stars, we find a general increase in the [Na/Fe] and [Na/Al] ratios with increasing metallicity, and a similar decrease in [La/Fe] and [Nd/Fe]. Additionally, the [Al/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] abundance trends almost identically follow those of the {alpha}-elements, and the [Zr/Fe] ratios exhibit relatively little change with [Fe/H]. The consistently low [La/Eu] ratios of the RGB stars indicate that at least a majority of bulge stars formed rapidly ({approx}<1 Gyr) and before the main s-process could become a significant pollution source. In contrast, we find that the potential inner disk clump stars exhibit abundance patterns more similar to those of the thin and thick disks. Comparisons between the abundance trends at different bulge locations suggest that the inner and outer bulges formed on similar timescales. However, we find evidence of some abundance differences between the most metal-poor and metal-rich stars in various bulge fields. The data also indicate that the halo may have had a more significant impact on the outer bulge initial composition than the inner bulge composition. The [Na/Fe], and to a lesser extent [La/Fe], abundances further indicate that the metal-poor bulge, at least at {approx}1 kpc from the Galactic center, and thick disk may not share an identical chemistry.

  15. Chemical abundances in the Galactic Bulge: evidence for a fast enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Lecureur, A.; Renzini, A.; Mamony, Y.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    2006-06-01

    We derived oxygen abundances for 42 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge. We present here the results for Oxygen, as measured from the forbidden line at 6300 Å. Oxygen shows a well defined trend with [Fe/H]. With [O/Fe] being higher in bulge stars than in thick disk ones, the latter already more oxygen enhanced than thin disk stars (Bensby, Feltzing, & Lundström 2004). This result supports the scenario that the bulge formed faster and probably earlier than the thick disk.

  16. Detection Feasibility of Magnetic Fields and HG Abundances in HgMn Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada-Hidai, M.; Sakaue, A.; Kotake, J.

    We analyzed two Fe II lines at 6147.7 AA and 6149.2 AA observed in 14 HgMn stars with the purpose to examine the feasibility of detecting magnetic fields in HgMn stars based on Mathys' empirical relation between the strengths of the Fe II lines and magnetic fields (Mathys 1990, A&A 232, 151). Takada-Hidai & Jugaku (1992, PASP 104, 106) found that the Fe II 6149 AA is strongly blended with the Hg II 6149.5 AA line in the typical HgMn star mu Lep. To investigate the blending effect of the Hg II line, we measured the strengths of Fe II lines in the sample stars with the Hg abundances of 4 < log Hg < 7 and obtained Hg abundaces from the blending Hg II lines. Most of the resulting Hg abundances were found to agree with the previously determined values within about 0.6 dex. We also found, from a comparison between the strengths of Fe II lines with Hg abundances, that the blending effect of the Hg II line seems to be negligible for the Hg abundances of about < 5 dex, and therefore magnetic fields may possibly be detected with Mathys' empirical relation in case of HgMn stars with such Hg abundances as < 5 dex.

  17. Abundances determined using Si ii and Si iii in B-type stars: evidence for stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. It is becoming clear that determination of the abundance of Si using lines of Si ii and Si iii can lead to quite discordant results in mid to late B-type stars. The difference between the Si abundances derived from the two ion states can exceed one dex in some cases. Aims: We have carried out a study intended to clarify which kinds of B stars exhibit this discrepancy, to try to identify regularities in the phenomenon, and to explore possible explanations such as abundance stratification by comparing models to observed spectra. Methods: We used spectra from the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter and FEROS spectrograph, supplemented with spectra from the ESO and ELODIE archives, of magnetic Bp, HgMn, and normal B-type stars ranging in effective temperature from about 10 500 to 15 000 K. Using these spectra, we derived abundances using the spectrum synthesis program zeeman, which can take the influence of magnetic fields into account. For each star, accurate abundances of Si ii, Si iii, Ti, Cr, and Fe were derived from two separate ~100 Å windows. Si ii abundances were deduced from multiple lines, and Si iii abundances were found using λλ 4552, 4567, and 4574. Results: All magnetic Bp stars in our sample show a discordance between the derived abundances of the first and second ions of silicon, with the latter being between 0.6-1.7 dex higher. The same behaviour is observed in the non-magnetic stars but to a much smaller extent: Si iii is enhanced by between 0.3-0.8 dex compared to Si ii. We do not detect the discrepancy in three stars, HD 22 136 (normal), HD 57 608 (HgMn) and HD 27 295 (HgMn); these are the only stars in our sample for which the microturbulence parameter is significantly different from zero, and which therefore probably have convection occurring in their atmospheres. Conclusions: We find that vertical stratification of silicon in the atmospheres of B-type stars may provide an explanation of this phenomenon, but our detailed stratification models

  18. Evidence for Field Cancerization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nonn, Larisa; Ananthanarayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Gann, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization, which is not yet well-characterized in the prostate, occurs when large areas of an organ or tissue surface are affected by a carcinogenic insult, resulting in the development of multi-focal independent premalignant foci and molecular lesions that precede histological change. METHODS Herein, we review the cumulative body of evidence concerning field effects in the prostate and critically evaluate the methods available for the identification and validation of field effect biomarkers. Validated biomarkers for field effects have an important role to play as surrogate endpoint biomarkers in Phase II prevention trials and as clinical predictors of cancer in men with negative biopsies. RESULTS Thus far, field effects have been identified involving nuclear morphometric changes, gene expression, protein expression, gene promoter methylation, DNA damage and angiogenesis. In addition to comparing cancer-adjacent benign tissue to more distant areas or to “supernormal” tissue from cancer-free organs, investigators can use a nested case–control design for negative biopsies that offers a number of unique advantages. CONCLUSIONS True carcinogenic field effects should be distinguished from secondary responses of the microenvironment to a developing tumor, although the latter may still lead to useful clinical prediction tools. PMID:19462462

  19. Evidence for the abundance of water on Mars now and in the past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.; Greeley, Ronald; Haberle, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses evidence for the abundance of water on Mars early in its history, based on the analysis of the Viking 1 and 2 images and the Martian-atmosphere water measurements. It is argued that integrated networks of small valleys in the ancient cratered terrain of Mars may indicate that the planet once possessed a warmer climate. It is pointed out that most Martian outflow channels originate from the regions of collapsed and disrupted terrain, suggesting that they were formed by a catastrophic release of groundwater. The question of the fate of Martian water is discussed, and arguments are presented suggesting that the Martian crust may retain significant porosity to a depth of 10 km and may possess a total pore volume sufficient to store a global layer of water 0.5-1.5 km deep.

  20. Evidence for the abundance of water on Mars now and in the past

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, S.M.; Greeley, R.; Haberle, R.M.; Arizona State Univ., Tempe; NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1989-02-01

    This paper discusses evidence for the abundance of water on Mars early in its history, based on the analysis of the Viking 1 and 2 images and the Martian-atmosphere water measurements. It is argued that integrated networks of small valleys in the ancient cratered terrain of Mars may indicate that the planet once possessed a warmer climate. It is pointed out that most Martian outflow channels originate from the regions of collapsed and disrupted terrain, suggesting that they were formed by a catastrophic release of groundwater. The question of the fate of Martian water is discussed, and arguments are presented suggesting that the Martian crust may retain significant porosity to a depth of 10 km and may possess a total pore volume sufficient to store a global layer of water 0.5-1.5 km deep.

  1. Behavior of Li abundances in solar-analog stars. Evidence for line-width dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Kawanomoto, S.; Honda, S.; Ando, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2007-06-01

    Context: It is known that the surface lithium abundances of field solar-analog G dwarfs show a large dispersion of ⪆2 dex (among which our Sun is located at the lower end) despite the similarity of stellar parameters, and planet-host stars tend to show comparatively lower Li abundances in the narrow T_eff range. Aims: To investigate the reason for these phenomena, an extensive study of Li abundances and their dependence on stellar parameters was carried out for a homogeneous sample of 118 selected solar analogs based on high-dispersion spectra obtained at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. Methods: The atmospheric parameters were spectroscopically determined by using the equivalent widths of Fe i and Fe ii lines, the ages/masses were estimated from stellar evolutionary tracks, and the width of the macrobroadening (rotation plus macroturbulence) function as well as Li abundances (A_Li) were established by spectrum-fitting analyses. Results: The resulting A_Li vs. T_eff relation revealed a characteristic inverse-triangle-like distribution enclosed by two clear-cut boundaries (the slanted one running from ~5900 K to ~5800 K and the vertical one at ~5700 K), while the Sun is located around its lowest apex. More significantly, A_Li in this region of large dispersion was found to closely correlate with the macrobroadening width (v_r+m), which is considered to be the most important parameter. Conclusions: With a reasonable assumption that the difference of rotational velocity is mainly responsible for the variety of v_r+m, we may conclude that the stellar angular momentum plays the decisive role in determining the surface Li abundances of solar-analog stars in the T_eff range of ~5900-5700 K. The low-Li tendency of planet-host stars may thus be interpreted in terms of rotational characteristics. Based on observations carried out at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (Okayama, Japan). Tables 2-6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc

  2. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  3. AN INTEGRAL FIELD STUDY OF ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, J. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Torrey, P.; Rupke, D. S. N.

    2012-07-01

    We present for the first time metallicity maps generated using data from the Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m of 10 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and discuss the abundance gradients and distribution of metals in these systems. We have carried out optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of several LIRGs in various merger phases to investigate the merger process. In a major merger of two spiral galaxies with preexisting disk abundance gradients, the changing distribution of metals can be used as a tracer of gas flows in the merging system as low-metallicity gas is transported from the outskirts of each galaxy to their nuclei. We employ this fact to probe merger properties by using the emission lines in our IFS data to calculate the gas-phase metallicity in each system. We create abundance maps and subsequently derive a metallicity gradient from each map. We compare our measured gradients to merger stage as well as several possible tracers of merger progress and observed nuclear abundances. We discuss our work in the context of previous abundance gradient observations and compare our results to new galaxy merger models that trace metallicity gradient. Our results agree with the observed flattening of metallicity gradients as a merger progresses. We compare our results with new theoretical predictions that include chemical enrichment. Our data show remarkable agreement with these simulations.

  4. Factors influencing aster leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) abundance and aster yellows phytoplasma infectivity in Wisconsin carrot fields.

    PubMed

    Frost, K E; Esker, P D; Van Haren, R; Kotolski, L; Groves, R L

    2013-06-01

    In Wisconsin, vegetable crops are threatened annually by infection of the aster yellows phytoplasma (AYp), the causal agent of aster yellows (AY) disease, vectored by the aster leafhopper, Macrosteles quadrilineatus Forbes. Aster leafhopper abundance and infectivity are influenced by processes operating across different temporal and spatial scales. We applied a multilevel modeling approach to partition variance in multifield, multiyear, pest scouting data sets containing temporal and spatial covariates associated with aster leafhopper abundance and infectivity. Our intent was to evaluate the relative importance of temporal and spatial covariates to infer the relevant scale at which ecological processes are driving AY epidemics and identify periods of elevated risk for AYp spread. The relative amount of aster leafhopper variability among and within years (39%) exceeded estimates of variation among farm locations and fields (7%). Similarly, time covariates explained the largest amount of variation of aster leafhopper infectivity (50%). Leafhopper abundance has been decreasing since 2001 and reached its minimum in 2010. The average seasonal pattern indicated that periods of above average abundance occurred between 11 June and 1 August. Annual infectivity appears to oscillate around an average value of 2% and seasonal periods of above average infectivity occur between 19 May and 15 July. The coincidence of the expected periods of high leafhopper abundance and infectivity increases our knowledge of when the insect moves into susceptible crop fields and when it spreads the pathogen to susceptible crops, representing a seasonal interval during which management of the insect can be focused. PMID:23726057

  5. The magnetic field topology and chemical abundance distributions of the Ap star HD 32633

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvester, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Previous observations of the Ap star HD 32633 indicated that its magnetic field was unusually complex in nature and could not be characterized by a simple dipolar structure. Here we derive magnetic field maps and chemical abundance distributions for this star using full Stokes vector (Stokes IQUV) high-resolution observations obtained with the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters. Our maps, produced using the INVERS10 magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) code, show that HD 32633 has a strong magnetic field which features two large regions of opposite polarity but deviates significantly from a pure dipole field. We use a spherical harmonic expansion to characterize the magnetic field and find that the harmonic energy is predominately in the ℓ = 1 and 2 poloidal modes with a small toroidal component. At the same time, we demonstrate that the observed Stokes parameter profiles of HD 32633 cannot be fully described by either a dipolar or dipolar plus quadrupolar field geometry. We compare the magnetic field topology of HD 32633 with other early-type stars for which MDI analyses have been performed, supporting a trend of increasing field complexity with stellar mass. We then compare the magnetic field topology of HD 32633 with derived chemical abundance maps for the elements Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Nd. We find that the iron-peak elements show similar distributions, but we are unable to find a clear correlation between the location of local chemical enhancements or depletions and the magnetic field structure.

  6. Oxygen abundances in the Galactic bulge: evidence for fast chemical enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Lecureur, A.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Renzini, A.; Minniti, D.; Momany, Y.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.We spectroscopically characterize the Galactic Bulge to infer its star formation timescale, compared to the other Galactic components, through the chemical signature on its individual stars. Methods: .We derived iron and oxygen abundances for 50 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge. High resolution (R=45 000) spectra for the target stars were collected with FLAMES-UVES at the VLT. Results: .Oxygen, as measured from the forbidden line at 6300 Å, shows a well-defined trend with [Fe/H], with [O/Fe] higher in bulge stars than in thick disk ones, which were known to be more oxygen enhanced than thin disk stars. Conclusions: .These results support a scenario in which the bulge formed before and more rapidly than the disk, and therefore the MW bulge can be regarded as a prototypical old spheroid, with a formation history similar to that of early-type (elliptical) galaxies.

  7. CNO abundances of some field horizontal-branch and Population I A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Hayes, D. S.; Davis Philip, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    From observations of infrared lines, oxygen and nitrogen abundances of the prototype field horizontal-branch stars HD 109995 and HD 161817, the somewhat similar star HD 64488, and the sharp-lined Population I A stars Theta Leo and HR 6559 have been obtained, as well as carbon abundances of HD 161817 and Theta Leo. The results for HD 161817 may be in accord with the predictions of Sweigart and Mengel (1979) for dredge-up during the previous red-giant stage if the non-LTE effects for the O I lines have been properly accounted for, and those for the C I and N I lines are small. This star and HD 109995 are apparently both oxygen and nitrogen poor to the same degree although their iron abundances differ by 0.3 dex.

  8. The impact of surface dynamo magnetic fields on the chemical abundance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukina, Nataliya G.; Sukhorukov, Andrii V.; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2015-10-01

    The solar abundances of Fe and of the CNO elements play an important role in addressing a number of important issues such as the formation, structure, and evolution of the Sun and the solar system, the origin of the chemical elements, and the evolution of stars and galaxies. Despite the large number of papers published on this issue, debates about the solar abundances of these elements continue. The aim of the present investigation is to quantify the impact of photospheric magnetic fields on the determination of the solar chemical abundances. To this end, we used two 3D snapshot models of the quiet solar photosphere with a different magnetization taken from recent magneto-convection simulations with small-scale dynamo action. Using such 3D models we have carried out spectral synthesis for a large set of Fei, Ci, Ni, and Oi lines, in order to derive abundance corrections caused by the magnetic, Zeeman broadening of the intensity profiles and the magnetically induced changes of the photospheric temperature structure. We find that if the magnetism of the quiet solar photosphere is mainly produced by a small-scale dynamo, then its impact on the determination of the abundances of iron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen is negligible.

  9. Abundance and dispersal of Heteronychus arator (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in maize fields under different fertilizer treatments.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, M; Mwatawala, M W; Kudra, A B

    2016-01-01

    The invasive African black beetle Heteronychus arator F. is a serious pest of crops in Tropical and sub Tropical regions, including East Africa. Literature on ecology of this pest in Sub Saharan Africa is scarce. Dispersal and abundance of H. arator were determined in maize fields in Njombe Region, in the Southern highlands of Tanzania, from December 2013 to May 2014. Adults of H. arator were collected monthly by hand picking and pitfall traps. Results showed that larvae were present throughout the growing season, with low population at planting and peak period coinciding with optimum soil moisture. The abundance of adults varied with time, with high peaks recorded in January. Abundance of both larvae and adults were significantly affected by fertilizer type, with high populations in farmyard manure. The type of fertilizer significantly affected dispersal of H. arator. A high number of beetles moved significantly longer distances in farmyard and inorganic fertilizer compared to bioslurry a day after release. Abundance of of beetles was negatively correlated with rainfall but positively correlated with average temperature, while abundance of larvae was positively correlated with rainfall. The results provide useful input into management of H. arator under different fertilizer practices and weather conditions. PMID:27026875

  10. Dataset on the abundance of ants and Cosmopolites sordidus damage in plantain fields with intercropped plants.

    PubMed

    Dassou, Anicet Gbèblonoudo; Carval, Dominique; Dépigny, Sylvain; Fansi, Gabriel; Tixier, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Ant abundance and Cosmopolites sordidus damage in plantain fields as affected by intercropping" (A.G. Dassou, D. Carval, S. Dépigny, G.H Fansi, P. Tixier, 2015) [1]. This article describes how associated crops maize (Zea mays), cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) intercropped in the plantain fields in Cameroun modify ant community structure and damages of banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus. The field data set is made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyzes. PMID:27622207

  11. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF A NEUTRON-CAPTURE ENHANCED RED GIANT IN THE BULGE PLAUT FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2013-09-20

    We present chemical abundances for 27 elements ranging from oxygen to erbium in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –1.67) bulge red giant branch star 2MASS 18174532-3353235. The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of a high-resolution (R ∼ 30, 000) spectrum obtained with the Magellan-MIKE spectrograph. While the light (Z ∼< 30) element abundance patterns match those of similar metallicity bulge and halo stars, the strongly enhanced heavy element abundances are more similar to 'r-II' halo stars (e.g., CS 22892-052) typically found at [Fe/H] ∼< – 2.5. We find that the heaviest elements (Z ≥ 56) closely follow the scaled-solar r-process abundance pattern. We do not find evidence supporting significant s-process contributions; however, the intermediate mass elements (e.g., Y and Zr) appear to have been produced through a different process than the heaviest elements. The light and heavy element abundance patterns of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are in good agreement with the more metal-poor r-process enhanced stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17{sup o}3248. 2MASS 18174532-3353235 also shares many chemical characteristics with the similar metallicity but comparatively α-poor Ursa Minor dwarf galaxy giant COS 82. Interestingly, the Mo and Ru abundances of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are also strongly enhanced and follow a similar trend recently found to be common in moderately metal-poor main-sequence turn-off halo stars.

  12. The impact of surface dynamo magnetic fields on the solar iron abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukina, N.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2015-07-01

    Most chemical abundance determinations ignore that the solar photosphere is significantly magnetized by the ubiquitous presence of a small-scale magnetic field. A recent investigation has suggested that there should be a significant impact on the derived iron abundance, owing to the magnetically induced changes on the photospheric temperature and density structure (indirect effect). The three-dimensional (3D) photospheric models used in that investigation have non-zero net magnetic flux values and stem from magneto-convection simulations without small-scale dynamo action. Here we address the same problem by instead using 3D models of the quiet solar photosphere that result from a state-of-the-art magneto-convection simulation with small-scale dynamo action, where the net magnetic flux is zero. One of these 3D models has negligible magnetization, while the other is characterized by a mean field strength of 160 Gauss in the low photosphere. With such 3D models we carried out spectral synthesis for a large set of Fe i lines to derive abundance corrections, taking the above-mentioned indirect effect and the Zeeman broadening of the intensity profiles (direct effect) into account. We conclude that if the magnetism of the quiet solar photosphere is mainly produced by a small-scale dynamo, then its impact on the determination of the solar iron abundance is negligible. Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Abundance, diversity and community characterization of aquatic Coleoptera in a rice field of Northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gómez Lutz, María Constanza; Kehr, Arturo I; Fernández, Liliana A

    2015-09-01

    Rice fields occupy large areas in Northeastern Argentina, and in Corrientes this widespead activity has become a feature in the landscape, as it is one of the main producing provinces. The aquatic Coleoptera is part of the fauna inhabiting these artificial environments but little is known about this group in irrigated rice fields. The aims of this study were to determine the diversity and species richness of coleopterans in a typical rice field, and to characterize the community of water beetles through different abundance models. For this, samples were collected from an active rice field located in "El Sombrero" town, in Corrientes Province, between November 2011 and April 2012. An entomological net of 30 cm diameter was used, and species richness, diversity and equitability were calculated monthly; besides, the community composition was characterized by means of rank-abundance models. A total of 74 species of aquatic coleopterans were identified. January and February resulted the months with the highest diversity. The aquatic Coleoptera species found in most of the sampled months were adjusted to the logarithmic rank-abundance model. The data suggests that, if it is properly managed, rice cropping in Northeastern Argentina can support a diverse aquatic coleopteran fauna. PMID:26666120

  14. SOLAR CYCLE ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS: EVIDENCE FOR A SUPRATHERMAL ION SEED POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G. M.; Desai, M. I.; Li, G.

    2012-04-01

    We have surveyed the heavy ion composition of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) over the recent solar minimum and combined this with our earlier survey to cover the 1998-2011 period encompassing a full solar cycle and onset of the new cycle. We find that the solar minimum CIR intensities and spectral forms are similar to those in active periods, indicating that the basic acceleration mechanism does not vary with solar activity for energies below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. However, the heavy ion abundances show a clear correlation with sunspot number, where heavy ions are more enhanced during active periods. Over the mass range He-Fe, the enhancement is organized by a power law in Q/M with exponent -1.9, with Fe/O varying by a factor of {approx}6. During solar minimum CIR Fe/O was {approx}0.05, well below the corresponding solar wind ratio. Previous studies have shown that rare ions (He{sup +}, {sup 3}He) enhanced in CIRs come from the suprathermal ion pool. The observations presented here extend this evidence, indicating that in addition to rare He{sup +} and {sup 3}He the CIR major heavy ion species are accelerated out of the suprathermal ion pool, not the bulk solar wind.

  15. The Effects of Magnetic Field Morphology on the Determination of Oxygen and Iron Abundances in the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Uitenbroek, Han; Rempel, Matthias; Criscuoli, Serena; Rast, Mark P.

    2015-02-01

    We have explored the impact of magnetic fields on the determination of the solar photospheric oxygen and iron abundances using three-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of convection. Specifically, we examined differences in abundance deduced from three classes of atmospheres simulated with the MURaM code: a pure hydrodynamic (HD) simulation, an MHD simulation with a local dynamo magnetic field that has saturated with an unsigned vertical field strength of 80 G at τ = 1, and an MHD simulation with an initially imposed vertical mean field of 80 G. We use differential equivalent width analysis for diagnosing abundances derived from five oxygen and four iron lines of differing wavelength, oscillator strength, excitation potential, and Landé g-factor, and find that the morphology of the magnetic field is important to the outcome of abundance determinations. The largest deduced abundance differences are found in the vertical mean field simulations, where the O I and Fe I abundance corrections compared to the pure HD case are ~+0.011 dex and +0.065 dex respectively. Small scale unresolved field resulting from the local dynamo has a smaller impact on abundance determinations, with corrections of -0.0001 dex and +0.0044 dex in the magnetized compared to the pure HD simulations. While the overall influence of magnetic field on abundance estimates is found to be small, we stress that such estimates are sensitive not only to the magnitude of magnetic field but also to its morphology.

  16. Evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of avian influenza virus subtypes in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; González-Reiche, Ana S.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Carter, Deborah L.; Newsome, George M.; Müller, Maria L.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Perez, Daniel R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of influenza A viruses (IAVs) are driven by host density and population immunity. Through an analysis of subtypic data for IAVs isolated from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), we present evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of viral subtypes in spring and summer/autumn.

  17. Simultaneous mapping of chemical abundances and magnetic field structure in Ap stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueftinger, T.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic A stars represent about 5 highly ordered, very stable and often very strong magnetic fields. They frequently show variations in both brightness and spectral line profiles that are synchronised to stellar rotation. Those variations are believed to be produced by atomic diffusion operating in the stellar atmospheres which have become stabilized by multi-kG magnetic fields. In recent years, with the development and application of the Doppler and magnetic-Doppler imaging techniques and the availability of high-precision spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric data, it has became possible to map the chemical abundances and magnetic field structures of Ap stars simultaneously and in increasing detail, based on full Stokes vector observations. I review the state-of-the-art understanding pf Ap star spots and their relation to magnetic fields, the development of Doppler and magnetic-Doppler imaging into one of the most powerful remote sensing methods for astrophysics, and the physics of Ap stars atmospheres that we can deduce from simultaneous mapping of magnetic field structure and chemical abundances.

  18. The Effects of Magnetic Field Morphology on the Determination of Oxygen and Iron Abundances in the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Uitenbroek, Han; Rempel, Matthias; Criscuoli, Serena; Rast, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The solar chemical abundance (or a scaled version of it) is implemented in numerous astrophysical analyses. Thus, an accurate and precise estimation of the solar elemental abundance is crucial in astrophysics.We have explored the impact of magnetic fields on the determination of the solar photospheric oxygen andiron abundances using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of convection. Specifically, weexamined differences in abundance deduced from three classes of atmospheres simulated with the MURaM code: apure hydrodynamic (HD) simulation, an MHD simulation with a local dynamo magnetic field that has saturated withan unsigned vertical field strength of 80 G at the optical depth unity surface, and an MHD simulation with an initially imposed vertical mean field of 80 G. We use differential equivalent width analysis for diagnosing abundances derived from five oxygen and four iron spectral lines of differing wavelength, oscillator strength, excitation potential, and Lande g-factor, and find that the morphology of the magnetic field is important to the outcome of abundance determinations. The largest deduced abundance differences are found in the vertical mean field simulations and small scale unresolved field resulting from the local dynamo has a smaller impact on abundance determinations.

  19. Increased Abundance and Transferability of Resistance Genes after Field Application of Manure from Sulfadiazine-Treated Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Groeneweg, Joost; Weichelt, Viola; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Brandes, Nikola; Nordwig, Mathias; Ding, Guo-Chun; Siemens, Jan; Heuer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Spreading manure containing antibiotics in agriculture is assumed to stimulate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in soil bacterial populations. Plant roots influencing the soil environment and its microflora by exudation of growth substrates might considerably increase this effect. In this study, the effects of manure from pigs treated with sulfadiazine (SDZ), here called SDZ manure, on the abundance and transferability of sulfonamide resistance genes sul1 and sul2 in the rhizosphere of maize and grass were compared to the effects in bulk soil in a field experiment. In plots that repeatedly received SDZ manure, a significantly higher abundance of both sul genes was detected compared to that in plots where manure from untreated pigs was applied. Significantly lower abundances of sul genes relative to bacterial ribosomal genes were encountered in the rhizosphere than in bulk soil. However, in contrast to results for bulk soil, the sul gene abundance in the SDZ manure-treated rhizosphere constantly deviated from control treatments over a period of 6 weeks after manuring, suggesting ongoing antibiotic selection over this period. Transferability of sulfonamide resistance was analyzed by capturing resistance plasmids from soil communities into Escherichia coli. Increased rates of plasmid capture were observed in samples from SDZ manure-treated bulk soil and the rhizosphere of maize and grass. More than 97% of the captured plasmids belonged to the LowGC type (having low G+C content), giving further evidence for their important contribution to the environmental spread of antibiotic resistance. In conclusion, differences between bulk soil and rhizosphere need to be considered when assessing the risks associated with the spreading of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23315733

  20. The relationship between mosquito abundance and rice field density in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of Japanese encephalitis (JE), is endemic to the Republic of Korea (ROK) where unvaccinated United States (U.S.) military Service members, civilians and family members are stationed. The primary vector of the JEV in the ROK is Culex tritaeniorhynchus. The ecological relationship between Culex spp. and rice fields has been studied extensively; rice fields have been shown to increase the prevalence of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. This research was conducted to determine if the quantification of rice field land cover surrounding U.S. military installations in the ROK should be used as a parameter in a larger risk model that predicts the abundance of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus populations. Mosquito data from the U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) mosquito surveillance program were used in this project. The average number of female Cx. tritaeniorhynchus collected per trap night for the months of August and September, 2002-2008, was calculated. Rice fields were manually digitized inside 1.5 km buffer zones surrounding U.S. military installations on high-resolution satellite images, and the proportion of rice fields was calculated for each buffer zone. Results Mosquito data collected from seventeen sample sites were analyzed for an association with the proportion of rice field land cover. Results demonstrated that the linear relationship between the proportion of rice fields and mosquito abundance was statistically significant (R2 = 0.62, r = .79, F = 22.72, p < 0.001). Conclusions The analysis presented shows a statistically significant linear relationship between the two parameters, proportion of rice field land cover and log10 of the average number of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus collected per trap night. The findings confirm that agricultural land cover should be included in future studies to develop JE risk prediction models for non-indigenous personnel living at military installations in the ROK. PMID:20573242

  1. Abundance Is Not Enough: The Need for Multiple Lines of Evidence in Testing for Ecological Stability in the Fossil Record

    PubMed Central

    Handley, John C.; Brett, Carlton E.

    2013-01-01

    The fossil record is the only source of information on the long-term dynamics of species assemblages. Here we assess the degree of ecological stability of the epifaunal pterioid bivalve assemblage (EPBA), which is part of the Middle Devonian Hamilton fauna of New York—the type example of the pattern of coordinated stasis, in which long intervals of faunal persistence are terminated by turnover events induced by environmental change. Previous studies have used changes in abundance structure within specific biofacies as evidence for a lack of ecological stability of the Hamilton fauna. By comparing data on relative abundance, body size, and predation, indexed as the frequency of unsuccessful shell-crushing attacks, of the EPBA, we show that abundance structure varied through time, but body-size structure and predation pressure remained relatively stable. We suggest that the energetic set-up of the Hamilton fauna's food web was able to accommodate changes in species attributes, such as fluctuating prey abundances. Ecological redundancy in prey resources, adaptive foraging of shell-crushing predators (arising from predator behavioral or adaptive switching in prey selection in response to changing prey abundances), and allometric scaling of predator-prey interactions are discussed as potential stabilizing factors contributing to the persistence of the Hamilton fauna's EPBA. Our study underscores the value and importance of multiple lines of evidence in tests of ecological stability in the fossil record. PMID:23690981

  2. Detailed abundance analysis of five field blue horizontal-branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafando, I.; LeBlanc, F.; Robert, C.

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that hot blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in globular clusters present abundance anomalies of certain chemical elements in their atmosphere; some metals are overabundant while helium is underabundant. Vertical stratification of chemical species, including iron, is also found in the atmosphere of a number of these objects. The aim of our work is to do a detailed abundance analysis of BHB stars found in the field. We studied the stars HD 128801, HD 143459, HD 213781, and HZ 27, using our high-resolution spectra in the visible region obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, and also Feige 86, using existing Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph visible spectra from the ESO archives. We searched for vertical stratification of the elements identified in our five stars, with the ZEEMAN2 code and stellar model atmospheres of PHOENIX. We confirm here the star rotational and radial velocities previously found, along with their average abundances. For the three cooler stars in our sample (HD 128801, HD 143459, and HZ 27), most elements detected are underabundant. For the two hotter stars (Feige 86 and HD 213781), the abundances of most elements are near or above their solar value. Of all the elements studied, only phosphorus is clearly found to be vertically stratified in the atmosphere of HD 213781. Marginal indications of vertical stratification of iron is observed for Feige 86. The chemical properties of the five field BHB stars are consistent with those of their globular-cluster counterparts.

  3. Large brown seaweeds of the British Isles: Evidence of changes in abundance over four decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesson, Chris; Bush, Laura E.; Davies, Andrew J.; Maggs, Christine A.; Brodie, Juliet

    2015-03-01

    The large brown seaweeds (macroalgae) are keystone species in intertidal and shallow subtidal marine ecosystems and are harvested for food and other products. Recently, there have been sporadic, often anecdotal, reports of local abundance declines around the British Isles, but regional surveys have rarely revisited sites to determine possible changes. An assessment was undertaken of changes in the abundance of large brown seaweeds around the British Isles using historical survey data, and determination of whether any changes were linked with climate change. Data were analysed from multiple surveys for 14 habitat-forming and commercially important species of Phaeophyceae, covering orders Laminariales, Fucales and Tilopteridales. Changes in abundance were assessed for sites over the period 1974-2010. Trends in distribution were compared to summer and winter sea surface temperatures (SST). Results revealed regional patterns of both increase and decrease in abundance for multiple species, with significant declines in the south for kelp species and increases in northern and central areas for some kelp and wracks. Abundance patterns of 10 of the 14 species showed a significant association with SSTs, but there was a mixture of positive and negative responses. This is the first British Isles-wide observation of declining abundance of large brown seaweeds. Historical surveys provide useful data to examine trends in abundance, but the ad hoc nature of these studies limit the conclusions that can be drawn. Although the British Isles remains a stronghold for large brown algae, it is imperative that systematic surveys are undertaken to monitor changes.

  4. Abundances of sodium, sulfur, and potassium in lunar volcanic glasses: Evidence for volatile loss during eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, J. W.; Mcguire, J.

    1992-01-01

    Six varieties of lunar volcanic glass are known to occur within the Apollo 17 sample collection. Investigations have shown that 25 volatile elements are known to be concentrated on the exterior surfaces of individual volcanic glass spheres. Since bulk analyses of volcanic glass provide an integrated abundance of an element on and with the glass spherules, other methods must be relied on to determine the interior abundance of an element. The interior abundance of an element with a volcanic glass sphere establishes the abundance of that element in the melt at the time of quench. The current study is part of a comprehensive attempt to measure the abundance of three volatile elements (Na, S, and K) within representative spheres of the 25 varieties of lunar volcanic glass currently known to exist at the Apollo landing sites. Comparison of the measured abundances of these elements within the interiors of individual glasses with bulk analyses and crystalline mare basalts will furnish new constraints on the geochemical behavior of volatile elements during lunar mare volcanism.

  5. Low larval abundance in the Sargasso Sea: new evidence about reduced recruitment of the Atlantic eels.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Reinhold; Stepputtis, Daniel; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Castonguay, Martin; Schaber, Matthias; Wysujack, Klaus; Vobach, Michael; Miller, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    The European eel Anguilla anguilla has shown decreased recruitment in recent decades. Despite increasing efforts to establish species recovery measures, it is unclear if the decline was caused by reduced numbers of reproductive-stage silver eels reaching the spawning area, low early larval survival, or increased larval mortality during migration to recruitment areas. To determine if larval abundances in the spawning area significantly changed over the past three decades, a plankton trawl sampling survey for anguillid leptocephali was conducted in March and April 2011 in the spawning area of the European eel that was designed to directly compare to collections made in the same way in 1983 and 1985. The catch rates of most anguilliform leptocephali were lower in 2011, possibly because of the slightly smaller plankton trawl used, but the relative abundances of European eel and American eel, Anguilla rostrata, leptocephali were much lower in 2011 than in 1983 and 1985 when compared to catches of other common leptocephali. The leptocephali assemblage was the same in 2011 as in previous years, but small larvae of mesopelagic snipe eels, Nemichthys scolopaceus, which spawn sympatrically with anguillid eels, were less abundant. Temperature fronts in the spawning area were also poorly defined compared to previous years. Although the causes for low anguillid larval abundances in 2011 are unclear, the fact that there are presently fewer European and American eel larvae in the spawning area than during previous time periods indicates that decreased larval abundance and lower eventual recruitment begin within the spawning area. PMID:25307845

  6. Low larval abundance in the Sargasso Sea: new evidence about reduced recruitment of the Atlantic eels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanel, Reinhold; Stepputtis, Daniel; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Castonguay, Martin; Schaber, Matthias; Wysujack, Klaus; Vobach, Michael; Miller, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The European eel Anguilla anguilla has shown decreased recruitment in recent decades. Despite increasing efforts to establish species recovery measures, it is unclear if the decline was caused by reduced numbers of reproductive-stage silver eels reaching the spawning area, low early larval survival, or increased larval mortality during migration to recruitment areas. To determine if larval abundances in the spawning area significantly changed over the past three decades, a plankton trawl sampling survey for anguillid leptocephali was conducted in March and April 2011 in the spawning area of the European eel that was designed to directly compare to collections made in the same way in 1983 and 1985. The catch rates of most anguilliform leptocephali were lower in 2011, possibly because of the slightly smaller plankton trawl used, but the relative abundances of European eel and American eel, Anguilla rostrata, leptocephali were much lower in 2011 than in 1983 and 1985 when compared to catches of other common leptocephali. The leptocephali assemblage was the same in 2011 as in previous years, but small larvae of mesopelagic snipe eels, Nemichthys scolopaceus, which spawn sympatrically with anguillid eels, were less abundant. Temperature fronts in the spawning area were also poorly defined compared to previous years. Although the causes for low anguillid larval abundances in 2011 are unclear, the fact that there are presently fewer European and American eel larvae in the spawning area than during previous time periods indicates that decreased larval abundance and lower eventual recruitment begin within the spawning area.

  7. Spectroscopic study of the HgMn star HD 49606: the quest for binarity, abundance stratifications and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, G.; Giarrusso, M.; Leone, F.; Munari, M.; Scalia, C.; Sparacello, E.; Scuderi, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-instrument analysis of the mercury-manganese star HD 49606. New spectroscopic observations have been obtained by us with Catania Astrophysical Observatory Spectropolarimeter (CAOS@OAC) and High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher-North@Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (HARPS-N@TNG). Combining these observations with archive data coming from other instruments, we performed a comprehensive analysis of this star. We highlight the motion around the centre of mass of a binary system of SB1 type, and we calculate the fundamental parameters characterizing its orbit. We also speculate on the nature of the unseen component. From the fit of H β and H γ, we determined the effective temperature and gravity, while from a number of metal lines, we derive the rotational and microturbulent velocities. Regarding chemical composition, we found underabundances of helium, oxygen, magnesium, sulfur and nickel, solar composition for carbon and overabundances for all the other elements. In particular, mercury abundance is derived taking into account an isotopic mixture different from the terrestrial one. As to magnesium, silicon and phosphorus, we found a non-constant abundance with the optical depth, a result currently considered an evidence of stratification. Spectropolarimetric observations have been performed in the attempt to highlight the presence of a magnetic field, but no detection has been found.

  8. Spectroscopic study of the HgMn star HD 49606: the quest for binarity, abundance stratifications and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, G.; Giarrusso, M.; Leone, F.; Munari, M.; Scalia, C.; Sparacello, E.; Scuderi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a multi-instrument analysis of the mercury-manganese star HD 49606. New spectroscopic observations have been obtained by us with Catania Astrophysical Observatory Spectropolarimeter (CAOS@OAC) and HARPS-N@TNG. Combining these observations with archive data coming from other instruments, we performed a comprehensive analysis of this star. We highlight the motion around the center of mass of a binary system of SB1 type, and we calculate the fundamental parameters characterizing its orbit. We also speculate on the nature of the unseen component. From the fit of Hβ and Hγ we determined the effective temperature and gravity, while from a number of metal lines we derive the rotational and microturbulent velocities. Regarding chemical composition, we found underabundances of helium, oxygen, magnesium, sulfur and nickel, solar composition for carbon and overabundances for all the other elements. In particular, mercury abundance is derived taking into account an isotopic mixture different from the terrestrial one. As to magnesium, silicon and phosphorus, we found a non constant abundance with the optical depth, a result currently considered an evidence of stratification. Spectropolarimetric observations have been performed in the attempt to highlight the presence of a magnetic field, but no detection has been found.

  9. Abundance and recruitment data for Undaria pinnatifida in Brest harbour, France: Model versus field results.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James T; Voisin, Marie; Johnson, Mark; Viard, Frédérique

    2016-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "A modelling approach to explore the critical environmental parameters influencing the growth and establishment of the invasive seaweed Undaria pinnatifida in Europe" [1]. This article describes raw simulation data output from a novel individual-based model of the invasive kelp species Undaria pinnatifida. It also includes field data of monthly abundance and recruitment values for a population of invasive U. pinnatifida (in Brest harbour, France) that were used to validate the model. The raw model output and field data are made publicly available in order to enable critical analysis of the model predictions and to inform future modelling efforts of the study species. PMID:27054156

  10. Abundance and recruitment data for Undaria pinnatifida in Brest harbour, France: Model versus field results

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James T.; Voisin, Marie; Johnson, Mark; Viard, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “A modelling approach to explore the critical environmental parameters influencing the growth and establishment of the invasive seaweed Undaria pinnatifida in Europe” [1]. This article describes raw simulation data output from a novel individual-based model of the invasive kelp species Undaria pinnatifida. It also includes field data of monthly abundance and recruitment values for a population of invasive U. pinnatifida (in Brest harbour, France) that were used to validate the model. The raw model output and field data are made publicly available in order to enable critical analysis of the model predictions and to inform future modelling efforts of the study species. PMID:27054156

  11. THE EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY ON THE DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN AND IRON ABUNDANCES IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Christopher S.; Uitenbroek, Han; Criscuoli, Serena; Rempel, Matthias; Rast, Mark P.

    2015-02-01

    We have explored the impact of magnetic fields on the determination of the solar photospheric oxygen and iron abundances using three-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of convection. Specifically, we examined differences in abundance deduced from three classes of atmospheres simulated with the MURaM code: a pure hydrodynamic (HD) simulation, an MHD simulation with a local dynamo magnetic field that has saturated with an unsigned vertical field strength of 80 G at τ = 1, and an MHD simulation with an initially imposed vertical mean field of 80 G. We use differential equivalent width analysis for diagnosing abundances derived from five oxygen and four iron lines of differing wavelength, oscillator strength, excitation potential, and Landé g-factor, and find that the morphology of the magnetic field is important to the outcome of abundance determinations. The largest deduced abundance differences are found in the vertical mean field simulations, where the O I and Fe I abundance corrections compared to the pure HD case are ∼+0.011 dex and +0.065 dex respectively. Small scale unresolved field resulting from the local dynamo has a smaller impact on abundance determinations, with corrections of –0.0001 dex and +0.0044 dex in the magnetized compared to the pure HD simulations. While the overall influence of magnetic field on abundance estimates is found to be small, we stress that such estimates are sensitive not only to the magnitude of magnetic field but also to its morphology.

  12. Low Abundances of Highly Siderophile Elements in the Lunar Mantle: Evidence for Prolonged Late Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Horan, M. F.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE: including Re, Au, Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd, Rh) are strongly partitioned into metal relative to silicates. In the terrestrial planets these elements are concentrated in metallic cores. Earth s mantle has sufficiently high abundances of the HSE (0.008 times CI abundances) that it has been hypothesized approximately 0.1-0.5% of the mass of the Earth was added following the last major interaction between the core and mantle [e.g. 1]. The additional material added to the Earth and Moon has been termed a late veneer , and the process has often been termed late accretion [2]. The timing of the dominant late accretionary period of the Earth and Moon is still poorly known. The abundances of HSE in the lunar mantle could provide important constraints on when the late veneer was added. The material that ultimately became the silicate portion of the Moon was likely stripped of most of its HSE prior to and during coalescence of the Moon. Consequently the initial lunar mantle likely had very low concentrations of the HSE. Unlike Earth, the generation of permanent lunar crust by 4.4 Ga prevented subsequent additions of HSE to the lunar mantle via continued accretion. Thus, if a substantial portion of the late veneer was added after 4.4 Ga, the lunar mantle should have retained very low HSE concentrations. Conversely, if the late veneer was mostly added prior to 4.4 Ga, HSE abundances in the lunar mantle may be roughly similar to abundances in the terrestrial mantle.

  13. Variance in prey abundance influences time budgets of breeding seabirds: Evidence from pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    We use data on pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba to test the hypothesis that discretionary time in breeding seabirds is correlated with variance in prey abundance. We measured the amount of time that guillemots spent at the colony before delivering fish to chicks ("resting time") in relation to fish abundance as measured by beach seines and bottom trawls. Radio telemetry showed that resting time was inversely correlated with time spent diving for fish during foraging trips (r = -0.95). Pigeon guillemots fed their chicks either Pacific sand lance Ammodytes hexapterus, a schooling midwater fish, which exhibited high interannual variance in abundance (CV = 181%), or a variety of non-schooling demersal fishes, which were less variable in abundance (average CV = 111%). Average resting times were 46% higher at colonies where schooling prey dominated the diet. Individuals at these colonies reduced resting times 32% during years of low food abundance, but did not reduce meal delivery rates. In contrast, individuals feeding on non-schooling fishes did not reduce resting times during low food years, but did reduce meal delivery rates by 27%. Interannual variance in resting times was greater for the schooling group than for the non-schooling group. We conclude from these differences that time allocation in pigeon guillemots is more flexible when variable schooling prey dominate diets. Resting times were also 27% lower for individuals feeding two-chick rather than one-chick broods. The combined effects of diet and brood size on adult time budgets may help to explain higher rates of brood reduction for pigeon guillemot chicks fed non-schooling fishes.

  14. THE ABUNDANCE SCATTER IN M33 FROM H II REGIONS: IS THERE ANY EVIDENCE FOR AZIMUTHAL METALLICITY VARIATIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    Optical spectra of 25 H II regions in the inner 2 kpc of the M33 disk have been obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from the detection of the [O III] {lambda}4363 auroral line displays a scatter of approximately 0.06 dex, a much smaller value than recently reported by Rosolowsky and Simon in this galaxy. The analysis of the abundances for a large sample of H II regions derived from the R{sub 23} strong-line indicator confirms that the scatter is small over the full disk of M33, consistent with the measuring uncertainties, and comparable to what is observed in other spiral galaxies. No evidence is therefore found for significant azimuthal variations in the present-day metallicity of the interstellar medium in this galaxy on spatial scales from {approx}100 pc to a few kpc. A considerable fraction of M33 H II regions with auroral line detections show spectral features revealing sources of hard ionizing radiation (such as He II emission and large [Ne III], [O III] line fluxes). Since R{sub 23} is shown to severely underestimate the oxygen abundances in such cases, care must be taken in chemical abundance studies of extragalactic H II regions based on this strong-line indicator.

  15. Abundant symmetries for the 1+1 dimensional classical Liouville field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Sen-yue

    1994-05-01

    Explicit calculation shows us that there exists a rich associated symmetry structure and abundant strong symmetry configuration for the 1+1 dimensional classical Liouville field theory. Starting from these symmetries and strong symmetries, various integrable hierarchies can be obtained. The Liouville I-III hierarchies, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy, the Fordy-Gibbons I, and Fordy-Gibbons II hierarchies are just special cases while the KdV hierarchy, Caudry-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera hierarchy, and Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy can be obtained by using a same Miura transformation from the modified KdV, the Fordy-Gibbons I and Fordy-Gibbons II hierarchies, respectively. Two types of the generalized Riccati hierarchies are also presented.

  16. First Spectroscopic Evidence for High Ionization State and Low Oxygen Abundance in Lyα Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Ono, Yoshiaki; Lee, Janice C.

    2013-05-01

    We present results from Keck/NIRSPEC and Magellan/MMIRS follow-up spectroscopy of Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 identified in our Subaru narrowband survey. We successfully detect Hα emission from seven LAEs, and perform a detailed analysis of six LAEs free from active galactic nucleus activity, two out of which, CDFS-3865 and COSMOS-30679, have [O II] and [O III] line detections. They are the first [O II]-detected LAEs at high-z, and their [O III]/[O II] ratios and R23-indices provide the first simultaneous determinations of ionization parameter and oxygen abundance for LAEs. CDFS-3865 has a very high ionization parameter (q_{ion}=2.5^{+1.7}_{-0.8} \\times 10^8 cm s-1) and a low oxygen abundance (12+log (O/H)=7.84^{+0.24}_{-0.25}) in contrast with moderate values of other high-z galaxies such as Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). COSMOS-30679 also possesses a relatively high ionization parameter (q_{ion}=8^{+10}_{-4} \\times 10^7 cm s-1) and a low oxygen abundance (12+log (O/H)=8.18^{+0.28}_{-0.28}). Both LAEs appear to fall below the mass-metallicity relation of z ~ 2 LBGs. Similarly, a low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) < 8.4 is independently indicated for typical LAEs from a composite spectrum and the [N II]/Hα index. Such high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances can be found in local star-forming galaxies, but this extreme local population occupies only ~0.06% of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic galaxy sample with a number density ~100 times smaller than that of LAEs. With their high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances, LAEs would represent an early stage of galaxy formation dominated by massive stars in compact star-forming regions. High-q ion galaxies like LAEs would produce ionizing photons efficiently with a high escape fraction achieved by density-bounded H II regions, which would significantly contribute to cosmic reionization at z > 6. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is

  17. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR HIGH IONIZATION STATE AND LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN Ly{alpha} EMITTERS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Lee, Janice C.

    2013-05-20

    We present results from Keck/NIRSPEC and Magellan/MMIRS follow-up spectroscopy of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 identified in our Subaru narrowband survey. We successfully detect H{alpha} emission from seven LAEs, and perform a detailed analysis of six LAEs free from active galactic nucleus activity, two out of which, CDFS-3865 and COSMOS-30679, have [O II] and [O III] line detections. They are the first [O II]-detected LAEs at high-z, and their [O III]/[O II] ratios and R23-indices provide the first simultaneous determinations of ionization parameter and oxygen abundance for LAEs. CDFS-3865 has a very high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=2.5{sup +1.7}{sub -0.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=7.84{sup +0.24}{sub -0.25}) in contrast with moderate values of other high-z galaxies such as Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). COSMOS-30679 also possesses a relatively high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=8{sup +10}{sub -4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=8.18{sup +0.28}{sub -0.28}). Both LAEs appear to fall below the mass-metallicity relation of z {approx} 2 LBGs. Similarly, a low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) < 8.4 is independently indicated for typical LAEs from a composite spectrum and the [N II]/H{alpha} index. Such high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances can be found in local star-forming galaxies, but this extreme local population occupies only {approx}0.06% of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic galaxy sample with a number density {approx}100 times smaller than that of LAEs. With their high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances, LAEs would represent an early stage of galaxy formation dominated by massive stars in compact star-forming regions. High-q{sub ion} galaxies like LAEs would produce ionizing photons efficiently with a high escape fraction achieved by density-bounded H II regions, which would significantly contribute to

  18. How within field abundance and spatial distribution patterns of earthworms and macropores depend on soil tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaik, Loes; Palm, Juliane; Schröder, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms play a key role in soil systems. They are ecosystem engineers affecting soil structure as well as the transport and availability of water and solutes through their burrowing behaviour. There are three different ecological earthworm types with different burrowing behaviour that can result in varying local infiltration patterns: from rapid deep vertical infiltration to a stronger diffuse distribution of water and solutes in the upper soil layers. The small scale variation in earthworm abundance is often very high and within fields earthworm population processes might result in an aggregated pattern. The question arises how the local distribution of earthworms affects spatial distributions of macroporosity and how both are influenced by soil tillage. Therefore we performed a total number of 430 earthworm samplings on four differently tilled agricultural fields in the Weiherbach catchment (South East Germany). Additionally, at a limited amount of 32 locations on two of the fields we performed sprinkling experiments with brilliant blue and excavated the soil to count macropores at different soil depths (10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm) to compare macropore distributions to the earthworm distributions.

  19. Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Ellen; Lalane, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach the scope and consequences of evidence-based practices in mental health through an innovative assignment that integrates classroom and field learning. The authors illustrate the planning and implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field…

  20. Oxygen Abundances in Low- and High-α Field Halo Stars and the Discovery of Two Field Stars Born in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, I.; Meléndez, J.; Chanamé, J.

    2012-10-01

    Oxygen abundances of 67 dwarf stars in the metallicity range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4 are derived from a non-LTE analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. These stars have precise atmospheric parameters measured by Nissen and Schuster, who find that they separate into three groups based on their kinematics and α-element (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) abundances: thick disk, high-α halo, and low-α halo. We find the oxygen abundance trends of thick-disk and high-α halo stars very similar. The low-α stars show a larger star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe] at a given [Fe/H] and have systematically lower oxygen abundances compared to the other two groups. Thus, we find the behavior of oxygen abundances in these groups of stars similar to that of the α elements. We use previously published oxygen abundance data of disk and very metal-poor halo stars to present an overall view (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.3) of oxygen abundance trends of stars in the solar neighborhood. Two field halo dwarf stars stand out in their O and Na abundances. Both G53-41 and G150-40 have very low oxygen and very high sodium abundances, which are key signatures of the abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster (GC) stars. Therefore, they are likely field halo stars born in GCs. If true, we estimate that at least 3% ± 2% of the local field metal-poor star population was born in GCs.

  1. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN LOW- AND HIGH-{alpha} FIELD HALO STARS AND THE DISCOVERY OF TWO FIELD STARS BORN IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.

    2012-10-01

    Oxygen abundances of 67 dwarf stars in the metallicity range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4 are derived from a non-LTE analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. These stars have precise atmospheric parameters measured by Nissen and Schuster, who find that they separate into three groups based on their kinematics and {alpha}-element (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) abundances: thick disk, high-{alpha} halo, and low-{alpha} halo. We find the oxygen abundance trends of thick-disk and high-{alpha} halo stars very similar. The low-{alpha} stars show a larger star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe] at a given [Fe/H] and have systematically lower oxygen abundances compared to the other two groups. Thus, we find the behavior of oxygen abundances in these groups of stars similar to that of the {alpha} elements. We use previously published oxygen abundance data of disk and very metal-poor halo stars to present an overall view (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.3) of oxygen abundance trends of stars in the solar neighborhood. Two field halo dwarf stars stand out in their O and Na abundances. Both G53-41 and G150-40 have very low oxygen and very high sodium abundances, which are key signatures of the abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster (GC) stars. Therefore, they are likely field halo stars born in GCs. If true, we estimate that at least 3% {+-} 2% of the local field metal-poor star population was born in GCs.

  2. The Abundance Scatter in M33 from H II Regions: Is There Any Evidence for Azimuthal Metallicity Variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    Optical spectra of 25 H II regions in the inner 2 kpc of the M33 disk have been obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from the detection of the [O III] λ4363 auroral line displays a scatter of approximately 0.06 dex, a much smaller value than recently reported by Rosolowsky & Simon in this galaxy. The analysis of the abundances for a large sample of H II regions derived from the R 23 strong-line indicator confirms that the scatter is small over the full disk of M33, consistent with the measuring uncertainties, and comparable to what is observed in other spiral galaxies. No evidence is therefore found for significant azimuthal variations in the present-day metallicity of the interstellar medium in this galaxy on spatial scales from ~100 pc to a few kpc. A considerable fraction of M33 H II regions with auroral line detections show spectral features revealing sources of hard ionizing radiation (such as He II emission and large [Ne III], [O III] line fluxes). Since R 23 is shown to severely underestimate the oxygen abundances in such cases, care must be taken in chemical abundance studies of extragalactic H II regions based on this strong-line indicator. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  3. Further Evidence for Weak Field Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1997-03-01

    Following our unexpected discovery of weak short-range surface field effects on the critical mixing transition of a binary liquid,(N.S. Desai, S. Peach, and C. Franck, Phys. Rev. E52), 4129 (1995) we have directly addressed our concern that these results might have been affected by surface heterogeneity. We have used octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) to cover borosilicate glass surfaces with partial monolayers. Reference substrates with identical treatment had OTS patches no larger than the bulk correlation length within 40 mK of the critical transition. The present reflectivity experiment employs uncovered reference surfaces for comparison in a single sample cell. We confirm our earlier discovery of a persistent (down to 3 mK above the critical point) deviation of the degree of critical adsorption from the maximum value expected. We have also improved our earlier analysis in order to examine the scaling behavior. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910, and through central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell Univ.

  4. Abundance, diversity, and seasonal population dynamics of aquatic Coleoptera and Heteroptera in rice fields: effects of direct seeding management.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koji, Shinsaku; Hidaka, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Koji

    2013-10-01

    Recent introduction of modern drainage systems has produced intensely dry conditions in rice farmlands and has degraded habitats for aquatic animals. In this study, we compared water beetle (Coleoptera) and water bug (Heteroptera) communities within rice fields cultivated under different management regimes: V-furrow no-till direct-seeding (DS) and conventional regimes. In DS fields, rice is sown in well-drained fields, and flooding is performed a month later than in conventional rice fields. DS fields are then continuously flooded until harvesting; unlike in conventional fields, where midseason drainage is performed in summer. We observed that DS fields supported higher densities of water beetles and water bugs than conventional fields, probably because of the high compatibility between the flooding period and the reproductive season of the insects. The species richness of water beetles was higher in DS fields than in conventional fields. Overall, DS fields showed higher water beetle and water bug abundance, but the effect was variable for individual species: seven species were more abundant in DS than in conventional fields, whereas two species showed opposite tendencies. Considering the differential responses among species to the management regimes, a mosaic of DS and conventional fields is preferable to either field alone for the conservation of aquatic insects in rice agroecosystems. PMID:24073897

  5. The Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time (MACT) Survey. I. Optical Spectroscopy in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Malkan, Matthew A.; Rigby, Jane R.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; de los Reyes, Mithi A.; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Deep rest-frame optical spectroscopy is critical for characterizing and understanding the physical conditions and properties of the ionized gas in galaxies. Here, we present a new spectroscopic survey called “Metal Abundances across Cosmic Time” or { M }{ A }{ C }{ T }, which will obtain rest-frame optical spectra for ∼3000 emission-line galaxies. This paper describes the optical spectroscopy that has been conducted with MMT/Hectospec and Keck/DEIMOS for ≈1900 z = 0.1–1 emission-line galaxies selected from our narrowband and intermediate-band imaging in the Subaru Deep Field. In addition, we present a sample of 164 galaxies for which we have measured the weak [O iii]λ4363 line (66 with at least 3σ detections and 98 with significant upper limits). This nebular emission line determines the gas-phase metallicity by measuring the electron temperature of the ionized gas. This paper presents the optical spectra, emission-line measurements, interstellar properties (e.g., metallicity, gas density), and stellar properties (e.g., star formation rates, stellar mass). Paper II of the { M }{ A }{ C }{ T } survey (Ly et al.) presents the first results on the stellar mass–gas metallicity relation at z ≲ 1 using the sample with [O iii]λ4363 measurements.

  6. Change in abundance of pacific brant wintering in alaska: evidence of a climate warming effect?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Dau, C.P.; Lee, T.; Sedinger, J.S.; Anderson, B.A.; Hines, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Winter distribution of Pacific Flyway brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) has shifted northward from lowtemperate areas to sub-Arctic areas over the last 42 years. We assessed the winter abundance and distribution of brant in Alaska to evaluate whether climate warming may be contributing to positive trends in the most northern of the wintering populations. Mean surface air temperatures during winter at the end of the Alaska Peninsula increased about 1??C between 1963 and 2004, resulting in a 23% reduction in freezing degree days and a 34% decline in the number of days when ice cover prevents birds from accessing food resources. Trends in the wintering population fluctuated with states of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, increasing during positive (warm) phases and decreasing during negative (cold) phases, and this correlation provides support for the hypothesis that growth in the wintering population of brant in Alaska is linked to climate warming. The size of the wintering population was negatively correlated with the number of days of strong northwesterly winds in November, which suggests that the occurrence of tailwinds favorable for migration before the onset of winter was a key factor in whether brant migrated from Alaska or remained there during winter. Winter distribution of brant on the Alaska Peninsula was highly variable and influenced by ice cover, particularly at the heavily used Izembek Lagoon. Observations of previously marked brant indicated that the Alaska wintering population was composed primarily of birds originating from Arctic breeding colonies that appear to be growing. Numbers of brant in Alaska during winter will likely increase as temperatures rise and ice cover decreases at high latitudes in response to climate warming. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  7. Elemental abundances of the supernova remnant G292.0+1.8: Evidence for a massive progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.; Singh, K. P.

    1994-02-01

    We present a comprehensive nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) analysis of X-ray spectral data from the Einstein Observatory and EXOSAT for the supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. The spectra are well described by a single-temperature, single-timescale NEI model with kT = 1.64-0.19+0.29 keV and net = (5.55-1.12+1.2 x 1010s/cu cm, which establishes that this remnant is indeed young and in the ionizing phase of evolution of its X-ray spectrum. We determine the abundances of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Fe and examine their variation over the allowed range of column density, kT, and net. Numerical calculations of the nucleosynthesis expected for a 25 solar mass progenitor agree best with the fitted abundances; in fact the minimum rms percent difference between this model and the derived abundances is only 15%. From the fitted emission measure and a simple geometric model of the remnant we estimate the mass of X-ray-emitting plasma to be 9.3-6.2+1.19 solar mass, for an assumed distance of 4.8 +/- 1.6 kpc. Additional errors on this mass estimate, from clumping of the ejecta, for example, may be substantial. No evidence was found for a difference in the thermodynamic state of the plasma as a function of elemental composition based on analysis of the individual ionization timescales of the various species. In this sense then, G292.0+1.8 resembles the remnant Cas A (another product of a massive star supernova), while it is different from the remnants of SN 1572 (Tycho) and SN 1006, both of which are believed to be from Type Ia supernovae.

  8. Elemental abundances of the supernova remnant G292.0+1.8: Evidence for a massive progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.; Singh, K. P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a comprehensive nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) analysis of X-ray spectral data from the Einstein Observatory and EXOSAT for the supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. The spectra are well described by a single-temperature, single-timescale NEI model with kT = 1.64(sub -0.19)(sup +0.29) keV and n(sub e)t = (5.55(sub -1.12)(sup +1.2) x 10(exp 10)s/cu cm, which establishes that this remnant is indeed young and in the ionizing phase of evolution of its X-ray spectrum. We determine the abundances of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Fe and examine their variation over the allowed range of column density, kT, and n(sub e)t. Numerical calculations of the nucleosynthesis expected for a 25 solar mass progenitor agree best with the fitted abundances; in fact the minimum rms percent difference between this model and the derived abundances is only 15%. From the fitted emission measure and a simple geometric model of the remnant we estimate the mass of X-ray-emitting plasma to be 9.3(sub -6.2)(sup +1.19) solar mass, for an assumed distance of 4.8 +/- 1.6 kpc. Additional errors on this mass estimate, from clumping of the ejecta, for example, may be substantial. No evidence was found for a difference in the thermodynamic state of the plasma as a function of elemental composition based on analysis of the individual ionization timescales of the various species. In this sense then, G292.0+1.8 resembles the remnant Cas A (another product of a massive star supernova), while it is different from the remnants of SN 1572 (Tycho) and SN 1006, both of which are believed to be from Type Ia supernovae.

  9. Behavior of Li abundances in solar-analog stars. II. Evidence of the connection with rotation and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Honda, S.; Kawanomoto, S.; Ando, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2010-06-01

    Context. We previously attempted to ascertain why the Li i 6708 line-strengths of Sun-like stars differ so significantly despite the superficial similarities of stellar parameters. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of 118 solar analogs and reported that a close connection exists between the Li abundance (ALi) and the line-broadening width (vr+m; mainly contributed by rotational effect), which led us to conclude that stellar rotation may be the primary control of the surface Li content. Aims: To examine our claim in more detail, we study whether the degree of stellar activity exhibits a similar correlation with the Li abundance, which is expected because of the widely believed close connection between rotation and activity. Methods: We measured the residual flux at the line center of the strong Ca ii 8542 line, r0(8542), known to be a useful index of stellar activity, for all sample stars using newly acquired spectra in this near-IR region. The projected rotational velocity (ve sin i) was estimated by subtracting the macroturbulence contribution from vr+m that we had already established. Results: A remarkable (positive) correlation was found in the ALi versus (vs.) r0(8542) diagram as well as in both the r0(8542) vs. ve sin i and ALi vs. ve sin i diagrams, as had been expected. With the confirmation of rotation-dependent stellar activity, this clearly shows that the surface Li abundances of these solar analogs progressively decrease as the rotation rate decreases. Conclusions: Given this observational evidence, we conclude that the depletion of surface Li in solar-type stars, probably caused by effective envelope mixing, operates more efficiently as stellar rotation decelerates. It may be promising to attribute the low-Li tendency of planet-host G dwarfs to their different nature in the stellar angular momentum. Based on observations carried out at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (Okayama, Japan).

  10. Seasonal patterns of aster leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) abundance and aster yellows phytoplasma infectivity in Wisconsin carrot fields.

    PubMed

    Frost, K E; Esker, P D; Van Haren, R; Kotolski, L; Groves, R L

    2013-06-01

    In Wisconsin, vegetable crops are threatened annually by the aster yellows phytoplasma (AYp), which is obligately transmitted by the aster leafhopper. Using a multiyear, multilocation data set, seasonal patterns of leafhopper abundance and infectivity were modeled. A seasonal aster yellows index (AYI) was deduced from the model abundance and infectivity predictions to represent the expected seasonal risk of pathogen transmission by infectious aster leafhoppers. The primary goal of this study was to identify periods of time during the growing season when crop protection practices could be targeted to reduce the risk of AYp spread. Based on abundance and infectivity, the annual exposure of the carrot crop to infectious leafhoppers varied by 16- and 70-fold, respectively. Together, this corresponded to an estimated 1,000-fold difference in exposure to infectious leafhoppers. Within a season, exposure of the crop to infectious aster leafhoppers (Macrosteles quadrilineatus Forbes), varied threefold because of abundance and ninefold because of infectivity. Periods of above average aster leafhopper abundance occurred between 11 June and 2 August and above average infectivity occurred between 27 May and 13 July. A more comprehensive description of the temporal trends of aster leafhopper abundance and infectivity provides new information defining when the aster leafhopper moves into susceptible crop fields and when they transmit the pathogen to susceptible crops. PMID:23726058

  11. DNA Sequence Analyses Reveal Abundant Diversity, Endemism and Evidence for Asian Origin of the Porcini Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Li, Yan-Chun; Tolgor, Bau; Kost, Gerhard W.; Yang, Zhu L.

    2012-01-01

    The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species) and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions. PMID:22629418

  12. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and cancer: the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, M N

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiologic evidence that low frequency electromagnetic fields generated by alternating current may be a cause of cancer. Studies examining residential exposures of children and adults and studies of electrical and electronics workers are reviewed. Using conventional epidemiologic criteria for inferring causal associations, including strength and consistency of the relationship, biological plausibility, and the possibility of bias as an explanation, it is concluded that the evidence is strongly suggestive that such radiation is carcinogenic. The evidence is strongest for brain and central nervous system cancers in electrical workers and children. Weaker evidence supports an association with leukemia in electrical workers. Some evidence also exists for an association with melanoma in electrical workers. Failure to find consistent evidence of a link between residential exposures and adult cancers may be attributable to exposure misclassification. Studies so far have used imperfect surrogates for any true biologically effective magnetic field exposure. The resulting exposure misclassification has produced relative risk estimates that understate any true risk. PMID:1821368

  13. The surface nitrogen abundance of a massive star in relation to its oscillations, rotation, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, C.; Molenberghs, G.; Kenward, M. G.; Neiner, C.

    2014-02-01

    We have composed a sample of 68 massive stars in our galaxy whose projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, and gravity are available from high-precision spectroscopic measurements. The additional seven observed variables considered here are their surface nitrogen abundance, rotational frequency, magnetic field strength, and the amplitude and frequency of their dominant acoustic and gravity modes of oscillation. A multiple linear regression to estimate the nitrogen abundance combined with principal component analysis, after addressing the incomplete and truncated nature of the data, reveals that the effective temperature and the frequency of the dominant acoustic oscillation mode are the only two significant predictors for the nitrogen abundance, while the projected rotational velocity and the rotational frequency have no predictive power. The dominant gravity mode and the magnetic field strength are correlated with the effective temperature but have no predictive power for the nitrogen abundance. Our findings are completely based on observations and their proper statistical treatment and call for a new strategy in evaluating the outcome of stellar evolution computations.

  14. Zinc abundances in Galactic bulge field red giants: Implications for damped Lyman-α systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Friaça, A. C. S.; da Silveira, C. R.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Zinc in stars is an important reference element because it is a proxy to Fe in studies of damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs), permitting a comparison of chemical evolution histories of bulge stellar populations and DLAs. In terms of nucleosynthesis, it behaves as an alpha element because it is enhanced in metal-poor stars. Abundance studies in different stellar populations can give hints to the Zn production in different sites. Aims: The aim of this work is to derive the iron-peak element Zn abundances in 56 bulge giants from high resolution spectra. These results are compared with data from other bulge samples, as well as from disk and halo stars, and damped Lyman-α systems, in order to better understand the chemical evolution in these environments. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using FLAMES+UVES on the Very Large Telescope. We computed the Zn abundances using the Zn i lines at 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. We considered the strong depression in the continuum of the Zn i 6362.34 Å line, which is caused by the wings of the Ca i 6361.79 Å line suffering from autoionization. CN lines blending the Zn i 6362.34 Å line are also included in the calculations. Results: We find [Zn/Fe] = +0.24 ± 0.02 in the range -1.3 < [Fe/H] < -0.5 and [Zn/Fe] = + 0.06 ± 0.02 in the range -0.5 < [Fe/H] < -0.1, whereas for [Fe/H] ≥ -0.1, it shows a spread of -0.60 < [Zn/Fe] < + 0.15, with most of these stars having low [Zn/Fe] < 0.0. These low zinc abundances at the high metallicity end of the bulge define a decreasing trend in [Zn/Fe] with increasing metallicities. A comparison with Zn abundances in DLA systems is presented, where a dust-depletion correction was applied for both Zn and Fe. When we take these corrections into account, the [Zn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] of the DLAs fall in the same region as the thick disk and bulge stars. Finally, we present a chemical evolution model of Zn enrichment in massive spheroids, representing a typical classical bulge evolution

  15. Factors influencing the abundance of pests in production fields and rates of interception of Dracaena marginata imported from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Eduardo; Benjamin, Tamara; Casanoves, Fernando; Sadof, Clifford

    2013-10-01

    Importation of live nursery plants, like Dracaena marginata Lamoureux (Ruscaceae), can provide a significant pathway for the entry of foliar pests from overseas into the United States. We studied the abundance of foliar pests of quarantine importance found on Costa Rican-grown D. marginata. These include five genera of leafhoppers (Heteroptera: Cicadellidae, Oncometopia, Caldweliola, Diestostema, Cypona, and Empoasca), Florida red scale (Heteroptera: Disapididae, Chrysomphalus aoinidum (L.)), katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), and a snail (Succinea costarricana von Martens (Gastropoda, Stylommatophora, Succineidae)). In our first study, we examined the rationale behind size restrictions on Dracaena cuttings imported into the United States from Costa Rica. When comparing plant size, no differences were found in the abundance of quarantined pests on small (15-46 cm), medium (46-81 cm), and large (81-152 cm) propagules. In a second study, we estimated monthly abundances of pests in production plots for 1 yr to determine their relationship to rates of interception at U.S. ports. In any given month, < 6% of the marketable shoots standing in the field were infested with at least one quarantine pest. There was no relationship between the average monthly frequencies of pest detection in the field and in U.S. inspection ports. Pest detections increased during the 1 mo when average monthly shipments were abnormally high. Our data suggest that off-shore postprocessing efforts to remove pest-infested material from the market stream need to be adjusted to accommodate sharp increases in the volume of shipped plants. PMID:24224243

  16. Activity, distribution, and abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the near surface soils of onshore oil and gas fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Tang, Yuping; Ren, Chun; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Wanmeng; Sun, Yongge

    2013-09-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but the ecological characteristics of MOB in hydrocarbon microseep systems are still poorly understood. In this study, the activity, distribution, and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic communities in the surface soils underlying an oil and gas field were investigated using biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques. Measurements of potential methane oxidation rates and pmoA gene copy numbers showed that soils inside an oil and gas field are hot spots of methane oxidation and MOB abundance. Correspondingly, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of pmoA genes also revealed considerable differences in the methanotrophic community composition between oil and gas fields and the surrounding soils. Principal component analysis ordination furthermore indicated a coincidence between elevated CH4 oxidation activity and the methanotrophic community structure with type I methanotrophic Methylococcus and Methylobacter, in particular, as indicator species of oil and gas fields. Collectively, our results show that trace methane migrated from oil and gas reservoirs can considerably influence not only the quantity but also the structure of the methanotrophic community. PMID:23090054

  17. Ostrinia nubilalis parasitism and the field abundance of non-target insects in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Bourguet, Denis; Chaufaux, Josette; Micoud, Annie; Delos, Marc; Naibo, Bernard; Bombarde, Fany; Marque, Gilles; Eychenne, Nathalie; Pagliari, Carine

    2002-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated in field trials the effects on non-target species, of transgenic corn producing the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In 1998, we collected Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) larvae from transgenic Bt corn (Novartis Hybrid 176) and non-Bt corn at four geographical sites. We found a significant variation in parasitism by the tachinids Lydella thompsoni (Herting) and Pseudoperichaeta nigrolineata (Walker) among sites, and more parasitism in non-Bt than in Bt fields. The Bt effect did not vary significantly among fields. In 1999, we performed a field experiment at two sites, comparing the temporal abundance of non-target arthropods in Bt corn (Monsanto Hybrid MON810) and non-Bt corn. The non-target insects studied included the aphids Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker), Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) and Sitobion avenae (F.), the bug Orius insidiosus (Say), the syrphid Syrphus corollae (Meigen), the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata (L.), the lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens), thrips and hymenopteran parasitoids. For all species but one, the number of individuals varied greatly over the season but did not differ between the types of corn. The only exception was thrips which, at one site, was significantly more abundant in Bt corn than in non-Bt corn. However this difference did not remain significant when we took the multiple tests into account. Implications for pest resistance management, population dynamics and risk assessment are discussed. PMID:15612256

  18. Abundance analysis, spectral variability, and search for the presence of a magnetic field in the typical PGa star HD 19400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Castelli, F.; González, J. F.; Carroll, T. A.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Drake, N. A.; Korhonen, H.; Briquet, M.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out an abundance determination, to search for spectral variability and for the presence of a weak magnetic field in the typical PGa star HD 19400. High-resolution, high signal-to-noise High Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectropolarimetric observations of HD 19400 were obtained at three different epochs in 2011 and 2013. For the first time, we present abundances of various elements determined using an ATLAS12 model, including the abundances of a number of elements not analysed by previous studies, such as Ne I, Ga II, and Xe II. Several lines of As II are also present in the spectra of HD 19400. To study the variability, we compared the behaviour of the line profiles of various elements. We report on the first detection of anomalous shapes of line profiles belonging to Mn and Hg, and the variability of the line profiles belonging to the elements Hg, P, Mn, Fe, and Ga. We suggest that the variability of the line profiles of these elements is caused by their non-uniform surface distribution, similar to the presence of chemical spots detected in HgMn stars. The search for the presence of a magnetic field was carried out using the moment technique and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method. Our measurements of the magnetic field with the moment technique using 22 Mn II lines indicate the potential existence of a weak variable longitudinal magnetic field on the first epoch. The SVD method applied to the Mn II lines indicates = -76 ± 25 G on the first epoch, and at the same epoch the SVD analysis of the observations using the Fe II lines shows = -91 ± 35 G. The calculated false alarm probability values, 0.008 and 0.003, respectively, are above the value 10-3, indicating no detection.

  19. Relationship between Russian wheat aphid abundance and edaphic and topographic characteristics of wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study explores the spatial relationship between Russian wheat aphid population density and variation in edaphic or topographic factors within wheat fields. Multiple regression analysis was applied to data collected from six wheat fields located in three States, Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska....

  20. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded DAO spectrograms. I - The field horizontal-branch stars HD-64488, 109995 and 161817

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Hill, Graham

    1987-01-01

    It is possible to improve the quality of elemental-abundance analyses by using higher-S/N data than has been the practice at high resolution. The procedures developed at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory to coadd high-dispersion coude spectrograms are used with a minimum of 10 6.5-A/mm IIa-O spectrograms of each of three field hoorizontal-branch (FHB) A stars to increase the S/N of the photographic data over a considerable wavelength region. Fine analyses of the sharp-lined prototype FHB stars HD 109995 and 161817 show an internal consistency which justifies this effort. Their photospheric elemental abundances are similar to those of Population II globular cluster giants. As their photometric and spectrophotometric properties are similar to blue HB stars in such clusters, they are confirmed to be the brighter analogs of such stars. HD 64488, which is photometrically and spectrophotometrically similar to the FHB stars, is found to be metal-poor (Fe/H = -1) with much broader lines (v sin i = 147 km/s). The implications of the abundance anomalies of all three stars are discussed.

  1. Role of Anaerobic Ciliates in Planktonic Food Webs: Abundance, Feeding, and Impact on Bacteria in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Massana, Ramon; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    1994-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of two populations of anaerobic ciliates, Plagiopyla sp. and Metopus sp., and of their potential prey, heterotrophic and phototrophic purple bacteria, in Lake Cisó throughout a 1-year cycle. The abundance of both ciliates was very low (less than 2 individuals per ml). During mixing, Plagiopyla ciliates exhibited high clearance rates (about 100 nl ciliate-1 h-1), its integrated abundance increased with a net doubling time of 47 days, and its potential doubling times, as calculated from the number of bacteria consumed, ranged between 5 and 8 days. During stratification, the activity of Plagiopyla ciliates was reduced and the population decreased; this was related to the higher amounts of sulfide present. The impact of predation by the Plagiopyla population on bacterioplankton was found to be insignificant, less than 0.1% of bacterial biomass consumed per day. Thus, anaerobic ciliates cannot control the bacterioplankton in Lake Cisó because of both the low abundance over the period studied and the low feeding rates during certain periods. A review of available field studies suggests that this conclusion can be extrapolated to most other anoxic systems. PMID:16349239

  2. Effects of suspended matter quality and virus abundance on microbial parameters: experimental evidence from a large European river

    PubMed Central

    Kernegger, Lisa; Zweimüller, Irene; Peduzzi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In riverine water, both suspended particulate material and viruses are prominent ecological factors. The existence of various particle types and differences in viral abundance impose variability in microenvironments. Particulates and their microbial surrounding may interact in several ways, this interaction being strongly dependent on particle quality and the abundance of organisms involved. In laboratory experiments, we used different suspended matter types (fresh and aged mineral sediment and leaf litter, river snow) that typically occur in riverine environments as model particles. We investigated the effects of particle quality and different ambient viral abundances (×1, ×2 enrichments, and inactivated viruses) on several microbial parameters (changes in bacterial and viral abundances, bacterial production, specific bacterial production) of both the free-living and particle-attached fractions using water from a floodplain system of the Danube River (Austria). Both seston quality and variable viral abundances in the bulk water influenced some microbial parameters. The average abundance of bacteria and viruses was significantly higher on organic than on inorganic particles and on aged particles (for both sediment and leaf litter). Changes in bacterial abundance during the course of the experiments were also influenced by particle quality, with, for example, aged sediment favoring increasing abundances. Virus:bacterium ratios (VBR) were significantly higher on organic than on inorganic particles, but significantly lower on suspended particles than in the plank-tonic fraction. Typically, bacterial secondary production (overall and cell-specific) was higher on particles than in bulk water. Bacterial productivity in the ambient water was negatively affected by the abundance of planktonic viruses but positively affected by that of attached viruses. These findings from experimental systems may foster in situ studies of particle-rich environments. PMID:24707113

  3. Changes in abundance and community structure of nematodes from the abyssal polymetallic nodule field, Tropical Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutin, Dmitry; Miljutina, Maria; Messié, Monique

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea fields of polymetallic nodules in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCFZ, tropical NE Pacific) are currently being investigated to assess their potential for commercial mining. During such mining, benthic communities will be inevitably disturbed or destroyed. Therefore, assessments of their standing stock and composition may be helpful for the future evaluation of possible impacts of commercial nodule exploitation. Analysis of nematode communities (at genus level) inhabiting the French license area of the CCFZ were studied based on data from the cruises NODINAUT (2004) and BIONOD (2012). The total nematode density was ca. 1.5-fold higher in 2012 as compared with 2004. This reflected a 2-2.5 times higher density of non-selective deposit-feeders (i.e. possessing a small buccal cavity without armature) in 2012 compared with 2004, whereas no significant differences between sampling periods were observed in the density of the other feeding groups. Consequently, whilst the list of the most abundant genera was identical, their relative abundances changed significantly. The relative abundance of the genus Thalassomonhystera was two times greater in 2012 than in 2004, whereas the relative abundances of the genera Acantholaimus and Theristus were significantly lower in 2012 (10% and 4%, respectively) than in 2004 (28% and 9%). Nematode diversity (including values of diversity indices and total number of recorded genera) was significantly lower in 2012 in comparison with 2004. Although our data do not take into account seasonal and shorter temporal scales of variability in nematode assemblages, we report here that a certain fraction of variations observed between the two sampling periods could be associated with differences in primary production. Future studies should aim to better characterise temporal variability in nematode communities of the CCFZ at seasonal and interannual scales.

  4. Abundant stable gauge field hair for black holes in anti-de Sitter space.

    PubMed

    Baxter, J E; Helbling, Marc; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2008-01-11

    We present new hairy black hole solutions of SU(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) theory in asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. These black holes are described by N+1 independent parameters and have N-1 independent gauge field degrees of freedom. Solutions in which all gauge field functions have no zeros exist for all N, and for a sufficiently large (and negative) cosmological constant. At least some of these solutions are shown to be stable under classical, linear, spherically symmetric perturbations. Therefore there is no upper bound on the amount of stable gauge field hair with which a black hole in AdS can be endowed. PMID:18232751

  5. The Chlorine Abundance of Earth: Evidence for Early Atmospheric Loss and Creation of a Life-Supporting Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Draper, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth abundance of the heavier halogens, Cl, Br and I, are significantly depleted relative to expected values based on CI chondrites and solar abundances. The cause of these ‘selective’ depletions may be related to 1) far greater volatility than previously assumed; 2) a hidden reservoir on Earth; 3) selective loss of the halogens during planetary accretion. The volatility of an element is related to its temperature of condensation from the cooling solar nebula. The high condensation temperature of Cl is based on sodalite crystallization at ~800 K (10-4 bar), but even if sodalite formation is kinetically impeded at such low pressures, NaCl (g) should condense to NaCl (s) at only slightly lower temperatures. An unreasonably low condensation temperature of ~200 K would be needed to explain Earth’s concentration of halogens. A second possibility for the apparent Earth depletion is that Cl is strongly partitioned into the core. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally measuring Cl partitioning between basalt and Fe (and Fe95.5S4.5) at high pressures and temperatures. Samples were doped with trace FeCl2 as a Cl source. The measured D (Cl) metal-basalt is less than 0.01 under all conditions, ruling out the possibility of a Cl sink in the core. We propose instead that the halogens were lost during the late giant bombardment stage of planetary accretion. The selective loss of the halogens relative to other elements with similar condensation temperatures is explained by their unique hydrophilic character. Early in Earth’s history, halogens were strongly partitioned into the ocean/surficial environment. They were then removed by atmospheric erosion associated with giant impacts towards the end of planetary accretion. Our results provide independent evidence for multiple atmospheric-loss events, a controversial conclusion that is at odds with some geophysical studies. Over 90% of Cl was lost in early Earth history. Today, the oceans host nearly half of Earth

  6. Impact of close habitat on the entomological diversity and abundance in carrot open fields.

    PubMed

    Colignon, P; Gaspar, C; Haubruge, E; Francis, F

    2002-01-01

    Vegetable open fields areas have been increasing for the last decade in Wallonia (South part of Belgium), mainly in Hesbaye. To be in accordance with quality standards, especially in terms of agrochemical residues (R.M.L.), biological pest control was developed and reduces the insecticide use, leading to have safer fresh products. Carrot represents an important cultivated species in Wallonia. To asses the impact of close habitat on both pest (mainly aphids) and beneficial insects, carrot fields were investigated during all the production duration in 2000. Twelve fields between Waremme and Hannut were visited weekly from June to October. Insects were caught using yellow traps and determined to the family level. Approximately 90,000 insects belonging to 109 families were identified. Significant differences linked to field closed habitat were observed on 31 families. An increase of biodiversity in term of family number near set-asides and woody borders was observed. Evaluation of pest and beneficial diversity and density in vegetable crops was discussed to promote future IPM program. PMID:12696415

  7. Direct evidence that density-dependent regulation underpins the temporal stability of abundant species in a diverse animal community

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how ecosystems are structured and stabilized, and to identify when communities are at risk of damage or collapse, we need to know how the abundances of the taxa in the entire assemblage vary over ecologically meaningful timescales. Here, we present an analysis of species temporal variability within a single large vertebrate community. Using an exceptionally complete 33-year monthly time series following the dynamics of 81 species of fishes, we show that the most abundant species are least variable in terms of temporal biomass, because they are under density-dependent (negative feedback) regulation. At the other extreme, a relatively large number of low abundance transient species exhibit the greatest population variability. The high stability of the consistently common high abundance species—a result of density-dependence—is reflected in the observation that they consistently represent over 98% of total fish biomass. This leads to steady ecosystem nutrient and energy flux irrespective of the changes in species number and abundance among the large number of low abundance transient species. While the density-dependence of the core species ensures stability under the existing environmental regime, the pool of transient species may support long-term stability by replacing core species should environmental conditions change. PMID:25100702

  8. Yeast hydrolysate supplementation increases field abundance and persistence of sexually mature sterile Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O L; Orchard, B A; Collins, S R; Taylor, P W

    2014-04-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a non-chemical approach used to control major pests from several insect families, including Tephritidae, and entails the mass-release of sterile insects that reduce fertility of wild populations. For SIT to succeed, released sterile males must mature and compete with wild males to mate with wild females. To reach sexual maturity, the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) (Diptera: Tephritidae), must obtain adequate nutrition after adult emergence; however, in current SIT programs sterile B. tryoni receive a pre-release diet that lacks key nutrients required to sustain sexual development. The chief objective of this study was to determine whether pre-release yeast hydrolysate (YH) supplements affect the persistence and abundance of sexually mature sterile male B. tryoni under field conditions. Experiments were run in outdoor cages under conditions of low and high environmental stress that differed markedly in temperature and humidity, and in the field. Under low environmental stress conditions, survival of sterile B. tryoni was monitored in cages under three diet treatments: (i) sugar only, (ii) sugar plus YH or (iii) sugar plus YH for 48 h and sugar only thereafter. Under high environmental stress conditions survival of sterile B. tryoni was monitored in cages under four diet treatments: (i) white sugar only, (ii) brown sugar only, (iii) white sugar plus YH and (iv) brown sugar plus YH. In a replicated field study, we released colour-marked sterile B. tryoni from two diet regimes, YH-supplemented or YH-deprived, and monitored abundance of sexually mature males. In the low-stress cage study, there was no effect of diet, although overall females lived longer than males. In the high stress cage study, mortality was lower for YH-fed flies than YH-deprived flies and females lived longer than males. In the field, YH supplementation resulted in higher abundance of sexually mature sterile males, with 1.2 YH-fed flies

  9. Field trials of line transect methods applied to estimation of desert tortoise abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, David R.; Burnham, Kenneth P.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Thomas, L. E. N.; Corn, Paul Stephen; Medica, Philip A.; Marlow, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the degree to which field observers can meet the assumptions underlying line transect sampling to monitor populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). We present the results of 2 field trials using artificial tortoise models in 3 size classes. The trials were conducted on 2 occasions on an area south of Las Vegas, Nevada, where the density of the test population was known. In the first trials, conducted largely by experienced biologists who had been involved in tortoise surveys for many years, the density of adult tortoise models was well estimated (-3.9% bias), while the bias was higher (-20%) for subadult tortoise models. The bias for combined data was -12.0%. The bias was largely attributed to the failure to detect all tortoise models on or near the transect centerline. The second trials were conducted with a group of largely inexperienced student volunteers and used somewhat different searching methods, and the results were similar to the first trials. Estimated combined density of subadult and adult tortoise models had a negative bias (-7.3%), again attributable to failure to detect some models on or near the centerline. Experience in desert tortoise biology, either comparing the first and second trials or in the second trial with 2 experienced biologists versus 16 novices, did not have an apparent effect on the quality of the data or the accuracy of the estimates. Observer training, specific to line transect sampling, and field testing are important components of a reliable survey. Line transect sampling represents a viable method for large-scale monitoring of populations of desert tortoise; however, field protocol must be improved to assure the key assumptions are met.

  10. Group II Xenoliths from Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Central Nevada: Evidence for a Kinked Geotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, M.; Mosely, J.; Norris, J.

    2015-12-01

    Group II xenoliths associated with the 140 Ka Easy Chair Crater, Lunar Crater volcanic field, NV, consist of amphibole rich-inclusions including amphibolites, pyroxenites, and gabbros. Abundant minerals in these inclusions are kaersutite, aluminous (7.3-9.7 wt% Al2O3), calcic clinopyroxene, primarily diopside, and olivine (Mg# 69-73) with accessory spinel, sulfide and apatite. Although most apatites are fluor-hydroxyapatite solid solutions, one xenolith contains Cl- and OH-rich apatite suggesting that Cl may have been an important constituent in the parent magma(s) . The xenoliths show abundant evidence for equilibration at relatively low temperatures including amphibole and orthopyroxene exsolution in clinopyroxene, and granules of magnetite in hercynite hosts. If latter texture is due to exsolution, then this particular Group II xenolith equilibrated at temperatures near or below 500oC or at a depth of about 15 km along a conductive geotherm. It may be that all the Group II xenoliths equilibrated at low temperatures given the abundant exsolution textures although Fe-Mg exchange relations suggest equilibration at temperatures in excess of 800oC. Low equilibration temperatures are in conflict with the unusually high equilibration temperatures, >1200oC (Smith, 2000) displayed by Group I xenoliths from this same volcanic field. Taken at face value, the geothermometric results indicate unusually high temperatures in the upper mantle, normal temperatures in the crust and the possibility of a kinked geotherm in the region. Curiously the LCVF lies in an area of "normal" heat flow, south of the Battle Mountain area of high heat flow but the number of heat flow measurements in the Lunar Crater area is very low (Humphreys et al., 2003; Sass, 2005). References: Humphreys et al., 2003, Int. Geol. Rev. 45: 575; Sass et al., 2005, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1207/; Smith, 2000, JGR 105: 16769.

  11. Field Abundance Patterns and Odor-Mediated Host Choice by Clover Seed Weevils, Apion fulvipes and Apion trifolii (Coleoptera: Apionidae).

    PubMed

    Nyabuga, Franklin N; Carrasco, David; Ranåker, Lynn; Andersson, Martin N; Birgersson, Göran; Larsson, Mattias C; Lundin, Ola; Rundlöf, Maj; Svensson, Glenn P; Anderbrant, Olle; Lankinen, Åsa

    2015-04-01

    The clover seed weevils Apion fulvipes Geoffroy, 1785 and Apion trifolii L., 1768 (Coleoptera: Apionidae) cause major losses to seed production of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), respectively. Clover is important as animal forage and an alternative to inorganic fertilizers. Because clover is mainly pollinated by bees, the use of insecticides in management of these weevils is discouraged. To gain basic knowledge for development of alternative management strategies, we investigated weevil field abundance over two growing seasons, as well as feeding and olfactory host preferences by A. fulvipes and A. trifolii. Field trap catches in southern Sweden revealed that white clover was dominated by A. fulvipes and red clover by A. trifolii. For both weevil species, female catches were positively correlated to the number of clover buds and flowers in the field. In feeding and olfactory bioassays, females of A. fulvipes and A. trifolii showed a preference for T. repens and T. pratense, respectively. However, the feeding preference was lost when the antennae were removed, indicating a significant role of olfaction in host choice. Male weevils of both species did not show clear olfactory or feeding preferences for host plant species. The field study and laboratory bioassays demonstrate that, at least for female weevils, olfaction is important for selection of host plants. We discuss these novel results in the context of managing these important pests of clover by exploiting olfaction and behavioral attraction to host plant volatiles. PMID:26470160

  12. Evidence, explanations, and recommendations for teachers' field trip strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebar, Bryan

    their practices. A subset of eight teachers were interviewed using guided conversations in order to shed further light on their use of the aquarium field trip and their pedagogical preparation. Data from all sources were organized by repeating ideas relevant to the questions of interest. The resulting evidence was interpreted to support distinct categories of teacher strategies and experience and related claims about these strategies and experiences. Thus, findings reveal that teachers attempt to link the curriculum to the activities, resources, and content encountered on the trip using a variety of connections. However, these curriculum connections are characterized as products of opportunistic situations and reveal limited depth. Evidence further indicates that teachers treat the aquarium visit as a background experience for their students rather than as an opportunity to introduce new concepts or do an activity that is integrated into the curriculum. Nevertheless, teachers included in this study were leading field trips that created countless learning opportunities for their students. Because training specific to field trips is rarely included in preservice programs, teachers were asked about influences on their field trip practice with specific focus on observed strategies. Findings suggest four categories of training experiences that teachers apply to their practice: (1) informal mentoring; (2) past experience trip leading; (3) outdoor education training; (4) traditional education training. Overall findings along with a review of previous research are suggestive of many ways in which efforts to enhance students' learning opportunities may be developed by means of support for teachers. Foremost among recommendations is the idea that field trip pedagogy be integrated into science methods courses required for preservice teachers (the premise for the final manuscript). Furthermore, the findings of this study may serve as a starting point for museums interested in the

  13. An assessment of field evidence for `Byerlee' friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    1994-09-01

    Structural analyses of the angles of frictional ‘lock-up’ for fault sets that have become progressively misoriented, together with field observations from seismology, geomorphology, and borehole stress measurements, suggest that Byerlee friction coefficients (0.6<μ<0.85) are widely applicable to natural sliding surfaces with displacements of up to a few kilometres in the upper crust, from the surface of the earth to seismogenic depths. Extensional normal faults operating under presumed vertical trajectories of extreme compressive stress provide some of the best evidence for frictional lock-up followed by the initiation of new favorably oriented faults, but similar lock-up phenomena also occur in thrust and strike-slip fault systems. However, extensional detachments which appear to have formed and remained active at very low dips (<15°) lie well outside the dip range of currently active normal faults, requiring stress trajectories that deviate significantly from the vertical and horizontal during their initiation and perhaps also during their continued reactivation. Other conspicuous exceptions to the pattern of frictional lock-up expected from Byerlee friction are major transform structures, such as the San Andreas fault in California, which remain active though oriented at high angles to the maximum principal compression. On the basis of the evidence afforded by the lower displacement faults, the apparent weakness of such structures seems most likely to arise from locally elevated fluid pressure, rather than from the presence of anomalously low-friction material within the fault zones.

  14. The surface magnetic field and chemical abundance distributions of the B2V helium-strong star HD 184927

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, I.; Wade, G.; Bohlender, D.; Kochukhov, O.; Marcolino, W.; Shultz, M.; Monin, D.; Grunhut, J.; Sitnova, T.; Tsymbal, V.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    A new time series of high-resolution Stokes I and V spectra of the magnetic B2V star HD 184927 has been obtained in the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars Large Program with an Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars (ESPaDOnS) spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and dimaPol liquid crystal spectropolarimeter at 1.8-m telescope of Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. We model the optical and UV spectrum obtained from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive to infer the stellar physical parameters. Using magnetic field measurements, we derive an improved rotational period of 9.531 02 ± 0.0007 d. We infer the longitudinal magnetic field from lines of H, He, and various metals, revealing large differences between the apparent field strength variations determined from different elements. Magnetic Doppler Imaging using He and O lines yields strongly non-uniform surface distributions of these elements. We demonstrate that the diversity of longitudinal field variations can be understood as due to the combination of element-specific surface abundance distributions in combination with a surface magnetic field that is comprised of dipolar and quadrupolar components. We have reanalysed IUE high-resolution spectra, confirming strong modulation of wind-sensitive C IV and S IV resonance lines. However, we are unable to detect any modulation of the Hα profile attributable to a stellar magnetosphere. We conclude that HD 184927 hosts a centrifugal magnetosphere (η _*˜ 2.4^{+22}_{-1.1}× 104), albeit one that is undetectable at optical wavelengths. The magnetic braking time-scale of HD 184927 is computed to be τJ = 0.96 or 5.8 Myr. These values are consistent with the slow rotation and estimated age of the star.

  15. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN THE EXTERNALLY POLLUTED WHITE DWARF GD 40: EVIDENCE OF A ROCKY EXTRASOLAR MINOR PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, B.; Jura, M.; Zuckerman, B.; Melis, C.; Koester, D. E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.ed

    2010-02-01

    We present Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer data with model atmosphere analysis of the helium-dominated polluted white dwarf GD 40, in which we measure atmospheric abundances relative to helium of nine elements: H, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Apart from hydrogen, whose association with the other contaminants is uncertain, this material most likely accreted from GD 40's circumstellar dust disk whose existence is demonstrated by excess infrared emission. The data are best explained by accretion of rocky planetary material, in which heavy elements are largely contained within oxides, derived from a tidally disrupted minor planet at least the mass of Juno, and probably as massive as Vesta. The relatively low hydrogen abundance sets an upper limit of 10% water by mass in the inferred parent body, and the relatively high abundances of refractory elements, Ca and Ti, may indicate high-temperature processing. While the overall constitution of the parent body is similar to the bulk Earth being over 85% by mass composed of oxygen, magnesium, silicon, and iron, we find n(Si)/n(Mg) = 0.30 +- 0.11, significantly smaller than the ratio near unity for the bulk Earth, chondrites, the Sun, and nearby stars. This result suggests that differentiation occurred within the parent body.

  16. Ionization structure and chemical abundances of the Wolf-Rayet nebula NGC 6888 with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Martín-Gordón, D.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez Montero, E.; Riera, A.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The study of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars gives us clues about the mass-loss history of massive stars, as well as about the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: This work aims to search for the observational footprints of the interactions between the ISM and stellar winds in the WR nebula NGC 6888 in order to understand its ionization structure, chemical composition, and kinematics. Methods: We have collected a set of integral field spectroscopy observations across NGC 6888, obtained with PPAK in the optical range performing both 2D and 1D analyses. Attending to the 2D analysis in the northeast part of NGC 6888, we have generated maps of the extinction structure and electron density. We produced statistical frequency distributions of the radial velocity and diagnostic diagrams. Furthermore, we performed a thorough study of integrated spectra in nine regions over the whole nebula. Results: The 2D study has revealed two main behaviours. We have found that the spectra of a localized region to the southwest of this pointing can be represented well by shock models assuming n = 1000 cm-3, twice solar abundances, and shock velocities from 250 to 400 km s-1. With the 1D analysis we derived electron densities ranging from <100 to 360 cm-3. The electron temperature varies from ~7700 K to ~10 200 K. A strong variation of up to a factor 10 between different regions in the nitrogen abundance has been found: N/H appears lower than the solar abundance in those positions observed at the edges and very enhanced in the observed inner parts. Oxygen appears slightly underabundant with respect to solar value, whereas the helium abundance is found to be above it. We propose a scenario for the evolution of NGC 6888 to explain the features observed. This scheme consists of a structure of multiple shells: i) an inner and broken shell with material from the interaction between the supergiant and WR shells, presenting an overabundance in N/H and a

  17. Field Evidence for Magnetite Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.

    2015-12-01

    The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral magnetite resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced magnetite during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of magnetite in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for magnetite formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.

  18. Abundance of Zetaproteobacteria within crustal fluids in back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Sunamura, Michinari; Takano, Yoshinori; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Motoo; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Takuroh; Kobayashi, Kensei; Moroi, Arimichi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Marumo, Katsumi; Urabe, Tetsuro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    To extend knowledge of subseafloor microbial communities within the oceanic crust, the abundance, diversity and composition of microbial communities in crustal fluids at back-arc hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT) were investigated using culture-independent molecular techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Seafloor drilling was carried out at two hydrothermal fields, on- and off-ridge of the back-arc spreading centre of the SMT. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for bacterial and archaeal communities were constructed from the fluid samples collected from the boreholes. Phylotypes related to Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria (putative sulfide-oxidizers) and Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria (putative iron-oxidizers) were recovered from the fluid samples. A number of unique archaeal phylotypes were also recovered. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated the presence of active bacterial and archaeal populations in the fluids. The Zetaproteobacteria accounted for up to 32% of the total prokaryotic cell number as shown by FISH analysis using a specific probe designed in this study. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the Zetaproteobacteria play a role in iron oxidation within the oceanic crust. PMID:19691504

  19. Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinglin; An, Xinli; Li, Hu; Su, Jianqiang; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge and manure are common soil amendments in crop production; however, their impact on the abundance and diversity of the antibiotic resistome in soil remains elusive. In this study, by using high-throughput sequencing and high-throughput quantitative PCR, the patterns of bacterial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in a long-term field experiment were investigated to gain insights into these impacts. A total of 130 unique ARGs and 5 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected and the long-term application of sewage sludge and chicken manure significantly increased the abundance and diversity of ARGs in the soil. Genes conferring resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines, and multiple drugs were dominant in the samples. Sewage sludge or chicken manure applications caused significant enrichment of 108 unique ARGs and MGEs with a maximum enrichment of up to 3845 folds for mexF. The enrichment of MGEs suggested that the application of sewage sludge or manure may accelerate the dissemination of ARGs in soil through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Based on the co-occurrence pattern of ARGs subtypes revealed by network analysis, aacC, oprD and mphA-02, were proposed to be potential indicators for quantitative estimation of the co-occurring ARGs subtypes abundance by power functions. The application of sewage sludge and manure resulted in significant increase of bacterial diversity in soil, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were the dominant phyla (>10% in each sample). Five bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Bacteroidetes) were found to be significantly correlated with the ARGs in soil. Mantel test and variation partitioning analysis (VPA) suggested that bacterial community shifts, rather than MGEs, is the major driver shaping the antibiotic resistome. Additionally, the co-occurrence pattern between ARGs and microbial taxa revealed by network analysis indicated that four

  20. Unprecedented evidence for high viral abundance and lytic activity in coral reef waters of the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Payet, Jérôme P.; McMinds, Ryan; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite nutrient-depleted conditions, coral reef waters harbor abundant and diverse microbes; as major agents of microbial mortality, viruses are likely to influence microbial processes in these ecosystems. However, little is known about marine viruses in these rapidly changing ecosystems. Here we examined spatial and short-term temporal variability in marine viral abundance (VA) and viral lytic activity across various reef habitats surrounding Moorea Island (French Polynesia) in the South Pacific. Water samples were collected along four regional cross-reef transects and during a time-series in Opunohu Bay. Results revealed high VA (range: 5.6 × 106–3.6 × 107 viruses ml-1) and lytic viral production (range: 1.5 × 109–9.2 × 1010 viruses l-1 d-1). Flow cytometry revealed that viral assemblages were composed of three subsets that each displayed distinct spatiotemporal relationships with nutrient concentrations and autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial abundances. The results highlight dynamic shifts in viral community structure and imply that each of these three subsets is ecologically important and likely to infect distinct microbial hosts in reef waters. Based on viral-reduction approach, we estimate that lytic viruses were responsible for the removal of ca. 24–367% of bacterial standing stock d-1 and the release of ca. 1.0–62 μg of organic carbon l-1 d-1 in reef waters. Overall, this work demonstrates the highly dynamic distribution of viruses and their critical roles in controlling microbial mortality and nutrient cycling in coral reef water ecosystems. PMID:25295032

  1. Unprecedented evidence for high viral abundance and lytic activity in coral reef waters of the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Payet, Jérôme P; McMinds, Ryan; Burkepile, Deron E; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Despite nutrient-depleted conditions, coral reef waters harbor abundant and diverse microbes; as major agents of microbial mortality, viruses are likely to influence microbial processes in these ecosystems. However, little is known about marine viruses in these rapidly changing ecosystems. Here we examined spatial and short-term temporal variability in marine viral abundance (VA) and viral lytic activity across various reef habitats surrounding Moorea Island (French Polynesia) in the South Pacific. Water samples were collected along four regional cross-reef transects and during a time-series in Opunohu Bay. Results revealed high VA (range: 5.6 × 10(6)-3.6 × 10(7) viruses ml(-1)) and lytic viral production (range: 1.5 × 10(9)-9.2 × 10(10) viruses l(-1) d(-1)). Flow cytometry revealed that viral assemblages were composed of three subsets that each displayed distinct spatiotemporal relationships with nutrient concentrations and autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial abundances. The results highlight dynamic shifts in viral community structure and imply that each of these three subsets is ecologically important and likely to infect distinct microbial hosts in reef waters. Based on viral-reduction approach, we estimate that lytic viruses were responsible for the removal of ca. 24-367% of bacterial standing stock d(-1) and the release of ca. 1.0-62 μg of organic carbon l(-1) d(-1) in reef waters. Overall, this work demonstrates the highly dynamic distribution of viruses and their critical roles in controlling microbial mortality and nutrient cycling in coral reef water ecosystems. PMID:25295032

  2. Field evidence of two-phase abrasion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Szabo, T.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.

    2013-12-01

    The rounded shape of river rocks is clear evidence that abrasion due to bed load transport is a significant agent for mass loss. Its contribution to downstream fining, however, is typically assumed to be negligible - as diminution trends may be explained solely by size-selective transport. A recent theory has predicted that pebble abrasion occurs in two well separated phases: in Phase 1, an intially-polyhedral pebble rounds to the shape of an inscribed ellipsoid without any change in axis dimensions; in Phase II, axis dimensions are slowly reduced. Importantly, Phase I abrasion means that an initially-blocky pebble may lose up to half its mass without any apparent change in 'size', which is only measured as the length of a single pebble axis by most field researchers. We hypothesize that field studies have significantly underestimated the importance of abrasion because they do not quantify pebble shape, and we set out to demonstrate that two-phase abrasion occurs in a natural stream. Our study examines downstream trends in pebble size and shape along a 10-km stretch of the Rio Mameyes within the Luquillo Critical Zone observatory, where volcaniclastic cobbles and boulders are transported by bed load at slopes up to 10%. The upper reaches of the stream consist of alluviated bedrock valleys that preclude sediment storage and thus minimize size-selective transport, which allows us to isolate the effects of abrasion. The lower 5 km is an alluvial river in which size-selective transport becomes operative. We quantified the shape and size of thousands of pebbles along the profile using hand and image-based techniques. The data provide the first field validation of two-phase abrasion; in the bedrock reaches, pebbles clearly evolve toward ellipsoids without any significant change in axis dimensions (rounding), while in the lower reaches pebbles slowly reduce their axis dimensions with little or no change in roundness. Results also show that shape metrics determined from

  3. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  4. Geomagnetic field behaviour preceding a Superchron: new evidence for a weak Devonian geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L.; Anwar, T.; Scherbakova, V.; Biggin, A. J.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Shatsillo, A.; Holt, J.; Pavlov, V.

    2015-12-01

    The ~50 million year transition from the peak in reversal frequency in the Middle Jurassic (~170Ma), associated with a weak geomagnetic field, to the stable and apparently strong field during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (84-121Ma), represents a dramatic change in time-averaged geomagnetic field behaviour during the Mesozoic Era. New evidence from Siberian samples suggests there is a similar transition in geomagnetic field behaviour during the Palaeozoic, with a weak geomagnetic field in the Upper Devonian preceding the Permo-Carboniferous Superchron (262-318Ma). Both sites, the Viluy Traps and the Zharovsk complex of the Patom Margin, have seemingly reliable, published palaeomagnetic directions and new age constraints, 364.4 ± 1.7Ma (40Ar/39A) 371-377Ma (U-Pb) respectively. The samples were measured using the Thermal Thellier-Coe protocol with partial thermo-remanent magnetisation (pTRM) and tail checks and the Microwave Thellier-IZZI protocol with pTRM checks. Accepted Arai plots show positive pTRM checks, a clear relation between distinct primary directional and palaeointensity components and little to no zig-zagging. Three distinct magneto-mineralogical types were identified from SEM and rock magnetic techniques; low Ti- and intermediate Ti- titanomagnetite and possible maghemite, with mineral type affecting the success rate of samples but resulting in no significant variation in palaeointensity results. The Arai plots also commonly have a distinct two-slope concave-up shape, although non-heating, pseudo-Thellier experiments have supported this resulting from a strong overprint component rather than alteration or multi-domain effects. Results from these experiments give low site mean values between 2.3-29.9μT (Virtual Dipole Moments 4-50.6 ZAm2). The apparently periodic (~180 million years) transitions in geomagnetic field behaviour may indicate the influence of mantle convection changing heat flow across the Core Mantle Boundary.

  5. Differing Abundances of Gypsum in the Primary and Secondary Dunes of the Martian Dune Field Olympia Undae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumila, I. T.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; Brown, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on a compositional study in Olympia Undae, located around the polar cap of Mars. Gypsum has been detected throughout the sand sea but with a decline in abundance westward (Langevin et al., 2005). Dune crests are the regions of highest apparent gypsum concentration in CRISM images. Olympia Undae consists of primary dunes formed transverse to circumpolar easterly winds and secondary dunes which lie almost orthogonal to the primary dunes (Ewing et al. 2010). METHODS: We examined a number of CRISM and HiRISE images across the dune field. We focused our preliminary study on FRT0000C31A and FRT0000C2FC, which exhibited the best spectral signatures. Gypsum was identified in CRISM images by its unique 1.45/1.49/1.54 μm triplet, ~1.94-1.95 μm band, 2.22/2.27 μm doublet and 2.49 μm band with a 2.42 μm shoulder. Spectra were acquired from regions of interest (ROIs) created along the crests of primary dunes and the low-relief crests of the secondary dunes (Fig. 1). FINDINGS: CRISM spectra of primary and secondary dune crest ROIs from FRT0000C2FC are compared with a gypsum-rich unit in FRT0000CA5C (Fig. 2). The I/F of gypsum-bearing regions is much darker than pure gypsum indicating a mixture composition containing darker components. The depth of the ~1.95 μm hydration band is ~20-30% stronger for primary dune crests relative to the secondaries, which suggests a similar relationship among the gypsum abundance of these features, assuming similar components and grain sizes. Semi-quantitative analyses are underway to measure this in more detail. Continuing studies are planned with additional images as well. Figure 1 A map-projected view of CRISM image FRT0000C2FC with ROI locations for the primary (P) and secondary (S) dune crests marked. Figure 2 CRISM I/F spectra of gypsum-bearing units in Olympia Undae compared with laboratory reflectance spectra of minerals.

  6. Field population abundance of leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadelidae) and planthopper (Homoptera: Delphacidae) as affected by rice growth stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizal, M. M.; Idris, A. B.

    2013-11-01

    The leafhopper (Homoptera: Delphacidae) and planthopper (Homoptera: Cicadelidae) are considered as important rice pest in Asia including Malaysia. As phloem-feeders, they can cause loss to rice growth development and their population abundance is thought to be influenced by rice growth stages. This study was conducted to examine the population of Delphacidae and Cicadelidae between different rice growth stages, i.e. before and after rice planting periods. Monthly sampling was conducted in three sites in Kuala Selangor at before planting, vegetative, reproductive, maturing stages and post-harvest period using sweeping net and light traps. Population abundance of Delphacidae and Cicadelidae were found to be significantly different and positively correlated with different rice growth stages (p<0.05). Delphacidae was most abundance during maturing stages, while the abundance of Cicadelidae peaked during reproductive stage of rice growth. Differences in temporal abundance of the population of these two homopterans indicated adaptive feeding strategy to reduce food competition.

  7. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    younger clusters. The O abundances in the younger clusters are significantly larger than those seen in H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supergiants. It is suggested, and supported with observational evidence, that this may be due to incomplete stellar models and the possibility that a significant fraction of O in gaseous nebulae is locked up in dust grains. Examining our results in a broader sense, we suggest that: a) the formation of the Galactic halo was a slow process but b) did not involve the merger of independent "fragments" c) Type Ia supernovae are dominated by CO-He white dwarf systems having Fe production timescales of a few Gyr d) The hiatus between the end of halo formation and the beginning of star formation in the disk, possibly required if CO-He white dwarfs are the dominant source of Type Ia supernovae, may be confirmed as the observed gap in the [O/H] distribution e) The long timescale (10^9 - 10^10 yr) of Fe production by CO-He white dwarf systems is also seen to be consistent with the lack of any correlation between age and [Fe/H] in our open cluster sample and the large scatter present in the [Fe/H] vs. age relations for field stars. (SECTION: Dissertation Summaries)

  8. Earthquake Rupture Complexity Evidence from Field Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Teran, O.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations provide strong evidence for four intriguing aspects of rupture process complexity for the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah - Indiviso earthquake. First, the southern “fork” of the rupture exhibits two splays just to the northwest of the event epicenter, both with nearly pure right-lateral faulting. Teleseismic source modeling by others indicates normal slip on deep fault surface preceded the shallow strike-slip faulting, and our field observations from the fork area indicate that the earliest phase of strike-slip faulting did not involve a significant normal faulting component. Second, as rupture propagated to the northwest along the Pescadores fault, slip ended abruptly on this fault and transferred across a complex zone to the Borrego fault (although the Pescadores fault continues farther and would have seemed an easier route to follow). This stepover is called the Puerta Accommodation Zone (PAZ) which extends 11 km along-strike within an elevated portion of the Cucapah massif and accommodates a left step (transpressional) that measures less than 2 km across-strike. Though partly obscured by rockfalls in the steep terrain here, only discontinuous faulting of up to one meter reached the ground surface, yet imagery differencing by others indicates several meters of continuous subsurface slip throughout this section. This 11 km region of reduced and discontinuous slip is one of the longest surface rupture jumps ever observed, with lengthy and continuous surface faulting on either side. The SE end of the stepover coincides spatially with the Canon Rojo embayment where the M7.2 1892 surface rupture propagated onto a second fault forming an abrupt corner in its surface trace. Hence, the surface rupture and slip distribution pattern in 2010 appears to have been influenced by stress changes induced by the 1892 event. Thirdly, from the NW end of the transition section, the Borrego fault continues to the NNW with strong east-down slip obliquity. Along

  9. Radial Trends in IMF-sensitive Absorption Features in Two Early-type Galaxies: Evidence for Abundance-driven Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Lu, Jessica R.; Mann, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of early-type galaxies show a correlation between stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as inferred from gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the galaxies’ central regions. To search for spatial variations in the IMF, we have observed two early-type galaxies with Keck/LRIS and measured radial gradients in the strengths of absorption features from 4000–5500 Å and 8000–10000 Å. We present spatially resolved measurements of the dwarf-sensitive spectral indices {Na} {{I}} (8190 Å) and Wing-Ford {{FeH}} (9915 Å), as well as indices for species of H, C2, CN, Mg, Ca, {{TiO}}, and Fe. Our measurements show a metallicity gradient in both objects, and Mg/Fe consistent with a shallow gradient in α-enhancement, matching widely observed trends for massive early-type galaxies. The {Na} {{I}} index and the CN1 index at 4160 Å exhibit significantly steeper gradients, with a break at r∼ 0.1 {r}{{eff}} (r∼ 300 pc). Inside this radius, {Na} {{I}} strength increases sharply toward the galaxy center, consistent with a rapid central rise in [Na/Fe]. In contrast, the ratio of the {{FeH}} to Fe index strength decreases toward the galaxy center. This behavior cannot be reproduced by a steepening IMF inside of 0.1 {r}{{eff}} if the IMF is a single power law. While gradients in the mass function above ∼ 0.4 {M}ȯ may occur, exceptional care is required to disentangle these IMF variations from the extreme variations in individual element abundances near the galaxies’ centers.

  10. Fire and nitrogen effects on Purple Threeawn (Aristida purpurea)abundance in northern mixed-grass prairie old fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purple threeawn (Aristida purpurea Nutt. varieties) is a native grass capable of increasing on rangelands, forming near monocultures, and creating a stable state. Productive rangelands throughout the Great Plains and Intermountain West have experienced increases in purple threeawn abundance, reduci...

  11. Effects of fertilization on microbial abundance and emissions of greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) in rice paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xianfang; Yu, Haiyang; Wu, Qinyan; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Yang, Jinghui; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2016-02-01

    This study is to explore effects of nitrogen application and straw incorporation on abundance of relevant microbes and CH 4 and N2O fluxes in a midseason aerated rice paddy field. Fluxes of CH 4 and N2O were recorded, and abundance of relevant soil microbial functional genes was determined during rice-growing season in a 6-year-long fertilization experiment field in China. Results indicate that application of urea significantly changed the functional microbial composition, while the influence of straw incorporation was not significant. Application of urea significantly decreased the gene abundances of archaeal amoA and mcrA, but it significantly increased the gene abundances of bacterial amoA. CH 4 emission was significantly increased by fresh straw incorporation. Incorporation of burnt straw tended to increase CH 4 emission, while the urea application had no obvious effect on CH 4 emission. N2O emission was significantly increased by urea application, while fresh or burnt straw incorporation tended to decrease N2O emission. The functional microbial composition did not change significantly over time, although the abundances of pmoA, archaeal amoA, nirS, and nosZ genes changed significantly. The change of CH 4 emission showed an inverse trend with the one of the N2O emissions over time. To some extent, the abundance of some functional genes in this study can explain CH 4 and N2O emissions. However, the correlation between CH 4 and N2O emissions and the abundance of related functional genes was not significant. Environmental factors, such as soil Eh, may be more related to CH 4 and N2O emissions. PMID:26811747

  12. Metal Abundances, Radial Velocities, and Other Physical Characteristics for the RR Lyrae Stars in The Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Sesar, Branimir; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans

    2013-08-01

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude δ Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 ± 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 ± 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ~-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-\\phi _31^s-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on ~970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg). Based in part on observations made at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. Also, based in part on

  13. Indirect Reciprocity, Resource Sharing, and Environmental Risk: Evidence from Field Experiments in Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Howe, E. Lance; Murphy, James J.; Gerkey, Drew; West, Colin Thor

    2016-01-01

    Integrating information from existing research, qualitative ethnographic interviews, and participant observation, we designed a field experiment that introduces idiosyncratic environmental risk and a voluntary sharing decision into a standard public goods game. Conducted with subsistence resource users in rural villages on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Northeast Siberia, we find evidence consistent with a model of indirect reciprocity and local social norms of helping the needy. When participants are allowed to develop reputations in the experiments, as is the case in most small-scale societies, we find that sharing is increasingly directed toward individuals experiencing hardship, good reputations increase aid, and the pooling of resources through voluntary sharing becomes more effective. We also find high levels of voluntary sharing without a strong commitment device; however, this form of cooperation does not increase contributions to the public good. Our results are consistent with previous experiments and theoretical models, suggesting strategic risks tied to rewards, punishments, and reputations are important. However, unlike studies that focus solely on strategic risks, we find the effects of rewards, punishments, and reputations are altered by the presence of environmental factors. Unexpected changes in resource abundance increase interdependence and may alter the costs and benefits of cooperation, relative to defection. We suggest environmental factors that increase interdependence are critically important to consider when developing and testing theories of cooperation PMID:27442434

  14. Indirect Reciprocity, Resource Sharing, and Environmental Risk: Evidence from Field Experiments in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Howe, E Lance; Murphy, James J; Gerkey, Drew; West, Colin Thor

    2016-01-01

    Integrating information from existing research, qualitative ethnographic interviews, and participant observation, we designed a field experiment that introduces idiosyncratic environmental risk and a voluntary sharing decision into a standard public goods game. Conducted with subsistence resource users in rural villages on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Northeast Siberia, we find evidence consistent with a model of indirect reciprocity and local social norms of helping the needy. When participants are allowed to develop reputations in the experiments, as is the case in most small-scale societies, we find that sharing is increasingly directed toward individuals experiencing hardship, good reputations increase aid, and the pooling of resources through voluntary sharing becomes more effective. We also find high levels of voluntary sharing without a strong commitment device; however, this form of cooperation does not increase contributions to the public good. Our results are consistent with previous experiments and theoretical models, suggesting strategic risks tied to rewards, punishments, and reputations are important. However, unlike studies that focus solely on strategic risks, we find the effects of rewards, punishments, and reputations are altered by the presence of environmental factors. Unexpected changes in resource abundance increase interdependence and may alter the costs and benefits of cooperation, relative to defection. We suggest environmental factors that increase interdependence are critically important to consider when developing and testing theories of cooperation. PMID:27442434

  15. Evidence-Based Practices in the Field of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An International Consensus Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Gomez, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    As evidence-based practices become increasingly advocated for and used in the human services field it is important to integrate issues raised by three perspectives on evidence: empirical-analytical, phenomenological-existential, and post-structural. This article presents and discusses an evidence-based conceptual model and measurement framework…

  16. Evidence, Explanations, and Recommendations for Teachers' Field Trip Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Field trips are well recognized by researchers as an educational approach with the potential to complement and enhance classroom science teaching by exposing students to unique activities, resources, and content in informal settings. The following investigation addresses teachers' field trip practices in three related manuscripts: (1) A study…

  17. Implementing Evidence-Based Programs: Lessons Learned from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jane; Maley, Mary; Purington, Amanda; Schantz, Karen; Dotterweich, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based programs (EBPs) are used in many health promotion efforts to ensure that the intended positive behavioral and health outcomes will be achieved. However, because EBPs are developed and tested in research settings, the contextual elements of real world implementation play an important role in their successful delivery in communities.…

  18. Abundant CH3OH Masers but no New Evidence for Star Formation in GCM0.253+0.016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, E. A. C.; Butterfield, N.; Ludovici, D. A.; Lang, C. C.; Ott, J.; Morris, M. R.; Schmitz, S.

    2015-05-01

    We present new observations of the quiescent giant molecular cloud GCM0.253+0.016 in the Galactic center, using the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Observations were made at wavelengths near 1 cm, at the K (24-26 GHz) and Ka (27 and 36 GHz) bands, with velocity resolutions of 1-3 km s-1 and spatial resolutions of ˜0.1 pc, at the assumed 8.4 kpc distance of this cloud. The continuum observations of this cloud are the most sensitive yet made, and reveal previously undetected emission which we attribute primarily to free-free emission from external ionization of the cloud. In addition to the sensitive continuum map, we produce maps of 12 molecular lines: 8 transitions of NH3-(1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (7, 7), and (9, 9), as well as the HC3N (3-2) and (4-3) lines, and CH3OH 4-1-30, the latter of which is known to be a collisionally excited maser. We identify 148 CH3OH 4-1-30 (36.2 GHz) sources, of which 68 have brightness temperatures in excess of the highest temperature measured for this cloud (400 K) and can be confirmed to be masers. The majority of these masers are concentrated in the southernmost part of the cloud. We find that neither these masers nor the continuum emission in this cloud provide strong evidence for ongoing star formation in excess of that previously inferred by the presence of an H2O maser.

  19. Natural hybrids in Atlantic eels (Anguilla anguilla, A. rostrata): evidence for successful reproduction and fluctuating abundance in space and time.

    PubMed

    Albert, Vicky; Jónsson, Bjarni; Bernatchez, Louis

    2006-06-01

    The outcome of natural hybridization is highly variable and depends on the nonexclusive effects of both pre- and post-mating reproductive barriers. The objective of this study was to address three specific questions regarding the dynamics of hybridization between the American and European eels (Anguilla rostrata and Anguilla anguilla). Using 373 AFLP loci, 1127 eels were genotyped, representing different life stages from both continents, as well as multiple Icelandic locations. We first evaluated the extent of hybridization and tested for the occurrence of hybrids beyond the first generation. Second, we tested whether hybrids were randomly distributed across continents and among Icelandic sampling sites. Third, we tested for a difference in the proportion of hybrids between glass eel and yellow eel stages in Iceland. Our results provided evidence for (i) an overall hybrid proportion of 15.5% in Iceland, with values ranging from 6.7% to 100% depending on life stages and locations; (ii) the existence of hybrids beyond the first generation; (iii) a nonrandom geographic distribution of hybrids in the North Atlantic; and (iv) a higher proportion of first and later generation hybrids in yellow eels compared to glass eels, as well as a significant latitudinal gradient in the proportion of hybrids in Icelandic freshwater. We propose that the combined effect of both differential survival of hybrids and variation in hybridization rate through time best explain these patterns. We discuss the possibility that climate change, which is impacting many environmental features in the North Atlantic, may have a determinant effect on the outcome of natural hybridization in Atlantic eels. PMID:16689906

  20. Nitrogen Deposition Reduces Plant Diversity and Alters Ecosystem Functioning: Field-Scale Evidence from a Nationwide Survey of UK Heathlands

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Georgina E.; Field, Christopher; Caporn, Simon J. M.; Britton, Andrea J.; Power, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from nitrogen (N) manipulation studies have provided strong evidence of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition on the structure and functioning of heathland ecosystems. Few studies, however, have sought to establish whether experimentally observed responses are also apparent under natural, field conditions. This paper presents the findings of a nationwide field-scale evaluation of British heathlands, across broad geographical, climatic and pollution gradients. Fifty two heathlands were selected across an N deposition gradient of 5.9 to 32.4 kg ha−1 yr−1. The diversity and abundance of higher and lower plants and a suite of biogeochemical measures were evaluated in relation to climate and N deposition indices. Plant species richness declined with increasing temperature and N deposition, and the abundance of nitrophilous species increased with increasing N. Relationships were broadly similar between upland and lowland sites, with the biggest reductions in species number associated with increasing N inputs at the low end of the deposition range. Both oxidised and reduced forms of N were associated with species declines, although reduced N appears to be a stronger driver of species loss at the functional group level. Plant and soil biochemical indices were related to temperature, rainfall and N deposition. Litter C:N ratios and enzyme (phenol-oxidase and phosphomonoesterase) activities had the strongest relationships with site N inputs and appear to represent reliable field indicators of N deposition. This study provides strong, field-scale evidence of links between N deposition - in both oxidised and reduced forms - and widespread changes in the composition, diversity and functioning of British heathlands. The similarity of relationships between upland and lowland environments, across broad spatial and climatic gradients, highlights the ubiquity of relationships with N, and suggests that N deposition is contributing to biodiversity loss and

  1. Numerical simulations of barnacle larval dispersion coupled with field observations on larval abundance, settlement and recruitment in a tropical monsoon influenced coastal marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Chetan A.; Samiksha, S. V.; George, Grinson; Aboobacker, V. M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2012-06-01

    Larval abundance in an area depends on various factors which operate over different spatial and temporal scales. Identifying the factors responsible for variations in larval supply and abundance is important to understand the settlement and recruitment variability of their population in a particular area. In view of this, observations were carried out to monitor the larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles on a regular basis for a period of two years. The results were then compared with the numerical modelling studies carried out along the west coast of India. Field observations of larval abundance showed temporal variations. The least abundance of larvae was mostly observed during the monsoon season and the peak in abundance was mostly observed during the pre-monsoon season. Numerical simulations also showed a seasonal change in larval dispersion and retention patterns. During pre-monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards south and the larvae released from the northern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuaries, whereas during the monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards north and the larvae released from southern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuary. During post-monsoon season, the larval movement was found towards the north in the beginning of the season and is shifted towards the south at the end of the season, but the movement was mostly restricted near to the release sites. Larval supply from the adjacent rocky sites to the estuaries was higher during the pre-monsoon season and the retention of larvae released from different sites within the estuaries was found to be highest during the late post-monsoon and early pre-monsoon season. Maximum larval supply and retention during the pre-monsoon season coincided with maximum larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles observed in the field studies. These observations showed that the pattern of

  2. Electric field evidence for tailward flow at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, A.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Mozer, F. S.; Cattell, C. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Birn, J.

    1983-01-01

    Electric field observations made near the neutral sheet of the magnetotail provide additional support for the view that reconnection occurs in the near-earth region of the tail. Southward turnings of the magnetic field that start at, or shortly after, substorm onsets are accompanied by enhancements in the dawn-to-dusk electric field, resulting in a tailward E x B drift velocity. Both the magnetic and the electric fields in the tailward-flowing plasma are nonuniform and vary with inferred spatial scales of several earth radii in the events examined in this paper. These nonuniformities may be the consequence of the tearing-mode process. The E x B flow was also towards the neutral sheet and away from midnight in the events studied.

  3. Response of Halimeda to ocean acidification: Field and laboratory evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, L.L.; Knorr, P.O.; Hallock, P.

    2009-01-01

    Rising atmospheric pCO2 levels are changing ocean chemistry more dramatically now than in the last 20 million years. In fact, pHvalues of the open ocean have decreased by 0.1 since the 1800s and are predicted to decrease 0.1-0.4 globally in the next 90 years. Ocean acidification will affect fundamental geochemical and biological processes including calcification and carbonate sediment production. The west Florida shelf is a natural laboratory to examine the effects of ocean acidification on aragonite production by calcareous green algae. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of crystal morphology of calcifying organisms reveals ultrastructural details of calcification that occurred at different saturation states. Comparison of archived and recent specimens of calcareous green alga Halimeda spp. from the west Florida shelf, demonstrates crystal changes in shape and abundance over a 40+ year time span. Halimeda crystal data from apical sections indicate that increases in crystal concentration and decreases in crystal width occurred over the last 40+ years. Laboratory experiments using living specimens of Halimeda grown in environments with known pH values were used to constrain historical observations. Percentages of organic and inorganic carbon per sample weight of pooled species did not significantly change. However, individual species showed decreased inorganic carbon and increased organic carbon in more recent samples, although the sample sizes were limited. These results indicate that the effect of increased pCO 2 and decreased pH on calcification is reflected in the crystal morphology of this organism. More data are needed to confirm the observed changes in mass of crystal and organic carbon. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  4. Response of Halimeda to ocean acidification: field and laboratory evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, L. L.; Knorr, P. O.; Hallock, P.

    2009-05-01

    Rising atmospheric pCO2 levels are changing ocean chemistry more dramatically now than in the last 20 million years. In fact, pH values of the open ocean have decreased by 0.1 since the 1800s and are predicted to decrease 0.1-0.4 globally in the next 90 years. Ocean acidification will affect fundamental geochemical and biological processes including calcification and carbonate sediment production. The west Florida shelf is a natural laboratory to examine the effects of ocean acidification on aragonite production by calcareous green algae. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of crystal morphology of calcifying organisms reveals ultrastructural details of calcification that occurred at different saturation states. Comparison of archived and recent specimens of calcareous green alga Halimeda spp. from the west Florida shelf, demonstrates crystal changes in shape and abundance over a 40+ year time span. Halimeda crystal data from apical sections indicate that increases in crystal concentration and decreases in crystal width occurred over the last 40+ years. Laboratory experiments using living specimens of Halimeda grown in environments with known pH values were used to constrain historical observations. Percentages of organic and inorganic carbon per sample weight of pooled species did not significantly change. However, individual species showed decreased inorganic carbon and increased organic carbon in more recent samples, although the sample sizes were limited. These results indicate that the effect of increased pCO2 and decreased pH on calcification is reflected in the crystal morphology of this organism. More data are needed to confirm the observed changes in mass of crystal and organic carbon.

  5. Social Work Field Instructors' Views and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Oxhandler, Holly K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a cross-sectional study of social work field instructors' views of and implementation of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and compares their responses with non-field instructors. A total of 688 National Association of Social Workers/Texas members (107 of which were field instructors) anonymously…

  6. Evidence for Subauroral Electric Fields from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor); Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.; Goldstein, J.; Sandel, B.

    2002-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission Extreme Ultraviolet Imager routinely provides global snapshots of the plasmasphere from high latitude. In these 10-minute images, intensity edges have been identified with the plasmapause and other strong gradients in plasmaspheric density. In addition to the classic sunward directed convection tail and its entrainment in corotation during storm-time recovery, the plasmapause boundary reveals a wide variety of structures thought to result from penetration of the solar wind induced convection electric field to subauroral latitudes. The so-called shoulder feature has most prominently been discussed in the context of under shielding in response to changes in the convection electric field strength. It is not yet clear whether all of the observed surface structures on the plasmasphere can be explained in this manner. The types of structures observed and their frequency of occurrence will be presented. A statistical view of these structures and associated solar wind conditions will also be presented.

  7. Geochemical evidence of drawdown in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Manon, M.A.; Jimenez, S.M.E.; Sanchez, A.A.; Fausto, L.J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Some wells of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field have undergone changes in the chemistry of fluids produced which reflect reservoir processes. Pressure decreases due to production in the southeastern part of the field have produced both drawdown of lower chloride fluids from an overlying aquifer and boiling in the aquifer with excess steam reaching the wells. These reservoir changes are indicated by changes in fluid chloride concentrations, Na/K ratios and measured enthalpies and by comparisons of aquifer fluid temperatures and chloride concentrations calculated from enthalpy and chemical measurements. Fluid temperatures have not been greatly affected by this drawdown because heat contained in the rock was transferred to the fluid. When this heat is exhausted, fluid temperatures may drop rapidly. ?? 1979.

  8. Late Ediacaran magnetostratigraphy of Baltica: Evidence for Magnetic Field Hyperactivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, Mikhail L.; Levashova, Natalia M.; Meert, Joseph G.; Golovanova, Inessa V.; Danukalov, Konstantin N.; Fedorova, Natalia M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-term changes in characteristics of the geomagnetic field may signal evolutionary changes within the Earth's interior. Among these long-term variations, the magnetic field reversal rate is probably the best known and most frequently used parameter to evaluate concomitant changes in the Earth's core. Although the reversal rate is well known for the last 150 Ma and reasonably constrained back to 300 Ma, knowledge of the early Paleozoic and earlier times is limited. Hence, the haunting question is whether the reversal pattern for the last 300 Myr is a good representation of the field behavior over a much longer interval. A paleomagnetic study of Upper Ediacaran sediments from the Zigan Fm. (Baltica in the western South Urals) revealed a high-temperature, dual-polarity component that is of primary origin (Levashova et al., 2013). In this paper, we present the results of a magnetostratigraphic study from the same sections that can be summed up as follows: 1) >30 magnetozones are found in the ca. 110 meters thick composite section of the Zigan Fm.; 2) A similar reversal pattern was reported from Upper Ediacaran sediments from the White Sea coast (North Russia) and SW Siberia but has never been found in clastic rocks of any other age; 3) The reversal pattern in three remote Ediacaran sections could not result from remagnetization or extremely slow sedimentation; 4) The reversal rate in the Late Ediacaran exceeded 20 reversals per million years; 5) The field appears to behave in a bipolar fashion during the period of hyperactivity.

  9. Electric field exposure and evidence of stress in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, L.; De Jager, L. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of stress induced by an electric field on the adrenal gland cortex of mice was examined by means of corticosterone serum assay and evaluation of the lipid profile of the different zones of the cortex. Six generations of experimental mice were exposed to a 10 kV/m electric field from conception and corresponding control groups were sham exposed. Mice were sacrificed at 35 days (n = 10), as adults (n = 20) and at 18 months (old mice) (n = 10). Blinded lipid estimates were performed on histological preparations of the adrenals, serum corticosterone levels were determined, and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean lipid volume in the zona glomerulosa of the exposed adult male group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.004). The median daytime corticosterone level of the exposed male mice was also significantly higher than that in the controls (P = 0.02). The lipid profiles and corticosterone values in the other subgroups did not differ significantly. As chronic stress increases the lipid volume of all the zones of the adrenal cortex and stimulates the zona glomerulosa to corticosterone secretion, the data suggest that the electric field acted as a chronic stressor in the adult male mice. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Laboratory and field evidence for long-term starvation survival of microorganisms in subsurface terrestrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Amy, P. S.; Haldeman, D. L.; Ringelberg, David B.; White, David C.

    1997-07-01

    Biogeochemical modeling of groundwater flow and nutrient flux in subsurface environments indicates that inhabitant microorganisms experience severe nutrient limitation. Using laboratory and field methods, we have been testing starvation survival in subsurface microorganisms. In microcosm experiments, we have shown that strains of two commonly isolated subsurface genera, Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas, are able to maintain viability in low-nutrient, natural subsurface sediments for over one year. These non- spore-forming bacteria undergo rapid initial miniaturization followed by a stabilization of cell size. Membrane lipid phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of the Pseudomonas are consistent with adaptation to nutrient stress; Arthrobacter apparently responds to nutrient deprivation without altering membrane PLFAs. To test survivability of microorganisms over a geologic time scale, we characterized microbial communities in a sequence of unsaturated sediments ranging in age from modern to > 780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass- balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the makeup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities. These and other studies provide evidence that microorganisms can survive nutrient limitation for geologic time periods.

  11. Evidences of the static magnetic field influence on cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Wendell Wagner Campos; Costa, Romero Marcos Pedrosa Brandão; Fernandes, Thiago de Salazar E; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2016-05-01

    Efforts to elucidate the doubtful character of the static magnetic field (SMF) influence on living cells have been made, although the topic still faces controversies because confusing reports in the scientific literature. This study intended to collect the most relevant issues separated by different topics (relating the SMF to its action on cellular systems) and analyze how the many field intensities, cell types and exposure time would affect the cell or intracellular structures. The analysis was based in the search in online databases aiming to give a general view of how the data can show conformity. It is proposed that scientists have been searching for linearity in what is actually a well characterized nonlinear system and two outputs are considered: the high sensitivity of parameters in which specific cell responses are generated and also the complexity and particularity of each cellular system. It is possible to trigger effects from a SMF, however in a stochastic way and depending on the cell system. PMID:26975790

  12. Magnetic fields in the ionospheric holes of Venus - Evidence for an intrinsic field?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The suggestion that the radial magnetic fields observed in the regions of depleted plasma density in the nightside Venus ionosphere arise from an intrinsic planetary field was recently made by Knudsen et al. (1982). In this report the polarities of these radial fields, as measured by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer, are examined in detail in order to determine if there is a geographical organization of the field polarity, or if the polarity of the radial field depends on the interplanetary field as previously proposed. The results of the data analysis indicate that a source in a planetary intrinsic field is unlikely.

  13. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  14. Field evidence for a hybrid interfacial-coseismic seismoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; Kulessa, B.; Pugin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In May, 2011, we carried out a field experiment in Leda Clay sediments near Ottawa, Canada to investigate whether seismoelectric conversions might be observed along with the clear P, S and PS converted waves regularly observed during near-surface seismic reflection surveys in that environment. Although high electrical conductivities (~10 Ωm below 6 m depth) were expected to result in weak electrical fields, we were encouraged by the availability of an IVI Minivib 1 vibroseis source, and by the presence of interfacial targets including the top of bedrock at ~23 m depth as well as porosity and textural changes within the overburden revealed by geotechnical logs. Seismic and seismoelectric shot records were acquired separately using both the MiniVib and an in-hole shotgun source. The recording system included 26 grounded dipoles, 4.5 m in length, all equipped with custom-made differential amplifiers. Harmonic subtraction, remote reference subtraction, and stacking of shot records were used to combat electrical noise levels associated with unstable powerline harmonics and apparent AM radio demodulation. Seismic and seismoelectric shot records bear a striking resemblance to each other; direct and refracted P-waves as well as P, S, and PS wave reflections all appear clearly in the seismoelectric records. At first glance, these would appear to be simply co-seismic seismoelectric effects. However, closer inspection reveals that some precede their corresponding seismic arrivals by several milliseconds, and exhibit broader bandwidths (up to 600 Hz) and better coherency. They are inferred to have been generated beneath each dipole receiver by upward travelling P and S-waves arriving at an interface, defined by contrasts in porosity and clay content, 7 m below the surface. These arrivals do not conform to either true co-seismic or true interfacial effects and therefore present a new challenge to our understanding of seismoelectric phenomena.

  15. Grades of Evidence: Variability in Quality of Findings in Effectiveness Studies of Complex Field Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Madhabi

    2007-01-01

    This article argues with a literature review that a simplistic distinction between strong and weak evidence hinged on the use of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the federal "gold standard" for generating rigorous evidence on social programs and policies, is not tenable with evaluative studies of complex, field interventions such as those…

  16. Comparing Soil and Bison δ13C to Field Estimates of C4 Plant Abundances in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D.; Still, C. J.; Cotton, J.; Powell, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope data (i.e., δ13C) from soils and herbivore tissue are commonly used as a proxy for the relative abundance of C4 and C3 plants at a site. These data are also increasingly used to represent other climatologically relevant properties of vegetated environments, such as productivity, aridity, water use efficiency, and tree cover. The δ13C values of soils and herbivore tissues are generally assumed to resemble their source vegetation, after accounting for diverse fractionation processes during litter decomposition and tissue metabolism and turnover. However, δ13C values have rarely been compared to source vegetation at a regional to continental scale. As a result, the quality of δ13C as a proxy has not been thoroughly evaluated, and the importance of modifying factors have not been assessed at biogeographically relevant scales. To address some of these issues, we combined three multi-source datasets from North America: herbaceous C4 plant abundances from thousands of vegetation plots, hundreds of soil δ13C measurements, and hundreds of bison collagen, hair, and enamel δ13C data (tissues with different turnover rates). These datasets were resampled to common grid for comparison. A stronger relationship with C4 vegetation existed for bison as compared to soil δ13C. To determine which factors might explain deviations in the vegetation plot and isotopic data, we used statistical models to quantify the influence of soil variables, mean annual precipitation and temperature, tree cover, presence of invasives, and fire frequency in conjunction with plot-based C4 abundance data. Our bison model was only improved by the addition of invasives. In contrast, our soil model was significantly improved when accounting for tree cover (C3 vegetation and shade), precipitation, various soil parameters, and invasive grasses, suggesting that soils are more likely to be biased from source vegetation in ways that could influence interpretation as a proxy at broad

  17. [Authentication of Trace Material Evidence in Forensic Science Field with Infrared Microscopic Technique].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-quan; Hu, Ke-liang

    2016-03-01

    In the field of forensic science, conventional infrared spectral analysis technique is usually unable to meet the detection requirements, because only very a few trace material evidence with diverse shapes and complex compositions, can be extracted from the crime scene. Infrared microscopic technique is developed based on a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic technique and microscopic technique. Infrared microscopic technique has a lot of advantages over conventional infrared spectroscopic technique, such as high detection sensitivity, micro-area analysisand nondestructive examination. It has effectively solved the problem of authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science. Additionally, almost no external interference is introduced during measurements by infrared microscopic technique. It can satisfy the special need that the trace material evidence must be reserved for witness in court. It is illustrated in detail through real case analysis in this experimental center that, infrared microscopic technique has advantages in authentication of trace material evidence in forensic science field. In this paper, the vibration features in infrared spectra of material evidences, including paints, plastics, rubbers, fibers, drugs and toxicants, can be comparatively analyzed by means of infrared microscopic technique, in an attempt to provide powerful spectroscopic evidence for qualitative diagnosis of various criminal and traffic accident cases. The experimental results clearly suggest that infrared microscopic technique has an incomparable advantage and it has become an effective method for authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science. PMID:27400510

  18. Field study site selection, species abundance and monthly distribution of anopheline mosquitoes in the northern Kruger National Park, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the ecology and behaviour of a target species is a prerequisite for the successful development of any vector control strategy. Before the implementation of any strategy it is essential to have comprehensive information on the bionomics of species in the targeted area. The aims of this study were to conduct regular entomological surveillance and to determine the relative abundance of anopheline species in the northern Kruger National Park. In addition to this, the impact of weather conditions on an Anopheles arabiensis population were evaluated and a range of mosquito collection methods were assessed. Methods A survey of Anopheles species was made between July 2010 and December 2012. Mosquitoes were collected from five sites in the northern Kruger National Park, using carbon dioxide-baited traps, human landing and larval collections. Specimens were identified morphologically and polymerase chain reaction assays were subsequently used where appropriate. Results A total of 3,311 specimens belonging to nine different taxa was collected. Species collected were: Anopheles arabiensis (n = 1,352), Anopheles quadriannulatus (n = 870), Anopheles coustani (n = 395), Anopheles merus (n = 349), Anopheles pretoriensis (n = 35), Anopheles maculipalpis (n = 28), Anopheles rivulorum (n = 19), Anopheles squamosus (n = 3) and Anopheles rufipes (n = 2). Members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex were the most abundant and widely distributed, occurring across all collection sites. The highest number of mosquitoes was collected using CO2 baited net traps (58.2%) followed by human landing catches (24.8%). Larval collections (17%) provided an additional method to increase sample size. Mosquito sampling productivity was influenced by prevailing weather conditions and overall population densities fluctuated with seasons. Conclusion Several anopheline species occur in the northern Kruger National Park and their densities

  19. Evidence for a Cultural Influence on Field-Independence in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Hwan Cui; Milne, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Field-independence, or weak central coherence, is a recognised phenotype of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There is also evidence of cultural variation in this perceptual style, as neurotypical individuals from Western nations are more field-independent than neurotypical individuals from East-Asian nations. The majority of research on perceptual…

  20. Relationship between abundance of blunt-nosed leopard lizards, Crotaphytus silus, and intensity of petroleum field development in Kern County, California, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.

    1980-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the distribution and relative abundance of blunt-nosed leopard lizards, Crotaphytus silus, on three sections of BLM land impacted by light to moderate petroleum developments; (2) correlate relative density estimates with absolute density estimates, characteristics of the dominant vegetation associations, density of animal burrows, percent open space, and level of oil field development; and (3) determine the radius of movement for the species. Relative densities of lizards in each section were measured by counting all lizards seen during four surveys conducted between May and July 1980.

  1. Chemical abundances and kinematics of 257 G-, K-type field giants. Setting a base for further analysis of giant-planet properties orbiting evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Benamati, L.; Santos, N. C.; Alves, S.; Lovis, C.; Udry, S.; Israelian, G.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Mortier, A.; Sozzetti, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    We performed a uniform and detailed abundance analysis of 12 refractory elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Co, Sc, Mn, and V) for a sample of 257 G- and K-type evolved stars from the CORALIE planet search programme. To date, only one of these stars is known to harbour a planetary companion. We aimed to characterize this large sample of evolved stars in terms of chemical abundances and kinematics, thus setting a solid base for further analysis of planetary properties around giant stars. This sample, being homogeneously analysed, can be used as a comparison sample for other planet-related studies, as well as for different type of studies related to stellar and Galaxy astrophysics. The abundances of the chemical elements were determined using an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis relative to the Sun, with the spectral synthesis code MOOG and a grid of Kurucz ATLAS9 atmospheres. To separate the Galactic stellar populations, both a purely kinematical approach and a chemical method were applied. We confirm the overabundance of Na in giant stars compared to the field FGK dwarfs. This enhancement might have a stellar evolutionary character, but departures from LTE may also produce a similar enhancement. Our chemical separation of stellar populations also suggests a `gap' in metallicity between the thick-disc and high-α metal-rich stars, as previously observed in dwarfs sample from HARPS. The present sample, as most of the giant star samples, also suffers from the B - V colour cut-off, which excludes low-log g stars with high metallicities, and high-log g star with low [Fe/H]. For future studies of planet occurrence dependence on stellar metallicity around these evolved stars, we suggest to use a subsample of stars in a `cut-rectangle' in the log g-[Fe/H] diagram to overcome the aforementioned issue.

  2. THE EFFECT OF RAINFALL ON THE ABUNDANCE OF TARNISHED PLANT BUG [LYGUS LINEOLARIS (PALISOT)] NYMPHS IN ALFALFA FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a 13-year field study in northwestern New Jersey, total May-June rainfall ranged from 6.5 to 10.7 inches (165-272mm). The highest rainfall reduced first generation nymphs of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot) (Miridae), in alfalfa by 50%. This reduction was likely mechanica...

  3. Archaean atmospheric evolution: evidence from the Witwatersrand gold fields, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2005-04-01

    The Witwatersrand gold fields in South Africa, the world's largest gold-producing province, play a pivotal role in the reconstruction of the Archaean atmosphere and hydrosphere. Past uncertainties on the genetic model for the gold caused confusion in the debate on Archaean palaeoenvironmental conditions. The majority of Witwatersrand gold occurs together with pyrite, uraninite and locally bitumen, on degradational surfaces of fluvial conglomerates that were laid down between 2.90 and 2.84 Ga in the Central Rand Basin. Although most of the gold appears as a precipitate within, or associated with, post-depositional hydrothermal phases and along microfractures, available microtextural, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic data all indicate that this hydrothermal gold, analogous to some pyrite and uraninite, was derived from the local mobilisation of detrital particles. Some of the key pieces of evidence are a significant correlation of the gold, pyrite and uraninite with other heavy minerals as well as sedimentary lithofacies, local preservation of in-situ gold micronuggets and abundant rounded forms of pyrite and uraninite, compositional heterogeneity on a microscale of the gold as well as the rounded pyrite and uraninte, and radiometric age data that indicate an age of the gold, pyrite and uraninite that is older than the maximum age of deposition for the host sediment. None of these observations/data is compatible with any of the suggested hydrothermal models, in which auriferous fluids were introduced from an external source into the host rock succession after sediment deposition. In contrast, those arguments, used in favour of hydrothermal models, emphasise the microtextural position of most of the gold, which highlights the undisputed hydrothermal nature of that gold in its present position, but does not explain its ultimate source. Furthermore, the macro-scale setting of the stratiform ore deposits is in stark contrast to any known type of epigenetic

  4. Perspectives--A Problem in Our Field: Making Distinctions between Evidence-Based Treatment and Evidence-Based Practice as a Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Kristie; Diel, James; Feder, Joshua; Lillas, Connie

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that the term "evidence-based treatment" (EBT) is often used synonymously with the term "evidence-based practice" (EBP) without making an important distinction. If a practitioner is applying an EBT, it should not be assumed that one is "practicing" the evidence. Within the infant-family and early childhood field, this confusion…

  5. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances and Electron and Positron Fluxes Using the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (r.l.) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 r.l. of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the capability of CALET to make additional measurements by exploiting the geomagnetic field it will be exposed to in the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit. The rare nuclei heavier than nickel (Z=28) can be resolved using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in field regions where the rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. CALET can also measure the distinct fluxes of cosmic ray positrons and electrons using the earth shadow of the geomagnetic field.

  6. Micron-scale coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance variations in diamonds: Evidence for episodic diamond formation beneath the Siberian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Bulanova, G. P.; De Corte, K.; Pearson, D. G.; Craven, J. A.; Davies, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    The internal structure and growth history of six macro-diamonds from kimberlite pipes in Yakutia (Russia) were investigated with cathodoluminescence imaging and coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance analyses along detailed core to rim traverses. The diamonds are characterised by octahedral zonation with layer-by-layer growth. High spatial resolution SIMS profiles establish that there is no exchange of the carbon isotope composition across growth boundaries at the μm scale and that isotopic variations observed between (sub)zones within the diamonds are primary. The macro-diamonds have δ13C values that vary within 2‰ of -5.3‰ and their nitrogen contents range between 0-1334 at. ppm. There are markedly different nitrogen aggregation states between major growth zones within individual diamonds that demonstrate Yakutian diamonds grew in multiple growth events. Growth intervals were punctuated by stages of dissolution now associated with <10 μm wide zones of nitrogen absent type II diamond. Across these resorption interfaces carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen contents record shifts between 0.5-2.3‰ and up to 407 at. ppm, respectively. Co-variation in δ13C value-nitrogen content suggests that parts of individual diamonds precipitated in a Rayleigh process from either oxidised or reduced fluids/melts, with two single diamonds showing evidence of both fluid types. Modelling the co-variation establishes that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond relative to its growth medium and that the nitrogen partition coefficient is different between oxidised (3-4.1) and reduced (3) sources. The reduced sources have δ13C values between -7.3‰ and -4.6‰, while the oxidised sources have higher δ13C values between -5.8‰ and -1.8‰ (if grown from carbonatitic media) or between -3.8‰ and +0.2‰ (if grown from CO2-rich media). It is therefore concluded that individual Yakutian diamonds originate from distinct fluids/melts of variable compositions. The

  7. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Ma, Yi-Bing; Hu, Hang-Wei; Wang, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Rong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Copper contamination on China's arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg−1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values) characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM) analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass. PMID:25699026

  8. Weeds in fields with contrasting conventional and genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops. I. Effects on abundance and diversity.

    PubMed

    Heard, M S; Hawes, C; Champion, G T; Clark, S J; Firbank, L G; Haughton, A J; Parish, A M; Perry, J N; Rothery, P; Scott, R J; Skellern, M P; Squire, G R; Hill, M O

    2003-11-29

    We compared the seedbanks, seed rains, plant densities and biomasses of weeds under two contrasting systems of management in beet, maize and spring oilseed rape. Weed seedbank and plant density were measured at the same locations in two subsequent seasons. About 60 fields were sown with each crop. Each field was split, one half being sown with a conventional variety managed according to the farmer's normal practice, the other half being sown with a genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) variety, with weeds controlled by a broad-spectrum herbicide. In beet and rape, plant densities shortly after sowing were higher in the GMHT treatment. Following weed control in conventional beet, plant densities were approximately one-fifth of those in GMHT beet. In both beet and rape, this effect was reversed after the first application of broad-spectrum herbicide, so that late-season plant densities were lower in the GMHT treatments. Biomass and seed rain in GMHT crops were between one-third and one-sixth of those in conventional treatments. The effects of differing weed-seed returns in these two crops persisted in the seedbank: densities following the GMHT treatment were about 20% lower than those following the conventional treatment. The effect of growing maize was quite different. Weed density was higher throughout the season in the GMHT treatment. Late-season biomass was 82% higher and seed rain was 87% higher than in the conventional treatment. The difference was not subsequently detectable in the seedbank because the total seed return was low after both treatments. In all three crops, weed diversity was little affected by the treatment, except for transient effects immediately following herbicide application. PMID:14561316

  9. Helium abundance enhancements in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrini, G.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for a link between helium enhancements at 1 AU and transient coronal mass ejections is provided by the statistical analysis of 73 large helium abundance enhancement observations made by IMPs 6, 7 and 8 over 1972-1978. These events, in which helium abundance enhancement is greater than about 10%, are sporadic, sometimes clustered in time, occur approximately in phase with the solar cycle, and nearly 50% of them are associated with interplanetary shocks and/or geomagnetic activity sudden commencements. The plasma pattern associated with them is nevertheless independent of shock occurrence, and features high magnetic field strength, low alpha-proton velocity difference, and low proton temperature, suggesting that the enhancement is embedded in a closed, magnetically dominated structure that expands adiabatically. Evidence of an association between helium enhancement at 1 AU and type II and IV radio bursts in the corona is presented.

  10. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Information and College Access: Evidence From a Randomized Field Experiment" examined the impact of offering an online informational video and financial aid materials to high school students on: (1) their postsecondary aspirations, (2) the accuracy of their understanding of financial aid availability, and (3) the accuracy of their estimates of…

  11. Reemployment Bonuses in the Unemployment Insurance System: Evidence from Three Field Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Philip K., Ed.; Spiegelman, Robert G., Ed.

    This book contains eight papers examining the evidence from three field experiences in Illinois, Pennsylvania, and Washington that were conducted to identify the impact of reemployment bonuses on the following indicators characterizing the unemployment insurance (UI) program: weeks of UI receipt during the benefit year; dollars of UI received…

  12. Constraints on hydrocarbon and organic acid abundances in hydrothermal fluids at the Von Damm vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of organic compounds in vent fluids has been of interest since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems, due to implications for the sustenance of present-day microbial populations and their potential role in the origin of life on early Earth. Possible sources of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems include microbial production, thermogenic degradation of organic material, and abiotic synthesis. Abiotic organic synthesis reactions may occur during active circulation of seawater-derived fluids through the oceanic crust or within olivine-hosted fluid inclusions containing carbon-rich magmatic volatiles. H2-rich end-member fluids at the Von Damm vent field on the Mid-Cayman Rise, where fluid temperatures reach 226°C, provide an exciting opportunity to examine the extent of abiotic carbon transformations in a highly reducing system. Our results indicate multiple sources of carbon compounds in vent fluids at Von Damm. An ultramafic-influenced hydrothermal system located on the Mount Dent oceanic core complex at 2350 m depth, Von Damm vent fluids contain H2, CH4, and C2+ hydrocarbons in high abundance relative to basalt-hosted vent fields, and in similar abundance to other ultramafic-hosted systems, such as Rainbow and Lost City. The CO2 content and isotopic composition in end-member fluids are virtually identical to bottom seawater, suggesting that seawater DIC is unchanged during hydrothermal circulation of seawater-derived fluids. Accordingly, end-member CH4 that is present in slightly greater abundance than CO2 cannot be generated from reduction of aqueous CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. We postulate that CH4 and C2+ hydrocarbons that are abundantly present in Von Damm vent fluids reflect leaching of fluids from carbon- and H2-rich fluid inclusions hosted in plutonic rocks. Geochemical modeling of carbon speciation in the Von Damm fluids suggests that the relative abundances of CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons, and CO2 are consistent with

  13. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacteria in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Alkane degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacterial community in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that trace amount of volatile hydrocarbons migrated from oil and gas reservoirs caused a shift of the n-alkane degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) to Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter). Real-time PCR results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils underlying oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils due to efficient microbial degradation. Our findings broadened the knowledge on the ecological characteristics of alkane degrading community in hydrocarbon microseeps and may provide a new approach for microbial prospecting for oil and gas (MPOG).

  14. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Alkane-degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter) dominated n-alkane-degrading bacterial communities in the near-surface soils of oil and gas reservoirs, while the dominant microbial communities were Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) in background soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils above oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils. The results of this study implicate that trace amounts of volatile hydrocarbons migrate from oil and gas reservoirs, and likely result in the changes of microbial communities in the near-surface soil.

  15. Field Evidence for a Low Permeability, High Storage Fault Core at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Brodsky, E. E.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogeologic properties within fault zones are few, in part because of the challenges of measuring the scale-dependent quantities in fractured rock reservoirs. This work aims to fill the gap by utilizing a combination of tidal, barometric and seismic response analyses on pressure head time-series from the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Southern California. The techniques sample different effective volumes and so allow us to investigate the scale-dependent structure near fault zones. Permeability and specific storage were inverted from tidal response at 14 locations, and specific storage was also computed from barometric efficiencies at 10 locations. In addition, we computed hydro-seismic transfer functions after nine local earthquakes and teleseismic events. We found that permeability computed from tidal response are quite homogeneous within about one and a half orders of magnitude over the site regardless of the presence of moderate to large faults. This result is consistent with the earlier aquifer tests using standard methods. The tidal responses also showed higher variability of specific storage inside the fault zones suggesting that fault damage zone generates a storage architecture. The storage from the tidal responses can be consistently interpreted for the tidal, barometric and seismic responses. However, the observations require that the permeability inside the fault zones at the spatial scale of the seismic response (~meters) is much lower than at the spatial scale of the tidal response (~10's of meters). The result suggests possible sensitivity to the low permeability fault core, which has been historically difficult to measure at the field scale.

  16. Evidence for the Cooccurrence of Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Ammonium and Methane Oxidation Processes in a Flooded Paddy Field

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-dong; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; Lian, Xu; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Jin, Ren-cun; He, Yun-feng; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. In the present study, we provide direct evidence for the cooccurrence of the anammox and n-damo processes in a flooded paddy field in southeastern China. Stable isotope experiments showed that the potential anammox rates ranged from 5.6 to 22.7 nmol N2 g−1 (dry weight) day−1 and the potential n-damo rates varied from 0.2 to 2.1 nmol CO2 g−1 (dry weight) day−1 in different layers of soil cores. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 1.0 × 105 to 2.0 × 106 copies g−1 (dry weight) in different layers of soil cores and the abundance of n-damo bacteria varied from 3.8 × 105 to 6.1 × 106 copies g−1 (dry weight). Phylogenetic analyses of the recovered 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that anammox bacteria affiliated with “Candidatus Brocadia” and “Candidatus Kuenenia” and n-damo bacteria related to “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” were present in the soil cores. It is estimated that a total loss of 50.7 g N m−2 per year could be linked to the anammox process, which is at intermediate levels for the nitrogen flux ranges of aerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification reported in wetland soils. In addition, it is estimated that a total of 0.14 g CH4 m−2 per year could be oxidized via the n-damo process, while this rate is at the lower end of the aerobic methane oxidation rates reported in wetland soils. PMID:25261523

  17. Evidence for the cooccurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in a flooded paddy field.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; Lian, Xu; He, Zhan-Fei; Geng, Sha; Jin, Ren-Cun; He, Yun-Feng; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. In the present study, we provide direct evidence for the cooccurrence of the anammox and n-damo processes in a flooded paddy field in southeastern China. Stable isotope experiments showed that the potential anammox rates ranged from 5.6 to 22.7 nmol N2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) and the potential n-damo rates varied from 0.2 to 2.1 nmol CO2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) in different layers of soil cores. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 1.0 × 10(5) to 2.0 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight) in different layers of soil cores and the abundance of n-damo bacteria varied from 3.8 × 10(5) to 6.1 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight). Phylogenetic analyses of the recovered 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that anammox bacteria affiliated with "Candidatus Brocadia" and "Candidatus Kuenenia" and n-damo bacteria related to "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" were present in the soil cores. It is estimated that a total loss of 50.7 g N m(-2) per year could be linked to the anammox process, which is at intermediate levels for the nitrogen flux ranges of aerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification reported in wetland soils. In addition, it is estimated that a total of 0.14 g CH4 m(-2) per year could be oxidized via the n-damo process, while this rate is at the lower end of the aerobic methane oxidation rates reported in wetland soils. PMID:25261523

  18. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Eric H; Jaronski, Stefan T; Hodgson, Erin W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought. PMID:26191815

  19. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Eric H.; Jaronski, Stefan T.; Hodgson, Erin W.; Gassmann, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought. PMID:26191815

  20. Ca II Triplet Spectroscopy of Small Magellanic Cloud Red Giants. IV. Abundances for a Large Sample of Field Stars and Comparison with the Cluster Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. C.; Geisler, D.; Carraro, G.; Clariá, J. J.; Villanova, S.; Gramajo, L. V.; Sarajedini, A.; Grocholski, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper represents a major step forward in the systematic and homogeneous study of Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) star clusters and field stars carried out by applying the calcium triplet technique. We present in this work the radial velocity and metallicity of approximately 400 red giant stars in 15 SMC fields, with typical errors of about 7 km s‑1 and 0.16 dex, respectively. We added to this information our previously determined metallicity values for 29 clusters and approximately 350 field stars using the identical techniques. Using this enlarged sample, we analyze the metallicity distribution and gradient in this galaxy. We also compare the chemical properties of the clusters and of their surrounding fields. We find a number of surprising results. While the clusters, taken as a whole, show no strong evidence for a metallicity gradient (MG), the field stars exhibit a clear negative gradient in the inner region of the SMC, consistent with the recent results of Dobbie et al. For distances to the center of the galaxy less than 4°, field stars show a considerably smaller metallicity dispersion than that of the clusters. However, in the external SMC regions, clusters and field stars exhibit similar metallicity dispersions. Moreover, in the inner region of the SMC, clusters appear to be concentrated in two groups: one more metal-poor and another more metal-rich than field stars. Individually considered, neither cluster group presents an MG. Most surprisingly, the MG for both stellar populations (clusters and field stars) appears to reverse sign in the outer regions of the SMC. The difference between the cluster metallicity and the mean metallicity of the surrounding field stars turns out to be a strong function of the cluster metallicity. These results could be indicating different chemical evolution histories for these two SMC stellar populations. They could also indicate variations in the chemical behavior of the SMC in its internal and external regions.

  1. Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence of opposing lateral visuospatial asymmetries in the upper and lower visual fields.

    PubMed

    Loughnane, Gerard M; Shanley, John P; Lalor, Edmund C; O'Connell, Redmond G

    2015-02-01

    Neurologically healthy individuals typically exhibit a subtle bias towards the left visual field during spatial judgments, known as "pseudoneglect". However, it has yet to be reliably established if the direction and magnitude of this lateral bias varies along the vertical plane. Here, participants were required to distribute their attention equally across a checkerboard array spanning the entire visual field in order to detect transient targets that appeared at unpredictable locations. Reaction times (RTs) were faster to left hemifield targets in the lower visual field but the opposite trend was observed for targets in the upper field. Electroencephalogram (EEG) analyses focused on the interval prior to target onset in order to identify endogenous neural correlates of these behavioral asymmetries. The relative hemispheric distribution of pre-target oscillatory alpha power was predictive of RT bias to targets in the lower visual field but not the upper field, indicating separate attentional mechanisms for the upper and lower visual fields. Analysis of multifocal visual-evoked potentials (MVEP) in the pre-target interval also indicated that the opposing upper and lower field asymmetries may impact on the magnitude of primary visual cortical responses. These results provide new evidence of a functional segregation of upper and lower field visuospatial processing. PMID:25282061

  2. Building Agency Capacity for Trauma-Informed Evidence-Based Practice and Field Instruction.

    PubMed

    Strand, Virginia; Popescu, Marciana; Abramovitz, Robert; Richards, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Through this article the authors describe how schools of social work offering a child and adolescent trauma specialization actively partnered with their community-based field placement agencies to achieve a dual purpose: help agencies sustain the capacity for evidence-based trauma treatment (EBTT) and provide sufficient EBTT MSW student field placement sites that support preparation of trauma-informed practitioners by schools of social work. Development and description of the specific conceptual framework used to inform the trauma-informed organizational change initiative is described. Results of an Organizational Readiness assessment undertaken at six agencies reflect a strong alignment between implementation drivers identified in the literature (Fixsen, Blase, Naoom, & Wallace, 2009) and the conceptual framework. The manner in which these results are being used by schools of social work and their agency partners in sustaining the implementation of evidence-based trauma treatment is reviewed, and implications for future research, education, and practice is discussed. PMID:26083452

  3. Field evidence of the viscous sublayer in a tidally forced developing boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengrove, M. E.; Foster, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    Field observations of boundary layer development within a tidally forced estuary revealed evidence of an observable viscous sublayer. Evidence is provided by several independent measures of the flow field, including hydrodynamic smoothness, an immobile bed, and characteristic velocity, constant stress, and higher-order moment structures. This investigation reports what may be the second comprehensive observation of the viscous sublayer in a marine environment, and what could be the first observation of a momentum balance that includes the viscous sublayer within a shallow estuarine environment. Hydrodynamic observations were made in a straight channel within the Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire over a flat sandy mud with low water depth of 1.5 m at the sampling location. Beyond quantifying the role of the benthic boundary layer in nutrient dynamics, these observations are useful to provide insight into very near boundary stress estimates leading to incipient motion in estuarine and coastal environments.

  4. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  5. New Evidence For Proton Cyclotron Resonance In a Magnetar Strength Field From SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, William; Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Swank, Jean H.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of evidence has recently been gathered in favor of the picture that Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars are powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields (B greater than 10(exp 14) G; i.e. magnetars). Nevertheless, present determination of the magnetic field in such magnetar candidates has been indirect and model dependent. A key prediction concerning magnetars is the detection of ion cyclotron resonance features, which would offer a decisive diagnostic of the field strength. Here we present the detection of a 5 keV absorption feature in a variety of bursts from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20, confirming our initial discovery and establishing the presence of the feature in the source's burst spectra. The line feature is well explained as proton cyclotron resonance in an ultra-strong magnetic field, offering a direct measurement of SGR 1806-20's magnetic field (B approx. 10(exp 15) G) and a clear evidence of a magnetar. Together with the source's spin-down rate, the feature also provides the first measurement of the gravitational redshift, mass and radius of a magnetar.

  6. A community change in the algal endosymbionts of a scleractinian coral following a natural bleaching event: field evidence of acclimatization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A.M; Berkelmans, R; van Oppen, M.J.H; Mieog, J.C; Sinclair, W

    2008-01-01

    The symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium) is highly sensitive to temperature stress, which makes coral reefs vulnerable to climate change. Thermal tolerance in corals is known to be substantially linked to the type of zooxanthellae they harbour and, when multiple types are present, the relative abundance of types can be experimentally manipulated to increase the thermal limits of individual corals. Although the potential exists for this to translate into substantial thermal acclimatization of coral communities, to date there is no evidence to show that this takes place under natural conditions. In this study, we show field evidence of a dramatic change in the symbiont community of Acropora millepora, a common and widespread Indo-Pacific hard coral species, after a natural bleaching event in early 2006 in the Keppel Islands (Great Barrier Reef). Before bleaching, 93.5% (n=460) of the randomly sampled and tagged colonies predominantly harboured the thermally sensitive Symbiodinium type C2, while the remainder harboured a tolerant Symbiodinium type belonging to clade D or mixtures of C2 and D. After bleaching, 71% of the surviving tagged colonies that were initially C2 predominant changed to D or C1 predominance. Colonies that were originally C2 predominant suffered high mortality (37%) compared with D-predominant colonies (8%). We estimate that just over 18% of the original A. millepora population survived unchanged leaving 29% of the population C2 and 71% D or C1 predominant six months after the bleaching event. This change in the symbiont community structure, while it persists, is likely to have substantially increased the thermal tolerance of this coral population. Understanding the processes that underpin the temporal changes in symbiont communities is key to assessing the acclimatization potential of reef corals. PMID:18348962

  7. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE EVIDENCE OF ENDURING HIGH STAR FORMATION RATES IN AN EARLY-TYPE GALAXY: HIGH [Ca/Fe] IN NGC 5128 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Duran, Maria Fernanda; Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2013-08-20

    We present [Fe/H], ages, and Ca abundances for an initial sample of 10 globular clusters in NGC 5128 obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectra of their integrated light. All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution integrated light abundance analysis of globular clusters. The clusters have a range in [Fe/H] between -1.6 and -0.2. In this sample, the average [Ca/Fe] for clusters with [Fe/H] <-0.4 is +0.37 {+-} 0.07, while the average [Ca/Fe] in our Milky Way (MW) and M31 GC samples is +0.29 {+-} 0.09 and +0.24 {+-} 0.10, respectively. This may imply a more rapid chemical enrichment history for NGC 5128 than for either the MW or M31. This sample provides the first quantitative picture of the chemical history of NGC 5128 that is directly comparable to what is available for the MW. Data presented here were obtained with the MIKE echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

  8. Variability of a stellar corona on a time scale of days. Evidence for abundance fractionation in an emerging coronal active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordon, R.; Behar, E.; Drake, S. A.

    2013-02-01

    Elemental abundance effects in active coronae have eluded our understanding for almost three decades, since the discovery of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect on the sun. The goal of this paper is to monitor the same coronal structures over a time interval of six days and resolve active regions on a stellar corona through rotational modulation. We report on four iso-phase X-ray spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn binary EI Eri with XMM-Newton, carried out approximately every two days, to match the rotation period of EI Eri. We present an analysis of the thermal and chemical structure of the EI Eri corona as it evolves over the six days. Although the corona is rather steady in its temperature distribution, the emission measure and FIP bias both vary and seem to be correlated. An active region, predating the beginning of the campaign, repeatedly enters into our view at the same phase as it rotates from beyond the stellar limb. As a result, the abundances tend slightly, but consistently, to increase for high FIP elements (an inverse FIP effect) with phase. We estimate the abundance increase of high FIP elements in the active region to be of about 75% over the coronal mean. This observed fractionation of elements in an active region on time scales of days provides circumstantial clues regarding the element enrichment mechanism of non-flaring stellar coronae.

  9. Variability of a Stellar Corona on a Time Scale of Days: Evidence for Abundance Fractionation in an Emerging Coronal Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordon, R.; Behar, E.; Drake, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Elemental abundance effects in active coronae have eluded our understanding for almost three decades, since the discovery of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect on the sun. The goal of this paper is to monitor the same coronal structures over a time interval of six days and resolve active regions on a stellar corona through rotational modulation. We report on four iso-phase X-ray spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn binary EI Eri with XMM-Newton, carried out approximately every two days, to match the rotation period of EI Eri. We present an analysis of the thermal and chemical structure of the EI Eri corona as it evolves over the six days. Although the corona is rather steady in its temperature distribution, the emission measure and FIP bias both vary and seem to be correlated. An active region, predating the beginning of the campaign, repeatedly enters into our view at the same phase as it rotates from beyond the stellar limb. As a result, the abundances tend slightly, but consistently, to increase for high FIP elements (an inverse FIP effect) with phase. We estimate the abundance increase of high FIP elements in the active region to be of about 75% over the coronal mean. This observed fractionation of elements in an active region on time scales of days provides circumstantial clues regarding the element enrichment mechanism of non-flaring stellar coronae.

  10. THE ABUNDANCE OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE REDSHIFT RANGE 8.5-12: NEW RESULTS FROM THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Koekemoer, Anton; Charlot, Stephane; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2013-01-20

    We present the results of the deepest search to date for star-forming galaxies beyond a redshift z {approx_equal} 8.5 utilizing a new sequence of near-infrared Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) images of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). This 'UDF12' campaign completed in 2012 September doubles the earlier exposures with WFC3/IR in this field and quadruples the exposure in the key F105W filter used to locate such distant galaxies. Combined with additional imaging in the F140W filter, the fidelity of high-redshift candidates is greatly improved. Using spectral energy distribution fitting techniques on objects selected from a deep multi-band near-infrared stack, we find seven promising z > 8.5 candidates. As none of the previously claimed UDF candidates with 8.5 < z < 10 are confirmed by our deeper multi-band imaging, our campaign has transformed the measured abundance of galaxies in this redshift range. Although we recover the candidate UDFj-39546284 (previously proposed at z = 10.3), it is undetected in the newly added F140W image, implying that it lies at z = 11.9 or is an intense emission line galaxy at z {approx_equal} 2.4. Although no physically plausible model can explain the required line intensity given the lack of Ly{alpha} or broadband UV signal, without an infrared spectrum we cannot rule out an exotic interloper. Regardless, our robust z {approx_equal} 8.5-10 sample demonstrates a luminosity density that continues the smooth decline observed over 6 < z < 8. Such continuity has important implications for models of cosmic reionization and future searches for z >10 galaxies with James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. The Abundance of Star-forming Galaxies in the Redshift Range 8.5-12: New Results from the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard S.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A.; Koekemoer, Anton; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Ouchi, Masami; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the deepest search to date for star-forming galaxies beyond a redshift z ~= 8.5 utilizing a new sequence of near-infrared Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) images of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). This "UDF12" campaign completed in 2012 September doubles the earlier exposures with WFC3/IR in this field and quadruples the exposure in the key F105W filter used to locate such distant galaxies. Combined with additional imaging in the F140W filter, the fidelity of high-redshift candidates is greatly improved. Using spectral energy distribution fitting techniques on objects selected from a deep multi-band near-infrared stack, we find seven promising z > 8.5 candidates. As none of the previously claimed UDF candidates with 8.5 < z < 10 are confirmed by our deeper multi-band imaging, our campaign has transformed the measured abundance of galaxies in this redshift range. Although we recover the candidate UDFj-39546284 (previously proposed at z = 10.3), it is undetected in the newly added F140W image, implying that it lies at z = 11.9 or is an intense emission line galaxy at z ~= 2.4. Although no physically plausible model can explain the required line intensity given the lack of Lyα or broadband UV signal, without an infrared spectrum we cannot rule out an exotic interloper. Regardless, our robust z ~= 8.5-10 sample demonstrates a luminosity density that continues the smooth decline observed over 6 < z < 8. Such continuity has important implications for models of cosmic reionization and future searches for z >10 galaxies with James Webb Space Telescope.

  12. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  13. Evidence for a chemical enrichment coupling of globular clusters and field stars in the Fornax dSph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Boeche, Corrado; Johnson, Christian I.; Frank, Matthias J.; Koch, Andreas; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I.

    2016-01-01

    The globular cluster H4, located in the center of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, is crucial for understanding the formation and chemical evolution of star clusters in low-mass galactic environments. H4 is peculiar because the cluster is significantly more metal-rich than the galaxy's other clusters, is located near the galaxy center, and may also be the youngest cluster in the galaxy. In this study, we present detailed chemical abundances derived from high-resolution (R ~ 28 000) spectroscopy of an isolated H4 member star for comparison with a sample of 22 nearby Fornax field stars. We find the H4 member to be depleted in the alpha-elements Si, Ca, and Ti with [Si/Fe] = -0.35 ± 0.34, [Ca/Fe] = + 0.05 ± 0.08, and [Ti/Fe] = -0.27 ± 0.23, resulting in an average [α/Fe] = -0.19 ± 0.14. If this result is representative of the average cluster properties, H4 is the only known system with a low [α/Fe] ratio and a moderately low metallicity embedded in an intact birth environment. For the field stars we find a clear sequence, seen as an early depletion in [α/Fe] at low metallicities, in good agreement with previous measurements. H4 falls on top of the observed field star [α/Fe] sequence and clearly disagrees with the properties of Milky Way halo stars. We therefore conclude that within a galaxy, the chemical enrichment of globular clusters may be closely linked to the enrichment pattern of the field star population. The low [α/Fe] ratios of H4 and similar metallicity field stars in Fornax give evidence that slow chemical enrichment environments, such as dwarf galaxies, may be the original hosts of alpha-depleted clusters in the halos of the Milky Way and M31. This article includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  14. Evidence for parallel electric field particle acceleration in the dayside auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Carlson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron and ion energy spectra and electron pitch angle distributions are presented for two sounding rocket flights in the dayside auroral zone. At times, effects of dc electric fields parallel to the magnetic field are evident in that: (1) within precipitation features, protons are decelerated by an amount of energy consistent with that which electrons gain and (2) electrons are sometimes aligned to within 3 deg (full width at half maximum) of the magnetic field. A maximum altitude for the accelerating region of several thousand kilometers is deduced from the narrow width of the pitch angle distribution and also from time-of-flight delays between the observation of accelerated electrons and decelerated protons.

  15. Distribution and abundance of forest birds in low-altitude habitat on Hawai'i Island: Evidence for range expansion of native species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, C.S.; Hart, P.J.; Woodwort, B.L.; Tweed, E.J.; Leburn, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The Hawaiian honeycreepers are thought to be limited primarily to middle- and high-altitude wet forests due to anthropogenic factors at lower altitudes, especially introduced mosquitotransmitted avian malaria. However, recent research has demonstrated that at least one native species, the Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens), is common in areas of active malaria transmission. We examined the current distribution and abundance of native and exotic forest birds within approximately 640 km2 of low-altitude (0-326 m) habitat on south-eastern Hawai'i Island, using roadside variable circular plot (VCP) at 174 stations along eight survey transects. We also re-surveyed 90 stations near sea level that were last surveyed in 1994-1995. Overall, introduced species were more abundant than natives; 11 exotic species made up 87% of the total individuals detected. The most common exotic passerines were Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus), House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) and Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Two native species, Hawai'i 'Amakihi and 'Apapane (Himatione sanguina), comprised 13% of the bird community at low altitudes. Hawai'i 'Amakihi were the most common and widespread native species, being found at 47% of stations at a density of 4.98 birds/ha (95% CI 3.52-7.03). Amakihi were significantly associated with 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha)-dominated forest. 'Apapane were more locally distributed, being found at only 10% of stations. Re-surveys of 1994-1995 transects demonstrated a significant increase in 'Amakihi abundance over the past decade. This work demonstrates a widespread recovery of Hawai'i 'Amakihi at low altitude in southeastern Hawai'i. The changing composition of the forest bird community at low-altitudes in Hawai'i has important implications for the dynamics of avian malaria in low-altitude Hawai'i, and for conservation of Hawai'i's lowland forests. ?? 2006 BirdLife International.

  16. Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-11-01

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

  17. A Stringent Limit on the Warm Dark Matter Particle Masses from the Abundance of z = 6 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the recently measured UV luminosity functions of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z ≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields provide an unprecedented probe for the mass m X of the warm dark matter (WDM) candidates independent of baryonic physics. Comparing the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies with the maximum number density of dark matter halos in WDM cosmologies sets a robust limit of m X ≥ 2.9 keV for the mass of thermal relic WDM particles at a 1σ confidence level, m X ≥ 2.4 keV at 2σ, and m X ≥ 2.1 keV at 3σ. These constraints are independent of the baryonic physics involved in galaxy formation and constitute the tightest constraints on WDM particle mass derived to date. We discuss the impact of our results on the production mechanism of sterile neutrinos. In particular, if sterile neutrinos are responsible for the 3.5 keV line reported in observations of X-ray clusters, our results firmly rule out the Dodelson–Widrow production mechanism and yield m sterile ≳ 6.1 keV for sterile neutrinos produced via the Shi–Fuller mechanism.

  18. The relationship between environmental abundant electromagnetic fields and packaging shape to their effects on the 17O NMR and Raman spectra of H2O-NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsamie, Maher A. A.; Rahman, Russly B. Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2015-07-01

    In this study, two identical groups of four containers with different packaging shapes made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were used to store H2O-NaCl solution for seven days at ambient room temperature (25 °C). Faraday shield was used to shield one group. The surrounding electromagnetic fields were measured during the storage period by using R&S®TS-EMF EMF measurement system. Samples of H2O-NaCl were collected at the end of the storage period and examined by 17Oxygene nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (17O NMR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electromagnetic simulation was used to explore the relationship between the packaging shape of H2O-NaCl containers and the environmentally abundant electromagnetic fields to their effects on the cluster size of water. The study showed variations in the cluster size of water stored inside the two groups of containers. It was observed that the cluster size of water stored in the unshielded containers was lower than that of the shielded containers. The cluster size of water stored in the unshielded pyramidal container was lower than the cluster size of water stored in the unshielded rectangular, square, and cylindrical containers. The EM simulation results showed significant variations in the total specific absorption rate SAR and maximum point SAR values induced in the H2O-NaCl solution in the unshielded container models at 2400 MHz for both vertical and horizontal polarization. It can be concluded that the variations in the values of SAR induced in H2O-NaCl solution are directly related to the variations in the cluster size of the stored water.

  19. Impact of the insecticide Alphacypermetrine and herbicide Oxadiazon, used singly or in combination, on the most abundant frog in French rice fields, Pelophylax perezi.

    PubMed

    Mesléard, François; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Lambret, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The potential impact of agricultural pesticides is a major concern with regard to biodiversity conservation. Pesticides are considered as one of the main causes of the worldwide decline of Amphibians. They are rarely used singly, but their cumulative impact and interaction are often neglected, as is the importance of the age or stage of the animal on which the impact of the molecules is assessed. We therefore tested the potential cumulative impact of the only authorized insecticide (Alphacypermetrine) and the main herbicide (Oxadiazon) used in French rice fields on four replicates of 25 eggs, young larvae and prometamorphosis tadpoles of the most abundant frog in paddies (Pelophylax perezi). We found no significant effect of the insecticide and herbicide, used singly or in combination, on hatching and young tadpoles. However, we found a strong impact of insecticide and herbicide used singly and a highly deleterious impact of their combined use on prometamorphosis tadpoles. Among the four replicates, only one of the prometamorphosis tadpoles did not reach this adult stage in the control against 9, 9, 6, 4 and 13, 9, 8, 7 with the herbicide and insecticide, respectively. But when the two pesticides were used in combination, only two prometamorphosis tapdoles reached the adult stage. Our results emphasize the potential impact on amphibians of pesticides used in agriculture and highlight the necessity of testing their role as cocktails. They also stress the importance of the age and/or stage of the target organism, the choice of which can lead to contrasting conclusions. Finally, our results suggest a possible underestimation of the impact of pesticides on non-targeted fauna in the rice fields in particular, and on living organisms in general. PMID:27107241

  20. Detection of abundant ethane and methane, along with carbon monoxide and water, in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake: evidence for interstellar origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; DiSanti, M. A.; Dello Russo, N.; Fomenkova, M.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Kaminski, C. D.; Xie, D. X.

    1996-01-01

    The saturated hydrocarbons ethane (C2H6) and methane (CH4) along with carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H2O) were detected in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake with the use of high-resolution infrared spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred production rates of molecular gases from the icy, cometary nucleus (in molecules per second) are 6.4 X 10(26) for C2H6, 1.2 X 10(27) for CH4, 9.8 X 10(27) for CO, and 1.7 X 10(29) for H2O. An abundance of C2H6 comparable to that of CH4 implies that ices in C/1996 B2 Hyakutake did not originate in a thermochemically equilibrated region of the solar nebula. The abundances are consistent with a kinetically controlled production process, but production of C2H6 by gas-phase ion molecule reactions in the natal cloud core is energetically forbidden. The high C2H6/CH4 ratio is consistent with production of C2H6 in icy grain mantles in the natal cloud, either by photolysis of CH4-rich ice or by hydrogen-addition reactions to acetylene condensed from the gas phase.

  1. Detection of abundant ethane and methane, along with carbon monoxide and water, in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake: evidence for interstellar origin.

    PubMed

    Mumma, M J; DiSanti, M A; Dello Russo, N; Fomenkova, M; Magee-Sauer, K; Kaminski, C D; Xie, D X

    1996-05-31

    The saturated hydrocarbons ethane (C2H6) and methane (CH4) along with carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H2O) were detected in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake with the use of high-resolution infrared spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred production rates of molecular gases from the icy, cometary nucleus (in molecules per second) are 6.4 X 10(26) for C2H6, 1.2 X 10(27) for CH4, 9.8 X 10(27) for CO, and 1.7 X 10(29) for H2O. An abundance of C2H6 comparable to that of CH4 implies that ices in C/1996 B2 Hyakutake did not originate in a thermochemically equilibrated region of the solar nebula. The abundances are consistent with a kinetically controlled production process, but production of C2H6 by gas-phase ion molecule reactions in the natal cloud core is energetically forbidden. The high C2H6/CH4 ratio is consistent with production of C2H6 in icy grain mantles in the natal cloud, either by photolysis of CH4-rich ice or by hydrogen-addition reactions to acetylene condensed from the gas phase. PMID:8650540

  2. ASCA Observation of the Poor Cluster of Galaxies AWM 7: Evidence of an Abundance Increase in the Intra-Cluster Medium at the Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiguang; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Ohashi, Takaya; Tamura, Takayuki

    1997-02-01

    We present the results of the ASCA central-pointing observation of the poor cD cluster AWM 7. The Performance Verification phase data of GIS 2, GIS 3, SIS 0 chip 1, and SIS 1 chip 3 were used to study the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) within 16' around the X-ray centroid. We found that, compared with the outer regions, the equivalent width of the Fe-K lines increases in the central 4' ( ~ 123 h(-1_{50) kpc)} region by a factor of ~ 1.5. Although the ICM temperature tends to decrease in the same region, the observed increase in the Fe-K line equivalent width cannot be explained away by a possible temperature drop. The model fitting indicates that the abundance increases from ~ 0.4 solar outside 4' to ~ 0.6 solar at the center. Thus, after the Centaurus cluster and the Virgo cluster, AWM 7 is the third poor cD cluster confirmed to show an abundance increase in the central region. The 0.5--3 keV flux of the cool emission within 4' is constrained to be <8*E(42) h(-2}_{50) erg s(-1) , or <21% of the total 0.5--3 keV flux from the same spatial region. We discuss possible relations of these phenomena to the cD galaxy.

  3. Evidence of natural Wolbachia infections in field populations of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Francesco; Segata, Nicola; Pompon, Julien; Marcenac, Perrine; Robert Shaw, W.; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Levashina, Elena A.; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally transmitted intracellular bacteria that invade insect populations by manipulating their reproduction and immunity and thus limiting the spread of numerous human pathogens. Experimental Wolbachia infections can reduce Plasmodium numbers in Anopheles mosquitoes in the laboratory, however, natural Wolbachia infections in field anophelines have never been reported. Here we show evidence of Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Wolbachia sequences in both female and male germlines across two seasons, and determined that these sequences are vertically transmitted from mother to offspring. Whole-genome sequencing of positive samples suggests that the genetic material identified in An. gambiae belongs to a novel Wolbachia strain, related to but distinct from strains infecting other arthropods. The evidence of Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations promotes further investigations on the possible use of natural Wolbachia–Anopheles associations to limit malaria transmission. PMID:24905191

  4. Benthic Foraminifera as Proxies of Organic Flux: Experimental and Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwaan, G. J.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Ernst, S. R.

    2003-04-01

    Food is one of the most important parameters in the marine realm, structuring faunal communities. Therefore, changing food flux from the mixed layer to the sea bottom is expected to be of great importance to the benthic community. In this poster we present data from 5 years of experimental work in which shallow and deeper water benthic foraminiferal associations were subjected to variable food fluxes, and even to artificial marine snow events. The experiments took place under well-controlled or well-monitored oxygen conditions. At the same time field research in the Adriatic Sea and the Levantine Basin suggests that variation in the input of nutrients greatly affects the benthic foraminiferal communities indeed, but mostly by variation of the oxygen content at the sea floor. This is confirmed by experiments. Deeper water assemblages, however, appear to be rather sensitive to changing food fluxes. In experiments with material from the Bay of Biscay high doses of organic matter result in significant response of the meiofauna: many microhabitat patterns shift to shallower depth. Some species, notably Epistominella exigua, respond after some weeks with increasing abundances; this suggests that they are good markers of eutrophic conditions. The main conclusion of experimental and field research is that short-term changes in associations are governed by the oxygen regime. Although on short time scales food does not have much effect in our experiments, it seems that on longer time scales food is of profound importance for structuring the foraminiferal community.

  5. Observations of a Newly "Captured" Magnetosheath Field Line: Evidence for "Double Reconnection"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.; Craven, Paul D.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun an investigation of the nature of the low-latitude boundary layer in the mid-altitude cusp region using data from the Polar spacecraft. This region has been routinely sampled for about three months each year for the periods 1999-2001 and 2004-2006. The low-to-mid-energy ion instruments frequently observed dense, magnetosheath-like plasma deep (in terms of distance from the magnetopause and in invariant latitude) in the magnetosphere. One such case, taken during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), shows magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from two separate merging sites along the same field lines. Cold ionospheric ions were also observed counterstreaming along the field lines, evidence that these field lines were closed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that double merging can produce closed field .lines populated by solar wind plasma. Through the use of individual cases such as this and statistical studies of a broader database we seek to understand the morphology of the LLBL as it projects from the sub-solar region into the cusp. We will present preliminary results of our ongoing study.

  6. Abundance of volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids from the Von Damm and Piccard deep sea hydrothermal fields, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; Reeves, E. P.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.; Klein, F.

    2012-12-01

    vent fluids, and imply the presence of a CO2 sink. Von Damm fluid CO2/CH4 ratios are relatively constant at 1.0 to 1.5 (mol/mol) in the higher temperature fluids, and are low compared with CO2/CH4 ratios of 200 to 250 (mol/mol) in the higher temperature Piccard fluids. All vent fluids at Von Damm are enriched in CH4 and longer-chain n-alkanes. Von Damm fluid H2 and H2S abundances are consistent with those at Rainbow and other ultramafic-influenced systems. At the Von Damm vent field, H2 shows non-conservative behavior in intermediate fluids at temperatures ≤114 °C. Such behavior is consistent with previous studies, which attributed non-conservative H2 behavior in ~30 °C vent fluids to microbial consumption (e.g. Von Damm and Lilley, 2004). Similar activity may be occurring at Von Damm. At Piccard, H2 shows non-conservative mixing behavior at temperatures ≤149 °C. H2 depletion at Piccard occurs at higher temperatures than at Von Damm, in excess of the currently known limit for life at 122 °C (Takei et al., 2008), suggesting that abiotic as well as microbial processes may be affecting H2 abundance. Methylated organic compounds, including methanethiol and methanol, were also observed in vent fluids at Piccard and Von Damm, and further organic compound analyses are ongoing.

  7. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  8. Distinguishing between debris flows and floods from field evidence in small watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Post-flood indirect measurement techniques to back-calculate flood magnitude are not valid for debris flows, which commonly occur in small steep watersheds during intense rainstorms. This is because debris flows can move much faster than floods in steep channel reaches and much slower than floods in low-gradient reaches. In addition, debris-flow deposition may drastically alter channel geometry in reaches where slope-area surveys are applied. Because high-discharge flows are seldom witnessed and automated samplers are commonly plugged or destroyed, determination of flow type often must be made on the basis of field evidence preserved at the site.

  9. Evidence of 13C non-covalent isotope effects obtained by quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at natural abundance during normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Rojas, Jose Manuel Moreno; Guillou, Claude; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-16

    Quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR at natural abundance has been used to determine the site-by-site (13)C/(12)C ratios in vanillin and a number of related compounds eluted from silica gel chromatography columns under similar conditions. Head-to-tail isotope fractionation is observed in all compounds at the majority of carbon positions. Furthermore, the site-specific isotope deviations show signatures characteristic of the position and functionality of the substituents present. The observed effects are more complex than would be obtained by simply summing the individual effects. Such detail is hidden when only the global (13)C content is measured by mass spectrometry. In particular, carbon positions within the aromatic ring are found to show site-specific isotope fractionation between the solute and the stationary phase. These interactions, defined as non-covalent isotope effects, can be normal or inverse and vary with the substitution pattern present. PMID:19748628

  10. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  11. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    PubMed Central

    Genung, Mark A.; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Claire B.; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; Reynolds, Wm. Nicholas; Felker-Quinn, Emmi; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot) of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1) plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2) plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. Conclusions/Significance These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:20090850

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Power frequency electromagnetic fields and health. Where's the evidence?5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alan W.; Hand, Jeff W.; Clarke, Robert N.; Stewart, Alice

    2000-09-01

    Twenty years ago concerns were raised that exposure to power frequency (or extremely low frequency (ELF)) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) may be associated with an increased risk of cancer or other health hazards. Subsequently no associations have been shown between laboratory magnetic field exposures and carcinogenesis in either animal or cellular models. Indeed, studies have demonstrated that magnetic fields are not associated with cancer. However, the puzzle remains that the results of some epidemiological studies may be interpreted as suggesting that living close to high-voltage transmission (HVT) lines appears to increase slightly the risk of childhood leukaemia. Alternatively, these results could result from small biases and errors in individual studies, which might not necessarily be the same in each study. The nature of the epidemiological studies (power-line, wire code, magnetic field or appliance based) appears to determine whether and how the EMFs associated with HVT lines might be a risk factor. It is possible that a simple association with either magnetic or electric field exposure may not be the whole answer, and an alternative mechanism is always a possibility. Although the interpretation of the available evidence by most expert bodies has led them to conclude that exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields is not a human health hazard, a working group under the auspices of the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) concluded that there was a possible low risk associated with certain exposures to ELF magnetic fields. NIEHS itself interpreted the finding as insufficient to warrant aggressive regulatory concern but stated that, because virtually everyone is routinely exposed to ELF EMFs, passive regulatory action is warranted, such as a continued emphasis on educating both the public and the regulated community on means aimed at reducing exposures. These analyses, conclusions and advice are not contradicted by

  13. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  14. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  15. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation. PMID:25267469

  16. Palaeomagnetic evidence for the persistence or recurrence of geomagnetic main field anomalies in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jay; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Leitner, Marko; Leonhardt, Roman; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Heunemann, Christoph; Bachtadse, Valerian; Ashley, Jack A. D.; Matzka, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    We present a dataset of a full-vector palaeomagnetic study of Late Pleistocene lavas from the island Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean. The current day geomagnetic field intensity in this region is approximately 25 μT, compared to an expected value of ∼43 μT; this phenomenon is known as the South Atlantic geomagnetic Anomaly (SAA). Geomagnetic field models extending back to the last 10 ka find no evidence for this being a persistent feature of the geomagnetic field, albeit, all models are constructed from data which is particularly sparse in the southern hemisphere. New 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating dating indicates the studied lavas from Tristan da Cunha extruded between 90 and 46 ka. Palaeointensity estimations of eight lava flows made using the Thellier method yield an average palaeointensity of 18 ± 6 μT and virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) of 3.1 ± 1.2 ×1022 Am2. The lava flows demonstrate four time intervals comparable to the present day SAA, where the average VADM of the Tristan da Cunha lavas is weaker than the global VADM average. This suggests a persistent or recurring low intensity anomaly to the main geomagnetic field similar to the SAA existed in the South Atlantic between 46 and 90 ka.

  17. FAST Observations of Acceleration Processes in the Cusp--Evidence for Parallel Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.. Jr.; Carlson, C.; McFadden, J.; Ergun, R.; Clemmons, J.; Klumpar D.; Strangeway, R.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of precipitating keV ions in the Earth's cusp originating at the magnetosheath provide unique means to test our understanding of particle acceleration and parallel electric fields in the lower altitude acceleration region. On numerous occasions, the FAST (The Fast Auroral Snapshot) spacecraft has encountered the Earth's cusp regions near its apogee of 4175 km which are characterized by their signatures of dispersed keV ion injections. The FAST instruments also reveal a complex microphysics inherent to many, but not all, of the cusp regions encountered by the spacecraft, that include upgoing ion beams and conics, inverted-V electrons, upgoing electron beams, and spikey DC-coupled electric fields and plasma waves. Detailed inspection of the FAST data often show clear modulation of the precipitating magnetosheath ions that indicate that they are affected by local electric potentials. For example, the magnetosheath ion precipitation is sometimes abruptly shut off precisely in regions where downgoing localized inverted-V electrons are observed. Such observations support the existence of a localized process, such as parallel electric fields, above the spacecraft which accelerate the electrons downward and consequently impede the precipitating ion precipitation. Other acceleration events in the cusp are sometimes organized with an apparent cellular structure that suggests Alfven waves or other large-scale phenomena are controlling the localized potentials. We examine several cusp encounters by the FAST satellite where the modulation of energetic session on acceleration particle populations reveals evidence of localized acceleration, most likely by parallel electric fields.

  18. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurin, D. A.; Mingels, S.; Kleshch, V. I.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-06-01

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methane-hydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm2, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1 V/μm. The integral FE current-voltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carbon-carbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  19. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D. A.; Kleshch, V. I.; Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-06-08

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methane–hydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm{sup 2}, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1 V/μm. The integral FE current–voltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carbon–carbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  20. Parasite-induced changes in the diet of a freshwater amphipod: field and laboratory evidence.

    PubMed

    Médoc, V; Piscart, C; Maazouzi, C; Simon, L; Beisel, J-N

    2011-04-01

    Trophically transmitted parasites are likely to strongly influence food web-structure. The extent to which they change the trophic ecology of their host remains nevertheless poorly investigated and field evidence is lacking. This is particularly true for acanthocephalan parasites whose invertebrate hosts can prey on other invertebrates and contribute to leaf-litter breakdown. We used a multiple approach combining feeding experiments, neutral lipids and stable isotopes to investigate the trophic ecology of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli parasitized by the bird acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus. Infected compared to uninfected amphipods consumed as many dead isopods, but fewer live isopods and less leaf material. Infection had no influence on the total concentration of neutral lipids. Contrary to what we expected based on laboratory findings, the nitrogen isotope signature, which allows for the estimation of consumer's trophic position, was not influenced by infection status. Conversely, the carbon isotope signature, which is used to identify food sources, changed with infection and suggested that the diet of infected G. roeseli includes less perilithon (i.e. fixed algae on rocks, stones) but more terrestrial inputs (e.g. leaf material) than that of uninfected conspecifics. This study shows evidence of changes in the trophic ecology of P. minutus-infected G. roeseli and we stress the need to complement feeding experiments with field data when investigating top-down effects of infection in an opportunistic feeder which adapts its diet to the available food sources. PMID:21232173

  1. Tectonic Evolution of Chingshui Geothermal Field Inferred from Evidence of Quartz and Calcite Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. C.; Song, S. R.; Wang, P. L.; Liu, C. M.; Yeh, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located in the valley of Chingshui stream, where is about 27 km SW of Ilan, northeastern Taiwan. It is a tectonically complex area occurred by the Philippine Plate subducting beneath the Eurasian plate in the south with Okinawa Trough opening in the Ilan Plain. Owing to complicated geological structure, the heat source of Chingshui geothermal field is still controversial. For understanding hot fluid sources and tectonic evolution, this study focuses on field survey of veins and scaling in the Chingshui geothermal field, and the results inferred from the data of SEM, XRD, carbon and oxygen isotope, and Uranium-thorium dating. The Chingshui hot fluid contains both high concentrations of SiO­2 and HCO3-, therefore, temperature and pressure both drop when the hot fluids inject into shallower fractures, and calcite and quartz both could be precipitated with competition or simultaneously. In Chilukeng River, many euhedral quartz crystals occurred in large damage zone of Xioananao fault that indicated the temperature drop played the dominated role when the hot fluids injected into the shallow. It inferred that the quartz crystal precipitated under compression stress, evidenced by the Xioananao thrust fault with no surface rupture. Whiles, there are gouges in normal fault with abundant calcite or calcite with quartz veins cropped out in the confluence of Chingshui River and Chilukeng River. The results indicate that those veins occurred in more recent period by U-Th dating data, because of degassing CO2 occurred in open fractures by normal faulting or the stress changing from compression to extension. The standard oxygen isotopes range from 1.29 to 20.73 permil of SMOW and the clumped isotope of Δ47 outcrop is 0.385 in calcite veins, suggest that the highest temperature of thermal fulids with calcite precipitations is 222℃±9℃ by calibrated equation of Passey and Henkes 2012. Meanwhile, it also indicates that the oxygen isotope of

  2. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  3. BAL Phosphorus Abundance and Evidence for Immense Ionic Column Densities in Quasar Outflows: VLT/X-Shooter Observations of Quasar SDSS J1512+1119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Benn, Chris; Chamberlain, Carter

    2012-10-01

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is ~1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, PID:87.B-0229.

  4. Genetic Variants Associated with Breast Cancer Risk: Comprehensive Field Synopsis, Meta-Analysis, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Over 1,000 reports have been published during the past two decades on associations between genetic variants in candidate genes and breast cancer risk. Results have been generally inconsistent. We conducted literature searches and meta-analyses to provide a field synopsis of the current understanding of the genetic architecture of breast cancer risk. Methods Systematic literature searches for candidate gene association studies of breast cancer risk were conducted in two stages using PubMed on or before February 28, 2010. A total of 24,500 publications were identified, of which, 1,059 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses were conducted for 279 genetic variants in 128 candidate genes or chromosomal loci that had a minimum of three data sources available. Variants with significant associations by meta-analysis were assessed using the Venice criteria and scored as having strong, moderate, or weak cumulative evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Findings Fifty-one variants in 40 genes showed statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. Cumulative epidemiologic evidence for an association with breast cancer risk was graded as strong for 10 variants in six genes (ATM, CASP8, CHEK2, CTLA4, NBN, and TP53), moderate for four variants in four genes (ATM, CYP19A1, TERT, and XRCC3), and weak for 37 additional variants. Additionally, in meta-analyses that included a minimum of 10,000 cases and 10,000 controls, convincing evidence of no association with breast cancer risk was identified for 45 variants in 37 genes. Interpretation While most genetic variants evaluated in previous candidate gene studies showed no association with breast cancer risk in meta-analyses, 14 variants in 9 genes were found to have moderate to strong evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Further evaluation of these variants is warranted. PMID:21514219

  5. Effects of weed cover composition on insect pest and natural enemy abundance in a field of Dracaena marginata (Asparagales: Asparagaceae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sadof, Clifford S; Linkimer, Mildred; Hidalgo, Eduardo; Casanoves, Fernando; Gibson, Kevin; Benjamin, Tamara J

    2014-04-01

    Weeds and their influence on pest and natural enemy populations were studied on a commercial ornamental farm during 2009 in the Atlantic Zone of Costa Rica. A baseline survey of the entire production plot was conducted in February, along a 5 by 5 m grid to characterize and map initial weed communities of plants, cicadellids, katydids, and armored scales. In total, 50 plant species from 21 families were found. Seven weed treatments were established to determine how weed manipulations would affect communities of our targeted pests and natural enemies. These treatments were selected based on reported effects of specific weed cover on herbivorous insects and natural enemies, or by their use by growers as a cover crop. Treatments ranged from weed-free to being completely covered with endemic species of weeds. Although some weed treatments changed pest abundances, responses differed among arthropod pests, with the strongest effects observed for Caldwelliola and Empoasca leafhoppers. Removal of all weeds increased the abundance of Empoasca, whereas leaving mostly cyperacaeous weeds increased the abundance of Caldwelliola. Weed manipulations had no effect on the abundance of katydid and scale populations. No weed treatment reduced the abundance of all three of the target pests. Differential responses of the two leafhopper species to the same weed treatments support hypotheses, suggesting that noncrop plants can alter the abundance of pests through their effects on arthropod host finding and acceptance, as well as their impacts on natural enemies. PMID:24517852

  6. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  7. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  8. Original Size of the Sudbury Structure: Evidence from Field Investigations and Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Paul D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of continuing studies of the original size of the Sudbury impact structure, including imaging radar and field investigations of supposed "Sudbury breccia" north of the Sudbury Igneous Comples (SIC). Imaging radar acquired from Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) aircraft, European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1), and RADARSAT shows no evidence of outer rings concentric with the North Range. Illumination directions are such that these rings, presumably extension fractures, would be conspicuous by look azimuth highlighting if they existed. Field mapping supports this interpretation, showing that supposed ring fractures occupied by Huronian sediments are essentially synclines older than the 1850 Ma impact and are not related to the impact. Field investigations of "Sudbury breccia" north of the SIC shows that most if not all of it is inside or along contacts with diabase dykes of the Sudbury Swarm (ca. 1238 Ma), and hence is far too young to be related to the impact. A recently-discovered occurrence of "Sudbury breccia" south of the SIC, near Creighton, is similarly associated with a NW-trending diabase dyke cutting the SIC, supporting the post-impact age of the breccia. It is concluded that the original north rim of the Sudbury crater was not more than 5 to 10 km north of the present North Range SIC contact, and that published estimates of the crater size (ca 200 km diameter) are incorrect.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHANGING PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELDS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, H. M.; Mao, X. J.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, H. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, G. P.

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have provided evidence that the solar photospheric magnetic fields could have rapid and permanent changes in both longitudinal and transverse components associated with major flares. As a result, the Lorentz force (LF) acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior could be perturbed, and the change of LF is always nearly in the downward direction. However, these rapid and permanent changes have not been systematically investigated, yet, using vector magnetograms. In this paper, we analyze photospheric vector magnetograms covering five flares to study the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate two-dimensional spatial distributions of the changing LF. Around the major flaring polarity inversion line, the net change of the LF is directed downward in an area of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} for X-class flares. For all events, the white-light observations show that sunspots darken in this location after flares, and magnetic fields become more inclined, which is consistent with the ideas put forward by Hudson et al. and Fisher et al., and observations.

  10. Induced magnetic fields as evidence for subsurface oceans in Europa and Callisto.

    PubMed

    Khurana, K K; Kivelson, M G; Stevenson, D J; Schubert, G; Russell, C T; Walker, R J; Polanskey, C

    1998-10-22

    The Galileo spacecraft has been orbiting Jupiter since 7 December 1995, and encounters one of the four galilean satellites-Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto-on each orbit. Initial results from the spacecraft's magnetometer have indicated that neither Europa nor Callisto have an appreciable internal magnetic field, in contrast to Ganymede and possibly Io. Here we report perturbations of the external magnetic fields (associated with Jupiter's inner magnetosphere) in the vicinity of both Europa and Callisto. We interpret these perturbations as arising from induced magnetic fields, generated by the moons in response to the periodically varying plasma environment. Electromagnetic induction requires eddy currents to flow within the moons, and our calculations show that the most probable explanation is that there are layers of significant electrical conductivity just beneath the surfaces of both moons. We argue that these conducting layers may best be explained by the presence of salty liquid-water oceans, for which there is already indirect geological evidence in the case of Europa. PMID:9796812

  11. The Auckland volcanic field, New Zealand: Geophysical evidence for structural and spatio-temporal relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, John; Locke, Corinne A.

    2010-08-01

    Geophysical data from the monogenetic Auckland volcanic field reveal complex structural and spatio-temporal relationships at different scales. The volcanic field is coincident with regional magnetic and gravity anomalies that mark a major crustal suture and with a discontinuity marking a significant structural asperity. Here, the linear regional magnetic anomaly splays into a wide band of NNW-trending lineaments, arising from serpentinised shear zones in the upper crust, that matches the extent of the volcanic field and that may reflect a region of crustal weakness creating preferential permeability. However, there appears to be no simple correlation between the locations of individual vents and these lineaments that might delineate more shallow structural controls with this orientation, probably as a consequence of other structural influences. High-resolution aeromagnetic data over the volcanic field show that the volcanoes have a wide range of magnetic signatures indicating a variability of subsurface structure. Scoria cone volcanoes typically have strong anomalies (up to several 100 nT) whilst tuff-ring volcanoes typically have weak anomalies (less than 50 nT), though the surface geology is not always an indicator of the nature and extent of the subsurface deposits. Both cone and tuff-ring volcanoes in the Auckland field appear to be underlain by subsurface bowl-shaped bodies of basalt, implying that their eruption histories commonly involve lava ponding into early excavated craters. The present geophysical data give no evidence for subsurface dyke-like structures or for substantial near-surface volumes of basaltic rocks where there are no known eruption centres or buried flows. Aeromagnetic and palaeomagnetic data suggest that a number of adjacent vents with an implied structural linkage may be contemporaneous, though other examples occur where vents of clearly different ages exploit the same apparent structure. A unique feature of the Auckland field is that at

  12. Biogeochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon occurrence, Recluse oil field, Wyoming; preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalziel, Mary C.; Donovan, Terrence J.

    1980-01-01

    Anomalously high manganese-to-iron ratios occurring in pine needles and sage leaves over the Recluse oil field, Wyoming, suggest effects of petroleum microseepage on the plants. This conclusion is supported by iron and manganese concentrations in soils and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in rock samples. Seeping hydrocarbons provided reducing conditions sufficient to enable divalent iron and manganese to be organically complexed or adsorbed on solids in the soils. These bound or adsorped elements in the divalent state are essential to plants, and the plants readily assimilate them. The magnitude of the plant anomalies, combined with the supportive isotopic and chemical evidence confirming petroleum leakage, makes a strong case for the use of plants as a biogeochemical prospecting tool.

  13. Evidence of primary migration of condensate by molecular solution in aqueous phase in Yacheng Field, offshore South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanxing, Zhang; Qiming, Zhang

    The composition of Yacheng condensate provides possible evidences of primary migration of petroleum by molecular solution in the aqueous phase. Aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs), especially benzene and toluene, make up a high percentage of the condensate. The abundance of each hydrocarbon (HC) in the condensate is mainly controlled by compound type and carbon number. The distribution of normal alkanes is discontinuous at C 16. Aromatic hydrocarbons are 3.8‰ isotopically heavier than the saturated hydrocarbons. The isoprenoid hydrocarbons are very abundant, especially pristane. The specific gravity of the Yacheng condensate is 0.85530 g cm -3, which is much higher than the average for condensates. These features are in good agreement with the HC solubilities in aqueous solution.

  14. Evidence for a sedimentary fingerprint of an asymmetric flow field surrounding a short seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Chapman, David C.; Thomson, John; Lampitt, Richard S.

    2004-06-01

    Physical oceanographic modeling and field studies have shown that kilometer-scale seafloor elevations of comparable breadth and width (abyssal hills, knolls, seamounts) are surrounded by complex flow fields. Asymmetric flow fields, reversed flow and closed streamlines around the topographic feature (Taylor caps), and resonantly amplified tidal currents around the seamount rim potentially control near-bottom particle dynamics, particle deposition at the seafloor and, consequently, the formation of the sedimentary record. We combine numerical modeling and field data to study how such topographically controlled flow-field features are reflected in the sedimentary record. Sediment deposition on a topographically isolated abyssal knoll (height: 900 m) on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the Northeast Atlantic (water depth above the abyssal plain: 4850 m) was studied, (1) by comparing the spatial distribution of 210Pb fluxes, calculated from inventories of sedimentary excess 210Pb, with 210Pb input from the water column as recorded by sediment traps; and (2) by comparing sedimentary grain-size distributions and Zr/Al ratios (an indicator for contents of the heavy mineral zircon) at slope, summit and far-field sites. Given Rossby numbers ≥0.23, a fractional seamount height of ˜0.2, and the absence of diurnal tides it is concluded that an asymmetric flow field without Taylor cap and without amplified tidal currents around the seamount rim is the principal flow-field feature at this knoll. The results and conclusions are as follows: (1) Geochemical and grain-size patterns in the sedimentary record largely agree with the predicted pattern of flow intensity around the topographic elevation: with increasing current strength (erosiveness) there is evidence for a growing discrepancy between water column-derived and sediment-derived 210Pb fluxes, and for increasing contents of larger and heavier particles. The topographically controlled flow field distorts a homogeneous particle

  15. Sky Compass Orientation in Desert Locusts—Evidence from Field and Laboratory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Locusts are long-range migratory insects. At high population density, immature animals form marching hopper bands while adults take off and form huge swarms of millions of animals. At low population densities animals are solitarious, but likewise migrate, mostly during the night. Numerous studies aimed at predicting locust infestations showed that migrations both as hopper bands and as adults are largely downwind following seasonal shifts of the tropical convergence zone taking the animals to areas of rainfall. Only a few studies provided evidence for active orientation mechanisms, including the involvement of a sun compass. This scarcity of evidence stands in contrast to recent neurobiological data showing sophisticated neuronal adaptations suited for sky compass navigation. These include a special dorsal eye region with photoreceptors suited to analyze the polarization pattern of the sky and a system of topographically arranged sky compass neurons in the central complex of the brain. Laboratory experiments, moreover, demonstrated polarotaxis in tethered flying animals. The discrepancy of these findings call for more rigorous field studies on active orientation mechanisms in locusts. It remains to be shown how locusts use their internal sky compass during mass migrations and what role it plays to guide solitarious locusts in their natural habitat. PMID:26733834

  16. Does social approval stimulate prosocial behavior? Evidence from a field experiment in the residential electricity market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoeli, Erez

    At least since Veblen (1899), economists have proposed that people do good because they desire "social approval" and want to look good in front of others. Evidence from the laboratory supports this claim, but is difficult to generalize due to the unrealistic degree of scrutiny in a laboratory environment. I administer a field experiment to test the potency of social approval in a realistic and policy relevant setting. In the experiment I solicit 7893 customers of a large electric utility for a program that helps prevent blackouts. I vary whether their decision to participate in the program is revealed to their neighbors. Customers whose decision is revealed are 1.5% more likely to sign up than those whose decision is anonymous when their decision is framed as a contribution to a public good. Social approval increases participation more than offering subjects a $25 incentive, and its effect is large relative to the mean sign-up rate of 4.1%. I explore whether social approval contributes to crowding out and conditionally cooperative behavior, but the evidence is inconclusive.

  17. Evidence for early postglacial warming in Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Andrew B. H.; Cwynar, Les C.

    2010-02-01

    Situated between the Western Pacific Warm Pool to the north and Antarctica to the south, Tasmania is an ideal location to study both postglacial and Holocene paleoclimates. Few well-dated, quantitative temperature reconstructions exist for the region so that important questions about the occurrence and magnitude of events, such as the Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas, in Tasmania remain unanswered. Here, we provide chironomid-based reconstructions of temperature of the warmest quarter (TWARM) for two small subalpine lakes, Eagle and Platypus Tarns, Mount Field National Park. Shortly after deglaciation, TWARM reached modern values by approximately 15 000 cal a BP and remained high until 13 000 cal a BP after which temperatures began to cool steadily, reaching a minimum by 11 100-10 000 cal a BP. These results are consistent with sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from south of Tasmania but are in stark contrast to temperature inferences drawn from vegetation reconstructions based on pollen data that indicate cool initial temperatures followed by a broad warm period between 11 600-6800 cal a BP (10 000-6000 14C a BP). The chironomid record broadly matches the summer insolation curve whereas the vegetation record and associated climate inferences mirror winter insolation. The Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas cold events are not evident in the chironomid-inferred temperatures, but the Antarctic Cold Reversal is evident in the loss-on-ignition curves.

  18. Experimental evidence of transport of pesticides through field soils - a review

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, M.

    1996-01-01

    Much information is available in the literature about pesticide transport through soils at the field scale. The purpose of this study is to review the literature with a focus on pesticide leaching to groundwater. The literature was compiled and discussed with respect to different factors that influence pesticide leaching. Pesticide leaching below the root zone has been demonstrated in sandy as well as in loamy soils. Particularly in loamy soils, there is evidence that even strongly adsorbing chemicals can move along preferential flow pathways and that the travel times of pesticides are comparable to those of conservative solutes. The amounts of pesticides leached below the root zone by worst case rainfall events depend on the chemical properties and can reach up to 5% of the applied mass. When there is no heavy rainfall shortly following application of chemicals, the mass annually leached below the root zone is in the range of <0.1 to 1%, occasionally it can reach up to 4%. Although a direct comparison cannot be made, the mass lost by leaching seems generally to be smaller than that lost by runoff, depending of course on the slope of the fields. Several factors that affect pesticide leaching, such as surface preparation, soil structure, soil water content, type of irrigation, pesticide formulation, time of application and rainfall events, are discussed with support of experimental evidence. While some factors showed inconsistent effects, others show promise in controlling leaching mechanisms. These latter factors include initial water content, surface preparation, and time of pesticide application. Based on the reviewed literature recommendations were made for future research activities. 172 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  19. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Murphy, E.M.; Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L.; Ringelberg, D. B. |

    1997-12-31

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  20. Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Pieroni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed. PMID:22899952

  1. Field evidence for non-host predator avoidance in a manipulated amphipod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Médoc, Vincent; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    Manipulative parasites are known to alter the spatial distribution of their intermediate hosts in a way that enables trophic transmission to definitive hosts. However, field data on the ecological implications of such changes are lacking. In particular, little is known about the spatial coexistence between infected prey and dead-end predators after a parasite-induced habitat shift. Here, we used an Amphipoda ( Gammarus roeseli)-Acanthocephala ( Polymorphus minutus) association to investigate how infection with a manipulative parasite affects the predation risk by non-hosts within the invertebrate community. First, we collected invertebrates by sampling various natural habitats and calculated the distribution amplitude of amphipods according to their infection status. Infection with P. minutus significantly reduced the habitat breadth in G. roeseli, parasitised individuals being mainly found in floating materials whereas uninfected ones were widespread throughout the sampled habitats. Second, to test if these changes also affect the risk for P. minutus to be ingested by non-hosts, we estimated the predation risk experienced by G. roeseli within the macro-invertebrate community. The habitat overlap between potential invertebrate predators and G. roeseli showed that the spatial probability of encounter was lower for P. minutus-infected amphipods than for uninfected conspecifics. For the first time, to our knowledge, a study used ecological tools to bring field evidence for the spatial avoidance of dead-end predators in a manipulated amphipod.

  2. Does Encouragement Matter in Improving Gender Imbalances in Technical Fields? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Unkovic, Cait; Sen, Maya; Quinn, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Does encouragement help address gender imbalances in technical fields? We present the results of one of the first and largest randomized controlled trials on the topic. Using an applied statistics conference in the social sciences as our context, we randomly assigned half of a pool of 3,945 graduate students to receive two personalized emails encouraging them to apply (n = 1,976) and the other half to receive nothing (n = 1,969). We find a robust, positive effect associated with this simple intervention and suggestive evidence that women responded more strongly than men. However, we find that women's conference acceptance rates are higher within the control group than in the treated group. This is not the case for men. The reason appears to be that female applicants in the treated group solicited supporting letters at lower rates. Our findings therefore suggest that "low dose" interventions may promote diversity in STEM fields but may also have the potential to expose underlying disparities when used alone or in a non-targeted way. PMID:27097315

  3. The left visual field attentional advantage: No evidence of different speeds of processing across visual hemifields.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2015-12-01

    Temporal-order judgment (TOJ) and simultaneity judgment (SJ) tasks are used to study differences in speed of processing across sensory modalities, stimulus types, or experimental conditions. Matthews and Welch (2015) reported that observed performance in SJ and TOJ tasks is superior when visual stimuli are presented in the left visual field (LVF) compared to the right visual field (RVF), revealing an LVF advantage presumably reflecting attentional influences. Because observed performance reflects the interplay of perceptual and decisional processes involved in carrying out the tasks, analyses that separate out these influences are needed to determine the origin of the LVF advantage. We re-analyzed the data of Matthews and Welch (2015) using a model of performance in SJ and TOJ tasks that separates out these influences. Parameter estimates capturing the operation of perceptual processes did not differ between hemifields by these analyses, whereas parameter estimates capturing the operation of decisional processes differed. In line with other evidence, perceptual processing also did not differ between SJ and TOJ tasks. Thus, the LVF advantage occurs with identical speeds of processing in both visual hemifields. If attention is responsible for the LVF advantage, it does not exert its influence via prior entry. PMID:26261896

  4. Field evidence for non-host predator avoidance in a manipulated amphipod.

    PubMed

    Médoc, Vincent; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    Manipulative parasites are known to alter the spatial distribution of their intermediate hosts in a way that enables trophic transmission to definitive hosts. However, field data on the ecological implications of such changes are lacking. In particular, little is known about the spatial coexistence between infected prey and dead-end predators after a parasite-induced habitat shift. Here, we used an Amphipoda (Gammarus roeseli)-Acanthocephala (Polymorphus minutus) association to investigate how infection with a manipulative parasite affects the predation risk by non-hosts within the invertebrate community. First, we collected invertebrates by sampling various natural habitats and calculated the distribution amplitude of amphipods according to their infection status. Infection with P. minutus significantly reduced the habitat breadth in G. roeseli, parasitised individuals being mainly found in floating materials whereas uninfected ones were widespread throughout the sampled habitats. Second, to test if these changes also affect the risk for P. minutus to be ingested by non-hosts, we estimated the predation risk experienced by G. roeseli within the macro-invertebrate community. The habitat overlap between potential invertebrate predators and G. roeseli showed that the spatial probability of encounter was lower for P. minutus-infected amphipods than for uninfected conspecifics. For the first time, to our knowledge, a study used ecological tools to bring field evidence for the spatial avoidance of dead-end predators in a manipulated amphipod. PMID:19139837

  5. Does Encouragement Matter in Improving Gender Imbalances in Technical Fields? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Unkovic, Cait; Sen, Maya; Quinn, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Does encouragement help address gender imbalances in technical fields? We present the results of one of the first and largest randomized controlled trials on the topic. Using an applied statistics conference in the social sciences as our context, we randomly assigned half of a pool of 3,945 graduate students to receive two personalized emails encouraging them to apply (n = 1,976) and the other half to receive nothing (n = 1,969). We find a robust, positive effect associated with this simple intervention and suggestive evidence that women responded more strongly than men. However, we find that women’s conference acceptance rates are higher within the control group than in the treated group. This is not the case for men. The reason appears to be that female applicants in the treated group solicited supporting letters at lower rates. Our findings therefore suggest that “low dose” interventions may promote diversity in STEM fields but may also have the potential to expose underlying disparities when used alone or in a non-targeted way. PMID:27097315

  6. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  7. Evidence for a functional subdivision of Premotor Ear-Eye Field (Area 8B)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotto, Marco; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Lucchetti, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The Supplementary Eye Field (SEF) and the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) have been described as participating in gaze shift control. Recent evidence suggests, however, that other areas of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex also influence gaze shift. Herein, we have investigated electrically evoked ear- and eye movements from the Premotor Ear-Eye Field, or PEEF (area 8B) of macaque monkeys. We stimulated PEEF during spontaneous condition (outside the task performance) and during the execution of a visual fixation task (VFT). In the first case, we functionally identified two regions within the PEEF: a core and a belt. In the core region, stimulation elicited forward ear movements; regarding the evoked eye movements, in some penetrations, stimulation elicited contraversive fixed-vectors with a mean amplitude of 5.14°; while in other penetrations, we observed prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position. On the contrary, in the belt region, stimulation elicited backward ear movements; regarding the eye movements, in some penetrations stimulation elicited prevalently contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell within 15° in respect to the primary eye position, while in the lateral edge of the investigated region, stimulation elicited contralateral goal-directed eye movements having end-points that fell beyond 15° in respect to the primary eye position. Stimulation during VFT either did not elicit eye movements or evoked saccades of only a few degrees. Finally, even though no head rotation movements were observed during the stimulation period, we viewed a relationship between the duration of stimulation and the neck forces exerted by the monkey's head. We propose an updated vision of the PEEF composed of two functional regions, core and belt, which may be involved in integrating auditory and visual information important to the programming of gaze orienting

  8. Magmatic Fluid Source of the Chingshui Geothermal Field: Evidence of Carbonate Isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. R.; Lu, Y. C.; Wang, P. L.; John, C. M.; MacDonald, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located at the northern tip of the Miocene Lushan Slate Formation, which was part of the Eurasian continental margin subject to the Plio-Pleistocene collision associated with the Luzon Arc. The remnant heat of the Taiwan orogeny has long been considered to drive the circulation of hydrothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. However, recent studies based on magnetic anomalies and helium isotopic ratios suggest that the heat might instead be derived from igneous bodies. By examining isotope data of calcite veins and scaling in geothermal wells, this study aimed to clarify the fluid origin and possible heat source accounting for the geothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses indicate that veins from outcrops and scalings in geothermal wells have high and low d values, respectively. Data for veins in drilled cores fall in between outcrop veins and scalings values. Such an isotopic pattern could be interpreted as the mixing of two end member fluids. The clumped isotope analysis of calcite veins from the outcrops yielded precipitation temperatures of up to 232 ± 16 ℃ and a reconstructed d18O fluid value of 9.5 ‰(magmatic fluid: 6-11 ‰; metamorphic fluid: 5-28 ‰ by Taylor, 1974). The inferred d18O values of hot fluids for the vein formation are significantly different from that of meteoric water in Chingshui area (around -5.4 ‰) as well as the scaling in geothermal wells (around -7.6 ‰). Previous study of magnetotelluric image demonstrated two possible fluid reservoirs at different depths (Chen et al. 2012). Our isotope data combined with these lines of evidence suggest that the scaling in geothermal wells could be derived from fluids originating from the shallower reservoir. In contrast, the veins present at outcrops could have been formed from 18O-enriched, deeply-sourced fluids related to either metamorphic dehydration or magmatic processes.

  9. Stormflow generation: A meta-analysis of field evidence from small, forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthold, Frauke K.; Woods, Ross A.

    2015-05-01

    Combinations of runoff characteristics are commonly used to represent distinct conceptual models of stormflow generation. In this study, three runoff characteristics: hydrograph response, time source of runoff water, and flow path are used to classify catchments. Published data from the scientific literature are used to provide evidence from small, forested catchments. Each catchment was assigned to one of the eight conceptual models, depending on the combination of quick/slow response, old/new water, and overland/subsurface flow. A standard procedure was developed to objectively diagnose the predominant conceptual model of stormflow generation for each catchment and assess its temporal and spatial support. The literature survey yielded 42 catchments, of which 30 catchments provide a complete set of qualitative runoff characteristics resulting in one of the eight conceptual models. The majority of these catchments classify as subsurface flow path dominated. No catchments were found for conceptual models representing combinations of quick response-new water-subsurface flow (SSF), slow-new-SSF, slow-old-overland flow (OF) nor new-slow-OF. Of the 30 qualitatively classified catchments, 24 provide a complete set of quantitative measures. In summary, the field support is strong for 19 subsurface-dominated catchments and is weak for 5 surface flow path dominated catchments (six catchments had insufficient quantitative data). Two alternative explanations exist for the imbalance of field support between the two flow path classes: (1) the selection of research catchments in past field studies was mainly to explain quick hydrograph response in subsurface dominated catchments; (2) catchments with prevailing subsurface flow paths are more common in nature. We conclude that the selection of research catchments needs to cover a wider variety of environmental conditions which should lead to a broader, and more widely applicable, spectrum of resulting conceptual models and process

  10. Relative resource abundance explains butterfly biodiversity in island communities

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naoaki; Yokoyama, Jun; Kawata, Masakado

    2007-01-01

    Ecologists have long been intrigued by the factors that control the pattern of biodiversity, i.e., the distribution and abundance of species. Previous studies have demonstrated that coexisting species partition their resources and/or that the compositional similarity between communities is determined by environmental factors, lending support to the niche-assembly model. However, no attempt has been made to test whether the relative amount of resources that reflects relative niche space controls relative species abundance in communities. Here, we demonstrate that the relative abundance of butterfly species in island communities is significantly related to the relative biomasses of their host plants but not to the geographic distance between communities. In the studied communities, the biomass of particular host plant species positively affected the abundance of the butterfly species that used them, and consequently, influenced the relative abundance of the butterfly communities. This indicated that the niche space of butterflies (i.e., the amount of resources) strongly influences butterfly biodiversity patterns. We present this field evidence of the niche-apportionment model that propose that the relative amount of niche space explains the pattern of the relative abundance of the species in communities. PMID:17553963

  11. Balancing ballistic protection against physiological strain: evidence from laboratory and field trials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Burdon, Catriona A; van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Fogarty, Alison L; Notley, Sean R; Hunt, Andrew P; Billing, Daniel C; Drain, Jace R; Silk, Aaron J; Patterson, Mark J; Peoples, Gregory E

    2016-02-01

    This project was based on the premise that decisions concerning the ballistic protection provided to defence personnel should derive from an evaluation of the balance between protection level and its impact on physiological function, mobility, and operational capability. Civilians and soldiers participated in laboratory- and field-based studies in which ensembles providing five levels of ballistic protection were evaluated, each with progressive increases in protection, mass (3.4-11.0 kg), and surface-area coverage (0.25-0.52 m(2)). Physiological trials were conducted on volunteers (N = 8) in a laboratory, under hot-dry conditions simulating an urban patrol: walking at 4 km·h(-1) (90 min) and 6 km·h(-1) (30 min or to fatigue). Field-based trials were used to evaluate tactical battlefield movements (mobility) of soldiers (N = 31) under tropical conditions, and across functional tests of power, speed, agility, endurance, and balance. Finally, trials were conducted at a jungle training centre, with soldiers (N = 32) patrolling under tropical conditions (averaging 5 h). In the laboratory, work tolerance was reduced as protection increased, with deep-body temperature climbing relentlessly. However, the protective ensembles could be grouped into two equally stressful categories, each providing a different level of ballistic protection. This outcome was supported during the mobility trials, with the greatest performance decrement evident during fire and movement simulations, as the ensemble mass was increased (-2.12%·kg(-1)). The jungle patrol trials similarly supported this outcome. Therefore, although ballistic protection does increase physiological strain, this research has provided a basis on which to determine how that strain can be balanced against the mission-specific level of required personal protection. PMID:26771198

  12. Gas hydrates in the Messoyakha gas field of the West Siberian Basin - a re-examination of the geologic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Ginsburg, Gabriel D.

    1997-01-01

    The amount of natural gas within the gas hydrate accumulations of the world is believed to greatly exceed the volume of known conventional natural gas reserves. The hydrocarbon production history of the Russian Messoyakha field, located in the West Siberian Basin, has been used as evidence that gas hydrates are an immediate source of natural gas that can be produced by conventional means. Re-examination of available geologic, geochemical, and hydrocarbon production data suggests, however, that gas hydrates may not have contributed to gas production in the Messoyakha field. More field and laboratory studies are needed to assess the historical contribution of gas hydrate production in the Messoyakha field.

  13. Gas hydrates in the Messoyakha gas field of the West Siberian Basin - A re-examination of the geologic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Ginsburg, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of natural gas within the gas hydrate accumulations of the world is believed to greatly exceed the volume of known conventional natural gas reserves. The hydrocarbon production history of the Russian Messoyakha field, located in the West Siberian Basin, has been used as evidence that gas hydrates are an immediate source of natural gas that can be produced by conventional means. Re-examination of available geologic, geochemical and hydrocarbon production data suggests, however, that gas hydrates may not have contributed to gas production in the Messoyakha field. More field and laboratory studies are needed to assess the historical contribution of gas hydrate production in the Messoyakha field.

  14. Evidence of Formation Scaling Occurred in the Chingshui Geothermal Field, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.-C.; Song, S.-R.; Liu, C.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Taiwan is located at the margin of young orogenic belt which the Philippine Sea plate collides with Asian continental margin. It is characteristic that the geothermal outcrops and hot springs are widely distributed in this island and has great potential to explore and develop the geothermal heat for power plant. A 3-Mw pilot power plant, therefore, was constructed in 1981 in the Chingshui area, northeastern Taiwan. However, due to rapid decline of power generation from 1.2 MWe to 0.2 MWe and shortage of economic efficiency, this plant was terminated in 1993. Most of the engineers and researchers considered the important reason for termination may be resulted from carbonate scaling, based on the findings of calcite deposits inside well pipe. A production well with the depth 1,500 m has been drilled into the reservoir of slate host rocks and raises 200 m cores between 600 m to 800 m in depth. Many calcite or aragonite minerals filled up the fractures, veins and open cracks have been found in the cores. Meanwhile, surface survey on outcrops shows that there are many quartz veins occurred in slate formation, but a few or no calcite veins. Those lines of evidence strongly suggest that the formation scaling rather than carbonate precipitations inside the wells termination of power plant have been occurred in the Chingshui geothermal field.

  15. Evidence of Fast Magnetic Field Evolution in an Accreting Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patruno, A.

    2012-07-01

    The large majority of neutron stars (NSs) in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) have never shown detectable pulsations despite several decades of intense monitoring. The reason for this remains an unsolved problem that hampers our ability to measure the spin frequency of most accreting NSs. The accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) HETE J1900.1-2455 is an intermittent pulsar that exhibited pulsations at about 377 Hz for the first two months and then turned into a nonpulsating source. Understanding why this happened might help us to understand why most LMXBs do not pulsate. We present a seven-year coherent timing analysis of data taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We discover new sporadic pulsations that are detected on a baseline of about 2.5 years. We find that the pulse phases anti-correlate with the X-ray flux as previously discovered in other AMXPs. We place stringent upper limits of 0.05% rms on the pulsed fraction when pulsations are not detected and identify an enigmatic pulse phase drift of ~180° in coincidence with the first disappearance of pulsations. Thanks to the new pulsations we measure a long term spin frequency derivative whose strength decays exponentially with time. We interpret this phenomenon as evidence of magnetic field burial.

  16. Multiple collapses at Mt Meru volcano, Tanzania: remote sensing and field evidences from debris avalanche deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcamp, Audray; Kwelwa, Shimba; Macheyeki, Athanas; Kervyn De Meerendre, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Mt Meru volcano is located in the Northern Tanzanian Divergence Zone where the East African rift splits into several branches. This 4565 m-high stratovolcano overlooks the highly populated city of Arusha and is breached on the east side by a 4x5 km horse-shoe shaped valley that was attributed to landslides associated with lahars deposits (Wilkinson et al., 1986; Dawson, 2008) and a major collapse (Wilkinson et al., 1986; Roberts, 2002; Dawson, 2008). An ash cone is growing up within the collapse scar, with its last eruption occurring in 1910. Remote sensing, detailed field mapping and facies/lithology description allowed the recognition of more than two collapse events originated from the main eastern scar, as well as at least one collapse from an almost buried scar on the North East flank. No evidence of syn-collapse eruption has been observed. The high distance and large area covered by the bigger deposit up to the foot of Kilimanjaro is partly due to local interaction with water, where debris avalanche behaves like a lahar. Mt Meru has been undergoing several phases of destabilisation events during its history and can be considered as still potentially hazardous, especially with the ongoing Ash Cone growth within the scar.

  17. Microcredit, family planning programs, and contraceptive behavior: evidence from a field experiment in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jaikishan; Tarozzi, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    The impact of community-based family planning programs and access to credit on contraceptive use, fertility, and family size preferences has not been established conclusively in the literature. We provide additional evidence on the possible effect of such programs by describing the results of a randomized field experiment whose main purpose was to increase the use of contraceptive methods in rural areas of Ethiopia. In the experiment, administrative areas were randomly allocated to one of three intervention groups or to a fourth control group. In the first intervention group, both credit and family planning services were provided and the credit officers also provided information on family planning. Only credit or family planning services, but not both, were provided in the other two intervention groups, while areas in the control group received neither type of service. Using pre- and post-intervention surveys, we find that neither type of program, combined or in isolation, led to an increase in contraceptive use that is significantly greater than that observed in the control group. We conjecture that the lack of impact has much to do with the mismatch between women's preferred contraceptive method (injectibles) and the contraceptives provided by community-based agents (pills and condoms). PMID:21506020

  18. Field experimental evidence that stochastic processes predominate in the initial assembly of bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi-Qi; Zhao, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2016-06-01

    To assess the relative importance of environmental selection, dispersal and stochastic processes in structuring ecological communities, we conducted a bacterial community assembly experiment using microcosms filled with sterile liquid medium under field conditions in the Inner Mongolian grasslands. Multiple replicate microcosms containing different carbon substrates were placed at nine locations across three spatial scales (10, 300 and 10 000 m distance between locations) in such a way that the environment of microcosms varies independently of the geographical distance. The operational taxonomic units within the experimental communities were assessed via the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques on the 10th and 17th days after the onset of the experiment. We found no evidence of distance decay in community similarity, and communities within a given location were more similar to each other regardless of environment than communities at other locations within the same spatial scale. Variance partitioning indicated that location explained more compositional variation in microbial communities than environment, particularly on the 17th day, despite that environment and location in combination could only explain less than half of the total variation. These results suggest that bacterial dispersal is not limited by distance in this experiment, and community assembly in microcosms is not environmentally determined but governed by stochastic processes. PMID:25809418

  19. Understanding Evidence-Based Information for the Early Childhood Field: Tips from RAND's Promising Practices Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Teryn; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    With the growing and diverse use of the term "evidence-based practice" it can be difficult for policymakers, funders, program officers, and other professionals to separate the good evidence from the flawed. Furthermore, once good evidence has been identified, it can be difficult to know how to use it. This article discusses key issues to consider…

  20. Evidence-Based Practice: What Does It Really Mean for the Early Childhood Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia; Wesley, Patricia W.; Snyder, Patricia; Winton, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The growing use of the term "evidence-based" in conference presentations, web sites, journal articles and grants announcements suggest definitive answers to a host of practice-related issues. The purpose of this paper is to address the questions of: (1) defining evidence-based practice; (2) how evidence-based practice differs from other practices;…

  1. Melt/peridotite interaction in the Southern Lanzo peridotite: Field, textural and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardo, G. B.; Zanetti, A.; Müntener, O.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents field, petrographic-structural and geochemical data on spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the southern domain of the Lanzo ophiolitic peridotite massif (Western Alps). Spinel lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites crop out at Mt. Arpone and Mt. Musinè. Field evidence indicates that pristine porphyroclastic spinel lherzolites are transformed to coarse granular spinel harzburgites, which are in turn overprinted by plagioclase peridotites, while strongly depleted spinel harzburgite and dunite bands and bodies replace the plagioclase peridotites. On the northern flank of Mt. Arpone, deformed, porphyroclastic (lithospheric) lherzolites, with diffuse pyroxenite banding, represent the oldest spinel-facies rocks. They show microstructures of a composite subsolidus evolution, suggesting provenance from deeper (asthenospheric) mantle levels and accretion to the lithosphere. These protoliths are locally transformed to coarse granular (reactive) spinel harzburgites and dunites, which show textures reminiscent of melt/rock reaction and geochemical characteristics suggesting that they are products of peridotite interaction with reactively percolating melts. Geochemical data and modelling suggest that <1-5% fractional melting of spinel-facies DMM produced the injected melts. Plagioclase peridotites are hybrid rocks resulting from pre-existing spinel peridotites and variable enrichment of plagioclase and micro-gabbroic material by percolating melts. The impregnating melts attained silica-saturation, as testified by widespread orthopyroxene replacement of olivine, during open system migration in the lithosphere. At Mt. Musinè, coarse granular spinel harzburgite and dunite bodies replace the plagioclase peridotites. Most of these replacive, refractory peridotites have interstitial magmatic clinopyroxene with trace element compositions in equilibrium with MORB, while some Cpx have REE-depleted patterns suggesting transient geochemical features of the

  2. Coherent Structure Patterns Affect Energy Balance Closure: Evidence from Virtual Measurements for a Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; De Roo, F.; Heinze, R.; Eder, F.; Huq, S.; Schmidt, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Mauder, M.

    2015-12-01

    The energy balance closure problem is a well-known issue of eddy-covariance measurements. However, the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Recent evidence suggests that organized low-frequency motion contributes significantly to the energy balance residual, because the associated transport cannot be captured by a point measurement. In this study, we carry out virtual measurements using a PArallelized Large-Eddy Simulation Model (PALM). In order to represent specific measurement days of the field campaign "High definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction" (HD(CP)²), which was part of the project "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction"(HOPE) in 2013, the simulations were driven by synoptic-scale COSMO-DE reanalysis data. Planet boundary layer height, the vertical profiles of variance and skewness of vertical wind were analyzed and a comparison with Doppler-lidar observations shows good agreement. Furthermore, simulated energy imbalances were compared with real-world imbalances from two eddy-covariance stations in the model domain. Particularly poor energy balance closure was found for a day with cellular organized structures in the surface layer, while the energy balance closure was better on other days with roll-like structures. This finding might be one explanation why the energy balance closure generally tends to improve with increasing friction velocity, since roll-like structures are typically associated with higher wind speeds. In order to gain insight into the partitioning of the energy balance residual between the sensible and latent heat fluxes, we further employed a control volume method within the numerical simulation. Hence, advection and storage terms were identified as the most important causes for the lack of energy balance closure by the eddy-covariance method. The results of the virtual measurements indicate that the "missing" part of the surface energy mainly comes from the

  3. Cultural innovation and transmission of tool use in wild chimpanzees: evidence from field experiments.

    PubMed

    Biro, Dora; Inoue-Nakamura, Noriko; Tonooka, Rikako; Yamakoshi, Gen; Sousa, Claudia; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2003-12-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are the most proficient and versatile users of tools in the wild. How such skills become integrated into the behavioural repertoire of wild chimpanzee communities is investigated here by drawing together evidence from three complementary approaches in a group of oil-palm nut- ( Elaeis guineensis) cracking chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea. First, extensive surveys of communities adjacent to Bossou have shown that population-specific details of tool use, such as the selection of species of nuts as targets for cracking, cannot be explained purely on the basis of ecological differences. Second, a 16-year longitudinal record tracing the development of nut-cracking in individual chimpanzees has highlighted the importance of a critical period for learning (3-5 years of age), while the similar learning contexts experienced by siblings have been found to result in near-perfect (13 out of 14 dyads) inter-sibling correspondence in laterality. Third, novel data from field experiments involving the introduction of unfamiliar species of nuts to the Bossou group illuminates key aspects of both cultural innovation and transmission. We show that responses of individuals toward the novel items differ markedly with age, with juveniles being the most likely to explore. Furthermore, subjects are highly specific in their selection of conspecifics as models for observation, attending to the nut-cracking activities of individuals in the same age group or older, but not younger than themselves. Together with the phenomenon of inter-community migration, these results demonstrate a mechanism for the emergence of culture in wild chimpanzees. PMID:12898285

  4. Soil invertebrate community change over fuel-contaminated sites on a subantarctic island: An ecological field-based line of evidence for site risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wasley, Jane; Mooney, Thomas J; King, Catherine K

    2016-04-01

    A number of fuel spills, of both recent and historic origins, have occurred on World Heritage-listed subantarctic Macquarie Island. Sites contaminated by mainly diesel fuels are undergoing remediation by the Australian Antarctic Division. The risks posed by these sites are being managed using a "weight of evidence" approach, for which this study provides a preliminary line of evidence for the ecological assessment component of this site management decision framework. This knowledge is pertinent, given the absence of environmental guidelines for fuel contaminants in subantarctic ecosystems. We provide a field-based, site-specific ecological risk assessment for soil invertebrate communities across the fuel spill sites, before the commencement of in situ remediation activities. Springtails (Collembola) were the most abundant taxa. Springtail community patterns showed only limited correlations with the level of fuel contamination at the soil surface, even when elevated levels occurred in the substratum layers. Of the environmental variables measured, community patterns were most strongly correlated with vegetation cover. We identify a suite of 6 species that contribute most to the community dynamics across these sites. A subset of these we propose as useful candidates for future development of single-species toxicity tests: Folsomotoma punctata, Cryptopygus caecus, Cryptopygus antarcticus and Parisotoma insularis. Findings from this study advance our understanding of soil invertebrate community dynamics within these contaminated sites, directly contributing to the improved management and restoration of the sites. Not only does this study provide an important line of evidence for the island's ecological risk assessment for fuel contaminants, it also enhances our understanding of the potential impact of fuels at other subantarctic islands. PMID:26202610

  5. Venera-9 magnetic field measurements in the Venus wake - Evidence for an earth-like interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Venera-9 magnetic field measurements in the Venus wake provide additional support for the hypothesis that Venus has an intrinsic planetary field. The observed field is in the direction expected for a northward moment, and is similar to that observed in equivalent locations in the terrestrial magnetosphere, both in its temporal and spatial behavior. In particular, Venera-9 appears to have observed a plasma sheet expansion, field-aligned currents, and tail-field dipolarization.

  6. Field data and numerical modeling: A multiple lines of evidence approach for assessing vapor intrusion exposure risks.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine K; McClean, Michael D; Suuberg, Eric M; Moradi, Ali; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Ames, Jennifer; Friguglietti, Leigh; Indeglia, Paul A; Shen, Rui; Yao, Yijun; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2016-06-15

    USEPA recommends a multiple lines of evidence approach to make informed decisions at vapor intrusion sites because the vapor intrusion pathway is notoriously difficult to characterize. Our study uses this approach by incorporating groundwater, soil gas, indoor air field measurements and numerical models to evaluate vapor intrusion exposure risks in a Metro-Boston neighborhood known to exhibit lower than anticipated indoor air concentrations based on groundwater concentrations. We collected and evaluated five rounds of field sampling data over the period of one year. Field data results show a steep gradient in soil gas concentrations near the groundwater surface; however as the depth decreases, soil gas concentration gradients also decrease. Together, the field data and the numerical model results suggest that a subsurface feature is limiting vapor transport into indoor air spaces at the study site and that groundwater concentrations are not appropriate indicators of vapor intrusion exposure risks in this neighborhood. This research also reveals the importance of including relevant physical models when evaluating vapor intrusion exposure risks using the multiple lines of evidence approach. Overall, the findings provide insight about how the multiple lines of evidence approach can be used to inform decisions by using field data collected using regulatory-relevant sampling techniques, and a well-established 3-D vapor intrusion model. PMID:26977535

  7. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  8. Evidence for the field line reconnection process in the particle and magnetic field measurements obtained during the Giotto-Halley encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, E.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Daly, P.; Korth, A.; Neubauer, F. M.; O'Sullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of low and high energy particles, as well as the magnetic field obtained by three different instruments during the Giotto-Halley encounter on March 13, 14, 1986 are used to study the field-line merging process. Spikes of 5-15 min duration in the high energy particle flux which are superimposed on the general intensity time profile are correlated with minima in the low energy particle flux and time periods of oppositely directed magnetic field lines. Strong changes in the pitch angle distribution of energetic ions are observed simultaneously. The observations are considered as evidence for sporadic field line merging processes in the front side of Halley's cometosheath which can accelerate ions and electrons up to E of about 300 keV.

  9. [Infantile leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields: review of epidemiologic evidence in 2000].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Salvan, A

    2001-01-01

    We review the epidemiological evidence on childhood leukemia and residential exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. The possibility of carcinogenic effects of power frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF), at levels below units of micro tesla (microT), was first raised in 1979 by a case-control study on childhood cancer carried out in Denver, USA. In that study, excess risks of total cancer and leukemia were observed among children living in homes with "high or very high current configuration", as categorised on the basis of proximity to electric lines and transformers. Many other epidemiological studies have been published since then, characterised by improved--although still not optimal--methods of exposure assessment. At the end of 2000, the epidemiological evidence to support the association between exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and the risk of childhood leukemia is less consistent than what was observed in the mid 90s. At the same time, a growing body of experimental evidence has accumulated against both a direct and a promoting carcinogenic effect of ELF-EMF. Such "negative" experimental evidence hampers a causal interpretation of the "positive" epidemiological studies. PMID:11758279

  10. Evidence for the Reversal of Magnetic Field Polarity in Coronal Streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Faraday rotation observations are unique amongst radio occultation measurements in that they respond to magnetic field in addition to electron density, making it possible to probe the coronal magnetic field.

  11. Compound-Specific Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis - Field Evidence of MTBE Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, T.; Kolhatkar, R. V.; Philp, P.; Wilson, J. T.; Landmeyer, J. E.; Allen, J.

    2002-12-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis allows opportunity to determine the isotopic ratios of individual contaminants. The technique has been applied to confirm biodegradation in studies of chlorinated solvents and recently BTEX, MTBE and TBA. Chemical reactions (including bio- and inorganic degradation) tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), resulting with enrichment of the unreacted substrate in the heavier isotopic species (13C, D), referred to as kinetic isotopic fractionation, so that the extent of fractionation may be used as a proxy for biodegradation. Processes such as volatilization, sorption etc., result in minimal degree of fractionation and do not interfere with the isotopic signal due to biodegradation. The results presented here show the first successful applications of compound-specific isotope analysis to understanding MTBE biodegradation in the field, at both aerobic and anaerobic sites. Observed fractionations suggest that two different biodegradation pathways may be involved. At a number of anaerobic locations major fractionation effects were observed for both C and H; enrichment factors Ÿnfor both elements were approaching or exceeding -10. A laboratory microcosm study using an enrichment culture yielded similar results (C data only). A characteristic feature of these sites was the presence of high concentrations of TBA. Conversely, at a number of sites, the C composition remained stable with little fractionation and stayed within the analytical precision range or changed minimally, while H displayed significant fractionation in excess of 60 per mil. Moderate agreement of the data with Rayleigh fractionation model was observed, suggesting that biodegradation effect was distorted by variability at the source or the plume was not homogeneous. The enrichment factor calculated for these data is similar to the one Ÿnpublished for aerobic microcosm of MTBE-degrading culture from Vandenberg AFB by Gray et al

  12. Songbird abundance and parasitism differ between urban and rural shrublands.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Dirk E; Thompson, Frank R

    2006-02-01

    Many studies have examined differences in avian community composition between urban and rural habitats, but few, if any, have looked at nesting success of urban shrubland birds in a replicated fashion while controlling for habitat. We tested factors affecting nest survival, parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), and species abundance in shrubland habitat in rural and urban landscapes. We found no support for our hypothesis that nest survival was lower in urban landscapes, but strong support for the hypothesis that survival increased with nest height. We found strong support for our hypothesis that cowbird parasitism was greater in urban than rural landscapes; parasitism in urban sites was at least twice that of rural sites. We found strong support for an urban landscape effect on abundance for several species; Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) and Brown-headed Cowbirds were more abundant in urban landscapes, whereas Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) and Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora pinus) were more abundant in rural sites. There was support for lower abundances of Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) and Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) with increased housing density. For six other species, edge and trail density or vegetation parameters best explained abundance. Lower abundances and greater parasitism in habitat patches in urban landscapes are evidence that, for some species, these urban landscapes do not fulfill the same role as comparable habitats in rural landscapes. Regional bird conservation planning and local habitat management in urban landscapes may need to consider these effects in efforts to sustain bird populations at regional and local scales. PMID:16705988

  13. Geo-botanical evidence of Late Quaternary mass wasting in block field areas of Virginia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of block fields at Massanutten Mountain, Virginia, document and provide information on the magnitude and frequency of mass movement on these coarse-grained slopes. Although Pleistocene periglacial climate may have facilitated original formation of block fields, some block fields now continue to spread downslope during intense runoff events. Present block-field mass wasting may be the principal erosional process in these areas of resistant rock.-from Author

  14. 47 CFR 73.153 - Field strength measurements in support of applications or evidence at hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength measurements in support of... (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.153 Field strength..., groundwave field strength measurements will take precedence over theoretical values, provided...

  15. 47 CFR 73.153 - Field strength measurements in support of applications or evidence at hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength measurements in support of... (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.153 Field strength..., groundwave field strength measurements will take precedence over theoretical values, provided...

  16. Evidence-based Health Informatics and the Scientific Development of the Field.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2016-01-01

    We define and discuss the nature of Evidence-based Health Informatics (EBHI), the kind of evidence health informatics researchers must generate to make EBHI a reality, and how we should grade such evidence. We propose adding principle-based evaluation studies to the list of common evaluation study types, and outline how to carry out such studies to generate evidence that will prove useful for establishing EBHI. The main purpose of a principle-based evaluation study is to test the impact on system acceptability, usage or effectiveness of a generalizable system design principle, so we also explore when during the system design process such principles are needed, and which disciplines are most promising as sources of design principles. We conclude with some challenges for EBHI, a list of the benefits of adopting this approach, and a test to ensure that we are advancing in the direction of science, as opposed to pseudoscience. PMID:27198088

  17. Experimental Evidence of a Zonal Magnetic Field in a Toroidal Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Ohshima, S.; Iguchi, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Toi, K.; Takahashi, C.; Kojima, M.; Nishimura, S.; Isobe, M.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Nagashima, Y.

    2007-04-20

    A zonal magnetic field is found in a toroidal plasma. The magnetic field has a symmetric bandlike structure, which is uniform in the toroidal and poloidal directions and varies radially with a finite wavelength of mesoscale, which is analogous to zonal flows. A time-dependent bicoherence analysis reveals that the magnetic field should be generated by the background plasma turbulence. The discovery is classified as a new kind of phenomenon of structured magnetic field generation, giving insight into phenomena such as dipole field generation in rotational planets.

  18. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  19. Differential neural activation for camouflage detection task in Field-Independent and Field-Dependent individuals: Evidence from fMRI.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Janani; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Khushu, Subash; Mandal, Manas K

    2015-12-01

    It is not clearly known as to why some people identify camouflaged objects with ease compared with others. The literature suggests that Field-Independent individuals detect camouflaged object better than their Field-Dependent counterparts, without having evidence at the neural activation level. A paradigm was designed to obtain neural correlates of camouflage detection, with real-life photographs, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-three healthy human subjects were stratified as Field-Independent (FI) and Field-Dependent (FD), with Witkin's Embedded Figure Test. FIs performed better than FDs (marginal significance; p=0.054) during camouflage detection task. fMRI revealed differential activation pattern between FI and FD subjects for this task. One sample T-test showed greater activation in terms of cluster size in FDs, whereas FIs showed additional areas for the same task. On direct comparison of the two groups, FI subjects showed additional activation in parts of primary visual cortex, thalamus, cerebellum, inferior and middle frontal gyrus. Conversely, FDs showed greater activation in inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, putamen, caudate nucleus and superior parietal lobule as compared to FIs. The results give preliminary evidence to the differential neural activation underlying the variances in cognitive styles of the two groups. PMID:26648036

  20. Influence of sun and shade conditions on Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) abundance and feeding activity on tropical soda apple (Solanales: Solanaceae) under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal) is a perennial invasive weed species which has become a serious problem in both agricultural and natural areas of the southeastern United States. A field survey was conducted at a ranch in Madison County, Florida, to assess the effect of sun and shade condi...

  1. FeCr2S4 in magnetic fields: possible evidence for a multiferroic ground state

    PubMed Central

    Bertinshaw, J.; Ulrich, C.; Günther, A.; Schrettle, F.; Wohlauer, M.; Krohns, S.; Reehuis, M.; Studer, A. J.; Avdeev, M.; Quach, D. V.; Groza, J. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Deisenhofer, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on neutron diffraction, thermal expansion, magnetostriction, dielectric, and specific heat measurements on polycrystalline FeCr2S4 in external magnetic fields. The ferrimagnetic ordering temperatures TC ≈ 170 K and the transition at TOO ≈ 10 K, which has been associated with orbital ordering, are only weakly shifted in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The cubic lattice parameter is found to decrease when entering the state below TOO. The magnetic moments of the Cr- and Fe-ions are reduced from the spin-only values throughout the magnetically ordered regime, but approach the spin-only values for fields >5.5 T. Thermal expansion in magnetic fields and magnetostriction experiments indicate a contraction of the sample below about 60 K. Below TOO this contraction is followed by a moderate expansion of the sample for fields larger than ~4.5 T. The transition at TOO is accompanied by an anomaly in the dielectric constant. The dielectric constant depends on both the strength and orientation of the external magnetic field with respect to the applied electric field for T < TOO. A linear correlation of the magnetic-field-induced change of the dielectric constant and the magnetic-field dependent magnetization is observed. This behaviour is consistent with the existence of a ferroelectric polarization and a multiferroic ground state below 10 K. PMID:25123960

  2. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: Numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Buividovich, P. V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Using numerical simulations of quenched SU (2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged ρ mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eBc = 0.927 (77) GeV2 or Bc = (1.56 ± 0.13) ṡ1016 Tesla. The condensation of the charged ρ mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  3. Consideration of the Martian magnetotail as evidence for an intrinsic magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, Stephen H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested by Verigin et al. (1993) that the response of the Martian magnetotail to changes in the solar wind ram pressure indicates the presence of an intrinsic dipole magnetic field. 3-D hybrid particle simulations of Mars were performed including the magnetotail regions. The simulations are in agreement with published Phobos 2 data from the 3 elliptical orbits and reproduce the magnetopause diameter dependence on the solar wind ram pressure reported by Verigin et al. (1993). However, the simulations were performed with no intrinsic field present, indicating that the dependence of the magnetotail width on ram pressure, is not a discriminator for the presence of the intrinsic field.

  4. Microscopic and biochemical evidence of differentially virulent field isolates of Diplocarpon rosae causing black spot disease of roses.

    PubMed

    Gachomo, Emma W; Kotchoni, Simeon O

    2010-01-01

    Black spot disease caused by Diplocarpon rosae is one of the most widespread diseases of roses that are very difficult to control due to the generative reproduction and complex genetic constitution of roses and up to now the control of black spot still requires intensive use of systemic fungicides. Here we report for the first time evidence of differentially virulent field isolates of D. rosae. Using a combination of fungal structures, disease symptoms and host cells protein expression pattern analysis we here provide direct biochemical evidence that tropical field isolates of D. rosae are more virulent and caused disease symptoms earlier than their temperate counterparts. The tropical fungal field isolates strongly induced an excessive accumulation of ROS and repressed activity of pathogenesis-related proteins such as peroxidases, chitinase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase compared to their temperate counterparts. These findings bring insights into a hidden pathogenic characteristic of tropical D. rosae field isolates compared to their temperate counterparts and open a novel dimension of parameters to be considered when controlling black spot disease of roses by fungicides in tropical versus temperate regions. Interestingly, we found that treatment of rose leaves with ROS (H2O2) prior to fungal inoculation promoted plant defense response regardless of the isolate virulence based on protein expression pattern analysis, suggesting that ROS (H2O2) can be efficiently incorporated into black spot disease management. PMID:20137960

  5. Evidence for lattice-polarization-enhanced field effects at the SrTiO3-based heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zhang, H. R.; Lei, Y.; Chen, Y. Z.; Pryds, N.; Shen, Baogen; Sun, Jirong

    2016-03-01

    Electrostatic gating provides a powerful approach to tune the conductivity of the two-dimensional electron liquid between two insulating oxides. For the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface, such gating effect could be further enhanced by a strong lattice polarization of STO caused by simultaneous application of gate field and illumination light. Herein, by monitoring the discharging process upon removing the gate field, we give firm evidence for the occurrence of this lattice polarization at the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. Moreover, we find that the lattice polarization is accompanied with a large expansion of the out-of-plane lattice of STO. Photo excitation affects the polarization process by accelerating the field-induced lattice expansion. The present work demonstrates the great potential of combined stimuli in exploring emergent phenomenon at complex oxide interfaces.

  6. Evidence for lattice-polarization-enhanced field effects at the SrTiO3-based heterointerface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Zhang, H. R.; Lei, Y.; Chen, Y. Z.; Pryds, N.; Shen, Baogen; Sun, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic gating provides a powerful approach to tune the conductivity of the two-dimensional electron liquid between two insulating oxides. For the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface, such gating effect could be further enhanced by a strong lattice polarization of STO caused by simultaneous application of gate field and illumination light. Herein, by monitoring the discharging process upon removing the gate field, we give firm evidence for the occurrence of this lattice polarization at the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. Moreover, we find that the lattice polarization is accompanied with a large expansion of the out-of-plane lattice of STO. Photo excitation affects the polarization process by accelerating the field-induced lattice expansion. The present work demonstrates the great potential of combined stimuli in exploring emergent phenomenon at complex oxide interfaces. PMID:26926433

  7. Evidence for weak magnetic fields in early-type emission stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Yudin, R. V.; Pogodin, M.; Schöller, M.; Peters, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    We report the results of our study of magnetic fields in a sample of 15 Be stars using spectropolarimetric data obtained at the European Southern Observatory with the multi-mode instrument FORS 1 installed at the 8 m Kueyen telescope. We detect weak photospheric magnetic fields in four stars, HD 56014, HD 148184, HD 155806, and HD 181615. We note that for HD 181615 the evolutionary status is not obvious due to the fact that it is a binary system currently observed in the initial rapid phase of mass exchange between the two components. Further, we notify the possible presence of distinct circular polarisation features in the circumstellar components of Ca II H&K in three stars, HD 58011, HD 117357, and HD 181615, hinting at a probable presence of magnetic fields in the circumstellar mass loss disks of these stars. We emphasize the need for future spectropolarimetric observations of Be stars with detected magnetic fields to study the temporal evolution of their magnetic fields and the correlation of magnetic field properties with dynamical phenomena taking place in the gaseous circumstellar disks of these stars. Based on observations collected at ESO, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes Nos. 075.D-0507 and 077.D-0406).

  8. Chemical Abundance Patterns of Galactic Bulge Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. M.; Kunder, A.; Pilachowski, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic bulge globular clusters are interesting but poorly understood stellar systems. The number of bulge globular cluster stars for which detailed chemical abundance information is available is considerably smaller than for halo cluster stars. However, there is growing evidence that many of the bulge globular clusters exhibit interesting characteristics, such as: double horizontal branches, populations separated by more than a factor of two in metallicity, high metallicity clusters with very blue horizontal branches, and large star-to-star variations of heavy element abundances. In order to investigate some of these problems, we have obtained high resolution spectra of several stars in multiple bulge globular clusters in order to measure detailed chemical abundance patterns. We make use of both new observations with the WIYN-Hydra and Magellan-MIKE spectrographs, and also archival data from VLT-FLAMES. We measure the abundances of several light odd-Z, alpha, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements, and compare the bulge globular cluster patterns with those in halo clusters and the bulge field. C.I.J. acknowledges support through the Clay Fellowship administered by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  9. Evidence for abrupt geomagnetic field intensity changes in Europe between 200 and 1400 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.

    2013-05-01

    Available archaeomagnetic data indicate that during the past 2500 yr there have been periods of rapid geomagnetic field intensity fluctuations interspersed with periods of almost constant field strength. Despite Europe being the most widely covered region in terms of archaeomagnetic data the occurrence and the behaviour of these rapid geomagnetic field intensity changes is under discussion and the challenge now is to precisely describe them. Here we present an improved description of the sharp intensity change that took place in Europe around 800 AD. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, four archaeological French kilns and three collections of bricks used for the construction of different French historical buildings with ages ranging between 335 and 1260 AD have been studied. Classical Thellier experiments performed on 164 specimens, and including anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetisation and cooling rate corrections, gave 119 reliable results. The 10 new high-quality mean archaeointensities obtained confirm the existence of an intensity maximum of about 85 μT (at the latitude of Paris) centred at ~800 AD and suggest that a previous abrupt intensity change occurred around 600 AD. Western European data also suggest the occurrence of abrupt geomagnetic field intensity changes during the 12th century AD and around the second half of the 13th century AD. Reliable selected eastern European data show a similar variation of geomagnetic field intensity with the occurrence of two intensity bumps (up to 75 μT at the latitude of Sofia) at ages around 650 and 950 AD and two periods of rapid intensity changes during the 12th century AD and 1300 AD. The results suggest that the described features of the geomagnetic field are observed at a continental scale and that very rapid intensity changes (of at least of 20 μT/century) took place in the recent history of the Earth's magnetic field.

  10. Evidence of a noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere, using microsignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M.; Krimigis, S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Using electron data of the MIMI-LEMMS detector that is onboard the Cassini spacecraft, we have created new, updated catalogues of energetic electron microsignature events caused by the Kronian moons Tethys and Dione. We studied the deviations of the moon's wake from the nearly circular path of the orbit of the moon-absorber and observed significant radial displacements that exhibit systematic asymmetries with respect to the local time, following a systematic trend: inward in the nightside and outward in the dayside of the inner magnetosphere. We show that these asymmetries cannot be explained by asymmetries of the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere. We developed several methods to associate the properties of the displacements to magnetospheric electric fields. Our results are consistent with an electric field that has a noon-to-midnight orientation and amplitudes that do not exceed 1 mV/m. Such an electric field is not predicted by any theoretical model and its origin is still unknown. While several ongoing studies are in agreement with our result, the radial displacement of microsignatures is the most sensitive tracer of this electric field so we will also discuss how the microsignature dataset can be used to put tighter constraints on its properties and origin.

  11. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  12. Field evidence for co-metabolism of trichloroethene stimulated by addition of electron donor to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark E; Brodie, Eoin L; Radtke, Corey W; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E; Lee, M Hope; Swift, Dana L; Colwell, Frederick S

    2010-06-15

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH(4) in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta(13)C of the CH(4) increases from -56 per thousand in the source area to -13 per thousand with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 per thousand to -13 per thousand, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH(4)-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with (13)C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE. PMID:20476753

  13. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock - Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the Phobos spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-ISOTROPIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM HINODE QUIET-SUN OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio Ramos, A.

    2009-08-20

    Some recent investigations of spectropolarimetric observations of the Zeeman effect in the Fe I lines at 630 nm carried out with the Hinode solar space telescope have concluded that the strength of the magnetic field vector in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun is in the hG regime and that its inclination is predominantly horizontal. We critically reconsider the analysis of such observations and carry out a complete Bayesian analysis with the aim of extracting as much information as possible from them, including error bars. We apply the recently developed BAYES-ME code that carries out a complete Bayesian inference for Milne-Eddington atmospheres. The sampling of the posterior distribution function is obtained with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme and the marginal distributions are analyzed in detail. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is used to study the extent to which the observations introduce new information in the inference process resulting in sufficiently constrained parameters. Our analysis clearly shows that only upper limits to the magnetic field strength can be inferred, with fields in the kG regime completely discarded. Furthermore, the noise level present in the analyzed Hinode observations induces a substantial loss of information for constraining the azimuth of the magnetic field. Concerning the inclination of the field, we demonstrate that some information is available to constrain it for those pixels with the largest polarimetric signal. The results also point out that the field in pixels with small polarimetric signals can be nicely reproduced in terms of a quasi-isotropic distribution.

  15. Field-aligned ion beams upstream of the earth's bow shock Evidence for a magnetosheath source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1983-01-01

    High time resolution ISEE-1 and -2 observations of upstream field-aligned ion beams at several crossings of the earth's bow shock indicate that some beams are due to high energy magnetosheath particles leaking through the shock into the upstream region. The distribution immediately downstream of these oblique shocks consists of a 'core' of directly transmitted, slightly heated ions, plus a crescent-shaped, high-velocity distribution, centered roughly on the magnetic field in the direction toward the upstream region, with a fairly well defined low velocity cutoff.

  16. Field-aligned currents in Saturn's northern nightside magnetosphere: Evidence for interhemispheric current flow associated with planetary period oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, G. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.; Bunce, E. J.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the magnetic perturbations associated with field-aligned currents observed on 34 Cassini passes over the premidnight northern auroral region during 2008. These are found to be significantly modulated not only by the northern planetary-period oscillation (PPO) system, similar to the southern currents by the southern PPO system found previously, but also by the southern PPO system as well, thus providing the first clear evidence of PPO-related interhemispheric current flow. The principal field-aligned currents of the two PPO systems are found to be co-located in northern ionospheric colatitude, together with the currents of the PPO-independent (subcorotation) system, located between the vicinity of the open-closed field boundary and field lines mapping to ~9 Saturn radius (Rs) in the equatorial plane. All three systems are of comparable magnitude, ~3 MA in each PPO half-cycle. Smaller PPO-related field-aligned currents of opposite polarity also flow in the interior region, mapping between ~6 and ~9 Rs in the equatorial plane, carrying a current of ~ ±2 MA per half-cycle, which significantly reduce the oscillation amplitudes in the interior region. Within this interior region the amplitudes of the northern and southern oscillations are found to fall continuously with distance along the field lines from the corresponding hemisphere, thus showing the presence of cross-field currents, with the southern oscillations being dominant in the south, and modestly lower in amplitude than the northern oscillations in the north. As in previous studies, no oscillations related to the opposite hemisphere are found on open field lines in either hemisphere.

  17. Evidence for Helical Magnetic fields in Kiloparsec-Scale AGN Jets and the Action of a Cosmic Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabuzda, D. C.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Contopulos, I.; Kazanas, D.

    2012-01-01

    A search for transverse kiloparsec-scale gradients in Faraday rotation-measure (RM) maps of extragalactic radio sources in the literature has yielded 6 AGNs displaying continuous, monotonic RM gradients across their jets, oriented roughly orthogonal to the local jet direction. The most natural interpretation of such transverse RM gradients is that they are caused by the systematic change in the line-of-sight components of helical magnetic fields associated with these jets. All the identified transverse RM gradients increase in the counterclockwise (CCW) direction on the sky relative to the centers of these AGNs. Taken together with the results of Contopoulos et al. who found evidence for a predominance of clockwise (CW) transverse RM gradients across parsec-scale (VLBI) jets, this provides new evidence for preferred orientations of RM gradients due to helical jet magnetic fields, with a reversal from CW in the inner jets to CCW farther from the centers of activity. This can be explained by the "Poynting-Robertson cosmic-battery" mechanism, which can generate helical magnetic fields with a. characteristic "twist," which are expelled with the jet outflows. If the Poynting-Robertson battery mechanism is not operating, an alternative mechanism must be identified, which is able to explain the 'predominance of CW /CCW RM gradients on parsec/kiloparsec scales.

  18. The Role of Homework in Student Learning Outcomes: Evidence from a Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodner, Andrew; Rupp, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a field experiment in the classroom where principles of micro-economics students are randomly assigned into homework-required and not-required groups. The authors find that homework plays an important role in student learning, especially so for students who initially perform poorly in the course. Students in…

  19. Effects of supervision on tax compliance: Evidence from a field experiment in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Katharina; Torgler, Benno; Kirchler, Erich; Hofmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a field experiment on tax compliance, focusing on newly founded firms. As a novelty the effect of tax authorities’ supervision on timely tax payments is examined. Interestingly, results show no positive overall effect of close supervision on tax compliance. PMID:25843992

  20. An Action-Oriented Approach to Gifted Education: Evidence from the Field of Scientific Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinghuan; Liu, Guirong; Lin, Chongde

    2012-01-01

    Eight years ago, the authors carried out a study on scientific creativity. Thirty-four eminent scientists, who had gained great creative scientific achievements in five fields--mathematics, physics, chemistry, geography and life science--were chosen and interviewed. In the study, the authors tried to find out what made a person demonstrate…

  1. Human Functioning, Supports, Assistive Technology, and Evidence-Based Practices in the Field of Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckasson, Ruth; Schalock, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the use of assistive technology (AT) in the context of three current international trends in the field of intellectual disability (ID) that are significantly impacting the delivery of services and supports to persons with ID: the provision of systems of supports based on the individual's assessed support needs, the increased…

  2. Emerging Evidence from Single-Subject Research in the Field of Deaf-Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.; Davidson, Roseanna; Banda, Devender R.

    2007-01-01

    Professionals in the field of deaf-blindness are challenged to use instructional practices that have been tested using experimental methodology. Single-subject design has been examined as a form of research that assists in substantiating practice. In a review of the literature, the authors identified 54 single-subject studies from 1969 to 2006…

  3. Do Employers Prefer Workers Who Attend For-Profit Colleges? Evidence from a Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darolia, Rajeev; Koedel, Cory; Martorell, Paco; Wilson, Katie; Perez-Arce, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports results from a resume-based field experiment designed to examine employer preferences for job applicants who attended for-profit colleges. For-profit colleges have seen sharp increases in enrollment in recent years despite alternatives, such as public community colleges, being much cheaper. We sent almost 9,000 fictitious…

  4. Magnetic fields and cancer: Animal and cellular evidence--an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, B.

    1995-03-01

    A few animal studies on the possible carcinogenic effect of magnetic fields have been published. They have been designed to reveal a possible tumor promotion obtained by applying continuous or pulsed alternating fields at flux densities varying between 0.5 {mu}T and 30 mT on mice or rats initiated with different initiators. One study with 2 mT applied on DMBA-initiated mice may suggest a copromotive effect together with the promoter TPA. Another study on rats suggests an inhibitory effect by a magnetic field on rat liver foci formation, induced with DENA. Cell studies show that magnetic fields at some frequencies, amplitudes, and wave forms interact with biological systems. Thus effects have been seen, e.g., on enzymes related to growth regulation, on calcium balance in the cell, on gene expression, and on pineal metabolism and its excretion of the oncostatic melatonin. Cellular and physiologic studies thus suggest effects that may be related to cell multiplication and tumor promotion. 64 refs.

  5. Magnetic fields and cancer: animal and cellular evidence--an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, B

    1995-01-01

    A few animal studies on the possible carcinogenic effect of magnetic fields have been published. They have been designed to reveal a possible tumor promotion obtained by applying continuous or pulsed alternating fields at flux densities varying between 0.5 microT and 30 mT on mice or rats initiated with different initiators. One study with 2 mT applied on DMBA-initiated mice may suggest a copromotive effect together with the promoter TPA. Another study on rats suggests an inhibitory effect by a magnetic field on rat liver foci formation, induced with DENA. Cell studies show that magnetic fields at some frequencies, amplitudes, and wave forms interact with biological systems. Thus effects have been seen, e.g., on enzymes related to growth regulation, on calcium balance in the cell, on gene expression, and on pineal metabolism and its excretion of the oncostatic melatonin. Cellular and physiologic studies thus suggest effects that may be related to cell multiplication and tumor promotion. PMID:7614950

  6. Math Skills and Labor-Market Outcomes: Evidence from a Resume-Based Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Tyhurst, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We examine the link between math skills and labor-market outcomes using a resume-based field experiment. Specifically, we send fictitious resumes in response to online job postings, randomly assigning some resumes to indicate stronger math skills, and measure employer responses. The resumes that are randomly assigned to indicate stronger math…

  7. Factors explaining the abundance of rodents in the city of Luang Prabang, Lao PDR, as revealed by field and household surveys.

    PubMed

    Promkerd, Prasartthong; Khoprasert, Yuvaluk; Virathavone, Phongthep; Thoummabouth, Manivone; Sirisak, Ouane; Jäkel, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    A field and a household survey, the latter of which included inspections and interviews with the residents of a total of 1370 properties, were conducted in 2004 in 30 villages of the city of Luang Prabang, Lao PDR, in order to assess the degree of rodent infestation and to identify potential factors influencing infestations. Roof rats, Rattus rattus, and the Polynesian rat, Rattus exulans, were the only rodents found in the city, and trapping results showed a clear dominance of roof rats (80-90% of all individuals). Measurements of rodent activity using tracking patches correlated positively with the trapping data, and revealed a significantly higher degree of rat infestation during the rainy season (September) than during the dry season (November). If households in the vicinity of the sampling locations were considered, villagers' accounts of indoor rodent infestations recorded during the household survey correlated positively with measurements of rodent activity. At least every second household reported indoor infestations. Using explorative statistical analyses (classification trees, factor analysis) we checked the predictive or explanatory value of up to 28 variables assessed during household inspections for villagers' observations on rodent infestation as the dependent variable. Trophic factors such as exposed food (indoors) and garbage (outdoors), and structural features such as open ceilings (indoors) and rat harborage in gardens (outdoors) ranked highest as explanatory variables. Assessment of a small sample of roof rat droppings collected inside houses revealed the presence of the potential disease agents Salmonella javiana, Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis and the parasitic nematode Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica). These results underline the need for an appropriate rodent management strategy for the city, whereby simple sanitation and rodent-proofing measures could be cheap means of reducing rat infestation rates. PMID:21396046

  8. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  9. Evidence of stochastic diffusion across a cross-field sheath due to Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Xu, X.Q.; Lichtenberg, A.J.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1992-03-15

    We identify mechanisms for particle transport across a cross-field sheath. We present a study of {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift motion in a vortex in which the ion drifts are perturbed by their finite gyroradii and electron drifts are perturbed by one or more traveling waves. Large-scale vortices, which are the result of nonlinear saturation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from shear in the {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift velocity, have been observed in plasma simulations of the cross-field sheath (K. Theilhaber and C. K. Birdsall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 772 (1989); Phys. Fluids B 1, 2241 (1989); 1, 2260 (1989)). Small-scale turbulence is also present, and ions and electrons are transported across the sheath. A vortex alone does not allow for the observed electron transport because the electron drift orbits simply circulate. On the other hand, the ion motion can be stochastic from resonant interaction between harmonics of the drift motion and the gyromotion, independent of the background turbulence. The fluctuations in the ion density would then give rise to a small-amplitude wave spectrum. The combined action of the vortex fields and traveling-wave fields on the electron motion can then lead to stochastic electron diffusion. We study these effects, showing that the values of vortex fields observed in the simulation are sufficient to lead to both ion and electron stochasticity. Furthermore, the rate of the resulting diffusion is sufficient to account for the diffusion observed in the simulation.

  10. The Andesites of the Tancítaro Volcanic Field, Michoacán Mexico: Evidence for their Formation in the Lower Crust.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, S. E.; Lange, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Tancítaro Volcanic field (~4000 km2) is located in the state of Michoacán, Mexico and is part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt related to subduction of the Cocos plate beneath North America. Erupted magmas show a continuum in composition from basalt (~51 wt% SiO2) through andesite (63 wt% SiO2); there is no dacite or rhyolite. This study focuses on the andesites (58-63 wt %), which show a considerable variation in eruptive style (cinder cones, shields, fissure-fed flows, and one stratovolcano, Volcán Tancítaro), degree of crystallinity (~3 to 40 vol%), and phenocryst assemblage (two- pyroxene + plagioclase; hornblende + plagioclase; hornblende only, etc.). There is no correlation between crystallinity and/or phenocryst assemblage and composition, although there is with style of eruption. All andesites erupted from the large (~100 km3) stratovolcano are crystal-rich (34-45 vol%), whereas peripheral erupted units in the form of cinder cones, shields, and fissure-fed flows show a lower range of crystallinities from ~3-20 vol%. Electron microprobe analyses have been conducted on 15-25 plagioclase grains in each of several andesite samples. For the crystal-poor varieties, the plagioclase hygrometer of Lange and Frey (2006) was used to calculate their pre-eruptive water concentrations. In one example, there is a variation of > 25 mol% in An content (~An85-60), which corresponds to a variation in water concentration of ~6-3 wt% H2O. Thus the variation in plagioclase composition in this crystal-poor andesite could be a result of degassing upon ascent rather than magma mingling. This is consistent with the textures of these plagioclase grains, which include abundant melt inclusions and evidence of rapid growth. In another crystal-poor example, there is a relatively narrow range (< 10 mol%) in An content (An70-60) among numerous plagioclase grains, corresponding to a water content that clusters near 3 wt% H2O. A combination of several lines of evidence suggests

  11. Preventing dengue through mobile phones: evidence from a field experiment in Peru.

    PubMed

    Dammert, Ana C; Galdo, Jose C; Galdo, Virgilio

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world (WHO, 2009). During the last two decades, the dramatic rise in the number of dengue infections has been particularly evident in Latin American and the Caribbean countries. This paper examines the experimental evidence of the effectiveness of mobile phone technology in improving households' health preventive behavior in dengue-endemic areas. The main results suggest that repeated exposure to health information encourages households' uptake of preventive measures against dengue. As a result, the Breteau Index in treatment households, an objective measure of dengue risk transmission, is 0.10 standard deviations below the mean of the control group, which shows a reduction in the number of containers per household that test positive for dengue larvae. The estimates also show marginally significant effects of the intervention on self-reported dengue symptoms. Moreover, we use a multiple treatment framework that randomly assigns households to one of the four treatment groups in order to analyze the impacts of framing on health behavior. Different variants emphasized information on monetary and non-monetary benefits and costs. The main results show no statistical differences among treatment groups. PMID:24681813

  12. Progressive deformation of ultramafic rocks accompanied with deflection of layered structure and mylonitization culminating into a pseudotachylyte-bearing seismogenic fault - a field evidence of plastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, T.; Obata, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plastic instability leading to rupture nucleation and propagetion (e.g. Hobbs et al.1986, Kelemen and Hirth, 2007) is an attractive hypothesis for deep earthquakes but lacked clear field evidences. 1D across-fault shear localization observed in some places (e.g. Jin et al.1998) is not clear if the deformation is directly related with seismicity. We present a clear field evidence of plastic instability as guided by pyroxenite/peridotite layering deflection structure (hereafter called LD structure, see figure) accompanied with mylonitization in spinel(Sp)-peridotite facies (P>~1GPa) in Balmuccia peridotite, Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy. The studied area contains abundant PST-bearing faults and N-S trending primary pyroxenite layers. Many faults in the area cut pyroxenite layers, but LD structure is found only in one place presented here. Many PSTs in the area have been (re)crystallized in Sp-peridotite facies, and have typically ultramylonitic texture (Ueda et al., 2008) with some injection veins. The fault with LD structure is situated in a fault system, which has two dominant attitudes with regional N-S extension. The shear strain of LD structure measured on outcrop surface is ~2.0. Near the fault, elongated Opx porphyroclasts (ellipses in figure) oblique to local layering are visible in peridotite. The dominant deformation textures are dynamic recrystallization in peridotite and kinking or undulatory extinction in pyroxenite. The mineral assemblages of the mylonite neoblast in the peridotite and the pyroxenite are Ol+Opx+Cpx+Sp+hornblende(Hbl), Cpx+Opx+Sp, respectively. Hbl typically occur only in neoblast. In the vicinity (several hundreds of micron) of the fault, dolomite(Dol) also occur in equilibrium with the assemblage above. The recrystallized grain sizes are 20-50 microns in peridotite and 10-30 microns in pyroxenite. The rarity of LD structure is consistent with general conception that deformation processes which lead to dynamic rupture initiation ought to be

  13. Evidence for epigenetic interactions for loci on mouse chromosome 1 regulating open field activity.

    PubMed

    de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; van Lith, H A; Oppelaar, H; Olivier, B; Kas, M J H

    2009-03-01

    The expression of motor activity levels in response to novel situations is under complex genetic and environmental control. Several genetic loci have been implicated in the regulation of this behavioral phenotype, but their relationship to epigenetic and epistatic interactions is relatively unknown. Here, we report on a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on mouse chromosome 1 for novelty-induced motor activity in the open field, using chromosome substitution strains derived from a high active host strain (C57BL/6J) and a low active donor strain (A/J). The QTL for open field (horizontal distance moved) peaked at the location of Kcnj9, however, QTL detection was initially masked by an interplay of both grandparent genetic origin and genetic co-factors influencing behavior on chromosome 1. Our findings indicate that epigenetic interactions can play an important role in the identification of behavioral QTLs and must be taken into consideration when applying behavioral genetic strategies. PMID:19048365

  14. First evidence of detecting surface nuclear magnetic resonance signals using a compact B-field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Aaron C.; Dlugosch, Raphael; Queitsch, Matthias; Macnae, James C.; Stolz, Ronny; Müller-Petke, Mike

    2014-06-01

    The noninvasive detection and characterization of subsurface aquifer structures demands geophysical techniques. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is the only technique that is directly sensitive to hydrogen protons and, therefore, allows for unambiguous detection of subsurface water. Traditionally, SNMR utilizes large surface coils for both transmitting excitation pulses and recording the groundwater response. Recorded data are thus a voltage induced by the time derivative of the secondary magnetic field. For the first time, we demonstrate that the secondary magnetic field in a SNMR experiment can be directly detected using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Conducting measurements at a test site in Germany, we demonstrate not only the ability to detect SNMR signals on the order of femtoTesla but also we are able to satisfy the observed data by inverse modeling. This is expected to open up completely new applications for this exciting technology.

  15. Microscopic Evidence for Field-Induced Magnetism in CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B.-L.; Urbano, R. R.; Curro, N. J.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Vorontsov, A. B.; Graf, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present NMR data in the normal and superconducting states of CeCoIn5 for fields close to Hc2(0)=11.8T in the ab plane. Recent experiments identified a first-order transition from the normal to superconducting state for H>10.5T, and a new thermodynamic phase below 290 mK within the superconducting state. We find that the Knight shifts of the In(1), In(2), and the Co are discontinuous across the first-order transition and the magnetic linewidths increase dramatically. The broadening differs for the three sites, unlike the expectation for an Abrikosov vortex lattice, and suggests the presence of static spin moments in the vortex cores. In the low-temperature and high-field phase, the broad NMR lineshapes suggest ordered local moments, rather than a long-wavelength quasiparticle spin density modulation expected for an FFLO phase.

  16. Evidence and importance of genetic exchange among field populations of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A.; Miles, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic pathogenic microorganisms that were previously assumed to propagate clonally have retained cryptic sexual cycles. The principal reproductive mode of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, remains a controversial topic. Despite the existence of two recent natural hybrid lineages, a pervasive view is that recombination has been restrained at an evolutionary scale and is of little epidemiological relevance to contemporary parasite populations. This article reviews the growing number of field studies which indicate that natural hybridization in T. cruzi may be frequent, non-obligatory and idiosyncratic; potentially involving independent exchange of kinetoplast and nuclear genetic material as well as canonical meiotic mechanisms. Together these observations now challenge the traditional paradigm of preponderate clonal evolution in T. cruzi and highlight the need for additional, intensive and appropriately sampled field surveys, complemented by high resolution, combined nuclear and mitochondrial population genetics analyses. PMID:26188331

  17. Assessing Adaptation with Asymmetric Climate Information: evidence from water bargaining field experiments in Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, A.; Velez, M.; Taddei, R.; Broad, K.

    2011-12-01

    We assess how asymmetric climate information affects bargaining -- an adaptation institution. As often observed in the field, some actors lack information. This yields vulnerability, despite participation. We examine the loss for a participant from being uncertain about water quantity when bargaining with a fully informed participant in an ultimatum game in Northeast Brazil. When all are fully informed, our field populations in the capital city and an agricultural valley produce a typical 60-40 split between those initiating and responding in one-shot bargaining. With asymmetric information, when initiators know the water quantity is low they get 80%. Thus even within bargaining, i.e. given strong participation, better integrating climate science into water management via greater effort to communicate relevant information to all involved can help to avoid inequities that could arise despite all of the stakeholders being 'at the table', as may well occur within future water allocation along a large new canal in the case we study.

  18. EVIDENCE FOR TWO SEPARATE BUT INTERLACED COMPONENTS OF THE CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.; Muglach, K. E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov

    2011-12-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out low-lying, mainly horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution ({approx}0.''1 pixel{sup -1}) image, taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line and covering an unusually large area, shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths comparable to a supergranular diameter. Comparison with simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas (supergranular cell interiors), with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this 'fibril arcade' is {approx}50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of total magnetic flux), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux links to remote regions of the opposite polarity, forming a second, higher canopy above the fibril canopy. The chromospheric field near the edge of the network thus has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae.

  19. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muglach, K.; Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (0.2") image taken in the core of the Ca IJ854.2 nm line shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, loop-like features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths on the order of a supergranular diameter (approx.30 Mm). Comparison with a line-of-sight magnetogram confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas, with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade' is 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of flux density), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux is diverted upward into the corona and connects to remote regions of the opposite polarity. We conclude that the chromospheric field near the edge of the network has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae, with the fibrils representing the low-lying horizontal flux that remains trapped within the highly nonpotential chromospheric layer.

  20. Evidence of magnetic field decay in massive main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Müller, A.; de Koter, A.; Morel, T.; Petit, V.; Sana, H.; Wade, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    A significant fraction of massive main-sequence stars show strong, large-scale magnetic fields. The origin of these fields, their lifetimes, and their role in shaping the characteristics and evolution of massive stars are currently not well understood. We compile a catalogue of 389 massive main-sequence stars, 61 of which are magnetic, and derive their fundamental parameters and ages. The two samples contain stars brighter than magnitude 9 in the V-band and range in mass between 5 and 100 M⊙. We find that the fractional main-sequence age distribution of all considered stars follows what is expected for a magnitude limited sample, while that of magnetic stars shows a clear decrease towards the end of the main sequence. This dearth of old magnetic stars is independent of the choice of adopted stellar evolution tracks, and appears to become more prominent when considering only the most massive stars. We show that the decreasing trend in the distribution is significantly stronger than expected from magnetic flux conservation. We also find that binary rejuvenation and magnetic suppression of core convection are unlikely to be responsible for the observed lack of older magnetic massive stars, and conclude that its most probable cause is the decay of the magnetic field, over a time span longer than the stellar lifetime for the lowest considered masses, and shorter for the highest masses. We then investigate the spin-down ages of the slowly rotating magnetic massive stars and find them to exceed the stellar ages by far in many cases. The high fraction of very slowly rotating magnetic stars thus provides an independent argument for a decay of the magnetic fields.

  1. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Muglach, K.; Warren, H. P.

    2011-12-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out low-lying, mainly horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (~0farcs1 pixel-1) image, taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line and covering an unusually large area, shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths comparable to a supergranular diameter. Comparison with simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas (supergranular cell interiors), with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade" is ~50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of total magnetic flux), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux links to remote regions of the opposite polarity, forming a second, higher canopy above the fibril canopy. The chromospheric field near the edge of the network thus has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae.

  2. Evidence for Two Separate But Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglach, Karin; Reardon, K.; Wang, Y.; Warren, H.

    2012-05-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (0.2") image taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths on the order of a supergranular diameter ( 30 Mm). Comparison with a line-of-sight magnetogram confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas, with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this ``fibril arcade'' is 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of flux density), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux is diverted upward into the corona and connects to remote regions of the opposite polarity. We conclude that the chromospheric field near the edge of the network has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae, with the fibrils representing the low-lying horizontal flux that remains trapped within the highly nonpotential chromospheric layer.

  3. Evidence for universal conductance fluctuations in an open quantum dot under a strictly parallel magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, C.; Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; De Poortere, E. P.; Shayegan, M.; Bayot, V.

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the transport properties of semiconductor ballistic cavities subject to a parallel magnetic field. Universal conductance fluctuations are observed on two GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well samples with one and two occupied carrier subbands, respectively. Large differences between the two open quantum dots in both the amplitude and frequency distribution of these fluctuations are analyzed in terms of electron orbital motion and magnetic subband depopulation.

  4. Evidence of field-evolved resistance to organophosphates and pyrethroids in Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Pathan, Attaullah Khan; Sayyed, Ali H; Aslam, Muhammad; Razaq, Muhammad; Jilani, Ghulam; Saleem, Mushtaq Ahmad

    2008-10-01

    The toxicity of some of the most commonly used insecticides in the organophosphate and pyrethroid classes were investigated against different Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) populations collected over three consecutive years (2005-2007). The populations were tested using leaf dip bioassays for residual effects and topical applications to measure the response of larvae that would come into direct contact with field application of insecticides. In leaf dip assays, the LC50 (micrograms per milliliter; 120 h) values for chlorpyrifos and profenofos were in the range of 59.3-1,023 and 180.02-1,118 respectively. The LC50 values for lambda-cyhalthrin, alphamethrin, and deltamethrin were 359.08-2,677, 112.9-923.5, and 47.81-407.03, respectively. The toxicity for the above insecticides in topical application was similar to toxicity in leaf dip assays. The susceptibility of a laboratory population, which was locally developed and designated as (Lab-PK), to deltamethrin was comparable with another susceptible laboratory population. Resistance ratios for five field populations were generally low to medium for deltamethrin, but high to very high for chlorpyrifos, profenofos, lambda-cyhalthrin and alphamethrin compared with the Lab-PK population. Our data also suggested that the five field populations had multiple resistance to two classes of insecticides. The populations showed resistance to two organophosphates tested and to lambda-cyhalthrin and alphamethrin; however, resistance to deltamethrin was only found at two locations. This pattern indicates occurrence of two divergent patterns of resistance within pyrethroids. The resistance to the insecticides was stable across 3 yr, suggesting field selection for general fitness had also taken place in various populations of C. carnea. The broad spectrum of resistance and stability of resistance to insecticides in C. carnea in the current study suggested that it could be a prime candidate for mass releases

  5. Is Quadrupole Structure of Out-of-Plane Magnetic Field Evidence for Hall Reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Vu, H. X.; Loring, B.; Omelchenko, Y.; Dorelli, J.

    2011-01-04

    The experimental observation of a quadrupole pattern in the ''out-of-plane'' field B{sub y} is usually interpreted as a tell-tale sign of Hall MHD mediated magnetic reconnection in the vicinity of a reconnecting X-point. In contrast to these conventional expectations, it is shown B{sub y} means of analytical equations describing the generation of B{sub y} that quadrupole structure can be formed even in the absence of Hall effects. In general, B{sub y} can be generated due to inhomogeneous ion flow, inhomogeneous current (Hall effect), or terms proportional to a pre-existing B{sub y}. This prediction is validated in a 3D global MHD simulation where it is shown that vortex flows at the dayside magnetopause lead to formation of a finite B{sub y} even in the absence of a pre-existing IMF B{sub y}. The generated field is shown to have a quadrupolar pattern in B{sub y} with peak amplitude {approx}0.5 of the total field. Similar vortex flows are also observed in 3D global hybrid simulations but the resulting B{sub y} structure in this case is a combination of the Hall effects and the inhomogeneous ion flows. Thus special care must be taken in using observations of quadrupole B{sub y} in satellite and experiments to infer information about its particular generation mechanism or attributing it to the Hall MHD reconnection regime.

  6. Microearthquake Study of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: Evidence of Stress Triggering - Masters Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2002-02-01

    A digital network of 24 seismograph stations was operated from September 15, 1987 to September 30, 1988, by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Unocal as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project to study seismicity related to tectonics and geothermal activity near the drilling site. More than 2001 microearthquakes were relocated in this study in order to image any pervasive structures that may exist within the Salton Sea geothermal field. First, detailed velocity models were obtained through standard 1-D inversion techniques. These velocity models were then used to relocate events using both single event methods and Double-Differencing, a joint hypocenter location method. An anisotropic velocity model was built from anisotropy estimates obtained from well logs within the study area. During the study period, the Superstition wills sequence occurred with two moderate earthquakes of MS 6.2 and MS 6.6. These moderate earthquakes caused a rotation of the stress field as observed from the inversion of first motion data from microearthquakes at the Salton Sea geothermal field. Coulomb failure analysis also indicates that microearthquakes occurring after the Superstition Hills sequence are located within a region of stress increase suggesting stress triggering caused by the moderate earthquakes.

  7. Evidence for enhanced cross-field transport mechanisms in the TCV Snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijvers, Wouter

    2015-11-01

    TCV experiments demonstrate that cross-field plasma transport is enhanced in the Snowflake divertor (SFD) compared to a standard single-null divertor (SND). This enhanced cross-field transport spreads the exhaust power over a larger surface area than can be achieved by magnetic geometry alone and, thereby, reduces the peak heat flux. Comparison of the experiments with modelling identifies steepened radial gradients, ExB drift effects, and βp-driven instabilities as the responsible transport mechanisms. The uncovered physics is also relevant to the SND and may help improve predictive models for the target profiles in ITER and DEMO. In SFD variants with an X-point in the scrape-off layer (SOL), part of the heat flux profile is split off and redirected to an additional target. The resulting steepened radial gradients enhance cross-field diffusion. This is confirmed by EMC3-Eirene simulations, which show a factor two reduction of the parallel heat flux, even if diffusivities remain constant. Theoretical analysis predicts enhanced ExB drifts in the SFD by increased poloidal gradients of the temperature and density. The predictions are confirmed by target heat and particle flux measurements in dedicated experiments with both toroidal field directions. Cross-field convection by curvature-driven modes at high βp (``churning modes'') explains the large fluxes into the private flux region of the SFD. This activates the extra targets and reduces the peak power to the primary targets up to a factor four. This mechanism is expected to be most effective when the divertor conditions are most severe: near the separatrix of a narrow, high-pressure SOL of a large tokamak. These and other alternative divertor configurations thus provide potential solutions to the power exhaust challenge, as well as laboratories to study SOL transport, one of the most important topics in tokamak research. This project was carried out with financial support from NWO. The work was carried out within

  8. Sulphur Cycling at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Isotopic Evidence From the Logatchev and Turtle Pits Hydrothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickmann, B.; Strauss, H.; Koschinsky, A.; Kuhn, T.; Petersen, S.; Schmidt, K.

    2005-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges and associated hydrothermal vent systems represent a unique scenario in which the interaction of hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere and the related element cycling can be studied. Sulphur participates in inorganic and microbially driven processes and plays, thus, an important role at these vent sites. The sulphur isotopic compositions of different sulphur-bearing minerals as well as dissolved sulphur compounds provide a tool for identifying the sulphur source and pertinent processes of sulphur cycling. Here, we present sulphur isotope data from an ongoing study of the Logatchev hydrothermal field at 14°45' N and the Turtle Pits hydrothermal field at 4°48' S. The former is located in 2900 to 3060 m water depth, hosted by ultramafic rocks, while the latter is situated in 2990 m water depth, hosted by basaltic rocks. Different metal sulphides (chalcopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, various copper sulphides), either particles from the emanating hot fluid itself or pieces of active and inactive black smokers, display δ34S values between +2 and +9 ‰. So far, no significant difference is discernible between mineral precipitates from both hydrothermal fields. However, differences exist between different generations of sulphide precipitates. Based on respective data from other sites of hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges, this sulphur isotope range suggests that sulphur in the hydrothermal fluid and mineral precipitates represents a mixture between mantle sulphur and reduced seawater sulphate. Anhydrite precipitates from hydrothermal chimneys, located inside sulphide conduits, and obvious late stage gypsum needles from voids, yielded sulphur isotope values between +17.5 and +20.0 ‰. This clearly identifies seawater sulphate as the principal sulphur source. Variable, but generally low abundances of sulphide and sulphate in differently altered mafic and ultramafic rocks point to a complex fluid-rock interaction. Sulphur isotope values for total

  9. Hydrocarbon-water interactions during brine migration: Evidence from hydrocarbon inclusions in calcite cements from Danish North Sea oil fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensenius, J.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Crude oils in primary and secondary fluid inclusions in calcite from fractures in seven offshore oil fields associated with diapiric salt structures in the Danish sector of the North Sea were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography and compared with crude oils produced from the same reservoirs. Oils from fluid inclusions in all fields show evidence of biodegradation (decreased n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane ratios and loss of n-C7, 2-methyl hexane, and 3-methyl hexane relative to methyl cyclohexane) and water washing (absence of benzene and depletion of toluene). Some oils in inclusions are extremely enriched in C6 and C7 cyclic alkanes suggesting that these samples contain hydrocarbons exsolved from ascending, hotter formation waters. Compared to inclusion oils the produced oils are less biodegraded, but are water washed, indicating that both types of oil interacted with large volumes of formation water. The carbon isotopic composition of the calcite host of the fluid inclusions in the Dagmar and Skjold fields is as light as -16.5%. PDB and the sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite in and adjacent to the calcite veins in the Skjold field is as light as -39.6%. CDT, indicating that biodegradation of the oils was a source of some of the carbon in the calcite and sulfate reduction was the source of sulfur for the pyrite. The evidence for microbial degradation of petroleum is consistent with present-day reservoir temperatures (65??-96??C) but is not consistent with previous estimates of the temperatures of calcite vein filling (95??-130??C) which are much higher than the temperatures of known occurrences of biodegraded oil. ?? 1990.

  10. Hydrocarbon-water interactions during brine migration: Evidence from hydrocarbon inclusions in calcite cements from Danish North Sea oil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensenius, Jørgen; Burruss, Robert C.

    1990-03-01

    Crude oils in primary and secondary fluid inclusions in calcite from fractures in seven offshore oil fields associated with diapiric salt structures in the Danish sector of the North Sea were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography and compared with crude oils produced from the same reservoirs. Oils from fluid inclusions in all fields show evidence of biodegradation (decreased n- C17/pristane and n- C18/phytane ratios and loss of n-C 7, 2-methyl hexane, and 3-methyl hexane relative to methyl cyclohexane) and water washing (absence of benzene and depletion of toluene). Some oils in inclusions are extremely enriched in C 6 and C 7 cyclic alkanes suggesting that these samples contain hydrocarbons exsolved from ascending, hotter formation waters. Compared to inclusion oils the produced oils are less biodegraded, but are water washed, indicating that both types of oil interacted with large volumes of formation water. The carbon isotopic composition of the calcite host of the fluid inclusions in the Dagmar and Skjold fields is as light as -16.5%. PDB and the sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite in and adjacent to the calcite veins in the Skjold field is as light as -39.6%. CDT, indicating that biodegradation of the oils was a source of some of the carbon in the calcite and sulfate reduction was the source of sulfur for the pyrite. The evidence for microbial degradation of petroleum is consistent with present-day reservoir temperatures (65°-96°C) but is not consistent with previous estimates of the temperatures of calcite vein filling (95°-130°C) which are much higher than the temperatures of known occurrences of biodegraded oil.

  11. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardom, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Muglach, K.; Warren, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out low-lying, mainly horizontal magnetic elds that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (approximately 0.1" per pixel) image, taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line and covering an unusually large area, shows the dark brils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths comparable to a supergranular diameter. Comparison with simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas (supergranular cell interiors), with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a lament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade" is approximately 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the brils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of total magnetic flux), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux links to remote regions of the opposite polarity, forming a second, higher canopy above the fibril canopy. The chromospheric field near the edge of the network thus has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae.

  12. Evidence for magnetic field compression in shocks within the jet of V404 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbaz, T.; Russell, D. M.; Covino, S.; Mooley, K.; Fender, R. P.; Rumsey, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present optical and near-IR linear polarimetry of V404 Cyg during its 2015 outburst and in quiescence. We obtained time resolved r'-band polarimetry when the source was in outburst, near-IR polarimetry when the source was near quiescence and multiple wave-band optical polarimetry later in quiescence. The optical to near-IR linear polarization spectrum can be described by interstellar dust and an intrinsic variable component. The intrinsic optical polarization, detected during the rise of one of the brightest flares of the outburst, is variable, peaking at 4.5 per cent and decaying to 3.5 per cent. We present several arguments that favour a synchrotron jet origin to this variable polarization, with the optical emission originating close to the jet base. The polarization flare occurs during the initial rise of a major radio flare event that peaks later, and is consistent with a classically evolving synchrotron flare from an ejection event. We conclude that the optical polarization flare represents a jet launching event; the birth of a major ejection. For this event we measure a rather stable polarization position angle of -9° E of N, implying that the magnetic field near the base of the jet is approximately perpendicular to the jet axis. This may be due to the compression of magnetic field lines in shocks in the accelerated plasma, resulting in a partially ordered transverse field that have now been seen during the 2015 outburst. We also find that this ejection occurred at a similar stage in the repetitive cycles of flares.

  13. Constraining Eruptive Conditions From Lava Flow Morphometry: A Case Study With Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanism is widely recognized as one of the primary factors affecting the surfaces of solid planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Basaltic lava is thought to be the most common composition based on observed features typical of basaltic eruptions found on Earth. Lava flows are one of the most easily recognizable landforms on planetary surfaces and their features may provide information about eruption dynamics, lava rheology, and potential hazards. More recently, researchers have taken a multi-faceted approach to combine remote sensing, field observations and quantitative modeling to constrain volcanic activity on Earth and other planets. Here we test a number of published models, including empirically derived relationships from Mt. Etna and Kilauea, models derived from laboratory experiments, and theoretical models previously applied to remote sensing of planetary surfaces, against well-documented eruptions from the literature and field observations. We find that the Graetz (Hulme and Felder, 1977, Phil.Trans., 285, 227 - 234) method for estimating effusion rates compares favorably with published eruption data, while, on the other hand, inverting lava flow length prediction models to estimate effusion rates leads to several orders of magnitude in error. The Graetz method also better constrains eruption duration. Simple radial spreading laws predict Hawaiian lava flow lengths quite well, as do using the thickness of the lava flow front and chilled crust. There was no observed difference between results from models thought to be exclusive to aa or pahoehoe flow fields. Interpreting historic conditions should therefore follow simple relationships to observable morphologies no matter the composition or surface texture. We have applied the most robust models to understand the eruptive conditions and lava rheology of the Batamote Mountains near Ajo, AZ, an eroded shield volcano in southern Arizona. We find effusion rates on the order of 100 - 200 cubic

  14. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind - Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    An examination of ISEE-3 data from 1978 reveal 25 electron heat flux dropout events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. The heat flux dropouts are found to occur in association with high plasma densities, low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. It is suggested that the heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  15. Does privatisation of vocational rehabilitation improve labour market opportunities? Evidence from a field experiment in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Laun, Lisa; Thoursie, Peter Skogman

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyses if privatisation of vocational rehabilitation can improve labour market opportunities for individuals on long-term sickness absence. We use a field experiment performed by the Public Employment Service and the Social Insurance Agency in Sweden during 2008-2010, in which over 4000 participants were randomly offered private and public rehabilitation. We find no differences in employment rates following rehabilitation between individuals who received rehabilitation by private and public providers. Also the average cost of rehabilitation was essentially equal for the two types of providers. This suggests that there are no large efficiency gains from privatising vocational rehabilitation. PMID:24473220

  16. First in situ evidence of electron pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field line curvature in the Ion diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Shen, C.; Marchaudon, A.; Rong, Z. J.; Lavraud, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Yao, Z.; Mihaljcic, B.; Ji, Y.; Ma, Y. H.; Liu, Z. X.

    2016-05-01

    Theory predicts that the first adiabatic invariant of a charged particle may be violated in a region of highly curved field lines, leading to significant pitch angle scattering for particles whose gyroradius are comparable to the radius of the magnetic field line curvature. This scattering generates more isotropic particle distribution functions, with important impacts on the presence or absence of plasma instabilities. Using magnetic curvature analysis based on multipoint Cluster spacecraft observations, we present the first investigation of magnetic curvature in the vicinity of an ion diffusion region where reconnected field lines are highly curved. Electrons at energies > 8 keV show a clear pitch angle ordering between bidirectional and trapped distribution in surrounding regions, while we show that in the more central part of the ion diffusion region electrons above such energies become isotropic. By contrast, colder electrons (~1 keV) retain their bidirectional character throughout the diffusion regions. The calculated adiabatic parameter K2 for these electrons is in agreement with theory. This study provides the first observational evidence for particle pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field lines with well characterized curvature in a space plasma.

  17. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.; Chen, Y. Q.; Carigi, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon and oxygen abundances in stars are important in many fields of astrophysics including nucleosynthesis, stellar structure, evolution of galaxies, and formation of planetary systems. Still, our knowledge of the abundances of these elements in different stellar populations is uncertain because of difficulties in observing and analyzing atomic and molecular lines of C and O. Aims: Abundances of C, O, and Fe are determined for F and G main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood with metallicities in the range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.4 in order to study trends and possible systematic differences in the C/Fe, O/Fe, and C/O ratios for thin- and thick-disk stars as well as high- and low-alpha halo stars. In addition, we investigate if there is any connection between C and O abundances in stellar atmospheres and the occurrence of planets. Methods: Carbon abundances are determined from the λλ 5052,5380 C i lines and oxygen abundances from the λ7774 O i triplet and the forbidden [O i] line at 6300 Å. MARCS model atmospheres are applied and non-LTE corrections for the O i triplet are included. Results: Systematic differences between high- and low-alpha halo stars and between thin- and thick-disk stars are seen in the trends of [C/Fe] and [O/Fe]. The two halo populations and thick-disk stars show the same trend of [C/O] versus [O/H], whereas the thin-disk stars are shifted to higher [C/O] values. Furthermore, we find some evidence of higher C/O and C/Fe ratios in stars hosting planets than in stars for which no planets have been detected. Conclusions: The results suggest that C and O in both high- and low-alpha halo stars and in thick-disk stars are made mainly in massive (M> 8 M⊙) stars, whereas thin-disk stars have an additional carbon contribution from low-mass AGB and massive stars of high metallicity causing a rising trend of the C/O ratio with increasing metallicity. However, at the highest metallicities investigated ([Fe/H] ≃ + 0.4), C/O does not

  18. Isotopic evidence for the origin of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the Pinacate volcanic field, northwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. J.; Musselman, T. E.; Gutmann, J. T.; Patchett, P. J.

    1993-02-01

    Six volcanic rocks, reconnaissance samples representing most of the temporal and compositional variation in the Pinacate volcanic field of Sonora and Arizona, are characterized for major element and NdSr isotopic compositions. The samples consist of basanite through trachyte of an early shield volcano, and alkali basalts and a tholeiite from later craters and cinder cones. With the exception of the trachyte sample, which has increased 87Sr/ 86Sr due to crustal effects, all 87Sr/ 86Sr values fall between 0.70312 and 0.70342, while ɛNd values are all between + 5.0 and + 5.7. Clinopyroxene in a rare spinel-lherzolite nodule derived from the uppermost mantle beneath the field has 87Sr/ 86Sr of 0.70320 but ɛNd of + 8.8, three ɛNd units higher than the volcanic rocks. Both the volcanic rocks and the nodule record the presence of asthenospheric, rather than enriched lithospheric mantle beneath Pinacate. This is consistent with one or both of (a) proximity of Pinacate to the Gulf of California spreading center and (b) presence of similar asthenospheric mantle signatures in volcanic rocks over a wide contiguous area of the southwestern USA. We consider the comparison to other southwestern USA magma sources as the more relevant alternative, although a definite conclusion is not possible at this stage.

  19. Field evidence of pore pressure diffusion in clayey soils prone to landsliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Matteo; Simoni, Alessandro

    2010-09-01

    The hydrologic behavior of shallow weathered soils commonly determines the propensity for slope failure. Here we use laboratory data and field data collected by an automated monitoring system to assess the character of pore water pressure responses in a natural clay slope subject to intermittent rainfall. Although we did not measure pore pressure distributions that triggered slope failure, we obtained three years of field data that provided reliable and largely reproducible documentation of transient pore pressure responses. At depths of tens of centimeters to a few meters below the ground surface, moisture and pressure sensors recorded relatively fast, transient responses to precipitation. The speeds of pore pressure pulses advancing downward in the saturated zone were much larger than those of advective fronts driven by gravity, and the amplitudes of the pulses attenuated with depth. Statistical assessment of 129 pressure head responses demonstrates that this behavior is consistent with predictions of a linear, one-dimensional pore pressure diffusion model. However, the model best simulates measurements if diffusivity is treated as a calibration parameter and if initial moisture conditions match model assumptions. For regional assessment of slope stability, the predictive accuracy of the linear-diffusion model is limited by inherent uncertainties in defining the initial conditions and in assigning the values of hydraulic parameters.

  20. Paleomagnetic evidence bearing on the structural development of the Latir volcanic field near Questa, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Lipman, P.W.; Elston, D.P.

    1982-09-10

    The mid-Tertiary Latir volcanic field in northern New Mexico comprises intermediate-composition volcanics overlain by a regional ash flow sheet and associated lavas of rhyolitic composition that are all cut by silicic-alkalic grantic intrusives. Deeply exposed along the eastern flank of the Rio Grande rift, the silicic extrusive and intrusive rocks all yield radiometric ages of about 23 m.y., within analytical uncertainties. Flow banding and eutaxitic structures within the extrusive units indicate intense structural deformation, which for the most part increases toward the Questa caldera. Paleomagnetic study was undertaken to obtain information on the orientation of the eruptive and intrusive units and to employ the magnetic directions for an evaluation of the tectonic and igneous history of the caldera and enclosing volcanic field. Radiometric ages and the paleomagnetic data indicate that an episode of pronounced extension coincided with a major pulse of igneous activity in the region 23 m.y. ago. Eastward tilting of the volcanic units appears to have been closely followed by caldera collapse and then by resurgent doming of the caldera. Welded tuff units within the caldera were turned on end and together with older volcanic units were incorporated in a collapse megabreccia. The megabreccia and other nearby units were partially or entirely overprinted by a thermochemical aureole associated with the resurgent doming and attendant hydrothermal circulation. The stocks of the resurgent dome appear to have undergone no significant later tilting.

  1. Different magnitude representations in left and right hemisphere: evidence from the visual half field technique.

    PubMed

    Notebaert, Karolien; Reynvoet, Bert

    2009-05-01

    The differences between left and right hemispheric magnitude representations were investigated in two lateralised priming experiments using single-digit (Experiment 1) and two-digit numbers (Experiment 2). Based on recent brain-imaging and TMS studies, some authors have argued that the magnitude representation in the left hemisphere (LH) is more precise than the one in the right hemisphere (RH). In two experiments a prime number preceded a target number that had to be classified as smaller or larger than a fixed standard. In order to reveal hemispheric differences in magnitude representation, the priming distance effect, i.e., faster responses to targets preceded by numerically closer primes, was analysed in both visual half fields (VHF). Using single-digit numbers no hemispheric differences were found for the priming distance effect, supporting an equally precise magnitude representation in both hemispheres. However, the experiment using two-digit numbers revealed a significantly steeper priming curve when targets were presented in the left visual field (LVF) compared to targets presented in the RVF. These results suggest a less precise magnitude representation in the RH, due to a larger overlap of magnitude representations. PMID:18792837

  2. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Ate; Keijsers, Joep G S; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  3. Viking electron temperature measurements: Evidence for a magnetic field in the Martian ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.B. ); Mantas, G.P. Univ. of Patra )

    1988-07-01

    Further analysis of the Viking RPA data has now provided measurements of the thermal electron temperature in the upper Martian ionosphere. It is found that T{sub e} is several thousand degrees K, i.e., only of the order of twice the ion temperature. The sum of all the measured partial plasma pressures, including ions and suprathermal electrons, has a minimum value of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} dyn cm{sup {minus}2} near 350 km and is found to be insufficient to balance the measured electron pressure in the shocked solar wind near 1,000 km altitude, by a factor of the order of 4. Thus there is no doubt that a magnetic field of at least 30 to 40 nT permeates the ionosphere. This conclusion is not inconsistent with previous assessments, but it now has a firm observational basis. These data do not uniquely establish whether the magnetic field is intrinsic or induced, but the authors assessment is that a significant intrinsic moment is not required.

  4. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, Joep G.S.; Maroulis, Jerry; Visser, Saskia M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface. PMID:25071984

  5. Fluid-inclusion evidence for previous higher temperatures in the miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    Heating and freezing data were obtained for liquid-rich secondary fluid inclusions in magmatic quartz, hydrothermal calcite and hydrothermal quartz crystals from 19 sampled depths in eight production drill holes (PGM-1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12 and 15) of the Miravalles geothermal field in northwestern Costa Rica. Homogenization temperatures for 386 fluid inclusions range from near the present measured temperatures to as much as 70??C higher than the maximum measured well temperature of about 240??C. Melting-point temperature measurements for 76 fluid inclusions suggest a calculated salinity range of about 0.2-1.9 wt% NaCl equivalent. Calculated salinities as high as 3.1-4.0 wt% NaCl equivalent for 20 fluid inclusions from the lower part of drill hole PGM-15 (the deepest drill hole) indicate that higher salinity water probably was present in the deeper part of the Miravalles geothermal field at the time these fluid inclusions were formed. ?? 1988.

  6. Evidence of Magnetic Field Switch-off in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M.; Newman, D.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-09-01

    The long-term evolution of large domain particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: toward a Petschek-like configuration or toward multiple X points. In the present simulation, a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminiscent of Petschek’s switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock/rotational discontinuity compound structure. Two external slow shocks (SS) located at the separatrices reduce the in-plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminiscent of rotational discontinuities (RD) in the internal part of the exhaust then perform the final switch-off. Both the SS and the RD are characterized through analysis of their Rankine–Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust.

  7. The groundwater regime of the Valley of Mexico from historic evidence and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durazo, Jaime; Farvolden, R. N.

    1989-12-01

    Groundwater is a matter of major importance in the Valley of Mexico because some 20 million people depend on it for most of their water supply. In Mexico, historical accounts, documents and native legends provide additional information of past conditions which relates to hydrogeological conditions. In any analysis of groundwater resources it is important to know the original conditions. The Valley of Mexico is a graben structure, closed hydrologically and covered by a series of lakes at the time of the Conquest. Groundwater recharge occurs in the mountains of volcanic rocks that surround the Valley to form the Basin of Mexico. Where the rocks are visibly permeable, the water-table is deep, for the most part, and runoff is low. Thick lacustrine clays cover the Valley floor and artesian conditions once prevailed. Large springs of potable water were numerous at the edge of the Valley, and where permeable aquifers pinch-out. Thermal mineral springs occur along lineaments thought to be fractures in the rocks below the alluvial fill. The entire Valley floor and the lowest slopes of the mountains were zones of groundwater discharge. All water discharge from the Valley was by evaporation and transpiration, and salts accumulated in the lake-water and in the clays. The main lakes were nonpotable and the Aztecs and later the Spanish colonials depended on groundwater from the springs. Salt production from brines was an important industry in the Aztec society as it is today. The ahuehuete tree, ( taxodium mucronatum), which commonly lives to be many hundreds of years old, is a phreatophyte and an indicator of fresh groundwater discharge in the Valley. It used to be much more abundant. Its occurence where earthquake damage is worst suggests upward migration of fresh groundwater through fractures in the clay tht have been opened by seismic response. The water table and the capillary fringe are near ground surface over a wide zone of lowlands around the edge of the ancient lakes

  8. Mismatch Responses in the Awake Rat: Evidence from Epidural Recordings of Auditory Cortical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Fabienne; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Backes, Heiko; Moran, Rosalyn; Gramer, Markus; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN), a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats. PMID:23646197

  9. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  10. Photosynthetic accessory pigments - Evidence for the influence of phycoerythrin on the submarine light field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Upwelled water-leaving spectral radiances and the submarine light-field source are theorized to have the physical scattering and absorption effects of photosynthetic accessory pigments. A laser is employed to induce phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence, and the presence of the photosynthetic accessory pigment is measured in oceanic waters with a spectral fluorescence method. Experimental data from active-passive correlation spectroscopy demonstrate that water-leaving spectral radiances of about 600 nm are highly correlated with phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence. Because the data on the phycoerythrin and chlorophyll fluorescences are entered randomly in the correlation the results are considered unambiguous. An estimate of the photopigment is derived that agrees with measurements of its laser-induced fluorescence.

  11. Social Networks and Externalities from Gift Exchange: Evidence from A Field Experiment☆

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Janet; Lin, Wanchuan; Meng, Juanjuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks whether gift exchange generates externalities for people outside of the bilateral relationship between the gift giver and recipient, and whether the nature of this relationship is affected by social networks. We examine this question in the context of a field experiment in urban Chinese hospital outpatient clinics. We first show that when patients give a small gift, doctors reciprocate with better service and a fewer unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics. We then show that gift giving creates externalities for third parties. If two patients, A and B are perceived as unrelated, B receives worse care when A gives a gift. However, if A identifies B as a friend, then both A and B benefit from A’s gift giving. Hence, we show that gift giving can create positive or negative externalities, depending on the giver’s social distance to the third party. PMID:26949272

  12. Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait: interpretations from thermal remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Literathy, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to oil pollution alter the apparent temperature, which was used as a recognition element to map out oil polluted surfaces. The LST contrast was successfully used to map spatial distribution of hydrocarbon pollution in the Burgan Oil field area of Kuwait. The methodology can be positively used to detect waste dumping, oil spills in oceans and ports, besides environmental management of oil pollution at or near the land surface. PMID:17291680

  13. Evidence of widespread natural recombination among field isolates of equine herpesvirus 4 but not among field isolates of equine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Vaz, P K; Horsington, J; Hartley, C A; Browning, G F; Ficorilli, N P; Studdert, M J; Gilkerson, J R; Devlin, J M

    2016-03-01

    Recombination in alphaherpesviruses allows evolution to occur in viruses that have an otherwise stable DNA genome with a low rate of nucleotide substitution. High-throughput sequencing of complete viral genomes has recently allowed natural (field) recombination to be studied in a number of different alphaherpesviruses, however, such studies have not been applied to equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) or equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4). These two equine alphaherpesviruses are genetically similar, but differ in their pathogenesis and epidemiology. Both cause economically significant disease in horse populations worldwide. This study used high-throughput sequencing to determine the full genome sequences of EHV-1 and EHV-4 isolates (11 and 14 isolates, respectively) from Australian or New Zealand horses. These sequences were then analysed and examined for evidence of recombination. Evidence of widespread recombination was detected in the genomes of the EHV-4 isolates. Only one potential recombination event was detected in the genomes of the EHV-1 isolates, even when the genomes from an additional 11 international EHV-1 isolates were analysed. The results from this study reveal another fundamental difference between the biology of EHV-1 and EHV-4. The results may also be used to help inform the future safe use of attenuated equine herpesvirus vaccines. PMID:26691326

  14. Petrophysical evidence for the nature of vertical permeability barriers: Temple Ave. Fault, Wilmington Oil Field, Long Beach, California

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, H.; Sample, J.C. )

    1996-01-01

    The Temple Avenue fault is a north-trending east-dipping normal fault that dissects the north flank of the Wilmington anticline in the Wilmington Oil field. The fault involves sediments of the Repetto Formation (lower Pliocene) and the Puente Formation (upper Miocene). Oil/water contact structural maps indicate that the fault acts as a permeability barrier. Well B-756-I was drilled across the Temple Ave. fault in the Repetto Formation. The throw of the fault in this well ranges from 15 to 17 meters (50 to 56 feet). The Repetto Formation is composed of interbeded sands and shales. Sixty five samples were collected from and around the fault zone. Preliminary XRD analysis of bulk and clay fractions show that authigenic clay minerals (<2 [mu]m) represent between 1 to 2% of the sediments. Clay minerals are mostly smectite (5-7%) and a Fe-illite (15-30%); chlorite and kaolinite are also present. The authigenic illite content appears to increase around the fault zone. Diagenetic conversion of Ca-rich feldspars to smectite is suggested by an inverse correlation of their abundances. Calcite is present in the majority of the samples (4-8%), but a significant increase in the carbonate content (14-16%) occurs along the fault. Ongoing SEM and isotope analysis will aid in the determination of the origin and nature of the changes in the mineralogy that contribute to form a permeability barrier.

  15. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  16. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  17. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A wide-field study of Holmberg II and evidence for ram pressure stripping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, E. J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Barker, M. K.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Arimoto, N.

    We present a deep, wide-field optical study of the M81 group dwarf galaxy Holmberg II (HoII) based on Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. Individual stars are resolved down to I˜25.2, i.e., about 1.5 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). We use resolved star counts in the outskirts of the galaxy to measure the radial surface brightness profile down to mu_V ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2, from which we determine a projected exponential scalelength of 0.70arcmin ±0.01arcmin (i.e., 0.69± 0.01 kpc). The low surface-brightness stellar component of HoII is regular and symmetric and has an extent much smaller than the vast H I cloud in which it is embedded. We compare the spatial distribution of the young and old stellar populations, and find that the old RGB stars are significantly more centrally concentrated than the young stellar populations, contrary to what is observed in most dwarf galaxies of the Local Universe. We discuss these properties in the context of the comet-like distribution of H I gas around HoII, and argue for the presence of a hot intragroup medium in the vicinity of HoII to explain the contrasting morphologies of the gas and stars.

  19. Field evidence that ecosystem service projects support biodiversity and diversify options

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Rebecca L.; Tallis, Heather; Kareiva, Peter; Daily, Gretchen C.

    2008-01-01

    Ecosystem service approaches to conservation are being championed as a new strategy for conservation, under the hypothesis that they will broaden and deepen support for biodiversity protection. Where traditional approaches focus on setting aside land by purchasing property rights, ecosystem service approaches aim to engage a much wider range of places, people, policies, and financial resources in conservation. This is particularly important given projected intensification of human impacts, with rapid growth in population size and individual aspirations. Here we use field research on 34 ecosystem service (ES) projects and 26 traditional biodiversity (BD) projects from the Western Hemisphere to test whether ecosystem service approaches show signs of realizing their putative potential. We find that the ES projects attract on average more than four times as much funding through greater corporate sponsorship and use of a wider variety of finance tools than BD projects. ES projects are also more likely to encompass working landscapes and the people in them. We also show that, despite previous concern, ES projects not only expand opportunities for conservation, but they are no less likely than BD projects to include or create protected areas. Moreover, they do not draw down limited financial resources for conservation but rather engage a more diverse set of funders. We also found, however, that monitoring of conservation outcomes in both cases is so infrequent that it is impossible to assess the effectiveness of either ES or BD approaches. PMID:18591667

  20. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

  1. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  2. Watching eyes on potential litter can reduce littering: evidence from two field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Robinson, Rebecca; Abayomi-Cole, Tim; Greenlees, Josh; O’Connor, Abby

    2015-01-01

    Littering constitutes a major societal problem, and any simple intervention that reduces its prevalence would be widely beneficial. In previous research, we have found that displaying images of watching eyes in the environment makes people less likely to litter. Here, we investigate whether the watching eyes images can be transferred onto the potential items of litter themselves. In two field experiments on a university campus, we created an opportunity to litter by attaching leaflets that either did or did not feature an image of watching eyes to parked bicycles. In both experiments, the watching eyes leaflets were substantially less likely to be littered than control leaflets (odds ratios 0.22–0.32). We also found that people were less likely to litter when there other people in the immediate vicinity than when there were not (odds ratios 0.04–0.25) and, in one experiment but not the other, that eye leaflets only reduced littering when there no other people in the immediate vicinity. We suggest that designing cues of observation into packaging could be a simple but fruitful strategy for reducing littering. PMID:26644979

  3. Watching eyes on potential litter can reduce littering: evidence from two field experiments.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Melissa; Robinson, Rebecca; Abayomi-Cole, Tim; Greenlees, Josh; O'Connor, Abby; Nettle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Littering constitutes a major societal problem, and any simple intervention that reduces its prevalence would be widely beneficial. In previous research, we have found that displaying images of watching eyes in the environment makes people less likely to litter. Here, we investigate whether the watching eyes images can be transferred onto the potential items of litter themselves. In two field experiments on a university campus, we created an opportunity to litter by attaching leaflets that either did or did not feature an image of watching eyes to parked bicycles. In both experiments, the watching eyes leaflets were substantially less likely to be littered than control leaflets (odds ratios 0.22-0.32). We also found that people were less likely to litter when there other people in the immediate vicinity than when there were not (odds ratios 0.04-0.25) and, in one experiment but not the other, that eye leaflets only reduced littering when there no other people in the immediate vicinity. We suggest that designing cues of observation into packaging could be a simple but fruitful strategy for reducing littering. PMID:26644979

  4. Field evidence that ecosystem service projects support biodiversity and diversify options.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Rebecca L; Tallis, Heather; Kareiva, Peter; Daily, Gretchen C

    2008-07-01

    Ecosystem service approaches to conservation are being championed as a new strategy for conservation, under the hypothesis that they will broaden and deepen support for biodiversity protection. Where traditional approaches focus on setting aside land by purchasing property rights, ecosystem service approaches aim to engage a much wider range of places, people, policies, and financial resources in conservation. This is particularly important given projected intensification of human impacts, with rapid growth in population size and individual aspirations. Here we use field research on 34 ecosystem service (ES) projects and 26 traditional biodiversity (BD) projects from the Western Hemisphere to test whether ecosystem service approaches show signs of realizing their putative potential. We find that the ES projects attract on average more than four times as much funding through greater corporate sponsorship and use of a wider variety of finance tools than BD projects. ES projects are also more likely to encompass working landscapes and the people in them. We also show that, despite previous concern, ES projects not only expand opportunities for conservation, but they are no less likely than BD projects to include or create protected areas. Moreover, they do not draw down limited financial resources for conservation but rather engage a more diverse set of funders. We also found, however, that monitoring of conservation outcomes in both cases is so infrequent that it is impossible to assess the effectiveness of either ES or BD approaches. PMID:18591667

  5. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  6. Electric field control of E region coherent echoes: Evidence from radar observations at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, Roman A.; Forsythe, V. V.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics and formation mechanisms of E region plasma irregularities at high latitudes are investigated using observations with the newly deployed Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar at the South Pole Antarctic station (SPS) near a magnetic latitude (MLAT) of 75°S. It is shown that E region echo occurrence at SPS exhibits a diurnal variation that is significantly different from those at auroral and polar cap latitudes. Moreover, analysis of major spectral populations also showed a distinct and previously unreported diurnal pattern. The plasma drift velocity estimates are derived at E region ranges of SPS, leveraging the SPS radar's position well within the MLAT region where SuperDARN convection estimates are well constrained by the data. It is shown that E region irregularity occurrence increases when the convection direction is within the SPS field of view and/or when the plasma drift component is comparable with the nominal ion-acoustic speed Cs of 350 m/s. This is the expected behavior for irregularities generated directly by the modified two-stream plasma instability (MTSI). On the other hand, irregularity velocity dependence on convection velocity showed an unexpected saturation at velocity values smaller than nominal Cs. It is demonstrated that the convection velocity at which irregularity velocity starts to differ from the convection component and to approach a maximum value is dependent on the magnetic aspect angle. Moreover, the maximum velocity value itself also depends on the aspect angle. The observed behavior is discussed in context of recent models that involve evolving aspect angles as a key characteristic of MTSI saturation.

  7. Laboratory and field evidence for photochemical production of carbon monoxide (CO) in polar snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Brough, N.; Blake, D. R.; Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.

    2010-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is considered as an indirect greenhouse gas, since increasing levels, e.g. by anthropogenic activities, will deplete hydroxyl (OH) radical concentrations and thus enhance build up of methane (CH4). Through its interactions with OH, CO concentrations also influence atmospheric oxidizing capacity. Recent observations in the mid latitudes of the northern hemisphere suggest that the sun lit snow pack acts as a CO source to the lower troposphere in summer. This aspect of snow photochemistry and snow-atmosphere exchange is likely only of regional importance, but a quantitative assessment of its atmospheric relevance is still lacking. Here we present new lab results from snow chamber experiments under controlled conditions. Snow samples from Halley, Antarctica (75.58° S, 26.65° W) were irradiated and gas emissions analyzed for CO, ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O). Comparison to experiments under dark conditions and blanks shows significant photolytic production of CO. Observed emission rates per surface area were on the order of 1.7 x 1010 molecules cm-2s-1. Assuming the typical diurnal variability of atmospheric mixing depth at Halley in summer these translate into CO production rates of 4-26 ppbv day-1. Ambient and firn air measurements of CO from a summer intensive campaign at Summit, Greenland (72.97° N, 38.77° W), another site in the high latitudes, allow to estimate fluxes and yield similar CO production rates of 3-17 ppbv day-1. Laboratory- and field-based CO formation rates observed in snow are compared with snow concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and CH2O. We discuss feasibility and further research needs of the parameterization of CO emissions from snow surfaces in order to extrapolate to the ice sheet scale.

  8. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  9. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  10. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  11. Reinterpretation of nappe structures in the Central Alps Evidence from 3D foliation field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxelon, M.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2003-04-01

    The Lepontine Alps represent the classic region for both, fold nappe development at mid-crustal levels and fold interference patterns from outcrop to regional scale. They have also been proposed as models for rapid burial and exhumation. However, before such models can be applied or critically assessed, the geometry of the units involved must be accurately known in three dimensions and this is a challenging task in this complex region. The three-dimensional geometry of the Lepontine nappes is not established unequivocally, as the integration and visualisation of structural data reflecting at least five different deformation phases has not yet been achieved satisfactorily. The present study focusses on a combination of new structural mapping in critical and/or contradictory areas, existing observations and their geostatistical assessment with modern computer-based tools (Editeur Géologique, Gocad) in order to develop a testable three-dimensional model of the geometry of the Lepontine Nappes in the Central Alps. Here we present a regional-scale three dimensional model of the southern central part of the Lepontine Region, bordered by the Swiss-Italian frontier in the east and Valle Leventina to the west and by Biasca and Locarno to the north and south. The model visualises a geostatistical calculation of the dominant foliation field in three dimensions, based on field measurements. The present day tectonostratigraphy and nappe geometry are mainly influenced by the three earliest recognisable Alpine deformation phases D_1 to D_3. D_1 structures are associated with first-time crustal nappe emplacement. Lithologies that are interpreted as nappe separators - mainly Mesozoic sediments such as "Bündnerschiefer" - have mostly been interleaved between the nappes during D_1, which entails strong isoclinal folding and pronounced boudinage of the infolded lithologies, with the development of a penetrative foliation S_1. S_1 and the infolded Mesozoic have been intensely

  12. Light-element abundance variations in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, S. L.; Grebel, E. K.

    2010-09-01

    We present evidence for the contribution of high-mass globular clusters to the stellar halo of the Galaxy. Using SDSS-II/SEGUE spectra of over 1900 G- and K-type halo giants, we identify for the first time a subset of stars with CN bandstrengths significantly larger, and CH bandstrengths lower, than the majority of halo field stars, at fixed temperature and metallicity. Since CN bandstrength inhomogeneity and the usual attendant abundance variations are presently understood as a result of star formation in globular clusters, we interpret this subset of halo giants as a result of globular cluster dissolution into the Galactic halo. We find that 2.5% of our sample is CN-strong, and can infer based on recent models of globular cluster evolution that the fraction of halo field stars initially formed within globular clusters may be as large as 50%.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tyler S; Jacob, Christopher G; Silva, Joana C; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V; Cummings, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25514047

  14. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tyler S.; Jacob, Christopher G.; Silva, Joana C.; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V.; Cummings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25514047

  15. Single-Case Design Research: Building the Evidence-Base in the Field of Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Joanna E; Guardino, Caroline; Antia, Shirin D; Luckner, John L

    2016-01-01

    The field of education of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students has a paucity of evidence-based practices (EBPs) to guide instruction. The authors discussed how the research methodology of single-case design (SCD) can be used to build EBPs through direct and systematic replication of studies. An overview of SCD research methods is presented, including an explanation of how internal and external validity issues are addressed, and why SCD is appropriate for intervention research with DHH children. The authors then examine the SCD research in the field according to quality indicators (QIs; at the individual level and as a body of evidence) to determine the existing evidence base. Finally, future replication areas are recommended to fill the gaps in SCD research with students who are DHH in order to add to the evidence base in the field. PMID:26853064

  16. Incremental assembly and prolonged consolidation of Cordilleran magma chambers--Evidence from the Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Plutons thus provide an integrated record of prolonged magmatic evolution, while volcanism offers snapshots of conditions at early stages. Growth of subvolcanic batholiths involved sustained multistage open-system processes. These commonly involved ignimbrite eruptions at times of peak power input, but assembly and consolidation processes continued at diminishing rates long after peak volcanism. Some evidence cited for early incremental pluton assembly more likely records late events during or after volcanism. Contrasts between relatively primitive arc systems dominated by andesitic compositions and small upper-crustal plutons versus more silicic volcanic fields and associated batholiths probably reflect intertwined contrasts in crustal thickness and magmatic power input. Lower power input would lead to a Cascade- or Aleutian-type arc system, where intermediate-composition magma erupts directly from middle- and lower-crustal storage without development of large shallow plutons. Andean and southern Rocky Mountain–type systems begin similarly with intermediate-composition volcanism, but increasing magma production, perhaps triggered by abrupt changes in plate boundaries, leads to development of larger upper-crustal reservoirs, more silicic compositions, large ignimbrites, and batholiths. Lack of geophysical evidence for voluminous eruptible magma beneath young calderas suggests that near-solidus plutons can be rejuvenated rapidly by high-temperature mafic recharge, potentially causing large explosive eruptions with only brief precursors.

  17. Integral-Field Spectroscopy of the Post-Red Supergiant IRC +10420: Evidence for an Axisymmetric Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; Oudmaijer, René D.; Sahu, Kailash C.

    2007-12-01

    We present NAOMI/OASIS adaptive-optics-assisted integral-field spectroscopy of the transitional massive hypergiant IRC +10420, an extreme mass-losing star apparently in the process of evolving from a red supergiant toward the Wolf-Rayet phase. To investigate the present-day mass-loss geometry of the star, we study the appearance of the line emission from the inner wind as viewed when reflected off the surrounding nebula. We find that, contrary to previous work, there is strong evidence for wind axisymmetry, based on the equivalent width and velocity variations of Hα and Fe II λ6516. We attribute this behavior to the appearance of the complex line profiles when viewed from different angles. We also speculate that the Ti II emission originates in the outer nebula in a region analogous to the strontium filament of η Carinae, based on the morphology of the line emission. Finally, we suggest that the present-day axisymmetric wind of IRC +10420, combined with its continued blueward evolution, is evidence that the star is evolving toward the B[e] supergiant phase.

  18. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund–Grevesse–Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  19. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  20. First Light Measurements with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers: Evidence for an Inverse First Ionization Potential Effect and Anomalous Ne Abundance in the Coronae of HR 1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkman, A. C.; Behar, E.; Guedel, M.; Audard, M.; denBoggende, A. J. F.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Cottam, J.; Erd, C.; denHerder, J. W.; Jensen, F.

    2000-01-01

    The RS CVn binary system HR 1099 was extensively observed by the XMM-Newton observatory in February 2000 as its first-light target. A total of 570 ks of exposure time was accumulated with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS). The integrated X-ray spectrum between 5-38A is of unprecedented quality and shows numerous features attributed to transitions of the elements C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe. Ni, and probably others. We perform an in-depth study of the elemental composition of the average corona of this system, and find that the elemental abundances strongly depend on the first ionisation potential (FIP) of the elements. But different from the solar coronal case, we find an inverse FIP effect, i.e., the abundances (relative to oxygen) increase with increasing FIP. Possible scenarios, e.g., selective enrichment due to Ne-rich flare-like events, are discussed.

  1. Toward Reliable Estimates of Abundance: Comparing Index Methods to Assess the Abundance of a Mammalian Predator

    PubMed Central

    Güthlin, Denise; Storch, Ilse; Küchenhoff, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Due to time and financial constraints indices are often used to obtain landscape-scale estimates of relative species abundance. Using two different field methods and comparing the results can help to detect possible bias or a non monotonic relationship between the index and the true abundance, providing more reliable results. We used data obtained from camera traps and feces counts to independently estimate relative abundance of red foxes in the Black Forest, a forested landscape in southern Germany. Applying negative binomial regression models, we identified landscape parameters that influence red fox abundance, which we then used to predict relative red fox abundance. We compared the estimated regression coefficients of the landscape parameters and the predicted abundance of the two methods. Further, we compared the costs and the precision of the two field methods. The predicted relative abundances were similar between the two methods, suggesting that the two indices were closely related to the true abundance of red foxes. For both methods, landscape diversity and edge density best described differences in the indices and had positive estimated effects on the relative fox abundance. In our study the costs of each method were of similar magnitude, but the sample size obtained from the feces counts (262 transects) was larger than the camera trap sample size (88 camera locations). The precision of the camera traps was lower than the precision of the feces counts. The approach we applied can be used as a framework to compare and combine the results of two or more different field methods to estimate abundance and by this enhance the reliability of the result. PMID:24743565

  2. Coronal Element Abundances of the Post-Common Envelope Binary V471 Tauri with ASCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Hussain, Gaitee; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on ASCA observations of the coronally active companion star in the post-common envelope binary V471 Tau. While it would be prudent to check the following results with grating spectroscopy, we find that a single-temperature plasma model does not fit the data. Two temperature models with variable abundances indicate that Fe is underabundant compared to the Hyades photospheric mean, whereas, the high first ionization potential element Ne is overabundant. This is indicative of the inverse first ionization effect, believed to result from the fractionation of ionized material by the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere of the star. Evolutionary calculations indicate that there should be no peculiar abundances on the companion star resulting from the common envelope epoch. Indeed, we find no evidence for peculiar abundances, although uncertainties are high.

  3. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland: Field evidence of anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Field evidence collected along two groundwater flow paths shows that anaerobic biodegradation naturally attenuates a plume of chlorinated volatile organic compounds as it discharges from an aerobic sand aquifer through wetland sediments. A decrease in concentrations of two parent contaminants, trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA), and a concomitant increase in concentrations of anaerobic daughter products occurs along upward flow paths through the Wetland sediments. The daughter products 1,2-dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane are produced from hydrogenolysis of TCE and from PCA degradation through hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination (reductive dechlorination) pathways. Total concentrations of TCE, PCA, and their degradation products, however, decrease to below detection levels within 0.15-0.30 m of land surface. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of TCE and PCA in the wetland sediments is associated with the naturally higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and the lower redox state of the groundwater compared to the aquifer. This field study indicates that wetlands and similar organic-rich environments at groundwater/surface-water interfaces may be important in intercepting groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organics and in naturally reducing concentrations and toxicity before sensitive surface-water receptors are reached.

  4. Evidence for the emergence of new rice types of interspecific hybrid origin in West African farmers' fields.

    PubMed

    Nuijten, Edwin; van Treuren, Robbert; Struik, Paul C; Mokuwa, Alfred; Okry, Florent; Teeken, Béla; Richards, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In West Africa two rice species (Oryza glaberrima Steud. and Oryza sativa L.) co-exist. Although originally it was thought that interspecific hybridization is impossible without biotechnological methods, progenies of hybridization appear to occur in farmer fields. AFLP analysis was used to assess genetic diversity in West Africa (including the countries The Gambia, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Guinea Conakry, Sierra Leone, Ghana and Togo) using 315 rice samples morphologically classified prior to analysis. We show evidence for farmer interspecific hybrids of African and Asian rice, resulting in a group of novel genotypes, and identify possible mechanisms for in-field hybridization. Spontaneous back-crossing events play a crucial role, resulting in different groups of genetic diversity in different regions developed by natural and cultural selection, often under adverse conditions. These new groups of genotypes may have potential relevance for exploitation by plant breeders. Future advances in crop development could be achieved through co-operation between scientists and marginalized farmer groups in order to address challenges of rapid adaptation in a world of increasing socio-political and climatic uncertainty. PMID:19806197

  5. Numerical evidence for a chiral spin liquid in the XXZ model on the kagome lattice in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changlani, Hitesh; Kumar, Krishna; Clark, Bryan; Fradkin, Eduardo

    Frustrated spin systems in two dimensions provide a fertile ground for discovering exotic states of matter, often with topologically non-trivial properties. In this work, we investigate the possible existence of a chiral spin liquid state in the spin 1/2 XXZ model on the frustrated kagome lattice in the presence of a magnetic field. This model is equivalent to a hard-core bosonic one with density-density interactions at finite filling fraction. Motivated by previous field theoretic predictions utilizing a Chern-Simons theory adapted for this lattice, we focus our attention to understanding the XY limit for the 2/3 magnetization plateau (equivalent to a system of hard-core bosons at 1/6 filling with weak nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions). Performing exact or accurate numerical computations, and based on energetics and construction of minimally entangled states and associated modular matrices, we provide evidence for such a spin liquid. We study the nature of this phase and examine its stability to additional interactions. We acknowledge support from the SciDAC program under Award Number DE-FG02-12ER46875.

  6. Diagenesis of the Machar Field (British North Sea) chalk: Evidence for decoupling of diagenesis in fractures and the host rock

    SciTech Connect

    Maliva, R.G.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Smalley, P.C.; Oxtoby, N.H.

    1995-01-02

    The Chalk Group (Cretaceous/Tertiary) in the Machar Field (British North Sea) contains both fracture-filling and microcrystalline calcite cements. Modeling of fluid-rock interaction using data on light stable isotopes obtained by whole rock analyses and laser ablation analyses of calcite cements reveal that the fracture and matrix diagenetic systems were largely decoupled. The calcium and carbonate of the fracture-filling calcite cements were derived largely from the adjacent chalk matrix. The fracture diagenetic system had a high water-rock ratio, which maintained a relatively stable water {delta}{sup 18}O ratio during calcite dissolution and precipitation. The chalk matrix, on the contrary, had a low molar water-rock ratio during recrystallization, which resulted in increases in the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value during recrystallization at elevated temperatures. This evolution of the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value is manifested by highly variable cement {delta}{sup 18}O values. The present-day formation waters of the Machar Field have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios significantly higher than the whole rock and fracture-filling cement calcite values, evidence that the chemical composition of the formation waters is not representative of that of the pore waters during chalk recrystallization. Little diagenesis is therefore now occurring in the Machar Field. The diagenetic systems of the chalk matrix and fractures both had a high degree of openness with respect to carbon, because of the introduction of organically derived bicarbonate rather than advection of water through the chalk. The bulk of calcite cementation in fractures and the recrystallization and cementation of the chalk matrix occurred at temperatures in the 80--100 C range, at or just below the present-day reservoir temperature of 97 C.

  7. Field-scale evidence for biogeophysical signatures resulting from natural attenuation of a well characterized crude oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, L. D.; Revil, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Mewafy, F.; Bekins, B. A.; Cozzarelli, I.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Skold, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Trost, J.; Erickson, M.; Heenan, J. W.; Lane, J. W.; Werkema, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent biogeophysical research has indicated that unique geophysical signatures are associated with the long-term biodegradation of organic contaminants. However, field-scale demonstrations of the presence of these signatures at sites of organic contamination are lacking. For the last three years, we have performed geophysical measurements at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site, a unique field laboratory situated just outside of Bemidji, MN. At this site, a ruptured pipeline spilled 1,700,000 L of crude oil into an uninhabited area in 1979. Natural attenuation of the spill has been extensively documented and a geochemical database extending back over 20 years is available to constrain interpretation of the geophysical signatures. We report compelling evidence of a transient geobattery associated with biodegradation of this mature hydrocarbon spill. Using an array of boreholes, self-potential measurements acquired from land surface, passing through the smear zone, capture a diagnostic dipole (peak to peak voltages up to 64 mV) indicating a current source centered on the smear zone, with anodic and cathodic reactions below and above the smear zone respectively. Down borehole measurements reveal that the smear zone is characterized by high magnetic susceptibility (MS); laboratory measurements show that this MS enhancement results from precipitation of iron mineral byproducts of biodegradation. These iron minerals presumably facilitate the electron transport between anode and cathode required to support a geobattery. Furthermore, laboratory and field-scale complex resistivity measurements reveal an enhancement in the complex surface conductivity within the smear zone most likely due to these biodegradation byproducts. The geobattery is not permanent, but instead periodically shuts down, presumably due to changes in the gradient of the redox species driving anodic and cathodic reactions. Gas samples show that conditions are anaerobic

  8. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  9. Dolomitization and neomorphism of Mississippian (Visean) upper debolt formation, Blueberry field, northeastern British Columbia: Geologic, petrologic, and chemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Durocher, S.; Al-Aasm, I.S.

    1997-06-01

    Petrographic, chemical, and isotopic studies of the Mississippian (Visean) upper Debolt Formation in the Blueberry field, British Columbia, Canada, reveal that dolomitization was the result of several diagenetic events and that neomorphic alteration of these dolomites significantly modified their original chemical signatures. These studies also demonstrate how tectonics play an important role in controlling and modifying reservoir dolomites in the area. Petrographic investigations have documented two early dolomite phases, (1) early matrix dolomite and (2) pervasive dolomite, and two later generations, (3) coarse cement and (4) pseudomorphic replacement of crinoids. Early matrix dolomite occurs as small (average 25 {mu}m) subhedral to euhedral crystals that replace the matrix of carbonate mudstones, wackestones, and packstones. Petrographic evidence suggests that early matrix dolomite had a relatively early, precompaction origin, possibly from marine fluids. However, geochemical evidence indicates that later fluids have altered their original geochemical signatures. Pervasive dolomite, which forms the reservoir intercrystalline porosity, occurs with planar-s and planar-e textures. Planar-s crystals typically have a dirty appearance and exhibit homogeneous dull brown/red cathodoluminescence colors. Planar-e crystals may appear with a cloudy core and a clear rim, and under cathodoluminescence display an irregular dull brown/red core and a thin, bright red rim. Due to the spatial distribution pattern of pervasive dolomite with respect to the overlying unconformity surface, its paleogeographic distribution and close temporal relationship with meteoric diagenetic events, pervasive dolomite formed from a mixture of seawater and meteoric fluids. However, alteration of their primary chemistry by later fluids is indicated by their depleted {delta}{sup 18}O values and radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios.

  10. Field reconnaissance of the Anti-Atlas coastline, Morocco: Fluvial and marine evidence for Late Cenozoic uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westaway, Rob; Aït Hssaine, Ali; Demir, Tuncer; Beck, Anthony

    2009-09-01

    The available evidence regarding the disposition and chronology of Pliocene-Pleistocene fluvial terraces, coastal rock flats, raised beaches and lacustrine sediments adjoining the Anti-Atlas coastline of Morocco has been reviewed and supplemented by additional information from our own field reconnaissance. It is thus suggested that the study region has experienced uplift by ˜ 130 m since the Mid-Pliocene climatic optimum (˜ 3.1 Ma), by ˜ 90 m since the latest Pliocene (˜ 2 Ma), and by ˜ 45 m since the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (˜ 0.9 Ma). Each of these phases of uplift correlates with a phase of global climate change known independently, and it is thus inferred that the observed uplift is being driven by climate through mechanisms such as erosional isostasy and the associated induced lower-crustal flow. Numerical modelling of the observed uplift history indicates that the mobile lower-crustal layer in the study region is ˜ 9 km thick, with a temperature at its base of ˜ 500 °C. The base of this mobile layer is inferred to be at ˜ 24 km depth, the deepest crust consisting of a layer of mafic underplating that does not flow under ambient conditions. The principal landform in the study region, the coastal rock platform at ˜ 60 m a.s.l., thus formed during a succession of interglacial marine highstands in the late Early Pleistocene when uplift rates were low. Although control on the ages of young sediments and landforms is currently extremely limited, being dependent on regional correlation schemes rather than on absolute dating, the study region fits the pattern, emerging worldwide, that climate change is driving the systematic growth of topographic relief evident during the Late Cenozoic.

  11. A Field Measurement of Isocyanic Acid (HNCO): Evidence of a Secondary Source and Presence in Cloud Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Liggio, G.; Wentzell, J. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Schroder, J.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been shown to cause a variety of adverse health effects via protein carbamylation reactions. It is proposed as a key compound in smoke related health issues due to its well-known sources, biomass burning and cigarette smoke. In spite of this, our understanding of the atmospheric fate of this toxic compound is incomplete. More ambient measurements are needed to elucidate additional sources and to better characterize the sinks of HNCO in the atmosphere. The recent development of the Acetate Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Acid-CIMS) has enabled on-line measurement of HNCO at ambient mixing ratios. Ambient measurements of HNCO were performed in La Jolla, CA during the spring/summer of 2012, using the Acid-CIMS. HNCO mixing ratios were found to be approximately 150 pptv during the night, but typically increased to over 300 pptv in the early afternoon. From the observed diurnal profile and the correlation of HNCO with temperature and other secondary compounds (e.g. nitric acid), we report evidence of a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO. The observed HNCO likely arose as a combination of primary and secondary sources. We have also detected HNCO in cloudwater by coupling the Acid-CIMS to a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field evidence of cloud scavenging of HNCO. Our result show that the cloud scavenging of HNCO may be more efficient than predicted from its effective Henry's law constant. Campaign-averaged diurnal profiles of Black Carbon (BC), isocyanic acid (HNCO) and nitric acid (HNO3). Dotted lines show the averaged time of sunrise and sunset during the campaign.

  12. Evidence of internal rotation and a helical magnetic field in the jet of the quasar NRAO 150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Sol N.; Agudo, Iván; Gómez, José L.; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Martí-Vidal, Iván; Roy, Alan L.

    2014-06-01

    The source NRAO 150 is a very prominent millimeter to radio emitting quasar at redshift z = 1.52 for which previous millimeter VLBI observations revealed a fast counterclockwise rotation of the innermost regions of the jet. Here we present new polarimetric multi-epoch VLBI-imaging observations of NRAO 150 performed at 8, 15, 22, 43, and 86 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) between 2006 and 2010. All new and previous observational evidence - i.e., spectral index maps, multi-epoch image cross-correlation, and low level of linear polarization degree in optically thin regions - are consistent with an interpretation of the source behavior where the jet is seen at an extremely small angle to the line of sight, and the high frequency emitting regions in NRAO 150 rotate at high speeds on the plane of the sky with respect to a reference point that does not need to be related to any particularly prominent jet feature. The observed polarization angle distribution at 22, 43, and 86 GHz during observing epochs with high polarization degree suggests that we have detected the toroidal component of the magnetic field threading the innermost jet plasma regions. This is also consistent with the lower degree of polarization detected at progressively poorer angular resolutions, where the integrated polarization intensity produced by the toroidal field is explained by polarization cancellation inside the observing beam. All this evidence is fully consistent with a kinematic scenario where the main kinematic and polarization properties of the 43 GHz emitting structure of NRAO 150 are explained by the internal rotation of such emission regions around the jet axis when the jet is seen almost face on. A simplified model developed to fit helical trajectories to the observed kinematics of the 43 GHz features fully supports this hypothesis. This explains the kinematics of the innermost regions of the jet in NRAO 150 in terms of internal

  13. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  14. Zinc Abundances in Galactic Bulge Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, C. R.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is overabundant in metal-poor stars (Cayrel et al. 2004), being partially produced by neutron addition. It decreases with increasing metallicity, similarly to alpha-elements. In order to trace its abundance, the derivation of Zn abundance in different stellar populations, and varying metallicities, helps understanding its nucleosynthesis processes. Zn is also the main element of reference to derive the metallicity from absorption lines in quasars (QSOs), which allows to compare their evolution as a function of redshift and metallicity in metal-poor stars. In the present work, we derive Zn abundances for a sample of 56 bulge field stars, observed at high resolution with the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph. The mean wavelength coverage is 4800-6800 Å, at a resolution R ˜ 45000. The atmospheric parameters effective temperature, gravity and metallicity were derived in Zoccali et al. (2008) and Hill et al. (2011). Recently we have analysed the manganese abundances of this sample (Barbuy et al. 2013). To compute the Zn abundances we use spectrum synthesis, for the lines ZnI 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. The analysis of our data shows that the abundance of [Zn/Fe] decreases with increasing metallicity, in agreement with the data obtained from the literature. The details of Zn behaviour for the metal-rich bulge stars of the present work are under analysis.

  15. InSAR Detection and Field Evidence for Thermokarst after a Tundra Wildfire, Using ALOS-PALSAR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iwahana, Go; Uchida, Masao; Liu, Lin; Gong, Wenyu; Meyer, Franz; Guritz, Richard; Yamanokuchi, Tsutomu; Hinzman, Larry

    2016-03-08

    Thermokarst is the process of ground subsidence caused by either the thawing of ice-rich permafrost or the melting of massive ground ice. The consequences of permafrost degradation associated with thermokarst for surface ecology, landscape evolution, and hydrological processes have been of great scientific interest and social concern. Part of a tundra patch affected by wildfire in northern Alaska (27.5 km2) was investigated here, using remote sensing and in situ surveys to quantify and understand permafrost thaw dynamics after surface disturbances. A two-pass differential InSAR technique using L-band ALOS-PALSAR has been shown capable of capturing thermokarst subsidence triggered by a tundramore » fire at a spatial resolution of tens of meters, with supporting evidence from field data and optical satellite images. We have introduced a calibration procedure, comparing burned and unburned areas for InSAR subsidence signals, to remove the noise due to seasonal surface movement. In the first year after the fire, an average subsidence rate of 6.2 cm/year (vertical) was measured. Subsidence in the burned area continued over the following two years, with decreased rates. The mean rate of subsidence observed in our interferograms (from 24 July 2008 to 14 September 2010) was 3.3 cm/year, a value comparable to that estimated from field surveys at two plots on average (2.2 cm/year) for the six years after the fire. These results suggest that this InSAR-measured ground subsidence is caused by the development of thermokarst, a thawing process supported by surface change observations from high-resolution optical images and in situ ground level surveys.« less

  16. Field and experimental evidence for coseismic ruptures along shallow creeping faults in forearc sediments of the Crotone Basin, South Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Fabrizio; Aldega, Luca; De Paola, Nicola; Faoro, Igor; Storti, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    Large seismic slip occurring along shallow creeping faults in tectonically active areas represents an unsolved paradox, which is largely due to our poor understanding of the mechanics governing creeping faults, and to the lack of documented geological evidence showing how coseismic rupturing overprints creep in near-surface conditions. In this contribution we integrate field, petrophysical, mineralogical and friction data to characterize the signature of coseismic ruptures propagating along shallow creeping faults affecting unconsolidated forearc sediments of the seismically active Crotone Basin, in South Italy. Field observations of fault zones show widespread foliated cataclasites in fault cores, locally overprinted by sharp slip surfaces decorated by thin (0.5-1.5 cm) black gouge layers. Compared to foliated cataclasites, black gouges have much lower grain size, porosity and permeability, which may have facilitated slip weakening by thermal fluid pressurization. Moreover, black gouges are characterized by distinct mineralogical assemblages compatible with high temperatures (180-200°C) due to frictional heating during seismic slip. Foliated cataclasites and black gouges were also produced by laboratory friction experiments performed on host sediments at sub-seismic (≤ 0.1 m/s) and seismic (1 m/s) slip rates, respectively. Black gouges display low friction coefficients (0.3) and velocity-weakening behaviours, as opposed to high friction coefficients (0.65) and velocity-strengthening behaviours shown by the foliated cataclasites. Our results show that narrow black gouges developed within foliated cataclasites represent a potential diagnostic marker for episodic seismic activity in shallow creeping faults. These findings can help understanding the time-space partitioning between aseismic and seismic slip of faults at shallow crustal levels, impacting on seismic hazard evaluation of subduction zones and forearc regions affected by destructive earthquakes and

  17. Further Evidence for Unusual Geomagnetic Field Behavior Around the Precambrian-Cambrian Boundary from new Siberian paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V.; Rud'ko, S.; Shatsillo, A.; Gallet, Y.; Kouznetsov, N.

    2015-12-01

    Since paleomagnetic studies have focused on Late Precambrian-Early Paleozoic geodynamics of the Siberian platform, apparently irreconcilable paleomagnetic poles have been obtained. We will first report on recent paleomagnetic results dated to the Late Ediacaran-Nemakit Daldynian (latemost Precambrian-Lowermost Cambrian) and Tommotian-Atdabanian (Lower Cambrian) periods obtained from the southwestern and southeastern margins of the Siberian platform. Whereas the poles of the older time interval lie close to Madagascar, Tommotian-Atdabanian poles are lying to the south of Australia, as other Cambrian poles previously obtained by Khramov and co-authors. Such a large angular difference in pole position could be explained either by True Polar Wander or by the occurrence of abnormal geomagnetic field behavior around the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Furthermore, a 60-m thick sequence of red siltstones and sandstones of the Ediacaran Lopata Formation, that crops out along the Teya river in the Yenisey Ridge region (Western margin of the Siberian platform), was sampled for magnetostratigraphy. Rock magnetic analyses and thermal demagnetization reveal a magnetization dominantly carried by hematite, with the coexistence of antiparallel components of magnetization in some samples. The magnetization isolated over the highest unblocking temperatures is regarded as the characteristic component. It defines numerous magnetic polarity intervals with antipodal directions. According to reasonable sedimentation rates expected for the lithology of the Lopata Formation, this high number of magnetozones most probably indicates the occurrence of an extremely high magnetic reversal frequency during at least a part of the Ediacaran. This result confirms other magnetostratigraphic data previously obtained in North-Western Russia and Urals. Altogether, the paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic results provide evidence supporting the unusual geomagnetic field behavior around the Precambrian

  18. Molecular and Geochemical Evidence of in situ Denitrification at a Dairy Field Site in the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Letain, T. E.; Singleton, M. J.; Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.; Balser, L. M.; Moran, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    Rising nitrate concentrations in California groundwater threaten an already strained water supply. Under certain conditions, however, intrinsic microbial denitrification can mitigate this problem. We present results from a field study at a central California dairy that document saturated-zone denitrification using a combination of molecular and geochemical methods. Geochemical measurements to assess denitrification included nitrate concentration, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, dissolved excess N2, and stable isotope composition of nitrate. Sharp decreases in nitrate concentrations with depth corresponded to sharp decreases in DO concentrations and decreasing redox potential. Nitrate in groundwater from this study had δ15N values (5 to 60 ‰) and δ18O values (-4 to 25 ‰) that plotted with a δ18O/δ15N slope of 0.5, consistent with denitrification. Dissolved N2 was found at concentrations well above Ar-normalized concentrations predicted for atmospheric N2, consistent with reduction of nitrate to N2. in situ denitrification was further documented by increased populations of denitrifying bacteria in zones with geochemical signatures of denitrification. Real-time, quantitative, Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) analysis was used to determine denitrifying bacterial cell populations present in aquifer sediment samples by measuring the abundance of genes encoding nitrite reductase, a central enzyme involved in denitrification. Real-time qPCR primers and probes allowing for universal detection of both the nirS (Fe-containing nitrite reductase) and nirK (Cu-containing nitrite reductase) genes in environmental samples were designed based on multiple alignments of over 30 nirS and nirK gene sequences available in GenBank. Trends in total eubacterial populations were also monitored by real-time qPCR analysis. Although geochemical measurements alone can sometimes convincingly indicate denitrification, the real-time qPCR analysis used in this study provides additional

  19. Revisiting the Abundance Gradient in the Maser Host Galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    New spectroscopic observations of 36 H II regions in NGC 4258 obtained with the Gemini telescope are combined with existing data from the literature to measure the radial oxygen abundance gradient in this galaxy. The [O III]λ4363 auroral line was detected in four of the outermost targets (17-22 kpc from the galaxy center), allowing a determination of the electron temperature Te of the ionized gas. From the use of different calibrations of the R 23 abundance indicator, an oxygen abundance gradient of approximately -0.012 ± 0.002 dex kpc-1 is derived. Such a shallow gradient, combined with the difference in the distance moduli measured from the Cepheid period-luminosity relation by Macri et al. between two distinct fields in NGC 4258, would yield an unrealistically strong effect of metallicity on the Cepheid distances. This strengthens the suggestion that systematic biases might affect the Cepheid distance of the outer field. Evidence for a similar effect in the differential study of M33 by Scowcroft et al. is presented. A revision of the transformation between strong-line and Te -based abundances in Cepheid-host galaxies is discussed. In the Te abundance scale, the oxygen abundance of the inner field of NGC 4258 is found to be comparable with the LMC value. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  20. The Effect of Group Attachment and Social Position on Prosocial Behavior. Evidence from Lab-in-the-Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarri, Delia; Grossman, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Social life is regulated by norms of fairness that constrain selfish behavior. While a substantial body of scholarship on prosocial behavior has provided evidence of such norms, large inter- and intra-personal variation in prosocial behavior still needs to be explained. The article identifies two social-structural dimensions along which people's generosity varies systematically: group attachment and social position. We conducted lab-in-the-field experiments involving 2,597 members of producer organizations in rural Uganda. Using different variants of the dictator game, we demonstrate that group attachment positively affects prosocial behavior, and that this effect is not simply the by-product of the degree of proximity between individuals. Second, we show that occupying a formal position in an organization or community leads to greater generosity toward in-group members. Taken together, our findings show that prosocial behavior is not an invariant social trait; rather, it varies according to individuals' relative position in the social structure. PMID:23555594

  1. Field experiment evidence of substantive, attributional, and behavioral persuasion by members of Congress in online town halls

    PubMed Central

    Minozzi, William; Neblo, Michael A.; Esterling, Kevin M.; Lazer, David M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Do leaders persuade? Social scientists have long studied the relationship between elite behavior and mass opinion. However, there is surprisingly little evidence regarding direct persuasion by leaders. Here we show that political leaders can persuade their constituents directly on three dimensions: substantive attitudes regarding policy issues, attributions regarding the leaders’ qualities, and subsequent voting behavior. We ran two randomized controlled field experiments testing the causal effects of directly interacting with a sitting politician. Our experiments consist of 20 online town hall meetings with members of Congress conducted in 2006 and 2008. Study 1 examined 19 small meetings with members of the House of Representatives (average 20 participants per town hall). Study 2 examined a large (175 participants) town hall with a senator. In both experiments we find that participating has significant and substantively important causal effects on all three dimensions of persuasion but no such effects on issues that were not discussed extensively in the sessions. Further, persuasion was not driven solely by changes in copartisans’ attitudes; the effects were consistent across groups. PMID:25775516

  2. Interference of field evidence, morphology, and DNA analyses of three related Lysiphlebus aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae).

    PubMed

    Starý, Petr; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Petrović, Andjeljko; Žikić, Vladimir; Rakhshani, Ehsan; Tomanović, Snežana; Tomanović, Željko; Havelka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This study provides evidence on integrating the morphological, field, and laboratory data, and application of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) barcoding gene to the three asexual or sexual Lysiphlebus spp., i.e., Lysiphlebus cardui (Marshall), Lysiphlebus confusus Tremblay and Eady and Lysiphlebus fabarum (Marshall) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae). New aphid- invasive plant association, Aphis fabae Scopoli (Hemipreta: Aphididae) on Impatiens glandulifera Royle, has been used in the same model area in the Czech Republic under the same sampling and rearing method for several consecutive years and throughout the season. For molecular identification of these three species, we used DNA sequences of the barcoding region of the mitochondrial COI gene. Although our results confirmed ecological and morphological differences among L. cardui, L. confusus, and L. fabarum, genetic analysis on the basis of COI mitochondrial barcoding gene does not support species status of the mentioned Lysiphlebus taxa. The level of morphological differentiation in these Lysiphlebus Förster species is in accordance with the usual species variability within subfamily Aphidiinae. However, it should be examined how appearance of asexual lineages affects the morphological or genetical variability. PMID:25399432

  3. Field experiment evidence of substantive, attributional, and behavioral persuasion by members of Congress in online town halls.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, William; Neblo, Michael A; Esterling, Kevin M; Lazer, David M J

    2015-03-31

    Do leaders persuade? Social scientists have long studied the relationship between elite behavior and mass opinion. However, there is surprisingly little evidence regarding direct persuasion by leaders. Here we show that political leaders can persuade their constituents directly on three dimensions: substantive attitudes regarding policy issues, attributions regarding the leaders' qualities, and subsequent voting behavior. We ran two randomized controlled field experiments testing the causal effects of directly interacting with a sitting politician. Our experiments consist of 20 online town hall meetings with members of Congress conducted in 2006 and 2008. Study 1 examined 19 small meetings with members of the House of Representatives (average 20 participants per town hall). Study 2 examined a large (175 participants) town hall with a senator. In both experiments we find that participating has significant and substantively important causal effects on all three dimensions of persuasion but no such effects on issues that were not discussed extensively in the sessions. Further, persuasion was not driven solely by changes in copartisans' attitudes; the effects were consistent across groups. PMID:25775516

  4. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  5. Tigers and their prey: Predicting carnivore densities from prey abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karanth, K.U.; Nichols, J.D.; Kumar, N.S.; Link, W.A.; Hines, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of ecology is to understand interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. In principle, ecologists should be able to identify a small number of limiting resources for a species of interest, estimate densities of these resources at different locations across the landscape, and then use these estimates to predict the density of the focal species at these locations. In practice, however, development of functional relationships between abundances of species and their resources has proven extremely difficult, and examples of such predictive ability are very rare. Ecological studies of prey requirements of tigers Panthera tigris led us to develop a simple mechanistic model for predicting tiger density as a function of prey density. We tested our model using data from a landscape-scale long-term (1995-2003) field study that estimated tiger and prey densities in 11 ecologically diverse sites across India. We used field techniques and analytical methods that specifically addressed sampling and detectability, two issues that frequently present problems in macroecological studies of animal populations. Estimated densities of ungulate prey ranged between 5.3 and 63.8 animals per km2. Estimated tiger densities (3.2-16.8 tigers per 100 km2) were reasonably consistent with model predictions. The results provide evidence of a functional relationship between abundances of large carnivores and their prey under a wide range of ecological conditions. In addition to generating important insights into carnivore ecology and conservation, the study provides a potentially useful model for the rigorous conduct of macroecological science.

  6. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  7. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  8. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  9. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  10. New field evidence for silicic ignimbrites and proximal lavas and their distribution in the Parana Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, S.; Harmon, L. J.; Gravley, D. M.; Gualda, G. A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silicic ignimbrites and lavas are sometimes very difficult to distinguish from one another in the field. Their accurate identification provides the basis for a better understanding of the origin of these deposits, including processes related to magma extraction, fragmentation and eruption style. We are studying the silicic volcanics in the Paraná Rift Basin in southern Brazil (the ~130 to 135 Ma Palmas member of the Serra Geral Formation), the counterpart to the Etendeka silicic volcanics in Africa. We present new field evidence for the identification of tabular-shaped ignimbrite-like packages, which contrast with dome-shaped proximal viscous lavas and domes. The tabular-shaped packages are highly welded and devitrified, but primary feldspar and pyroxene crystals can still be identified in outcrops. Flow/cooling unit boundaries can be seen at outcrop scale as well as at the kilometer scale where successive flat-topped terraces have been cut into the volcanic landscape. These packages bear conspicuous swarms of vesicle-poor black lens-shaped features set in a light colored matrix. The lenses range in their aspect ratio (2D height vs. length) and can be > 2 m long. Horizontal jointing is superimposed on the black lens-bearing outcrops and their spacing appears to coincide with the aspect ratio of the lenses, i.e. thinner lenses have a narrower joint spacing. Locally wider lenses grade down into completely stretched and/or flattened lenses that resemble conventional flow banding. We interpret these tabular packages as ignimbrites and the vesicle-poor black lenses as juvenile magma blobs (distinct from typical pumice or fiamme). A notably different flow-banded, irregularly deformed, and sometimes obsidian-bearing lithology appears in a number of locations. It supports topography characterized by rolling hills that contrasts markedly with the tilted plateaus supported by ignimbrites. The difference in morphology between ignimbrites and lavas is most readily observed in

  11. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  12. Saturn's dayside ultraviolet auroras: Evidence for morphological dependence on the direction of the upstream interplanetary magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, C J; Alexeev, I I; Badman, S V; Belenkaya, E S; Cowley, S W H; Dougherty, M K; Kalegaev, V V; Lewis, G R; Nichols, J D

    2014-01-01

    We examine a unique data set from seven Hubble Space Telescope (HST) “visits” that imaged Saturn's northern dayside ultraviolet emissions exhibiting usual circumpolar “auroral oval” morphologies, during which Cassini measured the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) upstream of Saturn's bow shock over intervals of several hours. The auroras generally consist of a dawn arc extending toward noon centered near ∼15° colatitude, together with intermittent patchy forms at ∼10° colatitude and poleward thereof, located between noon and dusk. The dawn arc is a persistent feature, but exhibits variations in position, width, and intensity, which have no clear relationship with the concurrent IMF. However, the patchy postnoon auroras are found to relate to the (suitably lagged and averaged) IMF Bz, being present during all four visits with positive Bz and absent during all three visits with negative Bz. The most continuous such forms occur in the case of strongest positive Bz. These results suggest that the postnoon forms are associated with reconnection and open flux production at Saturn's magnetopause, related to the similarly interpreted bifurcated auroral arc structures previously observed in this local time sector in Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph data, whose details remain unresolved in these HST images. One of the intervals with negative IMF Bz however exhibits a prenoon patch of very high latitude emission extending poleward of the dawn arc to the magnetic/spin pole, suggestive of the occurrence of lobe reconnection. Overall, these data provide evidence of significant IMF dependence in the morphology of Saturn's dayside auroras. Key Points We examine seven cases of joint HST Saturn auroral images and Cassini IMF data The persistent but variable dawn arc shows no obvious IMF dependence Patchy postnoon auroras are present for northward IMF but not for southward IMF PMID:26167441

  13. Field and laboratory studies of methane oxidation in an anoxic marine sediment: Evidence for a methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehler, T.M.; Alperin, M.J.; Albert, D.B.

    1994-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies of anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation is mediated by a consortium of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A seasonal survey of methane oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction rates indicates that methane production was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments at all times of year, while methane oxidation occurred in two modes. In the summer, methane oxidation was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments and occurred at rates lower than those of CO{sub 2} reduction. In the winter, net methane oxidation occurred in an interval at the base of the sulfate-containing zone. Sediment incubation experiments suggest both methanogens and sulfate reducers were responsible for the observed methane oxidation. In one incubation experiment both modes of oxidation were partially inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (a specific inhibitor of methanogens). This evidence, along with the apparent confinement of methane oxidation to sulfate-depleted sediments in the summer, indicates that methanogenic bacteria are involved in methane oxidation. In a second incubation experiment, net methane oxidation was induced by adding sulfate to homogenized methanogenic sediments, suggesting that sulfate reducers also a play a role in the process. We hypothesize that methanogens oxidize methane and produce hydrogen via a reversal of CO{sub 2} reduction. The hydrogen is efficiently removed and maintained at low concentrations by sulfate reducers. Pore water H{sub 2} concentrations in the sediment incubation experiments (while net methane oxidation was occurring) were low enough that methanogenic bacteria could derive sufficient energy for growth from the oxidation of methane. The methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium may also be a feasible mechanism for previously documented anaerobic methane oxidation in both freshwater and marine environments. 63 refs., 6 refs.

  14. Heterogeneous sources of oxygenated hydrocarbons in the tropical free troposphere: Field evidence for a biogeochemical cycle of marine organic carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Apel, E. C.; Baidar, S.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pierce, R.; Ortega, I.; Romashkin, P.; Wang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Oceans cover 70% of the Earth surface, and the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contained in the world's oceans is comparable to that of atmospheric CO2. Yet oceans are currently believed to be a net-receptor for organic carbon that is emitted over land. Recent our observations of very short-lived and very water soluble oxygenated hydrocarbons, like glyoxal, in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) above the Pacific Ocean (Sinreich et al., 2010, ACP) remain as of yet unexplained by atmospheric models. Organic carbon is relevant in the atmosphere because it influences the reactive chemical removal pathways of climate active gases (i.e., ozone, methane, dimethyl-sulfide), and can modify aerosols (e.g., secondary organic aerosol, SOA). This presentation provides a comprehensive field evidence that small oxygenated molecules (glyoxal, methyl ethyl ketone, butanal) from marine sources are widespread also in the tropical free troposphere. The data were collected as part of the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange experiment TORERO during Jan/Feb 2012 by means of an innovative payload of optical spectroscopic-, mass spectrometric-, and remote sensing instruments aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft (HIAPER), and aboard a NOAA ship. We have measured oxygenated hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (some 50+ species), aerosol size distributions, photolysis frequencies and other parameters over the full tropospheric air column (0-15km altitude) between 40N to 40S latitude over the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. We investigate the source mechanism, present source estimates of the organic carbon flux, and compare it with other sources of organic carbon from marine sources. We also present results from numerical models that suggest a strong impact of these molecules on the oxidative capacity of the tropical free troposphere, where most of tropospheric ozone mass resides, 60-80% of the global methane destruction occurs, and mercury oxidation rates are accelerated at

  15. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  16. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugler, Julie A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5x106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by their mass to be in a mass range of 0.9 to 1.1 solar masses as determined by Lambert & Reddy (2004). They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H] -0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken over several nights, with forty-six spectra taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and six spectra on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) using the Gecko spectrograph. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis, fitting a 4Å region around the resonance lines of Be II. The data were then analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, and metallicity and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to increase with metallicity and the linear relationship evident when extended to metallicities down to -4.0 dex with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread 1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K. This research was conducted through the Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy and was funded by the NSF.

  17. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-08-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  18. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-07-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [ A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  19. Habitat heterogeneity drives the host-diversity-begets-parasite-diversity relationship: evidence from experimental and field studies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pieter T J; Wood, Chelsea L; Joseph, Maxwell B; Preston, Daniel L; Haas, Sarah E; Springer, Yuri P

    2016-07-01

    Despite a century of research into the factors that generate and maintain biodiversity, we know remarkably little about the drivers of parasite diversity. To identify the mechanisms governing parasite diversity, we combined surveys of 8100 amphibian hosts with an outdoor experiment that tested theory developed for free-living species. Our analyses revealed that parasite diversity increased consistently with host diversity due to habitat (i.e. host) heterogeneity, with secondary contributions from parasite colonisation and host abundance. Results of the experiment, in which host diversity was manipulated while parasite colonisation and host abundance were fixed, further reinforced this conclusion. Finally, the coefficient of host diversity on parasite diversity increased with spatial grain, which was driven by differences in their species-area curves: while host richness quickly saturated, parasite richness continued to increase with neighbourhood size. These results offer mechanistic insights into drivers of parasite diversity and provide a hierarchical framework for multi-scale disease research. PMID:27147106

  20. Laboratory toxicity and benthic invertebrate field colonization of Upper Columbia River sediments: Finding adverse effects using multiple lines of evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Kemble, N.E.; Allert, A.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Dowling, B.; Gruenenfelder, C.; Roland, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    studies in an experimental pond (8-week duration) indicated that two of the most metal-contaminated UCR sediments (dominated by high levels of sand-sized slag particles) exhibited decreased invertebrate colonization compared with sand-based reference sediments. Field-exposed SIR-300 resin samples also exhibited decreased invertebrate colonization numbers compared with reference materials, which may indicate behavioral avoidance of this material under field conditions. Multiple lines of evidence (analytical chemistry, laboratory toxicity, and field colonization results), along with findings from previous studies, indicate that high metal concentrations associated with slag-enriched sediments in the UCR are likely to adversely impact the growth and survival of native benthic invertebrate communities. Additional laboratory toxicity testing, refinement of the applications of sediment benchmarks for metal toxicity, and in situ benthic invertebrate studies will assist in better defining the spatial extent, temporal variations, and ecological impacts of metal-contaminated sediments in the UCR system.

  1. Evidence-Based Practice: How Did It Emerge and What Does It Mean for the Early Childhood Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia; Wesley, Patricia W.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of evidence-based practice is helping early educators, special educators, early interventionists, child care professionals, mental health professionals, social workers, health care professionals, and others to transform the services provided to children and families. The authors discuss the emergence of the evidence-based…

  2. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  3. Trends in Stranding and By-Catch Rates of Gray and Harbor Seals along the Northeastern Coast of the United States: Evidence of Divergence in the Abundance of Two Sympatric Phocid Species?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, David W.; Frungillo, Jaime; Smith, Ainsley; Moore, Katie; Sharp, Brian; Schuh, Janelle; Read, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seals and gray seals are sympatric phocid pinnipeds found in coastal waters of the temperate and sub-Arctic North Atlantic. In the Northwest Atlantic, both species were depleted through a combination of subsistence hunts and government supported bounties, and are now re-occupying substantial portions of their original ranges. While both species appear to have recovered during the past 2 decades, our understanding of their population dynamics in US waters is incomplete. Here we describe trends in stranding and bycatch rates of harbor and gray seals in the North East United States (NEUS) over the past 16 years through an exploratory curve-fitting exercise and structural break-point analysis. Variability in gray seal strandings in Southern New England and bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery were best described by fitting positive exponential and linear models, and exhibited rates of increase as high as 22%. In contrast, neither linear nor exponential models fit the oscillation of harbor seal strandings and bycatch over the study period. However, a breakpoint Chow test revealed that harbor seal strandings in the Cape Cod, Massachusetts region and harbor seal bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery increased in the 1990s and then started declining in the early to mid-2000s. Our analysis indicates that ongoing variation in natural and anthropogenic mortality rates of harbor and gray seals in the NEUS is not synchronous, and likely represents diverging trends in abundance of these species as they assume new roles in the marine ecosystems of the region. PMID:26200461

  4. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  5. Magnetization of the Mn1-x Fe x Si in high magnetic field up to 50 T: Possible evidence of a field-induced Griffiths phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, A. N.; Huang, J.; Glushkov, V. V.; Lobanova, I. I.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Chubova, N. M.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoriev, S. V.; Kagan, M. Yu.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic properties of single crystals of Mn1-x Fe x Si solid solutions with x < 0.2 are investigated by pulsed field technique in magnetic fields up to 50 T. It is shown that magnetization of Mn1-x Fe x Si in the paramagnetic phase follows power law M(B) ~ B α with the exponents α ˜ 0.33 - 0.5, which starts above characteristic fields B c ˜ 1.5-7 T depending on the sample composition and lasts up to highest used magnetic field. Analysis of magnetization data including SQUID measurements in magnetic fields below 5T suggests that this anomalous behavior may be likely attributed to the formation of a field-induced Griffiths phase in the presence of spin-polaron effects.

  6. Relation of desert pupfish abundance to selected environmental variables in natural and manmade habitats in the Salton Sea basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, B.A.; Saiki, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the relation between abundance of desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius, and selected biological and physicochemical variables in natural and manmade habitats within the Salton Sea Basin. Field sampling in a natural tributary, Salt Creek, and three agricultural drains captured eight species including pupfish (1.1% of the total catch), the only native species encountered. According to Bray-Curtis resemblance functions, fish species assemblages differed mostly between Salt Creek and the drains (i.e., the three drains had relatively similar species assemblages). Pupfish numbers and environmental variables varied among sites and sample periods. Canonical correlation showed that pupfish abundance was positively correlated with abundance of western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and negatively correlated with abundance of porthole livebearers, Poeciliopsis gracilis, tilapias (Sarotherodon mossambica and Tilapia zillii), longjaw mudsuckers, Gillichthys mirabilis, and mollies (Poecilia latipinnaandPoecilia mexicana). In addition, pupfish abundance was positively correlated with cover, pH, and salinity, and negatively correlated with sediment factor (a measure of sediment grain size) and dissolved oxygen. Pupfish abundance was generally highest in habitats where water quality extremes (especially high pH and salinity, and low dissolved oxygen) seemingly limited the occurrence of nonnative fishes. This study also documented evidence of predation by mudsuckers on pupfish. These findings support the contention of many resource managers that pupfish populations are adversely influenced by ecological interactions with nonnative fishes. ?? Springer 2005.

  7. ABUNDANCES OF GALACTIC ANTICENTER PLANETARY NEBULAE AND THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE GRADIENT IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R. B. C.; Morrison, Michael A.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Jaskot, Anne E.; Balick, Bruce; Milingo, Jacquelynne B. E-mail: morrison@nhn.ou.ed E-mail: ajaskot@umich.ed E-mail: jmilingo@gettysburg.ed

    2010-11-20

    We have obtained spectrophotometric observations of 41 anticenter planetary nebulae (PNe) located in the disk of the Milky Way. Electron temperatures and densities, as well as chemical abundances for He, N, O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar were determined. Incorporating these results into our existing database of PN abundances yielded a sample of 124 well-observed objects with homogeneously determined abundances extending from 0.9 to 21 kpc in galactocentric distance. We performed a detailed regression analysis which accounted for uncertainties in both oxygen abundances and radial distances in order to establish the metallicity gradient across the disk to be 12 + log(O/H) = (9.09 {+-} 0.05) - (0.058 {+-} 0.006) x R{sub g} , with R{sub g} in kpc. While we see some evidence that the gradient steepens at large galactocentric distances, more objects toward the anticenter need to be observed in order to confidently establish the true form of the metallicity gradient. We find no compelling evidence that the gradient differs between Peimbert Types I and II, nor is oxygen abundance related to the vertical distance from the galactic plane. Our gradient agrees well with analogous results for H II regions but is steeper than the one recently published by Stanghellini and Haywood over a similar range in galactocentric distance. A second analysis using PN distances from a different source implied a flatter gradient, and we suggest that we have reached a confusion limit which can only be resolved with greatly improved distance measurements and an understanding of the natural scatter in oxygen abundances.

  8. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  9. The price of abundance: how a wealth of experiences impoverishes savoring.

    PubMed

    Quoidbach, Jordi; Dunn, Elizabeth W; Hansenne, Michel; Bustin, Gaelle

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the long-standing-yet previously untested-idea that an abundance of desirable life experiences may undermine people's ability to savor simpler pleasures. In Study 1, we found that the more countries individuals had visited, the less inclined they were to savor a future trip to a pleasant but ordinary destination. In Study 2, we conducted a field experiment at a popular tourist attraction, where we manipulated participants' perceptions of their own experiential backgrounds; when participants were led to feel well-traveled, they devoted significantly less time to their visit compared with individuals who were led to feel less worldly. We replicate these findings in Study 3 and found evidence that the observed effect could not be easily explained by other mechanisms. Being a world traveler-or just feeling like one-may undermine the proclivity to savor visits to enjoyable but unextraordinary destinations by endowing individuals with a sense of abundance. PMID:25583943

  10. Lower crustal earthquake swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain, California - evidence for the magmatic roots to the Mammoth Mountain mafic volcanic field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. P.; Shelly, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a cluster of dacitic domes erupted ~ 68 ka. It stands on the SW topographic rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern CA. Structurally, it is outboard of the caldera ring-fracture system and its magmatic system is genetically distinct from that of the caldera. It resides within a field of mafic (basaltic) vents that erupted between 190 - 8 ka. A series of phreatic explosions from the north flank of the mountain some 700 ybp attest to the infusion of heat to shallow depths shortly prior to the 600 ybp eruptions of the Inyo Domes 6 to 12 km north of the Mountain. Unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain since 1980 has included 1) swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the upper 10 km of the crust that define concentric elliptical ring-like patterns centered beneath the summit, 2) mid-crustal (depths 10 to 20 km) long-period volcanic earthquakes, 3) the onset of diffuse CO2 degassing in 1990 following an 11-month-long swarm of shallow (<10 km), brittle-failure earthquakes in 1989, 4) occasional very-long-period earthquakes at depths of ~ 3 km, and 5) brief swarms of lower-crustal, brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km, including sizable episodes June 16-17, 2006 and September 29-30, 2009. Seismic waveform correlation analysis at multiple stations reveals that these lower-crustal, brittle-failure swarms consist of tens to hundreds of repeated similar events and also serves to identify many events not included in the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) catalog. In the case of the 2009 episode, an evolution in waveform is clearly discernible over the sequence, suggesting a corresponding evolution in source location or mechanism. Work is ongoing to take advantage of the waveform similarity to estimate precise hypocentral locations of these events in order to distinguish between these possibilities.We suggest that the brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km are occurring within the more mafic mid- to lower-crust, which can remain

  11. Weak magnetic fields in Ap/Bp stars. Evidence for a dipole field lower limit and a tentative interpretation of the magnetic dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurière, M.; Wade, G. A.; Silvester, J.; Lignières, F.; Bagnulo, S.; Bale, K.; Dintrans, B.; Donati, J. F.; Folsom, C. P.; Gruberbauer, M.; Hui Bon Hoa, A.; Jeffers, S.; Johnson, N.; Landstreet, J. D.; Lèbre, A.; Lueftinger, T.; Marsden, S.; Mouillet, D.; Naseri, S.; Paletou, F.; Petit, P.; Power, J.; Rincon, F.; Strasser, S.; Toqué, N.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:We investigated a sample of 28 well-known spectroscopically-identified magnetic Ap/Bp stars, with weak, poorly-determined or previously undetected magnetic fields. The aim of this study is to explore the weak part of the magnetic field distribution of Ap/Bp stars. Methods: Using the MuSiCoS and NARVAL spectropolarimeters at Télescope Bernard Lyot (Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France) and the cross-correlation technique Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD), we obtained 282 LSD Stokes V signatures of our 28 sample stars, in order to detect the magnetic field and to infer its longitudinal component with high precision (median σ=40 G). Results: For the 28 studied stars, we obtained 27 detections of Stokes V Zeeman signatures from the MuSiCoS observations. Detection of the Stokes V signature of the 28th star (HD 32650) was obtained during science demonstration time of the new NARVAL spectropolarimeter at Pic du Midi. This result clearly shows that when observed with sufficient precision, all firmly classified Ap/Bp stars show detectable surface magnetic fields. Furthermore, all detected magnetic fields correspond to longitudinal fields which are significantly greater than some tens of G. To better characterise the surface magnetic field intensities and geometries of the sample, we phased the longitudinal field measurements of each star using new and previously-published rotational periods, and modeled them to infer the dipolar field intensity (B_d, measured at the magnetic pole) and the magnetic obliquity (β). The distribution of derived dipole strengths for these stars exhibits a plateau at about 1 kG, falling off to larger and smaller field strengths. Remarkably, in this sample of stars selected for their presumably weak magnetic fields, we find only 2 stars for which the derived dipole strength is weaker than 300 G. We interpret this “magnetic threshold” as a critical value necessary for the stability of large-scale magnetic fields, and develop a simple

  12. Dust formation in a galaxy with primitive abundances.

    PubMed

    Sloan, G C; Matsuura, M; Zijlstra, A A; Lagadec, E; Groenewegen, M A T; Wood, P R; Szyszka, C; Bernard-Salas, J; van Loon, J Th

    2009-01-16

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of galaxies. It governs the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium. In the local universe, dust forms primarily in the ejecta from stars, but its composition and origin in galaxies at very early times remain controversial. We report observational evidence of dust forming around a carbon star in a nearby galaxy with a low abundance of heavy elements, 25 times lower than the solar abundance. The production of dust by a carbon star in a galaxy with such primitive abundances raises the possibility that carbon stars contributed carbonaceous dust in the early universe. PMID:19150838

  13. Spatial and temporal variability of planktonic archaeal abundance in the Humboldt Current System off Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Renato A.; Levipan, Héctor A.; Urrutia, Homero

    2009-07-01

    The latest advances in the field of microbial ecology have shown that planktonic Archaea are one of the most abundant unicellular microorganisms of the oceans. However, no information is available on the contribution this group makes to the prokaryote assemblages that inhabit the eastern South Pacific Ocean. Here, we describe the relative abundance and vertical distribution of planktonic Archaea off northern and central-southern Chile. Data come from several cruises and a 45-month time series at a station located on the shelf off central-southern Chile. Both the taxonomic composition of the prokaryote community and its relative abundance were determined using quantitative dot blot 16S-rRNA hybridizations. Total Archaea in central-southern Chile made up 6-87% of the prokaryote rRNA in the water column and did not present evidence of any seasonal pattern. Crenarchaea were the most abundant archaeal group at this site and were significantly associated with the ammonium concentration ( r2=0.16, p=0.0003, n=80). Archaeal abundance in the time series was usually greater in the deeper layer (>50 m), with contributions reaching up to ˜90% of the prokaryote rRNA on certain occasions, and decreasing towards the surface. Important increments in the relative abundance of total Archaea were observed on given dates at the surface of the time-series station off central-southern Chile. Off northern Chile, total Archaea normally contributed from ˜10% to 50% of the prokaryote rRNA found between 10 and 1000 m, and were generally important in the mesopelagic realm. Our results indicate that Archaea constitute an important fraction of the prokaryote assemblage in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone.

  14. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  15. POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR A FISK-TYPE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. ANALYZING ULYSSES/KET ELECTRON OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sternal, O.; Heber, B.; Kopp, A.; Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.

    2011-11-01

    The propagation of energetic charged particles in the heliospheric magnetic field is one of the fundamental problems in heliophysics. In particular, the structure of the heliospheric magnetic field remains an unsolved problem and is discussed as a controversial topic. The first successful analytic approach to the structure of the heliospheric magnetic field was the Parker field. However, the measurements of the Ulysses spacecraft at high latitudes revealed the possible need for refinements of the existing magnetic field model during solar minimum. Among other reasons, this led to the development of the Fisk field. This approach is highly debated and could not be ruled out with magnetic field measurements so far. A promising method to trace this magnetic field structure is to model the propagation of electrons in the energy range of a few MeV. Employing three-dimensional and time-dependent simulations of the propagation of energetic electrons, this work shows that the influence of a Fisk-type field on the particle transport in the heliosphere leads to characteristic variations of the electron intensities on the timescale of a solar rotation. For the first time it is shown that the Ulysses count rates of 2.5-7 MeV electrons contain the imprint of a Fisk-type heliospheric magnetic field structure. From a comparison of simulation results and the Ulysses count rates, realistic parameters for the Fisk theory are derived. Furthermore, these parameters are used to investigate the modeled relative amplitudes of protons and electrons, including the effects of drifts.

  16. Temporal variability of local abundance, sex ratio and activity in the Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casula, P.; Nichols, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    When capturing and marking of individuals is possible, the application of newly developed capture-recapture models can remove several sources of bias in the estimation of population parameters such as local abundance and sex ratio. For example, observation of distorted sex ratios in counts or captures can reflect either different abundances of the sexes or different sex-specific capture probabilities, and capture-recapture models can help distinguish between these two possibilities. Robust design models and a model selection procedure based on information-theoretic methods were applied to study the local population structure of the endemic Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly, Polyommatus coridon gennargenti. Seasonal variations of abundance, plus daily and weather-related variations of active populations of males and females were investigated. Evidence was found of protandry and male pioneering of the breeding space. Temporary emigration probability, which describes the proportion of the population not exposed to capture (e.g. absent from the study area) during the sampling process, was estimated, differed between sexes, and was related to temperature, a factor known to influence animal activity. The correlation between temporary emigration and average daily temperature suggested interpreting temporary emigration as inactivity of animals. Robust design models were used successfully to provide a detailed description of the population structure and activity in this butterfly and are recommended for studies of local abundance and animal activity in the field.

  17. Hadrosaur locomotion and herding behavior: evidence from footprints in the mesaverde Formation, Grand Mesa Coal Field, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lockley, M.G.; Young, B.H.; Carpenter, K.

    1983-01-01

    Dinosaur footprint casts from a Mesavede (Campanian) coal mine near Gunnison, Colorado resemble those of the notorious mystery dinosaur, Xosauros which was probably a giant hadrosaur. Existing footprint descriptions, although obscure and hard to verify, are too important to overlook, particularly since debate over hadrosaur speeds currently focuses only on a single, apparently ambiguous trackway. Hindlimb/foot ratios and stride-length estimates based on comparisons with other animals should be modified using actual measurements of hadrosaurs. Mesaverde trackway data indicates that hadrosaurs were usually slow moving, although this does not imply that they were incapable of running. The frequency and preferred orientation of their prints suggests high relative abundance and gregarious group activity (herding), which was probably an effective defense strategy. Footprints of a carnosaur are also associated with those of the hadrosaurs.

  18. COMMENTS ON A REPORT OF REGRESSION-BASED EVIDENCE FOR IMPACT OF RECENT CLIMATE CHANGE ON WINTER WHEAT FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their 2008 paper entitled “Impact of recent climatic change ...”, Xiao et al. (Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 127:37-42) presented evidence for decreasing grain yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from 1981 to 2005 for two locations in China. They further reported non-linear effects of rainfal...

  19. Gradient in the IMF slope and Sodium abundance of M87 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Sarzi, M.; Krajnovic, D.

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence for a radial variation of the stellar initial mass function IMF) in the giant elliptical NGC~4486 based on integral-field MUSE data acquired during the first Science Verification run for this instrument. A steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF towards the centre of this galaxy is necessary to explain the increasing strength of several of the optical IMF sensitive features introduced by Spiniello et al., which we observe in high-quality spectra extracted in annular apertures. The need for a varying slope of the IMF emerges when the strength of these IMF-sensitive features, together with that other classical Lick indices mostly sensitive to stellar metallicity and the bundance of α-elements, are fitted with the state-of-the-art stellar population models from Conroy & van Dokkum and Vazdekis et al., which we modified in order to allow variations in IMF slope, metallicity and α-elements abundance. More specifically, adopting 13-Gyr-old, single-age stellar population models and an unimodal IMF we find that the slope of the latter increases from x=1.8 to x=2.6 in the central 25 arcsec of NGC~4486. Varying IMF accompanied by a metallicity gradient, whereas the abundance of α-element appears constant throughout the MUSE field of view. We found metallicity and α-element abundance gradients perfectly consistent with the literature. A sodium over-abundance is necessary (according to CvD12 models) at all the distances (for all the apertures) and a slight gradient of increasing [Na/Fe] ratio towards the center can be inferred. However, in order to completely break the degeneracies between Na-abundance, total metallicity and IMF variation a more detailed investigation that includes the redder NaI line is required.

  20. The Carina Project. VIII. The α-element abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Nonino, M.; Bono, G.; Primas, F.; Thévenin, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R.; Coppola, G.; da Silva, R. O.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Genovali, K.; Gilmozzi, R.; Iannicola, G.; Marconi, M.; Monelli, M.; Romaniello, M.; Walker, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    We have performed a new abundance analysis of Carina red giant (RG) stars from spectroscopic data collected with UVES (high spectral resolution) and FLAMES/GIRAFFE (high and medium resolution) at ESO/VLT. The former sample includes 44 RGs, while the latter consists of 65 (high-resolution) and ~800 (medium-resolution) RGs, covering a significant fraction of the galaxy's RG branch, and red clump stars. To improve the abundance analysis at the faint magnitude limit, the FLAMES/GIRAFFE data were divided into ten surface gravity and effective temperature bins. The spectra of the stars belonging to the same gravity and temperature bin were stacked. This approach allowed us to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the faint magnitude limit (V≥ 20.5 mag) by at least a factor of five. We took advantage of the new photometry index cU,B,I introduced recently as an age and probably a metallicity indicator to split stars along the red giant branch. These two stellar populations display distinct [Fe/H] and [Mg/H] distributions: their mean iron abundances are -2.15 ± 0.06 dex (σ = 0.28), and -1.75 ± 0.03 dex (σ = 0.21), respectively. The two iron distributions differ at the 75% level. This supports preliminary results. Moreover, we found that the old and intermediate-age stellar populations have mean [Mg/H] abundances of -1.91 ± 0.05 dex (σ = 0.22) and -1.35 ± 0.03 dex (σ = 0.22); these differ at the 83% level. Carina's α-element abundances agree, within 1σ, with similar abundances for field halo stars and for cluster (Galactic and Magellanic) stars. The same outcome applies to nearby dwarf spheroidals and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies in the iron range covered by Carina stars. Finally, we found evidence of a clear correlation between Na and O abundances, thus suggesting that Carina's chemical enrichment history is quite different from that in the globular clusters. Based on spectra retrieved from the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility and collected either with UVES at

  1. Inverse relationship between photon flux densities and nanotesla magnetic fields over cell aggregates: Quantitative evidence for energetic conservation

    PubMed Central

    Persinger, Michael A.; Dotta, Blake T.; Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Murugan, Nirosha J.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative relationship between local changes in magnetic fields and photon emissions within ∼2 mm of aggregates of 105–106 cells was explored experimentally. The vertical component of the earth’s magnetic field as measured by different magnetometers was ∼15 nT higher when plates of cells removed from incubation were measured compared to plates containing only medium. Additional experiments indicated an inverse relationship over the first ∼45 min between changes in photon counts (∼10−12 W·m−2) following removal from incubation and similar changes in magnetic field intensity. Calculations indicated that the energy within the aqueous volume containing the cells was equivalent for that associated with the flux densities of the magnetic fields and the photon emissions. For every approximately 1 nT increase in magnetic field intensity value there was a decrease of ∼2 photons (equivalent of 10−18 J). These results complement correlation studies and suggest there may be a conservation of energy between expression as magnetic fields that are subtracted or added to the adjacent geomagnetic field and reciprocal changes in photon emissions when aggregates of cells within a specific volume of medium (water) adapt to new environments. PMID:26005634

  2. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  3. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  4. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  5. Magnetic field dependent small-angle neutron scattering on a Co nanorod array: evidence for intraparticle spin misalignment

    PubMed Central

    Günther, A.; Bick, J.-P.; Szary, P.; Honecker, D.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Keiderling, U.; Feoktystov, A. V.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.; Michels, A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a cobalt nanorod array have been studied by means of magnetic field dependent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Measurement of the unpolarized SANS cross section dΣ/dΩ of the saturated sample in the two scattering geometries where the applied magnetic field H is either perpendicular or parallel to the wavevector k i of the incoming neutron beam allows one to separate nuclear from magnetic SANS, without employing the usual sector-averaging procedure. The analysis of the SANS data in the saturated state provides structural parameters (rod radius and centre-to-centre distance) that are in good agreement with results from electron microscopy. Between saturation and the coercive field, a strong field dependence of dΣ/dΩ is observed (in both geometries), which cannot be explained using the conventional expression of the magnetic SANS cross section of magnetic nanoparticles in a homogeneous nonmagnetic matrix. The origin of the strong field dependence of dΣ/dΩ is believed to be related to intradomain spin misalignment, due to magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and magnetostatic stray fields. PMID:24904245

  6. In vitro exposure of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ELF fields and new therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields: biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Vannoni, D; Albanese, A; Battisti, E; Aceto, E; Giglioni, S; Corallo, C; Carta, S; Ferrata, P; Fioravanti, A; Giordano, N

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequently occurring rheumatic disease, caused by metabolic changes in chondrocytes, the cells that maintain cartilage. Treatment with electromagnetic fields (MF) produces benefits in patients affected by this pathology. Isolated human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes were cultured in vitro under standard conditions or stimulated with IL-1beta or IGF-1, to mimic the imbalance between chondroformation and chondroresorption processes observed in OA cartilage in vivo. The cells were exposed for a specific time to extremely low frequency (ELF; 100-Hz) electromagnetic fields and to the Therapeutic Application of Musically Modulated Electromagnetic Fields (TAMMEF), which are characterized by variable frequencies, intensities, and waveforms. Using flow cytometry, we tested the effects of the different types of exposure on chondrocyte metabolism. The exposure of the cells to both systems enhances cell proliferation, does not generate reactive oxygen species, does not cause glutathione depletion or changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and does not induce apoptosis. This study presents scientific support to the fact that MF could influence OA chondrocytes from different points of view (viability, ROS production and apoptosis). We can conclude that both ELF and TAMMEF systems could be recommended for OA therapy and represent a valid non-pharmacological approach to the treatment of this pathology. PMID:22475096

  7. Revising traditional theory on the link between plant body size and fitness under competition: evidence from old-field vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Amanda J; Aarssen, Lonnie W

    2014-01-01

    The selection consequences of competition in plants have been traditionally interpreted based on a “size-advantage” hypothesis – that is, under intense crowding/competition from neighbors, natural selection generally favors capacity for a relatively large plant body size. However, this conflicts with abundant data, showing that resident species body size distributions are usually strongly right-skewed at virtually all scales within vegetation. Using surveys within sample plots and a neighbor-removal experiment, we tested: (1) whether resident species that have a larger maximum potential body size (MAX) generally have more successful local individual recruitment, and thus greater local abundance/density (as predicted by the traditional size-advantage hypothesis); and (2) whether there is a general between-species trade-off relationship between MAX and capacity to produce offspring when body size is severely suppressed by crowding/competition – that is, whether resident species with a larger MAX generally also need to reach a larger minimum reproductive threshold size (MIN) before they can reproduce at all. The results showed that MIN had a positive relationship with MAX across resident species, and local density – as well as local density of just reproductive individuals – was generally greater for species with smaller MIN (and hence smaller MAX). In addition, the cleared neighborhoods of larger target species (which had relatively large MIN) generally had – in the following growing season – a lower ratio of conspecific recruitment within these neighborhoods relative to recruitment of other (i.e., smaller) species (which had generally smaller MIN). These data are consistent with an alternative hypothesis based on a ‘reproductive-economy-advantage’ – that is, superior fitness under competition in plants generally requires not larger potential body size, but rather superior capacity to recruit offspring that are in turn capable of producing grand

  8. Revising traditional theory on the link between plant body size and fitness under competition: evidence from old-field vegetation.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Amanda J; Aarssen, Lonnie W

    2014-04-01

    The selection consequences of competition in plants have been traditionally interpreted based on a "size-advantage" hypothesis - that is, under intense crowding/competition from neighbors, natural selection generally favors capacity for a relatively large plant body size. However, this conflicts with abundant data, showing that resident species body size distributions are usually strongly right-skewed at virtually all scales within vegetation. Using surveys within sample plots and a neighbor-removal experiment, we tested: (1) whether resident species that have a larger maximum potential body size (MAX) generally have more successful local individual recruitment, and thus greater local abundance/density (as predicted by the traditional size-advantage hypothesis); and (2) whether there is a general between-species trade-off relationship between MAX and capacity to produce offspring when body size is severely suppressed by crowding/competition - that is, whether resident species with a larger MAX generally also need to reach a larger minimum reproductive threshold size (MIN) before they can reproduce at all. The results showed that MIN had a positive relationship with MAX across resident species, and local density - as well as local density of just reproductive individuals - was generally greater for species with smaller MIN (and hence smaller MAX). In addition, the cleared neighborhoods of larger target species (which had relatively large MIN) generally had - in the following growing season - a lower ratio of conspecific recruitment within these neighborhoods relative to recruitment of other (i.e., smaller) species (which had generally smaller MIN). These data are consistent with an alternative hypothesis based on a 'reproductive-economy-advantage' - that is, superior fitness under competition in plants generally requires not larger potential body size, but rather superior capacity to recruit offspring that are in turn capable of producing grand-offspring - and hence

  9. Inland fields of dispersed cobbles and boulders as evidence for a tsunami on Anegada, British Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Watt, Steve; Buckley, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Marine overwash from the north a few centuries ago transported hundreds of angular cobbles and boulders tens to hundreds of meters southward from limestone outcrops in the interior of Anegada, 140 km east–northeast of Puerto Rico. We examined two of several cobble and boulder fields as part of an effort to interpret whether the overwash resulted from a tsunami or a storm in a location where both events are known to occur. One of the cobble and boulder field extends 200 m southward from limestone outcrops that are 300 m inland from the island’s north shore. The other field extends 100 m southward from a limestone knoll located 800 m from the nearest shore. In the two fields, we measured the size, orientation, and spatial distribution of a total of 161 clasts and determined their stratigraphic positions with respect to an overwash sand and shell sheet deposit. In both fields, we found the spacing between clasts increased southward and that clast long-axis orientations are consistent with a transport trending north–south. Almost half the clasts are partially buried in a landward thinning and fining overwash sand and none were found embedded in the shelly mud of a pre-overwash marine pond. The two cobble and boulder fields resemble modern tsunami deposits in which dispersed clasts extend inland as a single layer. The fields contrast with coarse clast storm deposits that often form wedge-shaped shore-parallel ridges. These comparisons suggest that the overwash resulted from a tsunami and not from a storm.

  10. Anomalous hysteresis as evidence for a magnetic-field-induced chiral superconducting state in LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Urbano, R. R.; Goswami, P.; Tarantini, C.; Lv, B.; Kuhns, P.; Reyes, A. P.; Chu, C. W.; Balicas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetometry measurements in high-quality LiFeAs single crystals reveal a change in the sign of the magnetic hysteresis in the vicinity of the upper critical field Hc2, from a clear diamagnetic response dominated by the pinning of vortices to a considerably smaller net hysteretic response of opposite sign, which disappears at Hc2. If the diamagnetic response at high fields results from pinned vortices and associated screening supercurrents, this sign change must result from currents circulating in the opposite sense, which give rise to a small field-dependent magnetic moment below Hc2. This behavior seems to be extremely sensitive to the sample quality or stoichiometry, as we have observed it only in a few fresh crystals, which also display the de Haas van Alphen effect. We provide arguments against the surface superconductivity, the flux compression, and the random π junction scenarios, which have been previously put forward to explain a paramagnetic Meissner effect, below the lower critical field Hc1. The observed anomalous hysteresis at high fields will be compatible with the existence of chiral gap wave functions, which possess a field-dependent magnetic moment. Within a Landau-Ginzburg framework, we demonstrate how a (dx2-y2+idxy) or a (px+ipy) chiral superconducting component can be stabilized in the mixed state of s± superconductor, due to the combined effects of the magnetic field and the presence of competing pairing channels. The realization of a particular chiral pairing depends on the microscopic details of the strengths of the competing pairing channels.

  11. An evidence for prompt electric field disturbance driven by changes in the solar wind density under northward IMF Bz condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Diptiranjan; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Pant, Tarun K.; Veenadhari, B.; Shiokawa, K.

    2016-05-01

    Before the onset of a geomagnetic storm on 22 January 2012 (Ap = 24), an enhancement in solar wind number density from 10/cm3 to 22/cm3 during 0440-0510 UT under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) condition is shown to have enhanced the high-latitude ionospheric convection and also caused variations in the geomagnetic field globally. Conspicuous changes in ΔX are observed not only at longitudinally separated low-latitude stations over Indian (prenoon), South American (midnight), Japanese (afternoon), Pacific (afternoon) and African (morning) sectors but also at latitudinally separated stations located over high and middle latitudes. The latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the ΔX during 0440-0510 UT is shown to be consistent with the characteristics of prompt penetration electric field disturbances. Most importantly, the density pulse event caused enhancements in the equatorial electrojet strength and the peak height of the F layer (hmF2) over the Indian dip equatorial sector. Further, the concomitant enhancements in electrojet current and F layer movement over the dip equator observed during this space weather event suggest a common driver of prompt electric field disturbance at this time. Such simultaneous variations are found to be absent during magnetically quiet days. In absence of significant change in solar wind velocity and magnetospheric substorm activity, these observations point toward perceptible prompt electric field disturbance over the dip equator driven by the overcompression of the magnetosphere by solar wind density enhancement.

  12. Open and disconnected magnetic field lines within coronal mass ejections in the solar wind: Evidence for 3-dimensional reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Birn, J.; McComas, D. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Hesse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of suprathermal electron fluxes in the solar wind at energies greater than approximatley 80 eV indicate that magnetic field lines within coronal mass ejections. CMEs, near and beyond 1 AU are normally connected to the Sun at both ends. However, a preliminary reexamination of events previously identified as CMEs in the ISEE 3 data reveals that about 1/4 of all such events contain limited regions where field lines appear to be either connected to the Sun at only one end or connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends. Similar intervals of open and disconnected field lines within CMEs have been identified in the Ulysses observations. We believe that these anomalous field topologies within CMEs are most naturally interpreted in terms of 3-dimensional reconnection behind CMEs close to the Sun. Such reconnection also provides a natural explanation both for the flux rope topology of many CMEs as well as the coronal loops formed during long-duration solar soft X ray events. Although detailed numerical simulations of 3-dimensional reconnection behind CMEs are not yet available, such simulations have been done for the qualitatively similar geometry that prevails within the geomagnetic tail. Those simulations of plasmoid formation in the geomagnetic tail do produce the mixture of field topologies within plasmoids discussed here for CMEs.

  13. Evidence of Magnetic Breakdown on the Defects With Thermally Suppressed Critical Field in High Gradient SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Palczewski, Ari

    2013-09-01

    At SRF 2011 we presented the study of quenches in high gradient SRF cavities with dual mode excitation technique. The data differed from measurements done in 80's that indicated thermal breakdown nature of quenches in SRF cavities. In this contribution we present analysis of the data that indicates that our recent data for high gradient quenches is consistent with the magnetic breakdown on the defects with thermally suppressed critical field. From the parametric fits derived within the model we estimate the critical breakdown fields.

  14. Experimental evidence that a high electric field acts as an efficient external parameter during crystalline growth of bulk oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicher, P.; Haumont, R.; Saint-Martin, R.; Mininger, X.; Berthet, P.; Revcolevschi, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new crystal growth device, in which a high static external electric voltage (up to 14 kV) is added to a floating zone method, is described. Our first experiments show that the application of such an electric field acts like an external force, introducing a pressure effect which is in direct competition with temperature in the solid/liquid thermodynamic equilibrium. High electric fields could therefore be an additional parameter in crystal growth, opening original routes to the synthesis of new materials.

  15. High-heat geodynamic setting during the Palaeozoic evolution of the Mount Painter Province, SA, Australia: evidence from combined field structural geology and potential-field inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armit, R. J.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Schaefer, B. F.; Blaikie, T. N.

    2014-10-01

    A method for subsurface recognition of blind geological bodies is presented using combined surface constraints and 3-D structural modelling that incorporates constraints from detailed mapping, and potential-field inversion modelling. This method is applied to the Mount Painter Province and demonstrates that addition of low density material is required to reconcile the gravity signature of the region. This method may be an effective way to construct 3-D models in regions of excellent structural control, and can be used to assess the validity of surface structures with 3-D architecture. Combined geological and potential-field constrained inversion modelling of the Mount Painter Province was conducted to assess the validity of the geological models of the region. Magnetic susceptibility constrained stochastic property inversions indicates that the northeast to southwest structural trend of the relatively magnetic meta-sedimentary rocks of the Radium Creek Group in the Mount Painter Inlier is reconcilable with the similar, northeast to southwest trending positive magnetic anomalies in the region. Radium Creek Group packages are the major contributor of the total magnetic response of the region. However field mapping and the results of initial density constrained stochastic property inversion modelling do not correlate with a large residual negative gravity anomaly central to the region. Further density constrained inversion modelling indicates that an additional large body of relatively low density material is needed within the model space to account for this negative density anomaly. Through sensitivity analysis of multiple geometrical and varied potential-field property inversions, the best-fitting model records a reduction in gravity rms misfit from 21.9 to 1.69 mGal, representing a reduction from 56 to 4.5 per cent in respect to the total dynamic range of 37.5 mGal of the residual anomaly. This best-fitting model incorporates a volumetrically significant source

  16. The carbon monoxide abundance in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The steady-state abundance of carbon monoxide in interstellar clouds is calculated as a function of optical depth, density, and temperature. The molecular reactions which lead to CO can be initiated by the following ion-molecule reactions: H(+) + O yields O(+) + H, C(+) + H2 yields CH2(+) + a photon, and H3(+) + C and O. As the ultraviolet radiation field is attenuated, C(+) is transformed primarily into CO and C I. There are characteristic column densities for the transition to CO corresponding to the optical depths for attenuating this field at different wavelengths. For thick, low-temperature clouds the attenuation of the fields which ionize carbon, sulfur, and heavy metals is important for CO production initiated by H3(+). Complete conversion to CO does not necessarily occur, and considerable neutral carbon may be expected even in optically thick clouds. Comparison of integrated column densities of CO with extinction are in reasonable agreement with observations.

  17. University Differences in the Graduation of Minorities in STEM Fields: Evidence from California. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1223

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcidiacono, Peter; Aucejo, Esteban; Hotz, V. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The low number of college graduates with science degrees--particularly among underrepresented minorities--is of growing concern. We examine differences across universities in graduating students in different fields. Using student-level data on the University of California system during a period in which racial preferences were in place, we show…

  18. Field dipolarization in Saturn's magnetotail with planetward ion flows and energetic particle flow bursts: Evidence of quasi-steady reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Felici, M.; Badman, S. V.; Paranicas, C.; Jia, X.; Hospodarksy, G. B.; Andriopoulou, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Smith, A. W.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    We present a case study of an event from 20 August (day 232) of 2006, when the Cassini spacecraft was sampling the region near 32 RS and 22 h LT in Saturn's magnetotail. Cassini observed a strong northward-to-southward turning of the magnetic field, which is interpreted as the signature of dipolarization of the field as seen by the spacecraft planetward of the reconnection X line. This event was accompanied by very rapid (up to ~1500 km s-1) thermal plasma flow toward the planet. At energies above 28 keV, energetic hydrogen and oxygen ion flow bursts were observed to stream planetward from a reconnection site downtail of the spacecraft. Meanwhile, a strong field-aligned beam of energetic hydrogen was also observed to stream tailward, likely from an ionospheric source. Saturn kilometric radiation emissions were stimulated shortly after the observation of the dipolarization. We discuss the field, plasma, energetic particle, and radio observations in the context of the impact this reconnection event had on global magnetospheric dynamics.

  19. Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field Is Verbally Mediated: Evidence from Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Debi; Pak, Hyensou; Hanley, J. Richard

    2008-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that Korean (but not English) speakers show Categorical perception (CP) on a visual search task for a boundary between two Korean colour categories that is not marked in English. These effects were observed regardless of whether target items were presented to the left or right visual field. Because this boundary is…

  20. Anomalous arsenic contents in Lower Pennsylvanian Coals, Warrior field, northwestern Alabama, USA: Evidence for fluid flow during Alleghanian thrusting

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, J.R.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Pashin, J.C.; Offield, T.W.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes initial results from a study of the geology and geochemistry of anomalous arsenic (As) contents in bituminous coals from the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation, Warrior field, northwestern Alabama. Since 1977, the US Geological Survey has chemically analyzed 913 core and mine samples of coal and shaley coal from the Warrior field. These analyses document arsenic contents in coal of up to 1500 ppm (whole-coal, remnant-moisture basis) which are some of the highest contents reported for all United States coals. Warrior field coals also have elevated contents of copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), and antimony (Sb). For the approximately 13,000 samples of United States coals analyzed by the US Geological Survey, mean arsenic content is about 24 ppm. Nearly 80% of the 103 arsenic analyses greater than three standard deviations above this mean are from Alabama. A figure illustrates the distribution of arsenic contents in Warrior field coals and compares this distribution with the substantially lower arsenic contents in Paleocene coals from the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana, and Middle Pennsylvanian coals from the Illinois basin, Illinois, Indiana and western Kentucky.

  1. Evidence for Cross-Adaptation between s-triazine herbicides resulting in reduced efficacy under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils exhibiting enhanced atrazine degradation may be cross-adapted with other triazine herbicides resulting in reduced residual weed control. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine field persistence of simazine in atrazine adapted and non-adapted soils; 2) compare mineralization of ring...

  2. Dipolar geomagnetic field and low orbital obliquity during the last two billion years: Evidence from paleomagnetism of evaporite basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    Paleomagnetism of climatically sensitive sedimentary rock types, such as glacial deposits and evaporites, can test the uniformitarianism of ancient geomagnetic fields and paleoclimatic zones. Precambrian glacial deposits laid down in near-equatorial paleomagnetic latitudes indicate a paleoclimatic paradox that can be explained either by Snowball Earth episodes, or high orbital obliquity, or dramatically non-uniformitarian geomagnetic fields. Here I present the first global paleomagnetic compilation of the Earth's entire basin-scale evaporite record. Evaporation exceeds precipitation in today's subtropical desert belts, generally within a zone of 15-35° from the equator. Assuming a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) magnetic field for Cenozoic- Mesozoic time, evaporite basins of the past 250 Myr have a volume-weighted mean paleolatitude of 23±4°, also squarely within the subtropics. Carboniferous-Permian evaporites have an indistinguishable weighted-mean paleolatitude of 22±4°, which does not change significantly when recently hypothesized octupolar field components are included in the calculations. Early Paleozoic (including late Ediacaran) evaporites are lower-latitude (weighted mean 10±5°), but detailed analyses of individual examples show this cannot be attributed solely to nondipolar field components or sedimentary inclination biases; the cause may be due to particular paleogeographic effects on regional tropical climates, or incomplete sampling by the paleomagnetic data. Proterozoic (pre-Ediacaran) evaporite basins have a volume- weighted mean inclination of 33±4°, which would correspond to a mean paleolatitude of 18±3° for a pure GAD field. This latter mean is indistinguishable, within error, from the Cenozoic-Mesozoic mean and demonstrates the success of the GAD model as a first-order description of the geomagnetic field for the last two billion years. Also, general circulation climate models of a high-obliquity Earth predict either no strong zonal

  3. Molecular evidence for microorganisms participating in Fe, Mn, and S biogeochemical cycling in two low-temperature hydrothermal fields at the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiwei; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Li, Jiangtao; Sun, Zhilei

    2013-06-01

    We examined two low-temperature hydrothermal deposits rich in Fe-Si-Mn collected from the recently discovered hydrothermal fields at the Southwest Indian Ridge using mineralogical, geochemical, and molecular biological techniques. The mineralogical and geochemical analyses indicated that the low-temperature hydrothermal fields would provide a warm and chemical species-rich habitat for chemosynthetic-based hydrothermal ecosystems. Analyses of 16S rRNA sequences showed that ζ-Proteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, Leptothrix, and Pseudomonas were potential Fe and Mn oxidizers in the low-temperature hydrothermal environments, but they were not present in equal abundance among the subniches. Some potential Fe and Mn reducers were also recovered; they were more commonly found in the exterior black Fe-Mn oxides. The difference between the exterior black Fe-Mn oxides and the interior Opal-A could be related to differences in in situ physicochemical conditions. We also identified microbial players that may participate in sulfur (S) geochemical cycling in these low-temperature hydrothermal environments via analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and the aprA functional gene. The results indicated that members of γ-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria were involved in the S oxidation process, while members of δ-Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Firmicutes, and Archaea might participate in the S reduction process. Fe, Mn, and S oxidizers and reducers might actively participate in hydrothermal biogeochemical processes, which could influence the transfer of chemical species and the formation of biogenic minerals.

  4. TESTING FOR AZIMUTHAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanxia; Bresolin, Fabio; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.

    2013-03-20

    New optical spectra of 28 H II regions in the M101 disk have been obtained, yielding 10 new detections of the [O III] {lambda}4363 auroral line. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from these data, combined with previous observations, displays a local scatter of 0.15 {+-} 0.03 dex along an arc in the west side of the galaxy, compared with a smaller scatter of 0.08 {+-} 0.01 dex in the rest of the disk. One of the H II regions in our sample (H27) has a significantly lower oxygen abundance than surrounding nebulae at a similar galactocentric distance, while an additional, relatively nearby one (H128) was already known to have a high oxygen abundance for its position in the galaxy. These results represent marginal evidence for the existence of moderate deviations from chemical abundance homogeneity in the interstellar medium of M101. Using a variety of strong-line abundance indicators, we find no evidence for significant large-scale azimuthal variations of the oxygen abundance across the whole disk of the galaxy.

  5. Understanding the ecological background of rice agriculture on the Ningshao Plain during the Neolithic Age: pollen evidence from a buried paddy field at the Tianluoshan cultural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhai; Zheng, Yunfei; Yu, Shiyong; Li, Yongxiang; Shen, Huadong

    2012-03-01

    The progressive rise of atmospheric CH4 level since 5 ka has been hypothesized to result from human agricultural activities that turned forested lands, which would otherwise be a carbon sink, into paddy fields. Increasing numbers of Neolithic cultural sites unearthed in coastal eastern China, providing unique opportunities to test this hypothesis. Here, we present detailed pollen data from a buried paddy field at Tianluoshan cultural site on the Ningshao Plain, eastern China, to reconstruct the ecological conditions associated with the establishment of paddy fields. Stratigraphic data, radiocarbon ages, and pollen analyses show that vegetation underwent six phases of evolution and paddy fields were developed from 7000 to 4200 cal. yr BP. We found no evidence of slash-and-burn agriculture at the study site. Together with no presence of the irrigation system, our pollen data suggest the paddy fields at this site originated from wetlands. Hence, our findings do not support the hypothesis that anthropogenic-induced deforestation play ed a significant role in the rise of the atmospheric CH4 rise since the middle Holocene.

  6. Mars regolith versus SNC meteorites: Evidence for abundant crustal carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1987-01-01

    Viking XRF analyses are compared with those for terrestrial and lunar basalt samples, and eucritic meteorites (of possible Mars origin). The comparison indicates depletion of Ca relative to Si in the Mars regolith. It is suggested that carbonate formation during a warmer, wetter epoch early in Mars' history could have been responsible.

  7. Evidence for a toroidal magnetic-field component in 5C 4.114 on kiloparsec scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabuzda, Denise C.; Knuettel, Sebastian; Bonafede, Annalisa

    2015-11-01

    Context. A monotonic, statistically significant gradient in the observed Faraday rotation measure (RM) across the jet of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) reflects a corresponding gradient in the electron density and/or line-of-sight magnetic (B) field in the region of Faraday rotation. For this reason, such gradients may indicate the presence of a toroidal B field component, possibly associated with a helical jet B field. Although transverse RM gradients have been reported across a number of parsec-scale AGN jets, the same is not true on kiloparsec scales, suggesting that other (e.g. random) magnetic-field components usually dominate on these larger scales. Aims: We wished to identify clear candidates for monotonic, transverse RM gradients across AGN jet and lobe structures on scales larger than those probed thus far, and estimate their statistical significances. Methods: We identified an extended, monotonic transverse Faraday-rotation gradient across the northern lobe of a previously published Very Large Array (kiloparsec-scale) RM image of 5C 4.114. We reanalyzed these VLA data in order to determine the significance of this RM gradient. Results: The RM gradient across the northern kiloparsec-scale lobe structure of 5C 4.114 has a statistical significance of about 4σ. There is also a somewhat less prominent monotonic transverse Faraday-rotation gradient across the southern jet/lobe (narrower range of distances from the core, significance ≃ 3σ). Other parts of the Faraday-rotation distribution observed across the source are patchy and show no obvious order. Conclusions: This suggests that we are observing a random RM component associated with the foreground material in the cluster in which the radio source is located and through which it is viewed, superposed on a more ordered RM component that arises in the immediate vicinity of the AGN jets. We interpret the transverse RM gradient as reflecting the systematic variations of the line-of-sight component of a

  8. Charge trapping and de-trapping in isolated CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals under an external electric field: Indirect evidence for a permanent dipole moment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zang, Huidong; Cristea, Mihail; Shen, Xuan; Liu, Mingzhao; Camino, Fernando; Cotlet, Mircea

    2015-08-05

    Single nanoparticle studies of charge trapping and de-trapping in core/shell CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals incorporated into an insulating matrix and subjected to an external electric field demonstrate the ability to reversibly modulate the exciton dynamics and photoluminescence blinking while providing indirect evidence for the existence of a permanent ground state dipole moment in such nanocrystals. A model assuming the presence of energetically deep charge traps physically aligned along the direction of the permanent dipole is proposed in order to explain the dynamics of nanocrystal blinking in the presence of a permanent dipole moment.

  9. Experimental evidence of cut-wire-induced enhanced transmission of transverse-electric fields through sub-wavelength slits in a thin metallic screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Gallina, Ilaria; Andreone, Antonello; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo

    2010-12-01

    Recent numerical studies have demonstrated the possibility of achieving substantial enhancements in the transmission of transverse-electric-polarized electromagnetic fields through subwavelength slits in a thin metallic screen by placing single or paired metallic cut-wire arrays at a close distance from the screen. In this Letter, we report on the first experimental evidence of such extraordinary transmission phenomena, via microwave (X/Ku-band) measurements on printed-circuit-board prototypes. Experimental results agree very well with full-wave numerical predictions, and indicate an intrinsic robustness of the enhanced transmission phenomena with respect to fabrication tolerances and experimental imperfections.

  10. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  11. Constraints on chemical evolution models from QSOALS abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Models of the formation and early chemical evolution of our Galaxy are guided and constrained by our knowledge of abundances in globular cluster stars and halo field stars. The abundance patterns identified in halo and disk stars should be discernible in absorption lines of gas clouds in forming galaxies which are accidentally lying in front of background QSO's. Conversely, the ensemble of QSO absorption line systems (QSOALS) at each redshift may suggest a detailed model for the formation of our Galaxy that is testable using abundance patterns in halo stars.

  12. Experimental Evidence for Nonaxisymmetric Magnetorotational Instability in a Rotating Liquid Metal Exposed to an Azimuthal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seilmayer, Martin; Galindo, Vladimir; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gundrum, Thomas; Stefani, Frank; Gellert, Marcus; Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2014-07-01

    The azimuthal version of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a nonaxisymmetric instability of a hydrodynamically stable differentially rotating flow under the influence of a purely or predominantly azimuthal magnetic field. It may be of considerable importance for destabilizing accretion disks, and plays a central role in the concept of the MRI dynamo. We report the results of a liquid metal Taylor-Couette experiment that shows the occurrence of an azimuthal MRI in the expected range of Hartmann numbers.

  13. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Adriano E; Wang, Haichuan; Zukoff, Sarah N; Meinke, Lance J; French, B Wade; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99) was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial). For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99) were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed. PMID:26566127

  14. Evidence of Field-Evolved Resistance to Bifenthrin in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) Populations in Western Nebraska and Kansas

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adriano E.; Wang, Haichuan; Zukoff, Sarah N.; Meinke, Lance J.; French, B. Wade; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control larvae or adults of the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a key pest of field corn in the United States. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroids in WCR management programs in southwestern areas of Nebraska and Kansas the present research was designed to establish a baseline of susceptibility to the pyrethroid insecticide, bifenthrin, using susceptible laboratory populations and to compare this baseline with susceptibility of field populations. Concentration-response bioassays were performed to estimate the baseline susceptibility. From the baseline data, a diagnostic concentration (LC99) was determined and used to test adults of both laboratory and field populations. Larval susceptibility was also tested using both laboratory and field populations. Significant differences were recorded in adult and larval susceptibility among WCR field and laboratory populations. The highest LC50 for WCR adults was observed in populations from Keith 2 and Chase Counties, NE, with LC50s of 2.2 and 1.38 μg/vial, respectively, and Finney County 1, KS, with 1.43 μg/vial, as compared to a laboratory non-diapause population (0.24 μg/vial). For larvae, significant differences between WCR field and laboratory populations were also recorded. Significant differences in mortalities at the diagnostic bifenthrin concentration (LC99) were observed among WCR adult populations with western Corn Belt populations exhibiting lower susceptibility to bifenthrin, especially in southwestern Nebraska and southwestern Kansas. This study provides evidence that resistance to bifenthrin is evolving in field populations that have been exposed for multiple years to pyrethroid insecticides. Implications to sustainable rootworm management are discussed. PMID:26566127

  15. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  16. Solar Wind Electron Interaction with the Dayside Lunar Surface and Crustal Magnetic Fields: Evidence for Precursor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, Jasper S.; Poppe, A.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; Horanyi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Electron distributions measured by Lunar Prospector above the dayside lunar surface in the solar wind often have an energy dependent loss cone, inconsistent with adiabatic magnetic reflection. Energy dependent reflection suggests the presence of downward parallel electric fields below the spacecraft, possibly indicating the presence of a standing electrostatic structure. Many electron distributions contain apparent low energy (<100 eV) upwardgoing conics (58% of the time) and beams (12% of the time), primarily in regions with non-zero crustal magnetic fields, implying the presence of parallel electric fields and/or wave-particle interactions below the spacecraft. Some, but not all, of the observed energy dependence comes from the energy gained during reflection from a moving obstacle; correctly characterizing electron reflection requires the use of the proper reference frame. Nonadiabatic reflection may also play a role, but cannot fully explain observations. In cases with upward-going beams, we observe partial isotropization of incoming solar wind electrons, possibly indicating streaming and/or whistler instabilities. The Moon may therefore influence solar wind plasma well upstream from its surface. Magnetic anomaly interactions and/or non-monotonic near surface potentials provide the most likely candidates to produce the observed precursor effects, which may help ensure quasi-neutrality upstream from the Moon.

  17. African, southern Indian and South American cratons were not part of the Rodinia supercontinent: evidence from field relationships and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Alfred; Cordani, Umberto

    2003-11-01

    We discuss the question whether the late Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks of eastern, central and southern Africa, Madagascar, southern India, Sri Lanka and South America have played any role in the formation and dispersal of the supercontinent Rodinia, believed to have existed between about 1000 and 750 Ma ago. First, there is little evidence for the production of significant volumes of ~1.4-1.0 Ga (Kibaran or Grenvillian age) continental crust in the Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa, except, perhaps, in parts of northern Mozambique. This is also valid for most terranes related to West Gondwana, which are made up of basement rocks older than Mesoproterozoic, reworked in the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic cycle. This crust cannot be conclusively related to either magmatic accretion processes on the active margin of Rodinia or continental collision leading to amalgamation of the supercontinent. So far, no 1.4-1.0 Ga rocks have been identified in Madagascar. Secondly, there is no conclusive evidence for a ~1.0 Ga high-grade metamorphic event in the MB, although such metamorphism has been recorded in the presumed continuation of the MB in East Antarctica. In South America, even the Sunsas mobile belt, which is correlated with the Grenville belt of North America, does not include high-grade metamorphic rocks. All terranes with Mesoproterozoic ages seem to have evolved within extensional, aulacogen-type structures, and their compressional deformation, where observed, is normally much younger and is related to amalgamation of Gondwana. This is also valid for the Trans-Saharan and West Congo belts of West Africa. Third, there is also no evidence for post-1000 Ma sedimentary sequences that were deposited on the passive margin(s) of Rodinia. In contrast, the MB of East Africa and Madagascar is characterized by extensive structural reworking and metamorphic overprinting of Archaean rocks, particularly in Tanzania and Madagascar, and these rocks either

  18. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1995-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of 15 April 1994 to 15 April 1995.

  19. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  20. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  1. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  2. Control of deep lithospheric roots on crustal scale GOCE gravity and gradient fields evident in Gondwana reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Mariani, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 80km or better allowing for the first time to analyze tectonic structures at continental scale. Geologic correlation studies based on age determination and mineral composition of rock samples propose to continue the tectonic lineaments across continents to the pre-breakup position. Tectonic events which induce density changes, as metamorphic events and magmatic events, should then show up in the gravity field. Therefore gravity can be used as a globally available supportive tool for interpolation of isolated samples. Applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field places today's observed field at the pre-breakup position. In order to test the possible deep control of the crustal features, the same reconstruction is applied to the seismic velocity models, and a joint gravity-velocity analysis is performed. The geophysical fields allow to control the likeliness of the hypothesized continuation of lineations based on sparse surface outcrops. Total absence of a signal, makes the cross-continental continuation of the lineament improbable, as continental-wide lineaments are controlled by rheologic and compositional differences of lithospheric mantle. It is found that the deep lithospheric roots as those found below cratons control the position of the positive gravity values. The explanation is that the deep lithospheric roots focus asthenospheric upwelling outboard of the root protecting the overlying craton from magmatic intrusions. The study is carried out over the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105 Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological

  3. Field Evidence of Social Influence in the Expression of Political Preferences: The Case of Secessionists Flags in Barcelona

    PubMed Central

    Parravano, Antonio; Noguera, José A.; Hermida, Paula; Tena-Sánchez, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Models of social influence have explored the dynamics of social contagion, imitation, and diffusion of different types of traits, opinions, and conducts. However, few behavioral data indicating social influence dynamics have been obtained from direct observation in “natural” social contexts. The present research provides that kind of evidence in the case of the public expression of political preferences in the city of Barcelona, where thousands of citizens supporting the secession of Catalonia from Spain have placed a Catalan flag in their balconies and windows. Here we present two different studies. 1) During July 2013 we registered the number of flags in 26% of the electoral districts in the city of Barcelona. We find that there is a large dispersion in the density of flags in districts with similar density of pro-independence voters. However, by comparing the moving average to the global mean we find that the density of flags tends to be fostered in electoral districts where there is a clear majority of pro-independence vote, while it is inhibited in the opposite cases. We also show that the distribution of flags in the observed districts deviates significantly from that of an equivalent random distribution. 2) During 17 days around Catalonia’s 2013 national holiday we observed the position at balcony resolution of the flags displayed in the facades of a sub-sample of 82 blocks. We compare the ‘clustering index’ of flags on the facades observed each day to thousands of equivalent random distributions. Again we provide evidence that successive hangings of flags are not independent events but that a local influence mechanism is favoring their clustering. We also find that except for the national holiday day the density of flags tends to be fostered in facades located in electoral districts where there is a clear majority of pro-independence vote. PMID:25961562

  4. Field synopsis and meta-analyses of genetic epidemiological evidence for Kashin-Beck disease, an endemic osteoarthropathy in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Liu, Huan; Wang, Xi; Guo, Xiong; Lammi, Mikko J

    2016-10-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a chronic degenerative osteoarthropathy with unclear etiology. To provide current evidence supporting a genetic predisposition for KBD, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature on the genetic epidemiology of KBD. The PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wan Fang Data were searched up to August 2015 for articles published in English and Chinese. Genome-wide and exome sequencing, linkage, and case-control association studies for any genetic variants associated with KBD were included. Meta-analysis was performed for all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were evaluated in two or more studies. The effect size was summarized as odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) by fixed and random effects models. A total of 24 articles were systematically reviewed. Eleven short tandem repeats on chromosomes 2, 11 and 12, 34 SNPs in 12 genes, as well as copy number variant 452 were identified as KBD susceptibility factors in individual studies. The meta-analysis of the GPX1 rs1050450, DIO2 rs225014, TrxR2 rs5748469 and HLA-DRB1 rs7745040 failed to reveal any associations with KBD. However, the meta-analysis of HLA-DRB1 rs9275295 allele A was associated with KBD (OR = 1.737, 95 % CI: 1.002-3.012). In addition, seven haplotypes in GPX1, GPX4, HLA-DRB1 and GDF5 genes also showed significant associations with KBD. In conclusions, our study could identify a number of genetic markers associated with KBD. However, the evidence does not currently support a strong association between the specific variants and KBD because of the limited number of studies, and in the future, more rigorous studies are needed to confirm KBD's links with these variants. PMID:27256326

  5. Spatial patterns in the abundance of the coastal horned lizard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, R.N.; Suarez, A.V.; Case, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Coastal horned lizards (Phrynosoma coronatum) have undergone severe declines in southern California and are a candidate species for state and federal listing tender the Endangered Species Act. Quantitative data on their habitat use, abundance, and distribution are lacking, however. We investigated the determinants of abundance for coastal horned lizards at multiple spatial scales throughout southern California. Specifically, we estimated lizard distribution and abundance by establishing 256 pitfall trap arrays clustered within 21 sites across four counties. These arrays were sampled bimonthly for 2-3 years. At each array we measured 26 "local" site descriptors and averaged these values with other "regional" measures to determine site characteristics. Our analyses were successful at identifying factors within and among sites correlated with the presence and abundance of coastal horned lizards. These factors included the absence of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) (and presence of native ant species eaten by the lizards), the presence of chaparral community plants, and the presence of sandy substrates. At a regional scale the relative abundance of Argentine ants was correlated with the relative amount of developed edge around a site. There was no evidence for spatial autocorrelation, even at the scale of the arrays within sites, suggesting that the determinants of the presence or absence and abundance of horned lizard can vary over relatively small spatial scales (hundreds of meters). Our results suggest that a gap-type approach may miss some of the fine-scale determinants of species abundance in fragmented habitats.

  6. Geographical Range and Local Abundance of Tree Species in China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Haibao; Condit, Richard; Chen, Bin; Mi, Xiangcheng; Cao, Min; Ye, Wanhui; Hao, Zhanqing; Ma, Keping

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1) whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2) whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3) how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20–25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >105 km2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species’ abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges. PMID:24130772

  7. The diversity and abundance of small arthropods in onion, Allium cepa, seed crops, and their potential role in pollination.

    PubMed

    Walker, M K; Howlett, B G; Wallace, A R; McCallum, J A; Teulon, D A J

    2011-01-01

    Onion, Allium cepa L. (Asparagales: Amaryllidaceae), crop fields grown for seed production require arthropod pollination for adequate seed yield. Although many arthropod species visit A. cepa flowers, for most there is little information on their role as pollinators. Small flower visiting arthropods (body width < 3 mm) in particular are rarely assessed. A survey of eight flowering commercial A. cepa seed fields in the North and South Islands of New Zealand using window traps revealed that small arthropods were highly abundant among all except one field. Insects belonging to the orders Diptera and Thysanoptera were the most abundant and Hymenoptera, Collembola, Psocoptera, Hemiptera, and Coleoptera were also present. To test whether small arthropods might contribute to pollination, seed sets from umbels caged within 3 mm diameter mesh cages were compared with similarly caged, hand-pollinated umbels and uncaged umbels. Caged umbels that were not hand-pollinated set significantly fewer seeds (average eight seeds/umbel, n = 10) than caged hand-pollinated umbels (average 146 seeds/umbel) and uncaged umbels (average 481 seeds/umbel). Moreover, sticky traps placed on umbels within cages captured similar numbers of small arthropods as sticky traps placed on uncaged umbels, suggesting cages did not inhibit the movement of small arthropods to umbels. Therefore, despite the high abundance of small arthropods within fields, evidence to support their role as significant pollinators of commercial A. cepa seed crops was not found. PMID:22208869

  8. The Diversity and Abundance of Small Arthropods in Onion, Allium cepa, Seed Crops, and their Potential Role in Pollination

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M. K.; Howlett, B. G.; Wallace, A. R.; Mccallum, J. A.; Teulon, D. A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Onion, Allium cepa L. (Asparagales: Amaryllidaceae), crop fields grown for seed production require arthropod pollination for adequate seed yield. Although many arthropod species visit A. cepa flowers, for most there is little information on their role as pollinators. Small flower visiting arthropods (body width < 3 mm) in particular are rarely assessed. A survey of eight flowering commercial A. cepa seed fields in the North and South Islands of New Zealand using window traps revealed that small arthropods were highly abundant among all except one field. Insects belonging to the orders Diptera and Thysanoptera were the most abundant and Hymenoptera, Collembola, Psocoptera, Hemiptera, and Coleoptera were also present. To test whether small arthropods might contribute to pollination, seed sets from umbels caged within 3 mm diameter mesh cages were compared with similarly caged, hand-pollinated umbels and uncaged umbels. Caged umbels that were not hand-pollinated set significantly fewer seeds (average eight seeds/umbel, n = 10) than caged hand-pollinated umbels (average 146 seeds/umbel) and uncaged umbels (average 481 seeds/umbel). Moreover, sticky traps placed on umbels within cages captured similar numbers of small arthropods as sticky traps placed on uncaged umbels, suggesting cages did not inhibit the movement of small arthropods to umbels. Therefore, despite the high abundance of small arthropods within fields, evidence to support their role as significant pollinators of commercial A. cepa seed crops was not found. PMID:22208869

  9. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  10. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis. PMID:27262121

  11. Sinistrals are rarely “right”: evidence from tool-affordance processing in visual half-field paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Michałowski, Bartosz; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Although current neuroscience and behavioral studies provide substantial understanding of tool representations (e.g., the processing of tool-related affordances) in the human brain, most of this knowledge is limited to right-handed individuals with typical organization of cognitive and manual skills. Therefore, any insights from these lines of research may be of little value in rehabilitation of patients with atypical laterality of praxis and/or hand dominance. To fill this gap, we tested perceptual processing of man-made objects in 18 healthy left-handers who were likely to show greater incidence of right-sided or bilateral (atypical) lateralization of functions. In the two experiments reported here, participants performed a tool vs. non-tool categorization task. In Experiment 1, target and distracter objects were presented for 200 ms in the left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual field, followed by 200 ms masks. In Experiment 2, the centrally presented targets were preceded by masked primes of 35 ms duration, again presented in the LVF or RVF. Based on results from both studies, i.e., response times (RTs) to correctly discriminated stimuli irrespective of their category, participants were divided into two groups showing privileged processing in either left (N = 9) or right (N = 9) visual field. In Experiment 1, only individuals with RVF advantage showed significantly faster categorization of tools in their dominant visual field, whereas those with LVF advantage revealed merely a trend toward such an effect. In Experiment 2, when targets were preceded by identical primes, the “atypical” group showed significantly facilitated categorization of non-tools, whereas the “typical” group demonstrated a trend toward faster categorization of tools. These results indicate that in subjects with atypically organized cognitive skills, tool-related processes are not just mirror reversed. Thus, our outcomes call for particular caution in neurorehabilitation directed at left

  12. Systematically Asymmetric Heliospheric Magnetic Field: Evidence for a Quadrupole Mode and Non-Axisymmetry with Polarity Flip-Flops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.; Hiltula, T.

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) have detected interesting, systematic hemispherical and longitudinal asymmetries which have a profound significance for the understanding of solar magnetic fields. The in situ HMF measurements since the 1960s show that the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is systematically shifted (coned) southward during solar minimum times, leading to the concept of a bashful ballerina. While temporary shifts can be considerably larger, the average HCS shift (coning) angle is a few degrees, less than the 7.2∘ tilt of the solar rotation axis. Recent solar observations during the last two solar cycles verify these results and show that the magnetic areas in the northern solar hemisphere are larger and their intensity weaker than in the south during long intervals in the late declining to minimum phase. The multipole expansion reveals a strong quadrupole term which is oppositely directed to the dipole term. These results imply that the Sun has a symmetric quadrupole S0 dynamo mode that oscillates in phase with the dominant dipole A0 mode. Moreover, the heliospheric magnetic field has a strong tendency to produce solar tilts that are roughly opposite in longitudinal phase. This implies is a systematic longitudinal asymmetry and leads to a “flip-flop” type behaviour in the dominant HMF sector whose period is about 3.2 years. This agrees very well with the similar flip-flop period found recently in sunspots, as well as with the observed ratio of three between the activity cycle period and the flip-flop period of sun-like stars. Accordingly, these results require that the solar dynamo includes three modes, A0, S0 and a non-axisymmetric mode. Obviously, these results have a great impact on solar modelling.

  13. Evidence that filament fracture occurs in an ITER toroidal field conductor after cyclic Lorentz force loading in SULTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria, Carlos; Lee, Peter J.; Starch, William; Pong, Ian; Vostner, Alexander; Jewell, Matthew C.; Devred, Arnaud; Larbalestier, David C.

    2012-07-01

    We analyzed the ITER TFEU5 cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) after the full SULTAN conductor qualification test in order to explore whether Lorentz force induced strand movement inside the CICC produces any fracture of the brittle Nb3Sn filaments. Metallographic image analysis was used to quantify the change in void fraction of each sub-cable (petal); strands move in the direction of the Lorentz force, increasing the void space on the low force side of the CICC and producing a densification on the high force side. Adjacent strand counting shows that local increases in void space result in lower local strand-strand support. Extensive metallographic sampling unambiguously confirms that Nb3Sn filament fracture occurred in the TFEU5 CICC, but the filament fracture was highly localized to strand sections with high local curvature (likely produced during cabling, where strands are pivoted around each other). More than 95% of the straighter strand sections were free of filament cracks, while less than 60% of the bent strand sections were crack free. The high concentration of filament fractures on the tensile side of the strand-strand pivot points indicates that these pivot points are responsible for the vast majority of filament fracture. Much lower crack densities were observed in CICC sections extracted from a lower, gradient-field region of the SULTAN-tested cable. We conclude that localized filament fracture is induced by high Lorentz forces during SULTAN testing of this prototype toroidal field CICC and that the strand sections with the most damage are located at the petal corners of the high field zone.

  14. Behavioral evidence for inter-hemispheric cooperation during a lexical decision task: a divided visual field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Lemonnier, Sophie; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS The redundant bilateral visual presentation of verbal stimuli decreases asymmetry and increases the cooperation between the two hemispheres.The increased cooperation between the hemispheres is related to semantic information during lexical processing.The inter-hemispheric interaction is represented by both inhibition and cooperation. This study explores inter-hemispheric interaction (IHI) during a lexical decision task by using a behavioral approach, the bilateral presentation of stimuli within a divided visual field experiment. Previous studies have shown that compared to unilateral presentation, the bilateral redundant (BR) presentation decreases the inter-hemispheric asymmetry and facilitates the cooperation between hemispheres. However, it is still poorly understood which type of information facilitates this cooperation. In the present study, verbal stimuli were presented unilaterally (left or right visual hemi-field successively) and bilaterally (left and right visual hemi-field simultaneously). Moreover, during the bilateral presentation of stimuli, we manipulated the relationship between target and distractors in order to specify the type of information which modulates the IHI. Thus, three types of information were manipulated: perceptual, semantic, and decisional, respectively named pre-lexical, lexical and post-lexical processing. Our results revealed left hemisphere (LH) lateralization during the lexical decision task. In terms of inter-hemisphere interaction, the perceptual and decision-making information increased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting the inhibition of one hemisphere upon the other. In contrast, semantic information decreased the inter-hemispheric asymmetry, suggesting cooperation between the hemispheres. We discussed our results according to current models of IHI and concluded that cerebral hemispheres interact and communicate according to various excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, all which depend on specific

  15. Ship Rock Diatreme: is it a Classical Volcano? New Evidence on Magma Ascent and Emplacement Within the Navajo Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzien, J. R.; Mayhew, B.; Yospin, S.; Beiki, A.; Tewksbury, C.; Hardman, D.; Bank, C.; Noblett, J.; Semken, S.; Kroeger, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Navajo Volcanic Field (NVF) is an area of late-Tertiary volcanism along the New Mexico-Arizona border near the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. Among the roughly 80 exhumed diatremes that comprise the NVF, Ship Rock and The Thumb are two diatremes that present an interesting problem concerning magma ascent and emplacement within the NVF. Are the diatremes remnants of classical volcanoes with underlying magma chambers, or are the diatremes formed from buds off of upward propagating dike swarms? The 2006 Keck Consortium Geophysics Project collected non-invasive gravity and magnetic data to image the subsurface of Ship Rock and The Thumb to suggest constraints concerning the formation of these diatremes within the Navajo Volcanic Field. At Ship Rock, we collected over 120 gravity points spaced 500 m apart along 10 lines. We also collected about 65,000 magnetic points that cover an area of 1,570,000 square meters surro