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Sample records for abundant fragment ions

  1. Multifactorial Understanding of Ion Abundance in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Experiments.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Zeeshan; Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2013-01-29

    In a bottom-up shotgun approach, the proteins of a mixture are enzymatically digested, separated, and analyzed via tandem mass spectrometry. The mass spectra relating fragment ion intensities (abundance) to the mass-to-charge are used to deduce the amino acid sequence and identify the peptides and proteins. The variables that influence intensity were characterized using a multi-factorial mixed-effects model, a ten-fold cross-validation, and stepwise feature selection on 6,352,528 fragment ions from 61,543 peptide ions. Intensity was higher in fragment ions that did not have neutral mass loss relative to any mass loss or that had a +1 charge state. Peptide ions classified for proton mobility as non-mobile had lowest intensity of all mobility levels. Higher basic residue (arginine, lysine or histidine) counts in the peptide ion and low counts in the fragment ion were associated with lower fragment ion intensities. Higher counts of proline in peptide and fragment ions were associated with lower intensities. These results are consistent with the mobile proton theory. Opposite trends between peptide and fragment ion counts and intensity may be due to the different impact of factor under consideration at different stages of the MS/MS experiment or to the different distribution of observations across peptide and fragment ion levels. Presence of basic residues at all three positions next to the fragmentation site was associated with lower fragment ion intensity. The presence of proline proximal to the fragmentation site enhanced fragmentation and had the opposite trend when located distant from the site. A positive association between fragment ion intensity and presence of sulfur residues (cysteine and methionine) on the vicinity of the fragmentation site was identified. These results highlight the multi-factorial nature of fragment ion intensity and could improve the algorithms for peptide identification and the simulation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments.

  2. Multifactorial Understanding of Ion Abundance in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Zeeshan; Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    In a bottom-up shotgun approach, the proteins of a mixture are enzymatically digested, separated, and analyzed via tandem mass spectrometry. The mass spectra relating fragment ion intensities (abundance) to the mass-to-charge are used to deduce the amino acid sequence and identify the peptides and proteins. The variables that influence intensity were characterized using a multi-factorial mixed-effects model, a ten-fold cross-validation, and stepwise feature selection on 6,352,528 fragment ions from 61,543 peptide ions. Intensity was higher in fragment ions that did not have neutral mass loss relative to any mass loss or that had a +1 charge state. Peptide ions classified for proton mobility as non-mobile had lowest intensity of all mobility levels. Higher basic residue (arginine, lysine or histidine) counts in the peptide ion and low counts in the fragment ion were associated with lower fragment ion intensities. Higher counts of proline in peptide and fragment ions were associated with lower intensities. These results are consistent with the mobile proton theory. Opposite trends between peptide and fragment ion counts and intensity may be due to the different impact of factor under consideration at different stages of the MS/MS experiment or to the different distribution of observations across peptide and fragment ion levels. Presence of basic residues at all three positions next to the fragmentation site was associated with lower fragment ion intensity. The presence of proline proximal to the fragmentation site enhanced fragmentation and had the opposite trend when located distant from the site. A positive association between fragment ion intensity and presence of sulfur residues (cysteine and methionine) on the vicinity of the fragmentation site was identified. These results highlight the multi-factorial nature of fragment ion intensity and could improve the algorithms for peptide identification and the simulation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. PMID

  3. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  4. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  5. Predicting intensity ranks of peptide fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ari M

    2009-05-01

    Accurate modeling of peptide fragmentation is necessary for the development of robust scoring functions for peptide-spectrum matches, which are the cornerstone of MS/MS-based identification algorithms. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is a complex process that can involve several competing chemical pathways, which makes it difficult to develop generative probabilistic models that describe it accurately. However, the vast amounts of MS/MS data being generated now make it possible to use data-driven machine learning methods to develop discriminative ranking-based models that predict the intensity ranks of a peptide's fragment ions. We use simple sequence-based features that get combined by a boosting algorithm into models that make peak rank predictions with high accuracy. In an accompanying manuscript, we demonstrate how these prediction models are used to significantly improve the performance of peptide identification algorithms. The models can also be useful in the design of optimal multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions, in cases where there is insufficient experimental data to guide the peak selection process. The prediction algorithm can also be run independently through PepNovo+, which is available for download from http://bix.ucsd.edu/Software/PepNovo.html.

  6. Predicting Intensity Ranks of Peptide Fragment Ions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ari M.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of peptide fragmentation is necessary for the development of robust scoring functions for peptide-spectrum matches, which are the cornerstone of MS/MS-based identification algorithms. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is a complex process that can involve several competing chemical pathways, which makes it difficult to develop generative probabilistic models that describe it accurately. However, the vast amounts of MS/MS data being generated now make it possible to use data-driven machine learning methods to develop discriminative ranking-based models that predict the intensity ranks of a peptide's fragment ions. We use simple sequence-based features that get combined by a boosting algorithm in to models that make peak rank predictions with high accuracy. In an accompanying manuscript, we demonstrate how these prediction models are used to significantly improve the performance of peptide identification algorithms. The models can also be useful in the design of optimal MRM transitions, in cases where there is insufficient experimental data to guide the peak selection process. The prediction algorithm can also be run independently through PepNovo+, which is available for download from http://bix.ucsd.edu/Software/PepNovo.html. PMID:19256476

  7. Halogeno-substituted 2-aminobenzoic acid derivatives for negative ion fragmentation studies of N-linked carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J

    2005-01-01

    Negative ion electrospray mass spectra of high-mannose N-linked glycans derivatised with 2-aminobenzoic acids and ionised from solutions containing ammonium hydroxide gave prominent [M-H](-) ions accompanied by weaker [M-2H](2-) ions. Fragmentation of both types of ions gave prominent singly charged glycosidic cleavage ions containing the derivatised reducing terminus and ions from the non-reducing terminus that appeared to be products of cross-ring cleavages. Differentiation of these two groups of ions was conveniently achieved in a single spectrum by use of chloro- or bromo-substituted benzoic acids in order to label ions containing the derivative with an atom with a distinctive isotope pattern. Fragmentation of the doubly charged ions gave more abundant fragments, both singly and doubly charged, than did fragmentation of the singly charged ions, but information of chain branching was masked by the appearance of prominent ions produced by internal cleavages. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Forest edge disturbance increases rattan abundance in tropical rain forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Mason J; Edwards, Will; Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, Susan G; Alamgir, Mohammed; Porolak, Gabriel; Laurance, William F

    2017-07-20

    Human-induced forest fragmentation poses one of the largest threats to global diversity yet its impact on rattans (climbing palms) has remained virtually unexplored. Rattan is arguably the world's most valuable non-timber forest product though current levels of harvesting and land-use change place wild populations at risk. To assess rattan response to fragmentation exclusive of harvesting impacts we examined rattan abundance, demography and ecology within the forests of northeastern, Australia. We assessed the community abundance of rattans, and component adult (>3 m) and juvenile (≤3 m) abundance in five intact forests and five fragments (23-58 ha) to determine their response to a range of environmental and ecological parameters. Fragmented forests supported higher abundances of rattans than intact forests. Fragment size and edge degradation significantly increased adult rattan abundance, with more in smaller fragments and near edges. Our findings suggest that rattan increase within fragments is due to canopy disturbance of forest edges resulting in preferential, high-light habitat. However, adult and juvenile rattans may respond inconsistently to fragmentation. In managed forest fragments, a rattan abundance increase may provide economic benefits through sustainable harvesting practices. However, rattan increases in protected area forest fragments could negatively impact conservation outcomes.

  9. High Abundance of Ions in Cosmic Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Water-rich, mixed molecular ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout interstellar molecular clouds and the Solar System. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation and particle bombardment of these abiotic ices produces complex organic species, including important biogenic molecules such as amino acids and functionalized PAHs which may have played a role in the origin of life. This ability of such water-rich, oxygen dominated ices to promote production of complex organic species is surprising and points to an important, unusual, but previously overlooked mechanism at play within the ice. Here we report the nature of this mechanism using electronic spectroscopy. VUV-irradiation of PAH/H2O ices leads to an unprecedented and efficient (greater than 70 %) conversion of the neutral PAHs to their cation form (PAH+). Further, these H2O/PAH+ ices are stabile at temperatures below 50 K, a temperature domain common throughout interstellar clouds and the Solar System. Between 50 and 125 K they react to form the complex organics. In view of this, we conclude that charged PAHs and other molecular ions should be common and abundant in many cosmic ices. The chemical, spectroscopic and physical properties of these ion-rich ices can be of fundamental importance for objects as diverse as comets, planets, and molecular clouds and may account for several poorly understood phenomena associated with each of these object classes.

  10. Angular distributions and mechanisms of fragmentation by relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Haustein, P.E.; Cumming, J.B.

    1984-07-23

    Angular distributions of massive fragments from relativistic heavy-ion interactions are reported. Sideward peaking is observed for the light fragment /sup 37/Ar, from 25-GeV /sup 12/C+Au, while the distribution for /sup 127/Xe is strongly forward peaked. Conflicts of these observations and other existing data with predictions of models for the fragmentation process are discussed.

  11. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H(2)O, NH(3), CH(2)O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H(3)PO(4), whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H](+) and [M + H - H](-) within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  12. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H2O, NH3, CH2O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H3PO4, whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H]+ and [M + H - H]- within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  13. Positive and negative ion mode comparison for the determination of DNA/peptide noncovalent binding sites through the formation of "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Bessem; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Alves, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Gas-phase fragmentation of single strand DNA-peptide noncovalent complexes is investigated in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes.Collision-induced dissociation experiments, performed on the positively charged noncovalent complex precursor ions, have confirmed the trend previously observed in negative ion mode, i.e. a high stability of noncovalent complexes containing very basic peptidic residues (i.e. R > K) and acidic nucleotide units (i.e. Thy units), certainly incoming from the existence of salt bridge interactions. Independent of the ion polarity, stable noncovalent complex precursor ions were found to dissociate preferentially through covalent bond cleavages of the partners without disrupting noncovalent interactions. The resulting DNA fragment ions were found to be still noncovalently linked to the peptides. Additionally, the losses of an internal nucleic fragment producing "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions were also observed in both ion polarities, demonstrating the spectacular salt bridge interaction stability. The identical fragmentation patterns (regardless of the relative fragment ion abundances) observed in both polarities have shown a common location of salt bridge interaction certainly preserved from solution. Nonetheless, most abundant noncovalent fragment ions (and particularly three-body ones) are observed from positively charged noncovalent complexes. Therefore, we assume that, independent of the preexisting salt bridge interaction and zwitterion structures, multiple covalent bond cleavages from single-stranded DNA/peptide complexes rely on an excess of positive charges in both electrospray ionization ion polarities.

  14. Formation and fragmentation of quadruply charged molecular ions by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2010-07-22

    We investigated the formation and fragmentation of multiply charged molecular ions of several aromatic molecules by intense nonresonant femtosecond laser pulses of 1.4 mum with a 130 fs pulse duration (up to 2 x 10(14) W cm(-2)). Quadruply charged states were produced for 2,3-benzofluorene and triphenylene molecular ion in large abundance, whereas naphthalene and 1,1'-binaphthyl resulted only in up to triply charged molecular ions. The laser wavelength was nonresonant with regard to the electronic transitions of the neutral molecules, and the degree of fragmentation was strongly correlated with the absorption of the singly charged cation radical. Little fragmentation was observed for naphthalene (off-resonant with cation), whereas heavy fragmentation was observed in the case of 1,1'-binaphthyl (resonant with cation). The degree of H(2) (2H) and 2H(2) (4H) elimination from molecular ions increased as the charge states increased in all the molecules examined. A striking difference was found between triply and quadruply charged 2,3-benzofluorene: significant suppression of molecular ions with loss of odd number of hydrogen was observed in the quadruply charged ions. The Coulomb explosion of protons in the quadruply charged state and succeeding fragmentation resulted in the formation of triply charged molecular ions with an odd number of hydrogens. The hydrogen elimination mechanism in the highly charged state is discussed.

  15. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  16. Long-term landscape change and bird abundance in Amazonian rainforest fragments.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Philip C; Bierregaard, Richard O; Strong, Cheryl; Lovejoy, Thomas E

    2006-08-01

    The rainforests of the Amazon basin are being cut by humans at a rate >20,000 km2/year leading to smaller and more isolated patches of forest, with remaining fragments often in the range of 1-100 ha. We analyzed samples of understory birds collected over 20 years from a standardized mist-netting program in 1- to 100-ha rainforest fragments in a dynamic Amazonian landscape near Manaus, Brazil. Across bird guilds, the condition of second growth immediately surrounding fragments was often as important as fragment size or local forest cover in explaining variation in abundance. Some fragments surrounded by 100 m of open pasture showed reductions in insectivorous bird abundance of over 95%, even in landscapes dominated by continuous forest and old second growth. These extreme reductions may be typical throughout Amazonia in small (< or =10 ha), isolated fragments of rainforest. Abundance for some guilds returned to preisolation levels in 10- and 100-ha fragments connected to continuous forest by 20-year-old second growth. Our results show that the consequences of Amazonian forest loss cannot be accurately described without explicit consideration of vegetation dynamics in matrix habitat. Any dichotomous classification of the landscape into 'forest" and "nonforest" misses essential information about the matrix.

  17. Multi-scale models of grassland passerine abundance in a fragmented system in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renfrew, R.B.; Ribic, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Fragmentation of grasslands has been implicated in grassland bird population declines. Multi-scale models are being increasingly used to assess potential factors that influence grassland bird presence, abundance, and productivity. However, studies rarely assess fragmentation metrics, and seldom evaluate more than two scales or interactions among scales. We evaluated the relative importance of characteristics at multiple scales to patterns in relative abundance of Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). We surveyed birds in 74 southwestern Wisconsin pastures from 1997 to 1999 and compared models with explanatory variables from multiple scales: within-patch vegetation structure (microhabitat), patch (macrohabitat), and three landscape extents. We also examined interactions between macrohabitat and landscape factors. Core area of pastures was an important predictor of relative abundance, and composition of the landscape was more important than configuration. Relative abundance was frequently higher in pastures with more core area and in landscapes with more grassland and less wooded area. The direction and strength of the effect of core pasture size on relative abundance changed depending on amount of wooded area in the landscape. Relative abundance of grassland birds was associated with landscape variables more frequently at the 1200-m scale than at smaller scales. To develop better predictive models, parameters at multiple scales and their interactive effects should be included, and results should be evaluated in the context of microhabitat variability, landscape composition, and fragmentation in the study area. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Collision-induced fragmentation of negative ions from N-linked glycans derivatized with 2-aminobenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J

    2005-05-01

    N-Linked glycans from bovine ribonuclease B, chicken ovalbumin, bovine fetuin, porcine thyroglobulin and human alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein were derivatized with 2-aminobenzoic acid by reductive amination and their tandem mass spectra were recorded by negative ion electrospray ionization with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Derivatives were also prepared from 2-amino-5-methyl- and 2-amino-4,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid in order to confirm the identity of fragment ions containing the reducing terminus. Major fragments from the [M - H](-) ions from the neutral glycans retained the derivative (Y-type cleavages) and provided information on sequence and branching. Other major fragments were products of A-type cross-ring cleavages giving information on antenna structure. Singly doubly and triply charged ions were formed from sialylated glycans. They produced major fragments by loss of sialic acid and a series of singly charged ions that were similar to those from the neutral analogues. Doubly charge ions were also produced by the neutral glycans and were fragmented to form product ions with one and two charges. Again, the fragment ions with a single charge were similar to those from the singly charged parents, but branching information was less obvious because of the occurrence of more abundant ions produced by multiple cleavages. Detection limits were around 200 fmol (3 : 1 signal-to-noise ratio). Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Validation of Geant4 fragmentation for Heavy Ion Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolst, David; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, Giacomo; Folger, Gunter; Incerti, Sebastien; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Koi, Tatsumi; Mancusi, Davide; Pandola, Luciano; Romano, Francesco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Guatelli, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    12C ion therapy has had growing interest in recent years for its excellent dose conformity. However at therapeutic energies, which can be as high as 400 MeV/u, carbon ions produce secondary fragments. For an incident 400 MeV/u 12C ion beam, ∼ 70 % of the beam will undergo fragmentation before the Bragg Peak. The dosimetric and radiobiological impact of these fragments must be accurately characterised, as it can result in increasing the risk of secondary cancer for the patient as well as altering the relative biological effectiveness. This work investigates the accuracy of three different nuclear fragmentation models available in the Monte Carlo Toolkit Geant4, the Binary Intranuclear Cascade (BIC), the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade (INCL++). The models were benchmarked against experimental data for a pristine 400 MeV/u 12C beam incident upon a water phantom, including fragment yield, angular and energy distribution. For fragment yields the three alternative models agreed between ∼ 5 and ∼ 35 % with experimental measurements, the QMD using the "Frag" option gave the best agreement for lighter fragments but had reduced agreement for larger fragments. For angular distributions INCL++ was seen to provide the best agreement among the models for all elements with the exception of Hydrogen, while BIC and QMD was seen to produce broader distributions compared to experiment. BIC and QMD performed similar to one another for kinetic energy distributions while INCL++ suffered from producing lower energy distributions compared to the other models and experiment.

  20. Validation of Geant4 fragmentation for Heavy Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bolst, David; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, Giacomo

    12C ion therapy has had growing interest in recent years for its excellent dose conformity. However at therapeutic energies, which can be as high as 400 MeV/u, carbon ions produce secondary fragments. For an incident 400 MeV/u 12C ion beam, ~70% of the beam will undergo fragmentation before the Bragg Peak. The dosimetric and radiobiological impact of these fragments must be accurately characterised, as it can result in increasing the risk of secondary cancer for the patient as well as altering the relative biological effectiveness. Here, this work investigates the accuracy of three different nuclear fragmentation models available in themore » Monte Carlo Toolkit Geant4, the Binary Intranuclear Cascade (BIC), the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade (INCL++). The models were benchmarked against experimental data for a pristine 400 MeV/u 12C beam incident upon a water phantom, including fragment yield, angular and energy distribution. For fragment yields the three alternative models agreed between ~5 and ~35% with experimental measurements, the QMD using the “Frag” option gave the best agreement for lighter fragments but had reduced agreement for larger fragments. For angular distributions INCL++ was seen to provide the best agreement among the models for all elements with the exception of Hydrogen, while BIC and QMD was seen to produce broader distributions compared to experiment. BIC and QMD performed similar to one another for kinetic energy distributions while INCL++ suffered from producing lower energy distributions compared to the other models and experiment.« less

  1. Validation of Geant4 fragmentation for Heavy Ion Therapy

    DOE PAGES

    Bolst, David; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, Giacomo; ...

    2017-07-12

    12C ion therapy has had growing interest in recent years for its excellent dose conformity. However at therapeutic energies, which can be as high as 400 MeV/u, carbon ions produce secondary fragments. For an incident 400 MeV/u 12C ion beam, ~70% of the beam will undergo fragmentation before the Bragg Peak. The dosimetric and radiobiological impact of these fragments must be accurately characterised, as it can result in increasing the risk of secondary cancer for the patient as well as altering the relative biological effectiveness. Here, this work investigates the accuracy of three different nuclear fragmentation models available in themore » Monte Carlo Toolkit Geant4, the Binary Intranuclear Cascade (BIC), the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade (INCL++). The models were benchmarked against experimental data for a pristine 400 MeV/u 12C beam incident upon a water phantom, including fragment yield, angular and energy distribution. For fragment yields the three alternative models agreed between ~5 and ~35% with experimental measurements, the QMD using the “Frag” option gave the best agreement for lighter fragments but had reduced agreement for larger fragments. For angular distributions INCL++ was seen to provide the best agreement among the models for all elements with the exception of Hydrogen, while BIC and QMD was seen to produce broader distributions compared to experiment. BIC and QMD performed similar to one another for kinetic energy distributions while INCL++ suffered from producing lower energy distributions compared to the other models and experiment.« less

  2. Travelling-wave ion mobility and negative ion fragmentation of high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, David J.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Edgeworth, Matthew; Struwe, Weston B.; Pagel, Kevin; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Crispin, Max; Scrivens, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The isomeric structure of high-mannose N-glycans can significantly impact biological recognition events. Here, the utility of travelling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS)for isomer separation of high-mannose N-glycans is investigated. Negative ion fragmentation using collision-induced dissociation (CID) gave more informative spectra than positive ion spectra with mass-different fragment ions characterizing many of the isomers. Isomer separation by ion mobility in both ionization modes was generally limited, with the arrival time distributions (ATD) often showing little sign of isomers. However, isomers could be partially resolved by plotting extracted fragment ATDs of the diagnostic fragment ions from the negative ion spectra and the fragmentation spectra of the isomers could be extracted by using ions from limited areas of the ATD peak. In some cases, asymmetric ATDs were observed but no isomers could be detected by fragmentation. In these cases, it was assumed that conformers were being separated. Collision cross sections (CCSs) of the isomers in positive and negative fragmentation mode were estimated from TW IM-MS data using dextran glycans as calibrant. More complete CCS data were achieved in negative ion mode by utilizing the diagnostic fragment ions. Examples of isomer separations are shown for N-glycans released from the well-characterized glycoproteins chicken ovalbumin, porcine thyroglobulin and gp120 from the human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the cross sectional data, details of the negative ion collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of all resolved isomers are discussed. PMID:26956389

  3. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  4. Richness and Abundance of Ichneumonidae in a Fragmented Tropical Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Guerra, B; Hanson, P; Guevara, R; Dirzo, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of the magnitude of land use currently occurring in tropical regions, the local loss of animal species due to habitat fragmentation has been widely studied, particularly in the case of vertebrates. Many invertebrate groups and the ichneumonid wasps in particular, however, have been poorly studied in this context, despite the fact that they are one of the most species-rich groups and play an important role as regulators of other insect populations. Here, we recorded the taxonomic composition of ichneumonid parasitoids and assessed their species richness, abundance, similarity, and dominance in the Los Tuxtlas tropical rain forest, Mexico. We compared two forest types: a continuous forest (640 ha) and a forest fragment (19 ha). We sampled ichneumonids using four malaise traps in both forest types during the dry (September-October) and rainy (March-April) seasons. A total of 104 individuals of Ichneumonidae belonging to 11 subfamilies, 18 genera, and 42 species were collected in the continuous forest and 11 subfamilies, 15 genera, and 24 species were collected in the forest fragment. Species richness, abundance, and diversity of ichneumonids were greater in the continuous forest than in the forest fragment. We did not detect differences between seasons. Species rank/abundance curves showed that the ichneumonid community between the forest types was different. Species similarity between forest types was low. The most dominant species in continuous forest was Neotheronia sp., whereas in the forest fragment, it was Orthocentrus sp. Changes in the ichneumonid wasp community may compromise important tropical ecosystem processes.

  5. The impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse abundance on the plateau of eastern Zambia.

    PubMed

    Ducheyne, E; Mweempwa, C; De Pus, C; Vernieuwe, H; De Deken, R; Hendrickx, G; Van den Bossche, P

    2009-09-01

    Tsetse-transmitted human or livestock trypanosomiasis is one of the major constraints to rural development in sub-Saharan Africa. The epidemiology of the disease is determined largely by tsetse fly density. A major factor, contributing to tsetse population density is the availability of suitable habitat. In large parts of Africa, encroachment of people and their livestock resulted in a destruction and fragmentation of such suitable habitat. To determine the effect of habitat change on tsetse density a study was initiated in a tsetse-infested zone of eastern Zambia. The study area represents a gradient of habitat change, starting from a zone with high levels of habitat destruction and ending in an area where livestock and people are almost absent. To determine the distribution and density of the fly, tsetse surveys were conducted throughout the study area in the dry and in the rainy season. Landsat ETM+ imagery covering the study area were classified into four land cover classes (munga, miombo, agriculture and settlements) and two auxiliary spectral classes (clouds and shadow) using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood Classifier. The classes were regrouped into natural vegetation and agricultural zone. The binary images were overlaid with hexagons to obtain the spatial spectrum of spatial pattern. Hexagonal coverage was selected because of its compact and regular form. To identify scale-specific spatial patterns and associated entomological phenomena, the size of the hexagonal coverage was varied (250 and 500 m). Per coverage, total class area, mean patch size, number of patches and patch size standard deviation were used as fragmentation indices. Based on the fragmentation index values, the study zone was classified using a Partitioning Around Mediods (PAM) method. The number of classes was determined using the Wilks' lambda coefficient. To determine the impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse abundance, the correlation between the fragmentation indices and the index

  6. Structure and further fragmentation of significant [a3 + Na - H]+ ions from sodium-cationized peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huixin; Wang, Bing; Wei, Zhonglin; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    A good understanding of gas-phase fragmentation chemistry of peptides is important for accurate protein identification. Additional product ions obtained by sodiated peptides can provide useful sequence information supplementary to protonated peptides and improve protein identification. In this work, we first demonstrate that the sodiated a3 ions are abundant in the tandem mass spectra of sodium-cationized peptides although observations of a3 ions have rarely been reported in protonated peptides. Quantum chemical calculations combined with tandem mass spectrometry are used to investigate this phenomenon by using a model tetrapeptide GGAG. Our results reveal that the most stable [a3 + Na - H](+) ion is present as a bidentate linear structure in which the sodium cation coordinates to the two backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms. Due to structural inflexibility, further fragmentation of the [a3 + Na - H](+) ion needs to overcome several relatively high energetic barriers to form [b2 + Na - H](+) ion with a diketopiperazine structure. As a result, low abundance of [b2 + Na - H](+) ion is detected at relatively high collision energy. In addition, our computational data also indicate that the common oxazolone pathway to generate [b2 + Na - H](+) from the [a3 + Na - H](+) ion is unlikely. The present work provides a mechanistic insight into how a sodium ion affects the fragmentation behaviors of peptides. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Reduction of the K* meson abundance in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungtae; Lee, Su Houng

    2018-03-01

    We study the K* meson reduction in heavy-ion collisions by focusing on the hadronic effects on the K* meson abundance. We evaluate the absorption cross sections of the K* and K meson by light mesons in the hadronic matter, and further investigate the variation in the meson abundances for both particles during the hadronic stage of heavy-ion collisions. We show how the interplay between the interaction of the K* meson and kaon with light mesons in the hadronic medium determines the final yield difference of the statistical hadronization model to the experimental measurements. For the central Au+Au collision at √{sN N}=200 GeV, we find that the K*/K yield ratio at chemical freeze-out decreases by 37 % during the expansion of the hadronic matter, resulting in the final ratio comparable to STAR measurements of 0.23 ±0.05 .

  8. Collision Cross Sections and Ion Mobility Separation of Fragment Ions from Complex N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Watanabe, Yasunori; Allen, Joel D; Rudd, Pauline; Pagel, Kevin; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B

    2018-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) holds great potential for structural glycobiology, in particular in its ability to resolve glycan isomers. Generally, IM-MS has largely been applied to intact glycoconjugate ions with reports focusing on the separation of different adduct types. Here, we explore IM separation and report the collision cross section (CCS) of complex type N-glycans and their fragments in negative ion mode following collision-induced dissociation (CID). CCSs of isomeric fragment ions were found, in some cases, to reveal structural details that were not present in CID spectra themselves. Many fragment ions were confirmed as possessing multiple structure, details of which could be obtained by comparing their drift time profiles to different glycans. By using fragmentation both before and after mobility separation, information was gathered on the fragmentation pathways producing some of the ions. These results help demonstrate the utility of IM and will contribute to the growing use of IM-MS for glycomics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Collision Cross Sections and Ion Mobility Separation of Fragment Ions from Complex N-Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Watanabe, Yasunori; Allen, Joel D.; Rudd, Pauline; Pagel, Kevin; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B.

    2018-04-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) holds great potential for structural glycobiology, in particular in its ability to resolve glycan isomers. Generally, IM-MS has largely been applied to intact glycoconjugate ions with reports focusing on the separation of different adduct types. Here, we explore IM separation and report the collision cross section (CCS) of complex type N-glycans and their fragments in negative ion mode following collision-induced dissociation (CID). CCSs of isomeric fragment ions were found, in some cases, to reveal structural details that were not present in CID spectra themselves. Many fragment ions were confirmed as possessing multiple structure, details of which could be obtained by comparing their drift time profiles to different glycans. By using fragmentation both before and after mobility separation, information was gathered on the fragmentation pathways producing some of the ions. These results help demonstrate the utility of IM and will contribute to the growing use of IM-MS for glycomics. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  11. Environmental drivers of Ixodes ricinus abundance in forest fragments of rural European landscapes.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Steffen; Liira, Jaan; Gärtner, Stefanie; Hansen, Karin; Brunet, Jörg; Cousins, Sara A O; Deconchat, Marc; Decocq, Guillaume; De Frenne, Pieter; De Smedt, Pallieter; Diekmann, Martin; Gallet-Moron, Emilie; Kolb, Annette; Lenoir, Jonathan; Lindgren, Jessica; Naaf, Tobias; Paal, Taavi; Valdés, Alicia; Verheyen, Kris; Wulf, Monika; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2017-09-06

    The castor bean tick (Ixodes ricinus) transmits infectious diseases such as Lyme borreliosis, which constitutes an important ecosystem disservice. Despite many local studies, a comprehensive understanding of the key drivers of tick abundance at the continental scale is still lacking. We analyze a large set of environmental factors as potential drivers of I. ricinus abundance. Our multi-scale study was carried out in deciduous forest fragments dispersed within two contrasting rural landscapes of eight regions, along a macroclimatic gradient stretching from southern France to central Sweden and Estonia. We surveyed the abundance of I. ricinus, plant community composition, forest structure and soil properties and compiled data on landscape structure, macroclimate and habitat properties. We used linear mixed models to analyze patterns and derived the relative importance of the significant drivers. Many drivers had, on their own, either a moderate or small explanatory value for the abundance of I. ricinus, but combined they explained a substantial part of variation. This emphasizes the complex ecology of I. ricinus and the relevance of environmental factors for tick abundance. Macroclimate only explained a small fraction of variation, while properties of macro- and microhabitat, which buffer macroclimate, had a considerable impact on tick abundance. The amount of forest and the composition of the surrounding rural landscape were additionally important drivers of tick abundance. Functional (dispersules) and structural (density of tree and shrub layers) properties of the habitat patch played an important role. Various diversity metrics had only a small relative importance. Ontogenetic tick stages showed pronounced differences in their response. The abundance of nymphs and adults is explained by the preceding stage with a positive relationship, indicating a cumulative effect of drivers. Our findings suggest that the ecosystem disservices of tick-borne diseases, via the

  12. Optical model calculations of heavy-ion target fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fragmentation of target nuclei by relativistic protons and heavy ions is described within the context of a simple abrasion-ablation-final-state interaction model. Abrasion is described by a quantum mechanical formalism utilizing an optical model potential approximation. Nuclear charge distributions of the excited prefragments are calculated by both a hypergeometric distribution and a method based upon the zero-point oscillations of the giant dipole resonance. Excitation energies are estimated from the excess surface energy resulting from the abrasion process and the additional energy deposited by frictional spectator interactions of the abraded nucleons. The ablation probabilities are obtained from the EVA-3 computer program. Isotope production cross sections for the spallation of copper targets by relativistic protons and for the fragmenting of carbon targets by relativistic carbon, neon, and iron projectiles are calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  13. Fragmentation of organic ions bearing fixed multiple charges observed in MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xianwen; Li, Bao; de Waal, Bas F M; Schill, Jurgen; Baker, Matthew B; Bovee, Ralf A A; van Dongen, Joost L J; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Meijer, E W

    2018-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) was used to analyze a series of synthetic organic ions bearing fixed multiple charges. Despite the multiple intrinsic charges, only singly charged ions were recorded in each case. In addition to the pseudo-molecular ions formed by counterion adduction, deprotonation and electron capture, a number of fragment ions were also observed. Charge splitting by fragmentation was found to be a viable route for charge reduction leading to the formation of the observed singly charged fragment ions. Unlike multivalent metal ions, organic ions can rearrange and/or fragment during charge reduction. This fragmentation process will evidently complicate the interpretation of the MALDI MS spectrum. Because MALDI MS is usually considered as a soft ionization technique, the fragment ion peaks can easily be erroneously interpreted as impurities. Therefore, the awareness and understanding of the underlying MALDI-induced fragmentation pathways is essential for a proper interpretation of the corresponding mass spectra. Due to the fragment ions generated during charge reduction, special care should be taken in the MALDI MS analysis of multiply charged ions. In this work, the possible mechanisms by which the organic ions bearing fixed multiple charges fragment are investigated. With an improved understanding of the fragmentation mechanisms, MALDI TOF MS should still be a useful technique for the characterization of organic ions with fixed multiple charges. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Analyzing Internal Fragmentation of Electrosprayed Ubiquitin Ions During Beam-Type Collisional Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Kenneth R.; Skinner, Owen S.; Fellers, Ryan T.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2015-05-01

    Gaseous fragmentation of intact proteins is multifaceted and can be unpredictable by current theories in the field. Contributing to the complexity is the multitude of precursor ion states and fragmentation channels. Terminal fragment ions can be re-fragmented, yielding product ions containing neither terminus, termed internal fragment ions. In an effort to better understand and capitalize upon this fragmentation process, we collisionally dissociated the high (13+), middle (10+), and low (7+) charge states of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions. Both terminal and internal fragmentation processes were quantified through step-wise increases of voltage potential in the collision cell. An isotope fitting algorithm matched observed product ions to theoretical terminal and internal fragment ions. At optimal energies for internal fragmentation of the 10+, nearly 200 internal fragments were observed; on average each of the 76 residues in ubiquitin was covered by 24.1 internal fragments. A pertinent finding was that formation of internal ions occurs at similar energy thresholds as terminal b- and y-ion types in beam-type activation. This large amount of internal fragmentation is frequently overlooked during top-down mass spectrometry. As such, we present several new approaches to visualize internal fragments through modified graphical fragment maps. With the presented advances of internal fragment ion accounting and visualization, the total percentage of matched fragment ions increased from approximately 40% to over 75% in a typical beam-type MS/MS spectrum. These sequence coverage improvements offer greater characterization potential for whole proteins with no needed experimental changes and could be of large benefit for future high-throughput intact protein analysis.

  15. Amino and Acetamide Functional Group Effects on the Ionization and Fragmentation of Sugar Chains in Positive-Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagaki, Tohru; Sugahara, Kohtaro; Watanabe, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the influence of amino (-NH2) and acetamide (-NHCOCH3, -NAc) groups in sugar chains on their ionization and fragmentation, cycloamyloses (cyclodextrins, CyDs) and lacto-oligosaccharide are analyzed by MALDI TOF/TOF and ESI Q-TOF mass spectrometry. CyD derivatives substituted by amino or acetamide groups are ideal analytes to extract the function group effects, which are amino-CyD with one hexosamine (HexNH2) and acetamide-CyD with one N-acetyl hexosamine (HexNAc). Interestingly, the relative ion intensities and isotope-like patterns in their product ion spectra depend on the functional groups and ion forms of sugar chains. Consequently, the results indicate that a proton (H+) localizes on the amino group of the amino sugar, and that the proton (H+) induces their fragmentation. Sodium cation (Na+) attachment is independent from amino group and exerts no influence on their fragmentation patterns in amino group except for mono- and disaccharide fragment ions because there is the possibility of the reducing end effect. In contrast, a sodium cation localizes much more frequently on the acetamide group in acetamide-CyDs because the chemical species with HexNAc are stable. Thus, their ions with HexNAc are abundant. These results are consistent with the fragmentation of lacto-neo- N-tetraose and maltotetraose, suggesting that a sodium cation generally localizes much more frequently on the acetamide group in sugar chains.

  16. A First Survey on the Abundance of Plastics Fragments and Particles on Two Sandy Beaches in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noik, V. James; Mohd Tuah, P.

    2015-04-01

    Plastic fragments and particles as an emerging environmental contaminant and pollutant are gaining scientific attention in the recent decades due to the potential threats on biota. This study aims to elucidate the presence, abundance and temporal change of plastic fragments and particles from two selected beaches, namely Santubong and Trombol in Kuching on two sampling times. Morphological and polymer identification assessment on the recovered plastics was also conducted. Overall comparison statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of plastic fragments/debris on both of sampling stations were insignificantly different (p>0.05). Likewise, statistical analysis on the temporal changes on the abundance yielded no significant difference for most of the sampling sites on each respective station, except STB-S2. Morphological studies revealed physical features of plastic fragments and debris were diverse in shapes, sizes, colors and surface fatigues. FTIR fingerprinting analysis shows that polypropylene and polyethylene were the dominant plastic polymers debris on both beaches.

  17. Analysis of multi-fragmentation reactions induced by relativistic heavy ions using the statistical multi-fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Sato, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Niita, K.

    2013-09-01

    The fragmentation cross-sections of relativistic energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were analyzed using the statistical multi-fragmentation model (SMM) incorporated with the Monte-Carlo radiation transport simulation code particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS). Comparison with the literature data showed that PHITS-SMM reproduces fragmentation cross-sections of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies better than the original PHITS by up to two orders of magnitude. It was also found that SMM does not degrade the neutron production cross-sections in heavy ion collisions or the fragmentation cross-sections of light nuclei, for which SMM has not been benchmarked. Therefore, SMM is a robust model that can supplement conventional nucleus-nucleus reaction models, enabling more accurate prediction of fragmentation cross-sections.

  18. Practical application of in silico fragmentation based residue screening with ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathry; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-07-15

    A screening concept for residues in complex matrices based on liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IMS-HRMS is presented. The comprehensive four-dimensional data (chromatographic retention time, drift time, mass-to-charge and ion abundance) obtained in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode was used for data mining. An in silico fragmenter utilizing a molecular structure database was used for suspect screening, instead of targeted screening with reference substances. The utilized data-independent acquisition mode relies on the MS E concept; where two constantly alternating HRMS scans (low and high fragmentation energy) are acquired. Peak deconvolution and drift time alignment of ions from the low (precursor ion) and high (product ion) energy scan result in relatively clean product ion spectra. A bond dissociation in silico fragmenter (MassFragment) supplied with mol files of compounds of interest was used to explain the observed product ions of each extracted candidate component (chromatographic peak). Two complex matrices (fish and bovine liver extract) were fortified with 98 veterinary drugs. Out of 98 screened compounds 94 could be detected with the in silico based screening approach. The high correlation among drift time and m/z value of equally charged ions was utilized for an orthogonal filtration (ranking). Such an orthogonal ion mobility based filter removes multiply charged ions (e.g. peptides and proteins from the matrix) as well as noise and artefacts. Most significantly, this filtration dramatically reduces false positive findings but hardly increases false negative findings. The proposed screening approach may offer new possibilities for applications where reference compounds are hardly or not at all commercially available. Such areas may be the analysis of metabolites of drugs, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, marine toxins, derivatives of sildenafil or novel designer drugs (new psychoactive substances

  19. Edge disturbance drives liana abundance increase and alteration of liana-host tree interactions in tropical forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Mason J; Edwards, Will; Magrach, Ainhoa; Alamgir, Mohammed; Porolak, Gabriel; Mohandass, D; Laurance, William F

    2018-04-01

    Closed-canopy forests are being rapidly fragmented across much of the tropical world. Determining the impacts of fragmentation on ecological processes enables better forest management and improves species-conservation outcomes. Lianas are an integral part of tropical forests but can have detrimental and potentially complex interactions with their host trees. These effects can include reduced tree growth and fecundity, elevated tree mortality, alterations in tree-species composition, degradation of forest succession, and a substantial decline in forest carbon storage. We examined the individual impacts of fragmentation and edge effects (0-100-m transect from edge to forest interior) on the liana community and liana-host tree interactions in rainforests of the Atherton Tableland in north Queensland, Australia. We compared the liana and tree community, the traits of liana-infested trees, and determinants of the rates of tree infestation within five forest fragments (23-58 ha in area) and five nearby intact-forest sites. Fragmented forests experienced considerable disturbance-induced degradation at their edges, resulting in a significant increase in liana abundance. This effect penetrated to significantly greater depths in forest fragments than in intact forests. The composition of the liana community in terms of climbing guilds was significantly different between fragmented and intact forests, likely because forest edges had more small-sized trees favoring particular liana guilds which preferentially use these for climbing trellises. Sites that had higher liana abundances also exhibited higher infestation rates of trees, as did sites with the largest lianas. However, large lianas were associated with low-disturbance forest sites. Our study shows that edge disturbance of forest fragments significantly altered the abundance and community composition of lianas and their ecological relationships with trees, with liana impacts on trees being elevated in fragments relative

  20. Edge-interior differences in the species richness and abundance of drosophilids in a semideciduous forest fragment.

    PubMed

    Penariol, Leiza V; Madi-Ravazzi, Lilian

    2013-12-01

    Habitat fragmentation is the main cause of biodiversity loss, as remnant fragments are exposed to negative influences that include edge effects, prevention of migration, declines in effective population sizes, loss of genetic variability and invasion of exotic species. The Drosophilidae (Diptera), especially species of the genus Drosophila, which are highly sensitive to environmental variation, have been used as bioindicators. A twelve-month field study was conducted to evaluate the abundance and richness of drosophilids in an edge-interior transect in a fragment of semideciduous forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. One objective of the study was to evaluate the applied methodology with respect to its potential use in future studies addressing the monitoring and conservation of threatened areas. The species abundance along the transect showed a clear gradient, with species associated with disturbed environments, such as Drosophila simulans, Scaptodrosophila latifasciaeformis and Zaprionus indianus, being collected at the fragment edge and the species D. willistoni and D. mediostriata being found in the fragment's interior. Replacement of these species occurred at approximately 60 meters from the edge, which may be a reflection of edge effects on species abundance and richness because the species found within the habitat fragment are more sensitive to variations in temperature and humidity than those sampled near the edge. The results support the use of this methodology in studies on environmental impacts.

  1. Electron impact ionization of size selected hydrogen clusters (H2)N: ion fragment and neutral size distributions.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2008-05-21

    Clusters consisting of normal H2 molecules, produced in a free jet expansion, are size selected by diffraction from a transmission nanograting prior to electron impact ionization. For each neutral cluster (H2)(N) (N=2-40), the relative intensities of the ion fragments Hn+ are measured with a mass spectrometer. H3+ is found to be the most abundant fragment up to N=17. With a further increase in N, the abundances of H3+, H5+, H7+, and H9+ first increase and, after passing through a maximum, approach each other. At N=40, they are about the same and more than a factor of 2 and 3 larger than for H11+ and H13+, respectively. For a given neutral cluster size, the intensities of the ion fragments follow a Poisson distribution. The fragmentation probabilities are used to determine the neutral cluster size distribution produced in the expansion at a source temperature of 30.1 K and a source pressure of 1.50 bar. The distribution shows no clear evidence of a magic number N=13 as predicted by theory and found in experiments with pure para-H2 clusters. The ion fragment distributions are also used to extract information on the internal energy distribution of the H3+ ions produced in the reaction H2+ + H2-->H3+ +H, which is initiated upon ionization of the cluster. The internal energy is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated and to determine the number of molecules subsequently evaporated. The internal energy distribution found in this way is in good agreement with data obtained in an earlier independent merged beam scattering experiment.

  2. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Abundance and Source Population of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensema, R. J.; Desai, M. I.; Broiles, T. W.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we analyze the abundances of suprathermal heavy ions in 75 Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) events between January 1st 1995 and December 31st 2008. We correlate the heavy ion abundances in these CIRs with those measured in the solar wind and suprathermal populations upstream of these events. Our analysis reveals that the CIR suprathermal heavy ion abundances vary by nearly two orders of magnitude over the solar activity cycle, with higher abundances (e.g., Fe/O) occurring during solar maximum and depleted values occurring during solar minimum. The abundances are also energy dependent, with larger abundances at higher energies, particularly during solar maximum. Following the method used by Mason et al. 2008, we correlate the CIR abundances with the corresponding solar wind and suprathermal values measured during 6-hour intervals for upstream periods spanning 10 days prior to the start of each CIR event. This correlation reveals that suprathermal heavy ions are better correlated with upstream suprathermal abundances measured at the same energy compared with the solar wind heavy ion abundances. Using the 6-hour averaging method, we also identified timeframes of maximum correlation between the CIR and the upstream suprathermal abundances, and find that the time of maximum correlation depends on the energy of the suprathermal ions. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of previous studies of CIR and suprathermal particles, and CIR seed populations and acceleration mechanisms.

  4. Effects of Habitat Structure and Fragmentation on Diversity and Abundance of Primates in Tropical Deciduous Forests in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Pyritz, Lennart W; Büntge, Anna B S; Herzog, Sebastian K; Kessler, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Habitat structure and anthropogenic disturbance are known to affect primate diversity and abundance. However, researchers have focused on lowland rain forests, whereas endangered deciduous forests have been neglected. We aimed to investigate the relationships between primate diversity and abundance and habitat parameters in 10 deciduous forest fragments southeast of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. We obtained primate data via line-transect surveys and visual and acoustic observations. In addition, we assessed the vegetation structure (canopy height, understory density), size, isolation time, and surrounding forest area of the fragments. We interpreted our results in the context of the historical distribution data for primates in the area before fragmentation and interviews with local people. We detected 5 of the 8 historically observed primate species: Alouatta caraya, Aotus azarae boliviensis, Callithrix melanura, Callicebus donacophilus, and Cebus libidinosus juruanus. Total species number and detection rates decreased with understory density. Detection rates also negatively correlated with forest areas in the surroundings of a fragment, which may be due to variables not assessed, i.e., fragment shape, distance to nearest town. Observations for Alouatta and Aotus were too few to conduct further statistics. Cebus and Callicebus were present in 90% and 70% of the sites, respectively, and their density did not correlate with any of the habitat variables assessed, signaling high ecological plasticity and adaptability to anthropogenic impact in these species. Detections of Callithrix were higher in areas with low forest strata. Our study provides baseline data for future fragmentation studies in Neotropical dry deciduous forests and sets a base for specific conservation measures.

  5. Neutrons produced by known energies of ions abundant in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadman, W. W., III

    1972-01-01

    Particle accelerator radiation measurements are applied to the problem of calculating biological dose from radiation produced in the walls of a spacecraft by various ions in space. Neutrons, one of the products of the interactions of energetic ions with matter, are usually quite penetrating and have large values of Q.F. or R.B.E. Ions of helium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen were accelerated and directed onto target materials of copper or tantalum. The secondary neutron production was determined. Studies were made of the angular distribution and an inferred neutron spectrum was calculated from activities of threshold reaction detectors.

  6. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n: A comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Krutenkova, A. P.; Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; ...

    2015-05-29

    Momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from ¹²C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. The differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured are compared tomore » the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.« less

  7. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n. A comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Krutenkova, Anna P.; Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; ...

    2015-05-29

    The momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from 12C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. Moreover, the differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured aremore » compared to the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.« less

  8. Effect of land cover, habitat fragmentation and ant colonies on the distribution and abundance of shrews in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laakkonen, Juha; Fisher, Robert N.; Case, Ted J.

    2001-01-01

    Because effects of habitat fragmentation and anthropogenic disturbance on native animals have been relatively little studied in arid areas and in insectivores, we investigated the roles of different land covers, habitat fragmentation and ant colonies on the distribution and abundance of shrews, Notiosorex crawfordi and Sorex ornatus, in southern California.Notiosorex crawfordi was the numerically dominant species (trap-success rate 0·52) occurring in 21 of the 22 study sites in 85% of the 286 pitfall arrays used in this study.Sorex ornatus was captured in 14 of the sites, in 52% of the arrays with a total trap-success rate of 0·2. Neither of the species was found in one of the sites.The population dynamics of the two shrew species were relatively synchronous during the 4–5-year study; the peak densities usually occurred during the spring. Precipitation had a significant positive effect, and maximum temperature a significant negative effect on the trap-success rate of S. ornatus.Occurrence and abundance of shrews varied significantly between sites and years but the size of the landscape or the study site had no effect on the abundance of shrews. The amount of urban edge had no significant effect on the captures of shrews but increased edge allows invasion of the Argentine ants, which had a highly significant negative impact on the abundance of N. crawfordi.At the trap array level, the percentage of coastal sage scrub flora had a significant positive, and the percentage of other flora had a significant negative effect on the abundance of N. crawfordi. The mean canopy height and the abundance of N. crawfordi had a significant positive effect on the occurrence of S. ornatus.Our study suggests that the loss of native coastal sage scrub flora and increasing presence of Argentine ant colonies may significantly effect the distribution and abundance of N. crawfordi. The very low overall population densities of both shrew species in most study sites make both species

  9. Ion mobility mass spectrometry for ion recovery and clean-up of MS and MS/MS spectra obtained from low abundance viral samples

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, David J.; Crispin, Max; Bonomelli, Camille; Scrivens, Jim H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract Many samples of complex mixtures of N-glycans released from small amounts of material, such as glycoproteins from viruses, present problems for mass spectrometric analysis because of the presence of contaminating material that is difficult to remove by conventional methods without involving sample loss. This paper describes the use of ion mobility for extraction of glycan profiles from such samples and for obtaining clean CID spectra when targeted m/z values capture additional ions from those of the target compound. N-Glycans were released enzymatically from within SDS-PAGE gels, from the representative glycoprotein, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus, and examined by direct infusion electrospray in negative mode followed by ion mobility with a Waters Synapt G2 mass spectrometer. Clean profiles of singly, doubly and triply charged N-glycans were obtained from samples in cases where the raw electrospray spectra displayed only a few glycan ions as the result of low sample concentration or the presence of contamination. Ion mobility also enabled uncontaminated CID spectra to be obtained from glycans when their molecular ions displayed coincidence with ions from fragments or multiply charged ions with similar m/z values. This technique proved to be invaluable for removing extraneous ions from many CID spectra. The presence of such ions often produces spectra that are difficult to interpret. Most CID spectra, even those from abundant glycan constituents, benefited from such clean-up showing that the extra dimension provided by ion mobility was invaluable for studies of this type. PMID:26204966

  10. Fission fragment yields from heavy-ion-induced reactions measured with a fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, O. B.; Delaune, O.; Farget, F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Amthor, A. M.; Bastin, B.; Bazin, D.; Blank, B.; Cacéres, L.; Chbihi, A.; Fernández-Dominguez, B.; Grévy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Mittig, W.; Pereira, J.; Perrot, L.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Savajols, H.; Sherrill, B. M.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Villari, A. C.

    2018-04-01

    The systematic study of fission fragment yields under different initial conditions has provided valuable experimental data for benchmarking models of fission product yields. Nuclear reactions using inverse kinematics coupled to the use of a high-resolution spectrometer with good fragment identification are shown here to be a powerful tool to measure the inclusive isotopic yields of fission fragments. In-flight fusion-fission was used in this work to produce secondary beams of neutron-rich isotopes in the collisions of a 238U beam at 24 MeV/u with 9Be and 12C targets at GANIL using the LISE3 fragment separator. Unique identification of the A, Z, and atomic charge state, q, of fission products was attained with the Δ E- TKE-B ρ- ToF measurement technique. Mass, and atomic number distributions are reported for the two reactions. The results show the importance of different reaction mechanisms in the two cases. The optimal target material for higher yields of neutron-rich high- Z isotopes produced in fusion-fission reactions as a function of projectile energy is discussed.

  11. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E.

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Isomer Information from Ion Mobility Separation of High-Mannose Glycan Fragments.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Seabright, Gemma E; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B

    2018-05-01

    Extracted arrival time distributions of negative ion CID-derived fragments produced prior to traveling-wave ion mobility separation were evaluated for their ability to provide structural information on N-linked glycans. Fragmentation of high-mannose glycans released from several glycoproteins, including those from viral sources, provided over 50 fragments, many of which gave unique collisional cross-sections and provided additional information used to assign structural isomers. For example, cross-ring fragments arising from cleavage of the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue on Man 8 GlcNAc 2 isomers have unique collision cross-sections enabling isomers to be differentiated in mixtures. Specific fragment collision cross-sections enabled identification of glycans, the antennae of which terminated in the antigenic α-galactose residue, and ions defining the composition of the 6-antenna of several of the glycans were also found to have different cross-sections from isomeric ions produced in the same spectra. Potential mechanisms for the formation of the various ions are discussed and the estimated collisional cross-sections are tabulated. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Isomer Information from Ion Mobility Separation of High-Mannose Glycan Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Seabright, Gemma E.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B.

    2018-05-01

    Extracted arrival time distributions of negative ion CID-derived fragments produced prior to traveling-wave ion mobility separation were evaluated for their ability to provide structural information on N-linked glycans. Fragmentation of high-mannose glycans released from several glycoproteins, including those from viral sources, provided over 50 fragments, many of which gave unique collisional cross-sections and provided additional information used to assign structural isomers. For example, cross-ring fragments arising from cleavage of the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue on Man8GlcNAc2 isomers have unique collision cross-sections enabling isomers to be differentiated in mixtures. Specific fragment collision cross-sections enabled identification of glycans, the antennae of which terminated in the antigenic α-galactose residue, and ions defining the composition of the 6-antenna of several of the glycans were also found to have different cross-sections from isomeric ions produced in the same spectra. Potential mechanisms for the formation of the various ions are discussed and the estimated collisional cross-sections are tabulated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Protons from carbon ion fragmentation at 0.3–2.0 GeV/nucleon: Comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.

    2015-05-15

    Yields of protons at 3.5° from carbon ion fragmentation at energies of T{sub 0} = 0.3, 0.6, 0.95, and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on a Be target were measured in the FRAGM experiment at TWA-ITEP heavy-ion facility. Proton momentum spectra cover both the region of the fragmentation maximum and the cumulative region. The differential cross sections span six orders of its magnitude. The spectra are compared with the predictions of four models of ion-ion interactions: LAQGSM03.03, SHIELD-HIT, QMD, and BC.

  16. Doubly differential cross sections for galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Norbury, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    An abrasion-ablation T-matrix formulation is applied to the calculation of double differential-cross sections in projectile fragmentation of 2.1 GeV/nucleon O-16 on Be-9 and 86 MeV/nucleon C-12 on C-12 and Ag-108. An exponential parameterization of the ablation T-matrix is used and the total width of the intermediate states is taken as a parameter. Fitted values of the total width to experimental results are used to predict the lifetime of the ablation stage and indicate a decay time on the order of 10 to the -19th power sec.

  17. Production of spin-polarized radioactive ion beams via projectile fragmentation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, D.; Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A.

    2008-02-06

    Spin-polarized radioactive ion beams are produced in the projectile fragmentation reaction induced by intermediate-energy heavy ion beams. The degree of spin polarization shows characteristic dependence on the outgoing momentum of the projectile fragment in the magnitude around 1{approx}10%. The qualitative behavior is well described by the kinematical model of the fragmentation process. Recently, we have successfully produced spin-polarized beams of aluminum isotopes in the mass A{approx}30 region via the fragmentation of 95 MeV/u {sup 40}Ar projectiles. The magnetic moments of {sup 30}Al and {sup 32}Al and the electric quadrupole moments of {sup 31}Al and {sup 32}Al have been measured usingmore » the {beta}-NMR technique with the polarized RI beams of the Al isotopes.« less

  18. Electron molecular ion recombination: product excitation and fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nigel G; Poterya, Viktoriya; Babcock, Lucia M

    2006-01-01

    Electron-ion dissociative recombination is an important ionization loss process in any ionized gas containing molecular ions. This includes the interstellar medium, circumstellar shells, cometary comae, planetary ionospheres, fusion plasma boundaries, combustion flames, laser plasmas and chemical deposition and etching plasmas. In addition to controlling the ionization density, the process generates many radical species, which can contribute to a parallel neutral chemistry. Techniques used to obtain rate data and product information (flowing afterglows and storage rings) are discussed and recent data are reviewed including diatomic to polyatomic ions and cluster ions. The data are divided into rate coefficients and cross sections, including their temperature/energy dependencies, and quantitative identification of neutral reaction products. The latter involve both ground and electronically excited states and including vibrational excitation. The data from the different techniques are compared and trends in the data are examined. The reactions are considered in terms of the basic mechanisms (direct and indirect processes including tunneling) and recent theoretical developments are discussed. Finally, new techniques are mentioned (for product identification; electrostatic storage rings, including single and double rings; Coulomb explosion) and new ways forward are suggested.

  19. Electromagnetic dissociation effects in galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of galactic heavy ions by the Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. By using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta, estimates of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for a variety of reactions applicable to galactic cosmic ray shielding studies are presented and compared with other predictions and with available experimental data.

  20. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. Fragmentation of amino acids induced by collisions with low-energy highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarski, D. G.; Maclot, S.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Rousseau, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Huber, B. A.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation of amino acids NH2-(CH2)n-COOH (n=1 glycine; n=2 β-alanine and n=3 γ-aminobutyric acid GABA) following collisions with slow highly charged ions has been studied in the gas phase by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In the experiments, a multi-coincidence detection method was used to deduce the charge state of the molecules before fragmentation. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in the basis of the density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The combination of both methodologies is essential to unambiguously unravel the different fragmentation pathways.

  2. Proposal for a common nomenclature for fragment ions in mass spectra of lipids

    PubMed Central

    Hartler, Jürgen; Christiansen, Klaus; Gallego, Sandra F.; Peng, Bing; Ahrends, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry-based lipidomics have in recent years prompted efforts to standardize the annotation of the vast number of lipid molecules that can be detected in biological systems. These efforts have focused on cataloguing, naming and drawing chemical structures of intact lipid molecules, but have provided no guidelines for annotation of lipid fragment ions detected using tandem and multi-stage mass spectrometry, albeit these fragment ions are mandatory for structural elucidation and high confidence lipid identification, especially in high throughput lipidomics workflows. Here we propose a nomenclature for the annotation of lipid fragment ions, describe its implementation and present a freely available web application, termed ALEX123 lipid calculator, that can be used to query a comprehensive database featuring curated lipid fragmentation information for more than 430,000 potential lipid molecules from 47 lipid classes covering five lipid categories. We note that the nomenclature is generic, extendable to stable isotope-labeled lipid molecules and applicable to automated annotation of fragment ions detected by most contemporary lipidomics platforms, including LC-MS/MS-based routines. PMID:29161304

  3. Proposal for a common nomenclature for fragment ions in mass spectra of lipids.

    PubMed

    Pauling, Josch K; Hermansson, Martin; Hartler, Jürgen; Christiansen, Klaus; Gallego, Sandra F; Peng, Bing; Ahrends, Robert; Ejsing, Christer S

    2017-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry-based lipidomics have in recent years prompted efforts to standardize the annotation of the vast number of lipid molecules that can be detected in biological systems. These efforts have focused on cataloguing, naming and drawing chemical structures of intact lipid molecules, but have provided no guidelines for annotation of lipid fragment ions detected using tandem and multi-stage mass spectrometry, albeit these fragment ions are mandatory for structural elucidation and high confidence lipid identification, especially in high throughput lipidomics workflows. Here we propose a nomenclature for the annotation of lipid fragment ions, describe its implementation and present a freely available web application, termed ALEX123 lipid calculator, that can be used to query a comprehensive database featuring curated lipid fragmentation information for more than 430,000 potential lipid molecules from 47 lipid classes covering five lipid categories. We note that the nomenclature is generic, extendable to stable isotope-labeled lipid molecules and applicable to automated annotation of fragment ions detected by most contemporary lipidomics platforms, including LC-MS/MS-based routines.

  4. Fragmentation studies of relativistic iron ions using plastic nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Scampoli, P; Durante, M; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Gialanella, G

    2005-01-01

    We measured fluence and fragmentation of high-energy (1 or 5 A GeV) 56Fe ions accelerated at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron or at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA) using solid-state CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Different targets (polyethylene, PMMA, C, Al, Pb) were used to produce a large spectrum of charged fragments. CR-39 plastics were exposed both in front and behind the shielding block (thickness ranging from 5 to 30 g/cm2) at a normal incidence and low fluence. The radiation dose deposited by surviving Fe ions and charged fragments was measured behind the shield using an ionization chamber. The distribution of the measured track size was exploited to distinguish the primary 56Fe ions tracks from the lighter fragments. Measurements of projectile's fluence in front of the shield were used to determine the dose per incident particle behind the block. Simultaneous measurements of primary 56Fe ion tracks in front and behind the shield were used to evaluate the fraction of surviving iron projectiles and the total charge-changing fragmentation cross-section. These physical measurements will be used to characterize the beam used in parallel biological experiments. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry and negative ion fragmentation of hybrid and complex N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, David J.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Edgeworth, Matthew; Pagel, Kevin; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Struwe, Weston B.; Crispin, Max; Scrivens, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen cross sections of hybrid and complex glycans released from the glycoproteins IgG, gp120 (from human immunodeficiency virus), ovalbumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, thyroglobulin and fucosylated glycoproteins from the human parotid gland were measured with a travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer using dextran as the calibrant. The utility of this instrument for isomer separation was also investigated. Some isomers, such as Man3GlcNAc3 from chicken ovalbumin and Man3GlcNAc3Fuc1 from thyroglobulin could be partially resolved and identified by their negative ion fragmentation spectra. Several other larger glycans, however, although existing as isomers, produced only asymmetric rather than separated arrival time distributions (ATDs). Nevertheless, in these cases, isomers could often be detected by plotting extracted fragment ATDs of diagnostic fragment ions from the negative ion spectra obtained in the transfer cell of the Waters Synapt mass spectrometer. Coincidence in the drift times of all fragment ions with an overall asymmetric ATD profile usually suggested that separations were due to conformers or anomers, whereas symmetrical ATDs of fragments showing differences in drift times indicated isomer separation. Although some significant differences in cross sections were found for the smaller isomeric glycans, the differences found for the larger compounds were usually too small to be analytically useful. Possible correlations between cross sections and structural types were also investigated and it was found that complex glycans tended to have slightly smaller cross sections than high-mannose glycans of comparable molecular weight. In addition, biantennary glycans containing a core fucose and/or a bisecting GlcNAc residue fell on different mobility-m/z trend lines to those glycans not so substituted with both of these substituents contributing to larger cross sections. PMID:27477117

  6. Fragmentation of DNA components by hyperthermal heavy ion (Ar+ and Xe+) impact in the condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Sarvenaz Sarabipour, Ms; Michaud, Marc; Deng, Zongwu; Huels, Michael A.

    The overriding environmental factor that presently limits human endeavors in space is exposure to heavy ion radiation. While knowledge of its damage to living tissue is essential for radiation protection and risk estimates for astronauts, very little data exists at the molecular level regarding the nascent DNA damage by the primary particle track, or by secondary species during subsequent reaction cascades. This persistent lack of a basic understanding of nascent damage induced by such low dose, high LET radiation, introduces unacceptable errors in radiation risk estimates (based mainly on extrapolation from high dose, low LET radiation), particularly for long term exposure. Mutagenic effects induced by heavy ion radiation to cells are largely due to DNA damage by secondary transient species, i.e. secondary ballistic ions, electrons and radicals generated along the ion tracks; the secondary ions have hyperthermal energies up to several 100 eV, which they will deposit within a few nm in the surrounding medium; thus their LET is very high, and yields lethal clustered DNA lesions. We present measurements of molecular damage induced in films of DNA components by ions with precisely such low energies (1-100 eV) and compare results to conventional electron impact measurements. Experiments are conducted in UHV using a mass selected low energy ion source, and a high-resolution quadrupole MS to monitor ion yields desorbing from molecular films. Among the major fragments, NH4 + is identified in the desorption mass spectra of irradiated films of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, indicating efficient deamination; in cells this results in pre-mutagenic lesions. Experiments with 5-amino-Uracil, and comparison to previous results on uracil and thymine show that deamination is a key step in the NH4 + fragment formation. For Adenine, we also observe formation of amine aducts in the films, viz. amination of Adenine, and global fragmentation in all ion impact mass spectra, attributed

  7. DNA fragmentation induced by Fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used gamma rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by gamma rays in the size range 1-23 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Angular distributions and mechanisms for light fragment formation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, J.B.; Haustein, P.E.; Stoenner, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Angular distributions are reported for /sup 37/Ar and /sup 127/Xe produced by the interaction of 8-GeV /sup 20/Ne and 25-GeV /sup 12/C ions with Au. A shift from a forward to a sideward peaked distribution is observed for /sup 37/Ar, similar to that known to occur for incident protons over the same energy interval. Analysis of these data and those for Z = 8 fragments indicate that reactions leading to heavy fragment emission become more peripheral as bombarding energies increase. A mechanistic analysis is presented which explores the ranges of applicability of several models and the reliability of their predictionsmore » to fragmentation reactions induced by both energetic heavy ions and protons.« less

  9. Comprehensive Study On The Metastable Negative Ion Fragmentation Of Individual Dna Components And Larger Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingolfsson, O.; Flosadottir, H. D.; Omarsson, B.; Ilko, B.

    2010-07-01

    Here we present a systematic study on the unimolecular decay pathways of the deprotonated building blocks of DNA and RNA to address the following questions: 1. Are the negative ion fragmentation patterns observed in the metastable decay of individual DNA components still evident when these are combined to larger oligonucleotides? 2. What is the significance of the charge location in determining the fragmentation pathways in the metastable decay process? 3. Are those metastable decay channels relevant in dissociative electron attachment to DNA components? To address these questions we have studied the fragmentation patterns of the deprotonated ribose and ribose 5'-monophosphate, the fragmentation patterns of the individual bases, all nucleosides and all 2'-deoxynucleosides as well as the individual nucleotides and several combinations of hexameric oligonucleotides. Furthermore, to understand the significance of the charge location in determining the fragmentation path in the metastable decay process of these deprotonated ions we have also studied modified uridine and guanosine. These have been modified to block different deprotonation sites and thus to control the initial step in the in the fragmentation process i.e. the site of deprotonation. In addition to our experimental approach we have also simulated the metastable fragmentation of the deprotonated uridine and 2'-deoxyguanosine to clarify the mechanisms and fragmentation patterns observed. Where data is available, the results are compared to dissociative electron attachment to DNA components and discussed in context to the underlying mechanism. Experiments on modified nucleosides where selected deprotonation sites have been blocked are used to verify the predicted reaction paths and imulations on uridine and 2'-deoxyguanosine are compared to the experimental results and used to shed light on the mechanisms involved.

  10. Incorporation of the statistical multi-fragmentation model in PHITS and its application for simulation of fragmentation by heavy ions and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Niita, Koji

    2014-06-01

    The fragmentation reactions of relativistic-energy nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions were simulated using the Statistical Multi-fragmentation Model (SMM) incorporated with the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The comparisons of calculated cross-sections with literature data showed that PHITS-SMM predicts the fragmentation cross-sections of heavy nuclei up to two orders of magnitude more accurately than PHITS for heavy-ion-induced reactions. For proton-induced reactions, noticeable improvements are observed for interactions of the heavy target with protons at an energy greater than 1 GeV. Therefore, consideration for multi-fragmentation reactions is necessary for the accurate simulation of energetic fragmentation reactions of heavy nuclei.

  11. The anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 1: Carbon abundance, bulk chemistry, and mineralogy of fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Keller, L. P.; Klock, W.; Warren, J.; Blanford, G. E.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether or not cluster particles are sufficiently homogeneous to enable observations from one fragment of the cluster to be extrapolated to the entire cluster. We report on the results of a consortium study of the fragments of a large cluster particle. Multiple fragments from one large cluster were distributed to several research groups and were subjected to a variety of mineralogical and chemical analyses including: SEM, TEM, ion probe, SXRF, noble gas measurements, and microprobe laser mass spectrometry of individual fragments.

  12. The dehydroalanine effect in the fragmentation of ions derived from polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Alice L.; Peng, Zhou; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of peptides and proteins upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) is highly dependent on sequence and ion type (e.g. protonated, deprotonated, sodiated, odd electron, etc.). Some amino acids, for example aspartic acid and proline, have been found to enhance certain cleavages along the backbone. Here, we show that peptides and proteins containing dehydroalanine, a non-proteinogenic amino acid with an unsaturated side-chain, undergo enhanced cleavage of the N—Cα bond of the dehydroalanine residue to generate c- and z-ions. Because these fragment ion types are not commonly observed upon activation of positively charged even-electron species, they can be used to identify dehydroalanine residues and localize them within the peptide or protein chain. While dehydroalanine can be generated in solution, it can also be generated in the gas phase upon CID of various species. Oxidized S-alkyl cysteine residues generate dehydroalanine upon activation via highly efficient loss of the alkyl sulfenic acid. Asymmetric cleavage of disulfide bonds upon collisional activation of systems with limited proton mobility also generates dehydroalanine. Furthermore, we show that gas-phase ion/ion reactions can be used to facilitate the generation of dehydroalanine residues via, for example, oxidation of S-alkyl cysteine residues and conversion of multiply-protonated peptides to radical cations. In the latter case, loss of radical side-chains to generate dehydroalanine from some amino acids gives rise to the possibility for residue-specific backbone cleavage of polypeptide ions. PMID:27484024

  13. Structural Studies of Fucosylated N-Glycans by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Collision-Induced Fragmentation of Negative Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Struwe, Weston B.

    2018-05-01

    There is considerable potential for the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry in structural glycobiology due in large part to the gas-phase separation attributes not typically observed by orthogonal methods. Here, we evaluate the capability of traveling wave ion mobility combined with negative ion collision-induced dissociation to provide structural information on N-linked glycans containing multiple fucose residues forming the Lewisx and Lewisy epitopes. These epitopes are involved in processes such as cell-cell recognition and are important as cancer biomarkers. Specific information that could be obtained from the intact N-glycans by negative ion CID included the general topology of the glycan such as the presence or absence of a bisecting GlcNAc residue and the branching pattern of the triantennary glycans. Information on the location of the fucose residues was also readily obtainable from ions specific to each antenna. Some isobaric fragment ions produced prior to ion mobility could subsequently be separated and, in some cases, provided additional valuable structural information that was missing from the CID spectra alone.

  14. On the differences in element abundances of energetic ions from corotating events and from large solar events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Barbier, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    The abundances of energetic ions accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams by shock waves formed at corotating interaction regions (CIRs) where high-speed streams overtake the lower-speed solar wind are examined. The observed element abundances appear to represent those of the high-speed solar wind, unmodified by the shock acceleration. These abundances, relative to those in the solar photosphere, are organized by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ions in a way that is different from the FIP effect commonly used to describe differences between abundances in the solar photosphere and those in the solar corona, solar energetic particles (SEPs), and the low-speed solar wind. In contrast, the FIP effect of the ion abundances in the CIR events is characterized by a smaller amplitude of the differences between high-FIP and low-FIP ions and by elevated abundances of He, C, and S.

  15. Fragmentation studies of fulvic acids using collision induced dissociation fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Witt, Matthias; Fuchser, Jens; Koch, Boris P

    2009-04-01

    The complex natural organic matter standard Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA) was analyzed by negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR MS) using on-resonance collision induced dissociation (CID) of single ultrahigh resolved mass peaks in the ICR cell. Molecular formula assignment of precursor masses resulted in exactly one molecular formula for each of the peaks. Analyses of the corresponding fragment spectra and comparison to different standard substances revealed specific neutral losses and fragmentation patterns which result in structures consisting of a high degree of carboxyl- and fewer hydroxyl groups. The comparison of fragmented mass peaks within different pseudohomologous series (CH(2)-series, and CH(4) vs O exchange) suggested structurally based differences between these series. CID FTICR MS allowed isolating single mass peaks in a very complex natural organic matter spectrum. Subsequently, fragmentation gave structural insights into this material. Our results suggest that the structural diversity in complex humic substances is not as high as expected.

  16. Relative abundance of heavy ions in the inner zone of the radiation belts of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk, M.I.

    1986-03-01

    The energy dependences of the relative abundances of energetic (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) H, He, and O ions in the radiation belts are analyzed on the basis of experimental results obtained from measurement of their spectral characteristics on several satellites: Molniya-2, Kosmos-900, Prognoz-5, Explorer-45, ISEE-1, and OV1-19. It is shown that the formation of the energy dependence of He/H and O/H can be explained with a model providing for ion diffusion into the interior of the radiation belts with Coulomb losses taken into account under thecondition that the total-energy spectra at the boundary are more rigid for the heavy ionsmore » and are determined by such parameters of the quiet solar wind as the relative concentrations of the individual ion components and their charge states. It is shown that the fluxes of O and Fe ions with E > 1 MeV/nucleon measured on the orbital stations Salyut-6 and Skylab have an energy dependence of the relative abundances not inconsistent with above-noted mechanism for the formation of energetic ions of the inner radiation belt.« less

  17. On moments of the multiplicity events of slow target fragments in relativistic Sulfur-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, A.; Kamel, S.; Rashed, N.; Sabry, N.

    2014-07-01

    A detailed study on the multiplicity characteristics of the slow target fragments emitted in relativistic heavy-ion collisions has been carried out at ELab = 3.7A and 200A GeV using 32S projectile. The beam energy dependence of the black particles produced in the full phase space of 32S-emulsion (32S-Em) interactions on the target size in terms of their moments (mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis) is investigated. The various order moments of target fragments emitted in the interactions of 32S beams with the heavy (AgBr) target nuclei are estimated in the forward (FHS) and backward (BHS) hemispheres. The investigated values of ratio of variance to mean at both energies show that the multiplicity distributions (MDs) are not Poissonian and the strongly correlated emission of target fragments are in the forward directions. The degree of anisotropic fragment emission and nature of correlation among the emitted fragments are investigated. The energy dependence of entropy is examined in both hemispheres. The entropy values normalized to average multiplicity are found to be energy independent. Scaling of MD of black particles produced in these interactions has been studied to verify the validity of scaling hypothesis via two scaling (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO)-scaling and Hegyi-scaling) functions. A simplified universal function has been used in each scaling to display the experimental data.

  18. Atomic Data for Nebular Abundance Determinations: Photoionization and Recombination Properties of Xenon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Nicholas C.; Kerlin, Austin B.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of the photoionization (PI) and recombination properties of low-charge Xe ions. The abundances of neutron(n)-capture elements (atomic number Z > 30) are of interest in planetary nebulae (PNe) since they can be enriched by slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (the ``s-process'') in the progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Xe is particularly valuable, because it is the most widely-observed ``heavy-s'' species (Z > 40) in PNe. Its abundance relative to lighter n-capture elements can be used to determine s-process neutron exposures, and constrain s-process enrichment patterns as a function of progenitor metallicity. Using the atomic structure code AUTOSTRUCTURE (Badnell 2011, Comp. Phys. Comm., 182, 1528), we have computed multi-configuration Breit-Pauli distorted-wave PI cross sections and radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for neutral through six-times ionized Xe, data which are critically needed for accurate Xe abundance determinations in ionized nebulae. We find good agreement between our computed direct PI cross sections and experimental measurements. Internal uncertainties are estimated for our calculations by using three different configuration interaction expansions for each ion, and by testing the sensitivity of our results to the radial orbital scaling parameters. As found for other n-capture elements (Sterling & Witthoeft 2011, A&A, 529, A147; Sterling 2011, A&A, 533, A62), DR is the dominant recombination mechanism for Xe ions at nebular temperatures (~104 K). Following Sterling et al. (2015, ApJS, 218, 25), these data will be added to nebular modeling codes to compute ionization correction factors for unobserved Xe ions in PNe, which will enable elemental Xe abundances to be determined with much higher accuracy than is currently possible. This work is supported by NSF award AST-1412928.

  19. Abundance and fragmentation patterns of the ecosystem engineer Lithophyllum byssoides (Lamarck) Foslie along the Iberian Peninsula Atlantic coast. Conservation and management implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Puri; Rubal, Marcos; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-10-01

    The crustose calcareous red macroalgae Lithophyllum byssoides (Lamarck) Foslie is a common ecosystem engineer along the Atlantic and Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula. This species is threatened by several anthropogenic impacts acting at different spatial scales, such as pollution or global warming. The aim of this study is to identify scales of spatial variation in the abundance and fragmentation patterns of L. byssoides along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula. For this aim we used a hierarchical sampling design considering four spatial scales (from metres to 100s of kilometres). Results of the present study indicated no significant variability among regions investigated whereas significant variability was found at the scales of shore and site in spatial patterns of abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides. Variance components were higher at the spatial scale of shore for abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides with the only exception of percentage cover and thus, processes acting at the scale of 10s of kilometres seem to be more relevant in shaping the spatial variability both in abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides. These results provided quantitative estimates of abundance and fragmentation of L. byssoides at the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula establishing the observational basis for future assessment, monitoring and experimental investigations to identify the processes and anthropogenic impacts affecting L. byssoides populations. Finally we have also identified percentage cover and patch density as the best variables for long-term monitoring programs aimed to detect future anthropogenic impacts on L. byssoides. Therefore, our results have important implications for conservation and management of this valuable ecosystem engineer along the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

  20. Parasitic production of slow RI-beam from a projectile fragment separator by ion guide Laser Ion Source (PALIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Tetsu

    2009-10-01

    The projectile fragment separator BigRIPS of RIBF at RIKEN provides a wide variety of short-lived radioactive isotope (RI) ions without restrictions on their lifetime or chemical properties. A universal slow RI-beam facility (SLOWRI) to decelerate the beams from BigRIPS using an RF-carpet ion guide has been proposed as a principal facility of RIBF. However, beam time at such a modern accelerator facility is always limited and operational costs are high. We therefore propose an additional scheme as a complementary option to SLOWRI to drastically enhance the usability of such an expensive facility. In BigRIPS, a single primary beam produces thousands of isotopes but only one isotope is used for an experiment while the other >99.99% of isotopes are simply dumped in the slits or elsewhere in the fragment separator. We plan to locate a compact gas cell with 1 bar Ar at the slits. The thermalized ions in the cell will be quickly neutralized and transported to the exit by gas flow and resonantly re-ionized by lasers. Such low energy RI-beams will always be provided without any restriction to the main experiment. It will allow us to run parasitic experiments for precision atomic or decay spectroscopy, mass measurements. Furthermore, the resonance ionization in the cell itself can be used for high-sensitive laser spectroscopy, which will expand our knowledge of the ground state property of unstable nuclei.

  1. Effect of Ambipolar Diffusion on Ion Abundances in Contracting Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolek, Glenn E.; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1998-09-01

    Numerical simulations and analytical solutions have established that ambipolar diffusion can reduce the dust-to-gas ratio in magnetically and thermally supercritical cores during the epoch of core formation. We study the effect that this has on the ion chemistry in contracting protostellar cores and present a simplified analytical method that allows one to calculate the ion power-law exponent k (≡d ln ni/d ln nn, where ni and nn are the ion and neutral densities, respectively) as a function of core density. We find that, as in earlier numerical simulations, no single value of k can adequately describe the ion abundance for nn <~ 109 cm-3, a result that is contrary to the ``canonical'' value of k = 1/2 found in previous static equilibrium chemistry calculations and often used to study the effect of ambipolar diffusion in interstellar clouds. For typical cloud and grain parameters, reduction of the abundance of grains results in k > 1/2 during the core formation epoch (densities <~105 cm-3). As a consequence, observations of the degree of ionization in cores could be used, in principle, to determine whether ambipolar diffusion is responsible for core formation in interstellar molecular clouds. For densities >>105 cm-3, k is generally <<1/2.

  2. Novel fragmentation pathways of anionic adducts of steroids formed by electrospray anion attachment involving regioselective attachment, regiospecific decompositions, charge-induced pathways, and ion-dipole complex intermediates.

    PubMed

    Rannulu, Nalaka S; Cole, Richard B

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of several bifunctional neutral steroids, 5-α-pregnane diol (5-α-pregnane-3α-20βdiol), estradiol (3,17α-dihydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratriene), progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione), lupeol (3β-hydroxy-20(29)-lupene), pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one), and pregnenolone acetate (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one acetate) was accomplished by negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) employing adduct formation with various anions: fluoride, bicarbonate, acetate, and chloride. Fluoride yielded higher abundances of anionic adducts and more substantial abundances of deprotonated molecules compared with other investigated anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of precursor [M + anion](-) adducts of these steroids revealed that fluoride adduct [M + F](-) precursors first lose HF to produce [M - H](-) and then undergo consecutive decompositions to yield higher abundances of structurally-informative product ions than the other tested anions. In addition to charge-remote fragmentations, the majority of CID pathways of estradiol are deduced to occur via charge-induced fragmentation. Most interestingly, certain anions exhibit preferential attachment to a specific site on these bifunctional steroid molecules, which we are calling "regioselective anion attachment." Regioselective anion attachment is evidenced by subsequent regiospecific decomposition. Regioselective attachment of fluoride (and acetate) anions to low (and moderate) acidity functional groups of pregnenolone, respectively, is demonstrated using deuterated compounds. Moreover, the formation of unique intermediate ion-dipole complexes leading to novel fragmentation pathways of fluoride adducts of pregnenolone acetate, and bicarbonate adducts of d(4)-pregnenolone, are also discussed.

  3. Novel Fragmentation Pathways of Anionic Adducts of Steroids Formed by Electrospray Anion Attachment Involving Regioselective Attachment, Regiospecific Decompositions, Charge-Induced Pathways, and Ion-Dipole Complex Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannulu, Nalaka S.; Cole, Richard B.

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of several bifunctional neutral steroids, 5-α-pregnane diol (5-α-pregnane-3α-20βdiol), estradiol (3,17α-dihydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratriene), progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione), lupeol (3β-hydroxy-20(29)-lupene), pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one), and pregnenolone acetate (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one acetate) was accomplished by negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) employing adduct formation with various anions: fluoride, bicarbonate, acetate, and chloride. Fluoride yielded higher abundances of anionic adducts and more substantial abundances of deprotonated molecules compared with other investigated anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of precursor [M + anion]- adducts of these steroids revealed that fluoride adduct [M + F]- precursors first lose HF to produce [M - H]- and then undergo consecutive decompositions to yield higher abundances of structurally-informative product ions than the other tested anions. In addition to charge-remote fragmentations, the majority of CID pathways of estradiol are deduced to occur via charge-induced fragmentation. Most interestingly, certain anions exhibit preferential attachment to a specific site on these bifunctional steroid molecules, which we are calling "regioselective anion attachment." Regioselective anion attachment is evidenced by subsequent regiospecific decomposition. Regioselective attachment of fluoride (and acetate) anions to low (and moderate) acidity functional groups of pregnenolone, respectively, is demonstrated using deuterated compounds. Moreover, the formation of unique intermediate ion-dipole complexes leading to novel fragmentation pathways of fluoride adducts of pregnenolone acetate, and bicarbonate adducts of d4-pregnenolone, are also discussed.

  4. Nuclear fragmentation of GCR-like ions: comparisons between data and PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, Cary; Guetersloh, Stephen; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Sihver, Lembit; Mancusi, Davide; Fukumura, Aki; Iwata, Yoshi; Murakami, Takeshi

    We present a summary of results from recent work in which we have compared nuclear fragmentation cross section data to predictions of the PHITS Monte Carlo simulation. The studies used beams of 12 C, 35 Cl, 40 Ar, 48 Ti, and 56 Fe at energies ranging from 290 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Some of the data were obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, others at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These energies and ion species are representative of the heavy ion component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), which contribute significantly to the dose and dose equivalent that will be received by astronauts on deep-space missions. A critical need for NASA is the ability to accurately model the transport of GCR heavy ions through matter, including spacecraft walls, equipment racks, and other shielding materials, as well as through tissue. Nuclear interaction cross sections are of primary importance in the GCR transport problem. These interactions generally cause the incoming ion to break up (fragment) into one or more lighter ions, which continue approximately along the initial trajectory and with approximately the same velocity the incoming ion had prior to the interaction. Since the radiation dose delivered by a particle is proportional to the square of the quantity (charge/velocity), i.e., to (Z/β)2 , fragmentation reduces the dose (and, typically, dose equivalent) delivered by incident ions. The other mechanism by which dose can be reduced is ionization energy loss, which can lead to some particles stopping in the shielding. This is the conventional notion of shielding, but it is not applicable to human spaceflight, since the particles in the GCR tend to be highly energetic and because shielding must be relatively thin in order to keep overall mass as low as possible, keeping launch costs within reason. To support these goals, our group has systematically measured a large number of nuclear cross sections, intended to be used as either

  5. Measurement of fragmentation cross sections of 12C ions on a thin gold target with the FIRST apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; de Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, Ch.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kummali, A. H.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Randazzo, N.; Rescigno, R.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Salvador, S.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.; Patera, V.; FIRST Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of the light ions interaction processes with matter is of great interest in basic and applied physics. As an example, particle therapy and space radioprotection require highly accurate fragmentation cross-section measurements to develop shielding materials and estimate acute and late health risks for manned missions in space and for treatment planning in particle therapy. The Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy experiment at the Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion research (GSI) was designed and built by an international collaboration from France, Germany, Italy, and Spain for studying the collisions of a 12C ion beam with thin targets. The collaboration's main purpose is to provide the double-differential cross-section measurement of carbon-ion fragmentation at energies that are relevant for both tumor therapy and space radiation protection applications. Fragmentation cross sections of light ions impinging on a wide range of thin targets are also essential to validate the nuclear models implemented in MC simulations that, in such an energy range, fail to reproduce the data with the required accuracy. This paper presents the single differential carbon-ion fragmentation cross sections on a thin gold target, measured as a function of the fragment angle and kinetic energy in the forward angular region (θ ≲6° ), aiming to provide useful data for the benchmarking of the simulation softwares used in light ions fragmentation applications. The 12C ions used in the measurement were accelerated at the energy of 400 MeV/nucleon by the SIS (heavy ion synchrotron) GSI facility.

  6. A modular solid state detector for measuring high energy heavy ion fragmentation near the beam axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C. J.; Frankel, K. A.; Gong, W.; Heilbronn, L.; Lampo, E. J.; Leres, R.; Miller, J.; Schimmerling, W.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-element solid state detector has been designed to measure fluences of fragments produced near the beam axis by high energy heavy ion beams in thick targets. The detector is compact and modular, so as to be readily reconfigured according to the range of fragment charges and energies to be measured. Preamplifier gain settings and detector calibrations are adjustable remotely under computer control. We describe the central detector, its associated detectors and electronics, triggering scheme, data acquisition and particle identification techniques, illustrated by data taken with 600 MeV/u 56Fe beams and thick polyethylene targets at the LBL Bevalac. The applications of this work to space radiation protection are discussed.

  7. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  8. Fragmentation of negative ions from N-linked carbohydrates, part 4. Fragmentation of complex glycans lacking substitution on the 6-antenna.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Jaeken, Jaak; Butler, Mike; Armitage, Alison J; Rudd, Pauline M; Dwek, Raymond A

    2010-05-01

    Negative ion CID spectra of N-linked glycans released from glycoproteins contain many ions that are diagnostic for specific structural features such as the detailed arrangement of antennae and the location of fucose residues. Identification of such ions requires reference glycans that are often difficult to acquire in a pure state. The recent acquisition of a sample of N-glycans from a patient lacking the enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-2 provided an opportunity to investigate fragmentation of glycans lacking a 6-antenna. These glycans contained one or two galactose-N-acetylglucosamine-chains attached to the 3-linked mannose residue of the trimannosyl-chitobiose core with and without fucose substitution. The spectra from the patient sample clearly defined the antenna distribution and showed striking differences from the spectra of isomeric compounds obtained from normal subjects. Furthermore, they provided additional information on previously identified antenna-specific fragment ions and indicated the presence of additional ions that were diagnostic of fucose substitution. Glycans obtained from such enzyme-deficient patients can, thus, be a valuable way of obtaining spectra of specific isomers in a relatively pure state for interpretation of mass spectra. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Fragmentation of copper current collectors in Li-ion batteries during spherical indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Watkins, Thomas R.; Simunovic, Srdjan

    Large, areal, brittle fracture of copper current collector foils was observed by 3D x-ray computed tomography (XCT) of a spherically indented Li-ion cell. This fracture was hidden and non-catastrophic to a degree because the graphite layers deformed plastically, and held the materials together so that the cracks in the foils could not be seen under optical and electron microscopy. 3D XCT on the indented cell showed “mud cracks” within the copper layer. The cracking of copper foils could not be immediately confirmed when the cell was opened for post-mortem examination. However, an X-ray radiograph on a single foil of themore » Cu anode showed clearly that the copper foil had broken into multiple pieces similar to the brittle cracking of a ceramic under indentation. This new failure mode of anodes on Li-ion cell has very important implications on the behavior of Li-ion cells under mechanical abuse conditions. Furthermore, the fragmentation of current collectors in the anode must be taken into consideration for the electrochemical responses which may lead to capacity loss and affect thermal runaway behavior of the cells.« less

  10. Fragmentation of copper current collectors in Li-ion batteries during spherical indentation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hsin; Watkins, Thomas R.; Simunovic, Srdjan; ...

    2017-08-29

    Large, areal, brittle fracture of copper current collector foils was observed by 3D x-ray computed tomography (XCT) of a spherically indented Li-ion cell. This fracture was hidden and non-catastrophic to a degree because the graphite layers deformed plastically, and held the materials together so that the cracks in the foils could not be seen under optical and electron microscopy. 3D XCT on the indented cell showed “mud cracks” within the copper layer. The cracking of copper foils could not be immediately confirmed when the cell was opened for post-mortem examination. However, an X-ray radiograph on a single foil of themore » Cu anode showed clearly that the copper foil had broken into multiple pieces similar to the brittle cracking of a ceramic under indentation. This new failure mode of anodes on Li-ion cell has very important implications on the behavior of Li-ion cells under mechanical abuse conditions. Furthermore, the fragmentation of current collectors in the anode must be taken into consideration for the electrochemical responses which may lead to capacity loss and affect thermal runaway behavior of the cells.« less

  11. Fragmentation of copper current collectors in Li-ion batteries during spherical indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Watkins, Thomas R.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Bingham, Philip R.; Allu, Srikanth; Turner, John A.

    2017-10-01

    Large, areal, brittle fracture of copper current collector foils has been observed by 3D x-ray computed tomography (XCT) of a spherically indented Li-ion cell. This fracture is hidden and non-catastrophic to a degree because the graphite layers deform plastically, and hold the materials together so that the cracks in the foils cannot be seen under optical and electron microscopy. The cracking of copper foils could not be immediately confirmed when the cell is opened for post-mortem examination. However, 3D XCT on the indented cell reveals ;mud cracks; within the copper layer and an X-ray radiograph on a single foil of the Cu anode shows clearly that the copper foil has broken into multiple pieces. This failure mode of anodes in Li-ion cell has very important implications on the behavior of Li-ion cells under mechanical abuse conditions. The fragmentation of current collectors in the anode must be taken into consideration for the electrochemical responses which may lead to capacity loss and affect thermal runaway behavior of the cells.

  12. An (e, 2e+ ion) study of electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of tetrafluoromethane at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Khokon; Ren, Xueguang; Wang, Enliang; Kumar, S. V. K.; Dorn, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    We study ionization and fragmentation of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) molecule induced by electron impact at low energies ( E 0 = 38 and 67 eV). We use a reaction microscope combined with a pulsed photoemission electron beam for our experimental investigation. The momentum vectors of the two outgoing electrons (energies E 1, E 2) and one fragment ion are detected in triple coincidence (e, 2e+ ion). After dissociation, the fragment products observed are CF3 +, CF2 +, CF+, F+ and C+. For CF3 + and CF2 + channels, we measure the ionized orbitals binding energies, the kinetic energy (KE) of the charged fragments and the two-dimensional (2D) correlation map between binding energy (BE) and KE of the fragments. From the BE and KE spectra, we conclude which molecular orbitals contribute to particular fragmentation channels of CF4. We also measure the total ionization cross section for the formation of CF3 + and CF2 + ions as function of projectile energy. We compare our results with earlier experiments and calculations for electron-impact and photoionization. The major contribution to CF3 + formation originates from ionization of the 4t2 orbital while CF2 + is mainly formed after 3t2 orbital ionization. We also observe a weak contribution of the (4a1)-1 state for the channel CF3 +.

  13. reSpect: Software for Identification of High and Low Abundance Ion Species in Chimeric Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contributes to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), that enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the following iterations. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website. PMID:26419769

  14. reSpect: software for identification of high and low abundance ion species in chimeric tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contribute to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), which enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post-search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the iterations that follow. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. reSpect: Software for Identification of High and Low Abundance Ion Species in Chimeric Tandem Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-11-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contribute to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), which enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post-search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the iterations that follow. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website.

  16. Absolute Infrared Intensities and Interstellar Ice Abundances- From Neutrals to Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry

    Infrared (IR) telescopes, such as Spitzer and SOFIA, have revealed a rich variety of chemical species trapped in interstellar ices. However, quantifying the abundances of these species has been difficult because some molecules, such as formaldehyde (H2CO), and some ions, such as ammonium (NH4+), have poorly-known IR optical parameters, such as band strengths and optical constants. In the case of NH4+, the most widely used band-intensity values are from a mere two measurements published over a decade ago. Those two experiments cannot be repeated or checked as the original publication provided no information on reaction temperature, heating rate, spectral resolution, and so forth, and the two authors are no longer active in the field. Moreover, neither kinetic data nor statistics on the two measurements were provided, clearly an unsatisfactory situation. Exacerbating the problem is that NH4+ is sometimes used as a check on the IR spectral intensities of other ions, such as OCN- (cyanate), which has its own checkered past. We propose to correct these problems associated with abundance determinations of selected interstellar ices. We will combine two recent successful efforts from our laboratory and measure band intensities for NH4+ and OCN-, as well as HCOO- (formate). To unravel the interstellar formate band requires that we also properly determine its spectral baseline to distinguish from co-absorbing species, primarily formaldehyde (H2CO). Since the latter also has, at best, poorly-determined IR absolute intensities, we will measure them at multiple temperatures and ice phases for this project. This work will build on our recent success in deriving optical constants from IR spectra for interstellar hydrocarbon and nitrile ices (Hudson et al., 2014a, 2014b), and in generating NH4+ in situ for a study of Jupiter's atmosphere (Loeffler and Hudson, 2015). As a bonus, the proposed measurements also will enable the determination of band-strengths for such ions as CN-, NO

  17. Fragmentation of Electrospray-produced Deprotonated Ions of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Containing an Alkylated or Oxidized Thymidine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Williams, Renee T.; Guerrero, Candace R.; Ji, Debin; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Alkylation and oxidation constitute major routes of DNA damage induced by endogenous and exogenous genotoxic agents. Understanding the biological consequences of DNA lesions often necessitates the availability of oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) substrates harboring these lesions, and sensitive and robust methods for validating the identities of these ODNs. Tandem mass spectrometry is well suited for meeting these latter analytical needs. In the present study, we evaluated how the incorporation of an ethyl group to different positions (i.e., O2, N3 and O4) of thymine and the oxidation of its 5-methyl carbon impact collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) pathways of electrospray-produced deprotonated ions of ODNs harboring these thymine modifications. Unlike an unmodified thymine, which often manifests poor cleavage of the C3′-O3′ bond, the incorporation of an alkyl group to the O2 position and, to a much lesser extent, the O4 position, but not the N3 position of thymine, led to facile cleavage of the C3′-O3′ bond on the 3′ side of the modified thymine. Similar efficient chain cleavage was observed when thymine was oxidized to 5-formyluracil or 5-carboxyluracil, but not 5-hydroxymethyluracil. Additionally, with the support of computational modeling, we revealed that proton affinity and acidity of the modified nucleobases govern the fragmentation of ODNs containing the alkylated and oxidized thymidine derivatives, respectively. These results provided important insights into the effects of thymine modifications on ODN fragmentation. PMID:24664806

  18. Selective enhancement of carbohydrate ion abundances by diamond nanoparticles for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Lin; Wang, Chia-Chen; Lai, Yin-Hung; Lee, Hsun; Lin, Jia-Der; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2013-04-16

    Diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) were incorporated into matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) samples to enhance the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer to carbohydrates. The DNPs optimize the MALDI sample morphology and thermalize the samples for thermally labile compounds because they have a high thermal conductivity, a low extinction coefficient in UV-vis spectral range, and stable chemical properties. The best enhancement effect was achieved when matrix, DNP, and carbohydrate solutions were deposited and vacuum-dried consecutively to form a trilayer sample morphology. It allows the direct identification of underivatized carbohydrates mixed with equal amount of proteins because no increase in the ion abundance of proteins was achieved. For dextran with an average molecular weight of 1500, the trilayer method typically improves the sensitivity by 79- and 7-fold in comparison to the conventional dried-droplet and thin-layer methods, respectively.

  19. Ion abundances and implications for photochemistry in Comets Halley (1986 III) and Bradfield (1987 XXIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, B. L.; Womack, M.; Wagner, R. M.

    1993-04-01

    The Ohio State University Image Dissector Scanner on the Perkins 1.8-m telescope at the Lowell Observatory was used to record spectra of the plasma tails of Comets P/Halley (1986 III) and P/Bradfield (1987 XXIX, also 1987s). The ionic species CO(+), N2(+), CH(+), and H2O(+) were identified in these spectra, and column densities for them were calculated from measured fluxes. The observed N2(+)/H2O(+) ratios are at least an order of magnitude lower and the observed CH(+)/H2O(+) ratios are a factor of 100 higher than theoretical results. The abundance ratio N2/CO was derived in the plasma tail of Bradfield from N2(+) and CO(+) data, and found to be an order of magnitude higher than a value measured in Halley. The relative ion abundances of CH(+), N2(+), CO(+), and H2O(+) in Halley are consistent with in situ measurements obtained from the Giotto spacecraft.

  20. Effects of landscape composition and wetland fragmentation on frog and toad abundance and species richness in Iowa and Wisconsin, USA [abstract

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Sauer, J.R.; Olsen, D.A.; Mossman, M.J.; Hemesath, L.M.; Lannoo, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the relationships between anuran diversity and landscape features in the Upper Midwestern United States. Anuran relative abundance and species richness were measured using data collected by Wisconsin and Iowa state calling surveys conducted from 1990-1995. Landscape features surrounding survey points were determined using National Wetland Inventory and Wisconsin Wetland Inventory maps. We tested several hypotheses suggested by the literature. We hypothesized that the relative abundance and species richness of anurans that breed in ephemeral wetlands is positively correlated with the surrounding area of temporary wetlands and emergent wetlands. We hypothesized that the relative abundance and species richness of anurans is positively correlated with patch diversity and wetland edges, in the absence of local fragmentation effects. We hypothesized that the relative abundance and species richness of anurans is positively associated with forests but negatively associated with agriculture and urban areas. Our results show that the interspersion of different wetland types and the concomitant increase in wetland edge habitats were generally positive for frogs and toads and anuran abundance and diversity were generally higher in association with forests, especially forested wetlands. The presence of agriculture did not always depress frog and toad populations or diversity; some species were associated with agricultural landscapes. The two states differed in how anurans were associated with landscape features like lakes and permanent wetlands. We found that frog and toad relative abundance and diversity were lower when urban areas were present. Managers can use models like ours, generated from landscape analyses, along with range maps and population trend analyses to get a comprehensive picture of the health of individual species and groups of species. Our models could be applied to the landscape as a whole, and used to predict species relative abundance and

  1. Ultra High Resolution Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer (Orbitrap Elite) Facilitates Top Down LC MS/MS and Versatile Peptide Fragmentation Modes*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Annette; Damoc, Eugen; Lange, Oliver; Denisov, Eduard; Nolting, Dirk; Müller, Mathias; Viner, Rosa; Schwartz, Jae; Remes, Philip; Belford, Michael; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Cox, Juergen; Horning, Stevan; Mann, Matthias; Makarov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Although only a few years old, the combination of a linear ion trap with an Orbitrap analyzer has become one of the standard mass spectrometers to characterize proteins and proteomes. Here we describe a novel version of this instrument family, the Orbitrap Elite, which is improved in three main areas. The ion transfer optics has an ion path that blocks the line of sight to achieve more robust operation. The tandem MS acquisition speed of the dual cell linear ion trap now exceeds 12 Hz. Most importantly, the resolving power of the Orbitrap analyzer has been increased twofold for the same transient length by employing a compact, high-field Orbitrap analyzer that almost doubles the observed frequencies. An enhanced Fourier Transform algorithm—incorporating phase information—further doubles the resolving power to 240,000 at m/z 400 for a 768 ms transient. For top-down experiments, we combine a survey scan with a selected ion monitoring scan of the charge state of the protein to be fragmented and with several HCD microscans. Despite the 120,000 resolving power for SIM and HCD scans, the total cycle time is within several seconds and therefore suitable for liquid chromatography tandem MS. For bottom-up proteomics, we combined survey scans at 240,000 resolving power with data-dependent collision-induced dissociation of the 20 most abundant precursors in a total cycle time of 2.5 s—increasing protein identifications in complex mixtures by about 30%. The speed of the Orbitrap Elite furthermore allows scan modes in which complementary dissociation mechanisms are routinely obtained of all fragmented peptides. PMID:22159718

  2. Low-energy mass-selected ion beam production of fragments produced from hexamethyldisilane for SiC film formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Satoru, E-mail: yosimura@ppl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Kiuchi, Masato

    2016-03-14

    We have proposed an experimental methodology which makes it possible to deposit silicon carbide (SiC) films on Si substrates with a low-energy mass-selected ion beam system using hexamethyldisilane (HMD) as a gas source. In this study, one of the fragment ions produced from HMD, SiCH{sub 4}{sup +}, was mass-selected. The ion energy was approximately 100 eV. Then, the SiCH{sub 4}{sup +} ions were irradiated to a Si(100) substrate. When the temperature of the Si substrate was set at 800 °C during the ion irradiation, the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of the substrate following the completion of ion irradiation experiment demonstrated themore » occurrence of 3C-SiC deposition.« less

  3. Fragmentation of D- and L-enantiomers of amino acids through interaction with 3He2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Boitsov, V. M.; Vyaz'min, S. Yu.; Orbeli, A. L.; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    The relative cross section of processes attendant on the capture of an electron by 12-keV 3He2+ ions are measured by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for leucine (C6H13NO2), methionine (C5H11NO2S), and glutmic acid (C5H9NO4) molecules. No differences between the formation relative cross sections of different fragment ions for the D- and L-enantiomeric forms of the amino acids are revealed. The spectrum of glutamic acid fragments taken at temperatures above 110°C is explained by decomposition of the acid with the formation of pyroglutamic acid (C5H7NO3) and water. The results are compared with published data on fragmentation of the same molecules via electron-impact ionization.

  4. Seasonal Blowfly Distribution and Abundance in Fragmented Landscapes. Is It Useful in Forensic Inference about Where a Corpse Has Been Decaying?

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Jabi; Díaz, Beatriz; Saloña-Bordas, Marta I.

    2014-01-01

    Blowflies are insects of forensic interest as they may indicate characteristics of the environment where a body has been laying prior to the discovery. In order to estimate changes in community related to landscape and to assess if blowfly species can be used as indicators of the landscape where a corpse has been decaying, we studied the blowfly community and how it is affected by landscape in a 7,000 km2 region during a whole year. Using baited traps deployed monthly we collected 28,507 individuals of 10 calliphorid species, 7 of them well represented and distributed in the study area. Multiple Analysis of Variance found changes in abundance between seasons in the 7 analyzed species, and changes related to land use in 4 of them (Calliphora vomitoria, Lucilia ampullacea, L. caesar and L. illustris). Generalised Linear Model analyses of abundance of these species compared with landscape descriptors at different scales found only a clear significant relationship between summer abundance of C. vomitoria and distance to urban areas and degree of urbanisation. This relationship explained more deviance when considering the landscape composition at larger geographical scales (up to 2,500 m around sampling site). For the other species, no clear relationship between land uses and abundance was found, and therefore observed changes in their abundance patterns could be the result of other variables, probably small changes in temperature. Our results suggest that blowfly community composition cannot be used to infer in what kind of landscape a corpse has decayed, at least in highly fragmented habitats, the only exception being the summer abundance of C. vomitoria. PMID:24918607

  5. Mercury-induced fragmentation of n-decane and n-undecane in positive mode ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunzer, F

    2015-09-21

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for trace gas analysis. Using soft ionization techniques, fragmentation of analytes is normally not observed, with the consequence that analyte spectra of single substances are quite simple, i.e. showing in general only one peak. If the concentration is high enough, an extra cluster peak involving two analyte molecules can often be observed. When investigating n-alkanes, different results regarding the number of peaks in the spectra have been obtained in the past using this spectrometric technique. Here we present results obtained when analyzing n-alkanes (n-hexane to n-undecane) with a pulsed electron source, which show no fragmentation or clustering at all. However, when investigating a mixture of mercury and an n-alkane, a situation quite typical in the oil and gas industry, a strong fragmentation and cluster formation involving these fragments has been observed exclusively for n-decane and n-undecane.

  6. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  7. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and Photovoltaic Fission Fragment Detector Arrays for Light-Ion Induced Fission Correlation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-05-01

    The Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE - E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution of 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.

  8. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; ...

    2017-02-20

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  9. Effects of landscape composition and wetland fragmentation on frog and toad abundance and species richness in Iowa and Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Sauer, J.R.; Olsen, D.A.; Mossman, M.J.; Hemesath, L.M.; Lannoo, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Management of amphibian populations to reverse recent declines will require defining high-quality habitat for individual species or groups of species, followed by efforts to retain or restore these habitats on the landscape. We examined landscape-level habitat relationships for frogs and toads by measuring associations between relative abundance and species richness based on survey data derived from anuran calls and features of land-cover maps for Iowa and Wisconsin. The most consistent result across all anuran guilds was a negative association with the presence of urban land. Upland and wetland forests and emergent wetlands tended to be positively associated with anurans. Landscape metrics that represent edges and patch diversity also had generally positive associations, indicating that anurans benefit from a complex of habitats that include wetlands. In Iowa the most significant associations with relative abundance were the length of the edge between wetland and forest (positive) and the presence of urban land (negative). In Wisconsin the two most significant associations with relative abundance were forest area and agricultural area (both positive). Anurans had positive associations with agriculture in Wisconsin but not in Iowa. Remnant forest patches in agricultural landscapes may be providing refuges for some anuran species. Differences in anuran associations with deep water and permanent wetlands between the two states suggest opportunities for management action. Large-scale maps can contribute to predictive models of amphibian habitat use, but water quality and vegetation information collected from individual wetlands will likely be needed to strengthen those predictions. Landscape habitat analyses provide a framework for future experimental and intensive research on specific factors affecting the health of anurans.

  10. Scalable Synthesis of Defect Abundant Si Nanorods for High-Performance Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Meng, Xiangcai; Fan, Xiulin; Zhang, Wenbo; Zhang, Hongyong; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-06-23

    Microsized nanostructured silicon-carbon composite is a promising anode material for high energy Li-ion batteries. However, large-scale synthesis of high-performance nano-Si materials at a low cost still remains a significant challenge. We report a scalable low cost method to synthesize Al/Na-doped and defect-abundant Si nanorods that have excellent electrochemical performance with high first-cycle Coulombic efficiency (90%). The unique Si nanorods are synthesized by acid etching the refined and rapidly solidified eutectic Al-Si ingot. To maintain the high electronic conductivity, a thin layer of carbon is then coated on the Si nanorods by carbonization of self-polymerized polydopamine (PDA) at 800 °C. The carbon coated Si nanorods (Si@C) electrode at 0.9 mg cm(-2) loading (corresponding to area-specific-capacity of ∼2.0 mAh cm(-2)) exhibits a reversible capacity of ∼2200 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) current, and maintains ∼700 mAh g(-1) over 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1) with a capacity decay rate of 0.02% per cycle. High Coulombic efficiencies of 87% in the first cycle and ∼99.7% after 5 cycles are achieved due to the formation of an artificial Al2O3 solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the Si surface, and the low surface area (31 m(2) g(-1)), which has never been reported before for nano-Si anodes. The excellent electrochemical performance results from the massive defects (twins, stacking faults, dislocations) and Al/Na doping in Si nanorods induced by rapid solidification and Na salt modifications; this greatly enhances the robustness of Si from the volume changes and alleviates the mechanical stress/strain of the Si nanorods during the lithium insertion/extraction process. Introducing massive defects and Al/Na doping in eutectic Si nanorods for Li-ion battery anodes is unexplored territory. We venture this uncharted territory to commercialize this nanostructured Si anode for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  11. Fragmentation of molecular ions in differential mobility spectrometry as a method for identification of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Maziejuk, M; Puton, J; Szyposzyńska, M; Witkiewicz, Z

    2015-11-01

    The subject of the work is the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA). Studies were performed for mustard gas, i.e., bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (HD), sarin, i.e., O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB) and methyl salicylate (MS) used as test compounds. Measurements were conducted with two ceramic DMS analyzers of different constructions allowing the generation of an electric field with an intensity of more than 120 Td. Detector signals were measured for positive and negative modes of operation in a temperature range from 0 to 80 °C. Fragmentations of ions containing analyte molecules were observed for all tested compounds. The effective temperatures of fragmentation estimated on the basis of dispersion plots were equal from about 148 °C for GB to 178 °C for MS. It was found that values of separation voltage (SV) and compensation voltage (CV) at which the fragmentation of sample ions is observed may be the parameters improving the certainty of detection for different analytes. The DMS analyzers enabling the observation of ion fragmentation can be successfully used for effective CWA detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. New Development on Modelling Fluctuations and Fragmentation in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Danielewicz, Pawel

    2017-09-01

    During heavy-ion collisions (HIC), colliding nuclei form an excited composite system. Instabilities present in the system may deform the shape of the system exotically, leading to a break-up into fragments. Many experimental efforts have been devoted to the nuclear multifragmentation phenomenon, while traditional HIC models, lacking in proper treatment of fluctuations, fall short in explaining it. In view of this, we are developing a new model to implement realistic fluctuations into transport simulation. The new model is motivated by the Brownian motion description of colliding particles. The effects of two-body collisions are recast in one-body diffusion processes. Vastly different dynamical paths are sampled by solving Langevin equations in momentum space. It is the stochastic sampling of dynamical paths that leads to a wide spread of exit channels. In addition, the nucleon degree of freedom is used to enhance the fluctuations. The model has been tested in reactions such as 112Sn + 112Sn and 58Ni + 58Ni, where reasonable results are yielded. An exploratory comparison on the 112Sn + 112Sn reaction at 50 MeV/nucleon with two other models, the stochastic mean-field (SMF) and the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) models, has also been conducted. Work supported by the NSF Grant No. PHY-1403906.

  13. Effects of Charge State on Fragmentation Pathways, Dynamics, and Activation Energies of Ubiquitin Ions Measured by Blackbody Infrared Radiative Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Jockusch, Rebecca A.; Schnier, Paul D.; Price, William D.; Strittmatter, Eric. F.; Demirev, Plamen A.; Williams*, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Blackbody infrared radiative dissociation spectra of the (M + 5H)5+ through (M + 11H)11+ ions of the protein ubiquitin (8.6 kDa) formed by electrospray ionization were measured in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. The 5+ ion dissociates exclusively by loss of water and/or ammonia, whereas the 11+ charge state dissociates only by formation of complementary y and b ions. These two processes are competitive for intermediate charge state ions, with the formation of y and b ions increasingly favored for the higher charge states. The y and b ions are formed by cleavage of the backbone amide bond on the C-terminal side of acidic residues exclusively, with cleavage adjacent to aspartic acid favored. Thermal unimolecular dissociation rate constants for the dissociation of each of these charge states were measured. From the temperature dependence of these rates, Arrhenius activation parameters in the rapid energy exchange limit are obtained. The activation energies (Ea) and preexponential factors (A) for the 5+, 8+, and 9+ ions are 1.2 eV and 1012 s−1, respectively. These values for the 6+ and 7+ ions are 0.9–1.0 eV and 109 s−1, and those for the 10+ and 11+ ions are 1.6 eV and 1016–1017 s−1. Thus, with the exception of the 5+ ion, the higher charge states of ubiquitin have larger dissociation activation energies than the lower charge states. The different A factors observed for production of y and b ions from different precursor charge states indicate that they are formed by different mechanisms, ranging from relatively complex rearrangements to direct bond cleavages. These results clearly demonstrate that the relative dissociation rates of large biomolecule ions by themselves are not necessarily a reliable indicator of their relative dissociation energies, even when similar fragment ions are formed. PMID:9075403

  14. Effects of charge state on fragmentation pathways, dynamics, and activation energies of ubiquitin ions measured by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation.

    PubMed

    Jockusch, R A; Schnier, P D; Price, W D; Strittmatter, E F; Demirev, P A; Williams, E R

    1997-03-15

    Blackbody infrared radiative dissociation spectra of the (M + 5H)5+ through (M + 11H)11+ ions of the protein ubiquitin (8.6 kDa) formed by electrospray ionization were measured in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. The 5+ ion dissociates exclusively by loss of water and/or ammonia, whereas the 11+ charge state dissociates only by formation of complementary y and b ions. These two processes are competitive for intermediate charge state ions, with the formation of y and b ions increasingly favored for the higher charge states. The y and b ions are formed by cleavage of the backbone amide bond on the C-terminal side of acidic residues exclusively, with cleavage adjacent to aspartic acid favored. Thermal unimolecular dissociation rate constants for the dissociation of each of these charge states were measured. From the temperature dependence of these rates, Arrhenius activation parameters in the rapid energy exchange limit are obtained. The activation energies (Ea) and preexponential factors (A) for the 5+, 8+, and 9+ ions are 1.2 eV and 10(12) s-1, respectively. These values for the 6+ and 7+ ions are 0.9-1.0 eV and 10(9) s-1, and those for the 10+ and 11+ ions are 1.6 eV and 10(16)-10(17) s-1. Thus, with the exception of the 5+ ion, the higher charge states of ubiquitin have larger dissociation activation energies than the lower charge states. The different A factors observed for production of y and b ions from different precursor charge states indicate that they are formed by different mechanisms, ranging from relatively complex rearrangements to direct bond cleavages. These results clearly demonstrate that the relative dissociation rates of large biomolecule ions by themselves are not necessarily a reliable indicator of their relative dissociation energies, even when similar fragment ions are formed.

  15. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  16. Distribution and abundance of anadromous Sea Lamprey Spawners in a fragmented stream: Current status and potential range expansion following barrier removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Gardner, Cory; Coghlan, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Dams fragment watersheds and prevent anadromous fishes from reaching historic spawning habitat. Sedgeunkedunk Stream, a small tributary to the Penobscot River (Maine), has been the focus of efforts to reestablish marine-freshwater connectivity and restore anadromous fishes via the removal of two barriers to fish migration. Currently, Petromyzon marinus (Sea Lamprey) is the only anadromous fish known to spawn successfully in the stream downstream of the lowermost dam. Here, we describe the distribution and abundance of a spawning population of Sea Lamprey in Sedgeunkedunk Stream, prior to and in anticipation of habitat increase after the completion of one barrier removal. In 2008, we estimated the abundance of Sea Lamprey and its nests using daily stream surveys and an open-population mark-recapture model. We captured 47 Sea Lamprey and implanted each with a PIT tag so that we could track movements and nest associations of individual fish. The spawning migration began on 18 June, and the last living individual was observed on 27 June. We located 31 nests, distributed from head-of-tide to the lowermost dam; no spawners or nests were observed in the tidally influenced zone or upstream of this dam. Mean longevity in the stream and the number of nests attended were correlated with arrival date; early migrants were alive longer and attended more nests than later migrants. Males were more likely to be observed away from a nest, or attending three or more nests, than were females, which attended usually one or two nests. We observed a negative association between nest abundance and substrate cover by fine sediment. Based on their observed movements in the system, and the extent of their habitat use, we anticipate that spawning Sea Lamprey will recolonize formerly inaccessible habitat after dam removals.

  17. The influence of dose, dose-rate and particle fragmentation on cataract induction by energetic iron ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.; Huang, Y.; Brenner, D. J.; Tao, F.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ainsworth, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because activities in space necessarily involve chronic exposure to a heterogeneous charged particle radiation field it is important to assess the influence of dose-rate and the possible modulating role of heavy particle fragmentation on biological systems. Using the well-studied cataract model, mice were exposed to plateau 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions either as acute or fractionated exposures at total doses of 5-504 cGy. Additional groups of mice received 20, 360 and 504 cGy behind 50 mm of polyethylene, which simulates body shielding. The reference radiation consisted of Co-60 gamma radiation. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over their three year life spans. In accordance with our previous observations with heavy particles, the cataractogenic potential of the 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions was greater than for low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation and increased with decreasing dose relative to gamma rays. Fractionation of a given dose of Fe-56 ions did not reduce the cataractogenicity of the radiation compared to the acute regimen. Fragmentation of the beam in the polyethylene did not alter the cataractotoxicity of the ions, either when administered singly or in fractions.

  18. The influence of dose, dose-rate and particle fragmentation on cataract induction by energetic iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.; Huang, Y.; Brenner, D. J.; Tao, F.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ainsworth, E. J.

    1994-10-01

    Because activities in space necessarily involve chronic exposure to a heterogeneous charged particle radiation field it is important to assess the influence of dose-rate and the possible modulating role of heavy particle fragmentation on biological systems. Using the well-studied cataract model, mice were exposed to plateau 600 MeV/amu 56Fe ions either as acute or fractionated exposures at total doses of 5 - 504 cGy. Additional groups of mice received 20, 360 and 504 cGy behind 50 mm of polyethylene, which simulates body shielding. The reference radiation consisted of 60Co γ radiation. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over their three year life spans. In accordance with our previous observations with heavy particles, the cataractogenic potential of the 600 MeV/amu 56Fe ions was greater than for low-LET radiation and increased with decreasing dose relative to γ-rays. Fractionation of a given dose of 56Fe ions did not reduce the cataractogenicity of the radiation compared to the acute regimen. Fragmentation of the beam in the polyethylene did not alter the cataractotoxicity of the ions, either when administered singly or in fractions.

  19. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: nuclear fragmentation produced by 4He ion beams in a PMMA target.

    PubMed

    Marafini, M; Paramatti, R; Pinci, D; Battistoni, G; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Faccini, R; Frallicciardi, P M; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Piersanti, L; Rovituso, M; Rucinski, A; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Voena, C; Patera, V

    2017-02-21

    Nowadays there is a growing interest in particle therapy treatments exploiting light ion beams against tumors due to their enhanced relative biological effectiveness and high space selectivity. In particular promising results are obtained by the use of 4 He projectiles. Unlike the treatments performed using protons, the beam ions can undergo a fragmentation process when interacting with the atomic nuclei in the patient body. In this paper the results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy center are reported. For the first time the absolute fluxes and the energy spectra of the fragments-protons, deuterons, and tritons-produced by 4 He ion beams of 102, 125 and 145 MeV u -1 energies on a poly-methyl methacrylate target were evaluated at different angles. The obtained results are particularly relevant in view of the necessary optimization and review of the treatment planning software being developed for clinical use of 4 He beams in clinical routine and the relative bench-marking of Monte Carlo algorithm predictions.

  20. Fragment profiling of low molecular weight heparins using reversed phase ion pair liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Li, Daoyuan; Chi, Lequan; Du, Xuzhao; Bai, Xue; Chi, Lianli

    2015-04-30

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are linear and highly charged carbohydrate polymers prepared by chemical or enzymatic depolymerization of heparin. Compared to unfractionated heparin (UFH), LMWHs are prevalently used as clinical anticoagulant drugs due to their lower side effects and better bioavailability. The work presented herein provides a rapid and powerful fragment mapping method for structural characterization of LMWHs. The chain fragments of two types of LMWHs, enoxaparin and nadroparin, were generated by controlled enzymatic digestion with each of heparinase I (Hep I, Enzyme Commission (EC) # 4.2.2.7), heparinase II (Hep II, no EC # assigned) and heparinase III (Hep III, EC # 4.2.2.8). Reversed phase ion pair high performance liquid chromatography (RPIP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) was used to profile the oligosaccharide chains ranging from disaccharides to decasaccharides. A database containing all theoretical structural compositions was established to assist the mass spectra interpretation. The six digests derived by three enzymes from two types of LMWHs exhibited distinguishable fingerprinting patterns. And a total of 94 enoxaparin fragments and 109 nadroparin fragments were detected and identified. Besides the common LMWH oligosaccharides, many components containing characteristic LMWH structures such as saturated L-idopyranosuronic acid, 2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol, 1,6-anhydro-D-aminopyranose, as well as odd number oligosaccharides were also revealed. Quantitative comparison of major components derived from innovator and generic nadroparin products was presented. This approach to profile LMWHs' fragments offers a highly reproducible, high resolution and information-rich tool for evaluating the quality of this category of anticoagulant drugs or comparing structural similarities among samples from various sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Can collision-induced negative-ion fragmentations of [M-H](-) anions be used to identify phosphorylation sites in peptides?

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Peter; Bowie, John H

    2011-12-15

    A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of the fragmentation behaviour of energised [M-H](-) anions from selected phosphorylated peptides has confirmed some of the most complex rearrangement processes yet to be reported for peptide negative ions. In particular: pSer and pThr (like pTyr) may transfer phosphate groups to C-terminal carboxyl anions and to the carboxyl anion side chains of Asp and Glu, and characteristic nucleophilic/cleavage reactions accompany or follow these rearrangements. pTyr may transfer phosphate to the side chains of Ser and Thr. The reverse reaction, namely transfer of a phosphate group from pSer or pThr to Tyr, is energetically unfavourable in comparison. pSer can transfer phosphate to a non-phosphorylated Ser. The non-rearranged [M-H](-) species yields more abundant product anions than its rearranged counterpart. If a peptide containing any or all of Ser, Thr and Tyr is not completely phosphorylated, negative-ion cleavages can determine the number of phosphated residues, and normally the positions of Ser, Thr and Tyr, but not which specific residues are phosphorylated. This is in accord with comments made earlier by Lehmann and coworkers. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Probing peptide fragment ion structures by combining sustained off-resonance collision-induced dissociation and gas-phase H/D exchange (SORI-HDX) in Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instruments.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Arpád

    2008-12-01

    The usefulness of gas-phase H/D exchange is demonstrated to probe heterogeneous fragment and parent ion populations. Singly and multiply protonated peptides/proteins were fragmented by using sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID). The fragments and the surviving precursor ions then all undergo H/D exchange in the gas-phase with either D(2)O or CD(3)OD under the same experimental conditions. Usually, 10 to 60 s of reaction time is adequate to monitor characteristic differences in the H/D exchange kinetic rates. These differences are then correlated to isomeric ion structures. The SORI-HDX method can be used to rapidly test fragment ion structures and provides useful insights into peptide fragmentation mechanisms.

  3. Manifestation of quark clusters in the emission of cumulative protons in the experiment on the fragmentation of carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martemyanov, M. A.; Matsyuk, M. A.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2013-06-01

    The proton yields at an angle of 3.5° have been measured in the FRAGM experiment on the fragmentation of carbon ions with the energies T 0 = 0.6, 0.95, and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on a beryllium target at the heavy-ion accelerator complex TWAC (terawatt accumulator, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics). The data are represented in the form of the dependences of the invariant cross section for proton yield on the cumulative variable x in the range of 0.9 < x < 2.4. This invariant cross section varies within six orders of magnitude. The proton spectra have been analyzed within the theoretical approach of the fragmentation of quark clusters with the fragmentation functions obtained in the quark-gluon string model. The probabilities of the existence of six- and nine-quark clusters in the carbon nuclei are estimated as 8-12 and 0.2-0.6%, respectively. The results are compared to the estimated of quark effects obtained by other methods.

  4. Determination of the light ion abundances in the strong-helium star HR 3089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Using line blanketed model stellar atmospheres and a spectrum synthesis approach, a differential abundance study of the ultraviolet spectrum of HR 3089 relative to the normal star lambda Sco was performed. Both stars were found to have the same abundances of carbon and silicon, but the helium and nitrogen are significantly enhanced in HR 3089. The atmospheric parameters and the distribution of abundances found for HR 3089 agree well with the results of Osmer and Peterson on sharp-lined helium-rich stars. The rotational velocity of 160 km/sec found for HR 3089 places a constraint on the role of diffusion in producing the abundance anomalies. Examination of the resonance lines of C II, N II, Si III and Si IV shows no evidence for mass loss in either star.

  5. Ranking Fragment Ions Based on Outlier Detection for Improved Label-Free Quantification in Data-Independent Acquisition LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Aivett; Zhang, Ying; Varesio, Emmanuel; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Lisacek, Frédérique; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition LC-MS/MS techniques complement supervised methods for peptide quantification. However, due to the wide precursor isolation windows, these techniques are prone to interference at the fragment ion level, which in turn is detrimental for accurate quantification. The “non-outlier fragment ion” (NOFI) ranking algorithm has been developed to assign low priority to fragment ions affected by interference. By using the optimal subset of high priority fragment ions these interfered fragment ions are effectively excluded from quantification. NOFI represents each fragment ion as a vector of four dimensions related to chromatographic and MS fragmentation attributes and applies multivariate outlier detection techniques. Benchmarking conducted on a well-defined quantitative dataset (i.e. the SWATH Gold Standard), indicates that NOFI on average is able to accurately quantify 11-25% more peptides than the commonly used Top-N library intensity ranking method. The sum of the area of the Top3-5 NOFIs produces similar coefficients of variation as compared to the library intensity method but with more accurate quantification results. On a biologically relevant human dendritic cell digest dataset, NOFI properly assigns low priority ranks to 85% of annotated interferences, resulting in sensitivity values between 0.92 and 0.80 against 0.76 for the Spectronaut interference detection algorithm. PMID:26412574

  6. Liquid chromatography, in combination with a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument (LC QTOF), with sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) acquisition: systematic studies on its use for screenings in clinical and forensic toxicology and comparison with information-dependent acquisition (IDA).

    PubMed

    Roemmelt, Andreas T; Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Kraemer, Thomas

    2014-12-02

    Forensic and clinical toxicological screening procedures are employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques with information-dependent acquisition (IDA) approaches more and more often. It is known that the complexity of a sample and the IDA settings might prevent important compounds from being triggered. Therefore, data-independent acquisition (DIA) methods should be more suitable for systematic toxicological analysis (STA). The DIA method sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH), which uses Q1 windows of 20-35 Da for data-independent fragmentation, was systematically investigated for its suitability for STA. Quality of SWATH-generated mass spectra were evaluated with regard to mass error, relative abundance of the fragments, and library hits. With the Q1 window set to 20-25 Da, several precursors pass Q1 at the same time and are fragmented, thus impairing the library search algorithms to a different extent: forward fit was less affected than reverse fit and purity fit. Mass error was not affected. The relative abundance of the fragments was concentration dependent for some analytes and was influenced by cofragmentation, especially of deuterated analogues. Also, the detection rate of IDA compared to SWATH was investigated in a forced coelution experiment (up to 20 analytes coeluting). Even using several different IDA settings, it was observed that IDA failed to trigger relevant compounds. Screening results of 382 authentic forensic cases revealed that SWATH's detection rate was superior to IDA, which failed to trigger ∼10% of the analytes.

  7. Some Dynamical Features of Molecular Fragmentation by Electrons and Swift Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, E. C.; Sigaud, L.; Wolff, W.; Luna, H.; Natalia, Ferreira

    To date, the large majority of studies on molecular fragmentation by swift charged particles have been carried out using simple molecules, for which reliable Potential Energy Curves are available to interpret the measured fragmentation yields. For complex molecules the scenario is quite different and such guidance is not available, obscuring even a simple organization of the data which are currently obtained for a large variety of molecules of biological or technological interest. In this work we show that a general and relatively simple methodology can be used to obtain a broader picture of the fragmentation pattern of an arbitrary molecule. The electronic ionization or excitation cross section of a given molecular orbital, which is the first part of the fragmentation process, can be well scaled by a simple and general procedure at high projectile velocities. The fragmentation fractions arising from each molecular orbital can then be achieved by matching the calculated ionization with the measured fragmentation cross sections. Examples for Oxygen, Chlorodifluoromethane and Pyrimidine molecules are presented.

  8. Electron ionisation induced fragmentation of ethyl 5(1H)-oxo- and 7(1H)-oxo-1-aryl-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]-pyrimidine-6-carboxylates: evidence for an unusually regioselective rearrangement of M(+*) ions.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, V V; Pihlaja, K; Matosiuk, D

    2001-01-01

    The 70-eV electron ionisation (EI) mass spectra of the title compounds show clear differences between the 5-oxo and 7-oxo isomers due to regioselective fragmentations involving the ester function. Exceptionally abundant metastable peaks due to molecular ions fragmenting to [M -CO2](+.) were observed exclusively for the 7-oxo isomers, suggesting that the sufficiently long-lived molecular ions undergo a slow rearrangement preceding this fragmentation reaction. The results are contrasted to the available literature data on the ester group fragmentations involving the loss of CO2 and the EI mass spectrometry of pyrimidone beta-oxo esters. A reaction mechanism is proposed for the elimination of CO2 following ethyl group migration to the pyrimidone carbonyl oxygen. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Densities and abundances of hot cometary ions in the coma of P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, R.; Goldstein, B. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Balsiger, H.; Ip, W.-H.

    1991-01-01

    On its flight by P/Halley, the Giotto spacecraft carried a High Energy Range Spectrometer (HERS) for measuring the properties of cometary ions picked up by the solar wind in the nearly collisionless regions of the coma. Preliminary estimates of the ion densities observed by HERS were reevaluated and extended; density profiles along the Giotto trajectory are presented for 13 values of ion mass/charge. Comparison with the physical-chemical model of the interaction of sunlight and the solar wind with the comet by other researchers reveals that, with the exception of protons and H2(+), all ion densities were at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted. The high ion densities cannot be explained on the basis of compression of the plasma, but require additional or stronger ionization mechanisms. Ratios of the densities of different ion species reveal an overabundance of carbonaceous material and an underabundance of H2(+) compared to the predictions of the Schmidt. While the densities of solar wind ions (H(+) and He(++)) changed sharply across a magnetic discontinuity located 1.35(10)(exp 5) km from the comet, this feature, which has been called both the 'cometopause' and the 'magnetic pileup boundary' was barely distinguishable in the density profiles of hot cometary ions. This result is consistent with the interpretation that the magnetic pileup boundary detected by Giotto was caused by a discontinuity in the solar wind and is not an intrinsic feature of the interaction of the solar wind with an active comet.

  10. Experimental determination of particle range and dose distribution in thick targets through fragmentation reactions of stable heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Tomitani, Takehiro; Urakabe, Eriko; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2006-09-07

    In radiation therapy with highly energetic heavy ions, the conformal irradiation of a tumour can be achieved by using their advantageous features such as the good dose localization and the high relative biological effectiveness around their mean range. For effective utilization of such properties, it is necessary to evaluate the range of incident ions and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Several methods have been proposed to derive such physical quantities; one of them uses positron emitters generated through projectile fragmentation reactions of incident ions with target nuclei. We have proposed the application of the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method to a detected annihilation gamma-ray distribution for determination of the range of incident ions in a target and we have demonstrated the effectiveness of the method with computer simulations. In this paper, a water, a polyethylene and a polymethyl methacrylate target were each irradiated with stable (12)C, (14)N, (16)O and (20)Ne beams. Except for a few combinations of incident beams and targets, the MLE method could determine the range of incident ions R(MLE) with a difference between R(MLE) and the experimental range of less than 2.0 mm under the circumstance that the measurement of annihilation gamma rays was started just after the irradiation of 61.4 s and lasted for 500 s. In the process of evaluating the range of incident ions with the MLE method, we must calculate many physical quantities such as the fluence and the energy of both primary ions and fragments as a function of depth in a target. Consequently, by using them we can obtain the dose distribution. Thus, when the mean range of incident ions is determined with the MLE method, the annihilation gamma-ray distribution and the deposited dose distribution can be derived simultaneously. The derived dose distributions in water for the mono-energetic heavy-ion beams of four species were compared with those measured with an

  11. ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER ION IN COMET C/2001 Q4 (NEAT): IMPLICATION FOR ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2012-04-20

    The ortho-to-para abundance ratio (OPR) of cometary molecules is considered to be one of the primordial characteristics of cometary ices, and contains information concerning their formation. Water is the most abundant species in cometary ices, and OPRs of water in comets have been determined from infrared spectroscopic observations of H{sub 2}O rovibrational transitions so far. In this paper, we present a new method to derive OPR of water in comets from the high-dispersion spectrum of the rovibronic emission of H{sub 2}O{sup +} in the optical wavelength region. The rovibronic emission lines of H{sub 2}O{sup +} are sometimes contaminated by othermore » molecular emission lines but they are not affected seriously by telluric absorption compared with near-infrared observations. Since H{sub 2}O{sup +} ions are mainly produced from H{sub 2}O by photoionization in the coma, the OPR of H{sub 2}O{sup +} is considered to be equal to that of water based on the nuclear spin conservation through the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence excitation model of H{sub 2}O{sup +} and applied it to the spectrum of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT). The derived OPR of water is 2.54{sup +0.32}{sub -0.25}, which corresponds to a nuclear spin temperature (T{sub spin}) of 30{sup +10}{sub -4} K. This is consistent with the previous value determined in the near-infrared for the same comet (OPR = 2.6 {+-} 0.3, T{sub spin} = 31{sup +11}{sub -5} K).« less

  12. The collision of a hypervelocity massive projectile with free-standing graphene: Investigation of secondary ion emission and projectile fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Eller, Michael J; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A

    2017-02-07

    We present here the study of the individual hypervelocity massive projectiles (440-540 keV, 33-36 km/s Au 400 4+ cluster) impact on 1-layer free-standing graphene. The secondary ions were detected and recorded separately from each individual impact in the transmission direction using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We observed C 1-10 ± ions emitted from graphene, the projectiles which penetrated the graphene, and the Au 1-3 ± fragment ions in mass spectra. During the projectile-graphene interaction, the projectile loses ∼15% of its initial kinetic energy (∼0.18 keV/atom, 72 keV/projectile). The Au projectiles are neutralized when approaching the graphene and then partially ionized again via electron tunneling from the hot rims of the holes on graphene, obtaining positive and negative charges. The projectile reaches an internal energy of ∼450-500 eV (∼4400-4900 K) after the impact and then undergoes a ∼90-100 step fragmentation with the ejection of Au 1 atoms in the experimental time range of ∼0.1 μs.

  13. The collision of a hypervelocity massive projectile with free-standing graphene: Investigation of secondary ion emission and projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Eller, Michael J.; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2017-02-01

    We present here the study of the individual hypervelocity massive projectiles (440-540 keV, 33-36 km/s Au4004+ cluster) impact on 1-layer free-standing graphene. The secondary ions were detected and recorded separately from each individual impact in the transmission direction using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We observed C1-10± ions emitted from graphene, the projectiles which penetrated the graphene, and the Au1-3± fragment ions in mass spectra. During the projectile-graphene interaction, the projectile loses ˜15% of its initial kinetic energy (˜0.18 keV/atom, 72 keV/projectile). The Au projectiles are neutralized when approaching the graphene and then partially ionized again via electron tunneling from the hot rims of the holes on graphene, obtaining positive and negative charges. The projectile reaches an internal energy of ˜450-500 eV (˜4400-4900 K) after the impact and then undergoes a ˜90-100 step fragmentation with the ejection of Au1 atoms in the experimental time range of ˜0.1 μs.

  14. Ion-molecule calculation of the abundance ratio of CCD to CCH in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, Eric; Adams, Nigel G.; Smith, David; Defrees, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements and calculations have been performed to determine the abundance ratio of the deuterated ethynyl radical (CCD) to the normal radical (CCH) which can be achieved in dense interstellar clouds via isotopic fractionation in the C2H2(+) (HD)=C2HD(+)(H2) system of reactions. According to this limited treatment, the CCD/CCH abundance ratio which can be attained is in the range 0.02-0.03 for the Orion molecular cloud and 0.0l-0.02 for TMC-1. These ranges of numbers are in reasonable agreement with the observed values in Orion and TMC-1. However, the analysis of the CCD/CCH abundance ratio is complicated via the presence of competing fractionation mechanisms, especially in the low-temperature source TMC-1.

  15. Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from an urban forest fragment in Central Amazon (Brazil): Effects of opening areas on abundance, richness, and composition.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Eduarda D R; Ferreira-Keppler, Ruth L; Martins, Renato T; Ronderos, Maria M

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the immature stages of Ceratopogonidae (Diptera) in artificial containers in an urban forest fragment in Manaus (Brazil), including their behavioral, biological and ecological information. In addition, we evaluated the effects of deforestation in an open and forested area on Ceratopogonidae communities. Immatures were sampled between August 2012 and July 2014 in artificial containers installed in both habitat types. We collected 685 immatures of seven morpho-species of Bezzia Kieffer, Culicoides Latreille, Dasyhelea Kieffer, Forcipomyia Meigen, and Palpomyia Meigen. In the open area, we recorded higher temperature and electrical conductivity values than in the forested area; however, these variables did not differ between seasons. Water volume was higher in open area and in rainy season, while pH was similar in both areas and seasons. Species richness was higher in forested area, but did not differ between seasons. We did not record differences in abundance between areas or seasons. Community composition differed between areas, but not between seasons. We provide the first records of Culicoides (Hoffmania) insignis Lutz and C. (Haematomyidium) quasiparaensis Clastrier in artificial containers from the state of Amazonas. Our results suggest that the preservation of forested areas in Amazonas is fundamental for the maintenance of the life cycle of some species of Ceratopogonidae.

  16. Angular distribution measurement of fragment ions from a molecule using a new beamline consisting of a Grasshopper monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, N.; Suzuki, I. H.; Onuki, H.

    1989-07-01

    Optical characteristics of a new beamline consisting of a premirror, a Grasshopper monochromator, and a refocusing mirror have been investigated. The intensity of the monochromatic soft x-ray was estimated to be about 10/sup 8/ photons/(s 100 mA) at 500 eV with the storage electron energy of 600 MeV and the minimum slit width. This slit width provides a resolution of about 500. Angular distributions of fragment ions from an inner-shell excited nitrogen molecule have been measured with a rotatable time-of-flight mass spectrometer by using this beamline.

  17. A DNA logic gate based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification, responding to multiple low-abundance DNA fragment input signals, and its application in detecting miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqi; Song, Yanyan; Wu, Fan; Liu, Wenting; Fu, Boshi; Feng, Bingkun; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-04-25

    A conveniently amplified DNA AND logic gate platform was designed for the highly sensitive detection of low-abundance DNA fragment inputs based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification strategy. Compared with others, this system can detect miRNAs in biological samples. The success of this strategy demonstrates the potential of DNA logic gates in disease diagnosis.

  18. A novel method for assessment of fragmentation and beam-material interactions in helium ion radiotherapy with a miniaturized setup.

    PubMed

    Gallas, Raya R; Arico, Giulia; Burigo, Lucas N; Gehrke, Tim; Jakůbek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Tureček, Daniel; Martišíková, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy with protons and carbon ions enables to deliver dose distributions of high conformation to the target. Treatment with helium ions has been suggested due to their physical and biological advantages. A reliable benchmarking of the employed physics models with experimental data is required for treatment planning. However, experimental data for helium interactions is limited, in part due to the complexity and large size of conventional experimental setups. We present a novel method for the investigation of helium interactions with matter using miniaturized instrumentation based on highly integrated pixel detectors. The versatile setup consisted of a monitoring detector in front of the PMMA phantom of varying thickness and a detector stack for investigation of outgoing particles. The ion type downstream from the phantom was determined by high-resolution pattern recognition analysis of the single particle signals in the pixelated detectors. The fractions of helium and hydrogen ions behind the used targets were determined. As expected for the stable helium nucleus, only a minor decrease of the primary ion fluence along the target depth was found. E.g. the detected fraction of hydrogen ions on axis of a 220MeV/u 4 He beam was below 6% behind 24.5cm of PMMA. Monte-Carlo simulations using Geant4 reproduce the experimental data on helium attenuation and yield of helium fragments qualitatively, but significant deviations were found for some combinations of target thickness and beam energy. The presented method is promising to contribute to the reduction of the uncertainty of treatment planning for helium ion radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurements of 12C ions beam fragmentation at large angle with an Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pastore, A.; Patera, V.; Sarti, A.; Tioukov, V.

    2017-08-01

    Hadron radiotherapy is a powerful technique for the treatment of deep-seated tumours. The physical dose distribution of hadron beams is characterized by a small dose delivered in the entrance channel and a large dose in the Bragg peak area. Fragmentation of the incident particles and struck nuclei occurs along the hadron path. Knowledge of the fragment energies and angular distributions is crucial for the validation of the models used in treatment planning systems. We report on large angle fragmentation measurements of a 400 MeV/n 12C beam impinging on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The detector was made of 300 micron thick nuclear emulsion films, with sub-micrometric spatial resolution and large angle track detection capability, interleaved with passive material. Thanks to newly developed techniques in the automated scanning of emulsions it was possible to extend the angular range of detected particles. This resulted in the first measurement of the angular and momentum spectrum for fragments emitted in the range from 34o to 81o.

  20. Kinetic energies of fragment ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Angel, G. C.; Rstgi, O. P.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energies of ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO have been measured at the discrete resonance lines of He (584A) and Ne (736A), and with undispersed synchrotron radiation. O sup + ions were identified with energies from 0 to approximately 0.5 eV and two groups of N sup + ions one with energy of 0.36 eV and another with energies between 0.9 and 1.5 eV, apparently produced by predissociation of the C sup 3 P 1 and B'1 sigma states respectively.

  1. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: nuclear fragmentation produced by 4He ion beams in a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Paramatti, R.; Pinci, D.; Battistoni, G.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Piersanti, L.; Rovituso, M.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Patera, V.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest in particle therapy treatments exploiting light ion beams against tumors due to their enhanced relative biological effectiveness and high space selectivity. In particular promising results are obtained by the use of 4He projectiles. Unlike the treatments performed using protons, the beam ions can undergo a fragmentation process when interacting with the atomic nuclei in the patient body. In this paper the results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy center are reported. For the first time the absolute fluxes and the energy spectra of the fragments—protons, deuterons, and tritons—produced by 4He ion beams of 102, 125 and 145 MeV u-1 energies on a poly-methyl methacrylate target were evaluated at different angles. The obtained results are particularly relevant in view of the necessary optimization and review of the treatment planning software being developed for clinical use of 4He beams in clinical routine and the relative bench-marking of Monte Carlo algorithm predictions.

  2. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF ratesmore » spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 10 5 and 1 × 10 9cm -3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximumof ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv).We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm -3 s -1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH 3 levels. In conclusion, we compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.« less

  3. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao; ...

    2016-10-27

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF ratesmore » spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 10 5 and 1 × 10 9cm -3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximumof ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv).We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm -3 s -1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH 3 levels. In conclusion, we compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.« less

  4. Pros and Cons of Ion-Torrent Next Generation Sequencing versus Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism T-RFLP for Studying the Rumen Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Gabriel; Belanche, Alejandro; Girwood, Susan E.; Pinloche, Eric; Wilkinson, Toby; Newbold, C. Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing has challenged the use of other molecular fingerprinting methods used to study microbial diversity. We analysed the bacterial diversity in the rumen of defaunated sheep following the introduction of different protozoal populations, using both next generation sequencing (NGS: Ion Torrent PGM) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Although absolute number differed, there was a high correlation between NGS and T-RFLP in terms of richness and diversity with R values of 0.836 and 0.781 for richness and Shannon-Wiener index, respectively. Dendrograms for both datasets were also highly correlated (Mantel test = 0.742). Eighteen OTUs and ten genera were significantly impacted by the addition of rumen protozoa, with an increase in the relative abundance of Prevotella, Bacteroides and Ruminobacter, related to an increase in free ammonia levels in the rumen. Our findings suggest that classic fingerprinting methods are still valuable tools to study microbial diversity and structure in complex environments but that NGS techniques now provide cost effect alternatives that provide a far greater level of information on the individual members of the microbial population. PMID:25051490

  5. Extending a Tandem Mass Spectral Library to Include MS2 Spectra of Fragment Ions Produced In-Source and MSn Spectra.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E

    2017-11-01

    Tandem mass spectral library searching is finding increased use as an effective means of determining chemical identity in mass spectrometry-based omics studies. We previously reported on constructing a tandem mass spectral library that includes spectra for multiple precursor ions for each analyte. Here we report our method for expanding this library to include MS 2 spectra of fragment ions generated during the ionization process (in-source fragment ions) as well as MS 3 and MS 4 spectra. These can assist the chemical identification process. A simple density-based clustering algorithm was used to cluster all significant precursor ions from MS 1 scans for an analyte acquired during an infusion experiment. The MS 2 spectra associated with these precursor ions were grouped into the same precursor clusters. Subsequently, a new top-down hierarchical divisive clustering algorithm was developed for clustering the spectra from fragmentation of ions in each precursor cluster, including the MS 2 spectra of the original precursors and of the in-source fragments as well as the MS n spectra. This algorithm starts with all the spectra of one precursor in one cluster and then separates them into sub-clusters of similar spectra based on the fragment patterns. Herein, we describe the algorithms and spectral evaluation methods for extending the library. The new library features were demonstrated by searching the high resolution spectra of E. coli extracts against the extended library, allowing identification of compounds and their in-source fragment ions in a manner that was not possible before. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Structures and Fragmentation Mechanisms of the Ions of Ethanol by Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-15

    structural information contained in deuterated sp ies is readily obtainable. Eth 1 ions ty stdied tnc) Vde (CH3CHOH?’., [CH CHOHJ. (CH2COH]r-% [CH 2COF...high and low energy systems involves electronic 18 and vibrational 19 excitation respectively, the amount of energy thus deposited must be approximately

  7. Biophysical modeling of fragment length distributions of DNA plasmids after X and heavy-ion irradiation analyzed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsässer, Thilo; Brons, Stephan; Psonka, Katarzyna; Scholz, Michael; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2008-06-01

    The investigation of fragment length distributions of plasmid DNA gives insight into the influence of localized energy distribution on the induction of DNA damage, particularly the clustering of double-strand breaks. We present an approach that determines the fragment length distributions of plasmid DNA after heavy-ion irradiation by using the Local Effect Model. We find a good agreement of our simulations with experimental fragment distributions derived from atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies by including experimental constraints typical for AFM. Our calculations reveal that by comparing the fragmentation in terms of fluence, we can uniquely distinguish the effect of different radiation qualities. For very high-LET irradiation using nickel or uranium ions, no difference between their fragment distributions can be expected for the same dose level. However, for carbon ions with an intermediate LET, the fragmentation pattern differs from the distribution for very high-LET particles. The results of the model calculations can be used to determine the optimal experimental parameters for a demonstration of the influence of track structure on primary radiation damage. Additionally, we compare the results of our model for two different plasmid geometries.

  8. AUTOMATED DETERMINATION OF PRECURSOR ION, PRODUCT ION, AND NEUTRAL LOSS COMPOSITIONS AND DECONVOLUTION OF COMPOSITE MASS SPECTRA USING ION CORRELATION BASED ON EXACT MASSES AND RELATIVE ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    After a dispersive event, rapid determination of elemental compositions of ions in mass spectra is essential for tentatively identifying compounds. A Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART)® ion source interfaced to a JEOL AccuTOF® mass spectrometer provided exact masses accurate to ...

  9. Mass-energy distribution of fragments within Langevin dynamics of fission induced by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anischenko, Yu. A.; Adeev, G. D.

    2012-08-01

    A stochastic approach based on four-dimensional Langevin fission dynamics is applied to calculating mass-energy distributions of fragments originating from the fission of excited compound nuclei. In the model under investigation, the coordinate K representing the projection of the total angular momentum onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus is taken into account in addition to three collective shape coordinates introduced on the basis of the { c, h, α} parametrization. The evolution of the orientation degree of freedom ( K mode) is described by means of the Langevin equation in the overdamped regime. The tensor of friction is calculated under the assumption of the reducedmechanismof one-body dissipation in the wall-plus-window model. The calculations are performed for two values of the coefficient that takes into account the reduction of the contribution from the wall formula: k s = 0.25 and k s = 1.0. Calculations with a modified wall-plus-window formula are also performed, and the quantity measuring the degree to which the single-particle motion of nucleons within the nuclear system being considered is chaotic is used for k s in this calculation. Fusion-fission reactions leading to the production of compound nuclei are considered for values of the parameter Z 2/ A in the range between 21 and 44. So wide a range is chosen in order to perform a comparative analysis not only for heavy but also for light compound nuclei in the vicinity of the Businaro-Gallone point. For all of the reactions considered in the present study, the calculations performed within four-dimensional Langevin dynamics faithfully reproduce mass-energy and mass distributions obtained experimentally. The inclusion of the K mode in the Langevin equation leads to an increase in the variances of mass and energy distributions in relation to what one obtains from three-dimensional Langevin calculations. The results of the calculations where one associates k s with the measure of chaoticity in the

  10. Study of near-stability nuclei populated as fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Nelson, Ronald O; Devlin, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Examples are presented to illustrate the power of prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from compound nuclei with A {approx} 200 formed in fusion-evaporation reactions in experiments using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Complementary methods, such as Coulomb excitation and deep-inelastic processes, are also discussed. In other cases (n, xn{gamma}) reactions on stable isotopes have been used to establish neutron excitation functions for {gamma}-rays using a pulsed 'white'-neutron source, coupled to a high-energy-resolution germanium-detector array. The excitation functions can unambiguously assign {gamma}-rays to a specific reaction product. Results from all these methods bridge the gaps in the systematics of high-spin statesmore » between the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei. Results near shell closures should motivate new shell model calculations.« less

  11. Significance of the Fragmentation Region in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-08-01

    We present measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles produced in Au+Au collisions at three energies, (sNN)=19.6, 130, and 200GeV, for a range of collision centrali­ties. The distribution narrows for more central collisions and excess particles are produced at high pseudorapidity in peripheral collisions. For a given centrality, however, the distributions are found to scale with energy according to the “limiting fragmentation” hypothesis. The universal fragmentation region described by this scaling grows in pseudorapidity with increasing collision energy, extending well away from the beam rapidity and covering more than half of the pseudorapidity range over which particles are produced. This approach to a universal limiting curve appears to be a dominant feature of the pseudorapidity distribution and therefore of the total particle production in these collisions.

  12. Penning ionization and ion fragmentation of formamide HCONH2 by He∗, Ne∗, and Ar∗ in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Tamika A.; Siska, P. E.

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectra from Penning ionization by metastable atom bombardment (MAB) in the title system at kinetic energies near 1 kcal/mol are reported. The experiments employ a supersonic excited noble gas beam crossing an effusive beam of formamide vapor. Product ions are extracted perpendicular to the plane of the beams, analyzed by a quadrupole mass filter, and counted by a scintillation-type ion counter. Relative to 70 eV electron impact, the He∗ and Ne∗ spectra show more extensive breakage of C-N and C-H bonds despite the smaller available energy, while the Ar∗ spectrum shows only the molecular ion (m /z 45), H atom elimination (44), and the decarbonylation products CO+NH3+ (17). Fragmentation in the latter system has been analyzed using a combination of ab initio calculations and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with tunneling correction; good agreement with the experimental 45/44/17 intensity ratio 100/6.8±0.7/6.2±1.7 is obtained. 15% of m/z 17 and 50% of m /z 44 is attributed to tunneling. The ab initio decarbonylation reaction path yields a hydrogen bonded H2N-HCO+ transition state, which transfers a proton while proceeding downhill to the observed products, while both the path and the energetics support the earlier conclusion that the lowest lying electronically excited state of the ion (2π or 2a″) crosses the ground state early along the reaction path, thereby dominating the dynamics of decarbonylation.

  13. Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy of the b2 + Ion from PPG: Evidence of Third Residue Affecting b2 + Fragment Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutsma, John C.; Martens, Jonathan; Oomens, Jos; Maitre, Phillipe; Steinmetz, Vincent; Bernier, Matthew; Jia, Mengxuan; Wysocki, Vicki

    2017-07-01

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy was performed on the b2 + fragment ion from the protonated PPG tripeptide. Comparison of the experimental infrared spectrum with computed spectra for both oxazolone and diketopiperazine structures indicates that the majority of the fragment ion population has an oxazolone structure with the remainder having a diketopiperazine structure. This result is in contrast with a recent study of the IRMPD action spectrum of the PP b2 + fragment ion from PPP, which was found to be nearly 100% diketopiperazine (Martens et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 377, 179). The diketopiperazine b2 + ion is thermodynamically more stable than the oxazolone but normally requires a trans/cis peptide bond isomerization in the dissociating peptide. Martens et al. showed through IRMPD action spectroscopy that the PPP precursor ion was in a conformation in which the first peptide bond is already in the cis conformation and thus it was energetically favorable to form the thermodynamically-favored diketopiperazine b2 + ion. In the present case, solution-phase NMR spectroscopy and gas-phase IRMPD action spectroscopy show that the PPG precursor ion has its first amide bond in a trans configuration suggesting that the third residue is playing an important role in both the structure of the peptide and the associated ring-closure barriers for oxazolone and diketopiperazine formation.

  14. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  15. Automated Validation of Results and Removal of Fragment Ion Interferences in Targeted Analysis of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (MS) using SWATHProphet*

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew; Bader, Samuel L.; Shteynberg, David; Hood, Leroy; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics by mass spectrometry technology is widely used for identifying and quantifying peptides and proteins. The breadth and sensitivity of peptide detection have been advanced by the advent of data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry. Analysis of such data, however, is challenging due to the complexity of fragment ion spectra that have contributions from multiple co-eluting precursor ions. We present SWATHProphet software that identifies and quantifies peptide fragment ion traces in data-independent acquisition data, provides accurate probabilities to ensure results are correct, and automatically detects and removes contributions to quantitation originating from interfering precursor ions. Integration in the widely used open source Trans-Proteomic Pipeline facilitates subsequent analyses such as combining results of multiple data sets together for improved discrimination using iProphet and inferring sample proteins using ProteinProphet. This novel development should greatly help make data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry accessible to large numbers of users. PMID:25713123

  16. Complementary b/y fragment ion pairs from post-source decay of metastable YahO for calibration of MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Complementary b/y fragment ion pairs from post-source decay (PSD) of metastable YahO protein ion were evaluated for use in the calibration of MALDI-TOF-TOF for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The yahO gene from pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 was cloned into a pBAD18 plasmid vect...

  17. Beam optical design of in-flight fragment separator for high-power heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, C. C.; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, D. G.; Song, J. S.; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Kim, J. W.; Kim, J. R.; Wan, W.

    2013-12-01

    An in-flight fragment separator has been designed for the rare isotope science project (RISP) in Korea. A beam used for the design is 238U in the energy of 200 MeV/u with the maximum beam power of 400 kW. The use of high-power beam requires careful removal of the primary beam by pre-separator, for which its configuration was revised to employ four dipole magnets instead of two. Different configurations of the separator have been tested in search of optimal design in non-linear optics, which was complicated by the space needed for the target, beam dump and radiation shielding. Non-linear optical calculations have been carried out using GICOSY and COSY Infinity including the fringe fields of large-aperture quadrupole magnets. Correction of non-linear terms is made with multipole coils located inside the superconducting quadrupole magnets and by external multipole magnets. Beam simulations using LISE++ and MOCADI have been performed to consider the effects of multiple charge states of the primary and isotope beams produced at the target. Layout of the separator is being finalized, and detailed optics simulation will continue to refine its design.

  18. Precursor Ion Scan Mode-Based Strategy for Fast Screening of Polyether Ionophores by Copper-Induced Gas-Phase Radical Fragmentation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Crevelin, Eduardo J; Possato, Bruna; Lopes, João L C; Lopes, Norberto P; Crotti, Antônio E M

    2017-04-04

    The potential of copper(II) to induce gas-phase fragmentation reactions in macrotetrolides, a class of polyether ionophores produced by Streptomyces species, was investigated by accurate-mass electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Copper(II)/copper(I) transition directly induced production of diagnostic acylium ions with m/z 199, 185, 181, and 167 from α-cleavages of [macrotetrolides + Cu] 2+ . A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodology based on the precursor ion scan of these acylium ions was developed and successfully used to identify isodinactin (1), trinactin (2), and tetranactin (3) in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 in the precursor ion scan mode. In addition, copper(II) was also used to induce radical fragmentation reactions in the carboxylic acid polyether ionophore nigericin. The resulting product ions with m/z 755 and 585 helped to identify nigericin in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. Eucal-26 by means of precursor ion scan experiments, demonstrating that copper-induced fragmentation reactions can potentially identify different classes of polyether ionophores rapidly and selectively.

  19. Recent advances in lipid separations and structural elucidation using mass spectrometry combined with ion mobility spectrometry, ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xueyun; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    Lipids are a vital class of molecules that play important and varied roles in biological processes. Fully understanding lipid roles, however, is extremely difficult since the number and diversity of lipid species is immense, with cells expressing hundreds of enzymes that synthesize tens of thousands of different lipids. While recent advances in chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry have greatly progressed the understanding of lipid species and functions, effectively separating many lipids still remains problematic. Isomeric lipids have made lipid characterization especially difficult and occur due to subclasses having the same chemical composition, or species having multiple acyl chains connectivitiesmore » (sn-1, sn-2, or sn-3), double bond positions and orientations (cis or trans), and functional group stereochemistry (R versus S). Fully understanding the roles of lipids in biological processes therefore requires separating and evaluating how isomers change in biological and environmental samples. To address this challenge, ion mobility spectrometry separations, ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation techniques have increasingly been added to lipid analysis workflows to improve identifications. In this manuscript, we review the current state of these approaches and their capabilities for improving the identification of specific lipid species.« less

  20. The identification of disulfides in ricin D using proteolytic cleavage followed by negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Brinkworth, Craig S; Bowie, John H

    2015-01-30

    To use negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D, to provide sequence information; in particular, to identify disulfide position and connectivity. Negative-ion fragmentations of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D was studied using a Waters QTOF2 mass spectrometer operating in MS and MS(2) modes. Twenty-three peptides were obtained following high-performance liquid chromatography and studied by negative-ion mass spectrometry covering 73% of the amino-acid residues of ricin D. Five disulfide-containing peptides were identified, three intermolecular and two intramolecular disulfide-containing peptides. The [M-H](-) anions of the intermolecular disulfides undergo facile cleavage of the disulfide units to produce fragment peptides. In negative-ion collision-induced dissociation (CID) these source-formed anions undergo backbone cleavages, which provide sequencing information. The two intramolecular disulfides were converted proteolytically into intermolecular disulfides, which were identified as outlined above. The positions of the five disulfide groups in ricin D may be determined by characteristic negative-ion cleavage of the disulfide groups, while sequence information may be determined using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of the resulting cleaved peptides. Negative-ion mass spectrometry can also be used to provide partial sequencing information for other peptides (i.e. those not containing Cys) using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of these peptides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Fragmentation pathways of 2-substituted pyrrole derivatives using electrospray ionization ion trap and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xianrui; Guo, Zili; Yu, Chuanming

    2013-10-30

    Pyrrole derivatives are of considerable importance and are present in a wide range of natural products and used extensively in drug discovery. Fragmentation pathway studies play an important role in the structural identification of pyrrole derivatives. As a part of our ongoing work on heterocycles, fragmentation pathways of 2-substituted pyrrole derivatives were investigated by mass spectrometry (MS). Twelve pyrrole derivatives were synthesized and analyzed. Low-resolution fragmentation ions of all the compounds were generated by ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS(n) ) with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive mode. Hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was used to determine the elemental compositions of the resultant product ions. The side-chain substituents at the 2-position influence the fragmentation pathways. Typical losses of H2 O, aldehydes and pyrrole moieties from the [M + H](+) ion are observed for the compounds with side chains bearing aromatic groups at the 2-position of the pyrrole. However, losses of H2 O, alcohols and C3 H6 are the main cleavage pathways for compounds 6 and 12 with nonphenyl-substituted side chains at the 2-position. Typical fragmentation mechanisms of 2-substituted pyrrole derivatives are proposed and elucidated based on the observations of ITMS(n) and QTOFMS spectra. The results showed that the fragmentation pathways were remarkably influenced by the side-chain substituents at the 2-position of pyrrole. This investigation should have value in the structural identification of this series of molecules or compounds with similar structures. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fast Biological Modeling for Voxel-based Heavy Ion Treatment Planning Using the Mechanistic Repair-Misrepair-Fixation Model and Nuclear Fragment Spectra.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Florian; Cabal, Gonzalo; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Wilkens, Jan J; Carlson, David J

    2015-11-01

    The physical and biological differences between heavy ions and photons have not been fully exploited and could improve treatment outcomes. In carbon ion therapy, treatment planning must account for physical properties, such as the absorbed dose and nuclear fragmentation, and for differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions compared with photons. We combined the mechanistic repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model with Monte Carlo-generated fragmentation spectra for biological optimization of carbon ion treatment plans. Relative changes in double-strand break yields and radiosensitivity parameters with particle type and energy were determined using the independently benchmarked Monte Carlo damage simulation and the RMF model to estimate the RBE values for primary carbon ions and secondary fragments. Depth-dependent energy spectra were generated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for clinically relevant initial carbon ion energies. The predicted trends in RBE were compared with the published experimental data. Biological optimization for carbon ions was implemented in a 3-dimensional research treatment planning tool. We compared the RBE and RBE-weighted dose (RWD) distributions of different carbon ion treatment scenarios with and without nuclear fragments. The inclusion of fragments in the simulations led to smaller RBE predictions. A validation of RMF against measured cell survival data reported in published studies showed reasonable agreement. We calculated and optimized the RWD distributions on patient data and compared the RMF predictions with those from other biological models. The RBE values in an astrocytoma tumor ranged from 2.2 to 4.9 (mean 2.8) for a RWD of 3 Gy(RBE) assuming (α/β)X = 2 Gy. These studies provide new information to quantify and assess uncertainties in the clinically relevant RBE values for carbon ion therapy based on biophysical mechanisms. We present results from the first biological optimization of carbon ion radiation

  3. Fast Biological Modeling for Voxel-based Heavy Ion Treatment Planning Using the Mechanistic Repair-Misrepair-Fixation Model and Nuclear Fragment Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, Florian; Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, München; Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The physical and biological differences between heavy ions and photons have not been fully exploited and could improve treatment outcomes. In carbon ion therapy, treatment planning must account for physical properties, such as the absorbed dose and nuclear fragmentation, and for differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions compared with photons. We combined the mechanistic repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model with Monte Carlo-generated fragmentation spectra for biological optimization of carbon ion treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Relative changes in double-strand break yields and radiosensitivity parameters with particle type and energy were determined using the independently benchmarked Monte Carlo damagemore » simulation and the RMF model to estimate the RBE values for primary carbon ions and secondary fragments. Depth-dependent energy spectra were generated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for clinically relevant initial carbon ion energies. The predicted trends in RBE were compared with the published experimental data. Biological optimization for carbon ions was implemented in a 3-dimensional research treatment planning tool. Results: We compared the RBE and RBE-weighted dose (RWD) distributions of different carbon ion treatment scenarios with and without nuclear fragments. The inclusion of fragments in the simulations led to smaller RBE predictions. A validation of RMF against measured cell survival data reported in published studies showed reasonable agreement. We calculated and optimized the RWD distributions on patient data and compared the RMF predictions with those from other biological models. The RBE values in an astrocytoma tumor ranged from 2.2 to 4.9 (mean 2.8) for a RWD of 3 Gy(RBE) assuming (α/β){sub X} = 2 Gy. Conclusions: These studies provide new information to quantify and assess uncertainties in the clinically relevant RBE values for carbon ion therapy based on biophysical mechanisms. We present

  4. Determination of the sulfur isotope ratio in carbonyl sulfide using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry on fragment ions 32S+, 33S+, and 34S+.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Toyoda, Akari; Toyoda, Sakae; Ishino, Sakiko; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-01-06

    Little is known about the sulfur isotopic composition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant atmospheric sulfur species. We present a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions (δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S) of OCS using nanomole level samples. The direct isotopic analytical technique consists of two parts: a concentration line and online gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions (32)S(+), (33)S(+), and (34)S(+). The current levels of measurement precision for OCS samples greater than 8 nmol are 0.42‰, 0.62‰, and 0.23‰ for δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S, respectively. These δ and Δ values show a slight dependence on the amount of injected OCS for volumes smaller than 8 nmol. The isotope values obtained from the GC-IRMS method were calibrated against those measured by a conventional SF6 method. We report the first measurement of the sulfur isotopic composition of OCS in air collected at Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. The δ(34)S value obtained for OCS (4.9 ± 0.3‰) was lower than the previous estimate of 11‰. When the δ(34)S value for OCS from the atmospheric sample is postulated as the global signal, this finding, coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere, explains the reported δ(34)S for background stratospheric sulfate. This suggests that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  5. Analysis of the low molecular weight fraction of serum by LC-dual ESI-FT-ICR mass spectrometry: precision of retention time, mass, and ion abundance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth L; Mason, Christopher J; Muddiman, David C; Eckel, Jeanette E

    2004-09-01

    This study quantifies the experimental uncertainty for LC retention time, mass measurement precision, and ion abundance obtained from replicate nLC-dual ESI-FT-ICR analyses of the low molecular weight fraction of serum. We used ultrafiltration to enrich the < 10-kDa fraction of components from the high-abundance proteins in a pooled serum sample derived from ovarian cancer patients. The THRASH algorithm for isotope cluster detection was applied to five replicate nLC-dual ESI-FT-ICR chromatograms. A simple two-level grouping algorithm was applied to the more than 7000 isotope clusters found in each replicate and identified 497 molecular species that appeared in at least four of the replicates. In addition, a representative set of 231 isotope clusters, corresponding to 188 unique molecular species, were manually interpreted to verify the automated algorithm and to set its tolerances. For nLC retention time reproducibility, 95% of the 497 species had a 95% confidence interval of the mean of +/- 0.9 min or less without the use of chromatographic alignment procedures. Furthermore, 95% of the 497 species had a mass measurement precision of < or = 3.2 and < or = 6.3 ppm for internally and externally calibrated spectra, respectively. Moreover, 95% of replicate ion abundance measurements, covering an ion abundance range of approximately 3 orders of magnitude, had a coefficient of variation of less than 62% without using any normalization functions. The variability of ion abundance was independent of LC retention time, mass, and ion abundance quartile. These measures of analytical reproducibility establish a statistical rationale for differentiating healthy and disease patient populations for the elucidation of biomarkers in the low molecular fraction of serum. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  6. Automated LC-HRMS(/MS) Approach for the Annotation of Fragment Ions Derived from Stable Isotope Labeling-Assisted Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Structure elucidation of biological compounds is still a major bottleneck of untargeted LC-HRMS approaches in metabolomics research. The aim of the present study was to combine stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry for the automated interpretation of the elemental composition of fragment ions and thereby facilitate the structural characterization of metabolites. The software tool FragExtract was developed and evaluated with LC-HRMS/MS spectra of both native 12C- and uniformly 13C (U-13C)-labeled analytical standards of 10 fungal substances in pure solvent and spiked into fungal culture filtrate of Fusarium graminearum respectively. Furthermore, the developed approach is exemplified with nine unknown biochemical compounds contained in F. graminearum samples derived from an untargeted metabolomics experiment. The mass difference between the corresponding fragment ions present in the MS/MS spectra of the native and U-13C-labeled compound enabled the assignment of the number of carbon atoms to each fragment signal and allowed the generation of meaningful putative molecular formulas for each fragment ion, which in turn also helped determine the elemental composition of the precursor ion. Compared to laborious manual analysis of the MS/MS spectra, the presented algorithm marks an important step toward efficient fragment signal elucidation and structure annotation of metabolites in future untargeted metabolomics studies. Moreover, as demonstrated for a fungal culture sample, FragExtract also assists the characterization of unknown metabolites, which are not contained in databases, and thus exhibits a significant contribution to untargeted metabolomics research. PMID:24965664

  7. Evidence for Sequence Scrambling and Divergent H/D Exchange Reactions of Doubly-Charged Isobaric b-Type Fragment Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekavat, Behrooz; Miladi, Mahsan; Al-Fdeilat, Abdullah H.; Somogyi, Arpad; Solouki, Touradj

    2014-02-01

    To date, only a limited number of reports are available on structural variants of multiply-charged b-fragment ions. We report on observed bimodal gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reaction kinetics and patterns for substance P b10 2+ that point to presence of isomeric structures. We also compare HDX reactions, post-ion mobility/collision-induced dissociation (post-IM/CID), and sustained off-resonance irradiation-collision induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of substance P b10 2+ and a cyclic peptide with an identical amino acid (AA) sequence order to substance P b10. The observed HDX patterns and reaction kinetics and SORI-CID pattern for the doubly charged head-to-tail cyclized peptide were different from either of the presumed isomers of substance P b10 2+, suggesting that b10 2+ may not exist exclusively as a head-to-tail cyclized structure. Ultra-high mass measurement accuracy was used to assign identities of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions of substance P b10 2+; over 30 % of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions from substance P b10 2+ had rearranged (scrambled) AA sequences. Moreover, post-IM/CID experiments revealed the presence of two conformer types for substance P b10 2+, whereas only one conformer type was observed for the head-to-tail cyclized peptide. We also show that AA sequence scrambling from CID of doubly-charged b-fragment ions is not unique to substance P b10 2+.

  8. Evidence for sequence scrambling and divergent H/D exchange reactions of doubly-charged isobaric b-type fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Behrooz; Miladi, Mahsan; Al-Fdeilat, Abdullah H; Somogyi, Arpad; Solouki, Touradj

    2014-02-01

    To date, only a limited number of reports are available on structural variants of multiply-charged b-fragment ions. We report on observed bimodal gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reaction kinetics and patterns for substance P b10(2+) that point to presence of isomeric structures. We also compare HDX reactions, post-ion mobility/collision-induced dissociation (post-IM/CID), and sustained off-resonance irradiation-collision induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of substance P b10(2+) and a cyclic peptide with an identical amino acid (AA) sequence order to substance P b10. The observed HDX patterns and reaction kinetics and SORI-CID pattern for the doubly charged head-to-tail cyclized peptide were different from either of the presumed isomers of substance P b10(2+), suggesting that b10(2+) may not exist exclusively as a head-to-tail cyclized structure. Ultra-high mass measurement accuracy was used to assign identities of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions of substance P b10(2+); over 30% of the observed SORI-CID fragment ions from substance P b10(2+) had rearranged (scrambled) AA sequences. Moreover, post-IM/CID experiments revealed the presence of two conformer types for substance P b10(2+), whereas only one conformer type was observed for the head-to-tail cyclized peptide. We also show that AA sequence scrambling from CID of doubly-charged b-fragment ions is not unique to substance P b10(2+).

  9. Binning of shallowly sampled metagenomic sequence fragments reveals that low abundance bacteria play important roles in sulfur cycling and degradation of complex organic polymers in an acid mine drainage community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. J.; Andersson, A.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Our understanding of environmental microbiology has been greatly enhanced by community genome sequencing of DNA recovered directly the environment. Community genomics provides insights into the diversity, community structure, metabolic function, and evolution of natural populations of uncultivated microbes, thereby revealing dynamics of how microorganisms interact with each other and their environment. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for reconstructing near-complete genomes from natural environments while highlighting the challenges of analyzing community genomic sequence, especially from diverse environments. A major challenge of shotgun community genome sequencing is identification of DNA fragments from minor community members for which only low coverage of genomic sequence is present. We analyzed community genome sequence retrieved from biofilms in an acid mine drainage (AMD) system in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA, with an emphasis on identification and assembly of DNA fragments from low-abundance community members. The Richmond mine hosts an extensive, relatively low diversity subterranean chemolithoautotrophic community that is sustained entirely by oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The activity of these microorganisms greatly accelerates the generation of AMD. Previous and ongoing work in our laboratory has focused on reconstrucing genomes of dominant community members, including several bacteria and archaea. We binned contigs from several samples (including one new sample and two that had been previously analyzed) by tetranucleotide frequency with clustering by Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). The binning, evaluated by comparison with information from the manually curated assembly of the dominant organisms, was found to be very effective: fragments were correctly assigned with 95% accuracy. Improperly assigned fragments often contained sequences that are either evolutionarily constrained (e.g. 16S rRNA genes) or mobile elements that are

  10. Surface-induced dissociation: a unique tool for studying energetics and kinetics of the gas-phase fragmentation of large ions

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) is valuable tool for investigating activation and dissociation of large ions in tandem mass spectrometry. This account summarizes key findings from studies of the energetics and mechanisms of complex ion dissociation, in which SID experiments were combined with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental data. These studies used time- and collision-energy-resolved SID experiments and SID combined with resonant ejection of selected fragment ions on a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). Fast ion activation by collision with a surface combined with the long and variable timescale of a FT-ICR MS is perfectlymore » suited for studying the energetics and dynamics of complex ion dissociation in the gas phase. Modeling of time- and collision-energy-resolved SID enables accurate determination of energy and entropy effects in the dissociation process. It has been demonstrated that entropy effects play an important role in determining the dissociation rates of both covalent and non-covalent bonds in large gaseous ions. SID studies have provided important insights on the competition between charge-directed and charge-remote fragmentation in even-electron peptide ions and the role of charge and radical site on the energetics of the dissociation of odd-electron peptide ions. Furthermore, this work examined factors that affect the strength of non-covalent binding, as well as the competition between covalent and non-covalent bond cleavages and between proton and electron transfer in model systems. Finally, SID studies have been used to understand the factors affecting nucleation and growth of clusters in solution and the gas phase.« less

  11. Tuning Li2MO3 phase abundance and suppressing migration of transition metal ions to improve the overall performance of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiming; Tang, Tian; Ma, Zhihua; Gu, Haitao; Du, Wubing; Gao, Mingxia; Liu, Yongfeng; Jian, Dechao; Pan, Hongge

    2018-03-01

    The poor cycling stability of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has severely limited their practical application. Unfortunately, current strategies to improve their lifecycle sacrifice initial capacity. In this paper, we firstly report the synergistic improvement of the electrochemical performance of a Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (LNCMO) cathode material, including gains for capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability, by the partial substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions. Electrochemical performance is evaluated by a galvanostatic charge and discharge test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Structure and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Compared with the substitution of transition metal (TM) ions with Mg2+ ions reported previously, the substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions not only drastically ameliorates the capacity retention and rate performance challenges of LNCMO cathodes but also markedly suppresses their voltage fading, due to the inhibition of the migration of TM ions during cycling, while also increasing the capacity of the cathode due to an increased abundance of the Li2MO3 phase.

  12. Separation and characterization of unknown impurities and isomers in flomoxef sodium by LC-IT-TOF MS and study of their negative-ion fragmentation regularities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Wang, Fan; Li, Jiani; Shan, Weiguang; Zhu, Bingqi; Wang, Jian

    2017-06-05

    Thirteen unknown impurities in flomoxef sodium were separated and characterized by liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-IT-TOF MS)with positive and negative modes of electrospray ionization method for further improvement of official monographs in pharmacopoeias. The fragmentation patterns of impurities in flomoxef in the negative ion mode were studied in detail, and new negative-ion fragmentation regularities were discovered. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Kromasil C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm). The mobile phase consisted of (A) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (84:16, v/v) and (B) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (47:53, v/v). In order to determine the m/z values of the molecular ions and formulas of all detected impurities, full scan LC-MS in both positive and negative ion modes was firstly executed to obtain the m/z value of the molecules. Then LC-MS 2 and LC-MS 3 were carried out on target compounds to obtain as much structural information as possible. Complete fragmentation patterns of impurities were studied and used to obtain information about the structures of these impurities. Structures of thirteen unknown degradation products in flomoxef sodium were deduced based on the high resolution MS n data with both positive and negative modes. The forming mechanisms of degradation products in flomoxef sodium were also studied. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effects of landscape composition and wetland fragmentation on frog and toad abundance and species richness in Iowa and Wisconsin, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, Melinda G.; Sauer, John R.; Olsen, Douglas A.; Mossman, Michael J.; Hemesath, Lisa M.; Lannoo, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Management of amphibian populations to reverse recent declines will require defining high-quality habitat for individual species or groups of species, followed by efforts to retain or restore these habitats on the landscape. We examined landscape-level habitat relationships for frogs and toads by measuring associations between relative abundance and species richness based on survey data derived from anuran calls and features of land-cover maps for Iowa and Wisconsin. The most consistent result across all anuran guilds was a negative association with the presence of urban land. Upland and wetland forests and emergent wetlands tended to be positively associated with anurans. Landscape metrics that represent edges and patch diversity also had generally positive associations, indicating that anurans benefit from a complex of habitats that include wetlands. In Iowa the most significant associations with relative abundance were the length of the edge between wetland and forest ( positive) and the presence of urban land (negative). In Wisconsin the two most significant associations with relative abundance were forest area and agricultural area ( both positive). Anurans had positive associations with agriculture in Wisconsin but not in Iowa. Remnant forest patches in agricultural landscapes may be providing refuges for some anuran species. Differences in anuran associations with deep water and permanent wetlands between the two states suggest opportunities for management action. Large-scale maps can contribute to predictive models of amphibian habitat use, but water quality and vegetation information collected from individual wetlands will likely be needed to strengthen those predictions. Landscape habitat analyses provide a framework for future experimental and intensive research on specific factors affecting the health of anurans.

  14. Characterizing Sediment Supply to Rivers: Effects of Lithology, Climate, Weathering and Erosion on Rock-fragment Abundance in Granitic, Hillslope Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, C. S.; Marshall, J. A.; Sklar, L. S.; Granger, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    River incision sets the pace of landscape evolution and so is crucial to linkages among climate, tectonics and topography. Theoretical and experimental studies indicate that bedrock river incision should be regulated by both the quantity and caliber of sediment supply, which together affect the availability and persistence of bed-scouring tools in the channel. Rates of sediment supply are now quantified routinely using cosmogenic- radionuclide-based (CRN) measurements of hillslope erosion rates. Although grain-size data are also measured routinely (e.g., as part of state and federal soil surveys), they are not widely available for soils with well-constrained rates of erosion and weathering. As a result, there is much to learn about how weathering and erosion interrelate to regulate grain-size distributions in hillslope soils. Moreover, we lack a strong empirical basis for investigating how the rate and caliber of sediment supply affect bedrock river incision in natural systems. Here we compare new grain-size data with existing CRN-based rates of erosion and weathering for a series of granitic soils at two climatically diverse sites in the Sierra Nevada, California. Our results indicate that the percentage of coarse material---which presumably becomes the bedload that abrades and lowers channels---varies significantly across each site. At the colder, wetter site, differences in grain size and soil depth are substantial, despite little variability in erosion rates; coarse material abundance appears to increase with the density of bedrock outcrops, which increases with hillslope gradients, according to previous work. At the hotter, drier site, where rates of erosion and weathering vary by 10-fold, soil thickness and texture and the abundance of outcrops do not vary systematically across the landscape. We speculate that the differences in soil development across our two sites partly reflect effects of small differences in the ratio of biotite to hornblende in the

  15. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy neon and iron ions in human fibroblasts. II. Probing individual notI fragments by hybridization.

    PubMed

    Löbrich, M; Rydberg, B; Cooper, P K

    1994-08-01

    The initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks induced by energetic heavy ions (425 MeV/u neon and 250, 400 and 600 MeV/u iron) in comparison to X rays were measured in normal human diploid fibroblast cells within three small areas of the genome, defined by NotI fragments of 3.2, 2.0 and 1.2 Mbp. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated cells, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with probes recognizing single-copy sequences within the three NotI fragments. The gradual disappearance of the full-size NotI fragment with dose and the appearance of a smear of broken DNA molecules are quantified. Assuming Poisson statistics for the number of double-strand breaks induced per NotI fragment of known size, absolute yields of DNA double-strand breaks were calculated and determined to be linear with dose in all cases, with the neon ion (LET 32 keV/microns) producing 4.4 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy and all three iron-ion beams (LETs from 190 to 350 keV/microns) producing 2.8 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy, giving RBE values for production of double-strand breaks of 0.76 for neon and 0.48 for iron in comparison to our previously determined X-ray induction rate of 5.8 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy. These RBE values are in good agreement with results of measurements over the whole genome as reported in the accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, M. Löbrich and P. Cooper, Radiat. Res. 139, 133-141, 1994). The distribution of broken DNA molecules was similar for the various radiations, supporting a random distribution of double-strand breaks induced by the heavy ions over Mbp distances; however, correlated breaks (clusters) over much smaller distances are not ruled out. Reconstitution of the 3.2 Mbp NotI fragment was studied during postirradiation incubation of the cells as a measure of rejoining of correct DNA ends. The proportion of breaks repaired decreased with increasing LET.

  16. Measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments by the "correlated ion and neutral time of flight" method combined with "velocity-map imaging"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthias, F.; Feketeová, L.; Della Negra, R.; Dupasquier, T.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Märk, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the challenging field of imaging molecular dynamics, a novel method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments produced in collision induced dissociation experiments on an event-by-event basis. This has been made possible by combining a correlated ion and neutral time of flight method with a velocity map imaging technique. This new method relies on a multiparametric correlated detection of the neutral and charged fragments from collision induced dissociation on one single detector. Its implementation on the DIAM device (Device for irradiation of biomolecular clusters) (Dispositif d'Irradiation d'Agrégats bioMoléculaires) allowed us to measure the velocity distribution of water molecules evaporated from collision induced dissociation of mass- and energy-selected protonated water clusters.

  17. Anisotropy of the angular distribution of fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions: The influence of the level-density parameter and the neck thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, D.; Pahlavani, M. R.; Alavi, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the Langevin dynamical approach, the neutron multiplicity and the anisotropy of angular distribution of fission fragments in heavy ion fusion-fission reactions were calculated. We applied one- and two-dimensional Langevin equations to study the decay of a hot excited compound nucleus. The influence of the level-density parameter on neutron multiplicity and anisotropy of angular distribution of fission fragments was investigated. We used the level-density parameter based on the liquid drop model with two different values of the Bartel approach and Pomorska approach. Our calculations show that the anisotropy and neutron multiplicity are affected by level-density parameter and neck thickness. The calculations were performed on the 16O+208Pb and 20Ne+209Bi reactions. Obtained results in the case of the two-dimensional Langevin with a level-density parameter based on Bartel and co-workers approach are in better agreement with experimental data.

  18. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  19. Induced in-source fragmentation pattern of certain novel (1Z,2E)-N-(aryl)propanehydrazonoyl chlorides by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer system (QQQ) typically yields more abundant fragment ions than those produced with resonance excitation in the presence of helium gas in the ion trap mass spectrometer system (IT). Detailed product ion spectra can be obtained from one stage MS2 scan using the QQQ. In contrast, generating the same number of fragment ions in the ion trap requires multiple stages of fragmentation (MSn) using CID via in-trap resonance excitation with the associated time penalties and drop in sensitivity. Results The use of in-source fragmentation with electrospray ionization (ESI) followed by product ion scan (MS2) in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer system, was demonstrated. This process enhances the qualitative power of tandem mass spectrometry to simulate the MS3 of ion trap for a comprehensive study of fragmentation mechanisms. A five pharmacologically significant (1Z, 2E)-N-arylpropanehydrazonoyl chlorides (3a-e) were chosen as model compounds for this study. In this work, detailed fragmentation pathways were elucidated by further dissociation of each fragment ion in the ion spectrum, essentially, by incorporating fragmentor voltage induced dissociation (in-source fragmentation) and isolation of fragments in a quadrupole cell Q1. Subsequently, CID occurs in cell, Q2, and fragment ions are analyzed in Q3 operated in product ion mode this process can be referred to as pseudo-MS3 scan mode. Conclusions This approach allowed unambiguous assignment of all fragment ions using tandem mass spectrometer and provided adequate sensitivity and selectivity. It is beneficial for structure determination of unknown trace components. The data presented in this paper provide useful information on the effect of different substituents on the ionization/fragmentation processes and can be used in the characterization of this important class of compounds. PMID:23351484

  20. Probing the binding of Cu(2+) ions to a fragment of the Aβ(1-42) polypeptide using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-09-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD), with the NMR-derived restraints, were used to investigate the interactions of Cu(2+) ions with a fragment of the Aβ(1-42) polypeptide, Aβ(5-16) with the following sequence: Ac-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr-Glu-Val-His-His-Gln-Lys-NH2, denoted as HZ1. The studies presented in this paper, when compared with our previous results (Makowska et al., Spectrochim. Acta A 153: 451-456), show that the affinity of the peptide to metal ions is conformation-dependent. All the measurements were carried out in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution, pH6.0. The Stern-Volmer equations, along with spectroscopic observations, were used to determine the quenching and binding parameters. The obtained results unequivocally suggest that Cu(2+) ions quench the fluorescence of HZ1 only through a static quenching mechanism, in contrast to the fragment from the N-terminal part of the FPB28 protein, with sequence Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr- NH2 (D9) and its derivative with a single point mutation: Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr- NH2 (D9_M), where dynamic quenching occurred. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔITCH, ΔITCS) for the interactions between Cu(2+) ions and the HZ1 peptide were determined from the calorimetric data. The conditional thermodynamic parameters suggest that, under the experimental conditions, the formation of the Cu(2+)-HZ1 complex is both an enthalpy and entropy driven process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [An ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography/linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry method coupled with a diagnostic fragment ions-searching-based strategy for rapid identification and characterization of chemical components in Polygonum cuspidatum].

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhiran; Liang, Hailong; Liang, Chabhufi; Xu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    A method for qualitative analysis of constituents in Polygonum cuspidatum by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS) has been established. The methanol extract of Polygonum cuspidatumrn was separated on a Waters UPLC C18 column using acetonitrile-water (containing formic acid) eluting system and detected by LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in negative mode. The targeted components were further fragmented in LTQ and high accuracy data were acquired by Orbitrap MS. The summarized fragmentation pathways of typical reference components and a diagnostic fragment ions-searching-based strategy were used for detection and identification of the main phenolic components in Polygonum cuspidatum. Other clues such as nitrogen rule, even electron rule, degree of unsaturation rule and isotopic peak data were included for the structural elucidation as well. The whole analytical procedure was within 10 min and more than 30 components were identified or tentatively identified. This method is helpful for further phytochemical research and quality control on Polygonum cuspidatum and related preparations.

  2. Rapid profiling of polymeric phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza by hybrid data-dependent/targeted multistage mass spectrometry acquisition based on expected compounds prediction and fragment ion searching.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Feng, Zijin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Zhe; Han, Sumei; Hou, Jinjun; Li, Zhenwei; Wu, Wanying; Guo, De-An

    2018-04-01

    Phenolic acids are the major water-soluble components in Salvia miltiorrhiza (>5%). According to previous studies, many of them contribute to the cardiovascular effects and antioxidant effects of S. miltiorrhiza. Polymeric phenolic acids can be considered as the tanshinol derived metabolites, e.g., dimmers, trimers, and tetramers. A strategy combined with tanshinol-based expected compounds prediction, total ion chromatogram filtering, fragment ion searching, and parent list-based multistage mass spectrometry acquisition by linear trap quadropole-orbitrap Velos mass spectrometry was proposed to rapid profile polymeric phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. More than 480 potential polymeric phenolic acids could be screened out by this strategy. Based on the fragment information obtained by parent list-activated data dependent multistage mass spectrometry acquisition, 190 polymeric phenolic acids were characterized by comparing their mass information with literature data, and 18 of them were firstly detected from S. miltiorrhiza. Seven potential compounds were tentatively characterized as new polymeric phenolic acids from S. miltiorrhiza. This strategy facilitates identification of polymeric phenolic acids in complex matrix with both selectivity and sensitivity, which could be expanded for rapid discovery and identification of compounds from complex matrix. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Low-energy collision-induced fragmentation of negative ions derived from ortho-, meta-, and para-hydroxyphenyl carbaldehydes, ketones, and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Athula B; Ruzicka, Josef; Varughese, Deepu; Bialecki, Jason B; Jafri, Sayed

    2007-09-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of anions derived from several hydroxyphenyl carbaldehydes and ketones were recorded and mechanistically rationalized. For example, the spectrum of m/z 121 ion of deprotonated ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde shows an intense peak at m/z 93 for a loss of carbon monoxide attributable to an ortho-effect mediated by a charge-directed heterolytic fragmentation mechanism. In contrast, the m/z 121 ion derived from meta and para isomers undergoes a charge-remote homolytic cleavage to eliminate an *H and form a distonic anion radical, which eventually loses CO to produce a peak at m/z 92. In fact, for the para isomer, this two-step homolytic mechanism is the most dominant fragmentation pathway. The spectrum of the meta isomer on the other hand, shows two predominant peaks at m/z 92 and 93 representing both homolytic and heterolytic fragmentations, respectively. (18)O-isotope-labeling studies confirmed that the oxygen in the CO molecule that is eliminated from the anion of meta-hydroxybenzaldehyde originates from either the aldehydic or the phenolic group. In contrast, anions of ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, both of which show two consecutive CO eliminations, specifically lose the carbonyl oxygen first, followed by that of the phenolic group. Anions from 2-hydroxyphenyl alkyl ketones lose a ketene by a hydrogen transfer predominantly from the alpha position. Interestingly, a very significant charge-remote 1,4-elimination of a H(2) molecule was observed from the anion derived from 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde. For this mechanism to operate, a labile hydrogen atom should be available on the hydroxyl group adjacent to the carbaldehyde functionality.

  4. Determination of N-linked glycosylation in viral glycoproteins by negative ion mass spectrometry and ion mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, David; Harvey, David J.; Halldorsson, Steinar; Doores, Katie J.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glycan analysis of virion-derived glycoproteins is challenging due to the difficulties in glycoprotein isolation and low sample abundance. Here, we describe how ion mobility mass spectrometry can be used to obtain spectra from virion samples. We also describe how negative ion fragmentation of glycans can be used to probe structural features of virion glycans. PMID:26169737

  5. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Ackerman, Luke K.; Johnson, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  6. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  7. An algorithm to correct saturated mass spectrometry ion abundances for enhanced quantitation and mass accuracy in omic studies

    DOE PAGES

    Bilbao, Aivett; Gibbons, Bryson C.; Slysz, Gordon W.; ...

    2017-11-06

    We present that the mass accuracy and peak intensity of ions detected by mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are essential to facilitate compound identification and quantitation. However, high concentration species can yield erroneous results if their ion intensities reach beyond the limits of the detection system, leading to distorted and non-ideal detector response (e.g. saturation), and largely precluding the calculation of accurate m/z and intensity values. Here we present an open source computational method to correct peaks above a defined intensity (saturated) threshold determined by the MS instrumentation such as the analog-to-digital converters or time-to-digital converters used in conjunction with time-of-flightmore » MS. Here, in this method, the isotopic envelope for each observed ion above the saturation threshold is compared to its expected theoretical isotopic distribution. The most intense isotopic peak for which saturation does not occur is then utilized to re-calculate the precursor m/z and correct the intensity, resulting in both higher mass accuracy and greater dynamic range. The benefits of this approach were evaluated with proteomic and lipidomic datasets of varying complexities. After correcting the high concentration species, reduced mass errors and enhanced dynamic range were observed for both simple and complex omic samples. Specifically, the mass error dropped by more than 50% in most cases for highly saturated species and dynamic range increased by 1–2 orders of magnitude for peptides in a blood serum sample.« less

  8. An algorithm to correct saturated mass spectrometry ion abundances for enhanced quantitation and mass accuracy in omic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Aivett; Gibbons, Bryson C.; Slysz, Gordon W.

    The mass accuracy and peak intensity of ions detected by mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are essential to facilitate compound identification and quantitation. However, high concentration species can easily cause problems if their ion intensities reach beyond the limits of the detection system, leading to distorted and non-ideal detector response (e.g. saturation), and largely precluding the calculation of accurate m/z and intensity values. Here we present an open source computational method to correct peaks above a defined intensity (saturated) threshold determined by the MS instrumentation such as the analog-to-digital converters or time-to-digital converters used in conjunction with time-of-flight MS. In thismore » method, the isotopic envelope for each observed ion above the saturation threshold is compared to its expected theoretical isotopic distribution. The most intense isotopic peak for which saturation does not occur is then utilized to re-calculate the precursor m/z and correct the intensity, resulting in both higher mass accuracy and greater dynamic range. The benefits of this approach were evaluated with proteomic and lipidomic datasets of varying complexities. After correcting the high concentration species, reduced mass errors and enhanced dynamic range were observed for both simple and complex omic samples. Specifically, the mass error dropped by more than 50% in most cases with highly saturated species and dynamic range increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude for peptides in a blood serum sample.« less

  9. An algorithm to correct saturated mass spectrometry ion abundances for enhanced quantitation and mass accuracy in omic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Aivett; Gibbons, Bryson C.; Slysz, Gordon W.

    We present that the mass accuracy and peak intensity of ions detected by mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are essential to facilitate compound identification and quantitation. However, high concentration species can yield erroneous results if their ion intensities reach beyond the limits of the detection system, leading to distorted and non-ideal detector response (e.g. saturation), and largely precluding the calculation of accurate m/z and intensity values. Here we present an open source computational method to correct peaks above a defined intensity (saturated) threshold determined by the MS instrumentation such as the analog-to-digital converters or time-to-digital converters used in conjunction with time-of-flightmore » MS. Here, in this method, the isotopic envelope for each observed ion above the saturation threshold is compared to its expected theoretical isotopic distribution. The most intense isotopic peak for which saturation does not occur is then utilized to re-calculate the precursor m/z and correct the intensity, resulting in both higher mass accuracy and greater dynamic range. The benefits of this approach were evaluated with proteomic and lipidomic datasets of varying complexities. After correcting the high concentration species, reduced mass errors and enhanced dynamic range were observed for both simple and complex omic samples. Specifically, the mass error dropped by more than 50% in most cases for highly saturated species and dynamic range increased by 1–2 orders of magnitude for peptides in a blood serum sample.« less

  10. UVnovo: A De Novo Sequencing Algorithm Using Single Series of Fragment Ions via Chromophore Tagging and 351 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Robotham, Scott A.; Horton, Andrew P.; Cannon, Joe R.; Cotham, Victoria C.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    De novo peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry represents an important strategy for characterizing novel peptides and proteins, in which a peptide’s amino acid sequence is inferred directly from the precursor peptide mass and tandem mass spectrum (MS/MS or MS3) fragment ions, without comparison to a reference proteome. This method is ideal for organisms or samples lacking a complete or well-annotated reference sequence set. One of the major barriers to de novo spectral interpretation arises from confusion of N- and C-terminal ion series due to the symmetry between b and y ion pairs created by collisional activation methods (or c, z ions for electron-based activation methods). This is known as the ‘antisymmetric path problem’ and leads to inverted amino acid subsequences within a de novo reconstruction. Here, we combine several key strategies for de novo peptide sequencing into a single high-throughput pipeline: high efficiency carbamylation blocks lysine side chains, and subsequent tryptic digestion and N-terminal peptide derivatization with the ultraviolet chromophore AMCA yields peptides susceptible to 351 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). UVPD-MS/MS of the AMCA-modified peptides then predominantly produces y ions in the MS/MS spectra, specifically addressing the antisymmetric path problem. Finally, the program UVnovo applies a random forest algorithm to automatically learn from and then interpret UVPD mass spectra, passing results to a hidden Markov model for de novo sequence prediction and scoring. We show this combined strategy provides high performance de novo peptide sequencing, enabling the de novo sequencing of thousands of peptides from an E. coli lysate at high confidence. PMID:26938041

  11. Forest Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters

    2007-01-01

    What Is Forest Fragmentation,and Why Is It Important? Forest fragmentation refers to a loss of forest and the division of the remaining forest into smaller blocks. Fragmentation is of concern primarily because of its impact on the conservation of biological diversity. Forest fragmentation can affect the amount and quality of habitat for many wildlife species (Fahrig...

  12. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  13. Gas-phase fragmentation of coordination compounds: loss of CO(2) from inorganic carbonato complexes to give metal oxide ions

    PubMed

    Dalgaard; McKenzie

    1999-10-01

    Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, novel transition metal oxide coordination complex ions are proposed as the products of the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of some carbonato complex ions through the loss of a mass equivalent to CO(2). CID spectra of [(tpa)CoCO(3)](+) (tpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)methylamine), [(bispicMe(2)en)Fe(&mgr;-O)(&mgr;-CO(3))Fe(bispicMe(2)en)]2+ (bispicMe(2)en = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethy)eth- ane-1, 2-diamine) and [(bpbp)Cu(2)CO(3)](+) (bpbp(-) = bis[(bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)amino)methyl]-4-tertbutylpheno-lato(1-)), show peaks assigned to the mono- and dinuclear oxide cations, [(tpa)CoO](+), [(bispicMe(2)en)(2)Fe(2)(O)(2)]2+ and [(bpbp)Cu(2)O](+), as the dominant species. These results can be likened to the reverse of typical synthetic reactions in which metal hydroxide compounds react with CO(2) to give metal carbonato compounds. Because of the lack of available protons in the gas phase, novel oxide species rather than the more common hydroxide ions are generated. These oxide ions are relevant to the highly oxidizing species proposed in oxygenation reactions catalysed by metal oxides and metalloenzymes. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. First Identification of 5,11-Dideoxytetrodotoxin in Marine Animals, and Characterization of Major Fragment Ions of Tetrodotoxin and Its Analogs by High Resolution ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Abe, Yuka; Kudo, Yuta; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J.; Konoki, Keiichi; Cho, Yuko; Adachi, Masaatsu; Imazu, Takuya; Nishikawa, Toshio; Isobe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Even though tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a widespread toxin in marine and terrestrial organisms, very little is known about the biosynthetic pathway used to produce it. By describing chemical structures of natural analogs of TTX, we can start to identify some of the precursors that might be important for TTX biosynthesis. In the present study, an analog of TTX, 5,11-dideoxyTTX, was identified for the first time in natural sources, the ovary of the pufferfish and the pharynx of a flatworm (planocerid sp. 1), by comparison with totally synthesized (−)-5,11-dideoxyTTX, using high resolution ESI-LC-MS. Based on the presence of 5,11-dideoxyTTX together with a series of known deoxy analogs, 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 6,11-dideoxyTTX, 11-deoxyTTX, and 5-deoxyTTX, in these animals, we predicted two routes of stepwise oxidation pathways in the late stages of biosynthesis of TTX. Furthermore, high resolution masses of the major fragment ions of TTX, 6,11-dideoxyTTX, and 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX were also measured, and their molecular formulas and structures were predicted to compare them with each other. Although both TTX and 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX give major fragment ions that are very close, m/z 162.0660 and 162.1020, respectively, they are distinguishable and predicted to be different molecular formulas. These data will be useful for identification of TTXs using high resolution LC-MS/MS. PMID:23924959

  15. Nanosheets of earth-abundant jarosite as novel anodes for high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan-Li; Wen, Yuren; Chen, Chia-Chin; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2015-05-20

    Nanosheets of earth-abundant jarosite were fabricated via a facile template-engaged redox coprecipitation strategy at room temperature and employed as novel anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for the first time. These 2D materials exhibit high capacities, excellent rate capability, and prolonged cycling performance. As for KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 jarosite nanosheets (KNSs), the reversible capacities of above 1300 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 620 mAh g(-1) after 4000 cycles at a very high current density of 10 A g(-1) were achieved, respectively. Moreover, the resulting 2D nanomaterials retain good structural integrity upon cycling. These results reveal great potential of jarosite nanosheets as low-cost and high-performance anode materials for next-generation LIBs.

  16. U, Th, Pb and REE abundances and Pb 207/Pb 206 ages of individual minerals in returned lunar material by ion microprobe mass analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. A.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results of ion microprobe analyses of Apollo 11, 12 and 14 material, showing that U, Th, Pb and REE are concentrated in accessory minerals such as apatite, whitlockite, zircon, baddeleyite, zirkelite, and tranquillityite. Th/U ratios are found to vary by over a factor of 40 in these minerals. K, Ba, Rb and Sr have been localized in a K rich, U and Th poor glass phase that is commonly associated with the U and Th bearing accessory minerals. Li is observed to be fairly evenly distributed between the various accessory phases. The phosphates have been found to have REE abundance patterns (normalized to the chondrite abundances) that are fairly flat, while the Zr bearing minerals have patterns that rise steeply, by factors of ten or more, from La to Gd. All the accessory minerals have large negative Eu anomalies. Radiometric age dates (Pb 207/Pb 206) of the individual U and Th bearing minerals compare favorably with the Pb 207/Pb 206 age of the bulk rocks.

  17. Helium abundance and speed difference between helium ions and protons in the solar wind from coronal holes, active regions, and quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, M. S.; Li, Bo; Xia, LiDong; Huang, ZhengHua

    2018-05-01

    Two main models have been developed to explain the mechanisms of release, heating and acceleration of the nascent solar wind, the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) models and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, in which the plasma release processes are fundamentally different. Given that the statistical observational properties of helium ions produced in magnetically diverse solar regions could provide valuable information for the solar wind modelling, we examine the statistical properties of the helium abundance (AHe) and the speed difference between helium ions and protons (vαp) for coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs) and the quiet Sun (QS). We find bimodal distributions in the space of AHeand vαp/vA(where vA is the local Alfvén speed) for the solar wind as a whole. The CH wind measurements are concentrated at higher AHeand vαp/vAvalues with a smaller AHedistribution range, while the AR and QS wind is associated with lower AHeand vαp/vA, and a larger AHedistribution range. The magnetic diversity of the source regions and the physical processes related to it are possibly responsible for the different properties of AHeand vαp/vA. The statistical results suggest that the two solar wind generation mechanisms, WTD and RLO, work in parallel in all solar wind source regions. In CH regions WTD plays a major role, whereas the RLO mechanism is more important in AR and QS.

  18. Factors Affecting the Production of Aromatic Immonium Ions in MALDI 157 nm Photodissociation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Ashley, Daniel C.; Keijzer, Karlijn; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Immonium ions are commonly observed in the high energy fragmentation of peptide ions. In a MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer, singly charged peptides photofragmented with 157 nm VUV light yield a copious abundance of immonium ions, especially those from aromatic residues. However, their intensities may vary from one peptide to another. In this work, the effect of varying amino acid position, peptide length, and peptide composition on immonium ion yield is investigated. Internal immonium ions are found to have the strongest intensity, whereas immonium ions arising from C-terminal residues are the weakest. Peptide length and competition among residues also strongly influence the immonium ion production. Quantum calculations provide insights about immonium ion structures and the fragment ion conformations that promote or inhibit immonium ion formation.

  19. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil, E-mail: Anil.Shukla@pnnl.gov; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N{sub 2}). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sup +}, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sub m}{sup m+}, (HCOOLi){sub n}HCOO{sup −}, and (HCOOLi){sub n}(HCOO){sub m}{sup m−}. Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations ofmore » singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi){sub 2}) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.« less

  20. Estimating abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, Chris; Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  1. SU-F-J-202: Secondary Radiation Measurements for Charged Particle Therapy Monitoring: Fragmentation of Therapeutic He, C and O Ion Beams Impinging On a PMMA Target

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, A; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Paramatti, R

    Purpose: In Charged Particle Therapy (CPT), besides protons, there has been recently a growing interest in 4He, 12C and 16O beams. The secondary radiation produced in the interaction of those beams with a patient could be potentially used for on-line monitoring of range uncertainties in order to fully exploit the advantages of those light ions resulting from increased Radio Biological Effectiveness, reduced multiple scattering and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio. The study and precise characterization of secondary radiation (beta+, prompt gamma, charged fragments) is the cornerstone of any R&D activity aiming for online monitoring development and purpose of the analysis presented here.more » Methods: We present the measurements of the secondary radiation generated by He, C and O beams impinging on a beam stopping PMMA target. The data has been collected at the Heidelberg Ionbeam Therapy center (HIT), where several millions of collisions were recorded at different energies, relevant for therapeutical applications. Results: The experimental setup, as well as the analysis strategies will be reviewed. The detected particle fluxes as a function of the primary beam energy and the emission angle with respect to the beam direction will be presented and compared to the results of other available measurements. In addition, the energy spectra and emission shapes of charged secondary particles will be shown and discussed in the context of the primary beam range monitoring technique that is being developed by the ARPG collaboration, within the INSIDE project funded by the Italian research ministry. The implications for dose monitoring applications will be discussed, in the context of the current (or planned) state-of- the-art detector solutions. Conclusion: The characterization of the radiation produced by 12C, 4He and 16O beams fully supports the feasibility of on-line range monitoring in the clinical practice of CPT by means of secondary particles detection.« less

  2. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case ofmore » positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.« less

  3. ACE-SWICS In Situ Plasma Composition of Fragmented Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Rubin, M.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2013-12-01

    The interiors of comets contain some of the most pristine material in the solar system. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, discovered in 1930 with a double nucleus, is a Jupiter-family comet with a 5.34-year period. This comet split into 5 fragments in 1995 and disintegrated into nearly 70 pieces in 2006. In May and June of 2006, recently ionized cometary particles originating from some of these fragments were collected with the ACE-SWICS sensor. Due to a combination of the close proximity of the fragments passing between ACE-SWICS and the Sun, and the instrument characteristics, unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during this time. The cometary material released from some of these fragments can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pick-up ions having a mass-per-charge of 16-18 amu/e. With a focus on Helium, Carbon, and water-group ions, we present an analysis of the cometary plasma. Charge state ratios of C+/O+ fall below 0.1 during detection of comet fragment plasma, and there is a clear increase in He+ during fragment crossings. The C/O ratio and He charge states are used to provide constraints on the activity of the cometary fragments and also the spatial distribution of the extended and ionized cometary tail.

  4. Peptide Fragmentation Induced by Radicals at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Laiko, Victor V.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essentially atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to ECD/ETD, along with the y-/b- fragments that are specific to CAD. In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source. PMID:19034885

  5. Fragmentation Pathways of Lithiated Hexose Monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Frye, Joseph W.; Tschampel, John; Rabus, Jordan M.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2018-05-01

    We characterize the primary fragmentation reactions of three isomeric lithiated D-hexose sugars (glucose, galactose, and mannose) utilizing tandem mass spectrometry, regiospecific labeling, and theory. We provide evidence that these three isomers populate similar fragmentation pathways to produce the abundant cross-ring cleavage peaks (0,2A1 and 0,3A1). These pathways are highly consistent with the prior literature (Hofmeister et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 5964-5970, 1991, Bythell et al. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 28, 688-703, 2017, Rabus et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 19, 25643-25652, 2017) and the present labeling data. However, the structure-specific energetics and rate-determining steps of these reactions differ as a function of precursor sugar and anomeric configuration. The lowest energy water loss pathways involve loss of the anomeric oxygen to furnish B1 ions. For glucose and galactose, the lithiated α-anomers generate ketone structures at C2 in a concerted reaction involving a 1,2-migration of the C2-H to the anomeric carbon (C1). In contrast, the β-anomers are predicted to form 1,3-anhydroglucose/galactose B1 ion structures. Initiation of the water loss reactions from each anomeric configuration requires distinct reactive conformers, resulting in different product ion structures. Inversion of the stereochemistry at C2 has marked consequences. Both lithiated mannose forms expel water to form 1,2-anhydromannose B1 ions with the newly formed epoxide group above the ring. Additionally, provided water loss is not instantaneous, the α-anomer can also isomerize to generate a ketone structure at C2 in a concerted reaction involving a 1,2-migration of the C2-H to C1. This product is indistinguishable to that from α-glucose. The energetics and interplay of these pathways are discussed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  7. Chameleon fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signaturemore » which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.« less

  8. Diagnostic fragment-ion-based and extension strategy coupled to DFIs intensity analysis for identification of chlorogenic acids isomers in Flos Lonicerae Japonicae by HPLC-ESI-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Yu; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ning; Wang, Zi-Jian; Lu, Jian-Qiu; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2013-01-30

    A method of modified diagnostic fragment-ion-based extension strategy (DFIBES) coupled to DFIs (diagnostic fragmentation ions) intensity analysis was successfully established to simultaneously screen and identify the chlorogenic acids (CGAs) in Flos Lonicerae Japonicae (FLJ) by HPLC-ESI-MS(n). DFIs, such as m/z 191 [quinic acid-H](-), m/z 179 [caffeic acid-H](-) and m/z 173 [quinic acid-H-H2O](-) were determined or proposed from the fragmentation patterns analysis of corresponding reference substances for every chemical family of CGAs. A "structure extension" method was then proposed based on the well-demonstrated fragmentation patterns and was successively applied into the rapid screening of CGAs in FLJ. Considering that substitution isomerism is a common phenomenon, a full ESI-MS(n) fragmentation analysis according to the intensity of DFIs has been performed to identify the CGA isomers. Based on the DFIs and intensity analysis, 41 peaks attributed to CGAs including 4 caffeoylquinic acids (CQA), 7 CQA glycosides, 6 dicaffeoylquinic acids (DiCQA), 10 DiCQA glycosides, 1 tricaffeoylquinic acids (TriCQA), 4p-coumaroylquinic acids (pCoQA), 3 feruloylquinic acids (FQA) and 6 caffeoylferuloylquinic acids (CFQA) were identified preliminarily in a 65-min chromatographic run. It was the first time to systematically report the presence of CGAs in FLJ, especially for CQA glycosides, DiCQA glycosides, TriCQA, pCoQA and CFQA. All the results indicated that the method of developed DFIBES coupled to DFIs analysis was feasible, reliable and universal for screening and identifying the constituents with the same carbon skeletons especially the isomeric compounds from the complex extract of TCMs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. On the gas phase fragmentation of protonated uracil: a statistical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rossich Molina, Estefanía; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Spezia, Riccardo; Martínez-Núñez, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The potential energy surface of protonated uracil has been explored by an automated transition state search procedure, resulting in the finding of 1398 stationary points and 751 reactive channels, which can be categorized into isomerizations between pairs of isomers, unimolecular fragmentations and bimolecular reactions. The use of statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations allowed us to determine the relative abundances of each fragmentation channel as a function of the ion's internal energy. The KMC/RRKM product abundances are compared with novel mass spectrometry (MS) experiments in the collision energy range 1-6 eV. To facilitate the comparison between theory and experiments, further dynamics simulations are carried out to determine the fraction of collision energy converted into the ion's internal energy. The KMC simulations show that the major fragmentation channels are isocyanic acid and ammonia losses, in good agreement with experiments. The third predominant channel is water loss according to both theory and experiments, although the abundance obtained in the KMC simulations is very low, suggesting that non-statistical dynamics might play an important role in this channel. Isocyanic acid (HNCOH(+)) is also an important product in the KMC simulations, although its abundance is only significant at internal energies not accessible in the MS experiments.

  10. Versatile lipid profiling by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry using all ion fragmentation and polarity switching. Preliminary application for serum samples phenotyping related to canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallart-Ayala, H; Courant, F; Severe, S; Antignac, J-P; Morio, F; Abadie, J; Le Bizec, B

    2013-09-24

    Lipids represent an extended class of substances characterized by such high variety and complexity that makes their unified analyses by liquid chromatography coupled to either high resolution or tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS or LC-MS/MS) a real challenge. In the present study, a new versatile methodology associating ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS/MS) have been developed for a comprehensive analysis of lipids. The use of polarity switching and "all ion fragmentation" (AIF) have been two action levels particularly exploited to finally permit the detection and identification of a multi-class and multi-analyte extended range of lipids in a single run. For identification purposes, both higher energy collision dissociation (HCD) and in-source CID (collision induced dissociation) fragmentation were evaluated in order to obtain information about the precursor and product ions in the same spectra. This approach provides both class-specific and lipid-specific fragments, enhancing lipid identification. Finally, the developed method was applied for differential phenotyping of serum samples collected from pet dogs developing spontaneous malignant mammary tumors and health controls. A biological signature associated with the presence of cancer was then successfully revealed from this lipidome analysis, which required to be further investigated and confirmed at larger scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neutral Fragment Filtering for Rapid Identification of New Diester-Diterpenoid Alkaloids in Roots of Aconitum carmichaeli by Ultra-High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Linear Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiao Hui; Yang, Yi Ming; Zhu, Da Yuan; Xu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and effective method was developed for separation and identification of diester-diterpenoid alkaloids (DDA) in the roots of Aconitum carmichaeli by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution LTQ-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MSn). According to accurate mass measurement and the characteristic neutral loss filtering strategy, a total of 42 diester-diterpenoid alkaloids (DDA) were rapidly detected and characterized or tentatively identified. Meanwhile, the proposed fragmentation pathways and the major diagnostic fragment ions of aconitine, mesaconitine and hypaconitine were investigated to trace DDA derivatives in crude plant extracts. 23 potential new compounds were successfully screened and characterized in Aconitum carmichaeli, including 16 short chain fatty acyls DDA, 4 N-dealkyl DDA and several isomers of aconitine, mesaconitine and hypaconitine. PMID:23285005

  12. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  13. MSAll strategy for comprehensive quantitative analysis of PEGylated-doxorubicin, PEG and doxorubicin by LC-high resolution q-q-TOF mass spectrometry coupled with all window acquisition of all fragment ion spectra.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Su, Chong; Ren, Tianming; Meng, Xiangjun; Shi, Meiyun; Paul Fawcett, J; Zhang, Mengliang; Hu, Wei; Gu, Jingkai

    2017-11-06

    The covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to therapeutic compounds (known as PEGylation) is one of the most promising techniques to improve the biological efficacy of small molecular weight drugs. After administration, PEGylated prodrugs can be metabolized into pharmacologically active compounds so that PEGylated drug, free drug and released PEG are present simultaneously in the body. Understanding the pharmacokinetic behavior of these three compounds is needed to guide the development of pegylated theranostic agents. However, PEGs are polydisperse molecules with a wide range of molecular weights, so that the simultaneous quantitation of PEGs and PEGylated molecules in biological matrices is very challenging. This article reports the application of a data-independent acquisition method (MS All ) based on liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-q-q-TOF-MS) in the positive ion mode to the simultaneous determination of methoxyPEG2000-doxorubicin (mPEG2K-Dox) and its breakdown products in rat blood. Using the MS All technique, precursor ions of all molecules are generated in q1, fragmented to product ions in q2 (collision cell), and subjected to TOF separation before precursor and product ions are recorded using low and high collision energies (CE) respectively in different experiments for a single sample injection. In this study, dissociation in q2 generated a series of high resolution PEG-related product ions at m/z 89.0611, 133.0869, 177.1102, 221.1366, 265.1622, 309.1878, and 353.2108 corresponding to fragments containing various numbers of ethylene oxide subunits, Dox-related product ions at m/z 321.0838 and 361.0785, and an mPEG2K-Dox specific product ion at m/z 365.0735. Detection of mPEGs and mPEG2K-Dox was based on high resolution extracted ions of mPEG and the specific compound. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of doxorubicin, mPEG2K (methylated polyethylene glycol

  14. How enhanced molecular ions in Cold EI improve compound identification by the NIST library.

    PubMed

    Alon, Tal; Amirav, Aviv

    2015-12-15

    Library-based compound identification with electron ionization (EI) mass spectrometry (MS) is a well-established identification method which provides the names and structures of sample compounds up to the isomer level. The library (such as NIST) search algorithm compares different EI mass spectra in the library's database with the measured EI mass spectrum, assigning each of them a similarity score called 'Match' and an overall identification probability. Cold EI, electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams, provides mass spectra with all the standard EI fragment ions combined with enhanced Molecular Ions and high-mass fragments. As a result, Cold EI mass spectra differ from those provided by standard EI and tend to yield lower matching scores. However, in most cases, library identification actually improves with Cold EI, as library identification probabilities for the correct library mass spectra increase, despite the lower matching factors. This research examined the way that enhanced molecular ion abundances affect library identification probability and the way that Cold EI mass spectra, which include enhanced molecular ions and high-mass fragment ions, typically improve library identification results. It involved several computer simulations, which incrementally modified the relative abundances of the various ions and analyzed the resulting mass spectra. The simulation results support previous measurements, showing that while enhanced molecular ion and high-mass fragment ions lower the matching factor of the correct library compound, the matching factors of the incorrect library candidates are lowered even more, resulting in a rise in the identification probability for the correct compound. This behavior which was previously observed by analyzing Cold EI mass spectra can be explained by the fact that high-mass ions, and especially the molecular ion, characterize a compound more than low-mass ions and therefore carries more

  15. Differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization CAD tandem mass spectrometry in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Lucas M.; Owen, Ben C.; Gallardo, Vanessa A.

    2011-01-01

    Positive-mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS n ) was tested for the differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids. Each analyte forms exclusively an abundant protonated molecule upon ionization via positive-mode APCI in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Energy-resolved collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments carried out on the protonated analytes revealed fragmentation patterns that varied based on the location of the functional groups. Unambiguous differentiation between the regioisomers was achieved in each case by observing different fragmentation patterns, different relative abundances of ion-molecule reaction products, or different relative abundances of fragment ions formed at differentmore » collision energies. The mechanisms of some of the reactions were examined by H/D exchange reactions and molecular orbital calculations.« less

  16. Quantification and micron-scale imaging of spatial distribution of trace beryllium in shrapnel fragments and metallurgic samples with correlative fluorescence detection method and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L; Chandra, S; Agrawal, A

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a report raised the possibility of shrapnel-induced chronic beryllium disease from long-term exposure to the surface of retained aluminum shrapnel fragments in the body. Since the shrapnel fragments contained trace beryllium, methodological developments were needed for beryllium quantification and to study its spatial distribution in relation to other matrix elements, such as aluminum and iron, in metallurgic samples. In this work, we developed methodology for quantification of trace beryllium in samples of shrapnel fragments and other metallurgic sample-types with main matrix of aluminum (aluminum cans from soda, beer, carbonated water and aluminum foil). Sample preparation procedures were developed for dissolving beryllium for its quantification with the fluorescence detection method for homogenized measurements. The spatial distribution of trace beryllium on the sample surface and in 3D was imaged with a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument, CAMECA IMS 3f secondary ion mass spectrometry ion microscope. The beryllium content of shrapnel (∼100 ppb) was the same as the trace quantities of beryllium found in aluminum cans. The beryllium content of aluminum foil (∼25 ppb) was significantly lower than cans. SIMS imaging analysis revealed beryllium to be distributed in the form of low micron-sized particles and clusters distributed randomly in X-Y- and Z dimensions, and often in association with iron, in the main aluminum matrix of cans. These observations indicate a plausible formation of Be-Fe or Al-Be alloy in the matrix of cans. Further observations were made on fluids (carbonated water) for understanding if trace beryllium in cans leached out and contaminated the food product. A direct comparison of carbonated water in aluminum cans and plastic bottles revealed that beryllium was below the detection limits of the fluorescence detection method (∼0.01 ppb). These observations indicate that beryllium present in aluminum matrix was either

  17. Characteristic fragment size distributions in dynamic fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fenghua; Molinari, Jean-François; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fragmentation of a dynamically expanding ring (Mott's problem) is studied numerically to obtain the fragment signatures under different strain rates. An empirical formula is proposed to calculate an average fragment size. Rayleigh distribution is found to describe the statistical properties of the fragment populations.

  18. Product ion isotopologue pattern: A tool to improve the reliability of elemental composition elucidations of unknown compounds in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Walker, S; Mol, G

    2016-04-15

    Elucidation of the elemental compositions of unknown compounds (e.g., in metabolomics) generally relies on the availability of accurate masses and isotopic ratios. This study focuses on the information provided by the abundance ratio within a product ion pair (monoisotopic versus the first isotopic peak) when isolating and fragmenting the first isotopic ion (first isotopic mass spectrum) of the precursor. This process relies on the capability of the quadrupole within the Q Orbitrap instrument to isolate a very narrow mass window. Selecting only the first isotopic peak (first isotopic mass spectrum) leads to the observation of a unique product ion pair. The lighter ion within such an isotopologue pair is monoisotopic, while the heavier ion contains a single carbon isotope. The observed abundance ratio is governed by the percentage of carbon atoms lost during the fragmentation and can be described by a hypergeometric distribution. The observed carbon isotopologue abundance ratio (product ion isotopologue pattern) gives reliable information regarding the percentage of carbon atoms lost in the fragmentation process. It therefore facilitates the elucidation of the involved precursor and product ions. Unlike conventional isotopic abundances, the product ion isotopologue pattern is hardly affected by isobaric interferences. Furthermore, the appearance of these pairs greatly aids in cleaning up a 'matrix-contaminated' product ion spectrum. The product ion isotopologue pattern is a valuable tool for structural elucidation. It increases confidence in results and permits structural elucidations for heavier ions. This tool is also very useful in elucidating the elemental composition of product ions. Such information is highly valued in the field of multi-residue analysis, where the accurate mass of product ions is required for the confirmation process. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Differentiating chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans using collision-induced dissociation; uronic acid cross-ring diagnostic fragments in a single stage of tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kailemia, Muchena J; Patel, Anish B; Johnson, Dane T; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The stereochemistry of the hexuronic acid residues of the structure of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is a key feature that affects their interactions with proteins and other biological functions. Electron based tandem mass spectrometry methods, in particular electron detachment dissociation (EDD), have been able to distinguish glucuronic acid (GlcA) from iduronic acid (IdoA) residues in some heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides by producing epimer-specific fragments. Similarly, the relative abundance of glycosidic fragment ions produced by collision-induced dissociation (CID) or EDD has been shown to correlate with the type of hexuronic acid present in chondroitin sulfate GAGs. The present work examines the effect of charge state and degree of sodium cationization on the CID fragmentation products that can be used to distinguish GlcA and IdoA containing chondroitin sulfate A and dermatan sulfate chains. The cross-ring fragments (2,4)A(n) and (0,2)X(n) formed within the hexuronic acid residues are highly preferential for chains containing GlcA, distinguishing it from IdoA. The diagnostic capability of the fragments requires the selection of a molecular ion and fragment ions with specific ionization characteristics, namely charge state and number of ionizable protons. The ions with the appropriate characteristics display diagnostic properties for all the chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate chains (degree of polymerization of 4-10) studied.

  20. Electron impact fragmentation of adenine: partial ionization cross sections for positive fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Finnegan, Sinead; Eden, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Using computer-controlled data acquisition we have measured mass spectra of positive ions for electron impact on adenine, with electron energies up to 100 eV. Ion yield curves for 50 ions have been obtained and normalized by comparing their sum to the average of calculated total ionization cross sections. Appearance energies have been determined for 37 ions; for 20 ions for the first time. All appearance energies are consistent with the fragmentation pathways identified in the literature. Second onset energies have been determined for 12 fragment ions (for 11 ions for the first time), indicating the occurrence of more than one fragmentation process e.g. for 39 u (C2HN+) and 70 u (C2H4N3+). Matching ion yield shapes (118-120 u, 107-108 u, 91-92 u, and 54-56 u) provide new evidence supporting closely related fragmentation pathways and are attributed to hydrogen rearrangement immediately preceding the fragmentation. We present the first measurement of the ion yield curve of the doubly charged parent ion (67.5 u), with an appearance energy of 23.5 ± 1.0 eV. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  1. Using In Silico Fragmentation to Improve Routine Residue Screening in Complex Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathryn; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-12-01

    Targeted residue screening requires the use of reference substances in order to identify potential residues. This becomes a difficult issue when using multi-residue methods capable of analyzing several hundreds of analytes. Therefore, the capability of in silico fragmentation based on a structure database ("suspect screening") instead of physical reference substances for routine targeted residue screening was investigated. The detection of fragment ions that can be predicted or explained by in silico software was utilized to reduce the number of false positives. These "proof of principle" experiments were done with a tool that is integrated into a commercial MS vendor instrument operating software (UNIFI) as well as with a platform-independent MS tool (Mass Frontier). A total of 97 analytes belonging to different chemical families were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected in a data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode using ion mobility hyphenated with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry. The instrument was operated in the MS E mode with alternating low and high energy traces. The fragments observed from product ion spectra were investigated using a "chopping" bond disconnection algorithm and a rule-based algorithm. The bond disconnection algorithm clearly explained more analyte product ions and a greater percentage of the spectral abundance than the rule-based software (92 out of the 97 compounds produced ≥1 explainable fragment ions). On the other hand, tests with a complex blank matrix (bovine liver extract) indicated that the chopping algorithm reports significantly more false positive fragments than the rule based software. Graphical Abstract.

  2. Using In Silico Fragmentation to Improve Routine Residue Screening in Complex Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathryn; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-12-01

    Targeted residue screening requires the use of reference substances in order to identify potential residues. This becomes a difficult issue when using multi-residue methods capable of analyzing several hundreds of analytes. Therefore, the capability of in silico fragmentation based on a structure database ("suspect screening") instead of physical reference substances for routine targeted residue screening was investigated. The detection of fragment ions that can be predicted or explained by in silico software was utilized to reduce the number of false positives. These "proof of principle" experiments were done with a tool that is integrated into a commercial MS vendor instrument operating software (UNIFI) as well as with a platform-independent MS tool (Mass Frontier). A total of 97 analytes belonging to different chemical families were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected in a data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode using ion mobility hyphenated with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry. The instrument was operated in the MSE mode with alternating low and high energy traces. The fragments observed from product ion spectra were investigated using a "chopping" bond disconnection algorithm and a rule-based algorithm. The bond disconnection algorithm clearly explained more analyte product ions and a greater percentage of the spectral abundance than the rule-based software (92 out of the 97 compounds produced ≥1 explainable fragment ions). On the other hand, tests with a complex blank matrix (bovine liver extract) indicated that the chopping algorithm reports significantly more false positive fragments than the rule based software. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. In Situ Plasma Measurements of Fragmented Comet 73P Schwassmann-Wachmann 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Rubin, M.; Combi, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The interiors of comets contain some of the most pristine material in the solar system. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, discovered in 1930, is a Jupiter-family comet with a 5.34-year period. This comet split into 5 fragments in 1995 and disintegrated into nearly 70 major pieces in 2006. In 2006 May and June, recently ionized cometary particles originating from fragments including and surrounding some of these major objects were collected with the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. Due to a combination of the instrument characteristics and the close proximity of the fragments passing between those spacecraft and the Sun, unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during that time. The cometary material released from some of these fragments can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16-18 amu e-1, indicating that while these fragments are small, they are still actively sublimating. We present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, and heliospheric interactions, with a focus on helium, C+/O+, and water-group ions.

  4. IN SITU PLASMA MEASUREMENTS OF FRAGMENTED COMET 73P SCHWASSMANN–WACHMANN 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Combi, M.

    2015-12-10

    The interiors of comets contain some of the most pristine material in the solar system. Comet 73P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 3, discovered in 1930, is a Jupiter-family comet with a 5.34-year period. This comet split into 5 fragments in 1995 and disintegrated into nearly 70 major pieces in 2006. In 2006 May and June, recently ionized cometary particles originating from fragments including and surrounding some of these major objects were collected with the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. Due to a combination of the instrument characteristics and the close proximity of the fragments passing between those spacecraft and the Sun, unique measurements regarding themore » charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during that time. The cometary material released from some of these fragments can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16–18 amu e{sup −1}, indicating that while these fragments are small, they are still actively sublimating. We present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, and heliospheric interactions, with a focus on helium, C{sup +}/O{sup +}, and water-group ions.« less

  5. Relative abundances of elements (20 or = Z or = 28) at energies up to 70 GeV/amu using relativistic rise in ion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a new balloon borne cosmic ray detector flown from Palestine, TX in Sept., 1982 are discussed. The exposure of 62 square meter-ster-hr is sufficient to prove the concept of using gas ionization chambers as energy measuring devices in the relativistic rise region. The abundances, relative Fe-26, of the pure secondaries Cr-22 and Ti-24, the pure primary Ni26, and the mixed primary and secondary Ca-20 between 6 and 70GeV/amu were measured.

  6. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    younger clusters. The O abundances in the younger clusters are significantly larger than those seen in H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supergiants. It is suggested, and supported with observational evidence, that this may be due to incomplete stellar models and the possibility that a significant fraction of O in gaseous nebulae is locked up in dust grains. Examining our results in a broader sense, we suggest that: a) the formation of the Galactic halo was a slow process but b) did not involve the merger of independent "fragments" c) Type Ia supernovae are dominated by CO-He white dwarf systems having Fe production timescales of a few Gyr d) The hiatus between the end of halo formation and the beginning of star formation in the disk, possibly required if CO-He white dwarfs are the dominant source of Type Ia supernovae, may be confirmed as the observed gap in the [O/H] distribution e) The long timescale (10^9 - 10^10 yr) of Fe production by CO-He white dwarf systems is also seen to be consistent with the lack of any correlation between age and [Fe/H] in our open cluster sample and the large scatter present in the [Fe/H] vs. age relations for field stars. (SECTION: Dissertation Summaries)

  7. Quantification and micron-scale imaging of spatial distribution of trace beryllium in shrapnel fragments and metallurgic samples with correlative fluorescence detection method and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Agrawal, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a report raised the possibility of shrapnel-induced chronic beryllium disease (CBD) from long-term exposure to the surface of retained aluminum shrapnel fragments in the body. Since the shrapnel fragments contained trace beryllium, methodological developments were needed for beryllium quantification and to study its spatial distribution in relation to other matrix elements, such as aluminum and iron, in metallurgic samples. In this work, we developed methodology for quantification of trace beryllium in samples of shrapnel fragments and other metallurgic sample-types with main matrix of aluminum (aluminum cans from soda, beer, carbonated water, and aluminum foil). Sample preparation procedures were developed for dissolving beryllium for its quantification with the fluorescence detection method for homogenized measurements. The spatial distribution of trace beryllium on the sample surface and in 3D was imaged with a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instrument, CAMECA IMS 3f SIMS ion microscope. The beryllium content of shrapnel (~100 ppb) was the same as the trace quantities of beryllium found in aluminum cans. The beryllium content of aluminum foil (~25 ppb) was significantly lower than cans. SIMS imaging analysis revealed beryllium to be distributed in the form of low micron-sized particles and clusters distributed randomly in X-Y-and Z dimensions, and often in association with iron, in the main aluminum matrix of cans. These observations indicate a plausible formation of Be-Fe or Al-Be alloy in the matrix of cans. Further observations were made on fluids (carbonated water) for understanding if trace beryllium in cans leached out and contaminated the food product. A direct comparison of carbonated water in aluminum cans and plastic bottles revealed that beryllium was below the detection limits of the fluorescence detection method (~0.01 ppb). These observations indicate that beryllium present in aluminum matrix was either present in an

  8. Fragmentation of molecular tributyltin chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmekhin, S.; Caló, A.; Kisand, V.; Nõmmiste, E.; Kotilainen, H.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-06-01

    Fragmentation of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) vapour has been studied experimentally by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry at the photon energy range of 9-25 eV of synchrotron radiation, at 21.22 eV of HeI as well as with 500 eV electron beam excitation. Branching ratios of the tributyltin chloride fragments taken with HeI and synchrotron radiation have been presented first time. Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out for TBTCl and the ionization energies obtained were used to predict the dissociation pathways creating the observed ions.

  9. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N(+)) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N(+) ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-(13)C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN(-) anion at energies down to approximately 5 eV. N(+) ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH(-) and NH(2) (-) anions. A fraction of OO(-) fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH(-). The formation of H(3)O(+) ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes.

  10. The Zero-Degree Detector System for Fragmentation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Howell, L. W.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross sections requires the detection and identification of individual projectile fragments. If light and heavy fragments are recorded in 'ne same detector, it may be impossible distinguish the signal from the light fragment. To overcome this problem, we have developed the Zero-Degree Detector System. The ZDDS enables the measurement of cross sections for light fragment production by using pixelated detectors to separately measure the signals of each fragment. The system has been used to measure the fragmentation of beams as heavy as Fe at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan.

  11. Application of stored waveform ion modulation 2D-FTICR MS/MS to the analysis of complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Aaserud, David J

    2002-09-15

    Component identification of complex mixtures, whether they are from polymeric formulations or combinatorial synthesis, by conventional MS/MS techniques generally requires component separation by chromatography or mass spectrometry. An automated means of acquiring simultaneous MS/MS data from a complex mixture without prior separation is obtained from stored waveform ion modulation (SWIM) two-dimensional FTICR MS/MS. The technique applies a series of SWIFT excitation waveforms whose frequency domain magnitude spectrum is a sinusoid increasing in frequency from one waveform to the next. The controlled dissociation of the precursor ions produces an associated modulation of the product ion abundances. Fourier transformation of these abundances reveals the encoded modulation frequency from which connectivities of precursor and product ions are observed. The final result is total assignment of product ions for each precursor ion in a mixture from one automated experiment. We demonstrated the applicability of SWIM 2D-FTICR MS/MS to two diverse samples of industrial importance. We characterized structured polyester oligomers and products derived from combinatorial synthesis. Fragmentation pathways identified in standard serial ion isolation MS/MS experiments were observed for trimethylolpropane/methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride. A 20-component sample derived from combinatorial synthesis was fragmented, and the template ion along with another key fragment ion was identified for each of the 20 components.

  12. Dynamic of negative ions in potassium-D-ribose collisions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, D; Ferreira da Silva, F; García, G; Limão-Vieira, P

    2013-09-21

    We present negative ion formation from collisions of neutral potassium atoms with D-ribose (C5H10O5), the sugar unit in the DNA/RNA molecule. From the negative ion time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra, OH(-) is the main fragment detected in the collision range 50-100 eV accounting on average for 50% of the total anion yield. Prominence is also given to the rich fragmentation pattern observed with special attention to O(-) (16 m/z) formation. These results are in sharp contrast to dissociative electron attachment experiments. The TOF mass spectra assignments show that these channels are also observed, albeit with a much lower relative intensity. Branching ratios of the most abundant fragment anions as a function of the collision energy are obtained, allowing to establish a rationale on the collision dynamics.

  13. Application of Fragment Ion Information as Further Evidence in Probabilistic Compound Screening Using Bayesian Statistics and Machine Learning: A Leap Toward Automation.

    PubMed

    Woldegebriel, Michael; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G J; Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2016-08-02

    In this work, we introduce an automated, efficient, and elegant model to combine all pieces of evidence (e.g., expected retention times, peak shapes, isotope distributions, fragment-to-parent ratio) obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS/MS) data for screening purposes. Combining all these pieces of evidence requires a careful assessment of the uncertainties in the analytical system as well as all possible outcomes. To-date, the majority of the existing algorithms are highly dependent on user input parameters. Additionally, the screening process is tackled as a deterministic problem. In this work we present a Bayesian framework to deal with the combination of all these pieces of evidence. Contrary to conventional algorithms, the information is treated in a probabilistic way, and a final probability assessment of the presence/absence of a compound feature is computed. Additionally, all the necessary parameters except the chromatographic band broadening for the method are learned from the data in training and learning phase of the algorithm, avoiding the introduction of a large number of user-defined parameters. The proposed method was validated with a large data set and has shown improved sensitivity and specificity in comparison to a threshold-based commercial software package.

  14. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-07

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  15. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a 12C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u-1. Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of aminophospholipids (PE, MMPE, DMPE, PS): an apparently known fragmentation process revisited.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Rehulka, Pavel; Winkler, Wolfgang; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-07-01

    A new type of low-mass substituted 4-oxazolin product ions of [M + H](+) precursor ions of aminophospholipids (glycerophosphatidylethanolamine, glycerophosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine, glycerophosphatidyl-N,N-dimethylethanolamine, glycerophosphatidylserine) resulting from high-energy collision-induced dissociation (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry) and low-energy collision-induced dissociation (e.g., electrospray ionization quadrupole reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry) with accurate mass determination is described; these were previously misidentified as CHO-containing radical cationic product ions. The mechanism for the formation of these ions is proposed to be via rapid loss of water followed by cyclization to an 11-membered-ring transition state for the sn-1 fatty acid substituent and to a ten-membered-ring transition state for the sn-2 fatty acid substituent, and via final loss of monoacylglycerol phosphate, leading to substituted 4-oxazolin product ions. The minimum structural requirement for this interesting skeletal rearrangement fragmentation is an amino group linked to at least one hydrogen atom (i.e., ethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, serine). Therefore, N,N-dimethylethanolamine derivates do not exhibit this type of fragmentation. The analytical value of these product ions is given by the fact that by post source decay and particularly high-energy collision-induced dissociation achieved via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the sn-2-related substituted 4-oxazolin product ion is always significantly more abundant than the sn-1-related one, which is quite helpful for detailed structural analysis of complex lipids. All other important product ions found are described in detail (following our previously published glycerophospholipid product ion nomenclature; Pittenauer and Allmaier, Int. J. Mass. Spectrom

  17. Partial De Novo Sequencing and Unusual CID Fragmentation of a 7 kDa, Disulfide-Bridged Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Bohlen, Christopher J.

    2012-05-01

    A 7 kDa toxin isolated from the venom of the Texas coral snake ( Micrurus tener tener) was subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) analyses both before and after reduction at low pH. Manual and automated approaches to de novo sequencing are compared in detail. Manual de novo sequencing utilizing the combination of high accuracy CID and ETD data and an acid-related cleavage yielded the N-terminal half of the sequence from the reduced species. The intact polypeptide, containing 3 disulfide bridges produced a series of unusual fragments in ion trap CID experiments: abundant internal amino acid losses were detected, and also one of the disulfide-linkage positions could be determined from fragments formed by the cleavage of two bonds. In addition, internal and c-type fragments were also observed.

  18. Recent (2000-2015) developments in the analysis of minor unknown natural products based on characteristic fragment information using LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tian; Guo, Ze-Qin; Xu, Xiao-Ying; Wu, Zhi-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Liquid chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) has been widely used in natural product analysis. Global detection and identification of nontargeted components are desirable in natural product research, for example, in quality control of Chinese herbal medicine. Nontargeted components analysis continues to expand to exciting life science application domains such as metabonomics. With this background, the present review summarizes recent developments in the analysis of minor unknown natural products using LC-MS and mainly focuses on the determination of the molecular formulae, selection of precursor ions, and characteristic fragmentation patterns of the known compounds. This review consists of three parts. Firstly, the methods used to determine unique molecular formula of unknown compounds such as accurate mass measurements, MS n spectra, or relative isotopic abundance information, are introduced. Secondly, the methods improving signal-to-noise ratio of MS/MS spectra by manual-MS/MS or workflow targeting-only signals were elucidated; pure precursor ions can be selected by changing the precursor ion isolated window. Lastly, characteristic fragmentation patterns such as Retro-Diels-Alder (RDA), McLafferty rearrangements, "internal residue loss," and so on, occurring in the molecular ions of natural products are summarized. Classical application of characteristic fragmentation patterns in identifying unknown compounds in extracts and relevant fragmentation mechanisms are presented (RDA reactions occurring readily in the molecular ions of flavanones or isoflavanones, McLafferty-type fragmentation reactions of some natural products such as epipolythiodioxopiperazines; fragmentation by "internal residue loss" possibly involving ion-neutral complex intermediates). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 37:202-216, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Discriminating precursors of common fragments for large-scale metabolite profiling by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nikolskiy, Igor; Siuzdak, Gary; Patti, Gary J

    2015-06-15

    The goal of large-scale metabolite profiling is to compare the relative concentrations of as many metabolites extracted from biological samples as possible. This is typically accomplished by measuring the abundances of thousands of ions with high-resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometers. Although the data from these instruments provide a comprehensive fingerprint of each sample, identifying the structures of the thousands of detected ions is still challenging and time intensive. An alternative, less-comprehensive approach is to use triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass spectrometry to analyze predetermined sets of metabolites (typically fewer than several hundred). This is done using authentic standards to develop QqQ experiments that specifically detect only the targeted metabolites, with the advantage that the need for ion identification after profiling is eliminated. Here, we propose a framework to extend the application of QqQ mass spectrometers to large-scale metabolite profiling. We aim to provide a foundation for designing QqQ multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiments for each of the 82 696 metabolites in the METLIN metabolite database. First, we identify common fragmentation products from the experimental fragmentation data in METLIN. Then, we model the likelihoods of each precursor structure in METLIN producing each common fragmentation product. With these likelihood estimates, we select ensembles of common fragmentation products that minimize our uncertainty about metabolite identities. We demonstrate encouraging performance and, based on our results, we suggest how our method can be integrated with future work to develop large-scale MRM experiments. Our predictions, Supplementary results, and the code for estimating likelihoods and selecting ensembles of fragmentation reactions are made available on the lab website at http://pattilab.wustl.edu/FragPred. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  20. Interstellar abundances - Gas and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, G. B.

    1974-01-01

    Data on abundances of interstellar atoms, ions and molecules in front of zeta Oph are assembled and analyzed. The gas-phase abundances of at least 11 heavy elements are significantly lower, relative to hydrogen, than in the solar system. The abundance deficiencies of certain elements correlate with the temperatures derived theoretically for particle condensation in stellar atmospheres or nebulae, suggesting that these elements have condensed into dust grains near stars. There is evidence that other elements have accreted onto such grains after their arrival in interstellar space. The extinction spectrum of zeta Oph can be explained qualitatively and, to a degree, quantitatively by dust grains composed of silicates, graphite, silicon carbide, and iron, with mantles composed of complex molecules of H, C, N, and O. This composition is consistent with the observed gas-phase deficiencies.

  1. The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron-56 in polyethylene. I. Fragment fluence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Gong, W.; Schimmerling, W.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron ions in several thicknesses of polyethylene has been measured. Non-interacting primary beam particles and fragments have been identified and their LETs calculated by measuring ionization energy loss in a stack of silicon detectors. Fluences, normalized to the incident beam intensity and corrected for detector effects, are presented for each fragment charge and target. Histograms of fluence as a function of LET are also presented. Some implications of these data for measurements of the biological effects of heavy ions are discussed.

  2. The role of bound potassium ions in the hydrolysis of low concentrations of adenosine triphosphate by preparations of membrane fragments from ox brain cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, P. S. G.; Rodnight, R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The intrinsic Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ contents of a preparation of membrane fragments from ox brain were determined by emission flame photometry. 2. Centrifugal washing of the preparation with imidazole-buffered EDTA solutions decreased the bound Na+ from 90±20 to 24±12, the bound K+ from 27±3 to 7±2, the bound Mg2+ from 20±2 to 3±1 and the bound calcium from 8±1 to <1nmol/mg of protein. 3. The activities of the Na++K++Mg2+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and the Na+-dependent reaction forming bound phosphate were compared in the unwashed and washed preparations at an ATP concentration of 2.5μm (ATP/protein ratio 12.5pmol/μg). 4. The Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP as well as the plateau concentration of bound phosphate and the rate of dephosphorylation were decreased in the washed preparation. The time-course of formation and decline of bound phosphate was fully restored by the addition of 2.5μm-magnesium chloride and 2μm-potassium chloride. Addition of 2.5μm-magnesium chloride alone fully restored the plateau concentration of bound phosphate, but the rate of dephosphorylation was only slightly increased. Na+-dependent ATP hydrolysis was partly restored with 2.5μm-magnesium chloride; addition of K+ in the range 2–10μm-potassium chloride then further restored hydrolysis but not to the control rate. 5. Pretreatment of the washed preparation at 0°C with 0.5nmol of K+/mg of protein so that the final added K+ in the reaction mixture was 0.1μm restored the Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP and the time-course of the reaction forming bound phosphate. 6. The binding of [42K]potassium chloride by the washed membrane preparation was examined. Binding in a solution containing 10nmol of K+/mg of protein was linear over a period of 20min and was inhibited by Na+. Half-maximal inhibition of 42K+-binding required a 100-fold excess of sodium chloride. 7. It was concluded (a) that a significant fraction of the apparent Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP observed

  3. CF3+ fragmentation by electron impact ionization of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl-ethers, C5F10O, in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Toshio; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-04-01

    The gas phase fragmentations of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl ether (PPVE, C5F10O) are studied experimentally. Dominant fragmentations of PPVE are found to be the result of a dissociative ionization reaction, i.e., CF3+ via direct bond cleavage, and C2F3O- and C3F7O- via electron attachment. Regardless of the appearance energy of around 14.5 eV for the dissociative ionization of CF3+, the observed ion efficiency for the CF3+ ion was extremely large the order of 10-20 cm-2, compared with only 10-21 cm-2 for the other channels. PPVE characteristically generated CF3+ as the largest abundant ion are advantageous for use of feedstock gases in plasma etching processes.

  4. Fragmentation in the branching coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck): growth, survivorship, and reproduction of colonies and fragments.

    PubMed

    Lirman

    2000-08-23

    Acropora palmata, a branching coral abundant on shallow reef environments throughout the Caribbean, is susceptible to physical disturbance caused by storms. Accordingly, the survivorship and propagation of this species are tied to its capability to recover after fragmentation. Fragments of A. palmata comprised 40% of ramets within populations that had experienced recent storms. While the survivorship of A. palmata fragments was not directly related to the size of fragments, removal of fragments from areas where they settled was influenced by size. Survivorship of fragments was also affected by type of substratum; the greatest mortality (58% loss within the first month) was observed on sand, whereas fragments placed on top of live colonies of A. palmata fused to the underlying tissue and did not experience any losses. Fragments created by Hurricane Andrew on a Florida reef in August 1992 began developing new growth (proto-branches) 7 months after the storm. The number of proto-branches on fragments was dependent on size, but growth was not affected by the size of fragments. Growth-rates of proto-branches increased exponentially with time (1.7 cm year(-1) for 1993-1994, 2.7 cm year(-1) for 1994-1995, 4.2 cm year(-1) for 1995-1996, and 6.5 cm year(-1) for 1996-1997), taking over 4 years for proto-branches to achieve rates comparable to those of adult colonies on the same reef (6.9 cm year(-1)). In addition to the initial mortality and reduced growth-rates, fragmentation resulted in a loss of reproductive potential. Neither colonies that experienced severe fragmentation nor fragments contained gametes until 4 years after the initial damage. Although A. palmata may survive periodic fragmentation, the long-term effects of this process will depend ultimately on the balance between the benefits and costs of this process.

  5. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  6. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE)

    EPA Science Inventory



    Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer to simultaneously determine exact masses and relative isotopic abundances from mass peak profiles. These can be determined more accurately and at higher sensitivity ...

  7. Impact of energetic cosmic-ray ions on astrophysical ice grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainitz, Martin; Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2017-02-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation with REAX potentials, we study the consequences of cosmic-ray ion impact on ice grains. The grains are composed of a mixture of H2O, CO2, NH3, and CH3OH molecules. Due to the high energy deposition of the cosmic-ray ion, 5 keV/nm, a strong pressure wave runs through the grain, while the interior of the ion track gasifies. Abundant molecular dissociations occur; reactions of the fragments form a variety of novel molecular product species.

  8. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  9. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  10. Fragmentation of ionized doped helium nanodroplets: theoretical evidence for a dopant ejection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bonhommeau, D; Lewerenz, M; Halberstadt, N

    2008-02-07

    We report a theoretical study of the effect induced by a helium nanodroplet environment on the fragmentation dynamics of a dopant. The dopant is an ionized neon cluster Ne(n) (+) (n=4-6) surrounded by a helium nanodroplet composed of 100 atoms. A newly designed mixed quantum/classical approach is used to take into account both the large helium cluster zero-point energy due to the light mass of the helium atoms and all the nonadiabatic couplings between the Ne(n) (+) potential-energy surfaces. The results reveal that the intermediate ionic dopant can be ejected from the droplet, possibly with some helium atoms still attached, thereby reducing the cooling power of the droplet. Energy relaxation by helium atom evaporation and dissociation, the other mechanism which has been used in most interpretations of doped helium cluster dynamics, also exhibits new features. The kinetic energy distribution of the neutral monomer fragments can be fitted to the sum of two Boltzmann distributions, one with a low kinetic energy and the other with a higher kinetic energy. This indicates that cooling by helium atom evaporation is more efficient than was believed so far, as suggested by recent experiments. The results also reveal the predominance of Ne(2) (+) and He(q)Ne(2) (+) fragments and the absence of bare Ne(+) fragments, in agreement with available experimental data (obtained for larger helium nanodroplets). Moreover, the abundance in fragments with a trimeric neon core is found to increase with the increase in dopant size. Most of the fragmentation is achieved within 10 ps and the only subsequent dynamical process is the relaxation of hot intermediate He(q)Ne(2) (+) species to Ne(2) (+) by helium atom evaporation. The dependence of the ionic fragment distribution on the parent ion electronic state reached by ionization is also investigated. It reveals that He(q)Ne(+) fragments are produced only from the highest electronic state, whereas He(q)Ne(2) (+) fragments originate from

  11. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  12. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  13. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-16

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  14. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  15. Non-thermal ion desorption from an acetonitrile (CH3CN) astrophysical ice analogue studied by electron stimulated ion desorption.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F de A; Almeida, G C; Garcia-Basabe, Y; Wolff, W; Boechat-Roberty, H M; Rocco, M L M

    2015-11-07

    The incidence of high-energy radiation onto icy surfaces constitutes an important route for leading new neutral or ionized molecular species back to the gas phase in interstellar and circumstellar environments, especially where thermal desorption is negligible. In order to simulate such processes, an acetonitrile ice (CH3CN) frozen at 120 K is bombarded by high energy electrons, and the desorbing positive ions are analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). Several fragment and cluster ions were identified, including the Hn=1-3(+), CHn=0-3(+)/NHn=0-1(+); C2Hn=0-3(+)/CHn=0-3N(+), C2Hn=0-6N(+) ion series and the ion clusters (CH3CN)n=1-2(+) and (CH3CN)n=1-2H(+). The energy dependence on the positive ion desorption yield indicates that ion desorption is initiated by Coulomb explosion following Auger electronic decay. The results presented here suggest that non-thermal desorption processes, such as desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) may be responsible for delivering neutral and ionic fragments from simple nitrile-bearing ices to the gas-phase, contributing to the production of more complex molecules. The derived desorption yields per electron impact may contribute to chemical evolution models in different cold astrophysical objects, especially where the abundance of CH3CN is expected to be high.

  16. Fragments and Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Can teachers contact the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by always-new objectives, criteria, and initiatives? How, more importantly, can learners experience the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by testing, modular curricular, short-term learning objectives, and lessons that…

  17. Fragmentation of an elastica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-03-01

    When a thin rod is submitted to an axial force greater than its critical buckling load it takes the shape of an elastica. As the load further increases, a rod made of a brittle material breaks suddenly. More than two fragments may be formed during this fragmentation. In this work we discuss the sequence of events that lead to the final broken state with two or more fragments. We show that the criterion for breaking is not trivial. In particular, we investigate the effect of the duration of the loading and we show that at a given load the waiting time before breaking is broadly distributed. We discuss the consequences of the time delayed breaking on the distributions of fragment sizes and fragment numbers.

  18. Fragmentation of endohedral fullerene H o 3 N @ C 80 in an intense femtosecond near-infrared laser field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Hui; Fang, Li; Osipov, Timur; ...

    2018-02-22

    The fragmentation of gas phase endohedral fullerene, Ho 3N@C 80, was investigated using femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses with an ion velocity map imaging spectrometer. Here, we observed that Ho + abundance associated with carbon cage opening dominates at an intensity of 1.1 x 10 14 W/cm 2. As the intensity increases, the Ho + yield associated with multifragmentation of the carbon cage exceeds the prominence of Ho + associated with the gentler carbon cage opening. Moreover, the power law dependence of Ho + on laser intensity indicates that the transition of the most likely fragmentation mechanisms occurs around 2.0 xmore » 10 14 W/cn 2.« less

  19. Fragmentation of endohedral fullerene H o 3 N @ C 80 in an intense femtosecond near-infrared laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Hui; Fang, Li; Osipov, Timur

    The fragmentation of gas phase endohedral fullerene, Ho 3N@C 80, was investigated using femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses with an ion velocity map imaging spectrometer. Here, we observed that Ho + abundance associated with carbon cage opening dominates at an intensity of 1.1 x 10 14 W/cm 2. As the intensity increases, the Ho + yield associated with multifragmentation of the carbon cage exceeds the prominence of Ho + associated with the gentler carbon cage opening. Moreover, the power law dependence of Ho + on laser intensity indicates that the transition of the most likely fragmentation mechanisms occurs around 2.0 xmore » 10 14 W/cn 2.« less

  20. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  1. Dimensional crossover in fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez, Arezky H.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-11-01

    Experiments in which thick clay plates and glass rods are fractured have revealed different behavior of fragment mass distribution function in the small and large fragment regions. In this paper we explain this behavior using non-extensive Tsallis statistics and show how the crossover between the two regions is caused by the change in the fragments’ dimensionality during the fracture process. We obtain a physical criterion for the position of this crossover and an expression for the change in the power-law exponent between the small and large fragment regions. These predictions are in good agreement with the experiments on thick clay plates.

  2. Solar abundance of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holweger, H.

    1973-07-01

    An analysis of 19 photospheric Si I lines whose oscillator strengths have recently been detertmined by Garz (1973) leads to a solar abundance of silicon, log epsilon /sub Si/ = 7.65 plus or minus 0.07, on the scale where log epsilon /sub H/ = 12. Together with the sodium abundance determained earlier by the same method, a solar abundance ratio /sup epsilon /Na//sup epsilon /Si = 0.045 ( plus or minus 10%) results. Within the error limits this a grees wtth the meteoritic ratio found in carbonaceous chondrites. Results concerning line-broadening by hydrogen are discussed. (auth)

  3. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N{sup +}) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N{sup +} ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-{sup 13}C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partlymore » reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN{sup -} anion at energies down to {approx}5 eV. N{sup +} ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH{sup -} and NH{sub 2}{sup -} anions. A fraction of O/O{sup -} fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH{sup -}. The formation of H{sub 3}O{sup +} ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes.« less

  4. Secondary ion emission from phosphatidic acid sandwich films under atomic and molecular primary ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapel, D.; Benninghoven, A.

    2001-11-01

    Secondary ion yields increase considerably when changing from atomic to molecular primary ions. Since secondary ion emission from deeper layers could result in a pronounced yield increase, the secondary ion emission depth of molecular fragments was investigated. A phosphatidic acid Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) sandwich system was applied. The well-defined layer structure of the applied sample allows the assignment of different depths of origin to the selected fragment ions. At least 93% of the detected characteristic molecular fragment ions originate from the first and second layers. This holds true for all applied atomic and molecular primary ions.

  5. Fragment capture device

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point ofmore » the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.« less

  6. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  7. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf; Key, Brian P.; Garcia, Daniel B.

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  8. Estimating abundance: Chapter 27

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  9. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTEmore » analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.« less

  10. Space-based measurements of elemental abundances and their relation to solar abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) aboard the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft was in the solar wind continuously from August 1978 to December 1982. The results made it possible to establish long-term average solar wind abundance values for helium, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron. The Charge-Energy-Mass instrument aboard the CCE spacecraft of the AMPTE mission has measured the abundance of these elements in the magnetosheath and has also added carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, and sulfur to the list. There is strong evidence that these magnetosheath abundances are representative of the solar wind. Other sources of solar wind abundances are Solar Energetic Particle experiments and Apollo lunar foils. When comparing the abundances from all of these sources with photospheric abundances, it is clear that helium is depleted in the solar wind while silicon and iron are enhanced. Solar wind abundances for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon correlate well with the photospheric values. The incorporation of minor ions into the solar wind appears to depend upon both the ionization times for the elements and the Coulomb drag exerted by the outflowing proton flux.

  11. Fragmentation of nitrogen-14 nuclei at 2.1 Gev per nucleon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Bieser, F. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out at the bevatron on the nuclear fragmentation of nitrogen-14 ions at an energy of 2.1 billion electron volts (Gev) per nucleon. Because of the near equality of the velocities of the nitrogen-14 beam and the fragmentation products at an angle of 0 deg, we find it possible to identify the nuclear fragments isotopically.

  12. Aromatic organosulfates in atmospheric aerosols: Synthesis, characterization, and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudt, Sean; Kundu, Shuvashish; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J.; Surratt, Jason D.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2014-09-01

    Aromatic organosulfates are identified and quantified in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from Lahore, Pakistan, Godavari, Nepal, and Pasadena, California. To support detection and quantification, authentic standards of phenyl sulfate, benzyl sulfate, 3- and 4-methylphenyl sulfate and 2-, 3-, and 4-methylbenzyl sulfate were synthesized. Authentic standards and aerosol samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry. Benzyl sulfate was present in all three locations at concentrations ranging from 4 to 90 pg m-3. Phenyl sulfate, methylphenyl sulfates and methylbenzyl sulfates were observed intermittently with abundances of 4 pg m-3, 2-31 pg m-3, 109 pg m-3, respectively. Characteristic fragment ions of aromatic organosulfates include the sulfite radical (rad SO3-, m/z 80) and the sulfate radical (rad SO4-, m/z 96). Instrumental response factors of phenyl and benzyl sulfates varied by a factor of 4.3, indicating that structurally-similar organosulfates have significantly different instrumental responses and highlighting the need to develop authentic standards for absolute quantitation organosulfates. In an effort to better understand the sources of aromatic organosulfates to the atmosphere, chamber experiments with the precursor toluene were conducted under conditions that form biogenic organosulfates. Aromatic organosulfates were not detected in the chamber samples, suggesting that they form through different pathways, have different precursors (e.g. naphthalene or methylnaphthalene), or are emitted from primary sources.

  13. Aromatic organosulfates in atmospheric aerosols: synthesis, characterization, and abundance.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Sean; Kundu, Shuvashish; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; He, Xianran; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J; Surratt, Jason D; Stone1, Elizabeth A

    2014-09-01

    Aromatic organosulfates are identified and quantified in fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) from Lahore, Pakistan, Godavari, Nepal, and Pasadena, California. To support detection and quantification, authentic standards of phenyl sulfate, benzyl sulfate, 3-and 4-methylphenyl sulfate and 2-, 3-, and 4-methylbenzyl sulfate were synthesized. Authentic standards and aerosol samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry. Benzyl sulfate was present in all three locations at concentrations ranging from 4 - 90 pg m -3 . Phenyl sulfate, methylphenyl sulfates and methylbenzyl sulfates were observed intermittently with abundances of 4 pg m -3 , 2-31 pg m -3 , 109 pg m -3 , respectively. Characteristic fragment ions of aromatic organosulfates include the sulfite radical ( • SO 3 - , m/z 80) and the sulfate radical ( • SO 4 - , m/z 96). Instrumental response factors of phenyl and benzyl sulfates varied by a factor of 4.3, indicating that structurally-similar organosulfates may have significantly different instrumental responses and highlighting the need to develop authentic standards for absolute quantitation organosulfates. In an effort to better understand the sources of aromatic organosulfates to the atmosphere, chamber experiments with the precursor toluene were conducted under conditions that form biogenic organosulfates. Aromatic organosulfates were not detected in the chamber samples, suggesting that they form through different pathways, have different precursors (e.g. naphthalene or methylnaphthalene), or are emitted from primary sources.

  14. WITHDRAWN: Fragmentation of charged aqueous nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Kengo

    2005-11-01

    The whole evaporating process of charged aqueous nanodroplets is studied by systematic molecular dynamics simulations until most of the solvent molecules are evaporated. % The solvent evaporation makes the droplet smaller and smaller, and at a certain point the repulsive force among ions causes an instability, where typically single ion and 10 to 20 water molecules are disintegrated from the main droplet. % This ion fragmentation occurs around 70 to 80% of the charge predicted by the Rayleigh theory [Lord Rayleigh, Phil. Mag. 14, 184 (1882)]. % The numerical results are summarized in the function R(z) which is the fragmentation radius at the charge z. From the fitting by the power law Rz^β, we find that at lower temperature T=350 and 370 K the result is close to the Rayleigh theory β= 2/3, while at higher temperature T=400 and 450 K it is like β= 1/2. % Another fitting on R(z) by the extended ion evaporation mechanism [M. Gamero-Castaño and J. Fern'andez de la Mora, Anal. Chim. Acta 406, 67 (2000)] works well for both cases. % The final state of the evaporation process is typically a single ion with several water molecules. If we put an alanine dipeptide in zwitterionic form at the beginning, two charges remain in some cases.

  15. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks.

    PubMed

    Stenerlow, B; Hoglund, E; Carlsson, J

    2002-01-01

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons (60Co) or 125 keV/micrometers nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isomer-dependent fragmentation dynamics of inner-shell photoionized difluoroiodobenzene

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, Utuq; Bomme, Cédric; Savelyev, Evgeny; ...

    2017-05-11

    The fragmentation dynamics of 2,6- and 3,5-difluoroiodobenzene after iodine 4d inner-shell photoionization with soft X-rays are studied using coincident electron and ion momentum imaging. By analyzing the momentum correlation between iodine and fluorine cations in three-fold ion coincidence events, we can distinguish the two isomers experimentally. Classical Coulomb explosion simulations are in overall agreement with the experimentally determined fragment ion kinetic energies and momentum correlations and point toward different fragmentation mechanisms and time scales. Finally, while most three-body fragmentation channels show clear evidence for sequential fragmentation on a time scale larger than the rotational period of the fragments, the breakupmore » into iodine and fluorine cations and a third charged co-fragment appears to occur within several hundred femtoseconds.« less

  17. Electron impact fragmentation of thymine: partial ionization cross sections for positive fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Mahon, Francis; Barrett, Gerard; Gradziel, Marcin L.

    2014-06-01

    We have measured mass spectra for positive ions for low-energy electron impact on thymine using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Using computer controlled data acquisition, mass spectra have been acquired for electron impact energies up to 100 eV in steps of 0.5 eV. Ion yield curves for most of the fragment ions have been determined by fitting groups of adjacent peaks in the mass spectra with sequences of normalized Gaussians. The ion yield curves have been normalized by comparing the sum of the ion yields to the average of calculated total ionization cross sections. Appearance energies have been determined. The nearly equal appearance energies of 83 u and 55 u observed in the present work strongly indicate that near threshold the 55 u ion is formed directly by the breakage of two bonds in the ring, rather than from a successive loss of HNCO and CO from the parent ion. Likewise 54 u is not formed by CO loss from 82 u. The appearance energies are in a number of cases consistent with the loss of one or more hydrogen atoms from a heavier fragment, but 70 u is not formed by hydrogen loss from 71 u.

  18. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Electron Transfer Ion/Ion Reactions in a Three-Dimensional Quadrupole Ion Trap: Reactions of Doubly and Triply Protonated Peptides with SO2·−

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Sharon J.; Chrisman, Paul A.; Hogan, Jason M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Ion–ion reactions between a variety of peptide cations (doubly and triply charged) and SO2 anions have been studied in a 3-D quadrupole ion trap, resulting in proton and electron transfer. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) gives many c- and z-type fragments, resulting in extensive sequence coverage in the case of triply protonated peptides with SO2·−. For triply charged neurotensin, in which a direct comparison can be made between 3-D and linear ion trap results, abundances of ETD fragments relative to one another appear to be similar. Reactions of doubly protonated peptides with SO2·− give much less structural information from ETD than triply protonated peptides. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged ions formed in reactions with SO2·− shows a combination of proton and electron transfer products. CID of the singly charged species gives more structural information than ETD of the doubly protonated peptide, but not as much information as ETD of the triply protonated peptide. PMID:15762593

  20. Fragment generation, survival, and attachment of Dictyota spp. at Conch Reef in the Florida Keys, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herren, L. W.; Walters, L. J.; Beach, K. S.

    2006-05-01

    During the past decade, the relative abundance of the brown macroalgae Dictyota spp. has been high in the Florida Keys. Recent studies have shown that members of this genus successfully reproduce via vegetative fragmentation. To investigate the importance of fragmentation on the reef community, this study examined: (1) the degree of epiphytism on benthic organisms, (2) the rate of fragment production through fish foraging activities, (3) the likelihood of fragment entanglement, and (4) the fragment attachment and success rate. It was found that reef fish contributed substantially to the fragment pool; furthermore, most fish-produced fragments produced rhizoids and attached to sand grains within 24 h in the field. Fragments of Dictyota spp. most commonly became entangled around and then attached themselves to the green alga Halimeda tuna, and other Dictyota spp. These results suggest that vegetative fragmentation of Dictyota spp. plays an important role in the changing community structure on the Florida Keys reef tract.

  1. Light fragments from (C + Be) interactions at 0.6 GeV/nucleon

    DOE PAGES

    Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; ...

    2016-05-01

    We measured nuclear fragments emitted at 3.5° in 12C fragmentation at 0.6 GeV/nucleon. We also used the spectra obtained to test the predictions of four ion-ion interaction models: INCL++, BC, LAQGSM03.03 and QMD as well as for the comparison with the analytical parametrization in the framework of thermodynamical picture of fragmentation.

  2. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  3. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  4. Structural characterization of arginine-vasopressin and lysine-vasopressin by Fourier- transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and infrared multiphoton dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Battista, Fabio; Buchicchio, Alessandro; Amarena, Concetta G; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Guerrieri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and lysine-vasopressin (LVP) were analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) electrospray ionization (ESI) in the positive ion mode. LVP and AVP exhibited the protonated adduct [M+H](+) as the predominant ion at m/z 1056.43965 and at m/z 1084.44561, respectively. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), using a CO(2) laser source at a wavelength of 10.6 μm, was applied to protonated vasopressin molecules. The IRMPD mass spectra presented abundant mass fragments essential for a complete structural information. Several fragment ions, shared between two target molecules, are discussed in detail. Some previously unpublished fragments were identified unambiguously utilizing the high resolution and accurate mass information provided by the FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The opening of the disulfide loop and the cleavage of the peptide bonds within the ring were observed even under low-energy fragmentation conditions. Coupling the high-performance FT-ICR mass spectrometer with IRMPD as a contemporary fragmentation technique proved to be very promising for the structural characterization of vasopressin.

  5. Evidence of diketopiperazine and oxazolone structures for HA b2+ ion.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Brittany R; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Gucinski, Ashley C; Somogyi, Arpád; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2009-12-09

    Peptide fragmentation can lead to an oxazolone or diketopiperazine b(2)(+) ion structure. IRMPD spectroscopy combined with computational modeling and gas-phase H/D exchange was used to study the structure of the b(2)(+) ion from protonated HAAAA. The experimental spectrum of the b(2)(+) ion matches both the experimental spectrum for the protonated cyclic dipeptide HA (a commercial diketopiperazine) and the theoretical spectrum for a diketopiperazine protonated at the imidazole pi nitrogen. A characteristic band at 1875 cm(-1) and increased abundance of the peaks at 1619 and 1683 cm(-1) indicate a second population corresponding to an oxazolone species. H/D exchange also shows a mixture of two populations consistent with a mixture of b(2)(+) ion diketopiperazine and oxazolone structures.

  6. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  7. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Treesearch

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  8. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  9. Observation of shape isomers states in fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Yu V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Malaza, V.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.

    2017-06-01

    We discuss the manifestations of a new original effect appeared at crossing of the metal foils by fission fragments. We have observed significant mass deficit in the total mass Ms of the fission fragments detected in coincidence with ions knocked out from the foil. It was shown that at the large angles of scattering of the knocked-out ions from the foil predominantly conventional elastic Rutherford scattering takes place. As the result Ms corresponds to the mean mass of the mother system after emission of fission neutrons (no missing mass). In contrast, in near frontal impacts fission fragment misses essential part of its mass. Residual nuclei at least for the fragments from the heavy mass peak show magic nucleon composition.

  10. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  11. Season-modulated responses of Neotropical bats to forest fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diogo F; Rocha, Ricardo; López-Baucells, Adrià; Farneda, Fábio Z; Carreiras, João M B; Palmeirim, Jorge M; Meyer, Christoph F J

    2017-06-01

    Seasonality causes fluctuations in resource availability, affecting the presence and abundance of animal species. The impacts of these oscillations on wildlife populations can be exacerbated by habitat fragmentation. We assessed differences in bat species abundance between the wet and dry season in a fragmented landscape in the Central Amazon characterized by primary forest fragments embedded in a secondary forest matrix. We also evaluated whether the relative importance of local vegetation structure versus landscape characteristics (composition and configuration) in shaping bat abundance patterns varied between seasons. Our working hypotheses were that abundance responses are species as well as season specific, and that in the wet season, local vegetation structure is a stronger determinant of bat abundance than landscape-scale attributes. Generalized linear mixed-effects models in combination with hierarchical partitioning revealed that relationships between species abundances and local vegetation structure and landscape characteristics were both season specific and scale dependent. Overall, landscape characteristics were more important than local vegetation characteristics, suggesting that landscape structure is likely to play an even more important role in landscapes with higher fragment-matrix contrast. Responses varied between frugivores and animalivores. In the dry season, frugivores responded more to compositional metrics, whereas during the wet season, local and configurational metrics were more important. Animalivores showed similar patterns in both seasons, responding to the same group of metrics in both seasons. Differences in responses likely reflect seasonal differences in the phenology of flowering and fruiting between primary and secondary forests, which affected the foraging behavior and habitat use of bats. Management actions should encompass multiscale approaches to account for the idiosyncratic responses of species to seasonal variation in

  12. Comparison of habitat quality and diet of Colobus vellerosus in forest fragments in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sarah N P; Saj, Tania L; Sicotte, Pascale

    2006-10-01

    The forest fragments surrounding the Boabeng-Fiema Monkey Sanctuary (BFMS) in central Ghana shelter small populations of Colobus vellerosus. Little is known about these populations or the ability of the fragments to support them, despite the fact that these fragments represent potentially important habitat for the colobus in this region. We compared the diet of three groups of C. vellerosus in the fragments to two groups in BFMS. We also examined the differences in plant species composition and food abundance among fragments. The study took place from June to November 2003. Dietary data were collected using scan sampling. Plant species composition and food abundance were evaluated using tree plots and large tree surveys. As in BFMS groups, leaves constituted the highest proportion of the diet of fragment groups, yet the colobus in fragments fed on more lianas than did those in BFMS. Over 50% of all species observed eaten by colobus in the fragments were not consumed in BFMS groups during the same season. Food abundance was similar between fragments and BFMS, although species composition differed. There was no relationship between the density of colobus and the density of food trees or percentage of food species, suggesting that other factors may be influencing the number of colobus present. This study highlights the broad dietary range of C. vellerosus, which may be a factor allowing its survival in these fragments.

  13. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; ...

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  14. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  15. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (P<0.05, ANOVA). A seasonal response to chilling was observed in the coral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (P<0.05, ANOVA). However, in the late spring, coral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P<0.05, ANOVA). When a cryoprotectant (1M dimethyl sulfoxide) was used in concert with chilling it protected the coral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (P<0.05, ANOVA). The zooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W., E-mail: cguennou@iac.es

    2015-07-10

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period tomore » characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.« less

  17. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  18. Ecosystem extent and fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Roger; Hansen, Matt

    2017-01-01

    One of the candidate essential biodiversity variable (EBV) groups described in the seminal paper by Pereira et al. (2014) concerns Ecosystem Structure. This EBV group is distinguished from another EBV group which encompasses aspects of Ecosystem Function. While the Ecosystem Function EBV treats ecosystem processes like nutrient cycling, primary production, trophic interactions, etc., the Ecosystem Structure EBV relates to the set of biophysical properties of ecosystems that create biophysical environmental context, confer biophysical structure, and occur geographically. The Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation EBV is one of the EBVs in the Ecosystem Structure EBV group.Ecosystems are understood to exist at multiple scales, from very large areas (macro-ecosystems) like the Arctic tundra, for example, to something as small as a tree in an Amazonian rain forest. As such, ecosystems occupy space and therefore can be mapped across any geography of interest, whether that area of interest be a site, a nation, a region, a continent, or the planet. One of the most obvious and seemingly straightforward EBVs is Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation. Ecosystem extent refers to the location and geographic distribution of ecosystems across landscapes or in the oceans, while ecosystem fragmentation refers to the spatial pattern and connectivity of ecosystem occurrences on the landscape.

  19. Solar abundances as derived from solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there are well defined average abundances of heavy (Z above 2) solar energetic particles (SEPs), with variations in the acceleration and propagation producing a systematic flare-to-flare fractionation that depends on the charge per unit mass of the ion. Correcting the average SEP abundances for this fractionation yields SEP-derived coronal abundances for 20 elements. High-resolution SEP studies have also provided isotopic abundances for five elements. SEP-derived abundances indicate that elements with high first ionization potentials (greater than 10 eV) are depleted in the corona relative to the photosphere and provide new information on the solar abundance of C and Ne-22.

  20. A Multi-Scale Perspective of the Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Birds in Eastern Forests

    Treesearch

    Frank R. Thompson; Therese M. Donovan; Richard M. DeGraff; John Faaborg; Scott K. Robinson

    2002-01-01

    We propose a model that considers forest fragmentation within a spatial hierarchy that includes regional or biogeographic effects, landscape-level fragmentation effects, and local habitat effects. We hypothesize that effects operate "top down" in that larger scale effects provide constraints or context for smaller scale effects. Bird species' abundance...

  1. Virtual fragment preparation for computational fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has become an important component of the drug discovery process. The use of fragments can accelerate both the search for a hit molecule and the development of that hit into a lead molecule for clinical testing. In addition to experimental methodologies for FBDD such as NMR and X-ray Crystallography screens, computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role. The success of the computational simulations is due in large part to how the database of virtual fragments is prepared. In order to prepare the fragments appropriately it is necessary to understand how FBDD differs from other approaches and the issues inherent in building up molecules from smaller fragment pieces. The ultimate goal of these calculations is to link two or more simulated fragments into a molecule that has an experimental binding affinity consistent with the additive predicted binding affinities of the virtual fragments. Computationally predicting binding affinities is a complex process, with many opportunities for introducing error. Therefore, care should be taken with the fragment preparation procedure to avoid introducing additional inaccuracies.This chapter is focused on the preparation process used to create a virtual fragment database. Several key issues of fragment preparation which affect the accuracy of binding affinity predictions are discussed. The first issue is the selection of the two-dimensional atomic structure of the virtual fragment. Although the particular usage of the fragment can affect this choice (i.e., whether the fragment will be used for calibration, binding site characterization, hit identification, or lead optimization), general factors such as synthetic accessibility, size, and flexibility are major considerations in selecting the 2D structure. Other aspects of preparing the virtual fragments for simulation are the generation of three-dimensional conformations and the assignment of the associated atomic point charges.

  2. Rain forest fragmentation and the proliferation of successional trees.

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Nascimento, Henrique E M; Laurance, Susan G; Andrade, Ana C; Fearnside, Philip M; Ribeiro, José E L; Capretz, Robson L

    2006-02-01

    The effects of habitat fragmentation on diverse tropical tree communities are poorly understood. Over a 20-year period we monitored the density of 52 tree species in nine predominantly successional genera (Annona, Bellucia, Cecropia, Croton, Goupia, Jacaranda, Miconia, Pourouma, Vismia) in fragmented and continuous Amazonian forests. We also evaluated the relative importance of soil, topographic, forest dynamic, and landscape variables in explaining the abundance and species composition of successional trees. Data were collected within 66 permanent 1-ha plots within a large (approximately 1000 km2) experimental landscape, with forest fragments ranging from 1 to 100 ha in area. Prior to forest fragmentation, successional trees were uncommon, typically comprising 2-3% of all trees (> or =10 cm diameter at breast height [1.3 m above the ground surface]) in each plot. Following fragmentation, the density and basal area of successional trees increased rapidly. By 13-17 years after fragmentation, successional trees had tripled in abundance in fragment and edge plots and constituted more than a quarter of all trees in some plots. Fragment age had strong, positive effects on the density and basal area of successional trees, with no indication of a plateau in these variables, suggesting that successional species could become even more abundant in fragments over time. Nonetheless, the 52 species differed greatly in their responses to fragmentation and forest edges. Some disturbance-favoring pioneers (e.g., Cecropia sciadophylla, Vismia guianensis, V. amazonica, V. bemerguii, Miconia cf. crassinervia) increased by >1000% in density on edge plots, whereas over a third (19 of 52) of all species remained constant or declined in numbers. Species responses to fragmentation were effectively predicted by their median growth rate in nearby intact forest, suggesting that faster-growing species have a strong advantage in forest fragments. An ordination analysis revealed three main

  3. MS/MS analysis and imaging of lipids across Drosophila brain using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nhu T N; Munem, Marwa; Ewing, Andrew G; Fletcher, John S

    2017-06-01

    Lipids are abundant biomolecules performing central roles to maintain proper functioning of cells and biological bodies. Due to their highly complex composition, it is critical to obtain information of lipid structures in order to identify particular lipids which are relevant for a biological process or metabolic pathway under study. Among currently available molecular identification techniques, MS/MS in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging has been of high interest in the bioanalytical community as it allows visualization of intact molecules in biological samples as well as elucidation of their chemical structures. However, there have been few applications using SIMS and MS/MS owing to instrumental challenges for this capability. We performed MS and MS/MS imaging to study the lipid structures of Drosophila brain using the J105 and 40-keV Ar 4000 + gas cluster ion source, with the novelty being the use of MS/MS SIMS analysis of intact lipids in the fly brain. Glycerophospholipids were identified by MS/MS profiling. MS/MS was also used to characterize diglyceride fragment ions and to identify them as triacylglyceride fragments. Moreover, MS/MS imaging offers a unique possibility for detailed elucidation of biomolecular distribution with high accuracy based on the ion images of its fragments. This is particularly useful in the presence of interferences which disturb the interpretation of biomolecular localization. Graphical abstract MS/MS was performed during time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis of Drosophila melongaster (fruit fly) to elucidate the structure and origin of different chemical species in the brain including a range of different phospholipid classes (PC, PI, PE) and di- and triacylglycerides (DAG & TAG) species where reference MS/MS spectra provided a potential means of discriminating between the isobaric [M-OH] + ion of DAGs and the [M-RCO] + ion of TAGs.

  4. Coherent control of alkali cluster fragmentation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, Albrecht; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Bartelt, Andreas; Vajda, Štefan; Wöste, Ludger

    2003-06-01

    Metal clusters exhibit extraordinary chemical and catalytic properties, which sensitively depend upon their size. This behavior makes them interesting candidates for the real-time analysis of ultrafast photo-induced processes—ultimately leading to coherent control scenarii. We have performed transient multi-photon ionization experiments on small alkali clusters of different size in order to probe their wave packet dynamics, structural reorientations, charge transfers and dissociative events in different vibrationally excited electronic states including their ground state. The observed processes were highly dependent on the irradiated pulse parameters, like its phase, amplitude and duration; an emphasis to employ a feedback control system for generating the optimum pulse shapes. Their spectral and temporal behavior reflects interesting properties about the investigated system and the irradiated photochemical process. We present first the vibrational dynamics of bound, dissociated, and pre-dissociated electronically excited states of alkali dimers and trimers. The scheme for observing the wave packet dynamics in the electronic ground state using stimulated Raman-pumping is shown. Since the employed pulse parameters significantly influence the efficiency of the irradiated dynamic pathways photo-induced fragmentation experiments on bifurcating reaction channels were carried out. In these experiments different branching ionization and fragmentation pathways of electronically excited Na 2K were investigated. By employing an evolutionary algorithm for optimizing the phase and amplitude of the applied laser field, the yield of the resulting parent or fragment ions could significantly be influenced and interesting features could be concluded from the obtained optimum pulse shapes revealing the characteristic molecular oscillation period. Moreover, the influence on the optimal pulse shape due to fragmentation from larger clusters into NaK is obtained. The substructure of

  5. Geographic variation in cowbird distribution, abundance, and parasitism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Hahn, D.C.; George, T. Luke; Dobkin, David S.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated geographical patterns in the abundance and distribution of Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater), and in the frequency of cowbird parasitism, across North America in relation to habitat fragmentation. We found no distinctive parasitism patterns at the national or even regional scales, but the species is most abundant in the Great Plains, the heart of their original range, and least common in the southeastern U.S. This situation is dynamic, because both the Brown-headed and two other cowbird species are actively expanding their ranges in the southern U.S. We focused almost entirely in this paper on the Brown-headed Cowbird, because it is the only endemic North American cowbird, its distribution is much wider, and it has been much more intensively studied. We determined that landscape is the most meaningful unit of scale for comparing cowbird parasitism patterns as, for example, in comparisons of northeastern and central hardwood forests within agricultural matrices, and suburbanized areas versus western coniferous forests. We concluded that cowbird parasitism patterns were broadly similar within all landscapes. Even comparisons between prominently dissimilar landscapes, such as hardwoods in agriculture and suburbia versus coniferous forest, display a striking similarity in the responses of cowbirds. Our review clearly indicated that proximity of feeding areas is the key factor influencing presence and parasitism patterns within the landscape. We considered intensity of landscape fragmentation from forest-dominated landscapes altered in a forest management context to fragmentation characterized by mixed suburbanization or agricultural development. Our review consistently identified an inverse relationship between extent of forest cover across the landscape and cowbird presence. Invariably, the variation seen in parasitism frequencies within a region was at least partially explained as a response to changes in forest cover. The most salient geographic

  6. HZEFRG1 - SEMIEMPIRICAL NUCLEAR FRAGMENTATION MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The high charge and energy (HZE), Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model, HZEFRG1, was developed to provide a computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program package for generating nuclear fragmentation databases. These databases can then be used in radiation transport applications such as space radiation shielding and dosimetry, cancer therapy with laboratory heavy ion beams, and simulation studies of detector design in nuclear physics experiments. The program provides individual element and isotope production cross sections for the breakup of high energy heavy ions by the combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei. The nuclear breakup contributions are estimated using an energy-dependent abrasion-ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation. The abrasion step involves removal of nucleons by direct knockout in the overlap region of the colliding nuclei. The abrasions are treated on a geometric basis and uniform spherical nuclear density distributions are assumed. Actual experimental nuclear radii obtained from tabulations of electron scattering data are incorporated. Nuclear transparency effects are included by using an energy-dependent, impact-parameter-dependent average transmission factor for the projectile and target nuclei, which accounts for the finite mean free path of nucleons in nuclear matter. The ablation step, as implemented by Bowman, Swiatecki, and Tsang (LBL report no. LBL-2908, July 1973), was treated as a single-nucleon emission for every 10 MeV of excitation energy. Fragmentation contributions from electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) processes, arising from the interacting Coulomb fields, are estimated by using the Weiszacker-Williams theory, extended to include electric dipole and electric quadrupole contributions to one-nucleon removal cross sections. HZEFRG1 consists of a main program, seven function subprograms, and thirteen subroutines. Each is fully commented and begins with a brief description of its

  7. Comparison of Data Acquisition Strategies on Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Canterbury, Jesse D.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Goodlett, David R.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Shaffer, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    A common strategy in mass spectrometry analyses of complex protein mixtures is to digest the proteins to peptides, separate the peptides by microcapillary liquid chromatography and collect tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) on the eluting, complex peptide mixtures, a process commonly termed “shotgun proteomics”. For years, the most common way of data collection was via data-dependent acquisition (DDA), a process driven by an automated instrument control routine that directs MS/MS acquisition from the highest abundant signals to the lowest, a process often leaving lower abundant signals unanalyzed and therefore unidentified in the experiment. Advances in both instrumentation duty cycle and sensitivity allow DDA to probe to lower peptide abundance and therefore enable mapping proteomes to a more significant depth. An alternative to acquiring data by DDA is by data-independent acquisition (DIA), in which a specified range in m/z is fragmented without regard to prioritization of a precursor ion or its relative abundance in the mass spectrum. As a consequence, DIA acquisition potentially offers more comprehensive analysis of peptides than DDA and in principle can yield tandem mass spectra of all ionized molecules following their conversion to the gas-phase. In this work, we evaluate both DDA and DIA on three different linear ion trap instruments: an LTQ, an LTQ modified in-house with an electrodynamic ion funnel, and an LTQ-Velos. These instruments were chosen as they are representative of both older (LTQ) and newer (LTQ-Velos) ion trap designs i.e., linear ion trap and dual ion traps, respectively, and allow direct comparison of peptide identification using both DDA and DIA analysis. Further, as the LTQ-Velos has an improved “S-lens” ion guide in the high-pressure region to improve ion flux, we found it logical to determine if the former LTQ model could be leveraged by improving sensitivity by modifying with an electrodynamic ion guide of significantly different

  8. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  9. Fragment-based lead generation: identification of seed fragments by a highly efficient fragment screening technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Lars; Ritscher, Allegra; Müller, Gerhard; Hafenbradl, Doris

    2009-08-01

    For the detection of the precise and unambiguous binding of fragments to a specific binding site on the target protein, we have developed a novel reporter displacement binding assay technology. The application of this technology for the fragment screening as well as the fragment evolution process with a specific modelling based design strategy is demonstrated for inhibitors of the protein kinase p38alpha. In a fragment screening approach seed fragments were identified which were then used to build compounds from the deep-pocket towards the hinge binding area of the protein kinase p38alpha based on a modelling approach. BIRB796 was used as a blueprint for the alignment of the fragments. The fragment evolution of these deep-pocket binding fragments towards the fully optimized inhibitor BIRB796 included the modulation of the residence time as well as the affinity. The goal of our study was to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of our novel fragment screening technology at high fragment concentrations, compare the screening data with biochemical activity data and to demonstrate the evolution of the hit fragments with fast kinetics, into slow kinetic inhibitors in an in silico approach.

  10. NUCFRG2: An evaluation of the semiempirical nuclear fragmentation database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Badavi, F. F.; Chun, S. Y.; Norbury, J. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.

    1995-01-01

    A semiempirical abrasion-ablation model has been successful in generating a large nuclear database for the study of high charge and energy (HZE) ion beams, radiation physics, and galactic cosmic ray shielding. The cross sections that are generated are compared with measured HZE fragmentation data from various experimental groups. A research program for improvement of the database generator is also discussed.

  11. Tank fragmentation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daye, C. J.; Cooksey, D.; Walters, R. J.; Auble, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic study of a simulated tank fragmentation test was made. Sixteen disks and four spheres were ejected from a test article mounted in a vertical orientation 110 ft above a target installed on the test chamber floor. The test was performed at a chamber pressure of 25 microns. Velocities at impingement on the target ranged from 88 to 120 ft/sec; corresponding ejection velocities at the exit plane of the ejector assembly ranged from 29 to 87 ft/sec. Tumble axes of the disks were expected to be all in the north-south direction; the majority of those measured were, while some were skewed from this direction, the maximum observed being 90 deg. A typical measured tumble rate was 2.4 turns/sec. The dispersion pattern measured on the target was reasonably regular, and measured approximately 16 ft east-to-west by 11 ft north-to-south.

  12. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  13. Twilight of Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, David

    2014-03-01

    Baby boomers enjoyed the most benign period in human history: fifty years of relative peace, cheap energy, plentiful grain supply, and a warming climate due to the highest solar activity for 8,000 years. The party is over - prepare for the twilight of abundance. David Archibald reveals the grim future the world faces on its current trajectory: massive fuel shortages, the bloodiest warfare in human history, a global starvation crisis, and a rapidly cooling planet. Archibald combines pioneering science with keen economic knowledge to predict the global disasters that could destroy civilization as we know it - disasters that are waiting just around the corner. But there's good news, too: We can have a good future if we prepare for it. Advanced, civilized countries can have a permanently high standard of living if they choose to invest in the technologies that will get them there. Archibald, a climate scientist as well as an inventor and a financial specialist, explains which scientific breakthroughs can save civilization in the coming crisis - if we can cut through the special interest opposition to these innovations and allow free markets to flourish.

  14. The Multiple Impacts of Tropical Forest Fragmentation on Arthropod Biodiversity and on their Patterns of Interactions with Host Plants.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; Dáttilo, Wesley; Martínez-Falcón, Ana Paola; Durán-Barrón, César; Valenzuela, Jorge; López, Sara; Lombera, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Tropical rain forest fragmentation affects biotic interactions in distinct ways. Little is known, however, about how fragmentation affects animal trophic guilds and their patterns of interactions with host plants. In this study, we analyzed changes in biotic interactions in forest fragments by using a multitrophic approach. For this, we classified arthropods associated with Heliconia aurantiaca herbs into broad trophic guilds (omnivores, herbivores and predators) and assessed the topological structure of intrapopulation plant-arthropod networks in fragments and continuous forests. Habitat type influenced arthropod species abundance, diversity and composition with greater abundance in fragments but greater diversity in continuous forest. According to trophic guilds, coleopteran herbivores were more abundant in continuous forest and overall omnivores in fragments. Continuous forest showed a greater diversity of interactions than fragments. Only in fragments, however, did the arthropod community associated with H aurantiaca show a nested structure, suggesting novel and/or opportunistic host-arthropod associations. Plants, omnivores and predators contributed more to nestedness than herbivores. Therefore, Heliconia-arthropod network properties do not appear to be maintained in fragments mainly caused by the decrease of herbivores. Our study contributes to the understanding of the impact of fragmentation on the structure and dynamics of multitrophic arthropod communities associated with a particular plant species of the highly biodiverse tropical forests. Nevertheless, further replication of study sites is needed to strengthen the conclusion that forest fragmentation negatively affects arthropod assemblages.

  15. The Multiple Impacts of Tropical Forest Fragmentation on Arthropod Biodiversity and on their Patterns of Interactions with Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; Dáttilo, Wesley; Martínez-Falcón, Ana Paola; Durán-Barrón, César; Valenzuela, Jorge; López, Sara; Lombera, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Tropical rain forest fragmentation affects biotic interactions in distinct ways. Little is known, however, about how fragmentation affects animal trophic guilds and their patterns of interactions with host plants. In this study, we analyzed changes in biotic interactions in forest fragments by using a multitrophic approach. For this, we classified arthropods associated with Heliconia aurantiaca herbs into broad trophic guilds (omnivores, herbivores and predators) and assessed the topological structure of intrapopulation plant-arthropod networks in fragments and continuous forests. Habitat type influenced arthropod species abundance, diversity and composition with greater abundance in fragments but greater diversity in continuous forest. According to trophic guilds, coleopteran herbivores were more abundant in continuous forest and overall omnivores in fragments. Continuous forest showed a greater diversity of interactions than fragments. Only in fragments, however, did the arthropod community associated with H aurantiaca show a nested structure, suggesting novel and/or opportunistic host-arthropod associations. Plants, omnivores and predators contributed more to nestedness than herbivores. Therefore, Heliconia-arthropod network properties do not appear to be maintained in fragments mainly caused by the decrease of herbivores. Our study contributes to the understanding of the impact of fragmentation on the structure and dynamics of multitrophic arthropod communities associated with a particular plant species of the highly biodiverse tropical forests. Nevertheless, further replication of study sites is needed to strengthen the conclusion that forest fragmentation negatively affects arthropod assemblages. PMID:26731271

  16. Diverse Effects of a Seven-Year Experimental Grassland Fragmentation on Major Invertebrate Groups

    PubMed Central

    Braschler, Brigitte; Baur, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major driver of biodiversity loss, but observed effects vary and may depend on the group examined. Time since fragmentation may explain some differences between taxonomical groups, as some species and thus species composition respond with a delay to changes in their environment. Impacts of drivers of global change may thus be underestimated in short-term studies. In our study we experimentally fragmented nutrient-poor dry calcareous grasslands and studied the response of species richness, individual density and species composition of various groups of invertebrates (gastropods, ants, ground beetles, rove beetles, orthoptera, spiders, woodlice) in 12 small (1.5 m * 1.5 m) and 12 large (4.5 m * 4.5 m) fragments and their corresponding control plots after 7 years. We further examined responses to fragmentation in relation to body size and habitat preferences. Responses to fragmentation varied between taxonomical groups. While spider species richness and individual density were lower in fragments, the opposite was true for an orthopteran species and woodlice. Species composition and β-diversity differed between fragments and control plots for some groups. However, the interaction treatment*plot size was rarely significant. Species with high occupancy rates in undisturbed control plots responded more negatively to the fragmentation, while species with large body size were relatively more abundant in fragments in some groups. No effect of the fragmentation was found for ants, which may have the longest lag times because of long-lived colonies. However, relationships between abundance and the species’ preferences for environmental factors affected by edge effects indicate that ant diversity too may be affected in the longer-term. Our results show the importance of considering different groups in conservation management in times of widespread fragmentation of landscapes. While species richness may respond slowly, changes in abundance related

  17. Does Tropical Forest Fragmentation Increase Long-Term Variability of Butterfly Communities?

    PubMed Central

    Leidner, Allison K.; Haddad, Nick M.; Lovejoy, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major driver of biodiversity loss. Yet, the overall effects of fragmentation on biodiversity may be obscured by differences in responses among species. These opposing responses to fragmentation may be manifest in higher variability in species richness and abundance (termed hyperdynamism), and in predictable changes in community composition. We tested whether forest fragmentation causes long-term hyperdynamism in butterfly communities, a taxon that naturally displays large variations in species richness and community composition. Using a dataset from an experimentally fragmented landscape in the central Amazon that spanned 11 years, we evaluated the effect of fragmentation on changes in species richness and community composition through time. Overall, adjusted species richness (adjusted for survey duration) did not differ between fragmented forest and intact forest. However, spatial and temporal variation of adjusted species richness was significantly higher in fragmented forests relative to intact forest. This variation was associated with changes in butterfly community composition, specifically lower proportions of understory shade species and higher proportions of edge species in fragmented forest. Analysis of rarefied species richness, estimated using indices of butterfly abundance, showed no differences between fragmented and intact forest plots in spatial or temporal variation. These results do not contradict the results from adjusted species richness, but rather suggest that higher variability in butterfly adjusted species richness may be explained by changes in butterfly abundance. Combined, these results indicate that butterfly communities in fragmented tropical forests are more variable than in intact forest, and that the natural variability of butterflies was not a buffer against the effects of fragmentation on community dynamics. PMID:20224772

  18. Discrimination Between Peptide O-Sulfo- and O-Phosphotyrosine Residues by Negative Ion Mode Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson-Averbukh, Marina; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Lehmann, Wolf D.

    2011-12-01

    Unambiguous differentiation between isobaric sulfated and phosphorylated tyrosine residues (sTyr and pTyr) of proteins by mass spectrometry is challenging, even using high resolution mass spectrometers. Here we show that upon negative ion mode collision-induced dissociation (CID), pTyr- and sTyr-containing peptides exhibit entirely different modification-specific fragmentation patterns leading to a rapid discrimination between the isobaric covalent modifications using the tandem mass spectral data. This study reveals that the ratio between the relative abundances of [M-H-80]- and [M-H-98]- fragment ions in ion-trap CID and higher energy collision dissociation (HCD) spectra of singly deprotonated +80 Da Tyr-peptides can be used as a reliable indication of the Tyr modification group nature. For multiply deprotonated +80 Da Tyr-peptides, CID spectra of sTyr- and pTyr-containing sequences can be readily distinguished based on the presence/absence of the [M-nH-79](n-1)- and [M-nH-79-NL]( n-1)- ( n = 2, 3) fragment ions (NL = neutral loss).

  19. Habitat fragmentation effects on the orchid bee communities in remnant forests of southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Fátima do Rosário Naschenveng; Penatti, N C

    2012-10-01

    The effect of habitat fragmentation on the structure of orchid bee communities was analyzed by the investigation of the existence of a spatial structure in the richness and abundance of Euglossini species and by determining the relationship between these data and environmental factors. The surveys were carried out in four different forest fragments and one university campus. Richness, abundance, and diversity of species were analyzed in relation to abiotic (size of the area, extent of the perimeter, perimeter/area ratio, and shape index) and biotic characteristics (vegetation index of the fragment and of the matrix of each of the locations studied). We observed a highly significant positive correlation between the diversity index and the vegetation index of the fragment, landscape and shape index. Our analysis demonstrated that the observed variation could be explained mainly by the vegetation index and the size of the fragment. Variations in relative abundance showed a tendency toward an aggregated spatial distribution between the fragments studied, as well as between the sampling stations within the same habitat, demonstrating the existence of a spatial structure on a small scale in the populations of Euglossini. This distribution will determine the composition of species that coexist in the area after fragmentation. These data help in understanding the differences and similarities in the structure of communities of Euglossini resulting from forest fragmentation.

  20. Hydrogen rearrangements in the fragmentation of anthracene by low-energy electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Dunne, Melissa; Gradziel, Marcin L.

    2018-02-01

    We have measured mass spectra for positive ions produced by low-energy electron impact on anthracene using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The electron impact energy has been varied from 0 to 100 eV in steps of 0.5 eV. Ion yield curves of most of the fragment ions have been determined by fitting groups of adjacent peaks in the mass spectra with sequences of normalized Gaussians. Appearance energies for all these ions have been determined, and we report the first direct measurement of the triple ionization energy of anthracene at 45.5±0.5 eV. The groups of fragments containing 8-13 carbon atoms provide evidence for hydrogen rearrangements during the fragmentation, involving retention or loss of one or two additional hydrogen atoms. Groups of fragments with 6 and 7 carbon atoms clearly show the presence of doubly-charged fragments. The smaller fragments with 1-4 carbon atoms all show broadened peaks, and these fragments may be partly or mostly due to energetic charge-separation fragmentations of doubly-charged anthracene.

  1. Transport of Light Ions in Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Tai, H.; Shinn, J. L.; Chun, S. Y.; Tripathi, R. K.; Sihver, L.

    1998-01-01

    A recent set of light ion experiments are analyzed using the Green's function method of solving the Boltzmann equation for ions of high charge and energy (the GRNTRN transport code) and the NUCFRG2 fragmentation database generator code. Although the NUCFRG2 code reasonably represents the fragmentation of heavy ions, the effects of light ion fragmentation requires a more detailed nuclear model including shell structure and short range correlations appearing as tightly bound clusters in the light ion nucleus. The most recent NTJCFRG2 code is augmented with a quasielastic alpha knockout model and semiempirical adjustments (up to 30 percent in charge removal) in the fragmentation process allowing reasonable agreement with the experiments to be obtained. A final resolution of the appropriate cross sections must await the full development of a coupled channel reaction model in which shell structure and clustering can be accurately evaluated.

  2. Source abundances of ultra heavy elements derived from UHCRE measurements.

    PubMed

    Domingo, C; Font, J; Baixeras, C; Fernandez, F

    1996-11-01

    A total of 205 tracks have been located, measured, and positively identified as originating from Ultra Heavy (Z > or = 65) cosmic ray ions with energies over 2 GeV/amu in the 10 UHCRE plastic track detector (mainly Lexan polycarbonate) stacks studied by our Group. About 40 values of reduced etch rate S have been obtained along each of these tracks. A method based on determining the gradient of S, together with calibration in accelerators, is used to determine the charge of each ion resulting in one of such tracks to obtain the charge spectrum of the recorded Ultra Heavy ions. The abundance ratio of ions with 87 < or = Z < or = 100 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 as well as that of ions with 81 < or = Z < or = 86 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 80 are calculated at 0.016 and 0.32, respectively, which agree with the values obtained from measurements in the HEAO-3 and Ariel-6 experiments. The abundance ratio of ions with 70 < or = Z < or = 73 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 is also calculated, but its value (0.074) did not seem to be significant because of our detectors' low registration efficiency in the charge range 70 < or = Z < or = 73. A computer program developed by our Group, based on the Leaky Box cosmic ray propagation model, has been used to determine the source abundances of cosmic ray nuclei with Z > or = 65 inferred from the abundances measured in the UHCRE. It appeared that r-process synthesized elements were overabundant compared to the Solar System abundances, as predicted by other authors.

  3. Mass spectrometry for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based approaches in chemical biology and drug discovery have been widely adopted worldwide in both academia and industry. Fragment hits tend to interact weakly with their targets, necessitating the use of sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding. Common fragment screening techniques include differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ligand-observed NMR. Validation and characterization of hits is usually performed using a combination of protein-observed NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. In this context, MS is a relatively underutilized technique in fragment screening for drug discovery. MS-based techniques have the advantage of high sensitivity, low sample consumption and being label-free. This review highlights recent examples of the emerging use of MS-based techniques in fragment screening. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Fragment Screening and HIV Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide-range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target. PMID:21972022

  5. Fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Feyfant, Eric; Cross, Jason B; Paris, Kevin; Tsao, Désirée H H

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD), which is comprised of both fragment screening and the use of fragment hits to design leads, began more than 15 years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity and utility. Its origin lies on the fact that the coverage of chemical space and the binding efficiency of hits are directly related to the size of the compounds screened. Nevertheless, FBDD still faces challenges, among them developing fragment screening libraries that ensure optimal coverage of chemical space, physical properties and chemical tractability. Fragment screening also requires sensitive assays, often biophysical in nature, to detect weak binders. In this chapter we will introduce the technologies used to address these challenges and outline the experimental advantages that make FBDD one of the most popular new hit-to-lead process.

  6. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    grassland fragments, as well as to determine the potential for the use of LFA in decision-making involving the conservation of grassland fragments. The results indicated that the occurrence, size and characteristics of vegetated patches, and especially the presence of litter abundances, were the main factors determining differences in the LFA indices. Furthermore, mowing resulted in the overall fine-scale biophysical indices being higher for some of the urban grassland fragments. This implied that it is not necessarily the influence of urbanisation entailing high or low resource conserving patchiness and patch quality, but rather the management practices associated with urban and exurban areas. Therefore, from a conservation point of view, the grassland fragments in the City of Potchefstroom are just as conservable (on a biophysical function level involving soil processes) than the more "natural" exurban grassland fragments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular matrix fragmentation in young, healthy cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Craddock, R J; Hodson, N W; Ozols, M; Shearer, T; Hoyland, J A; Sherratt, M J

    2018-02-09

    Although the composition and structure of cartilaginous tissues is complex, collagen II fibrils and aggrecan are the most abundant assemblies in both articular cartilage (AC) and the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc (IVD). Whilst structural heterogeneity of intact aggrecan ( containing three globular domains) is well characterised, the extent of aggrecan fragmentation in healthy tissues is poorly defined. Using young, yet skeletally mature (18-30 months), bovine AC and NP tissues, it was shown that, whilst the ultrastructure of intact aggrecan was tissue-dependent, most molecules (AC: 95 %; NP: 99.5 %) were fragmented (lacking one or more globular domains). Fragments were significantly smaller and more structurally heterogeneous in the NP compared with the AC (molecular area; AC: 8543 nm2; NP: 4625 nm2; p < 0.0001). In contrast, fibrillar collagen appeared structurally intact and tissue-invariant. Molecular fragmentation is considered indicative of a pathology; however, these young, skeletally mature tissues were histologically and mechanically (reduced modulus: AC: ≈ 500 kPa; NP: ≈ 80 kPa) comparable to healthy tissues and devoid of notable gelatinase activity (compared with rat dermis). As aggrecan fragmentation was prevalent in neonatal bovine AC (99.5 % fragmented, molecular area: 5137 nm2) as compared with mature AC (95.0 % fragmented, molecular area: 8667 nm2), it was hypothesised that targeted proteolysis might be an adaptive process that modified aggrecan packing (as simulated computationally) and, hence, tissue charge density, mechanical properties and porosity. These observations provided a baseline against which pathological and/or age-related fragmentation of aggrecan could be assessed and suggested that new strategies might be required to engineer constructs that mimic the mechanical properties of native cartilaginous tissues.

  8. Statistical prescission point model of fission fragment angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Bency; Kataria, S. K.

    1998-03-01

    In light of recent developments in fission studies such as slow saddle to scission motion and spin equilibration near the scission point, the theory of fission fragment angular distribution is examined and a new statistical prescission point model is developed. The conditional equilibrium of the collective angular bearing modes at the prescission point, which is guided mainly by their relaxation times and population probabilities, is taken into account in the present model. The present model gives a consistent description of the fragment angular and spin distributions for a wide variety of heavy and light ion induced fission reactions.

  9. Faunal Communities Are Invariant to Fragmentation in Experimental Seagrass Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Scott R.; Lombana, Alfonso V.; Orth, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Human-driven habitat fragmentation is cited as one of the most pressing threats facing many coastal ecosystems today. Many experiments have explored the consequences of fragmentation on fauna in one foundational habitat, seagrass beds, but have either surveyed along a gradient of existing patchiness, used artificial materials to mimic a natural bed, or sampled over short timescales. Here, we describe faunal responses to constructed fragmented landscapes varying from 4–400 m2 in two transplant garden experiments incorporating live eelgrass (Zostera marina L.). In experiments replicated within two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay, USA across multiple seasons and non-consecutive years, we comprehensively censused mesopredators and epifaunal communities using complementary quantitative methods. We found that community properties, including abundance, species richness, Simpson and functional diversity, and composition were generally unaffected by the number of patches and the size of the landscape, or the intensity of sampling. Additionally, an index of competition based on species co-occurrences revealed no trends with increasing patch size, contrary to theoretical predictions. We extend conclusions concerning the invariance of animal communities to habitat fragmentation from small-scale observational surveys and artificial experiments to experiments conducted with actual living plants and at more realistic scales. Our findings are likely a consequence of the rapid life histories and high mobility of the organisms common to eelgrass beds, and have implications for both conservation and restoration, suggesting that even small patches can rapidly promote abundant and diverse faunal communities. PMID:27244652

  10. Faunal Communities Are Invariant to Fragmentation in Experimental Seagrass Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Marion, Scott R; Lombana, Alfonso V; Orth, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Human-driven habitat fragmentation is cited as one of the most pressing threats facing many coastal ecosystems today. Many experiments have explored the consequences of fragmentation on fauna in one foundational habitat, seagrass beds, but have either surveyed along a gradient of existing patchiness, used artificial materials to mimic a natural bed, or sampled over short timescales. Here, we describe faunal responses to constructed fragmented landscapes varying from 4-400 m2 in two transplant garden experiments incorporating live eelgrass (Zostera marina L.). In experiments replicated within two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay, USA across multiple seasons and non-consecutive years, we comprehensively censused mesopredators and epifaunal communities using complementary quantitative methods. We found that community properties, including abundance, species richness, Simpson and functional diversity, and composition were generally unaffected by the number of patches and the size of the landscape, or the intensity of sampling. Additionally, an index of competition based on species co-occurrences revealed no trends with increasing patch size, contrary to theoretical predictions. We extend conclusions concerning the invariance of animal communities to habitat fragmentation from small-scale observational surveys and artificial experiments to experiments conducted with actual living plants and at more realistic scales. Our findings are likely a consequence of the rapid life histories and high mobility of the organisms common to eelgrass beds, and have implications for both conservation and restoration, suggesting that even small patches can rapidly promote abundant and diverse faunal communities.

  11. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  12. Ion Trap Collisional Activation of c and z• Ions Formed via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Electron Transfer Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    A series of c- and z•-type product ions formed via gas-phase electron transfer ion/ion reactions between protonated polypeptides with azobenzene radical anions are subjected to ion trap collision activation in a linear ion trap. Fragment ions including a-, b-, y-type and ammonia-loss ions are typically observed in collision induced dissociation (CID) of c ions, showing almost identical CID patterns as those of the C-terminal amidated peptides consisting of the same sequences. Collisional activation of z• species mainly gives rise to side-chain losses and peptide backbone cleavages resulting in a-, b-, c-, x-, y-and z-type ions. Most of the fragmentation pathways of z• species upon ion trap CID can be accounted for by radical driven processes. The side-chain losses from z• species are different from the small losses observed from the charge-reduced peptide molecular species in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), which indicates rearrangement of the radical species. Characteristic side-chain losses are observed for several amino acid residues, which are useful to predict their presence in peptide/protein ions. Furthermore, the unique side-chain losses from leucine and isoleucine residues allow facile distinction of these two isomeric residues. PMID:17608403

  13. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Neustetter, M; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Denifl, S

    2016-08-07

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO)6 clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W2(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W2C(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves.

  14. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Neustetter, M.; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E.; Denifl, S., E-mail: Stephan.Denifl@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt

    2016-08-07

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO){sub 6} clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W{sub 2}(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤more » n ≤ 3) and W{sub 2}C(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves.« less

  15. Peptide Fragmentation by Corona Discharge Induced Electrochemical Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John R.; Hess, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental studies have greatly improved our understanding of electrospray, including the underlying electrochemical reactions. Generally regarded as disadvantageous, we have recently shown that corona discharge (CD) can be used as an effective method to create a radical cation species [M]+•, thus optimizing the electrochemical reactions that occur on the surface of the stainless steel (SS) electrospray capillary tip. This technique is known as CD initiated electrochemical ionization (CD-ECI). Here, we report on the fundamental studies using CD-ECI to induce analytically useful in-source fragmentation of a range of molecules that complex transition metals. Compounds that have been selectively fragmented using CD-ECI include enolate forming phenylglycine containing peptides, glycopeptides, nucleosides and phosphopeptides. Collision induced dissociation (CID) or other activation techniques were not necessary for CD-ECI fragmentation. A four step mechanism was proposed: 1. Complexation using either Fe in the SS capillary tip material or Cu(II) as an offline complexation reagent; 2. Electrochemical oxidation of the complexed metal and thus formation of a radical cation (e.g.; Fe - e− → Fe +•); 3. Radical fragmentation of the complexed compound. 4. Electrospray ionization of the fragmented neutrals. Fragmentation patterns resembling b- and y-type ions were observed and allowed the localization of the phosphorylation sites. PMID:20869880

  16. Gas-phase structure and fragmentation pathways of singly protonated peptides with N-terminal arginine.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Csonka, István P; Suhai, Sándor; Barofsky, Douglas F; Paizs, Béla

    2010-11-25

    The gas-phase structures and fragmentation pathways of the singly protonated peptide arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) are investigated by means of collision-induced-dissociation (CID) and detailed molecular mechanics and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that despite the ionizing proton being strongly sequestered at the guanidine group, protonated RGD can easily be fragmented on charge directed fragmentation pathways. This is due to facile mobilization of the C-terminal or aspartic acid COOH protons thereby generating salt-bridge (SB) stabilized structures. These SB intermediates can directly fragment to generate b(2) ions or facilely rearrange to form anhydrides from which both b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O fragments can be formed. The salt-bridge stabilized and anhydride transition structures (TSs) necessary to form b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O are much lower in energy than their traditional charge solvated counterparts. These mechanisms provide compelling evidence of the role of SB and anhydride structures in protonated peptide fragmentation which complements and supports our recent findings for tryptic systems (Bythell, B. J.; Suhai, S.; Somogyi, A.; Paizs, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14057-14065.). In addition to these findings we also report on the mechanisms for the formation of the b(1) ion, neutral loss (H(2)O, NH(3), guanidine) fragment ions, and the d(3) ion.

  17. Changes in Tree Reproductive Traits Reduce Functional Diversity in a Fragmented Atlantic Forest Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Girão, Luciana Coe; Lopes, Ariadna Valentina; Tabarelli, Marcelo; Bruna, Emilio M.

    2007-01-01

    Functional diversity has been postulated to be critical for the maintenance of ecosystem functioning, but the way it can be disrupted by human-related disturbances remains poorly investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that habitat fragmentation changes the relative contribution of tree species within categories of reproductive traits (frequency of traits) and reduces the functional diversity of tree assemblages. The study was carried out in an old and severely fragmented landscape of the Brazilian Atlantic forest. We used published information and field observations to obtain the frequency of tree species and individuals within 50 categories of reproductive traits (distributed in four major classes: pollination systems, floral biology, sexual systems, and reproductive systems) in 10 fragments and 10 tracts of forest interior (control plots). As hypothesized, populations in fragments and control plots differed substantially in the representation of the four major classes of reproductive traits (more than 50% of the categories investigated). The most conspicuous differences were the lack of three pollination systems in fragments-pollination by birds, flies and non-flying mammals-and that fragments had a higher frequency of both species and individuals pollinated by generalist vectors. Hermaphroditic species predominate in both habitats, although their relative abundances were higher in fragments. On the contrary, self-incompatible species were underrepresented in fragments. Moreover, fragments showed lower functional diversity (H' scores) for pollination systems (−30.3%), floral types (−23.6%), and floral sizes (−20.8%) in comparison to control plots. In contrast to the overwhelming effect of fragmentation, patch and landscape metrics such as patch size and forest cover played a minor role on the frequency of traits. Our results suggest that habitat fragmentation promotes a marked shift in the relative abundance of tree reproductive traits and greatly

  18. Analysis of Bacterial Lipooligosaccharides by MALDI-TOF MS with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nancy J.; John, Constance M.; Jarvis, Gary A.

    2016-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are major microbial virulence factors displayed on the outer membrane of rough-type Gram-negative bacteria. These amphipathic glycolipids are comprised of two domains, a core oligosaccharide linked to a lipid A moiety. Isolated LOS samples are generally heterogeneous mixtures of glycoforms, with structural variability in both domains. Traditionally, the oligosaccharide and lipid A components of LOS have been analyzed separately following mild acid hydrolysis, although important acid-labile moieties can be cleaved. Recently, an improved method was introduced for analysis of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS using a thin layer matrix composed of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) and nitrocellulose. In addition to molecular ions, the spectra show in-source "prompt" fragments arising from regiospecific cleavage between the lipid A and oligosaccharide domains. Here, we demonstrate the use of traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for IMS-MS and IMS-MS/MS analyses of intact LOS from Neisseria spp. ionized by MALDI. Using IMS, the singly charged prompt fragments for the oligosaccharide and lipid A domains of LOS were readily separated into resolved ion plumes, permitting the extraction of specific subspectra, which led to increased confidence in assigning compositions and improved detection of less abundant ions. Moreover, IMS separation of precursor ions prior to collision-induced dissociation (CID) generated time-aligned, clean MS/MS spectra devoid of fragments from interfering species. Incorporating IMS into the profiling of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS exploits the unique domain structure of the molecule and offers a new means of extracting more detailed information from the analysis.

  19. Oxygen abundances in halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessell, Michael S.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Ruan, Kui

    1991-12-01

    The present study determines the oxygen abundance for a sample of metal-poor G dwarfs by analysis of OH lines between 3080 and 3200 A and the permitted high-excitation far-red O I triple. The oxygen abundances determined from the low-excitation OH lines are up to 0.55 dex lower than those measured from the high-excitation O I lines. The abundances for the far-red O I triplet lines agree with those rederived from Abia and Rebolo (1989), and the abundances from the OH lines in dwarfs and giants are in agreement with the rederived O abundances of Barbuy (1988) and others from the forbidden resonance O I line. Because the chi = 0.1.7 eV OH lines are formed in the same layers as the majority of Fe, Ti, and other neutral metal lines used for abundance analyses, it is argued that the OH lines and the forbidden O I line yield the true oxygen abundances relative to the metals.

  20. Study of Electron Ionization and Fragmentation of Non-hydrated and Hydrated Tetrahydrofuran Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustetter, Michael; Mahmoodi-Darian, Masoomeh; Denifl, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Mass spectroscopic investigations on tetrahydrofuran (THF, C4H8O), a common model molecule of the DNA-backbone, have been carried out. We irradiated isolated THF and (hydrated) THF clusters with low energy electrons (electron energy 70 eV) in order to study electron ionization and ionic fragmentation. For elucidation of fragmentation pathways, deuterated TDF (C4D8O) was investigated as well. One major observation is that the cluster environment shows overall a protective behavior on THF. However, also new fragmentation channels open in the cluster. In this context, we were able to solve a discrepancy in the literature about the fragment ion peak at mass 55 u in the electron ionization mass spectrum of THF. We ascribe this ion yield to the fragmentation of ionized THF clusters.

  1. Distinctive and Complementary MS2 Fragmentation Characteristics for Identification of Sulfated Sialylated N-Glycopeptides by nanoLC-MS/MS Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chu-Wei; Guu, Shih-Yun; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2018-04-01

    High sensitivity identification of sulfated glycans carried on specific sites of glycoproteins is an important requisite for investigation of molecular recognition events involved in diverse biological processes. However, aiming for resolving site-specific glycosylation of sulfated glycopeptides by direct LC-MS2 sequencing is technically most challenging. Other than the usual limiting factors such as lower abundance and ionization efficiency compared to analysis of non-glycosylated peptides, confident identification of sulfated glycopeptides among the more abundant non-sulfated glycopeptides requires additional considerations in the selective enrichment and detection strategies. Metal oxide has been applied to enrich phosphopeptides and sialylated glycopeptides, but its use to capture sulfated glycopeptides has not been investigated. Likewise, various complementary MS2 fragmentation modes have yet to be tested against sialylated and non-sialylated sulfoglycopeptides due to limited appropriate sample availability. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of sequencing tryptic sulfated N-glycopeptide and its MS2 fragmentation characteristics by first optimizing the enrichment methods to allow efficient LC-MS detection and MS2 analysis by a combination of CID, HCD, ETD, and EThcD on hybrid and tribrid Orbitrap instruments. Characteristic sulfated glyco-oxonium ions and direct loss of sulfite from precursors were detected as evidences of sulfate modification. It is anticipated that the technical advances demonstrated in this study would allow a feasible extension of our sulfoglycomic analysis to sulfoglycoproteomics. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Isospin dependence of fragment spectra in heavy/super-heavy colliding nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Rajiv, E-mail: rajivchug@gmail.com; Kumar, Rohit, E-mail: rohitksharma.pu@gmail.com; Vinayak, Karan Singh, E-mail: drksvinayak@gmail.com

    2016-05-06

    Using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) approach, we performed a theoretical investigation of the evolution of various kinds of fragments in heavy and superheavy-ion reactions in the intermediate/medium energy domain. We demonstrated direct impact of symmetry energy and Coulomb interactions on the evolution of fragments. Final fragment spectra (yields) obtained from the analysis of various heavy/super-heavy ion reactions at different reaction conditions show high sensitivity towards Coulomb interactions and less significant sensitivity to symmetry energy forms. No inconsistent pattern of fragment structure is obtained in case of super-heavy ion involved reactions for all the parameterizations of density dependence of symmetrymore » energy.« less

  3. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  4. Fragmentations of [M-H]- anions of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate. Does the sulfate group rearrange? A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Bowie, John H

    2013-05-30

    To investigate the fragmentations in the negative-ion electrospray mass spectra of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate. Possible fragmentation mechanisms were explored using a Waters QTOF2 tandem mass spectrometer in concert with calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The major negative ion formed in the ESI-MS of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate is [(M-H)-SO3](-) and this process normally yields the base peak of the spectrum. The basic backbone cleavages of [(M-H)-SO3](-) allowed the sequence of the peptide to be determined. Rearrangement reactions involving the formation of HOSO3(-) and [(M-H)-H2SO4](-) yielded minor peaks with relative abundances ≤ 10% and ≤ 2%, respectively. The mass spectra of the [M-H](-) and [(M-H)-SO3](-) anions of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate allowed the position of the tyrosine sulfate group to be determined, together with the amino acid sequence of the peptide. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Tropical forest fragmentation affects floral visitors but not the structure of individual-based palm-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests.

  6. Would protecting tropical forest fragments provide carbon and biodiversity cobenefits under REDD+?

    PubMed

    Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, William F; Martins, Sebastião V; Meira-Neto, João Augusto A; Simonelli, Marcelo; Edwards, David P

    2015-09-01

    Tropical forests store vast amounts of carbon and are the most biodiverse terrestrial habitats, yet they are being converted and degraded at alarming rates. Given global shortfalls in the budgets required to prevent carbon and biodiversity loss, we need to seek solutions that simultaneously address both issues. Of particular interest are carbon-based payments under the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism to also conserve biodiversity at no additional cost. One potential is for REDD+ to protect forest fragments, especially within biomes where contiguous forest cover has diminished dramatically, but we require empirical tests of the strength of any carbon and biodiversity cobenefits in such fragmented systems. Using the globally threatened Atlantic Forest landscape, we measured above-ground carbon stocks within forest fragments spanning 13 to 23 442 ha in area and with different degrees of isolation. We related these stocks to tree community structure and to the richness and abundance of endemic and IUCN Red-listed species. We found that increasing fragment size has a positive relationship with above-ground carbon stock and with abundance of IUCN Red-listed species and tree community structure. We also found negative relationships between distance from large forest block and tree community structure, endemic species richness and abundance, and IUCN Red-listed species abundance. These resulted in positive congruence between carbon stocks and Red-listed species, and the abundance and richness of endemic species, demonstrating vital cobenefits. As such, protecting forest fragments in hotspots of biodiversity, particularly larger fragments and those closest to sources, offers important carbon and biodiversity cobenefits. More generally, our results suggest that macroscale models of cobenefits under REDD+ have likely overlooked key benefits at small scales, indicating the necessity to apply models that include finer

  7. HZEFRG1: An energy-dependent semiempirical nuclear fragmentation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Khan, Ferdous

    1993-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of high-energy heavy ions by the combined nuclear and coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. The nuclear breakup contributions are estimated with an abrasion-ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation that includes an energy-dependent, mean free path. The electromagnetic dissociation contributions arising from the interacting coulomb fields are estimated by using Weizsacker-Williams theory extended to include electric dipole and electric quadrupole contributions. The complete computer code that implements the model is included as an appendix. Extensive comparisons of cross section predictions with available experimental data are made.

  8. Absolute quantitation of low abundance plasma APL1β peptides at sub-fmol/mL Level by SRM/MRM without immunoaffinity enrichment.

    PubMed

    Sano, Shozo; Tagami, Shinji; Hashimoto, Yuuki; Yoshizawa-Kumagaye, Kumiko; Tsunemi, Masahiko; Okochi, Masayasu; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2014-02-07

    Selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) has been widely used for the quantification of specific proteins/peptides, although it is still challenging to quantitate low abundant proteins/peptides in complex samples such as plasma/serum. To overcome this problem, enrichment of target proteins/peptides is needed, such as immunoprecipitation; however, this is labor-intense and generation of antibodies is highly expensive. In this study, we attempted to quantify plasma low abundant APLP1-derived Aβ-like peptides (APL1β), a surrogate marker for Alzheimer's disease, by SRM/MRM using stable isotope-labeled reference peptides without immunoaffinity enrichment. A combination of Cibacron Blue dye mediated albumin removal and acetonitrile extraction followed by C18-strong cation exchange multi-StageTip purification was used to deplete plasma proteins and unnecessary peptides. Optimal and validated precursor ions to fragment ion transitions of APL1β were developed on a triple quadruple mass spectrometer, and the nanoliquid chromatography gradient for peptide separation was optimized to minimize the biological interference of plasma. Using the stable isotope-labeled (SI) peptide as an internal control, absolute concentrations of plasma APL1β peptide could be quantified as several hundred amol/mL. To our knowledge, this is the lowest detection level of endogenous plasma peptide quantified by SRM/MRM.

  9. Isotopic Effects in Nuclear Fragmentation and GCR Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Improving the accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and transport models is an important goal in preparing for studies of the projected risks and the efficiency of potential mitigations methods for space exploration. In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary cosmic rays and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross sections on GCR transport models. Measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR including their modulation throughout the solar cycle. The quantum multiple-scattering approach to nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used as the data base generator in order to accurately describe the odd-even effect in fragment production. Using the Badhwar and O'Neill GCR model, the QMSFRG model and the HZETRN transport code, the effects of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and on fragment production for transport problems is described for a complete GCR isotopic-grid. The principle finding of this study is that large errors ( 100%) will occur in the mass-flux spectra when comparing the complete isotopic-grid (141 ions) to a reduced isotopic-grid (59 ions), however less significant errors 30%) occur in the elemental-flux spectra. Because the full isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer work-stations, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  10. Electromagnetic Dissociation Cross Sections for High LET Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear interaction cross sections are used in space radiation transport codes to calculate the probability of fragment emission in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Strong interactions usually dominate in these collisions, but electromagnetic (EM) interactions can also sometimes be important. Strong interactions typically occur when the projectile nucleus hits a target nucleus, with a small impact parameter. For impact parameters larger than the sum of the nuclear radii, EM reactions dominate and the process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) if one of the nuclei undergo fragmentation. Previous models of EMD have been used to calculate single proton (p) production, single neutron (n) production or light ion production, where a light ion is defined as an isotope of hydrogen (H) or helium (He), such as a deuteron (2H), a triton (3H), a helion (3He) or an alpha particle (4He). A new model is described which can also account for multiple nucleon production, such as 2p, 2n, 1p1n, 2p1n, 2p2n, etc. in addition to light ion production. Such processes are important to include for the following reasons. Consider, for example, the EMD reaction 56Fe + Al --> 52Cr + X + Al, for a 56Fe projectile impacting Al, which produces the high linear energy transfer (LET) fragment 52Cr. In this reaction, the most probable particles representing X are either 2p2n or 4He. Therefore, production of the high LET fragment 52Cr, must include the multiple nucleon production of 2p2n in addition to the light ion production of 4He. Previous models, such as the NUCFRG3 model, could only account for the 4He production process in this reaction and could not account for 2p2n. The new EMD model presented in this work accounts for both the light ion and multiple nucleon processes, and is therefore able to correctly account for the production of high LET products such as 52Cr. The model will be described and calculations will be presented that show the importance of light ion and multiple

  11. Projectile fragmentation of 500 A MeV 56Fe in nuclear emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Sheng; Zhang, Dong-Hai; Li, Hui-Ling; Yasuda, N.

    2013-07-01

    N-4 stacks of nuclear emulsion were exposed to 500 A MeV 56Fe ions at the HIMAC NIRS. Particle production was investigated in 56Fe-Em interactions. The multiplicity distribution of projectile fragments was done in this paper and compared with interactions induced by 56Fe and other heavy ions in nuclear emulsion at other energies. The variation of characteristics of the heavy ion interactions with the mass and energy of the projectile is studied.

  12. Quantum control of molecular fragmentation in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    Present advances in laser technology allow the production of ultrashort (<˜5 fs, approaching single cycle at 800 nm), intense tabletop laser pulses. At these high intensities laser-matter interactions cannot be described with perturbation theory since multiphoton processes are involved. This is in contrast to photodissociation by the absorption of a single photon, which is well described by perturbation theory. For example, at high intensities (<˜5x1013 W/cm2) the fragmentation of molecular hydrogen ions has been observed via the absorption of three or more photons. In another example, an intriguing dissociation mechanism has been observed where molecular hydrogen ions seem to fragment by apparently absorbing no photons. This is actually a two photon process, photoabsorption followed by stimulated emission, resulting in low energy fragments. We are interested in exploring these kinds of multiphoton processes. Our research group has studied the dynamics and control of fragmentation induced by strong laser fields in a variety of molecular targets. The main goal is to provide a basic understanding of fragmentation mechanisms and possible control schemes of benchmark systems such as H2+. This knowledge is further extended to more complex systems like the benchmark H3+ polyatomic and other molecules. In this dissertation, we report research based on two types of experiments. In the first part, we describe laser-induced fragmentation of molecular ion-beam targets. In the latter part, we discuss the formation of highly-excited neutral fragments from hydrogen molecules using ultrashort laser pulses. In carrying out these experiments, we have also extended experimental techniques beyond their previous capabilities. We have performed a few experiments to advance our understanding of laser-induced fragmentation of molecular-ion beams. For instance, we explored vibrationally resolved spectra of O2+ dissociation using various wavelengths. We observed a vibrational suppression

  13. Transitions from functionalization to fragmentation reactions of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Andrew T; Onasch, Timothy B; Croasdale, David R; Wright, Justin P; Martin, Alexander T; Franklin, Jonathan P; Massoli, Paola; Kroll, Jesse H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Brune, William H; Worsnop, Douglas R; Davidovits, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) reactions governing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors were studied in a flow reactor in the absence of NO(x). SOA precursors were n-decane (n-C10), n-pentadecane (n-C15), n-heptadecane (n-C17), tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane (JP-10), and vapors of diesel fuel and Southern Louisiana crude oil. Aerosol mass spectra were measured with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, from which normalized SOA yields, hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios, and C(x)H(y)+, C(x)H(y)O+, and C(x)H(y)O(2)+ ion abundances were extracted as a function of OH exposure. Normalized SOA yield curves exhibited an increase followed by a decrease as a function of OH exposure, with maximum yields at O/C ratios ranging from 0.29 to 0.74. The decrease in SOA yield correlates with an increase in oxygen content and decrease in carbon content, consistent with transitions from functionalization to fragmentation. For a subset of alkane precursors (n-C10, n-C15, and JP-10), maximum SOA yields were estimated to be 0.39, 0.69, and 1.1. In addition, maximum SOA yields correspond with a maximum in the C(x)H(y)O+ relative abundance. Measured correlations between OH exposure, O/C ratio, and H/C ratio may enable identification of alkane precursor contributions to ambient SOA.

  14. Distinct compartmentalization of dentin matrix protein 1 fragments in mineralized tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Izabela; Qin, Disheng; Huang, Bingzhen; Sun, Yao; Mues, Gabrielle; Svoboda, Kathy; Bonewald, Lynda; Butler, William T; Feng, Jerry Q; Qin, Chunlin

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) has been shown to be critical for the formation of dentin and bone. However, the precise pathway by which DMP1 participates in dentinogenesis and osteogenesis remains to be clarified. DMP1 is present in the extracellular matrix of dentin and bone as processed NH(2)- and COOH-terminal fragments. The NH(2)-terminal fragment occurs as a proteoglycan, whereas the COOH-terminal fragment is highly phosphorylated. The differences in biochemical properties suggest that these fragments may have different tissue and cell distribution in association with distinct functions. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal fragments of DMP1 in tooth, bone, osteocytes as well as MC3T3-E1 and HEK-293 cells. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed using antibodies specific to the NH(2)- or COOH-terminal region of DMP1. Clear differences in the distribution of these fragments were observed. In the teeth and bone, the NH(2)-terminal fragment was primarily located in the nonmineralized predentin and cartilage of the growth plate, while the COOH-terminal fragment accumulated in the mineralized zones. In osteocytes, the NH(2)-terminal fragment appeared more abundant along cell membrane and processes of osteocytes, while the COOH-terminal fragment was often found in the nuclei. This pattern of distribution in cellular compartments was further confirmed by analyses on MC3T3-E1 and HEK-293 cells transfected with a construct containing DMP1 cDNA. In these cell lines, the COOH-terminal fragment accumulated in cell nuclei, while the NH(2)-terminal fragment was in the cytosol. The different distribution of DMP1 fragments indicates that these DMP1 variants must perform distinct functions. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Avian persistence in fragmented rainforest.

    PubMed

    Lens, Luc; Van Dongen, Stefan; Norris, Ken; Githiru, Mwangi; Matthysen, Erik

    2002-11-08

    What factors determine the persistence of species in fragmented habitats? To address this question, we studied the relative impacts of forest deterioration and fragmentation on bird species in 12 rainforest fragments in Kenya, combining 6 years of individual capture-recapture data with measurements of current captures and museum specimens. Species mobility, as estimated from species-specific dispersal rates, and tolerance to habitat deterioration, as estimated from change in fluctuating asymmetry with increasing habitat disturbance, explained 88% of the variation in patch occupancy among eight forest bird species. Occupancy increased with mobility and with tolerance to deterioration, where both variables contributed equally to this relationship. We conclude that individual-level study, such as of dispersal behavior and phenotypic development, can predict patterns of persistence at the species level. More generally, for conservation tactics to stand a high chance of success, they should include action both within sites, to minimize habitat deterioration, and across landscapes, to maximize dispersal.

  16. Spatial patterns in the abundance of the coastal horned lizard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Suarez, Andrew V.; Case, Ted J.

    2002-01-01

    Coastal horned lizards (   Phrynosoma coronatum) have undergone severe declines in southern California and are a candidate species for state and federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. Quantitative data on their habitat use, abundance, and distribution are lacking, however. We investigated the determinants of abundance for coastal horned lizards at multiple spatial scales throughout southern California. Specifically, we estimated lizard distribution and abundance by establishing 256 pitfall trap arrays clustered within 21 sites across four counties. These arrays were sampled bimonthly for 2–3 years. At each array we measured 26 “local” site descriptors and averaged these values with other “regional” measures to determine site characteristics. Our analyses were successful at identifying factors within and among sites correlated with the presence and abundance of coastal horned lizards. These factors included the absence of the invasive Argentine ant (  Linepithema humile) (and presence of native ant species eaten by the lizards), the presence of chaparral community plants, and the presence of sandy substrates. At a regional scale the relative abundance of Argentine ants was correlated with the relative amount of developed edge around a site. There was no evidence for spatial autocorrelation, even at the scale of the arrays within sites, suggesting that the determinants of the presence or absence and abundance of horned lizard can vary over relatively small spatial scales ( hundreds of meters). Our results suggest that a gap-type approach may miss some of the fine-scale determinants of species abundance in fragmented habitats.

  17. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  18. Sunspots, Starspots, and Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, George A.; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The composition of plasma in solar and stellar atmospheres is not fixed, but varies from feature to feature. These variations are organized by the First Ionization Potential (FIP) of the element. Solar measurements often indicate that low FIP elements (< 10eV, such as Fe, Si, Mg) are enriched by factors of 3-4 in the corona relative to high FIP elements (>10 eV, such as C, N, O, Ar, He) compared to abundances in the photosphere. Stellar observations have also shown similar enrichments. An inverse FIP effect, where the low FIP elements are depleted, has been observed in stellar coronae of stars believed to have large starspots in their photospheres. The abundances are important for determining radiative loss rates in models, tracing the origin of the slow solar wind, and for understanding wave propagation in the chromosphere and corona. Recently, inverse FIP effects have been discovered in the Sun (Doschek, Warren, & Feldman 2015, ApJ, 808, L7) from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The inverse FIP regions seem always to be near sunspots and cover only a very small area (characteristic length = a few arcseconds). However, in pursuing the search for inverse FIP regions, we have found that in some sunspot groups the coronal abundance at a temperature of 3-4 MK can be near photospheric over much larger areas of the sun near the sunspots (e.g., 6,000 arcsec2). Also, sometimes the abundances at 3-4 MK are in between coronal and photospheric values. This can occur in small areas of an active region. It is predicted (Laming 2015, Sol. Phys., 12, 2) that the FIP effect should be highly variable in the corona. Several examples of coronal abundance variations are presented. Our work indicates that a comprehensive re-investigation of solar abundances is highly desirable. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  19. Importance of riparian remnants for frog species diversity in a highly fragmented rainforest.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mendoza, Clara; Pineda, Eduardo

    2010-12-23

    Tropical forests undergo continuous transformation to other land uses, resulting in landscapes typified by forest fragments surrounded by anthropogenic habitats. Small forest fragments, specifically strip-shaped remnants flanking streams (referred to as riparian remnants), can be particularly important for the maintenance and conservation of biodiversity within highly fragmented forests. We compared frog species diversity between riparian remnants, other forest fragments and cattle pastures in a tropical landscape in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. We found similar species richness in the three habitats studied and a similar assemblage structure between riparian remnants and forest fragments, although species composition differed by 50 per cent. Frog abundance was halved in riparian remnants compared with forest fragments, but was twice that found in pastures. Our results suggest that riparian remnants play an important role in maintaining a portion of frog species diversity in a highly fragmented forest, particularly during environmentally stressful (hot and dry) periods. In this regard, however, the role of riparian remnants is complementary, rather than substitutive, with respect to the function of other forest fragments within the fragmented forest.

  20. Effects of microhabitat on palm seed predation in two forest fragments in southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marina; Galetti, Mauro

    2004-12-01

    The establishment of plants depends crucially on where seeds are deposited in the environment. Some authors suggest that in forest understory seed predation is lower than in gaps, and higher than at the forest edge. However, most studies have been carried out in large forest patches and very little is known about the effects of microhabitat conditions on seed predation in forest fragments. We evaluated the effects of three microhabitats (gaps, forest edge, and understory) on seed predation of two palm species ( Euterpe edulis and Syagrus romanzoffiana) in two semi-deciduous forest fragments (230 and 2100 ha) in southeast Brazil. Our objective was to test two hypotheses: (1) Low rodent abundance in small fragments as a result of meso-predator action levels leads to lower seed predation in small fragments. (2) Most mammal species in small fragments are generalists with respect to diet and habitat, so that seed predation is similar in different microhabitats (gaps, forest edge and understory) in the small fragment, but not in the larger one. The study community of small fragments is usually composed of generalist species (in diet and habitat aspects), so we expected the same rate of seed predation among microhabitats (gaps, forest edge and understory) in the tested smaller fragment. The experiment was carried out in the dry season (for E. edulis) and in the wet season (for S. romanzoffiana) in 1999. We conclude that post-dispersal seed predation in forest fragments can be directly connected with mammal communities, reflecting their historical and ecological aspects.

  1. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  2. Effects of habitat fragmentation on wild mammal infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vaz, V C; D'Andrea, P S; Jansen, A M

    2007-11-01

    Expansion of human activities frequently results in habitat fragmentation, a phenomenon that has been widely recognized in the last decades as one of the major threats to world's biodiversity. The transformation of a continuous forest into a fragmented area results in a hyper-dynamic landscape with unpredictable consequences to overall ecosystem health. The effect of the fragmentation process on Trypanosoma cruzi infection among small wild mammals was studied in an Atlantic Rain Forest landscape. Comparing continous forest to fragmented habitat, marsupials were less abundant than rodents in the continuous landscape. An overall decrease in small wild mammal richness was observed in the smaller fragments. An anti-T. cruzi seroprevalence of 18% (82/440) was deteced by immunofluorescence assay. Moreover, this seroprevalence was higher in the fragmented habitat than in the continuous forest. According to the collected data, 3 main factors seem to modulate infection by T. cruzi in small wild mammals: (i) habitat fragmentation; (ii) biodiversity loss; (iii) increase of marsupial abundance in mammal communities. Furthermore, an extremely mild controlled infection by T. cruzi was detected since no patent parasitaemia could be detected in fresh blood samples, and no parasites were isolated by haemoculture.

  3. Secondary forest regeneration benefits old-growth specialist bats in a fragmented tropical landscape.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ricardo; Ovaskainen, Otso; López-Baucells, Adrià; Farneda, Fábio Z; Sampaio, Erica M; Bobrowiec, Paulo E D; Cabeza, Mar; Palmeirim, Jorge M; Meyer, Christoph F J

    2018-02-28

    Tropical forest loss and fragmentation are due to increase in coming decades. Understanding how matrix dynamics, especially secondary forest regrowth, can lessen fragmentation impacts is key to understanding species persistence in modified landscapes. Here, we use a whole-ecosystem fragmentation experiment to investigate how bat assemblages are influenced by the regeneration of the secondary forest matrix. We surveyed bats in continuous forest, forest fragments and secondary forest matrix habitats, ~15 and ~30 years after forest clearance, to investigate temporal changes in the occupancy and abundance of old-growth specialist and habitat generalist species. The regeneration of the second growth matrix had overall positive effects on the occupancy and abundance of specialists across all sampled habitats. Conversely, effects on generalist species were negligible for forest fragments and negative for secondary forest. Our results show that the conservation potential of secondary forests for reverting faunal declines in fragmented tropical landscapes increases with secondary forest age and that old-growth specialists, which are often of most conservation concern, are the greatest beneficiaries of secondary forest maturation. Our findings emphasize that the transposition of patterns of biodiversity persistence in island ecosystems to fragmented terrestrial settings can be hampered by the dynamic nature of human-dominated landscapes.

  4. Galactic Abundance Patterns via Peimbert Types I & II Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milingo, J. B.; Barnes, K. L.; Kwitter, K. B.; Souza, S. P.; Henry, R. B. C.; Skinner, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are well known fonts of information about both stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution. Abundance patterns in PNe are used to note signatures and constraints of nuclear processing, and as tracers of the distribution of metals throughout galaxies. In this poster abundance gradients and heavy element ratios are presented based upon newly acquired spectrophotometry of a sample of Galactic Peimbert Type I PNe. This new data set is extracted from spectra that extend from λ 3600 - 9600Å allowing the use of [S III] features at λ 9069 and 9532Å. Since a significant portion of S in PNe resides in S+2 and higher ionization stages, including these features improves the extrapolation from observed ion abundances to total element abundance. An alternate metallicity tracer, Sulfur is precluded from enhancement and depletion across the range of PNe progenitor masses. Its stability in intermediate mass stars makes it a useful tool to probe the natal conditions as well as the evolution of PNe progenitors. This is a continuation of our Type II PNe work, the impetus being to compile a relatively large set of line strengths and abundances with internally consistent observation, reduction, calibration, and abundance determination, minimizing systematic affects that come from compiling various data sets. This research is supported by the AAS Small Research Grants program, the Franklin & Marshall Committee on Grants, and NSF grant AST-0307118.

  5. Isomerization and fragmentation reactions of gaseous phenylarsane radical cations and phenylarsanyl cations. A study by tandem mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Letzel, Matthias; Kirchhoff, Dirk; Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Stein, Daniel; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2006-04-28

    The unimolecular reactions of radical cations and cations derived from phenylarsane, C6H5AsH2 (1) and dideutero phenylarsane, C6H5AsD2 (1-d2), were investigated by methods of tandem mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. The mass spectrometric experiments reveal that the molecular ion of phenylarsane, 1*+, exhibits different reactivity at low and high internal excess energy. Only at low internal energy the observed fragmentations are as expected, that is the molecular ion 1*+ decomposes almost exclusively by loss of an H atom. The deuterated derivative 1-d2 with an AsD2 group eliminates selectively a D atom under these conditions. The resulting phenylarsenium ion [C6H5AsH]+, 2+, decomposes rather easily by loss of the As atom to give the benzene radical cation [C6H6]*+ and is therefore of low abundance in the 70 eV EI mass spectrum. At high internal excess energy, the ion 1*+ decomposes very differently either by elimination of an H2 molecule, or by release of the As atom, or by loss of an AsH fragment. Final products of these reactions are either the benzoarsenium ion 4*+, or the benzonium ion [C6H7]+, or the benzene radical cation, [C6H6]*+. As key-steps, these fragmentations contain reductive eliminations from the central As atom under H-H or C-H bond formation. Labeling experiments show that H/D exchange reactions precede these fragmentations and, specifically, that complete positional exchange of the H atoms in 1*+ occurs. Computations at the UMP2/6-311+G(d)//UHF/6-311+G(d) level agree best with the experimental results and suggest: (i) 1*+ rearranges (activation enthalpy of 93 kJ mol(-1)) to a distinctly more stable (DeltaH(r)(298) = -64 kJ mol(-1)) isomer 1 sigma*+ with a structure best represented as a distonic radical cation sigma complex between AsH and benzene. (ii) The six H atoms of the benzene moiety of 1 sigma*+ become equivalent by a fast ring walk of the AsH group. (iii) A reversible isomerization 1+<==>1 sigma*+ scrambles eventually all H

  6. Developments in SPR Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Chavanieu, Alain; Pugnière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have played an increasing role alongside high-throughput screening in drug discovery for 15 years. The label-free biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is now sensitive and informative enough to serve during primary screens and validation steps. In this review, the authors discuss the role of SPR in fragment screening. After a brief description of the underlying principles of the technique and main device developments, they evaluate the advantages and adaptations of SPR for fragment-based drug discovery. SPR can also be applied to challenging targets such as membrane receptors and enzymes. The high-level of immobilization of the protein target and its stability are key points for a relevant screening that can be optimized using oriented immobilized proteins and regenerable sensors. Furthermore, to decrease the rate of false negatives, a selectivity test may be performed in parallel on the main target bearing the binding site mutated or blocked with a low-off-rate ligand. Fragment-based drug design, integrated in a rational workflow led by SPR, will thus have a predominant role for the next wave of drug discovery which could be greatly enhanced by new improvements in SPR devices.

  7. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  8. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  9. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  10. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  11. EUV emission spectra in collisions of highly charged tantalum ions with nitrogen and oxygen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Hajime; Numadate, Naoki; Uchikura, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Kento; Akutsu, Takuto; Long, Elaine; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2017-10-01

    We have performed ion beam collision experiments using multiply charged tantalum ions and observed EUV (extreme ultra-violet) emission spectra in collisions of ions with molecular targets, N2 and O2. Broad UTAs (un-resolved transition arrays) from multiply charged Ta ions were observed, and the mean wavelengths of the UTAs shifted and became shorter at higher charge statea of Ta ions. These UTAs may be attributed to the 4f-5d and 4f-5g transitions. Not only the UTA emission from incident ions, but also the sharp emission lines from multiply charged fragment atomic ions were observed. Production of temporary highly charged molecular ions, their kinetic energy and fragmentation processes have been investigated with coincident detection technique. However, the observation of emission from the fragments might be for the first time. The formation mechanisms of the multiply charged fragment atomic ions from target molecules are discussed.

  12. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  13. Terrestrial salamander abundance on reclaimed mountaintop removal mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Petra Bohall; Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    Mountaintop removal mining, a large-scale disturbance affecting vegetation, soil structure, and topography, converts landscapes from mature forests to extensive grassland and shrubland habitats. We sampled salamanders using drift-fence arrays and coverboard transects on and near mountaintop removal mines in southern West Virginia, USA, during 2000–2002. We compared terrestrial salamander relative abundance and species richness of un-mined, intact forest with habitats on reclaimed mountaintop removal mines (reclaimed grassland, reclaimed shrubland, and fragmented forest). Salamanders within forests increased in relative abundance with increasing distance from reclaimed mine edge. Reclaimed grassland and shrubland habitats had lower relative abundance and species richness than forests. Characteristics of reclaimed habitats that likely contributed to lower salamander abundance included poor soils (dry, compacted, little organic matter, high rock content), reduced vertical structure of vegetation and little tree cover, and low litter and woody debris cover. Past research has shown that salamander populations reduced by clearcutting may rebound in 15–24 years. Time since disturbance was 7–28 years in reclaimed habitats on our study areas and salamander populations had not reached levels found in adjacent mature forests.

  14. Optical model analyses of galactic cosmic ray fragmentation in hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical optical model methods for calculating cross sections for the fragmentation of galactic cosmic ray nuclei by hydrogen targets are presented. The fragmentation cross sections are calculated with an abrasion-ablation collision formalism. Elemental and isotopic cross sections are estimated and compared with measured values for neon, sulfur, and calcium ions at incident energies between 400A MeV and 910A MeV. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  15. Impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse populations and trypanosomosis risk in Eastern Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mweempwa, Cornelius; Marcotty, Tanguy; De Pus, Claudia; Penzhorn, Barend Louis; Dicko, Ahmadou Hamady; Bouyer, Jérémy; De Deken, Reginald

    2015-08-04

    Fragmentation of tsetse habitat in eastern Zambia is largely due to encroachments by subsistence farmers into new areas in search of new agricultural land. The impact of habitat fragmentation on tsetse populations is not clearly understood. This study was aimed at establishing the impact of habitat fragmentation on physiological and demographic parameters of tsetse flies in order to enhance the understanding of the relationship between fragmentation and African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) risk. A longitudinal study was conducted to establish the age structure, abundance, proportion of females and trypanosome infection rate of Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood (Diptera: Glossinidae) in areas of varying degrees of habitat fragmentation in Eastern Zambia. Black screen fly rounds were used to sample tsetse populations monthly for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to analyse age, proportion of females and infection rate data. Flies got significantly older as fragmentation increased (p < 0.004). The proportion of old flies, i.e. above ovarian category four, increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 25.9% (CI 21.4-31.1) at the least fragmented site (Lusandwa) to 74.2% (CI 56.8-86.3) at the highly fragmented site (Chisulo). In the most fragmented area (Kasamanda), tsetse flies had almost disappeared. In the highly fragmented area a significantly higher trypanosome infection rate in tsetse (P < 0.001) than in areas with lower fragmentation was observed. Consequently a comparatively high trypanosomosis incidence rate in livestock was observed there despite lower tsetse density (p < 0.001). The overall proportion of captured female flies increased significantly (P < 0.005) as fragmentation reduced. The proportion increased from 0.135 (CI 0.10-0.18) to 0.285 (CI 0.26-0.31) at the highly and least fragmented sites, respectively. Habitat fragmentation creates conditions to which tsetse populations respond physiologically and demographically thereby

  16. Quantum Correlated Multi-Fragment Reaction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Feagin, James M.

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. This report will focus on the 12 year period from 2004 to 2017, although the DOE–BES has supported my research every year since 1986. All of the support from the grant was used to pay summer salaries of the PI and students and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals as well as conference invited talks and colloquiums. There were 12 peer reviewed publications in these 12+ years. Innovationsmore » in few-body science at molecular and nano levels are a critical component of on- going efforts to establish sustainable environmental and energy resources. The varied research paths taken will require the development of basic science on broad fronts with increasing flexi- bility to crossover technologies. We thus worked to extract understanding and quantum control of few-body microscopic systems based on our long-time experience with more conventional studies of correlated electrons and ions. Given the enormous advances over the past 20 years to our understanding of quantum cor- relations with photon interferometry, AMO collision science generally is ready to move beyond the one-particle, single-port momentum detection that has dominated collision physics since Rutherford. Nevertheless, our familiar theoretical tools for collision theory need to be up- graded to incorporate these more generalized measurement formalisms and ultimately to give incentive for a new generation of experiments. Our interest in these topics remains motivated by the recent surge in and success of exper- iments involving few-body atomic and molecular fragmentation and the detection of all the fragments. The research described here thus involved two parallel efforts with (i) emphasis on reaction imaging while (ii) pursuing longtime work on quantum correlated collective excitations.« less

  17. Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  18. Fragments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Lowery

    Based on experiences growing out of a high school course on visual education, exercise cards are presented which are concerned with the boundaries of experience. They may act as preparation and stimulus for traditional art classes. The activities are divided into groups of enduring activities: mapping, representing; sensory awareness; inner…

  19. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  20. Coordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired by Heme Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ritika

    Linear oligopyrroles are degradation products of heme, which is converted in the presence of heme oxygenase to bile pigments, such as biliverdin and bilirubin. These tetrapyrrolic oligopyrroles are ubiquitously present in biological systems and find applications in the fields of catalysis and sensing. These linear tetrapyrrolic scaffolds are further degraded into linear tripyrrolic and dipyrrolic fragments. Although these lower oligopyrroles are abundantly present, their coordination chemistry requires further characterization. This dissertation focuses mainly on two classes of bioinspired linear oligopyrroles, propentdyopent and tripyrrindione, and their transition metal complexes, which present a rich ligand-based redox chemistry. Chapter 1 offers an overview of heme degradation to different classes of linear oligopyrroles and properties of their transition metal complexes. Chapter 2 is focused on the tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of the urinary pigment uroerythrin, which coordinates divalent transition metals palladium and copper with square planar geometry. Specifically, the tripyrrin-1, 14-dione ligand binds Cu(II) and Pd(II) as a dianionic organic radical under ambient conditions. The electrochemical study confirms the presence of ligand based redox chemistry, and one electron oxidation or reduction reactions do not alter the planar geometry around the metal center. The X-Ray analysis and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the complexes in the solid and solution phase reveals intermolecular interactions between the ligand based unpaired electrons and therefore formation of neutral pi-pi dimers. In Chapter 3, the antioxidant activity and the fluorescence sensor properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand in the presence of superoxide are described. We found that the tripyrrindione ligand undergoes one-electron reduction in the presence of the superoxide radical anion (O2•- ) to form highly fluorescent H3TD1•- radical anion, which emits

  1. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  2. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  3. Abundance of nitrogen in QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, G.A.

    1976-03-01

    Models of photoionized QSO emission-line regions show that measurements of O iii/N iv/C iv or N iii/C iii can yield the C/N/O ratios to an accuracy of a factor 2 or better. The N iii/C iii intensity ratios observed for the QSO PKS 1756+237 (z=1.72) implies a N/C abundance ratio 5 times larger than the solar value. This is comparable with the nitrogen overabundance in the nuclei of nearby galaxies, and it points to advanced chemical evolution in this QSO, with Zapproximately-greater-thanZ/sub sun/. Such a large abundance of nitrogen appears to be exceptional; composite spectra indicate that most QSOs havemore » (N/O) approximately one-fourth to one-half the solar value. (AIP)« less

  4. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  5. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Unusual Fragmentation of Pro-Ser/Thr-Containing Peptides Detected in Collision-Induced Dissociation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2012-04-01

    During collision-induced dissociation (CID)-, phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptides frequently undergo neutral loss of phosphoric acid. Subsequent amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the site of phosphorylation results in a y ion with a mass 18 Da lower than the corresponding unmodified y fragment. We report here that when the phosphoserine or phosphothreonine is directly preceded by a proline, an unusual fragment with a mass 10 Da higher than the corresponding unmodified y ion is frequently observed. Accurate mass measurements are consistent with elimination of the phosphoric acid followed by fragmentation between the α carbon and the carbonyl group of the proline residue. We propose a cyclic oxazoline structure for this fragment. Our observation may be explained by the charge-directed SN2 neighboring group participation reaction proposed for the phosphoric acid elimination by Palumbo et al. [Palumbo, A. M., Tepe, J. J., Reid, G. E. Mechanistic Insights into the Multistage Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Phosphoserine- and Phosphothreonine-Containing Peptides. J. Protein Res. 7(2), 771-779 (2008)]. Considering such specific fragment ions for confirmation purposes after regular database searches may boost the confidence of peptide identifications as well as phosphorylation site assignments.

  7. Species Richness and Phenology of Cerambycid Beetles in Urban Forest Fragments of Northern Delaware

    Treesearch

    K. Handley; J. Hough-Goldstein; L.M. Hanks; J.G. Millar; V. D' amico

    2015-01-01

    Cerambycid beetles are abundant and diverse in forests, but much about their host relationships and adult behavior remains unknown. Generic blends of synthetic pheromones were used as lures in traps, to assess the species richness, and phenology of cerambycids in forest fragments in northern Delaware. More than 15,000 cerambycid beetles of 69 species were trapped over...

  8. Effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on amphibians: A review and prospectus

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2006-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the largest threats to amphibian populations. However, most studies have not provided clear insights into their population-level implications. There is a critical need to investigate the mechanisms that underlie patterns of distribution and abundance. In order to understand the population- and species-level implications of...

  9. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) -• radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H• and H+, it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2 -• adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) - ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2 -• present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained.

  10. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  11. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  12. Workflow Design Using Fragment Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Sébastien; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille; France, Robert

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (Soa) paradigm supports the assembly of atomic services to create applications that implement complex business processes. Assembly can be accomplished by service orchestrations defined by Soa architects. The Adore method allows Soa architects to model complex orchestrations of services by composing models of smaller orchestrations called orchestration fragments. The Adore method can also be used to weave fragments that address new concerns into existing application models. In this paper we illustrate how the Adore method can be used to separate and compose process aspects in a Soa design of the Car Crash Crisis Management System. The paper also includes a discussion of the benefits and limitations of the Adore method.

  13. Fragmentation efficiency of explosive volcanic eruptions: A study of experimentally generated pyroclasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2006-05-01

    Products of magma fragmentation can pose a severe threat to health, infrastructure, environment, and aviation. Systematic evaluation of the mechanisms and the consequences of volcanic fragmentation is very difficult as the adjacent processes cannot be observed directly and their deposits undergo transport-related sorting. However, enhanced knowledge is required for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Laboratory experiments on natural samples allow the precise characterization of the generated pyroclasts and open the possibility for substantial advances in the quantification of fragmentation processes. They hold the promise of precise characterization and quantification of fragmentation efficiency and its dependence on changing material properties and the physical conditions at fragmentation. We performed a series of rapid decompression experiments on three sets of natural samples from Unzen volcano, Japan. The analysis comprised grain-size analysis and surface area measurements. The grain-size analysis is performed by dry sieving for particles larger than 250 μm and wet laser refraction for smaller particles. For all three sets of samples, the grain-size of the most abundant fraction decreases and the weight fraction of newly generated ash particles (up to 40 wt.%) increases with experimental pressure/potential energy for fragmentation. This energy can be estimated from the volume of the gas fraction and the applied pressure. The surface area was determined through Argon adsorption. The fragmentation efficiency is described by the degree of fine-particle generation. Results show that the fragmentation efficiency and the generated surface correlate positively with the applied energy.

  14. Response of the Agile Antechinus to Habitat Edge, Configuration and Condition in Fragmented Forest

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Christopher P.; Lill, Alan; Reina, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation seriously threaten native animal communities. We studied the response of a small marsupial, the agile antechinus Antechinus agilis, to several environmental variables in anthropogenically fragmented Eucalyptus forest in south-east Australia. Agile antechinus were captured more in microhabitats dominated by woody debris than in other microhabitats. Relative abundances of both sexes were positively correlated with fragment core area. Male and female mass-size residuals were smaller in larger fragments. A health status indicator, haemoglobin-haematocrit residuals (HHR), did not vary as a function of any environmental variable in females, but male HHR indicated better health where sites' microhabitats were dominated by shrubs, woody debris and trees other than Eucalyptus. Females were trapped less often in edge than interior fragment habitat and their physiological stress level, indicated by the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in peripheral blood, was higher where fragments had a greater proportion of edge habitat. The latter trend was potentially due to lymphopoenia resulting from stress hormone-mediated leukocyte trafficking. Using multiple indicators of population condition and health status facilitates a comprehensive examination of the effects of anthropogenic disturbances, such as habitat fragmentation and degradation, on native vertebrates. Male agile antechinus' health responded negatively to habitat degradation, whilst females responded negatively to the proportion of edge habitat. The health and condition indicators used could be employed to identify conservation strategies that would make habitat fragments less stressful for this or similar native, small mammals. PMID:22076129

  15. Response of the agile antechinus to habitat edge, configuration and condition in fragmented forest.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Christopher P; Lill, Alan; Reina, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation seriously threaten native animal communities. We studied the response of a small marsupial, the agile antechinus Antechinus agilis, to several environmental variables in anthropogenically fragmented Eucalyptus forest in south-east Australia. Agile antechinus were captured more in microhabitats dominated by woody debris than in other microhabitats. Relative abundances of both sexes were positively correlated with fragment core area. Male and female mass-size residuals were smaller in larger fragments. A health status indicator, haemoglobin-haematocrit residuals (HHR), did not vary as a function of any environmental variable in females, but male HHR indicated better health where sites' microhabitats were dominated by shrubs, woody debris and trees other than Eucalyptus. Females were trapped less often in edge than interior fragment habitat and their physiological stress level, indicated by the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in peripheral blood, was higher where fragments had a greater proportion of edge habitat. The latter trend was potentially due to lymphopoenia resulting from stress hormone-mediated leukocyte trafficking. Using multiple indicators of population condition and health status facilitates a comprehensive examination of the effects of anthropogenic disturbances, such as habitat fragmentation and degradation, on native vertebrates. Male agile antechinus' health responded negatively to habitat degradation, whilst females responded negatively to the proportion of edge habitat. The health and condition indicators used could be employed to identify conservation strategies that would make habitat fragments less stressful for this or similar native, small mammals.

  16. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  17. Injecting asteroid fragments into resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farinella, Paolo; Gonczi, R.; Froeschle, Christiane; Froeschle, Claude

    1992-01-01

    We have quantitatively modeled the chance insertion of asteroid collisional fragments into the 3:1 and g = g(sub 6) resonances, through which they can achieve Earth-approaching orbits. Although the results depend on some poorly known parameters, they indicate that most meteorites and near-earth asteroids probably come from a small and non-representative sample of asteroids, located in the neighborhood of the two resonances.

  18. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  19. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al. , 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al. , 1990; Ouellette et al. , 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  20. Fragmentation study of iridoid glucosides through positive and negative electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Kerhoas, Lucien; Ducrot, Paul-Henri

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methodology based on the combined use of positive and negative electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation (CID) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been applied to the mass spectral study of a series of six naturally occurring iridoids through in-source fragmentation of the protonated [M+H]+, deprotonated [M--H]- and sodiated [M+Na]+ ions. This led to the unambiguous determination of the molecular masses of the studied compounds and allowed CID spectra of the molecular ions to be obtained. Valuable structural information regarding the nature of both the glycoside and the aglycone moiety was thus obtained. Glycosidic cleavage and ring cleavages of both aglycone and sugar moieties were the major fragmentation pathways observed during CID, where the losses of small molecules, the cinnamoyl and the cinnamate parts were also observed. The formation of the ionized aglycones, sugars and their product ions was thus obtained giving information on their basic skeleton. The protonated, i.e. [M+H]+ and deprotonated [M--H]-, ions were found to fragment mainly by glycosidic cleavages. MS/MS spectra of the [M+Na]+ ions gave complementary information for the structural characterization of the studied compounds. Unlike the dissociation of protonated molecular ions, that of sodiated molecules also provided sodiated sugar fragments where the C0+ fragment corresponding to the glucose ion was obtained as base peak for all the studied compounds. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Defining Gas-Phase Fragmentation Propensities of Intact Proteins During Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverland, Nicole A.; Skinner, Owen S.; Fellers, Ryan T.; Tariq, Areeba A.; Early, Bryan P.; LeDuc, Richard D.; Fornelli, Luca; Compton, Philip D.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2017-06-01

    Fragmentation of intact proteins in the gas phase is influenced by amino acid composition, the mass and charge of precursor ions, higher order structure, and the dissociation technique used. The likelihood of fragmentation occurring between a pair of residues is referred to as the fragmentation propensity and is calculated by dividing the total number of assigned fragmentation events by the total number of possible fragmentation events for each residue pair. Here, we describe general fragmentation propensities when performing top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS) using denaturing or native electrospray ionization. A total of 5311 matched fragmentation sites were collected for 131 proteoforms that were analyzed over 165 experiments using native top-down mass spectrometry (nTDMS). These data were used to determine the fragmentation propensities for 399 residue pairs. In comparison to denatured top-down mass spectrometry (dTDMS), the fragmentation pathways occurring either N-terminal to proline or C-terminal to aspartic acid were even more enhanced in nTDMS compared with other residues. More generally, 257/399 (64%) of the fragmentation propensities were significantly altered ( P ≤ 0.05) when using nTDMS compared with dTDMS, and of these, 123 were altered by 2-fold or greater. The most notable enhancements of fragmentation propensities for TDMS in native versus denatured mode occurred (1) C-terminal to aspartic acid, (2) between phenylalanine and tryptophan (F|W), and (3) between tryptophan and alanine (W|A). The fragmentation propensities presented here will be of high value in the development of tailored scoring systems used in nTDMS of both intact proteins and protein complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Targeted Identification of SUMOylation Sites in Human Proteins Using Affinity Enrichment and Paralog-specific Reporter Ions*

    PubMed Central

    Lamoliatte, Frederic; Bonneil, Eric; Durette, Chantal; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Wildemann, Dirk; Zerweck, Johannes; Wenshuk, Holger; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modulates the activities of numerous proteins involved in different cellular functions such as gene transcription, cell cycle, and DNA repair. Comprehensive identification of SUMOylated sites is a prerequisite to determine how SUMOylation regulates protein function. However, mapping SUMOylated Lys residues by mass spectrometry (MS) is challenging because of the dynamic nature of this modification, the existence of three functionally distinct human SUMO paralogs, and the large SUMO chain remnant that remains attached to tryptic peptides. To overcome these problems, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably express functional SUMO paralogs with an N-terminal His6-tag and an Arg residue near the C terminus that leave a short five amino acid SUMO remnant upon tryptic digestion. We determined the fragmentation patterns of our short SUMO remnant peptides by collisional activation and electron transfer dissociation using synthetic peptide libraries. Activation using higher energy collisional dissociation on the LTQ-Orbitrap Elite identified SUMO paralog-specific fragment ions and neutral losses of the SUMO remnant with high mass accuracy (< 5 ppm). We exploited these features to detect SUMO modified tryptic peptides in complex cell extracts by correlating mass measurements of precursor and fragment ions using a data independent acquisition method. We also generated bioinformatics tools to retrieve MS/MS spectra containing characteristic fragment ions to the identification of SUMOylated peptide by conventional Mascot database searches. In HEK293 cell extracts, this MS approach uncovered low abundance SUMOylated peptides and 37 SUMO3-modified Lys residues in target proteins, most of which were previously unknown. Interestingly, we identified mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains with ubiquitylated SUMO proteins (K20 and K32) and SUMOylated ubiquitin (K63), suggesting a complex crosstalk between these two modifications. PMID

  3. Inner-shell excitation and ionic fragmentation of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, A.P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Cavell, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    Inner-shell excitation and associated decay spectroscopies are site specific probes of electronic and geometrical structure and photoionization dynamics. X-ray absorption probes the geometric and electronic structure, while time-of-flight mass spectrometry with multi-coincidence detection provides information on the photofragmentation dynamics of the initially produced inner-shell state. Auger decay of inner-shell excited and ionised states is an efficient source of multiply charged ions. The charge separation and fragmentation of these species, studied by photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence (also called charge separation mass spectrometry) gives insights into bonding and electronic structure. In molecules, the dependence of the fragmentation process on the X-ray energy can revealmore » cases of site and/or state selective fragmentation. At the ALS the authors have examined the soft X-ray spectroscopy and ionic fragmentation of a number of molecules, including carboranes, silylenes, phosphorus halides, SF{sub 6} and CO{sub 2}. Their work is illustrated using results from the carborane and PF{sub 3} studies.« less

  4. Native Frames: Disentangling Sequential from Concerted Three-Body Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Severt, T.; Berry, Ben; Jochim, Bethany; Feizollah, Peyman; Kaderiya, Balram; Zohrabi, M.; Ablikim, U.; Ziaee, Farzaneh; Raju P., Kanaka; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2018-03-01

    A key question concerning the three-body fragmentation of polyatomic molecules is the distinction of sequential and concerted mechanisms, i.e., the stepwise or simultaneous cleavage of bonds. Using laser-driven fragmentation of OCS into O++C++S+ and employing coincidence momentum imaging, we demonstrate a novel method that enables the clear separation of sequential and concerted breakup. The separation is accomplished by analyzing the three-body fragmentation in the native frame associated with each step and taking advantage of the rotation of the intermediate molecular fragment, CO2 + or CS2 + , before its unimolecular dissociation. This native-frame method works for any projectile (electrons, ions, or photons), provides details on each step of the sequential breakup, and enables the retrieval of the relevant spectra for sequential and concerted breakup separately. Specifically, this allows the determination of the branching ratio of all these processes in OCS3 + breakup. Moreover, we find that the first step of sequential breakup is tightly aligned along the laser polarization and identify the likely electronic states of the intermediate dication that undergo unimolecular dissociation in the second step. Finally, the separated concerted breakup spectra show clearly that the central carbon atom is preferentially ejected perpendicular to the laser field.

  5. Decarboxylation of bovine prothrombin fragment 1 and prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Tuhy, P M; Bloom, J W; Mann, K G

    1979-12-25

    Bovine prothrombin fragment 1 and prothrombin undergo decarboxylation of their gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues when the lyophilized proteins are heated in vacuo at 110 degrees C for several hours. The fully decarboxylated fragment 1 product has lost its barium-binding ability as well as the calcium-binding function which causes fluorescence quenching in the presence of 2 mM Ca2+. There is no sign of secondary structure alteration in solution upon analysis by fluorescence emission and circular dichroic spectroscopy. A family of partially decarboxylated fragment 1 species generated by heating for shorter periods shows that the initial decrease in calcium-binding ability occurs almost twice as rapidly as the loss of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid. This is consistent with the idea that differential functions can be ascribed to the 10 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues in fragment 1, including both high- and low-affinity metal ion binding sites. Prothrombin itself also undergoes total decarboxylation without any apparent alteration in secondary structure. However, in this case the latent thrombin activity is progressively diminished during the heating process in terms of both clotting activity and hydrolysis of the amide substrate H-D-Phe-Pip-Arg-pNA. The present results indicate that in vitro decarboxylation of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in dried proteins is useful for analyzing the detailed calcium-binding proteins of vitamin K dependent coagulation factors.

  6. Abundances, Ionization States, Temperatures, and FIP in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-04-01

    The relative abundances of chemical elements and isotopes have been our most effective tool in identifying and understanding the physical processes that control populations of energetic particles. The early surprise in solar energetic particles (SEPs) was 1000-fold enhancements in {}3He/{}4He from resonant wave-particle interactions in the small "impulsive" SEP events that emit electron beams that produce type III radio bursts. Further studies found enhancements in Fe/O, then extreme enhancements in element abundances that increase with mass-to-charge ratio A/Q, rising by a factor of 1000 from He to Au or Pb arising in magnetic reconnection regions on open field lines in solar jets. In contrast, in the largest SEP events, the "gradual" events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast, wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Averaging many events provides a measure of solar coronal abundances, but A/Q-dependent scattering during transport causes variations with time; thus if Fe scatters less than O, Fe/O is enhanced early and depleted later. To complicate matters, shock waves often reaccelerate impulsive suprathermal ions left over or trapped above active regions that have spawned many impulsive events. Direct measurements of ionization states Q show coronal temperatures of 1-2 MK for most gradual events, but impulsive events often show stripping by matter traversal after acceleration. Direct measurements of Q are difficult and often unavailable. Since both impulsive and gradual SEP events have abundance enhancements that vary as powers of A/Q, we can use abundances to deduce the probable Q-values and the source plasma temperatures during acceleration, ≈3 MK for impulsive SEPs. This new technique also allows multiple spacecraft to measure temperature variations across the face of a shock wave, measurements otherwise unavailable and provides a new understanding of abundance variations in the element He. Comparing coronal abundances from SEPs

  7. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals direct albumin fragmentation within the diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Grove, Kerri J; Lareau, Nichole M; Voziyan, Paul A; Zeng, Fenghua; Harris, Raymond C; Hudson, Billy G; Caprioli, Richard M

    2018-05-17

    Albumin degradation in the renal tubules is impaired in diabetic nephropathy such that levels of the resulting albumin fragments increase with the degree of renal injury. However, the mechanism of albumin degradation is unknown. In particular, fragmentation of the endogenous native albumin has not been demonstrated in the kidney and the enzymes that may contribute to fragmentation have not been identified. To explore this we utilized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry for molecular profiling of specific renal regions without disturbing distinct tissue morphology. Changes in protein expression were measured in kidney sections of eNOS -/- db/db mice, a model of diabetic nephropathy, by high spatial resolution imaging allowing molecular localizations at the level of single glomeruli and tubules. Significant increases were found in the relative abundances of several albumin fragments in the kidney of the mice with diabetic nephropathy compared with control nondiabetic mice. The relative abundance of fragments detected correlated positively with the degree of nephropathy. Furthermore, specific albumin fragments accumulating in the lumen of diabetic renal tubules were identified and predicted the enzymatic action of cathepsin D based on cleavage specificity and in vitro digestions. Importantly, this was demonstrated directly in the renal tissue with the endogenous nonlabeled murine albumin. Thus, our results provide molecular insights into the mechanism of albumin degradation in diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic assessment of survey scan and MS2-based abundance strategies for label-free quantitative proteomics using high-resolution MS data.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Sheng, Quanhu; Zhang, Ming; Qu, Jun

    2014-04-04

    Survey-scan-based label-free method have shown no compelling benefit over fragment ion (MS2)-based approaches when low-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) was used, the growing prevalence of high-resolution analyzers may have changed the game. This necessitates an updated, comparative investigation of these approaches for data acquired by high-resolution MS. Here, we compared survey scan-based (ion current, IC) and MS2-based abundance features including spectral-count (SpC) and MS2 total-ion-current (MS2-TIC), for quantitative analysis using various high-resolution LC/MS data sets. Key discoveries include: (i) study with seven different biological data sets revealed only IC achieved high reproducibility for lower-abundance proteins; (ii) evaluation with 5-replicate analyses of a yeast sample showed IC provided much higher quantitative precision and lower missing data; (iii) IC, SpC, and MS2-TIC all showed good quantitative linearity (R(2) > 0.99) over a >1000-fold concentration range; (iv) both MS2-TIC and IC showed good linear response to various protein loading amounts but not SpC; (v) quantification using a well-characterized CPTAC data set showed that IC exhibited markedly higher quantitative accuracy, higher sensitivity, and lower false-positives/false-negatives than both SpC and MS2-TIC. Therefore, IC achieved an overall superior performance than the MS2-based strategies in terms of reproducibility, missing data, quantitative dynamic range, quantitative accuracy, and biomarker discovery.

  9. Systematic Assessment of Survey Scan and MS2-Based Abundance Strategies for Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Using High-Resolution MS Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Survey-scan-based label-free method have shown no compelling benefit over fragment ion (MS2)-based approaches when low-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) was used, the growing prevalence of high-resolution analyzers may have changed the game. This necessitates an updated, comparative investigation of these approaches for data acquired by high-resolution MS. Here, we compared survey scan-based (ion current, IC) and MS2-based abundance features including spectral-count (SpC) and MS2 total-ion-current (MS2-TIC), for quantitative analysis using various high-resolution LC/MS data sets. Key discoveries include: (i) study with seven different biological data sets revealed only IC achieved high reproducibility for lower-abundance proteins; (ii) evaluation with 5-replicate analyses of a yeast sample showed IC provided much higher quantitative precision and lower missing data; (iii) IC, SpC, and MS2-TIC all showed good quantitative linearity (R2 > 0.99) over a >1000-fold concentration range; (iv) both MS2-TIC and IC showed good linear response to various protein loading amounts but not SpC; (v) quantification using a well-characterized CPTAC data set showed that IC exhibited markedly higher quantitative accuracy, higher sensitivity, and lower false-positives/false-negatives than both SpC and MS2-TIC. Therefore, IC achieved an overall superior performance than the MS2-based strategies in terms of reproducibility, missing data, quantitative dynamic range, quantitative accuracy, and biomarker discovery. PMID:24635752

  10. Fragmentation during primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    Understanding the physics of the very first stars in the universe, the so-called Population III (or Pop III) stars, is crucial in determining how the universe evolved into what we observe today. In the standard model of Pop III star formation, the baryonic matter, mainly atomic hydrogen, collapses gravitationally into small Dark Matter (DM) minihalos. However, so far there is little understanding on how the thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of the primordial gas depend on the initial configuration of the minihalos (for example, rotation of the unstable clumps inside minihalos, turbulence, formation of molecular hydrogen and cosmic variance of the minihalos). We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. Unlike some earlier cosmological calculations, the implementation of sink particles allows us to follow the evolution of the accretion disk that builds up in the centre of each minihalo and fragments. We find that the fragmentation behavior depends on the adopted choice of three-body H2 formation rate coefficient. The increasing cooling rate during rapid conversion of the atomic to molecular hydrogen is offset by the heating due to gas contraction. We propose that the H2 cooling, the heating due to H2 formation and compressional heating together set a density and temperature structure in the disk that favors fragmentation. We also find that the cloud's initial degree of rotation has a significant effect on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the collapsing gas. Clouds with higher rotation exhibit spiral-arm-like structures that become gravitationally unstable to fragmentation on several scales. These type of clouds tend to fragment more and have lower accretion rates compared to their slowly rotating counterparts. In addition, we find that the distribution of specific angular

  11. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  12. Evaluating Fragment Construction Policies for SDT Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    allocates a fragment and begins translation. Once a termination condition is met, Strata emits any trampolines that are necessary. Trampolines are pieces... trampolines (unless its target previously exists in the fragment cache). Once a CTI’s target instruction becomes available in the fragment cache, the CTI is...linked directly to the destination, avoiding future uses of the trampoline . This mechanism is called Fragment Linking and avoids significant overhead

  13. The effects of forest fragmentation on biodiversity under post-drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, A.; Swei, A.

    2016-12-01

    Habitat fragmentation is the greatest threat to wildlife worldwide. Understanding the impact of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity can benefit from theories established in island biogeography. Landscapes surrounded by human development are analogous to oceanic islands in that the size of habitat fragment can determine biodiversity. For terrestrial ecosystems, species traits can influence how they respond to the disturbance of habitat fragmentation. We tested how habitat patch size correlates to species richness and abundance of mammals in northern California in a post-drought environment. Using GIS and Fragstat we established nine forest fragments of varying size, differing minimally in location, topography, climate, and vegetation cover. This allows us to minimize site differences to test the effects of patch size on biodiversity. We used wildlife cameras to estimate richness of medium and large mammals and mark-and-recapture analysis to estimate species richness and abundance of small mammals. We also collected ticks with standard dragging and flagging techniques to determine the relationship between habitat patch size and species richness on Lyme disease risk. Our preliminary results indicate that meso-and-large mammal richness increases significantly with patch area (P=0.024) as well as larval tick density (P=0.035). At the same time, small mammal richness, abundance and diversity peaks in intermediate sized fragments. Further we found invasive species such as house mouse, Norway rat, and black rat only in patches smaller than 50 ha. Our results support the theory that invasive species are better adapted to disturbed areas versus native habitat. The ways in which habitat destruction and fragmentation are acting upon species and communities has critical consequences for conservation, ecosystem services, landscape planning, and many fields of environmental change research.

  14. Fragment and Debris Hazards from Accidental Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-13

    region boundr’ a - fragment weight m - number of fragments with weight PAq . are determined using 9. the ever- age weight of fragments voeithing more than...34 Nineteenth Explosives Safety Seminar, Los Ang. es, CA, Sep 1980. Merz, Hans A., "The Effects of Explosions in Slightly Buried Concrete Structures

  15. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; R. O' Neill; B. Jones; E. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (...

  16. Jet axes and universal transverse-momentum-dependent fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Duff; Scimemi, Ignazio; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2017-04-01

    We study the transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons in jets. By measuring the transverse momentum with respect to a judiciously chosen axis, we find that this observable is insensitive to (the recoil of) soft radiation. Furthermore, for small transverse momenta we show that the effects of the jet boundary factorize, leading to a new transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) fragmentation function. In contrast to the usual TMD fragmentation functions, it does not involve rapidity divergences and is universal in the sense that it is independent of the type of process and number of jets. These results directly apply to sub-jets instead of hadrons. We discuss potential applications, which include studying nuclear modification effects in heavy-ion collisions and identifying boosted heavy resonances.

  17. Photodissociation of methyl formate: Conical intersections, roaming and triple fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, King-Chuen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan

    2015-12-31

    The photodissociation channels of methyl formate have been extensively investigated by two different advanced experimental techniques, ion imaging and Fourier-Transform-Infrared emission spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to characterize the role of alternative routes to the conventional transition-state mediated pathway: the roaming and the triple fragmentation processes. The photolysis experiments, carried out at a range of laser wavelengths in the vicinity of the triple fragmentation threshold, beside the simulation of large bunches of classical trajectories with different initial conditions, have shown that both mechanisms share a common path that involves a conical intersectionmore » during the relaxation process from the electronic excited state S{sub 1} to the ground state S{sub 0}.« less

  18. Consecutive Fragmentation Mechanisms of Protonated Ferulic Acid Probed by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Sabrina M.; Marta, Rick A.; Martens, Jonathan K.; McMahon, Terry B.

    2012-10-01

    Protonated ferulic acid and its principle fragment ion have been characterized using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. Due to its extensively conjugated structure, protonated ferulic acid is observed to yield three stable fragment ions in IRMPD experiments. It is proposed that two parallel fragmentation pathways of protonated ferulic acid are being observed. The first pathway involves proton transfer, resulting in the loss of water and subsequently carbon monoxide, producing fragment ions m/z 177 and 149, respectively. Optimization of m/z 177 yields a species containing an acylium group, which is supported by a diagnostic peak in the IRMPD spectrum at 2168 cm-1. The second pathway involves an alternate proton transfer leading to loss of methanol and rearrangement to a five-membered ring.

  19. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  20. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  1. Chemical Abundances in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Barger, Kathleen A.; Wakker, Bart P.; Richter, Philipp; Antwi-Danso, Jacqueline; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Howk, J. Christopher; Lehner, Nicolas; D’Onghia, Elena; Crowther, Paul A.; Lockman, Felix J.

    2018-02-01

    The Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic Stream is a vast debris field of H I clouds connecting the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. It represents an example of active gas accretion onto the Galaxy. Previously, only one chemical abundance measurement had been made in the LA. Here we present chemical abundance measurements using Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Green Bank Telescope spectra of four AGN sightlines passing through the LA and three nearby sightlines that may trace outer fragments of the LA. We find low oxygen abundances, ranging from {4.0}-2.0+2.0 % solar to {12.6}-4.1+6.0 % solar, in the confirmed LA directions, with the lowest values found in the region known as LA III, farthest from the LMC. These abundances are substantially lower than the single previous measurement, S/H = 35 ± 7% solar, but are in agreement with those reported in the SMC filament of the trailing Stream, supporting a common origin in the SMC (not the LMC) for the majority of the LA and trailing Stream. This provides important constraints for models of the formation of the Magellanic System. Finally, two of the three nearby sightlines show high-velocity clouds with H I columns, kinematics, and oxygen abundances consistent with LA membership. This suggests that the LA is larger than traditionally thought, extending at least 20° further to the Galactic northwest. Based on observations taken under programs 12172, 12212, 12248, 12275, 13115, and 14687 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under programs GBT12A_206, GBT17B_424 of the Green Bank Observatory, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation and is operated by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. The human gastrin precursor. Characterization of phosphorylated forms and fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Varro, A; Desmond, H; Pauwels, S; Gregory, H; Young, J; Dockray, G J

    1988-01-01

    There is a potential phosphorylation site in the C-terminal region of the precursor for the acid-stimulating hormone gastrin, which is immediately adjacent to an important cleavage point. In the present study we have sought to identify, separate, quantify and characterize phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of human progastrin and its fragments. Identification was made by two radioimmunoassays: (a) a novel assay employing an antibody raised to intact human progastrin; and (b) an assay using antibody reacting with the C-terminal tryptic fragment of human progastrin, as well as progastrin itself. Two forms of human progastrin isolated from a gastrinoma were separated by ion-exchange h.p.l.c., and had similar elution positions on reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and on gel filtration. The more acidic peptide contained close to equimolar amounts of phosphate. On trypsinization, peptides were released that co-eluted on ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, and had the immunochemical properties of, naturally occurring C-terminal fragments of progastrin. One of the latter was isolated and shown by Edman degradation after derivatization with ethanethiol to have the sequence Ser (P)-Ala-Glu-Asp-Glu-Asn. Similar peptides occur in antral mucosa resected from ulcer patients. The unphosphorylated forms of progastrin predominated, whereas the phosphorylated forms of the C-terminal fragments were predominant. This distribution could be explained by preferential cleavage of phosphorylated progastrin. We conclude that in human progastrin, Ser-96 can occur in the phosphorylated form; this residue immediately follows a pair of basic residues (Arg-Arg) that are cleaved during synthesis of the biologically active product. PMID:3223964

  3. New Approach for Studying Slow Fragmentation Kinetics in FT-ICR: Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new approach for studying the kinetics of large ion fragmentation in the gas phase by coupling surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with resonant ejection of selected fragment ions using a relatively short (5 ms) ejection pulse. The approach is demonstrated for singly protonated angiotensin III ions excited by collisions with a self-assembled monolayer of alkylthiol on gold (HSAM). The overall decomposition rate and rate constants of individual reaction channels are controlled by varying the kinetic energy of the precursor ion in a range of 65–95 eV. The kinetics of peptidemore » fragmentation are probed by varying the delay time between resonant ejection and fragment ion detection at a constant total reaction time. RRKM modeling indicates that the shape of the kinetics plots is strongly affected by the shape and position of the energy deposition function (EDF) describing the internal energy distribution of the ion following ion-surface collision. Modeling of the kinetics data provides detailed information on the shape of the EDF and energy and entropy effects of individual reaction channels.« less

  4. Small RNA populations revealed by blocking rRNA fragments in Drosophila melanogaster reproductive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Dalmay, Tamas

    2018-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a complex and highly conserved regulatory mechanism mediated via small RNAs (sRNAs). Recent technical advances in high throughput sequencing have enabled an increasingly detailed analysis of sRNA abundances and profiles in specific body parts and tissues. This enables investigations of the localized roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). However, variation in the proportions of non-coding RNAs in the samples being compared can hinder these analyses. Specific tissues may vary significantly in the proportions of fragments of longer non-coding RNAs (such as ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA) present, potentially reflecting tissue-specific differences in biological functions. For example, in Drosophila, some tissues contain a highly abundant 30nt rRNA fragment (the 2S rRNA) as well as abundant 5’ and 3’ terminal rRNA fragments. These can pose difficulties for the construction of sRNA libraries as they can swamp the sequencing space and obscure sRNA abundances. Here we addressed this problem and present a modified “rRNA blocking” protocol for the construction of high-definition (HD) adapter sRNA libraries, in D. melanogaster reproductive tissues. The results showed that 2S rRNAs targeted by blocking oligos were reduced from >80% to < 0.01% total reads. In addition, the use of multiple rRNA blocking oligos to bind the most abundant rRNA fragments allowed us to reveal the underlying sRNA populations at increased resolution. Side-by-side comparisons of sequencing libraries of blocked and non-blocked samples revealed that rRNA blocking did not change the miRNA populations present, but instead enhanced their abundances. We suggest that this rRNA blocking procedure offers the potential to improve the in-depth analysis of differentially expressed sRNAs within and across different tissues. PMID:29474379

  5. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  6. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods.

    PubMed

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H 2 O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c • +57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Distinguishing aspartic and isoaspartic acids in peptides by several mass spectrometric fragmentation methods

    PubMed Central

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, TMPP charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues. PMID:27613306

  8. Factors responsible for Ixodes ricinus nymph abundance: Are soil features indicators of tick abundance in a French region where Lyme borreliosis is endemic?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Valérie; Boulanger, Nathalie; Schwartz, Dominique; George, Jean-Claude; Ertlen, Damien; Zilliox, Laurence; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Jaulhac, Benoît

    2018-05-01

    In Europe, the hard tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) is the main vector of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group). A field study was conducted to evaluate the abundance of Ixodes nymphs in the French region of Alsace, where Lyme borreliosis is endemic, and to determine whether environmental factors such as soil moisture and composition may be associated with nymph abundance. In the ten sites studied, ticks were collected by drag sampling from March to October in 2013 and 2014. Temperature, relative humidity, saturation deficit, soil pH, humus composition and type of vegetation were recorded at each site. The abundance of I. ricinus was highly variable from one site to another. Inter-annual variations were also observed, since the nymph abundance were higher in 2013 than in 2014. This study shows that humus type can be indicative of nymph abundance. Three types of humus were observed: (1) moder, (2) mull, and (3) mull-moder humus. One of them, moder humus, which is characterized by a thick layer of fragmented leaves, was found in multivariate analyses to be strongly associated with the nymph abundance. This study demonstrates that factors such as saturation deficit do not suffice to explain the differences in nymph abundance among sites. The composition of the soil and especially the type of humus should also be taken into consideration when assessing acarological risk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  10. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  11. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  12. Fragmentation of wall rock garnets during deep crustal earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Austrheim, Håkon; Dunkel, Kristina G.; Plümper, Oliver; Ildefonse, Benoit; Liu, Yang; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Fractures and faults riddle the Earth’s crust on all scales, and the deformation associated with them is presumed to have had significant effects on its petrological and structural evolution. However, despite the abundance of directly observable earthquake activity, unequivocal evidence for seismic slip rates along ancient faults is rare and usually related to frictional melting and the formation of pseudotachylites. We report novel microstructures from garnet crystals in the immediate vicinity of seismic slip planes that transected lower crustal granulites during intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Bergen Arcs area, western Norway, some 420 million years ago. Seismic loading caused massive dislocation formations and fragmentation of wall rock garnets. Microfracturing and the injection of sulfide melts occurred during an early stage of loading. Subsequent dilation caused pervasive transport of fluids into the garnets along a network of microfractures, dislocations, and subgrain and grain boundaries, leading to the growth of abundant mineral inclusions inside the fragmented garnets. Recrystallization by grain boundary migration closed most of the pores and fractures generated by the seismic event. This wall rock alteration represents the initial stages of an earthquake-triggered metamorphic transformation process that ultimately led to reworking of the lower crust on a regional scale. PMID:28261660

  13. Models of fragmentation with composite power laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Z.; Rodgers, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    Some models for binary fragmentation are introduced in which a time dependent transition size produces two regions of fragment sizes above and below the transition size. In the first model we assume a fixed rate of fragmentation for the largest fragment and two different rates of fragmentation in the two regions of sizes above and below the transition size. The model is solved exactly in the long time limit to reveal stable time-invariant solutions for the fragment size and mass distributions. These solutions exhibit composite power law behaviours; power laws with two different exponents for fragments in smaller and larger regions. A special case of the model with no fragmentation in the smaller size region is also examined. Another model is also introduced which have three regions of fragment sizes with different rates of fragmentation. The similarities between the stable distributions in our models and composite power law distributions from experimental work on shock fragmentation of long thin glass rods and thick clay plates are discussed.

  14. Variability in Abundances of Meteorites in the Ordovician

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, P. R.; Schmitz, B.; Kita, N.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of the flux of extraterrestrial material throughout Earth's history is of great interest to reconstruct the collisional evolution of the asteroid belt. Here, we present a review of our investigations of the nature of the meteorite flux to Earth in the Ordovician, one of the best-studied time periods for extraterrestrial matter in the geological record [1]. We base our studies on compositions of extraterrestrial chromite and chrome-spinel extracted by acid dissolution from condensed marine limestone from Sweden and Russia [1-3]. By analyzing major and minor elements with EDS and WDS, and three oxygen isotopes with SIMS we classify the recovered meteoritic materials. Today, the L and H chondrites dominate the meteorite and coarse micrometeorite flux. Together with the rarer LL chondrites they have a type abundance of 80%. In the Ordovician it was very different: starting from 466 Ma ago 99% of the flux was comprised of L chondrites [2]. This was a result of the collisional breakup of the parent asteroid. This event occurred close to an orbital resonance in the asteroid belt and showered Earth with >100x more L chondritic material than today during more than 1 Ma. Although the flux is much lower at present, L chondrites are still the dominant type of meteorites that fall today. Before the asteroid breakup event 467 Ma ago the three groups of ordinary chondrites had about similar abundances. Surprisingly, they were possibly surpassed in abundance by achondrites, materials from partially and fully differentiated asteroids [3]. These achondrites include HED meteorites, which are presumably fragments released during the formation of the Rheasilvia impact structure 1 Ga ago on asteroid 4 Vesta. The enhanced abundance of LL chondrites is possibly a result of the Flora asteroid family forming event at 1 Ga ago. The higher abundance of primitive achondrites was likely due to smaller asteroid family forming events that have not been identified yet but that did

  15. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MS/MS Automated Selected Ion Chromatograms

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Matthew

    2005-12-12

    This program can be used to read a LC-MS/MS data file from either a Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer (.Raw file) or an Agilent Ion Trap mass spectrometer (.MGF and .CDF files) and create a selected ion chromatogram (SIC) for each of the parent ion masses chosen for fragmentation. The largest peak in each SIC is also identified, with reported statistics including peak elution time, height, area, and signal to noise ratio. It creates several output files, including a base peak intensity (BPI) chromatogram for the survey scan, a BPI for the fragmentation scans, an XML file containing the SICmore » data for each parent ion, and a "flat file" (ready for import into a database) containing summaries of the SIC data statistics.« less

  17. Aggregation-fragmentation-diffusion model for trail dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kawagoe, Kyle; Huber, Greg; Pradas, Marc; ...

    2017-07-21

    We investigate statistical properties of trails formed by a random process incorporating aggregation, fragmentation, and diffusion. In this stochastic process, which takes place in one spatial dimension, two neighboring trails may combine to form a larger one, and also one trail may split into two. In addition, trails move diffusively. The model is defined by two parameters which quantify the fragmentation rate and the fragment size. In the long-time limit, the system reaches a steady state, and our focus is the limiting distribution of trail weights. We find that the density of trail weight has power-law tail P(w)~w –γ formore » small weight w. We obtain the exponent γ analytically and find that it varies continuously with the two model parameters. In conclusion, the exponent γ can be positive or negative, so that in one range of parameters small-weight trails are abundant and in the complementary range they are rare.« less

  18. Differences in seed rain composition in small and large fragments in the northeast Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Knörr, U C; Gottsberger, G

    2012-09-01

    Tropical forests are seriously threatened by fragmentation and habitat loss. The impact of fragment size and forest configuration on the composition of seed rain is insufficiently studied. For the present study, seed rain composition of small and large forest fragments (8-388 ha) was assessed in order to identify variations in seed abundance, species richness, seed size and dispersal mode. Seed rain was documented during a 1-year period in three large and four small Atlantic Forest fragments that are isolated by a sugarcane matrix. Total seed rain included 20,518 seeds of 149 species of trees, shrubs, palms, lianas and herbs. Most species and seeds were animal-dispersed. A significant difference in the proportion of seeds and species within different categories of seed size was found between small and large fragments. Small fragments received significantly more very small-sized seeds (<0.3 cm) and less large-seeded species (>1.5 cm) that were generally very rare, with only one species in small and eight in large fragments. We found a negative correlation between the inflow of small-sized seeds and the percentage of forest cover. Species richness was lower in small than in large fragments, but the difference was not very pronounced. Given our results, we propose changing plant species pools through logging, tree mortality and a high inflow of pioneer species and lianas, especially in small forest fragments and areas with low forest cover. Connecting forest fragments through corridors and reforestation with local large-seeded tree species may facilitate the maintenance of species diversity. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Neutronics Assessments for a RIA Fragmentation Line Beam Dump Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, J L; Reyes, S; Ahle, L E

    Heavy ion and radiation transport calculations are in progress for conceptual beam dump designs for the fragmentation line of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Using the computer code PHITS, a preliminary design of a motor-driven rotating wheel beam dump and adjacent downstream multipole has been modeled. Selected results of these calculations are given, including neutron and proton flux in the wheel, absorbed dose and displacements per atom in the hub materials, and heating from prompt radiation and from decay heat in the multipole.

  20. Structures of endothiapepsin-fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library.

    PubMed

    Huschmann, Franziska U; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein-ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin-fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity.

  1. Structures of endothiapepsin–fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library

    PubMed Central

    Huschmann, Franziska U.; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S.; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein–ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin–fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity. PMID:27139825

  2. Natural-abundance 17O NMR spectra of some inorganic and biologically important phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Sheppard, Norman

    A number of optimization techniques were employed to obtain 17O NMR spectra at natural abundance for a variety of inorganic and orgnic phosphates and polyphosphates. 17O chemical shifts and some JPO coupling constants are reported for the orthophosphate series of ions from H 3PO 4 to PO 43-, the pyrophosphate ion, P 2O 74-, the linear tripolyphosphate ion, P 3O 105-, and the cyclic trimetaphosphate ion, P 3O 93-; and for disodium DL-α-glycerophosphate and monosodium adenosine monophosphate. 17O- depleted water enables much improved results to be obtained in acqueous solutions.

  3. A small mammal community in a forest fragment, vegetation corridor and coffee matrix system in the Brazilian Atlantic forest.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level.

  4. A Small Mammal Community in a Forest Fragment, Vegetation Corridor and Coffee Matrix System in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level. PMID:21912591

  5. Absolute quantification of microbial taxon abundances.

    PubMed

    Props, Ruben; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rubbens, Peter; De Vrieze, Jo; Hernandez Sanabria, Emma; Waegeman, Willem; Monsieurs, Pieter; Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput amplicon sequencing has become a well-established approach for microbial community profiling. Correlating shifts in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa with environmental gradients is the goal of many microbiome surveys. As the abundances generated by this technology are semi-quantitative by definition, the observed dynamics may not accurately reflect those of the actual taxon densities. We combined the sequencing approach (16S rRNA gene) with robust single-cell enumeration technologies (flow cytometry) to quantify the absolute taxon abundances. A detailed longitudinal analysis of the absolute abundances resulted in distinct abundance profiles that were less ambiguous and expressed in units that can be directly compared across studies. We further provide evidence that the enrichment of taxa (increase in relative abundance) does not necessarily relate to the outgrowth of taxa (increase in absolute abundance). Our results highlight that both relative and absolute abundances should be considered for a comprehensive biological interpretation of microbiome surveys.

  6. Energetics and Dynamics of Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides: Fragmentation of Angiotensin Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo

    2011-12-01

    We present a first study of the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of deprotonated peptides using time- and collision-energy resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. SID of four model peptides: RVYIHPF, HVYIHPF, DRVYIHPF, and DHVYIHPF was studied using a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for studying ion-surface collisions. Energy and entropy effects for the overall decomposition of the precursor ion were deduced by modeling the time- and collision energy-resolved survival curves using an RRKM based approach developed in our laboratory. The results were compared to the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of the correspondingmore » protonated species. We demonstrate that acidic peptides are less stable in the negative mode because of the low threshold associated with the kinetically hindered loss of H2O from [M-H]- ions. Comparison between the two basic peptides indicates that the lower stability of the [M-H]- ion of RVYIHPF as compared to HVYIHPF towards fragmentation is attributed to the differences in fragmentation mechanisms. Specifically, threshold energy associated with losses of NH3 and NHCNH from RVYIHPF is lower than the barrier for backbone fragmentation that dominates gas-phase decomposition of HVYIHPF. The results provide a first quantitative comparison between the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of [M+H]+ and [M-H]- ions of acidic and basic peptides.« less

  7. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Walton, Courtney L.

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here in this paper, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-likemore » spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.« less

  8. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Walton, Courtney L.; ...

    2016-06-27

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here in this paper, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-likemore » spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.« less

  9. Metal abundance of Tal 13

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, R.; Diaz, A.I.

    1982-08-01

    Low-resolution spectrograms have been obtained of the three RR Lyrae variables in the distant and very sparse globular cluster Pal 13. A comparison of these spectrograms with similar ones of several RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters M4, M5, and M22 reveals that Pal 13 is intermediate to M5 and M22 in metal abundance. A value of (Fe/H) = -1.67 +- 0.15 is obtained for Pal 13 by adopting Zinn's (1980a (Astrophys. J. Suppl. 42,19)) values of (Fe/H) for these other clusters. Pal 13 is another example of a distant halo object that is not extremely metal poor.

  10. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  11. Palila abundance estimates and trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, Paul C.; Brink, Kevin W.; Camp, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The palila (Loxioides bailleui) population was surveyed annually during 1998−2014 on Mauna Kea Volcano to determine abundance, population trend, and spatial distribution. In the latest surveys, the 2013 population was estimated at 1,492−2,132 birds (point estimate: 1,799) and the 2014 population was estimated at 1,697−2,508 (point estimate: 2,070). Similar numbers of palila were detected during the first and subsequent counts within each year during 2012−2014, and there was no difference in their detection probability due to count sequence. This suggests that greater precision in population estimates can be achieved if future surveys include repeat visits. No palila were detected outside the core survey area in 2013 or 2014, suggesting that most if not all palila inhabit the western slope during the survey period. Since 2003, the size of the area containing all annual palila detections do not indicate a significant change among years, suggesting that the range of the species has remained stable; although this area represents only about 5% of its historical extent. During 1998−2003, palila numbers fluctuated moderately (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.21). After peaking in 2003, population estimates declined steadily through 2011; since 2010, estimates have fluctuated moderately above the 2011 minimum (CV = 0.18). The average rate of decline during 1998−2014 was 167 birds per year with very strong statistical support for an overall declining trend in abundance. Over the 16-year monitoring period, the estimated rate of change equated to a 68% decline in the population.

  12. Fragmentation characteristics of hydroxycinnamic acids in ESI-MSn by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhi-Hui; Sun, Chang-Hai; Fang, Hong-Zhuang

    2017-07-01

    This work aims to analyze the electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (ESI-MS n ) fragmentation characteristics of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) in negative ion mode. The geometric parameters, energies, natural bond orbitals and frontier orbitals of fragments were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) to investigate mass spectral fragmentation mechanisms. The results showed that proton transfer always occurred during fragmentation of HCAs; their quasi-molecular ions ([M - H] - ) existed in more than one form and were mainly with the lowest energy. The fragmentation characteristics included the followings: (1) according to the different substitution position of phenolic hydroxyl group, the ring contraction reaction by CO elimination from benzene was in an increasingly difficult order: m-phenolic hydroxyl > p-phenolic hydroxyl > o-phenolic hydroxyl; and (2) ortho effect always occurred in o-dihydroxycinnamic acids (o-diHCAs), i.e. one phenolic hydroxyl group offered H + , which combined with the other one to lose H 2 O. In addition, there was a nucleophilic reaction during ring contraction in diHCAs that oxygen atom attacked the carbon atom binding with the other phenolic hydroxyl to lose CO 2 . The fragmentation characteristics and mechanism of HCAs could be used for analysis and identification of such compounds quickly and effectively, and as reference for structural analogues by ESI-MS. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Human impacts affect tree community features of 20 forest fragments of a vanishing neotropical hotspot.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Aldo Alves; de Oliveira-Filho, Ary Teixeira; Eisenlohr, Pedro V; Miranda, Pedro L S; de Lemos Filho, José Pires

    2015-02-01

    The loss in forest area due to human occupancy is not the only threat to the remaining biodiversity: forest fragments are susceptible to additional human impact. Our aim was to investigate the effect of human impact on tree community features (species composition and abundance, and structural descriptors) and check if there was a decrease in the number of slender trees, an increase in the amount of large trees, and also a reduction in the number of tree species that occur in 20 fragments of Atlantic montane semideciduous forest in southeastern Brazil. We produced digital maps of each forest fragment using Landsat 7 satellite images and processed the maps to obtain morphometric variables. We used investigative questionnaires and field observations to survey the history of human impact. We then converted the information into scores given to the extent, severity, and duration of each impact, including proportional border area, fire, trails, coppicing, logging, and cattle, and converted these scores into categorical levels. We used linear models to assess the effect of impacts on tree species abundance distribution and stand structural descriptors. Part of the variation in floristic patterns was significantly correlated to the impacts of fire, logging, and proportional border area. Structural descriptors were influenced by cattle and outer roads. Our results provided, for the first time, strong evidence that tree species occurrence and abundance, and forest structure of Atlantic seasonal forest fragments respond differently to various modes of disturbance by humans.

  14. Fragmentation of a valine molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukstich, V. S.; Romanova, L. G.; Megela, I. G.; Papp, A. V.; Snegurskii, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of ion products of single and dissociative ionization of a valine molecule (C5H11NO2) by high-energy (11.5 MeV) and low-energy (below 150 eV) electrons has been investigated by mass spectrometry. Mass spectra of this molecule and near-threshold functions of yield of its ion fragments, for which the magnitudes of occurrence energies are determined, have been obtained. The analysis of the changes in mass spectra of valine molecules irradiated with doses of 5 and 20 kGy in comparison with those for unirradiated molecules shows that high-energy irradiation changes irreversibly the structure of some of the initial molecules.

  15. Primary fragmentation pathways of gas phase [M(uracil-H)(uracil)]+ complexes (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Cd, Pd , Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Pb): loss of uracil versus HNCO.

    PubMed

    Ali, Osama Y; Randell, Nicholas M; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-04-23

    Complexes formed between metal dications, the conjugate base of uracil, and uracil are investigated by sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Positive-ion electrospray spectra show that [M(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Cd, Pd, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, or Pb) is the most abundant ion even at low concentrations of uracil. SORI-CID experiments show that the main primary decomposition pathway for all [M(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) , except where M=Ca, Sr, Ba, or Pb, is the loss of HNCO. Under the same SORI-CID conditions, when M is Ca, Sr, Ba, or Pb, [M(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) are shown to lose a molecule of uracil. Similar results were observed under infrared multiple-photon dissociation excitation conditions, except that [Ca(Ura-H)(Ura)](+) was found to lose HNCO as the primary fragmentation product. The binding energies between neutral uracil and [M(Ura-H)](+) (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Fe, Cd, Pd ,Mg, Ca, Sr Ba, or Pb) are calculated by means of electronic-structure calculations. The differences in the uracil binding energies between complexes which lose uracil and those which lose HNCO are consistent with the experimentally observed differences in fragmentation pathways. A size dependence in the binding energies suggests that the interaction between uracil and [M(Ura-H)](+) is ion-dipole complexation and the experimental evidence presented supports this. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Knowledge-based Fragment Binding Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Grace W.; Altman, Russ B.

    2014-01-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening. PMID:24762971

  17. Knowledge-based fragment binding prediction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace W; Altman, Russ B

    2014-04-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening.

  18. Status and Perspectives of the INFN-LNS In-Flight Fragment Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Calabretta, L.; Cardella, G.; Cosentino, G.; De Filippo, E.; Gnoffo, B.; La Cognata, M.; Martorana, N. S.; Pagano, E. V.; Pizzone, R. G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Romano, S.; Russo, A. D.; Santonocito, D.

    2018-05-01

    In the last 15 years the FRIBs@LNS facility has successfully produced Radioactive Ion Beams using the In-Flight technique. We report on the current status and future perspectives opened by FRAISE, a new fragment separator that will be build in connection with the upgrade of Superconducting Cyclotron of the INFN-LNS laboratories.

  19. Habitat fragmentation leads to reduced pollinator visitation, fruit production and recruitment in urban mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Tyge D; Minchinton, Todd E; Ayre, David J

    2017-10-01

    Mangrove forests worldwide undergo anthropogenic fragmentation that may threaten their existence, and yet there have been few tests of the effects of fragmentation on demographic processes critical for mangrove regeneration. Predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation on mangroves is problematic as pollinators may move more freely across water than terrestrial habitat, and propagules can be widely dispersed by water. Here, within each of two estuaries, we compared pollinator diversity and activity, reproductive effort and output, and rates of recruitment for sets of three large (>1500 trees), medium (300-500) and small (<50) stands. As predicted, most measures of reproductive activity and success were inversely related to stand size with large stands typically producing significantly more and larger fruit, and significantly more seedlings. Most strikingly, we found the effect of fragmentation on the abundance of pollinators (honeybees), the production and quality of fruit and the survival rate of seedlings to be similar, showing significant reduction of recruitment in small stands. This study provides the first rigorous evidence that recruitment of mangroves, like for many terrestrial plants, is negatively impacted by habitat fragmentation. From a management perspective, we argue that in the short term our data imply the importance of conserving the largest possible stands. However, additional work is needed to determine (1) the proportion of recruits within small stands that originate within large stands, (2) how seedling performance varies with fruit size and genotype, and (3) how seedling size and performance vary with the abundance and diversity of pollen.

  20. The impact of edge effect on termite community (Blattodea: Isoptera) in fragments of Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C S; Cristaldo, P F; Florencio, D F; Ribeiro, E J M; Cruz, N G; Silva, E A; Costa, D A; Araújo, A P A

    2017-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is considered to be one of the biggest threats to tropical ecosystem functioning. In this region, termites perform an important ecological role as decomposers and ecosystem engineers. In the present study, we tested whether termite community is negatively affected by edge effects on three fragments of Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. Termite abundance and vegetation structure were sampled in 10 transects (15 × 2 m), while termite richness, activity, and soil litter biomass were measured in 16 quadrants (5 × 2 m) at forest edge and interior of each fragment. Habitat structure (i.e. number of tree, diameter at breast height and soil litter biomass) did not differ between forest edge and interior of fragments. Termite richness, abundance and activity were not affected by edge effect. However, differences were observed in the β diversity between forest edge and interior as well as in the fragments sampled. The β diversity partitioning indicates that species turnover is the determinant process of termite community composition under edge effect. Our results suggest that conservation strategies should be based on the selection of several distinct sites instead of few rich sites (e.g. nesting).