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Sample records for abundant immune cell

  1. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits B cell proliferation and reduces the abundance of IgM-secreting cells in cultured immune tissues of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Martins, Kelly; Applegate, Ben; Hagedorn, Birgit; Kennish, John; Zwollo, Patty

    2015-05-01

    Plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its active metabolite MEHP have important immunotoxic effects in mammalian species, including inhibition of cell proliferation, inflammation inhibition, lowering of the antibody response, and apoptosis. Virtually nothing is known about the potential detrimental effects of DEHP/MEHP on the teleost immune system, although phthalates are a likely threat to fish health. Here we investigated whether short-term in vitro DEHP exposure would affect B lineage cells in the rainbow trout, using cultured immune tissues. Cell culture conditions, evidence of cellular incorporation of DEHP, and possible effects of DEHP on immune genes were first established using the mouse pre-B cell line PD31 and data confirmed a dose-dependent cellular uptake of DEHP using liquid chromatography-coupled ion trap mass spectrometry. Effects of in vitro DEHP exposure on trout B cell proliferation were tested by flow cytometry. Significant, dose-dependent inhibition was evident in both anterior and posterior kidney cultures after 24 h exposure to ≥4 μM DEHP. DEHP-induced cell death was not significant for the range of DEHP tested. Further, the abundance of IgM-secreting plasmablasts and plasma cells was significantly reduced after in vitro exposure of ≥16 μM DEHP for 2 or 7 days. Finally, in vitro DEHP exposure significantly lowered the levels of secreted HCmu transcripts in a dose-dependent manner. B lineage cells from posterior kidney were more sensitive to effects of in vitro DEHP exposure than those from anterior kidney. Together, the data support a model where DEHP modifies the normal B cell activation pathways in rainbow trout, promoting B cell differentiation while suppressing plasmablast expansion, resulting in fewer IgM-secreting plasma cells. Insufficient production of protective antibody make fish more susceptible to infection, and increases their risk for disease and mortality in polluted waters. PMID:25748607

  2. NK cells inhibit humoral immunity by reducing the abundance of CD4+ T follicular helper cells during a chronic virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kevin D.; Kline, Hannah C.; Whitmire, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to understand better how to improve B cell responses and immunity to persisting virus infections, which often cause debilitating illness or death. People with chronic virus infection show evidence of improved virus control when there is a strong neutralizing antibody response, and conversely, B cell dysfunction is associated with higher viral loads. We showed previously that NK cells inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to disseminating LCMV infection and that depletion of NK cells attenuates chronic infection. Here, we examined the effect of NK cell depletion on B cell responses to LCMV infection in mice. Whereas mice infected acutely generated a peak level of antibody soon after the infection was resolved, mice infected chronically showed a continued increase in antibody levels that exceeded those after acute infection. We found that early NK cell depletion rapidly increased virus-specific antibody levels to chronic infection, and this effect depended on CD4+ T cells and was associated with elevated numbers of CXCR5+CD4+ TFH cells. However, the NK cell-depleted mice controlled the infection and by 1 mo pi, had lower TFH cell numbers and antibody levels compared with mice with sustained infection. Finally, we show that NK cell depletion improved antiviral CD8+ T cell responses only when B cells and virus-specific antibody were present. Our data indicate that NK cells diminish immunity to chronic infection, in part, by suppressing TFH cell and antibody responses. PMID:25986014

  3. Immune cells in term and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-11-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm. PMID:24954221

  4. Nanoengineering of Immune Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Milone, Michael C.; Dustin, Michael L.; Kam, Lance C.

    2010-01-01

    T lymphocytes are a key regulatory component of the adaptive immune system. Understanding how the micro- and nano-scale details of the extracellular environment influence T cell activation may have wide impact on the use of T cells for therapeutic purposes. In this article, we examine how the micro- and nano-scale presentation of ligands to cell surface receptors, including microscale organization and nanoscale mobility, influences the activation of T cells. We extend these studies to include the role of cell-generated forces, and the rigidity of the microenvironment, on T cell activation. These approaches enable delivery of defined signals to T cells, a step toward understanding the cell-cell communication in the immune system, and developing micro/nano- and material- engineered systems for tailoring immune responses for adoptive T cell therapies. PMID:21562611

  5. Immune cell promotion of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death from cancer, and immunotherapy and chemotherapy have had limited success in reversing its progression. Data from mouse models suggest that the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells to tumours protects metastatic cancer cells from surveillance by killer cells, which nullifies the effects of immunotherapy and thus establishes metastasis. Furthermore, in most cases, tumour-infiltrating immune cells differentiate into cells that promote each step of the metastatic cascade and thus are novel targets for therapy. In this Review, we describe how tumour-infiltrating immune cells contribute to the metastatic cascade and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies to target these cells. PMID:25614318

  6. Are mesenchymal stromal cells immune cells?

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be promising agents for the treatment of immunological disease. Although originally identified as precursor cells for mesenchymal lineages, in vitro studies have demonstrated that MSCs possess diverse immune regulatory capacities. Pre-clinical models have shown beneficial effects of MSCs in multiple immunological diseases and a number of phase 1/2 clinical trials carried out so far have reported signs of immune modulation after MSC infusion. These data indicate that MSCs play a central role in the immune response. This raises the academic question whether MSCs are immune cells or whether they are tissue precursor cells with immunoregulatory capacity. Correct understanding of the immunological properties and origin of MSCs will aid in the appropriate and safe use of the cells for clinical therapy. In this review the whole spectrum of immunological properties of MSCs is discussed with the aim of determining the position of MSCs in the immune system. PMID:25880839

  7. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  8. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  9. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  10. Genetically engineered immune privileged Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Long, Charles R.; Dufour, Jannette M.

    2012-01-01

    Sertoli cells are immune privileged cells, important for controlling the immune response to male germ cells as well as maintaining the tolerogenic environment in the testis. Additionally, ectopic Sertoli cells have been shown to survive and protect co-grafted cells when transplanted across immunological barriers. The survival of ectopic Sertoli cells has led to the idea that they could be used in cell based gene therapy. In this review, we provide a brief overview of testis immune privilege and Sertoli cell transplantation, factors contributing to Sertoli cell immune privilege, the challenges faced by viral vector gene therapy, the use of immune privileged cells in cell based gene therapy and describe several recent studies on the use of genetically engineered Sertoli cells to provide continuous delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:22553487

  11. Immune cells in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  12. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  13. γδ T Cell and Other Immune Cells Crosstalk in Cellular Immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Wu, Kangni; Hu, Yongxian; Sheng, Lixia; Tie, Ruxiu; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells have been recognized as effectors with immunomodulatory functions in cellular immunity. These abilities enable them to interact with other immune cells, thus having the potential for treatment of various immune-mediated diseases with adoptive cell therapy. So far, the interactions between γδ T cell and other immune cells have not been well defined. Here we will discuss the interactivities among them and the perspective on γδ T cells for their use in immunotherapy could be imagined. The understanding of the crosstalk among the immune cells in immunopathology might be beneficial for the clinical application of γδ T cell. PMID:24741636

  14. Glycosylation in immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Markus; Gleissner, Christian A.; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leukocyte recruitment encompasses cell adhesion and activation steps that enable circulating leukocytes to roll, arrest, and firmly adhere on the endothelial surface before they extravasate into distinct tissue locations. This complex sequence of events relies on adhesive interactions between surface structures on leukocytes and endothelial cells and also on signals generated during the cell-cell contacts. Cell surface glycans play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment. Several glycosyltransferases such as α1,3 fucosyltransferases, α2,3 sialyltransferases, core 2 N-acetylglucosaminlytransferases, β1,4 galactosyltransferases and polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases have been implicated in the generation of functional selectin ligands that mediate leukocyte rolling via binding to selectins. Recent evidence also suggests a role of α2,3 sialylated carbohydrate determinants in triggering chemokine-mediated leukocyte arrest and influencing β1 integrin function. Additional mechanisms by galectin- and siglec-dependent processes contribute to the growing number of reports emphasizing the significant role of glycans for the successful recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Advancing the knowledge on glycan function into appropriate pathology models is likely to suggest interesting new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of immune- and inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:19594631

  15. Innate immunity, decidual cells, and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chang-Ching; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Huang, S Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) manifested by hypertension and proteinuria complicates 3% to 8% of pregnancies and is a leading cause of fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It may lead to intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and long-term sequelae in women and fetuses, and consequently cause socioeconomic burden to the affected families and society as a whole. Balanced immune responses are required for the maintenance of successful pregnancy. Although not a focus of most studies, decidual cells, the major resident cell type at the fetal-maternal interface, have been shown to modulate the local immune balance by interacting with other cell types, such as bone marrow derived-immune cells, endothelial cells, and invading extravillous trophoblasts. Accumulating evidence suggests that an imbalanced innate immunity, facilitated by decidual cells, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PE. Thus, this review will discuss the role of innate immunity and the potential contribution of decidual cells in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:22814099

  16. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment. PMID:26483876

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells: immune evasive, not immune privileged

    PubMed Central

    Ankrum, James A.; Ong, Joon Faii; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The diverse immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may be exploited for treatment of a multitude of inflammatory conditions. MSCs have long been reported to be hypoimmunogenic or ‘immune privileged’; this property is thought to enable MSC transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers and the creation of off-the-shelf therapies consisting of MSCs grown in culture. However, recent studies describing generation of antibodies against and immune rejection of allogeneic donor MSCs suggest that MSCs may not actually be immune privileged. Nevertheless, whether rejection of donor MSCs influences the efficacy of allogeneic MSC therapies is not known, and no definitive clinical advantage of autologous MSCs over allogeneic MSCs has been demonstrated to date. Although MSCs may exert therapeutic function through a brief ‘hit and run’ mechanism, protecting MSCs from immune detection and prolonging their persistence in vivo may improve clinical outcomes and prevent patient sensitization toward donor antigens. PMID:24561556

  18. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  19. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  20. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  1. Orchestration of Angiogenesis by Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Pagani, Arianna; Pulze, Laura; Albini, Adriana; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Noonan, Douglas M.; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) plays a major role in cancer and is indispensable for tumor progression. The TUMIC involves many “players” going well beyond the malignant-transformed cells, including stromal, immune, and endothelial cells (ECs). The non-malignant cells can acquire tumor-promoting functions during carcinogenesis. In particular, these cells can “orchestrate” the “symphony” of the angiogenic switch, permitting the creation of new blood vessels that allows rapid expansion and progression toward malignancy. Considerable attention within the context of tumor angiogenesis should focus not only on the ECs, representing a fundamental unit, but also on immune cells and on the inflammatory tumor infiltrate. Immune cells infiltrating tumors typically show a tumor-induced polarization associated with attenuation of anti-tumor functions and generation of pro-tumor activities, among these angiogenesis. Here, we propose a scenario suggesting that the angiogenic switch is an immune switch arising from the pro-angiogenic polarization of immune cells. This view links immunity, inflammation, and angiogenesis to tumor progression. Here, we review the data in the literature and seek to identify the “conductors” of this “orchestra.” We also suggest that interrupting the immune → inflammation → angiogenesis → tumor progression process can delay or prevent tumor insurgence and malignant disease. PMID:25072019

  2. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyeongjin

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  3. Gamma delta T cells and the immune response to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'd T cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells that play a critical role in bridging the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. 'd T cells are particularly abundant in ruminant species and may constitute of up 60% of the circulating lymphocyte pool in young cattle. The frequency of circ...

  4. Immune signature of tumor infiltrating immune cells in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Katharina; Fornara, Paolo; Lautenschläger, Christine; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Seliger, Barbara; Riemann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells have been discussed as an essential factor for the prediction of the outcome of tumor patients. Lymphocyte-specific genes are associated with a favorable prognosis in colorectal cancer but with poor survival in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Flow cytometric analyses combined with immunohistochemistry were performed to study the phenotypic profiles of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the frequency of T cells and macrophages in RCC lesions. Data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and survival of patients. Comparing oncocytoma and clear cell (cc)RCC, T cell numbers as well as activation-associated T cell markers were higher in ccRCC, whereas the frequency of NK cells was higher in oncocytoma. An intratumoral increase of T cell numbers was found with higher tumor grades (G1:G2:G3/4 = 1:3:4). Tumor-associated macrophages slightly increased with dedifferentiation, although the macrophage-to-T cell ratio was highest in G1 tumor lesions. A high expression of CD57 was found in T cells of early tumor grades, whereas T cells in dedifferentiated RCC lesions expressed higher levels of CD69 and CTLA4. TIL composition did not differ between older (>70 y) and younger (<58 y) patients. Enhanced patients’ survival was associated with a higher percentage of tumor infiltrating NK cells and Th1 markers, e.g. HLA-DR+ and CXCR3+ T cells, whereas a high number of T cells, especially with high CD69 expression correlated with a worse prognosis of patients. Our results suggest that immunomonitoring of RCC patients might represent a useful tool for the prediction of the outcome of RCC patients. PMID:25949868

  5. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  6. Phenotypic characterisation of immune cell infiltrates in testicular germ cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hvarness, Tine; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Claesson, Mogens H

    2013-12-01

    Immune cells often infiltrate testicular germ cell neoplasms, including pre-invasive carcinoma in situ (CIS), but the significance of this phenomenon remains unknown. The composition and distribution of infiltrating immune cells were examined by immunohistochemistry in testis samples with CIS and overt seminoma, in comparison to biopsies from infertile men without neoplasia. The composition of immune cells was similar across all the groups studied. Macrophages, CD8⁺ and CD45R0⁺ T lymphocytes constituted the majority of infiltrates, B lymphocytes were present in an intermediate proportion and very few CD4⁺ and FoxP3⁺ T cells were detected. HLA-I antigen was more abundant in Sertoli cells in tubules containing CIS than in those with normal spermatogenesis. This study showed a phenotypically comparable composition of infiltrating immune cells independently of the presence of neoplasia, suggesting the absence of active immune surveillance in testicular germ cell cancer. PMID:24290033

  7. IL-33 in T Cell Differentiation, Function, and Immune Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Peine, Michael; Marek, Roman M; Löhning, Max

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a role for the alarmin interleukin (IL)-33 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation and function, and have also revealed important distinctions. The IL-33 receptor ST2 is constitutively and abundantly expressed on T-helper-2 (Th2) and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells in a GATA-3- and STAT5-dependent manner. Upon activation, Th1 and cytotoxic T cells express ST2 transiently, driven by T-bet and/or STAT4. We review these findings here, and critically examine evidence indicating that IL-33 enhances the differentiation and functionality of various T cell subsets through positive feedback loops involving lineage-specifying transcription factors. In this context, we discuss how quantitative and qualitative differences in ST2 expression between effector and GATA-3(+) regulatory T cells may contribute to immune homeostasis, and outline important areas of future inquiry. PMID:27055914

  8. Staying alive: cell death in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Upton, Jason W; Chan, Francis Ka-Ming

    2014-04-24

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of host defense against invading intracellular pathogens. Apoptosis, programmed necrosis, and pyroptosis each serve to limit pathogen replication in infected cells, while simultaneously promoting the inflammatory and innate responses that shape effective long-term host immunity. The importance of carefully regulated cell death is evident in the spectrum of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders caused by defects in these pathways. Moreover, many viruses encode inhibitors of programmed cell death to subvert these host responses during infection, thereby facilitating their own replication and persistence. Thus, as both virus and cell vie for control of these pathways, the battle for survival has shaped a complex host-pathogen interaction. This review will discuss the multifaceted role that programmed cell death plays in maintaining the immune system and its critical function in host defense, with a special emphasis on viral infections. PMID:24766891

  9. Epigenetic Dysfunction in Turner Syndrome Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Bradly J; Hong, Lee Kyung; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition associated with partial or complete absence of the X chromosome that involves characteristic findings in multiple organ systems. In addition to well-known clinical characteristics such as short stature and gonadal failure, TS is also associated with T cell immune alterations and chronic otitis media, suggestive of a possible immune deficiency. Recently, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on the X chromosome (UTX), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been identified as a downregulated gene in TS immune cells. Importantly, UTX is an X-linked gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation and thus is haploinsufficient in TS. Mice with T cell-specific UTX deficiency have impaired clearance of chronic viral infection due to decreased frequencies of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which are critical for B cell antibody generation. In parallel, TS patients have decreased Tfh frequencies in peripheral blood. Together, these findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the X-linked UTX gene in TS T cells underlies an immune deficit, which may manifest as increased predisposition to chronic otitis media. PMID:27039394

  10. Tumor-Induced STAT3 Signaling in Myeloid Cells Impairs Dendritic Cell Generation by Decreasing PKCβII Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Farren, Matthew R.; Carlson, Louise M.; Netherby, Colleen S.; Lindner, Inna; Li, Pui-Kai; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Abrams, Scott I.; Lee, Kelvin P.

    2014-01-01

    A major mechanism by which cancers escape control by the immune system is by blocking the differentiation of myeloid cells into dendritic cells (DCs), immunostimulatory cells that activate anti-tumor T cells. Tumor-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in myeloid progenitor cells is thought to cause this block in their differentiation. In addition, a signaling pathway through protein kinase C βII (PKCβII) is essential for the differentiation of myeloid cells into DCs. Here, we found in humans and mice that breast cancer cells substantially decreased the abundance of PKCβII in myeloid progenitor cells through a mechanism involving the enhanced activation of STAT3 signaling by soluble, tumor-derived factors (TDFs). STAT3 bound to previously undescribed negative regulatory elements within the promoter of PRKCB, which encodes PKCβII. We also found a previously undescribed counter-regulatory mechanism through which the activity of PKCβII inhibited tumor-dependent STAT3 signaling by decreasing the abundance of cell-surface receptors, such as cytokine and growth factor receptors, that are activated by TDFs. Together, these data suggest that a previously unrecognized crosstalk mechanism between the STAT3 and PKCβII signaling pathways provides the molecular basis for the tumor-induced blockade in the differentiation of myeloid cells, and suggest that enhancing PKCβII activity may be a therapeutic strategy to alleviate cancer-mediated suppression of the immune system. PMID:24550541

  11. The immune microenvironment in Hodgkin lymphoma: T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Vardhana, Santosha; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is curable in the majority of cases with chemotherapy and/or radiation. However, 15–20% of patients ultimately relapse and succumb to their disease. Pathologically, classical Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by rare tumor-initiating Reed-Sternberg cells surrounded by a dense immune microenvironment. However, the role of the immune microenvironment, particularly T and B cells, in either promoting or restricting Classical Hodgkin lymphoma growth remains undefined. Recent dramatic clinical responses seen using monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, a cell surface receptor whose primary function is to restrict T cell activation, have reignited questions regarding the function of the adaptive immune system in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. This review summarizes what is known regarding T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27365459

  12. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  13. [Immune cells on the IUD].

    PubMed

    Trebichavský, I; Nyklícek, O; Zahradnícková, M

    1989-06-01

    Cells isolated on the surface of just removed IUD "DANA" were characterized by means of monoclonal antibodies and the avidin-biotin method. Activated macrophages with the membrane sign CD 14 and transferrin receptors (25-72%) and B lymphocytes producing IgA and IgG (14-56%) contained strong transplantation antigens class II. By these glycoproteins macrophages and B cells are able to differentiate alie and thus also paternal antigens. The presence of these cells in the uterus may be the stimulus for triggering an aggressive cytotoxic reaction against the blastocyst and explains the contraceptive action of intrauterine devices. PMID:2791001

  14. Controlled One-on-One Encounters between Immune Cells and Microbes Reveal Mechanisms of Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-08-01

    Among many challenges facing the battle against infectious disease, one quandary stands out. On the one hand, it is often unclear how well animal models and cell lines mimic human immune behavior. On the other hand, many core methods of cell and molecular biology cannot be applied to human subjects. For example, the profound susceptibility of neutropenic patients to infection marks neutrophils (the most abundant white blood cells in humans) as vital immune defenders. Yet because these cells cannot be cultured or genetically manipulated, there are gaps in our understanding of the behavior of human neutrophils. Here, we discuss an alternative, interdisciplinary strategy to dissect fundamental mechanisms of immune-cell interactions with bacteria and fungi. We show how biophysical analyses of single-live-cell/single-target encounters are revealing universal principles of immune-cell phagocytosis, while also dispelling misconceptions about the minimum required mechanistic determinants of this process. PMID:26244729

  15. Immune cell identity: perspective from a palimpsest

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system in mammals is composed of multiple different immune cell types that migrate through the body and are made continuously throughout life. Lymphocytes and myeloid cells interact with each other and depend upon each other, but are each highly diverse and specialized for different roles. Lymphocytes uniquely require developmentally programmed mutational changes in the genome itself for their maturation. Despite profound differences between their mechanisms of threat recognition and threat response, however, the developmental origins of lymphocytes and myeloid cells are interlinked, and important aspects of their response mechanisms remain shared. As the immune defense system has been elucidated in the past 50 years, it is notable that the chain of logic toward our current understanding was driven by strongly posited models that led to crucial discoveries even though these models ended up being partly wrong. It has been the predictive strength of these models and their success as guides to incisive experimental research that has also illuminated the limits of each model’s explanatory scope, beyond which another model needed to assume the lead. This brief review describes how a succession of distinct paradigms has helped to clarify a sophisticated picture of immune cell generation and control. PMID:26750603

  16. Immune Cells and Inflammation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zihan; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of diabetes. At its core, DN is a metabolic disorder which can also manifest itself in terms of local inflammation in the kidneys. Such inflammation can then drive the classical markers of fibrosis and structural remodeling. As a result, resolution of immune-mediated inflammation is critical towards achieving a cure for DN. Many immune cells play a part in DN, including key members of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. While these cells were classically understood to primarily function against pathogen insult, it has also become increasingly clear that they also serve a major role as internal sensors of damage. In fact, damage sensing may serve as the impetus for much of the inflammation that occurs in DN, in a vicious positive feedback cycle. Although direct targeting of these proinflammatory cells may be difficult, new approaches that focus on their metabolic profiles may be able to alleviate DN significantly, especially since dysregulation of the local metabolic environment may well be responsible for triggering inflammation to begin with. In this review, the authors consider the metabolic profile of several relevant immune types and discuss their respective roles. PMID:26824038

  17. Autoreactive natural killer T cells: promoting immune protection and immune tolerance through varied interactions with myeloid antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Subramanya; Fox, Lisa; Wang, Xiaohua; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate T lymphocytes that are restricted by CD1d antigen-presenting molecules and recognize lipids and glycolipids as antigens. NKT cells have attracted attention for their potent immunoregulatory effects. Like other types of regulatory lymphocytes, a high proportion of NKT cells appear to be autoreactive to self antigens. Thus, as myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitutively express CD1d, NKT cells are able to interact with these APCs not only during times of immune activation but also in immunologically quiescent periods. The interactions of NKT cells with myeloid APCs can have either pro-inflammatory or tolerizing outcomes, and a central question is how the ensuing response is determined. Here we bring together published results from a variety of model systems to highlight three critical factors that influence the outcome of the NKT–APC interaction: (i) the strength of the antigenic signal delivered to the NKT cell, as determined by antigen abundance and/or T-cell receptor (TCR) affinity; (ii) the presence or absence of cytokines that costimulate NKT cells [e.g. interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and interferon (IFN)-α]; (iii) APC intrinsic factors such as differentiation state (e.g. monocyte versus DC) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Together with recent findings that demonstrate new links between NKT cell activation and endogenous lipid metabolism, these results outline a picture in which the functions of NKT cells are closely attuned to the existing biological context. Thus, NKT cells may actively promote tolerance until a critical level of danger signals arises, at which point they switch to activating pro-inflammatory immune responses. PMID:20465577

  18. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  19. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  20. Platelets and their interactions with other immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fong W.; Vijayan, K. Vinod; Rumbaut, Rolando E.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells, long known to be critically involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition to their role in blood clots, increasing evidence reveals significant roles for platelets in inflammation and immunity. However, the notion that platelets represent immune cells is not broadly recognized in the field of Physiology. This manuscript reviews the role of platelets in inflammation and immune responses, and highlights their interactions with other immune cells, including examples of major functional consequences of these interactions. PMID:26140718

  1. Targeted STAT3 disruption in myeloid cells alters immunosuppressor cell abundance in a murine model of spontaneous medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Catalina; Nobuta, Hiroko; Li, Jiaxi; Kasai, Atsushi; Yong, William H.; Waschek, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the immune system may provide early protection against cancer, tumors may exploit the healing arm of the immune system to enhance their growth and metastasis. For example, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to promote tumor growth by several mechanisms, including the suppression of T cell activity. It has been suggested that STAT3 activation in myeloid cells modulates multiple aspects of MDSC physiology, including their expansion and activity. Whereas most animal studies investigating tumor immunology have used tumor implants, we used transgenic mice (Smo*) that spontaneously develop medulloblastoma brain tumors to investigate the temporal accumulation of MDSCs within tumors and how myeloid STAT3 disruption affects MDSC and other immune cell types. We found distinct populations of MDSC in medulloblastoma tumors, with a high prevalence of CD11b+Ly6G+Ly6Clow/− cells, described previously by others as G-MDSCs. These were found early in tumor development, in premalignant lesions located on the surface of the cerebellum of 28-day-old mice. In fully developed tumors, pSTAT3 was found in the majority of these cells. Conditional STAT3 gene disruption in myeloid cells resulted in an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype of macrophages in Smo* mice. Moreover, a significant reduction in the abundance of G-MDSCs and Tregs was observed within tumors along with an increased presence of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Despite these alterations in immune cells induced by myeloid STAT3 disruption, we found no effect on tumor incidence in Smo* mice with this deletion. PMID:24068730

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Common Traits in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To protect host against immune-mediated damage, immune responses are tightly regulated. The regulation of immune responses is mediated by various populations of mature immune cells, such as T regulatory cells and B regulatory cells, but also by immature cells of different origins. In this review, we discuss regulatory properties and mechanisms whereby two distinct populations of immature cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells mediate immune regulation, focusing on their similarities, discrepancies, and potential clinical applications. PMID:27529074

  3. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  4. NKT Cell Immune Responses to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tessmer, Marlowe S.; Fatima, Ayesha; Paget, Christophe; Trottein, François; Brossay, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a heterogeneous population of innate T cells that have attracted recent interest because of their potential to regulate immune responses to a variety of pathogens. The most widely studied NKT cell subset is the invariant (i)NKT cells that recognize glycolipids in the context of the CD1d molecule. The multifaceted methods of activation iNKT cells possess and their ability to produce regulatory cytokines has made them a primary target for therapeutic studies. Objective/Methods This review gives insight into the roles of iNKT cells during infectious diseases, particularly viral infections. We also highlight the different mechanisms leading to iNKT cell activation in response to pathogens. Conclusions The iNKT cell versatility allows them to detect and respond to several viral infections. However, therapeutic approaches to specifically target iNKT cells will require additional research. Notably, examination of the roles of non-invariant NKT cells in response to pathogens warrant further investigations. PMID:19236234

  5. Lentiviral Vectors for Immune Cells Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Steven; Tai, April; Wang, Pin

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles suitable for delivering long-term transgene expression in various cell types. Engineering lentiviral vectors to have the capacity to transduce specific cell types is of great interest to advance the translation of lentiviral vectors towards the clinic. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to target lentiviral vectors to cells of the immune system. In this overview we distinguish between two types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies: 1) targeting of the vectors to specific cells by lentiviral vector surface modifications, and 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue-specific promoters to drive transgene expression. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value but ultimately combining these approaches may help reduce the effects of off-target expression and improve the efficiency and saftey of lentiviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:20085508

  6. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  7. Cell-mediated immunity in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Gliński, W; Jablonska, S; Langner, A; Obalek, S; Haftek, M; Proniewska, M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed in 6 cases of epidermodysplasia verruciformis and 2 healthy family members. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was studied by measuring response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), percentrages of E- and EAC-rosette-forming lymphocytes, bacterial skin tests, and allergic reactions to dinitrochloro-benzene (DNCB). Impairment of CMI was manifested by reduction in the percentage of E rosettes, and lowered response to PHA, and- to a lesser degree- to Con A. The immune response to DNCB sensitization was invariably negative. Impairment of CMI was greater in cases of long duration and with extensive lesions. The cases of similar duration and extent of lesions, which never showed tendency to tumor formation, were not different in CMI in comparison with cases with numerous tumors. Only in cases with very advanced tumors CMI was impaired parallel to the gravity of the patient's general condition. PMID:1017532

  8. Distribution of Immune Cells in the Human Cervix and Implications for HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Trifonova, Radiana T.; Lieberman, Judy; van Baarle, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Problem Knowledge of the mucosal immune cell composition of the human female genital tract is important for understanding susceptibility to HIV-1. Method of Study We developed an optimized procedure for multicolor flow cytometry analysis of immune cells from human cervix to characterize all major immune cell subsets in the endocervix and ectocervix. Results Half of tissue hematopoietic cells were CD14+, many of which were macrophages and about a third were CD11c+, most of which were CD103-CD11b+CX3CR1+DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs). The other dominant population were T cells, with more CD8 than CD4 cells. T cells (both CD8 and CD4) and B cells were more abundant in the ectocervix than endocervix of premenopausal women, however CD8+ T cell and B cell numbers declined in the ectocervix after menopause, while CD4 T cell counts remained higher. B, NK and conventional myeloid and plasmocytoid DCs each were a few percent of tissue hematopoietic cells. Although the ectocervix had more HIV-susceptible CD4+ T cells, polarized endocervical explants supported HIV-replication significantly better. Conclusions Due to their abundance in the genital tract CX3CR1+DC-SIGN+DCs might be important in HIV-transmission. Our data also suggests that the columnar epithelium of the upper genital tract might be a preferential site for HIV-transmission. PMID:24410939

  9. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  10. B Cells and Humoral Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Diehl, Cody J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Insights into the important contribution of inflammation and immune functions in the development and progression of atherosclerosis have greatly improved our understanding of this disease. Although the role of T cells has been extensively studied for decades, only recently has the role of B cells gained more attention. Recent studies have identified differential effects of different B-cell subsets and helped to clarify the still poorly understood mechanisms by which these act. B1 cells have been shown to prevent lesion formation, whereas B2 cells have been suggested to promote it. Natural IgM antibodies, mainly derived from B1 cells, have been shown to mediate atheroprotective effects, but the functional role of other immunoglobulin classes, particularly IgG, still remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent insights on the role of B cells and various immunoglobulin classes and how these may mediate their effects in atherosclerotic lesion formation. Moreover, we will highlight potential therapeutic approaches focusing on B-cell depletion that could be used to translate experimental evidence to human disease. PMID:24855199

  11. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  12. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  13. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  14. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  15. Respiratory epithelial cells orchestrate pulmonary innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Alenghat, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial surfaces of the lungs are in direct contact with the environment and are subjected to dynamic physical forces as airway tubes and alveoli are stretched and compressed during ventilation. Mucociliary clearance in conducting airways, reduction of surface tension in the alveoli, and maintenance of near sterility have been accommodated by the evolution of a multi-tiered innate host-defense system. The biophysical nature of pulmonary host defenses are integrated with the ability of respiratory epithelial cells to respond to and 'instruct' the professional immune system to protect the lungs from infection and injury. PMID:25521682

  16. Rapid detection of microbial cell abundance in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andrea M; Yuan, Quan; Close, Dan M; O'Dell, Kaela B; Fortney, Julian L; Wu, Jayne; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-15

    The detection and quantification of naturally occurring microbial cellular densities is an essential component of environmental systems monitoring. While there are a number of commonly utilized approaches for monitoring microbial abundance, capacitance-based biosensors represent a promising approach because of their low-cost and label-free detection of microbial cells, but are not as well characterized as more traditional methods. Here, we investigate the applicability of enhanced alternating current electrokinetics (ACEK) capacitive sensing as a new application for rapidly detecting and quantifying microbial cellular densities in cultured and environmentally sourced aquatic samples. ACEK capacitive sensor performance was evaluated using two distinct and dynamic systems - the Great Australian Bight and groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. Results demonstrate that ACEK capacitance-based sensing can accurately determine microbial cell counts throughout cellular concentrations typically encountered in naturally occurring microbial communities (10(3)-10(6) cells/mL). A linear relationship was observed between cellular density and capacitance change correlations, allowing a simple linear curve fitting equation to be used for determining microbial abundances in unknown samples. This work provides a foundation for understanding the limits of capacitance-based sensing in natural environmental samples and supports future efforts focusing on evaluating the robustness ACEK capacitance-based within aquatic environments. PMID:27315516

  17. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the 'non-classical immune cell'.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can infect 'non-classical immune cells', which comprise a significant constituency of cells that reside outside of those defined as 'classical immune cells' from myeloid or lymphoid origin. Here we address the influence of specific 'non-classical immune cells' in host responses and their effects in controlling mycobacterial growth or enabling an environment conducive for bacilli persistence. The interaction of M. tuberculosis with epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocytes, glia and neurons and downstream cellular responses that often dictate immune regulation and disease outcome are discussed. Functional integration and synergy between 'classical' and 'non-classical immune cells' are highlighted as critical for determining optimal immune outcomes that favour the host. PMID:25801479

  19. Common clonal origin of central and resident memory T cells following skin immunization

    PubMed Central

    Gaide, Olivier; Emerson, Ryan O.; Jiang, Xiaodong; Gulati, Nicholas; Nizza, Suzanne; Desmarais, Cindy; Robins, Harlan; Krueger, James G.; Clark, Rachael A.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Central memory T (TCM) cells in lymph nodes (LN) and resident memory T (TRM) cells in peripheral tissues play distinct roles in protective immunity1-5. Both are generated after primary infections, but the clonal origin of TRM and TCM cells is unclear. To address this question, mice were immunized through the skin with either a protein antigen, a chemical hapten, or a non-replicating poxvirus. We then analyzed antigen activated T cells from different tissues using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the gene (Tcrbv) encoding T cell receptor gene β chain CDR3 region to simultaneously track thousands of unique T cells6. For every abundant TRM clone generated in the skin, an abundant TCM clone bearing the identical TCR was present in lymph nodes (LN). Thus antigen reactive skin TRM and LN TCM clones were derived from a common naive T cell precursor after skin immunization, generating overlapping TCR repertoires. Although they bore the same TCR, TRM mediated rapid contact hypersensitivity (CHS)7 responses in mice, whereas TCM mediated delayed and attenuated responses. Studies in human subjects confirmed the generation of skin TRM in allergic contact dermatitis. Thus, immunization through skin simultaneously generates skin TRM and LN TCM in similar numbers from the same naïve T cells. PMID:25962122

  20. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  1. Abundant Genetic Overlap between Blood Lipids and Immune-Mediated Diseases Indicates Shared Molecular Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Ole A.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Albrecht, Mario; Mattingsdal, Morten; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A.; Mills, Ian; Aukrust, Pål; McEvoy, Linda K.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Karlsen, Tom H.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals), applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR) methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG), low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL)] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis). We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88), LDL (n = 87) and HDL (n = 52). Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2) and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1). We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25853426

  2. Cell Surface Changes Associated with Cellular Immune Reactions in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappi, Anthony J.; Silvers, Michael

    1984-09-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts.

  3. Cell surface changes associated with cellular immune reactions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nappi, A J; Silvers, M

    1984-09-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts. PMID:6433482

  4. Purinergic Signaling During Immune Cell Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Davide; McNamee, Eóin N; Idzko, Marco; Gambari, Roberto; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Migration and positioning of immune cells is fundamental for their differentiation and recruitment at sites of infection. Besides the fundamental role played by chemokines and their receptors, recent studies demonstrate that a complex network of purinergic signaling events plays a key role in these trafficking events. This process includes the release of nucleotides (such as ATP and ADP) and subsequent autocrine and paracrine signaling events through nucleotide receptors. At the same time, surface-expressed ectoapyrases and nucleotidases convert extracellular nucleotides to adenosine, and adenosine signaling events play additional functional roles in leucocyte trafficking. In this review we revisit classical paradigms of inflammatory cell trafficking in the context of recent studies implicating purinergic signaling events in this process. PMID:27142306

  5. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  6. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Greineisen, William E.; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcεRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signalling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcεRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signalling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  7. Invariant natural killer T cells: bridging innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wu, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system interact with pathogens via conserved pattern-recognition receptors, whereas cells of the adaptive immune system recognize pathogens through diverse, antigen-specific receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Although iNKT cells express T cell receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement, these receptors are semi-invariant and interact with a limited set of lipid and glycolipid antigens, thus resembling the pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Functionally, iNKT cells most closely resemble cells of the innate immune system, as they rapidly elicit their effector functions following activation, and fail to develop immunological memory. iNKT cells can become activated in response to a variety of stimuli and participate in the regulation of various immune responses. Activated iNKT cells produce several cytokines with the capacity to jump-start and modulate an adaptive immune response. A variety of glycolipid antigens that can differentially elicit distinct effector functions in iNKT cells have been identified. These reagents have been employed to test the hypothesis that iNKT cells can be harnessed for therapeutic purposes in human diseases. Here, we review the innate-like properties and functions of iNKT cells and discuss their interactions with other cell types of the immune system. PMID:20734065

  8. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Feng, Hao; Zhao, Jun; Feldman, Emily R; Chen, Si-Yi; Yuan, Weiming; Huang, Canhua; Akbari, Omid; Tibbetts, Scott A; Feng, Pinghui

    2016-07-12

    Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8(+) T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy. PMID:27346349

  9. Immune cells tracing using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Yasuhara, Masato; Dohi, Taeko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. Here we report an example of labeling immune cells by QDs. We collected splenic CD4 + T-lymphocyte and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Then cells were labeled with QDs. QDs are incorporated into the T-lymphocyte and macrophages immediately after addition and located in the cytoplasm via endocytosis pathway. The fluorescence of QDs held in the endosomes was easily detected for more than a week. In addition, T-lymphocytes labeled with QDs were stable and cell proliferation or cytokine production including IL-2 and IFN-γ was not affected. When QD-labeled T-lymphocytes were adoptively transferred intravenously to mice, they remained in the peripheral blood and spleen up to a week. Using QD-labeled peritoneal macrophages, we studied cell traffic during inflammation on viscera in peritoneum cavity. QD-labeled macrophages were transplanted into the peritoneum of the mouse, and colitis was induced by intracolonic injection of a hapten, trinitrobenzensulfonic acid. With the aid of stong signals of QDs, we found that macrophage accumuled on the inflammation site of the colon. These results suggested that fluorescent probes of QDs might be useful as bioimaging tools for tracing target cells in vivo.

  10. Immune regulation of epithelial cell function: Implications for GI pathologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammalian immune system is a complex and dynamic network that recognizes, responds, and adapts to numerous foreign and self molecules. CD4+ T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses, and upon stimulation by antigen, naive CD4+ T cells proliferate and differentiate into various T cell subsets...

  11. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and 19F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo. PMID:24013185

  12. Neoantigen Load, Antigen Presentation Machinery, and Immune Signatures Determine Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sato, Yusuke; Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Ogawa, Seishi; Homma, Yukio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumors commonly harbor multiple genetic alterations, some of which initiate tumorigenesis. Among these, some tumor-specific somatic mutations resulting in mutated protein have the potential to induce antitumor immune responses. To examine the relevance of the latter to immune responses in the tumor and to patient outcomes, we used datasets of whole-exome and RNA sequencing from 97 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to identify neoepitopes predicted to be presented by each patient's autologous HLA molecules. We found that the number of nonsilent or missense mutations did not correlate with patient prognosis. However, combining the number of HLA-restricted neoepitopes with the cell surface expression of HLA or β2-microglobulin(β2M) revealed that an A-neo(hi)/HLA-A(hi) or ABC-neo(hi)/β2M(hi) phenotype correlated with better clinical outcomes. Higher expression of immune-related genes from CD8 T cells and their effector molecules [CD8A, perforin (PRF1) and granzyme A (GZMA)], however, did not correlate with prognosis. This may have been due to the observed correlation of these genes with the expression of other genes that were associated with immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment (CTLA-4, PD-1, LAG-3, PD-L1, PD-L2, IDO1, and IL10). This suggested that abundant neoepitopes associated with greater antitumor effector immune responses were counterbalanced by a strongly immunosuppressive microenvironment. Therefore, immunosuppressive molecules should be considered high-priority targets for modulating immune responses in patients with ccRCC. Blockade of these molecular pathways could be combined with immunotherapies targeting neoantigens to achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 463-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980598

  13. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  14. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-01-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms. PMID:21475301

  15. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  16. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  17. Virus-specific CD4+ memory phenotype T cells are abundant in unexposed adults

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; Kidd, Brian A.; Han, Arnold; Kotzin, Jonathan J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    While T cell memory is generally thought to require direct antigen exposure, we find an abundance of memory phenotype cells (20–90%, averaging over 50%) of CD4+ T cells specific for viral antigens in adults that have never been infected. These cells express the appropriate memory markers and genes, rapidly produce cytokines, and have clonally expanded. This contrasts with newborns where the same T cell receptor (TCR) specificities are almost entirely naïve, which may explain the vulnerability of young children to infections. One mechanism for this phenomenon is TCR cross-reactivity to environmental antigens and in support of this we find extensive cross-recognition by HIV-1 and influenza-reactive T lymphocytes to other microbial peptides and the expansion of one of these following influenza vaccination. Thus the presence of these memory phenotype T cells has significant implications for immunity to novel pathogens, child and adult health, and the influence of pathogen-rich versus hygienic environments. PMID:23395677

  18. Differential protein network analysis of the immune cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Trevor; Hovig, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen) completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks. PMID:25309909

  19. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans. PMID:26627458

  20. The Dynamics of Interactions Among Immune and Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Eder, Katalin; Kalman, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common intracranial malignancy that constitutes about 50 % of all gliomas. Despite aggressive, multimodal therapy consisting of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of <10 %. Resistance to conventional therapies is most likely caused by several factors. Alterations in the functions of local immune mediators may represent a critical contributor to this resistance. The tumor microenvironment contains innate and adaptive immune cells in addition to the cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. These various cells communicate with each other by means of direct cell-cell contact or by soluble factors including cytokines and chemokines, and act in autocrine and paracrine manners to modulate tumor growth. There are dynamic interactions among the local immune elements and the tumor cells, where primarily the protective immune cells attempt to overcome the malignant cells. However, by developing somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications, the glioblastoma tumor cells acquire the capability of counteracting the local immune responses, and even exploit the immune cells and products for their own growth benefits. In this review, we survey those immune mechanisms that likely contribute to glioblastoma pathogenesis and may serve as a basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26224516

  1. Regulation of Intestinal Immune System by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells survey antigenic materials beneath our body surfaces and provide a front-line response to internal and external danger signals. Dendritic cells (DCs), a subset of innate immune cells, are critical sentinels that perform multiple roles in immune responses, from acting as principal modulators to priming an adaptive immune response through antigen-specific signaling. In the gut, DCs meet exogenous, non-harmful food antigens as well as vast commensal microbes under steady-state conditions. In other instances, they must combat pathogenic microbes to prevent infections. In this review, we focus on the function of intestinal DCs in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Specifically, we describe how intestinal DCs affect IgA production from B cells and influence the generation of unique subsets of T cell. PMID:25713503

  2. [Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Inoue, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody that has recently been approved in Japan, and has shown high response rates and more favorable safety profiles in 2 phase III clinical trials. Accordingly, immune checkpoint therapy has now been included as a new standard treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. These immune checkpoints are receptors expressed on T cells that regulate the immune response. The PD-1/PD-L1 signal inhibits cytotoxic T lymphocyte proliferation and survival, induces apoptosis of infiltrative T cells, and increases the amount of regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, severe immune-related adverse event(irAE)have been observed, including enterocolitis, neuropathies, and endocrinopathies. There are different management approaches to irAEs with conventional cytotoxic drugs. This article reviews the available data regarding immune checkpoint therapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27306803

  3. Exosomes and nanotubes: Control of immune cell communication.

    PubMed

    McCoy-Simandle, Kessler; Hanna, Samer J; Cox, Dianne

    2016-02-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical to coordinate the activity and behavior of a multicellular organism. The cells of the immune system not only must communicate with similar cells, but also with many other cell types in the body. Therefore, the cells of the immune system have evolved multiple ways to communicate. Exosomes and tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are two means of communication used by immune cells that contribute to immune functions. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types that can mediate intercellular communication and in the immune system they are proposed to play a role in antigen presentation and modulation of gene expression. TNTs are membranous structures that mediate direct cell-cell contact over several cell diameters in length (and possibly longer) and facilitate the interaction and/or the transfer of signals, material and other cellular organelles between connected cells. Recent studies have revealed additional, but sometimes conflicting, structural and functional features of both exosomes and TNTs. Despite the new and exciting information in exosome and TNT composition, origin and in vitro function, biologically significant functions are still being investigated and determined. In this review, we discuss the current field regarding exosomes and TNTs in immune cells providing evaluation and perspectives of the current literature. PMID:26704468

  4. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  5. Dendritic cells and cytokines in immune rejection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrantini, Maria; Capone, Imerio; Belardelli, Filippo

    2008-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in linking innate and adaptive immunity and, thus, in the generation of a protective immune response against both infectious diseases and tumors. The ability of DCs to prime and expand an immune response is regulated by signals acting through soluble mediators, mainly cytokines and chemokines. Understanding how cytokines influence DC functions and orchestrate the interactions of DCs with other immune cells is strictly instrumental to the progress in cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we will illustrate how certain cytokines and immune stimulating molecules can induce and sustain the antitumor immune response by acting on DCs. We will also discuss these cytokine-DC interactions in the light of clinical results in cancer patients. PMID:18054517

  6. Immune Cell Isolation from Mouse Femur Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Quan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the site of hematopoesis and contains mixed population of blood cells including erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. The following protocol provides a simple and fast method for isolation of bone marrow immune cells (no erythrocytes) from mouse femurs with a yield of approximate 8 × 107 cells in 5 ml culture media (1.6 × 104 cells/μl). Further isolation or flow cytometric analysis might be required for study of specific immune cell types.

  7. Th17 Cell Plasticity and Functions in Cancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guéry, Leslie; Hugues, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells represent a particular subset of T helper lymphocytes characterized by high production of IL-17 and other inflammatory cytokines. Th17 cells participate in antimicrobial immunity at mucosal and epithelial barriers and particularly fight against extracellular bacteria and fungi. While a role for Th17 cells in promoting inflammation and autoimmune disorders has been extensively and elegantly demonstrated, it is still controversial whether and how Th17 cells influence tumor immunity. Although Th17 cells specifically accumulate in many different types of tumors compared to healthy tissues, the outcome might however differ from a tumor type to another. Th17 cells were consequently associated with both good and bad prognoses. The high plasticity of those cells toward cells exhibiting either anti-inflammatory or in contrast pathogenic functions might contribute to Th17 versatile functions in the tumor context. On one hand, Th17 cells promote tumor growth by inducing angiogenesis (via IL-17) and by exerting themselves immunosuppressive functions. On the other hand, Th17 cells drive antitumor immune responses by recruiting immune cells into tumors, activating effector CD8+ T cells, or even directly by converting toward Th1 phenotype and producing IFN-γ. In this review, we are discussing the impact of the tumor microenvironment on Th17 cell plasticity and function and its implications in cancer immunity. PMID:26583099

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of intratumoral immune cells reveal the immune landscape in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bindea, Gabriela; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Tosolini, Marie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Waldner, Maximilian; Obenauf, Anna C; Angell, Helen; Fredriksen, Tessa; Lafontaine, Lucie; Berger, Anne; Bruneval, Patrick; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Becker, Christoph; Pagès, Franck; Speicher, Michael R; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Galon, Jérôme

    2013-10-17

    The complex interactions between tumors and their microenvironment remain to be elucidated. Combining large-scale approaches, we examined the spatio-temporal dynamics of 28 different immune cell types (immunome) infiltrating tumors. We found that the immune infiltrate composition changed at each tumor stage and that particular cells had a major impact on survival. Densities of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and innate cells increased, whereas most T cell densities decreased along with tumor progression. The number of B cells, which are key players in the core immune network and are associated with prolonged survival, increased at a late stage and showed a dual effect on recurrence and tumor progression. The immune control relevance was demonstrated in three endoscopic orthotopic colon-cancer mouse models. Genomic instability of the chemokine CXCL13 was a mechanism associated with Tfh and B cell infiltration. CXCL13 and IL21 were pivotal factors for the Tfh/B cell axis correlating with survival. This integrative study reveals the immune landscape in human colorectal cancer and the major hallmarks of the microenvironment associated with tumor progression and recurrence. PMID:24138885

  9. Cell-mediated immunity in experimental Nocardia asteroides infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, T; Agarwal, S C

    1977-01-01

    Experimental mycetoma-like lesions developed in guinea pigs after subcutaneous injection of Nocardia asteroides. Although delayed hypersensitivity appeared earlier, increased macrophage migration inhibition and microbicidal activity appeared after 7 weeks. When the lesions healed, high cell-mediated immunity was present. Cell-mediated immunity was transferred to normal recipient guinea pigs from healed donor guinea pigs by spleen cell transfer. Recipient guinea pigs showed marked protection against challenge with N. asteroides. PMID:321348

  10. Innate cell communication kick-starts pathogen-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C.; Yap, George S.; Gause, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition of infection and mediate essential mechanisms of pathogen elimination, and also facilitate adaptive immune responses. We review here the numerous intricate interactions among innate cells that initiate protective immunity. The efficient eradication of pathogens depends on the coordinated actions of multiple cells, including innate cells and epithelial cells. Rather than acting as isolated effector cells, innate cells are in constant communication with other responding cells of the immune system, locally and distally. These interactions are critically important for the efficient control of primary infections as well for the development of ‘trained’ innate cells that facilitate the rapid elimination of homologous or heterologous infections. PMID:27002843

  11. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types.

    PubMed

    Kippner, Linda E; Kim, Jinhee; Gibson, Greg; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription profiling provides

  12. Roles of regulatory T cells in cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yoshiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2016-08-01

    CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 are highly immune suppressive and play central roles in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis, yet in malignant tumors they promote tumor progression by suppressing effective antitumor immunity. Indeed, higher infiltration by Tregs is observed in tumor tissues, and their depletion augments antitumor immune responses in animal models. Additionally, increased numbers of Tregs and, in particular, decreased ratios of CD8(+) T cells to Tregs among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are correlated with poor prognosis in various types of human cancers. The recent success of cancer immunotherapy represented by immune checkpoint blockade has provided a new insight in cancer treatment, yet more than half of the treated patients did not experience clinical benefits. Identifying biomarkers that predict clinical responses and developing novel immunotherapies are therefore urgently required. Cancer patients whose tumors contain a large number of neoantigens stemming from gene mutations, which have not been previously recognized by the immune system, provoke strong antitumor T-cell responses associated with clinical responses following immune checkpoint blockade, depending on the resistance to Treg-mediated suppression. Thus, integration of a strategy restricting Treg-mediated immune suppression may expand the therapeutic spectrum of cancer immunotherapy towards patients with a lower number of neoantigens. In this review, we address the current understanding of Treg-mediated immune suppressive mechanisms in cancer, the involvement of Tregs in cancer immunotherapy, and strategies for effective and tolerable Treg-targeted therapy. PMID:27160722

  13. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  14. Selenoprotein K knockout mice exhibit deficient calcium flux in immune cells and impaired immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Hoffmann, FuKun W.; Kumar, Mukesh; Huang, Zhi; Roe, Kelsey; Nguyen-Wu, Elizabeth; Hashimoto, Ann S.; Hoffmann, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Selenoprotein K (Sel K) is a selenium-containing protein for which no function has been identified. We found that Sel K is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein expressed at relatively high levels in immune cells and is regulated by dietary selenium. Sel K−/− mice were generated and found to be similar to WT controls regarding growth and fertility. Immune system development was not affected by Sel K deletion, but specific immune cell defects were found in Sel K−/− mice. Receptor-mediated Ca2+ flux was decreased in T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages from Sel K−/− mice compare to controls. Ca2+-dependent functions including T cell proliferation, T cell and neutrophil migration, and Fcγ-receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages were decreased in cells from Sel K−/− mice compared to controls. West Nile virus (WNV) infections were performed and Sel K−/− mice exhibited decreased viral clearance in the periphery and increased viral titers in brain. Furthermore, WNV-infected Sel K−/− mice demonstrated significantly lower survival (2/23; 8.7%) compared to WT controls (10/26; 38.5%). These results establish Sel K as an ER-membrane protein important for promoting effective Ca2+ flux during immune cell activation and provide insight into molecular mechanisms by which dietary selenium enhances immune responses. PMID:21220695

  15. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of lead and cadmium on cell-mediated immunity was studied in peritoneal macrophages, B-, and T-lymphocytes of mice. Lead and cadmium were administered in drinking water for 10 weeks in short-term experiments and up to 18 months to deal with immune responses in aged mic...

  16. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  17. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  18. [Multipotent mesenchymal stromal and immune cells interaction: reciprocal effects].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Buravkova, L B

    2012-12-01

    Adult multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) are considered now as one of the key players in physiological and pathological tissue remodeling. Clarification of the mechanisms that mediate MMSC functions, is one of the most intriguing issues in modern cell physiology. Present Review summarizes current understanding of the MMSC effects on different types of immune cells. The realization of MMSC immunomodulatory capacity is considered as a contribution of direct cell-to-cell contacts, soluble mediators and of local microenvironmental factors, the most important of which is the partial pressure of oxygen. MMSCs and immune cells interaction is discussed in the terms of reciprocal effects, modifying properties of all "partner cells". Special attention is paid to the influence of immune cells on the MMSCs. "Immunosuppressive" phenomenon of MMSCs is considered as the integral part of the "response to injury" mechanism. PMID:23461191

  19. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity. PMID:25126585

  20. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+), cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+), T-helper cells (CD4+), B cells (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+), mast cells (CD117+), mononuclear cells (CD11c+), plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+), B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+) and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+) compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells) in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition. PMID:26413839

  1. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  2. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  3. Role of ion channels in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis during the interplay between immune and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bose, T; Cieślar-Pobuda, A; Wiechec, E

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are abundantly expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells, thereby regulating the Ca2+ influx and downstream signaling pathways of physiological processes. The immune system is specialized in the process of cancer cell recognition and elimination, and is regulated by different ion channels. In comparison with the immune cells, ion channels behave differently in cancer cells by making the tumor cells more hyperpolarized and influence cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore, ion channels comprise an important therapeutic target in anti-cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the implication of ion channels in regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis during the crosstalk between immune and cancer cell as well as their role in cancer progression. PMID:25695601

  4. Reliable and High Efficiency Extraction of Kidney Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Meuth, Alex; Smith, Cassandra; Annayya, Aroor

    2016-01-01

    Immune system activation occurs in multiple kidney diseases and pathophysiological processes. The immune system consists of both adaptive and innate components and multiple cell types. Sometimes, the cell type of interest is present in very low numbers among the large numbers of total cells isolated from the kidney. Hence, reliable and efficient isolation of kidney mononuclear cell populations is important in order to study the immunological problems associated with kidney diseases. Traditionally, tissue isolation of kidney mononuclear cells have been performed via enzymatic digestions using different varieties and strengths of collagenases/DNAses yielding varying numbers of viable immune cells. Recently, with the development of the mechanical tissue disruptors for single cell isolation, the collagenase digestion step is avoided and replaced by a simple mechanical disruption of the kidneys after extraction from the mouse. Herein, we demonstrate a simple yet efficient method for the isolation of kidney mononuclear cells for every day immune cell extractions. We further demonstrate an example of subset analysis of immune cells in the kidney. Importantly, this technique can be adapted to other soft and non-fibrous tissues such as the liver and brain. PMID:27583412

  5. Stability analysis of simple models for immune cells interacting with normal pathogens and immune system retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Reibnegger, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Werner, E R; Werner-Felmayer, G; Dierich, M P; Wachter, H

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical analysis is presented for several simple dynamical systems that might be considered as crude descriptions for the situation when an immune system retrovirus, immune cells, and normal autonomously replicating pathogens interact. By stability analysis of the steady-state solutions, the destabilizing effect of the immune system retrovirus is described. The qualitative behavior of the solutions depending on the system parameters is analyzed in terms of trajectories moving in a phase space in which the axes are defined by the population numbers of the interacting biological entities. PMID:2522657

  6. Cell-cell communication via extracellular membrane vesicles and its role in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inkyu

    2013-08-01

    The host immune response involves a variety of cell types, including specialized immune and non-immune cells. The delicate coordination among these cells via close communication is central for the proper operation of immune system. Cell-cell communication is mediated by a complex network that includes soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and metabolites exported from cells, as well as membrane-bound receptors and their ligands. Cell-cell communication is also mediated by membrane vesicles (e.g., exosomes, ectosomes), which are either shed by distant cells or exchanged by cells that are making direct contact. Intercellular communication via extracellular membrane vesicles has drawn much attention recently, as they have been shown to carry various biomolecules that modulate the activities of recipient cells. In this review, I will discuss current views on cell-cell communication via extra-cellular membrane vesicles, especially shedded membrane vesicles, and their effects on the control of the immune system. PMID:23807045

  7. Maintenance of Immune Homeostasis through ILC/T Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    von Burg, Nicole; Turchinovich, Gleb; Finke, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged as a new family of immune cells with crucial functions in innate and adaptive immunity. ILC subsets mirror the cytokine and transcriptional profile of CD4+ T helper (TH) cell subsets. Hence, group 1 (ILC1), group 2 (ILC2), and group 3 (ILC3) ILCs can be distinguished by the production of TH1, TH2, and TH17-type cytokines, respectively. Cytokine release by ILCs not only shapes early innate immunity but can also orchestrate TH immune responses to microbial or allergen exposure. Recent studies have identified an unexpected effector function of ILCs as antigen presenting cells. Both ILC2s and ILC3s are able to process and present foreign antigens (Ags) via major histocompatibility complex class II, and to induce cognate CD4+ T cell responses. In addition, Ag-stimulated T cells promote ILC activation and effector functions indicating a reciprocal interaction between the adaptive and innate immune system. A fundamental puzzle in ILC function is how ILC/T cell interactions promote host protection and prevent autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, the way in which microenvironmental and inflammatory signals determine the outcome of ILC/T cell immune responses in various tissues is not yet understood. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the mechanisms that coordinate the collaboration between ILCs and T cells under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. We also discuss the potential roles of T cells and other immune cells to regulate ILC functions and to maintain homeostasis in mucosal tissues. PMID:26322047

  8. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  9. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres.

    PubMed

    Glass, Joshua J; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P R; Parton, Robert G; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells-an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:27031090

  10. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  11. Myeloid cell-driven angiogenesis and immune regulation in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Lee B.; Bergers, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer as its induction is indispensable to fuel an expanding tumor. The tumor microenvironment contributes to tumor vessel growth, and distinct myeloid cells recruited by the tumor have been shown to not only support angiogenesis but to foster an immune suppressive environment that supports tumor expansion and progression. Recent findings suggest that the intertwined regulation of angiogenesis and immune modulation can offer therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of cancer. Here we review the mechanisms by which distinct myeloid cell populations contribute to tumor angiogenesis, discuss current approaches in the clinic that are targeting both angiogenic and immune suppressive pathways, and highlight important areas of future research. PMID:25770923

  12. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-01

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:25941086

  13. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology.

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J

    2016-04-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  14. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  15. Balancing Immune Protection and Immune Pathology by CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Thomas, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immunity contributes to the clearance of virus-infected cells, and CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, its cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced proinflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL antiviral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated non-specific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity. PMID:26904022

  16. Balancing Immune Protection and Immune Pathology by CD8(+) T-Cell Responses to Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Susu; Thomas, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immunity contributes to the clearance of virus-infected cells, and CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, its cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced proinflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL antiviral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated non-specific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity. PMID:26904022

  17. Immune-surveillance through exhausted effector T-cells.

    PubMed

    Zehn, Dietmar; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Thimme, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) and certain strains of the rodent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) establish a state of persisting viral replication. This occurs besides strong adoptive immune responses and the induction of large numbers of activated pathogen-specific T-cells. The failure of the immune system to clear these viruses is typically attributed to a loss of effector T-cell function-a phenomenon referred to as T-cell exhaustion. Though largely accepted, this loss of function concept is being more and more challenged by comprehensive clinical and experimental observations which highlight that T-cells in chronic infections are more functional than previously considered. Here, we highlight examples that demonstrate that such T-cells mediate a profound form of immune-surveillance. We also briefly discuss the opportunities and limitations of employing 'exhausted' T-cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26826950

  18. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  19. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  20. Antitumor immunity induced by hybrid murine tumor cells: requirements for optimal immunization

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, C.S.; O'Donnell, R.W.; Horan, P.K.; Budd, H.S.; Spennacchio, J.L.; Chuang, C.; Henshaw, E.C.

    1982-09-01

    Hybrid tumor cells have been evaluated for their ability to induce specific antitumor immunity in inbred female C3H/He mice challenged with the syngeneic BA tumor. Hybrid cells were produced by fusion of BA cells with a BALB/c renal adenocarcinoma, which is hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase-deficient and grows well in culture. Corynebacterium parvum was evaluated as an adjuvant for BA and hybrid cells. The BA tumor was shown to be poorly immunogenic, and four weekly injections of BA cells alone or C. parvum alone did not confer significant immunity. When BA cells and C. parvum were mixed, survival time was prolonged and most mice remained tumor-free. Hybrid cell lines derived from the BA tumor were produced in culture in unlimited quantities and were successfully used as immunogens. The addition of C. parvum to hybrids gave a significant incremental increase in survival when compared to the survival resulting from immunization by hybrids without adjuvant. When hybrids without adjuvant were used, several weekly injections were required for effective immunization. Irradiated and unirradiated hybrids were compared, and it was found that irradiation did not diminish hybrid immunogenicity. The potential problems and advantages of this concept of therapy are discussed.

  1. Stress Hyperglycemia, Insulin Treatment, and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients. PMID:24899891

  2. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  3. Effects of mimosine on Wolbachia in mosquito cells: cell cycle suppression reduces bacterial abundance

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    The plant allelochemical l-mimosine (β-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridone)]-α-aminopropionic acid; leucenol) resembles the nonessential amino acid, tyrosine. Because the obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, metabolizes amino acids derived from host cells, the effects of mimosine on infected and uninfected mosquito cells were investigated. The EC50 for mimosine was 6–7 μM with Aedes albopictus C7-10 and C/wStr cell lines, and was not influenced by infection status. Mosquito cells responded to concentrations of mimosine substantially lower than those used to synchronize the mammalian cell cycle; at concentrations of 30–35 μM, mimosine reversibly arrested the mosquito cell cycle at the G1/S boundary and inhibited growth of Wolbachia strain wStr. Although lower concentrations of mimosine slightly increased wStr abundance, concentrations that suppressed the cell cycle reduced Wolbachia levels. PMID:26019119

  4. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  6. CX3CR1(+) B Cells Show Immune Suppressor Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The immune regulatory functions of B cells are not fully understood yet. The present study aims to characterize a subtype of B cells that expresses CX3CR1. In this study, peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with food allergies and healthy subjects. Peripheral B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. T cell proliferation was assessed by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assay. The results showed that the CX3CR1+ B cells were detected in the peripheral blood samples of healthy subjects and were significantly less in patients with food allergies. CX3CR1+ B cells expressed high levels of TGF-β and integrin αvβ6. CX3CR1+ B cells could efficiently suppress other effector CD4+ T cell activation. We conclude that human peripheral CX3CR1+ B cells have immune suppressor properties. PMID:24970890

  7. Super-enhancers: Asset management in immune cell genomes

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Steven; O’Shea, John J.; Vahedi, Golnaz

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs) are regions of the genome consisting of clusters of regulatory elements bound with very high amounts of transcription factors, and this architecture appears to be the hallmark of genes and noncoding RNAs linked with cell identity. Recent studies have identified SEs in CD4+ T cells and have further linked these regions to SNPs associated with immune-mediated disorders, pointing to an important role for these structures in the T cell differentiation and function. Here we review the features that define SEs, and discuss their function within the broader understanding of the mechanisms that define immune cell identity and function. We propose that SEs present crucial regulatory hubs, coordinating intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation signals, and argue that delineating these regions will provide important insight into the factors and mechanisms that define immune cell identity. PMID:26277449

  8. Super-enhancers: Asset management in immune cell genomes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Steven; O'Shea, John J; Vahedi, Golnaz

    2015-09-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs) are regions of the genome consisting of clusters of regulatory elements bound with very high amounts of transcription factors, and this architecture appears to be the hallmark of genes and noncoding RNAs linked with cell identity. Recent studies have identified SEs in CD4(+) T cells and have further linked these regions to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with immune-mediated disorders, pointing to an important role for these structures in the T cell differentiation and function. Here we review the features that define SEs, and discuss their function within the broader understanding of the mechanisms that define immune cell identity and function. We propose that SEs present crucial regulatory hubs, coordinating intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation signals, and argue that delineating these regions will provide important insight into the factors and mechanisms that define immune cell identity. PMID:26277449

  9. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited

  10. Tailored immunity by skin antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Clement; Perrin, Helene; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    Skin vaccination aims at targeting epidermal and dermal antigen-presenting cells (APCs), indeed many subsets of different origin endowed with various functions populate the skin. The idea that the skin could represent a particularly potent site to induce adaptive and protective immune response emerged after the success of vaccinia virus vaccination by skin scarification. Recent advances have shown that multiple subsets of APCs coexist in the skin and participate in immunity to infectious diseases. Induction of an adaptive immune response depends on the initial recognition and capture of antigens by skin APCs and their transport to lymphoid organs. Innovative strategies of vaccination have thus been developed to target skin APCs for tailored immunity, hence this review will discuss recent insights into skin APC subsets characterization and how they can shape adaptive immune responses. PMID:25483512

  11. Regulation of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anja K; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens. They are important contributors to innate mucosal immunity and generate various and sophisticated anti-microbial defense mechanisms, including the formation of a tight barrier and secretion of anti-microbial substances as well as inflammatory mediators. To provide these active defense mechanisms, epithelial cells functionally express various pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize conserved microbial patterns mediating inducible activation of innate immunity. Mucosal surfaces, however, are prone to contact with pathogenic as well as non-pathogenic microbes and, therefore, immune-recognition principles have to be strictly regulated to avoid uncontrolled permanent activation. This review will focus on mechanisms by which epithelial cells regulate mucosal immune responses, thus creating an organ-specific microenvironment. This includes local adaptations in microbial recognition, regulation of local immune homeostasis, and modulation of antigen-presenting cells and adaptive immune responses. These regulatory mechanisms serve the special needs of controlled microbial recognition in mucosal compartments. PMID:18060372

  12. Secondary specific immune response in vitro to MSV tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Senik, A; Hebrero, F P; Levy, J P

    1975-12-15

    The interactions which occur between antigenic tumor cells and normal or immune lymphoid cells in a 3-day in vitro culture, have been studied with a murine sarcoma virus (MSV)-induced tumor. The 3H-thymidine incorporation of lymphoma cells growing in suspension, and the radioactive-chromium release of freshly sampled lymphoma cells regularly added to the culture, have been compared to determine the part played by immune lymphoid cells in cytolysis and cytostasis of the tumor-cell population. The cytolytic activity increases in the culture from day 0 to day 3. It is due, predominantly, to T-cells, and remains specific to antigens shared by MSV tumors and related lymphomas. This activity would be difficult to detect unless freshly sampled ascitic cells were used as targets, since the lymphoma cells spontaneously lose a part of their sensitivity to immune cytolysis during in vitro culture. The method used in the present experiments is a secondary chromium release test (SCRT), which measures the invitro secondary stimulation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by tumor cells. In the absence of stimulatory cells, the CTL activity would have rapidly fallen in vitro. The cytostatic activity also increases during the 3 days in vitro, in parallel to the cytolytic activity: it is due to non-T-cells and remains mainly non-specific. The significance of these data for the interpretation of invitro demonstrated cell-mediated anti-tumor immune reactions is briefly discussed, as well as their relevance in the in vivo role of immune CTL. PMID:53210

  13. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  14. Eliminating Encephalitogenic T Cells without Undermining Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Jonathan P.; Elfers, Eileen E.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Grunblatt, Eli; Hildeman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current clinical approach for treating autoimmune diseases is to broadly blunt immune responses as a means of preventing autoimmune pathology. Among the major side effects of this strategy are depressed beneficial immunity and increased rates of infections and tumors. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model for human multiple sclerosis, we report a novel alternative approach for purging autoreactive T cells that spares beneficial immunity. The moderate and temporally limited use of etoposide, a topoisomerase inhibitor, to eliminate encephalitogenic T cells significantly reduces the onset and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, dampens cytokine production and overall pathology, while dramatically limiting the off-target effects on naive and memory adaptive immunity. Etoposide-treated mice show no or significantly ameliorated pathology with reduced antigenic spread, yet have normal T cell and T-dependent B cell responses to de novo antigenic challenges as well as unimpaired memory T cell responses to viral rechallenge. Thus, etoposide therapy can selectively ablate effector T cells and limit pathology in an animal model of autoimmunity while sparing protective immune responses. This strategy could lead to novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases with both enhanced efficacy and decreased treatment-associated morbidities. PMID:24277699

  15. Monocyte Heterogeneity: Consequences for Monocyte-Derived Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Blood monocytes are precursors of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. They are a heterogeneous cell population with differences in size, phenotype, and function. Although monocytes maintain several tissue-specific populations of immune cells in homeostasis, their contribution to populations of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts is significantly increased in inflammation. Identification of a growing number of functionally different subsets of cells within populations of monocyte-derived immune cells has recently put monocyte heterogeneity into sharp focus. Here, we summarize recent findings in monocyte heterogeneity and their differentiation into dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. We also discuss these advances in the context of the formation of functionally different monocyte-derived subsets of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. PMID:27478854

  16. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26098690

  17. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  18. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  19. Regulation of innate immune cell function by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Weichhart, Thomas; Hengstschläger, Markus; Linke, Monika

    2015-10-01

    The innate immune system is central for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and quickly responds to local or systemic perturbations by pathogenic or sterile insults. This rapid response must be metabolically supported to allow cell migration and proliferation and to enable efficient production of cytokines and lipid mediators. This Review focuses on the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in controlling and shaping the effector responses of innate immune cells. mTOR reconfigures cellular metabolism and regulates translation, cytokine responses, antigen presentation, macrophage polarization and cell migration. The mTOR network emerges as an integrative rheostat that couples cellular activation to the environmental and intracellular nutritional status to dictate and optimize the inflammatory response. A detailed understanding of how mTOR metabolically coordinates effector responses by myeloid cells will provide important insights into immunity in health and disease. PMID:26403194

  20. MP1 encodes an abundant and highly antigenic cell wall mannoprotein in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chan, C M; Lee, C; Wong, S S; Yuen, K Y

    1998-03-01

    We cloned the MP1 gene, which encodes an abundant antigenic cell wall mannoprotein from the dimorphic pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. MP1 is a unique gene without homologs in sequence databases. It codes for a protein, Mp1p, of 462 amino acid residues, with a few sequence features that are present in several cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. It contains two putative N glycosylation sites, a serine- and threonine-rich region for O glycosylation, a signal peptide, and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal sequence. Specific anti-Mp1p antibody was generated with recombinant Mp1p protein purified from Escherichia coli to allow further characterization of Mp1p. Western blot analysis with anti-Mp1p antibody revealed that Mp1p has predominant bands with molecular masses of 58 and 90 kDa and that it belongs to a group of cell wall proteins that can be readily removed from yeast cell surfaces by glucanase digestion. In addition, Mp1p is an abundant yeast glycoprotein and has high affinity for concanavalin A, a characteristic indicative of a mannoprotein. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis with immunogold staining indicated that Mp1p is present in the cell walls of the yeast, hyphae, and conidia of P. marneffei. Finally, it was observed that infected patients develop a specific antibody response against Mp1p, suggesting that this protein represents a good cell surface target for host humoral immunity. PMID:9488383

  1. Spaceflight alters immune cell function and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Berry, Wallace D.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Lesniak, A. T.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were performed onboard Cosmos 2044 to determine spaceflight effects on immunologically important cell function and distribution. Results indicate that bone marrow cells from flown and suspended rats exhibited a decreased response to a granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with the bone marrow cells from control rats. Bone marrow cells showed an increase in the percentage of cells expressing markers for helper T-cells in the myelogenous population and increased percentages of anti-asialo granulocyte/monocyte-1-bearing interleulin-2 receptor bearing pan T- and helper T-cells in the lymphocytic population.

  2. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease. PMID:27039885

  3. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1997-01-01

    Our proposed experiments included: (1) immunzing mice with synthetic peptides; (2) preparing spleen and lymph node cells; (3) growing them under conventional conditions as well as in the rotatory vessel in appropriate medium reconstituting with synthetic peptides and/or cytokines as needed; and (4) comparing at regular time intervals the specific CTL activity as well as helper T-cell activity (in terms of both proliferative responses and cytokine production) using established procedures in my laboratory. We further proposed that once we demonstrated the merit of rotatory vessel technology to achieve desired results, these studies would be expanded to include immune cells from non-human primates (rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees) and also humans. We conducted a number of experiments to determine CTL induction by the synthetic peptides corresponding to antigenic proteins in HIV and HPV in different mouse strains that express MHC haplotypes H-2b or H-2d. We immunized mice with 100 ug of the synthetic peptide, suspended in sterile water, and emulsified in CFA (1:1). The immune lymph node cells obtained after 7 days were restimulated by culturing in T25 flask, HARV-10, or STLV-50, in the presence of the peptide at 20 ug/ml. The results from the 5'Cr-release assay consistently revealed complete abrogation of CTL activity of cells grown in the bioreactors (both HARV and STLV), while significant antigen-specific CTL activity was observed with cells cultured in tissue culture flasks. Thus, overall the data we generated in this study proved the usefulness of the NASA-developed developed technology for understanding the known immune deficiency during space travel. Additionally, this ex vivo microgravity technology since it mimics effectively the in vivo situation, it is also useful in understanding immune disorders in general. Thus, our proposed studies in TMC-NASA contract round II application benefit from data generated in this TMC-NASA contract round I study.

  4. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zouali, Moncef; Richard, Yolande

    2011-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptive branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ) and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount a local antibody response against type-2 T-cell-independent (TI-2) antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-cell-dependent (TD) immune responses through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in humans, non-human primates, and rodents. We also summarize studies - performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and in macaques whose infection with Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans - showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus) as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells - MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells - with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies. PMID:22566852

  5. Sea urchin immune cells as sentinels of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-03-01

    Echinoderms, an ancient and very successful phylum of marine invertebrates, play a central role in the maintenance of ecosystem integrity and are constantly exposed to environmental pressure, including: predation, changes in temperature and pH, hypoxia, pathogens, UV radiation, metals, toxicants, and emerging pollutants like nanomaterials. The annotation of the sea urchin genome, so closely related to humans and other vertebrate genomes, revealed an unusually complex immune system, which may be the basis for why sea urchins can adapt to different marine environments and survive even in hazardous conditions. In this review, we give a brief overview of the morphological features and recognized functions of echinoderm immune cells with a focus on studies correlating stress and immunity in the sea urchin. Immune cells from adult Paracentrotus lividus, which have been introduced in the last fifteen years as sentinels of environmental stress, are valid tools to uncover basic molecular and regulatory mechanisms of immune responses, supporting their use in immunological research. Here we summarize laboratory and field studies that reveal the amenability of sea urchin immune cells for toxicological testing. PMID:25463510

  6. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma subgroups by Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA relative abundance and oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Kishor; Goedert, James J.; Modali, Rama; Preiss, Liliana; Ayers, Leona W.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous malignancy of dermal neuroendocrine cells. To investigate this heterogeneity, we developed a tissue microarray (TMA) to characterize immunohistochemical staining of candidate tumor cell proteins and a quantitative PCR assay to detect MCPyV and measure viral loads. MCPyV was detected in 19 of 23 (74%) primary MCC tumors, but 8 of these had less than 1 viral copy per 300 cells. Viral abundance of 0.06–1.2viral copies/cell was directly related to presence of retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT) by immunohistochemical staining (P≤0.003). Higher viral abundance tumors tended to be associated with less p53 expression, younger age at diagnosis, and longer survival (P≤0.08). These data suggest that MCC may arise through different oncogenic pathways, including ones independent of pRb and MCPyV. PMID:19551862

  8. Immune response to stem cells and strategies to induce tolerance.

    PubMed

    Batten, Puspa; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2007-08-29

    Although recent progress in cardiovascular tissue engineering has generated great expectations for the exploitation of stem cells to restore cardiac form and function, the prospects of a common mass-produced cell resource for clinically viable engineered tissues and organs remain problematic. The refinement of stem cell culture protocols to increase induction of the cardiomyocyte phenotype and the assembly of transplantable vascularized tissue are areas of intense current research, but the problem of immune rejection of heterologous cell type poses perhaps the most significant hurdle to overcome. This article focuses on the potential advantages and problems encountered with various stem cell sources for reconstruction of the damaged or failing myocardium or heart valves and also discusses the need for integrating advances in developmental and stem cell biology, immunology and tissue engineering to achieve the full potential of cardiac tissue engineering. The ultimate goal is to produce 'off-the-shelf' cells and tissues capable of inducing specific immune tolerance. PMID:17584730

  9. Effects of spaceflight on levels and activity of immune cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Berry, Wallace D.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irena V.; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on cells from rats that had been flown on Soviet Biosputnik Cosmos 1887 to explore the effects of speceflight on immune responses. Rat bone marrow cells were examined for their response to colony stimulating factor-M. Rat spleen and bone marrow cells were stained with antibodies directed against cell surface antigenic markers. The results of the studies indicate that bone marrow cells from flown rats showed a decreased response to colony stimulating factor. There was a higher percentage of spleen cells from flown rats staining positively for pan-T-cell, suppressor-T-cell, and interleukin-2 receptor cell surface antigens. A small increase in the percentage of cells staining positively for helper-T-cell antigens was also noted. In addition, a higher percentage of cells that appeared to be part of the myelogenous population of bone marrow cells from flown rats stained positively for surface immunoglobulin.

  10. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales. PMID:27572161

  11. Natural T cell immunity against cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagorsen, Dirk; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Marincola, Francesco M; Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2003-10-01

    It has long been a matter of debate whether tumors are spontaneously immunogenic in patients. With the availability of sensitive methods, naturally occurring T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can be frequently detected in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current data on T cell responses to TAAs in various malignancies, including melanoma, colorectal cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer. T cell responses against various antigens, including melanoma differentiation antigens, carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, her-2/neu, Wilms' tumor protein, proteinase 3, NY-ESO-1, and surviving, have been reported in a substantial number of patients. In contrast, other TAAs, including most antigens of the MAGE family, do not usually elicit spontaneous T cell responses. A distinction between direct ex vivo T cell responses and in vitro-generated T cell responses is provided because in vitro stimulation results in quantitative and functional changes of T cell responses. The possible role of TAA-specific T cells in immunosurveillance and tumor escape and the implications for immunological treatment strategies are discussed. Naturally occurring T cells against TAAs are a common phenomenon in tumor patients. Understanding the mechanisms and behavior of natural TAA-specific T cells could provide crucial information for rational development of more efficient T cell-directed immunotherapy. PMID:14555498

  12. Odor Enrichment Sculpts the Abundance of Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Melissa Cavallin; Biju, K.C.; Hoffman, Joshua; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    Mitral cells are the primary output cell from the olfactory bulb conveying olfactory sensory information to higher cortical areas. Gene-targeted deletion of the Shaker potassium channel Kv1.3 alters voltage-dependence and inactivation kinetics of mitral cell current properties, which contribute to the “Super-smeller” phenotype observed in Kv1.3-null mice. The goal of the current study was to determine if morphology and density are influenced by mitral cell excitability, olfactory environment, and stage of development. Wildtype (WT) and Kv1.3-null (KO) mice were exposed to a single odorant (peppermint or citralva) for 30 days. Under unstimulated conditions, postnatal day 20 KO mice had more mitral cells than their WT counterparts, but no difference in cell size. Odor-enrichment with peppermint, an olfactory and trigeminal stimulus, decreased the number of mitral cells in three month and one year old mice of both genotypes. Mitral cell density was most sensitive to odor-stimulation in three month WT mice. Enrichment at the same age with citralva, a purely olfactory stimulus, decreased cell density regardless of genotype. There were no significant changes in cell body shape in response to citralva exposure, but the cell area was greater in WT mice and selectively greater in the ventral region of the OB in KO mice. This suggests that trigeminal or olfactory stimulation may modify mitral cell area and density while not impacting cell body shape. Mitral cell density can therefore be modulated by the voltage and sensory environment to alter information processing or olfactory perception. PMID:23485739

  13. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  14. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  15. Immune cell profiling to guide therapeutic decisions in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ermann, Joerg; Rao, Deepak A.; Teslovich, Nikola C.; Brenner, Michael B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are needed to guide treatment decisions for patients with rheumatic diseases. Although the phenotypic and functional analysis of immune cells is an appealing strategy for understanding immune-mediated disease processes, immune cell profiling currently has no role in clinical rheumatology. New technologies, including mass cytometry, gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and multiplexed functional assays, enable the analysis of immune cell function with unprecedented detail and promise not only a deeper understanding of pathogenesis, but also the discovery of novel biomarkers. The large and complex data sets generated by these technologies—big data—require specialized approaches for analysis and visualization of results. Standardization of assays and definition of the range of normal values are additional challenges when translating these novel approaches into clinical practice. In this Review, we discuss technological advances in the high-dimensional analysis of immune cells and consider how these developments might support the discovery of predictive biomarkers to benefit the practice of rheumatology and improve patient care. PMID:26034835

  16. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  17. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection. PMID:22167808

  18. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  19. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika. PMID:27212842

  20. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  1. Stimulatory Effect of β-glucans on Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucans are naturally occurring polysaccharides that are produced by bacteria, yeast, fungi, and many plants. Although their pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulatory, anti-infective and anti-cancer effects, have been well studied, it is still unclear how β-glucans exert their activities. However, recent studies on the β-glucan receptors shed some light on their mechanism of action. Since β-glucans have large molecular weights, they must bind surface receptors to activate immune cells. In this review, we summarize the immunopharmacological activities and the potential receptors of β-glucans in immune cells. PMID:22039366

  2. Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, D.; Cruvinel, W.M.; Resende, L.S.; Mesquita, F.V.; Silva, N.P.; Câmara, N.O.S.; Andrade, L.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th) responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17) and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh). These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R), the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27096200

  3. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  4. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  5. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients. PMID:26868867

  6. Myeloid suppressor cells and immune modulation in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Minu K.; Andersson, Åsa; Zhu, Li; Harris-White, Marni; Lee, Jay M.; Dubinett, Steven; Sharma, Sherven

    2012-01-01

    Many tumors, including lung cancers, promote immune tolerance to escape host immune surveillance and facilitate tumor growth. Tumors utilize numerous pathways to inhibit immune responses, including the elaboration of immune-suppressive mediators such as PGE2, TGF-β, IL-10, VEGF, GM-CSF, IL-6, S100A8/A9 and SCF, which recruit and/or activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs, a subset of heterogeneous bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells, are found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and positively correlate to malignancy. Solid tumors contain MDSCs that maintain an immune-suppressive network in the tumor microenvironment. This review will focus on the interaction of tumors with MDSCs that lead to dysregulation of antigen presentation and T-cell activities in murine tumor models. Specific genetic signatures in lung cancer modulate the activities of MDSCs and impact tumor progression. Targeting MDSCs may have a long-term antitumor benefit and is at the forefront of anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:22401635

  7. T regulatory cells and the immune aging process

    PubMed Central

    Jagger, Ann Titi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Goronzy, Jorg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Constant exposure to new and persisting antigens and the need to replace cellular attrition with newly build cells lead to profound remodeling of the immune system during the second half of life. The impact of the immunosenescence process varies amongst the different functional subsets represented within the immune system, and emerging data suggest that progressive aging significantly affects frequencies, subset distribution and functional competence of regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the central role of Treg cells in immune homeostasis, age-related loss of Treg function would be predicted to render the host susceptible to excessive immunity, encountered in elderly humans as a syndrome of chronic-smoldering inflammation. Conversely, age-dependent gain of Treg activity would expose the host to greater risk of immune failure, such as the rising risk of malignancies and infections in the aging population. Emerging data suggest that some Treg populations, specifically naturally occurring Tregs (nTreg), seem to accumulate with advancing age, whereas inducible Tregs (iTreg) appear to be less available in the older host. More studies are necessary to elucidate functional competence of old Tregs, with emphasis on comparing efficacy of young on old Tregs for defined functional domains. Mechanisms of declining Treg inducibility are not understood, but may provide an opportunity for targeted immunomodulation in the elderly. On the horizon is the potential to develop novel therapeutic interventions that target Tregs to make the elderly more efficient in fighting cancers and infections and dampen the risk for senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:24296590

  8. New immune cells in spondyloarthritis: Key players or innocent bystanders?

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    The central role of the inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-23, and IL-17 in the disease pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA) is unquestionable, given the strong efficacy of anti-cytokine therapeutics used in the treatment of SpA patients. These cytokines are produced by a diverse range of immune cells, some extending beyond the typical spectrum of lineage-defined subsets. Recently, a number of specialized cells, such as innate-like T-cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and natural killer receptor (NKR)-expressing T cells, have been marked to be involved in SpA pathology. In this chapter, we will elaborate on the unique characteristics of these particular immune subsets and critically evaluate their potential contribution to SpA disease, taking into account their role in joint and gut pathology. PMID:27107508

  9. Interactions between MSCs and Immune Cells: Implications for Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Tracy K.; Dighe, Abhijit S.; Lobo, Peter I.; Cui, Quanjun

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that, of the 7.9 million fractures sustained in the United States each year, 5% to 20% result in delayed or impaired healing requiring therapeutic intervention. Following fracture injury, there is an initial inflammatory response that plays a crucial role in bone healing; however, prolonged inflammation is inhibitory for fracture repair. The precise spatial and temporal impact of immune cells and their cytokines on fracture healing remains obscure. Some cytokines are reported to be proosteogenic while others inhibit bone healing. Cell-based therapy utilizing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is an attractive option for augmenting the fracture repair process. Osteoprogenitor MSCs not only differentiate into bone, but they also exert modulatory effects on immune cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this paper, we review the current literature on both in vitro and in vivo studies on the role of the immune system in fracture repair, the use of MSCs in the enhancement of fracture healing, and interactions between MSCs and immune cells. Insight into this paradigm can provide valuable clues in identifying cellular and noncellular targets that can potentially be modulated to enhance both natural bone healing and bone repair augmented by the exogenous addition of MSCs. PMID:26000315

  10. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  11. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  12. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-03-24

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  15. Bridging innate NK cell functions with adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Emanuela; Carlomagno, Simona; Pesce, Silvia; Moretta, Alessandro; Sivori, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) are major human NK receptors displaying either inhibitory or activating functions which recognize allotypic determinants of HLA-class I molecules. Surprisingly, NK cell treatment with CpG-ODN (TLR9 ligands) results in selective down-modulation of KIR3DL2, its co-internalization with CpG-ODN and its translocation to TLR9-rich early endosomes. This novel KIR-associated function may offer clues to better understand the possible role of certain KIRs and also emphasizes the involvement of NK cells in the course of microbial infections. NK cells are involved not only in innate immune responses against viruses and tumors but also participate in the complex network of cell-to cell interaction that leads to the development of adaptive immune responses. In this context the interaction of NK cells with DC appears to play a crucial role in the acquisition of CCR7, a chemokine receptor that enables NK cells to migrate towards lymph nodes in response to CCL19 and/or CCL21. Analysis of NK cell clones revealed that KIR-mismatched but not KIR-matched NK cells acquire CCR7. These data have important implications in haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), in which KIR-mismatched NK cells may acquire the ability to migrate to secondary lymphoid compartments (SLCs), where they can kill recipient's antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells thus preventing graft versus host (and host vs. graft) reactions. PMID:21842364

  16. Solar Cells from Earth-Abundant Semiconductors with Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-04-30

    Progress is reported in these areas: Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin Film a-Si Solar Cells; Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin InGaN Quantum Well Solar Cells; and Earth Abundant Cu{sub 2}O and Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} Solar Cells.

  17. APRIL modulates B and T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jens V.; López-Fraga, Marta; Elustondo, Fernando A.; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla E.; Rodríguez, Dolores; Gómez-Caro, Ruth; de Jong, Joan; Martínez-A, Carlos; Medema, Jan Paul; Hahne, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The TNF-like ligands APRIL and BLyS are close relatives and share the capacity to bind the receptors TACI and BCMA. BLyS has been shown to play an important role in B cell homeostasis and autoimmunity, but the biological role of APRIL remains less well defined. Analysis of T cells revealed an activation-dependent increase in APRIL mRNA expression. We therefore generated mice expressing APRIL as a transgene in T cells. These mice appeared normal and showed no signs of B cell hyperplasia. Transgenic T cells revealed a greatly enhanced survival in vitro as well as enhanced survival of staphylococcal enterotoxin B–reactive CD4+ T cells in vivo, which both directly correlate with elevated Bcl-2 levels. Analysis of humoral responses to T cell–dependent antigens in the transgenic mice indicated that APRIL affects only IgM but not IgG responses. In contrast, T cell–independent type 2 (TI-2) humoral response was enhanced in APRIL transgenic mice. As TACI was previously reported to be indispensable for TI-2 antibody formation, these results suggest a role for APRIL/TACI interactions in the generation of this response. Taken together, our data indicate that APRIL is involved in the induction and/or maintenance of T and B cell responses. PMID:12070306

  18. Innate lymphoid cell function in the context of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bando, Jennifer K; Colonna, Marco

    2016-06-21

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a family of innate immune cells that have diverse functions during homeostasis and disease. Subsets of ILCs have phenotypes that mirror those of polarized helper T cell subsets in their expression of core transcription factors and effector cytokines. Given the similarities between these two classes of lymphocytes, it is important to understand which functions of ILCs are specialized and which are redundant with those of T cells. Here we discuss genetic mouse models that have been used to delineate the contributions of ILCs versus those of T cells and review the current understanding of the specialized in vivo functions of ILCs. PMID:27328008

  19. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth. PMID:20491794

  20. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α− mDCs preferentially prime CD4+ T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of vaccines against

  1. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α(+) mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α(-) mDCs preferentially prime CD4(+) T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3(+) mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α(+) mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8(+) T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of

  2. B-1-cell subpopulations contribute differently to gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bishnudeo; Agarwal, Shiwani; Brennecke, Anne-Margarete; Krey, Martina; Pabst, Oliver; Düber, Sandra; Weiss, Siegfried

    2013-08-01

    In mice, B-1 (B1a/B1b) cells are mainly located in the peritoneal cavity. B-1 cells are well known for their role in the early stages of Ab-mediated immune responses against pathogenic invasion as well as for the production of natural IgM antibodies. Although such B cells have been claimed to give rise to intestinal plasma cells producing IgA, a clear role of B-1 cells in IgA production in the gut-associated tissues is still not defined. Here, we employed the transgenic L2 mouse model characterized by the lack of B-2 cells and presence of B-1 cells as major B-cell subpopulation. The oligoclonality of the Ab repertoire in this mouse allowed us to take typical B1a cell VH sequences as indicators of the presence of IgM-producing B-1a cells in Peyer's patches as well as in lamina propria. However, amongst the IgAVH sequences recovered from the same tissues, none of the sequences showed B1a-cell specificity. Interestingly, all IgAVH sequences derived from the lamina propria of L2 mice displayed extensive numbers of nucleotide exchanges, indicating somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation. This suggests that the contribution of natural unmutated IgA by B-1a cells to intestinal immunity is negligible. PMID:23677546

  3. Hepatocytes: a key cell type for innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Gao, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocytes, the major parenchymal cells in the liver, play pivotal roles in metabolism, detoxification, and protein synthesis. Hepatocytes also activate innate immunity against invading microorganisms by secreting innate immunity proteins. These proteins include bactericidal proteins that directly kill bacteria, opsonins that assist in the phagocytosis of foreign bacteria, iron-sequestering proteins that block iron uptake by bacteria, several soluble factors that regulate lipopolysaccharide signaling, and the coagulation factor fibrinogen that activates innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the wide variety of innate immunity proteins produced by hepatocytes and discuss liver-enriched transcription factors (e.g. hepatocyte nuclear factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins), pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin (IL)-6, IL-22, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and downstream signaling pathways (e.g. signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 and nuclear factor-κB) that regulate the expression of these innate immunity proteins. We also briefly discuss the dysregulation of these innate immunity proteins in chronic liver disease, which may contribute to an increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26685902

  4. Hepatocytes: a key cell type for innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Gao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the major parenchymal cells in the liver, play pivotal roles in metabolism, detoxification, and protein synthesis. Hepatocytes also activate innate immunity against invading microorganisms by secreting innate immunity proteins. These proteins include bactericidal proteins that directly kill bacteria, opsonins that assist in the phagocytosis of foreign bacteria, iron-sequestering proteins that block iron uptake by bacteria, several soluble factors that regulate lipopolysaccharide signaling, and the coagulation factor fibrinogen that activates innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the wide variety of innate immunity proteins produced by hepatocytes and discuss liver-enriched transcription factors (e.g. hepatocyte nuclear factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins), pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin (IL)-6, IL-22, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and downstream signaling pathways (e.g. signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 and nuclear factor-κB) that regulate the expression of these innate immunity proteins. We also briefly discuss the dysregulation of these innate immunity proteins in chronic liver disease, which may contribute to an increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26685902

  5. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses. PMID:23880363

  6. Cell-mediated immune responses after immunization of healthy seronegative children with varicella vaccine: kinetics and specificity.

    PubMed

    Watson, B; Keller, P M; Ellis, R W; Starr, S E

    1990-10-01

    Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were determined in seronegative children immunized with live attenuated Oka strain varicella vaccine. At 2 weeks after immunization, 80% of children had detectable lymphocyte proliferation to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antigens, while only 40% had antibodies to VZV as detected by ELISA. By 6 weeks after immunization, 97% of children seroconverted, and 95% of these responded to VZV antigens in the proliferation assay. A high proportion of immunized children also responded in the proliferation assay to purified glycoproteins I, II, and III of VZV. These results indicate that most children develop a broad cell-mediated immune response to VZV antigens within weeks after immunization with varicella vaccine. PMID:2169495

  7. Splenic Immune Cells In Experimental Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Fathali, Nancy; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Hasegawa, Yu; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neuroimmune processes contribute to hypoxic-ischemic damage in the immature brain and may play a role in the progression of particular variants of neonatal encephalopathy. The present study was designed to elucidate molecular mediators of interactions between astrocytes, neurons and infiltrating peripheral immune cells after experimental neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Splenectomy was performed on postnatal day-7 Sprague-Dawley rats 3 days prior to HI surgery; in which the right common carotid artery was permanently ligated followed by 2 hours of hypoxia (8% O2). Quantitative analysis showed that natural killer (NK) and T cell expression was reduced in spleen but increased in the brain following HI. Elevations in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression after HI by immune cells promoted interleukin-15 expression in astrocytes and infiltration of inflammatory cells to site of injury; additionally, down-regulated the pro-survival protein, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, resulting in caspase-3 mediated neuronal death. The removal of the largest pool of peripheral immune cells in the body by splenectomy, COX-2 inhibitors, as well as rendering NK cells inactive by CD161 knockdown, significantly ameliorated cerebral infarct volume at 72 hours, diminished body weight loss and brain and systemic organ atrophy, and reduced neurobehavioral deficits at 3 weeks. Herein we demonstrate with the use of surgical approach (splenectomy), with pharmacological loss-gain function approach using COX-2 inhibitors/agonists, as well as with NK cell-type specific siRNA that after neonatal HI, the infiltrating peripheral immune cells may modulate downstream targets of cell death and neuroinflammation by COX-2 regulated signals. PMID:23626659

  8. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  9. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  10. Innate immune cells cast an eye on DNA.

    PubMed

    Sander, Leif E; Blander, J Magarian

    2009-12-01

    The threonine phosphatase eyes absent (EYA) has been identified as a novel regulator of innate immune responses to cytosolic nucleic acids and undigested DNA from apoptotic cells. EYA regulates responses of yet unidentified DNA sensors and enhances interferon-beta and CXCL10 transcription. PMID:19789172

  11. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  12. Cellular senescence impact on immune cell fate and function.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Rita; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Jorgensen, Christian; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Brondello, Jean-Marc

    2016-06-01

    Cellular senescence occurs not only in cultured fibroblasts, but also in undifferentiated and specialized cells from various tissues of all ages, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review recent findings on the role of cellular senescence in immune cell fate decisions in macrophage polarization, natural killer cell phenotype, and following T-lymphocyte activation. We also introduce the involvement of the onset of cellular senescence in some immune responses including T-helper lymphocyte-dependent tissue homeostatic functions and T-regulatory cell-dependent suppressive mechanisms. Altogether, these data propose that cellular senescence plays a wide-reaching role as a homeostatic orchestrator. PMID:26910559

  13. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  14. Label-free detection of immune complexes with myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Szittner, Z; Bentlage, A E H; Rovero, P; Migliorini, P; Lóránd, V; Prechl, J; Vidarsson, G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide proof-of-concept for quantitative and qualitative label-free detection of immune complexes through myeloid cells with imaging surface plasmon resonance. Surface plasmon resonance imaging was first applied to monitor the binding of human sera from healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to immobilized citrullinated RA-specific peptide antigens, histone citrullinated peptide 2 (HCP2) and viral citrullinated peptide 2 (VCP2). Next, the binding of monocytoid cell line U937 to the resulting immune complexes on the sensor surface was monitored. As control, binding of U937 was monitored to immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses simultaneously. Cell response results were compared to results of cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (CCP2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), clinical RA diagnosis and antigen-specific antibody distribution of the samples. Human IgG3 triggered the most pronounced response, followed by IgG1 and IgG4, while IgG2 did not result in U937 cell binding. Serum samples obtained from RA patients resulted in a significantly increased cell response to VCP2 compared to healthy controls. The strength of cell response towards VCP2 immune complexes showed significant correlation with levels of antigen-specific IgA, IgG and IgG3. Cellular responses on VCP2 immune complexes showed significant association with both CCP2-based serological positivity and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria-based clinical RA diagnosis. Immunoglobulin-triggered binding of monocytoid cells can be monitored using a label-free multiplex technology. Because these binding events are presumably initiated by Fc receptors, the system provides a tool for biological detection of autoantibodies with diagnostic value, here exemplified by anti-citrullinated antibodies. This provides added information to antibody levels, as interaction with Fc-receptor-expressing cells is also affected by post-translational modification of the immunoglobulins

  15. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  16. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances. PMID:26341398

  17. In Scarcity and Abundance: Metabolic Signals Regulating Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Shady; Peter, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Although nutrient availability is a major driver of cell growth, and continuous adaptation to nutrient supply is critical for the development and survival of all organisms, the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing are only beginning to emerge. Here, we highlight recent advances in the field of nutrient sensing and discuss arising principles governing how metabolism might regulate growth-promoting pathways. In addition, we discuss signaling functions of metabolic enzymes not directly related to their metabolic activity. PMID:23997189

  18. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  19. Potent Cell-Intrinsic Immune Responses in Dendritic Cells Facilitate HIV-1-Specific T Cell Immunity in HIV-1 Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Buzon, Maria Jose; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Hickman, Taylor; Cronin, Jacqueline; Pimenova, Dina; Walker, Bruce D.; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 elite controllers (EC) restrict HIV-1 replication through highly functional HIV-1-specific T cell responses, but mechanisms supporting the evolution of effective HIV-1-specific T cell immunity in these patients remain undefined. Cytosolic immune recognition of HIV-1 in conventional dendritic cells (cDC) can facilitate priming and expansion of HIV-1-specific T cells; however, HIV-1 seems to be able to avoid intracellular immune recognition in cDCs in most infected individuals. Here, we show that exposure of cDCs from EC to HIV-1 leads to a rapid and sustained production of type I interferons and upregulation of several interferon-stimulated effector genes. Emergence of these cell-intrinsic immune responses was associated with a reduced induction of SAMHD1 and LEDGF/p75, and an accumulation of viral reverse transcripts, but inhibited by pharmacological blockade of viral reverse transcription or siRNA-mediated silencing of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS. Importantly, improved cell-intrinsic immune recognition of HIV-1 in cDCs from elite controllers translated into stronger abilities to stimulate and expand HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. These data suggest an important role of cell-intrinsic type I interferon secretion in dendritic cells for the induction of effective HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells, and may be helpful for eliciting functional T cell immunity against HIV-1 for preventative or therapeutic clinical purposes. PMID:26067651

  20. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  1. Tissue Specific Heterogeneity in Effector Immune Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Saba; Badrealam, Khan Farheen; Sherwani, Asif; Gupta, Umesh D.; Owais, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct “homing codes” (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors) during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A) and sunlight (vitamin D3) prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centre stage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue-tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues along with giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells. PMID:23986763

  2. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  3. Potentially pathogenic immune cells and networks in apparently healthy lacrimal glands.

    PubMed

    Mircheff, Austin K; Wang, Yanru; Ding, Chuanqing; Warren, Dwight W; Schechter, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    Lacrimal glands of people over 40 years old frequently contain lymphocytic infiltrates. Relationships between histopathological presentation and physiological dysfunction are not straightforward. Data from rabbit studies have suggested that at least two immune cell networks form in healthy lacrimal glands, one responding to environmental dryness, the other to high temperatures. New findings indicate that mRNAs for several chemokines and cytokines are expressed primarily in epithelial cells; certain others are expressed in both epithelial cells and immune cells. Transcript abundances vary substantially across glands from animals that have experienced the same conditions, allowing for correlation analyses, which detect clusters that map to various cell types and to networks of coordinately functioning cells. A core network--expressing mRNAs including IL-1α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IL-10--expands adaptively with exposure to dryness, suppressing IFN-γ, but potentially causing physiological dysfunction. High temperature elicits concurrent increases of mRNAs for prolactin (PRL), CCL21, and IL-18. PRL is associated with crosstalk to IFN-γ, BAFF, and IL-4. The core network reacts to the resulting PRL-BAFF-IL-4 network, creating a profile reminiscent of Sjögren's disease. In a warmer, moderately dry setting, PRL-associated increases of IFN-γ are associated with suppression of IL-10 and augmentations of IL-1α and IL-17, creating a profile reminiscent of severe chronic inflammation. PMID:25557346

  4. Genetic variants regulating immune cell levels in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Valeria; Steri, Maristella; Sole, Gabriella; Sidore, Carlo; Virdis, Francesca; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Floris, Matteo; Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Urru, Silvana A M; Olla, Stefania; Marongiu, Michele; Piras, Maria G; Lobina, Monia; Maschio, Andrea; Pitzalis, Maristella; Urru, Maria F; Marcelli, Marco; Cusano, Roberto; Deidda, Francesca; Serra, Valentina; Oppo, Manuela; Pilu, Rosella; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Pireddu, Luca; Zara, Ilenia; Porcu, Eleonora; Kwong, Alan; Brennan, Christine; Tarrier, Brendan; Lyons, Robert; Kang, Hyun M; Uzzau, Sergio; Atzeni, Rossano; Valentini, Maria; Firinu, Davide; Leoni, Lidia; Rotta, Gianluca; Naitza, Silvia; Angius, Andrea; Congia, Mauro; Whalen, Michael B; Jones, Chris M; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco

    2013-09-26

    The complex network of specialized cells and molecules in the immune system has evolved to defend against pathogens, but inadvertent immune system attacks on "self" result in autoimmune disease. Both genetic regulation of immune cell levels and their relationships with autoimmunity are largely undetermined. Here, we report genetic contributions to quantitative levels of 95 cell types encompassing 272 immune traits, in a cohort of 1,629 individuals from four clustered Sardinian villages. We first estimated trait heritability, showing that it can be substantial, accounting for up to 87% of the variance (mean 41%). Next, by assessing ∼8.2 million variants that we identified and confirmed in an extended set of 2,870 individuals, 23 independent variants at 13 loci associated with at least one trait. Notably, variants at three loci (HLA, IL2RA, and SH2B3/ATXN2) overlap with known autoimmune disease associations. These results connect specific cellular phenotypes to specific genetic variants, helping to explicate their involvement in disease. PMID:24074872

  5. The role of airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells in chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Michael J.; Byers, Derek E.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal immune response to environmental agents is generally thought to be responsible for causing chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Based on studies of experimental models and human subjects, there is increasing evidence that the response of the innate immune system is crucial for the development of this type of airway disease. Airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells represent key components of the pathogenesis of chronic airway disease and are emerging targets for new therapies. In this Review, we summarize the innate immune mechanisms by which airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells regulate the development of chronic respiratory diseases. We also explain how these pathways are being targeted in the clinic to treat patients with these diseases. PMID:25234144

  6. Th17 cells in immunity to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of immunity to fungal pathogens has advanced considerably in recent years. Particularly significant have been the parallel discoveries in the C-type lectin receptor family and the Th effector arms of immunity, especially Th17 cells and their signature cytokine IL-17. Many of these studies have focused on the most common human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which is typically a commensal microbe in healthy individuals but causes various disease manifestations in immunocompromised hosts, ranging from mild mucosal infections to lethal disseminated disease. Here, we discuss emerging fundamental discoveries with C. albicans that have informed our overall molecular understanding of fungal immunity. In particular, we focus on the importance of pattern recognition receptor-mediated fungal recognition and subsequent IL-17 responses in host defense against mucosal candidiasis. In light of these recent advances, we also discuss the implications for anti-cytokine biologic therapy and vaccine development. PMID:22607796

  7. The Role of Immune Cells in Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Jun; Zhai, Nai-Cui; Song, Hong-Xiao; Yang, Yang; Cui, An; Li, Tian-Yang; Tu, Zheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases that may progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Host immune responses are important factors that determine whether HBV infection is cleared or persists. After infection, viral replication occurs inside hepatocytes, and the secretion of infectious virions can take place at high rates for decades. Consequently, HBV DNA and viral proteins, like HBV early antigen (HBeAg) and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), can be easily detected in serum. Chronic infection with HBV is the result of an ineffective antiviral immune response towards the virus. In this review, we discuss the role of immune cells in chronic HBV infection. PMID:26807384

  8. Immune indexes of larks from desert and temperate regions show weak associations with life history but stronger links to environmental variation in microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Nicholas P C; Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Hine, Kathryn; Jaquier, Sophie; Shobrak, Mohammed; Williams, Joseph B; Tinbergen, Joost M; Tieleman, B Irene

    2012-01-01

    Immune defense may vary as a result of trade-offs with other life-history traits or in parallel with variation in antigen levels in the environment. We studied lark species (Alaudidae) in the Arabian Desert and temperate Netherlands to test opposing predictions from these two hypotheses. Based on their slower pace of life, the trade-off hypothesis predicts relatively stronger immune defenses in desert larks compared with temperate larks. However, as predicted by the antigen exposure hypothesis, reduced microbial abundances in deserts should result in desert-living larks having relatively weaker immune defenses. We quantified host-independent and host-dependent microbial abundances of culturable microbes in ambient air and from the surfaces of birds. We measured components of immunity by quantifying concentrations of the acute-phase protein haptoglobin, natural antibody-mediated agglutination titers, complement-mediated lysis titers, and the microbicidal ability of whole blood. Desert-living larks were exposed to significantly lower concentrations of airborne microbes than temperate larks, and densities of some bird-associated microbes were also lower in desert species. Haptoglobin concentrations and lysis titers were also significantly lower in desert-living larks, but other immune indexes did not differ. Thus, contrary to the trade-off hypothesis, we found little evidence that a slow pace of life predicted increased immunological investment. In contrast, and in support of the antigen exposure hypothesis, associations between microbial exposure and some immune indexes were apparent. Measures of antigen exposure, including assessment of host-independent and host-dependent microbial assemblages, can provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying immunological variation. PMID:22902379

  9. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  10. Evidence of tricellulin expression by immune cells, particularly microglia.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Cibelle; Silva, Sandra Leitão; Pereira, Pedro; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria A

    2011-06-17

    Tight junctions (TJs) are elaborate structures located on the apical region of epithelial cells that limit paracellular permeability. Tricellulin is a recently discovered TJ protein, which is concentrated at the structurally specialized tricellular TJs but also present at bicellular contacts between epithelial cells, namely in the stomach. Interestingly, several TJ proteins have been found in other than epithelial cells, as astrocytes, and tricellulin mRNA expression was reported in mature dendritic cells. These findings prompted us to look for tricellulin expression in both epithelial and immune cells in the stomach, as well as in microglia, the brain resident immunocompetent cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human stomach tissue sections revealed peroxidase staining at three-corner contact sites, as well as at the contact between two adjacent epithelial cells, thus evidencing the expression of tricellulin not only at tricellullar but at bicellular junctions as well. Such analysis, further revealed tricellulin immunostaining in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, scattered throughout the lamina propria. Cultured rat microglia exhibited a notorious tricellulin staining, consistent with an extensive expression of the protein along the cell, which was not absolutely coincident with the lysosomal marker CD68. Detection of mRNA expression by real-time PCR provided supportive evidence for the expression of the TJ protein in microglia. These data demonstrate for the first time that microglia express a TJ protein. Moreover, the expression of tricellulin both in microglia and in the stomach immune cells point to a possible role of this new TJ protein in the immune system. PMID:21624353

  11. Novel immune modulators used in hematology: impact on NK cells.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Stephanie; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    There is a wide range of important pharmaceuticals used in treatment of cancer. Besides their known effects on tumor cells, there is growing evidence for modulation of the immune system. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs(®)) play an important role in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome and have already demonstrated antitumor, anti-angiogenic, and immunostimulating effects, in particular on natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are directly targeting different kinases and are known to regulate effector NK cells and expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) on tumor cells. Demethylating agents, histone deacetylases, and proteasome inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic regulation and protein degradation of malignant cells. There are first hints that these drugs also sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy, radiation, and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by enhanced expression of TRAIL and NKG2DLs. However, these pharmaceuticals may also impair NK cell function in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In summary, this review provides an update on the effects of different novel molecules on the immune system focusing NK cells. PMID:23316191

  12. Novel immune modulators used in hematology: impact on NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Stephanie; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide range of important pharmaceuticals used in treatment of cancer. Besides their known effects on tumor cells, there is growing evidence for modulation of the immune system. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs®) play an important role in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome and have already demonstrated antitumor, anti-angiogenic, and immunostimulating effects, in particular on natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are directly targeting different kinases and are known to regulate effector NK cells and expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) on tumor cells. Demethylating agents, histone deacetylases, and proteasome inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic regulation and protein degradation of malignant cells. There are first hints that these drugs also sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy, radiation, and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by enhanced expression of TRAIL and NKG2DLs. However, these pharmaceuticals may also impair NK cell function in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In summary, this review provides an update on the effects of different novel molecules on the immune system focusing NK cells. PMID:23316191

  13. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  14. T regulatory cells and their counterparts: masters of immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, C; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2009-05-01

    The interaction of environmental and genetic factors with the immune system can lead to the development of allergic diseases. The essential step in this progress is the generation of allergen-specific CD4(+) T-helper (Th) type 2 cells that mediate several effector functions. The influence of Th2 cytokines leads to the production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies by B cells, development and recruitment of eosinophils, mucus production and bronchial hyperreactivity, as well as tissue homing of other Th2 cells and eosinophils. Meanwhile, Th1 cells may contribute to chronicity and the effector phases. T cells termed T regulatory (Treg) cells, which have immunosuppressive functions and cytokine profiles distinct from that of either Th1 or Th2 cells, have been intensely investigated during the last 13 years. Treg cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines. Treg cells are able to inhibit the development of allergen-specific Th2 and Th1 cell responses and therefore play an important role in a healthy immune response to allergens. In addition, Treg cells potently suppress IgE production and directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. Currently, Treg cells represent an exciting area of research, where understanding the mechanisms of peripheral tolerance to allergens may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches for the prevention and cure of allergic diseases. PMID:19422105

  15. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Amber; Suzuki, Oscar T.; Benton, Cristina; Parks, Bethany; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01 × 10−8). Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies. PMID:25926793

  16. Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Simone Kennedy; Lam, Brandon; Lau, Kenneth; Larkin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Th17 and IL-17 play important roles in the clearance of extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. However, strong evidence also implicates the Th17 lineage in several autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and asthma. The Th17 subset has also been connected with type I diabetes, although whether it plays a role in the pathogenicity of or protection from the disease remains a controversial issue. In this review we have provided a comprehensive overview of Th17 pathogenicity and function, including novel evidence for a protective role of Th17 cells in conjunction with the microbiota gut flora in T1D onset and progression. PMID:24454481

  17. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using mouse immune-precursor cells, and observed that bioreactor culturing results in the loss of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. The reason for the abrogation of CTL function is microgravity conditions in the bioreactor, but not the antigen per se or its MHC restriction. Similarly, we observed that allostimulation of human PBMC in the bioreactor, but not in the T flask, resulted in the blunting of both allo-CTL function and the NK activity, indicating that the microgravity-associated functional defects are not unique to the mouse system. These results provide further confirmation to the microgravity-associated immune dysfunction, and constitute ground-based confirmatory data for those related to space-travel.

  18. Adaptive (T and B cells) immunity and control by dendritic cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Chronic inflammation in response to lipoprotein accumulation in the arterial wall is central in the development of atherosclerosis. Both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this process. Adaptive immune responses develop against an array of potential antigens presented to effector T lymphocytes by antigen-presenting cells, especially dendritic cells. Functional analysis of the role of different T-cell subsets identified the Th1 responses as proatherogenic, whereas regulatory T-cell responses exert antiatherogenic activities. The effect of Th2 and Th17 responses is still debated. Atherosclerosis is also associated with B-cell activation. Recent evidence established that conventional B-2 cells promote atherosclerosis. In contrast, innate B-1 B cells offer protection through secretion of natural IgM antibodies. This review discusses the recent development in our understanding of the role of T- and B-cell subsets in atherosclerosis and addresses the role of dendritic cell subpopulations in the control of adaptive immunity. PMID:24812352

  19. IVIg immune reconstitution treatment alleviates the state of persistent immune activation and suppressed CD4 T cell counts in CVID.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Santos, Bianca A N; Carvalho, Karina I; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6-12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:24130688

  20. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Franz J. J.; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J.; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  1. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  2. LAI reactivity in rats immunized with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pham Manh Hung; Kalafut, F; Novotná, L; Koníková, E

    1980-01-01

    Leukocytes of peripheral blood of F1 hybrid inbred strain of rats LW X AVN and rats of inbred Lewis strain, immunized for three consecutive weeks with increasing doses of live or dead MC-1 or B 77 tumor cells, incubated for 20 hours with specific tumor extract, showed a lower adhering ability (LAI 32.8 +/- 16.6, 44.4 +/- 14.0, 43.1 +/- 7.4%) than that of the same cell population cultured without a specific antigen. The nonspecific tumor extract did not produce any LAI reactivity (4.4 +/- 5.9, 5.8 +/- 8.2, 6.7 +/- 5.9%). The values of LAI leukocytes of the controls tested by both the antigens were concordant with those found in samples of the same cell population tested without any antigens. The discussion bears on a possibility of applying the 20-hour modification of the LAI test in studies of cell immunity in immunized patients. PMID:7005699

  3. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  4. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications. PMID:26817529

  5. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  6. Innate Immune Function of TH2 Cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liying; Huang, Yuefeng; Chen, Xi; Hu-Li, Jane; Urban, Joseph F.; Paul, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 helper T (TH) cells produce interleukin 13 (IL-13) when stimulated by papain or house dust mites (HDM) and induce eosinophilic inflammation. This innate response is dependent on IL-33 but not T cell antigen receptors (TCRs). While type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are the dominant innate producers of IL-13 in naïve animals, we show here that in helminth-infected mice, TH2 cell numbers increased and became major mediators of innate type II responses. TH2 cells made important contributions to HDM-induced antigen–non-specific eosinophilic inflammation and protected mice recovering from Ascaris suum infection against subsequent infection with the phylogenetically distant nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Our findings reveal a previously unappreciated role of effector TH2 cells during TCR-independent innate-like immune responses. PMID:26322482

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells: Critical Cells Driving Immune Suppression in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Katherine H.; Beury, Daniel W.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress innate and adaptive immunity. MDSCs are present in many disease settings; however, in cancer, they are a major obstacle for both natural antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Tumor and host cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) produce a myriad of pro-inflammatory mediators that activate MDSCs and drive their accumulation and suppressive activity. MDSCs utilize a variety of mechanisms to suppress T cell activation, induce other immune-suppressive cell populations, regulate inflammation in the TME, and promote the switching of the immune system to one that tolerates and enhances tumor growth. Because MDSCs are present in most cancer patients and are potent immune-suppressive cells, MDSCs have been the focus of intense research in recent years. This review describes the history and identification of MDSCs, the role of inflammation and intracellular signaling events governing MDSC accumulation and suppressive activity, immune-suppressive mechanisms utilized by MDSCs, and recent therapeutics that target MDSCs to enhance antitumor immunity. PMID:26216631

  8. Trail networks formed by populations of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Kwon, Tae Goo; Park, Jin-sung; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-02-01

    Populations of biological cells that communicate with each other can organize themselves to generate large-scale patterns. Examples can be found in diverse systems, ranging from developing embryos, cardiac tissues, chemotaxing ameba and swirling bacteria. The similarity, often shared by the patterns, suggests the existence of some general governing principle. On the other hand, rich diversity and system-specific properties are exhibited, depending on the type of involved cells and the nature of their interactions. The study on the similarity and the diversity constitutes a rapidly growing field of research. Here, we introduce a new class of self-organized patterns of cell populations that we term as ‘cellular trail networks’. They were observed with populations of rat microglia, the immune cells of the brain and the experimental evidence suggested that haptotaxis is the key element responsible for them. The essential features of the observed patterns are well captured by the mathematical model cells that actively crawl and interact with each other through a decomposing but non-diffusing chemical attractant laid down by the cells. Our finding suggests an unusual mechanism of socially cooperative long-range signaling for the crawling immune cells.

  9. CD52-Negative NK Cells Are Abundant in the Liver and Less Susceptible to Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Muraoka, Izumi; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Ruiz, Phillip; Ricordi, Camillo; Vianna, Rodrigo; Ohdan, Hideki; Waldmann, Herman; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cell depleting strategies have become an integral part of immunosuppressive regimens in organ transplantation. Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, a cell-surface antigen on several immune cells. It has been suggested that lymphocyte depletion increases the risk of serious infections. However, this has not been observed with short-term alemtuzumab treatment in an organ transplant setting. For induction therapy using alemtuzumab following liver transplantation, we found that T- and B-cell numbers declined rapidly after alemtuzumab therapy; however, the natural killer (NK) cell number was sustained. NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity. Since the effects of alemtuzumab on NK cell functions, especially those of liver NK cells, are unknown, this study aimed to investigate this in detail. Methods To assess the effect of alemtuzumab on NK cells, samples were obtained from 7 organ donors and examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Phenotypical and functional differences within subsets of NK cells with different levels of CD52 expression were determined by flow cytometry and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Results CD52 expression on NK cells was lower than that on other lymphocyte subsets. The liver contained a large number of CD52− NK cells compared with the peripheral blood. In vitro treatment of liver-derived NK cells with alemtuzumab did not result in cell death. In contrast, co-incubation with alemtuzumab induced cell death in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and non-NK cells in the liver. Furthermore, CD52− liver NK cells were more cytotoxic and produced more IFN-γ than CD52+ NK cells after cytokine activation. Conclusion The liver contains a large number of CD52− NK cells. These cells are refractory to alemtuzumab and have robust activity. These findings indicate that CD52− NK cells persist and could protect against infection after alemtuzumab-based lymphocyte depletion. PMID

  10. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  11. Engineered Lentivector Targeting of Dendritic Cells for In Vivo Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Yang, Haiguang; Rideout, Kendra; Cho, Taehoon; Joo, Kye il; Ziegler, Leslie; Elliot, Abigail; Walls, Anthony; Yu, Dongzi; Baltimore, David; Wang, Pin

    2008-01-01

    We report a method of inducing antigen production in dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo targeting with lentiviral vectors that specifically bind to the DC surface protein, DC-SIGN. To target the DCs, the lentivector was enveloped with a viral glycoprotein from Sindbis virus, engineered to be DC-SIGN-specific. In vitro, this lentivector specifically transduced DCs and induced DC maturation. A remarkable frequency (up to 12%) of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD8+ T cells and a significant antibody response were observed 2 weeks following injection of a targeted lentiviral vector encoding an OVA transgene into naïve mice. These mice were solidly protected against the growth of the OVA-expressing E.G7 tumor and this methodology could even induce regression of an established tumor. Thus, lentiviral vectors targeting DCs provide a simple method of producing effective immunity and may provide an alternative route for immunization with protein antigens. PMID:18297056

  12. Cochlin produced by follicular dendritic cells promotes antibacterial innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Py, Bénédicte F; Gonzalez, Santiago F; Long, Kai; Kim, Mi-Sung; Kim, Young-A; Zhu, Hong; Yao, Jianhua; Degauque, Nicolas; Villet, Régis; Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Pier, Gerald B; Carroll, Michael C; Yuan, Junying

    2013-05-23

    Cochlin, an extracellular matrix protein, shares homologies with the Factor C, a serine protease found in horseshoe crabs, which is critical for antibacterial responses. Mutations in the COCH gene are responsible for human DFNA9 syndrome, a disorder characterized by neurodegeneration of the inner ear that leads to hearing loss and vestibular impairments. The physiological function of cochlin, however, is unknown. Here, we report that cochlin is specifically expressed by follicular dendritic cells and selectively localized in the fine extracellular network of conduits in the spleen and lymph nodes. During inflammation, cochlin was cleaved by aggrecanases and secreted into blood circulation. In models of lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, Coch(-/-) mice show reduced survival linked to defects in local cytokine production, recruitment of immune effector cells, and bacterial clearance. By producing cochlin, FDCs thus contribute to the innate immune response in defense against bacteria. PMID:23684986

  13. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  14. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14+ monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant. PMID:18639521

  15. In vitro production of functional immune cells derived from human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Payuhakrit, Witchuda; Panichakul, Tasanee; Charoenphon, Natthawut; Chalermsaenyakorn, Panus; Jaovisidha, Adithep; Wongborisuth, Chokdee; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from cord blood are potentially high sources for transplantation due to their low immunogenicity and the presence of the multipotent cells. These cells are capable of differentiating to produce various lineages of blood cells under specific conditions. We have enriched highly purified CD34+ cells from cord blood, determined in vitro growth of the cells in culture systems in the absence (condition A) or presence of GM-CSF and G-CSF (condition B), and determined the profile of immune cells during the period of cultivation by using flow cytometry. PhytohemagglutininA (PHA) was used as a mitogen to stimulate T lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells. GM-CSF and G-CSF prolonged the survival of the growing cells and also maintained expansion of cells in blastic stage. By day 12 of cultivation, when cell numbers peaked, various types of immune cells had appeared (CD14+ cells, CD40+HLA-DR+ cells, CD3+CD56+ cells, CD19+ cells, CD3+CD4+ cells, CD3+CD8+cells and CD3-CD56+). A significantly higher percentage of monocytes (p = 0.002) were observed under culture with GM-CSF, G-CSF when compared with culture without GM-CSF, G-CSF. In addition, T lymphocytes derived from HSC responded to 50 µg/ml of PHA. This is the first report showing the complete differentiation and proliferation of immune cells derived from CD34+ HSC under in vitro culture conditions. Lymphocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells and polymorph nuclear cells derived from HSC in vitro are unique, and thus may benefit various studies such as innate immunity and pathophysiology of immune disorders. PMID:26933404

  16. Immune Cells and Molecular Networks in Experimentally Induced Pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Gaudin, A; Bienvenu, G; Amiaud, J; Farges, J C; Cuturi, M C; Moreau, A; Alliot-Licht, B

    2016-02-01

    Dental pulp is a dynamic tissue able to resist external irritation during tooth decay by using immunocompetent cells involved in innate and adaptive responses. To better understand the immune response of pulp toward gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed biological mediators and immunocompetent cells in rat incisor pulp experimentally inflamed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline solution (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Untreated teeth were used as control. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine ligands, growth factors, and enzymes were evaluated at the transcript level, and the recruitment of the different leukocytes in pulp was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis after 3 h, 9 h, and 3 d post-PBS or post-LPS treatment. After 3 d, injured rat incisors showed pulp wound healing and production of reparative dentin in both LPS and PBS conditions, testifying to the reversible pulpitis status of this model. IL6, IL1-β, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, MMP9, and iNOS gene expression were significantly upregulated after 3 h of LPS stimulation as compared with PBS. The immunoregulatory cytokine IL10 was also upregulated after 3 h, suggesting that LPS stimulates not only inflammation but also immunoregulation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed a significant, rapid, and transient increase in leukocyte levels 9 h after PBS and LPS stimulation. The quantity of dendritic cells was significantly upregulated with LPS versus PBS. Interestingly, we identified a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-enriched cell population in noninjured rodent incisor dental pulp. The percentage of this population, known to regulate immune response, was higher 9 h after inflammation triggered with PBS and LPS as compared with the control. Taken together, these data offer a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of dental pulp immunity that may be elicited by gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26472753

  17. Characterization of PrP(Sc) transmission from immune cells to neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yufuko; Sadaike, Tetsuji; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2012-10-01

    We investigated PrP(Sc) transmission in neuronal cells, spleen cells and several immune cells using an in vitro cell-to-cell transmission system. The transmission of PrP(Sc) in the supernatant of PrP(Sc)-infected neuronal cells was also investigated. We found that PrP(Sc) transmission was more efficient in the cell-to-cell transmission system than in the supernatant-mediated system. PrP(Sc) was more efficiently transmitted from adherent spleen cells to neuronal cells than from floating spleen cells. The adherent spleen cells were composed of macrophages (80%), dendritic cells (8%) and follicular dendritic cells (3%), indicating that macrophages play an important role in PrP(Sc) transmission from immune cells to neuronal cells. Although PrP(Sc) in the immune cells used as donor cells was gradually degraded, the PrP(Sc) transmitted to neuronal cells was observed by Western blot analysis. Investigation of the mechanism of PrP(Sc) transmission between cells represents an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:23246505

  18. Circulating immune cell subpopulations in pestivirus persistently infected calves and non-infected calves varying in immune status [Abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circulating immune cell subpopulations in cattle representing varying stages of immune status categorized as; colostrum deprived (CD), receiving colostrum (COL), colostrum plus vaccination (VAC) and persistently infected with a pestivirus (PI) were compared. The PI calves were infected with a H...

  19. Targeting Rho-GTPases in immune cell migration and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Maté; Munoz, Marcia A; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes are unmatched migrators capable of traversing barriers and tissues of remarkably varied structural composition. An effective immune response relies on the ability of its constituent cells to infiltrate target sites. Yet, unwarranted mobilization of immune cells can lead to inflammatory diseases and tissue damage ranging in severity from mild to life-threatening. The efficacy and plasticity of leukocyte migration is driven by the precise spatiotemporal regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The small GTPases of the Rho family (Rho-GTPases), and their immediate downstream effector kinases, are key regulators of cellular actomyosin dynamics and are therefore considered prime pharmacological targets for stemming leukocyte motility in inflammatory disorders. This review describes advances in the development of small-molecule inhibitors aimed at modulating the Rho-GTPase-centric regulatory pathways governing motility, many of which stem from studies of cancer invasiveness. These inhibitors promise the advent of novel treatment options with high selectivity and potency against immune-mediated pathologies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cytoskeleton, Extracellular Matrix, Cell Migration, Wound Healing and Related Topics. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-24 PMID:24571448

  20. Adiponectin Receptor Signaling on Dendritic Cells Blunts Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Peng H.; Tyrrell, Helen E.J.; Gao, Liquan; Xu, Danmei; Quan, Jianchao; Gill, Dipender; Rai, Lena; Ding, Yunchuan; Plant, Gareth; Chen, Yuan; Xue, John Z.; Handa, Ashok I.; Greenall, Michael J.; Walsh, Kenneth; Xue, Shao-An

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) that interact with T cells represent a crucial site for the development of tolerance to tumor antigens, but there remains incomplete knowledge about how DC-tolerizing signals evolve during tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that DCs isolated from patients with metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer express high levels of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, which are sufficient to blunt antitumor immunity. Mechanistic investigations of ligand–receptor interactions on DCs revealed novel signaling pathways for each receptor. AdipoR1 stimulated IL10 production by activating the AMPK and MAPKp38 pathways, whereas AdipoR2 modified inflammatory processes by activating the COX-2 and PPARγ pathways. Stimulation of these pathways was sufficient to block activation of NF-κB in DC, thereby attenuating their ability to stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Together, our findings reveal novel insights into how DC-tolerizing signals evolve in cancer to promote immune escape. Furthermore, by defining a critical role for adiponectin signaling in this process, our work suggests new and broadly applicable strategies for immunometabolic therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:25261236

  1. Immunophenotyping of immune cell populations in the raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Franziska; Jungwirth, Nicole; Carlson, Regina; Tipold, Andrea; Böer, Michael; Scheibe, Thomas; Molnár, Viktor; von Dörnberg, Katja; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-12-15

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a highly adaptable carnivore that has rapidly conquered Europe over the last decades and represents a potential candidate as pathogen reservoir, bearing the risk for transmission of infectious agents, as zoonosis or spill-over, to other wild life and domestic animals and man. Comprehensive investigations of infectious diseases in raccoons require a detailed knowledge of the participating immune cell populations. To close this gap of knowledge, various antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity with leukocytes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood of raccoons using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Eight out of 16 antibodies, directed against CD3, CD79α, Pax-5, IgG, CD44, MHC class II, myeloid/histiocyte antigen (MAC387), and Iba-1 exhibited a specific immunoreaction with cells in distinct anatomical compartments in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 7 out of 18 antibodies directed against CD11c, CD14, CD21, CD44, CD79α, MHC class I and II cross-reacted with peripheral blood-derived raccoon leukocytes. Summarized, the usefulness of several cross-reacting antibodies was determined for the characterization of raccoon immune cells in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, offering the opportunity to study the raccoon immune system under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:26672912

  2. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells. PMID:24635174

  3. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  4. Detecting Secreted Analytes from Immune Cells: An Overview of Technologies.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kelly A; Hui, Caitlyn; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is largely shaped by secreted factors and infiltrating immune cells and the nature of this environment can profoundly influence tumor growth and progression. As such, there is an increasing need to identify and quantify secreted factors by tumor cells, tumor-associated cells, and infiltrating immune cells. To meet this need, the dynamic range of immunoassays such as ELISAs and ELISpots have been improved and the scope of reagents commercially available has been expanded. In addition, new bead-based and membrane-based screening arrays have been developed to allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in one sample. Similarly, the optimization of intracellular staining for flow cytometry now allows for the quantitation of multiple cytokines from either a purified cell population or a complex mixed cell suspension. Herein, we review the rapidly evolving technologies that are currently available to detect secreted analytes. Emphasis is placed on discussing the advantages and disadvantages of these assays and their applications. PMID:27581018

  5. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  6. Evidence for induction of humoral and cytotoxic immune responses against devil facial tumor disease cells in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) immunized with killed cell preparations.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, A; Brown, G K; Tovar, C; Lyons, A B; Woods, G M

    2015-06-12

    Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) risk extinction from a contagious cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) in which the infectious agent is the tumor cell itself. Because devils are unable to produce an immune response against the tumor cells no devil has survived 'infection'. To promote an immune response we immunized healthy devils with killed DFTD tumor cells in the presence of adjuvants. Immune responses, including cytotoxicity and antibody production, were detected in five of the six devils. The incorporation of adjuvants that act via toll like receptors may provide additional signals to break 'immunological ignorance'. One of these devils was protected against a challenge with viable DFTD cells. This was a short-term protection as re-challenge one year later resulted in tumor growth. These results suggest that Tasmanian devils can generate immune responses against DFTD cells. With further optimization of immune stimulation it should be possible to protect Tasmanian devils against DFTD with an injectable vaccine. PMID:25708088

  7. Paneth Cell α-Defensins in Enteric Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, André J.

    2014-01-01

    Paneth cells at the base of small intestinal crypts of Lieberkühn secrete high levels of α-defensins in response to cholinergic and microbial stimuli. Paneth cell α-defensins are broad spectrum microbicides that function in the extracellular environment of the intestinal lumen, and they are responsible for the majority of secreted bactericidal peptide activity. Paneth cell α-defensins confer immunity to oral infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and they are major determinants of the composition of the small intestinal microbiome. In addition to host defense molecules such as α-defensins, lysozyme, and Pla2g2a, Paneth cells also produce and release proinflammatory mediators as components of secretory granules. Disruption of Paneth cell homeostasis, with subsequent induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy, or apoptosis, contributes to inflammation in diverse genetic and experimental mouse models. PMID:21560070

  8. Immune Suppressive Effect of Cinnamaldehyde Due to Inhibition of Proliferation and Induction of Apoptosis in Immune Cells: Implications in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casado, Cristina; Diaz-Perales, Araceli; Oida, Kumiko; Singer, Josef; Kinaciyan, Tamar; Fuchs, Heidemarie C.; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides its anti-inflammatory effects, cinnamaldehyde has been reported to have anti-carcinogenic activity. Here, we investigated its impact on immune cells. Methods Activation of nuclear factor-κB by cinnamaldehyde (0–10 µg/ml) alone or in combination with lipopolysaccharide was assessed in THP1XBlue human monocytic cell line and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Proliferation and secretion of cytokines (IL10 and TNFα) was determined in primary immune cells and the human cell lines (THP1, Jurkat E6-1 and Raji cell lines) stimulated with cinnamaldehyde alone or in conjunction with lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide was determined in mouse RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, different treated PBMCs were stained for CD3, CD20 and AnnexinV. Results Low concentrations (up to 1 µg/ml) of cinnamaldehyde resulted in a slight increase in nuclar factor-kB activation, whereas higher concentrations led to a dose-dependent decrease of nuclear factor-kB activation (up to 50%) in lipopolysachharide-stimulated THP1 cells and PBMCs. Accordingly, nitric oxide, interleukin 10 secretion as well as cell proliferation were reduced in lipopolysachharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, PBMCs and THP1, Raji and Jurkat-E6 immune cells in the presence of cinnamaldehyde in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis of PBMCs revealed that CD3+ were more affected than CD20+ cells to apopotosis by cinnamaldehyde. Conclusion We attribute the anti-inflammatory properties of cinnamaldehyde to its ability to block nuclear factor-κB activation in immune cells. Treatment with cinnamaldehyde led to inhibition of cell viability, proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary and immortalized immune cells. Therefore, despite its described anti-carcinogenic property, treatment with cinnamaldehyde in cancer patients might be contraindicated due to its ability to inhibit immune cell activation. PMID:25271635

  9. Helenalin suppresses essential immune functions of activated CD4+ T cells by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berges, Carsten; Fuchs, Dominik; Opelz, Gerhard; Daniel, Volker; Naujokat, Cord

    2009-09-01

    Helenalin is a naturally occuring sesquiterpene lactone extracted from Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis ssp. foliosa. Helenalin and its derivatives are known for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects via inhibiting NF-kappaB and telomerase activity and impairing protein and DNA synthesis, suggesting that helenalin is a potential candidate for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we show that helenalin induces apoptosis in activated CD4+ T cells by triggering the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis is accompanied by rapid stabilization of p53, nuclear localization of p53 and AIF, and an increase in ROS production that results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim). Activated CD4+ T cells which survive exposure to helenalin undergo inhibition of proliferation by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest is accompanied by the accumulation of cell cycle regulator proteins p21(WAF/CIP1), p2(KIP1) and cyclin D2, whereas abundance of cyclin A and B(1) is decreased. Cell surface expression of the activation-associated receptors CD25, CD27, CD28, CD120b as well as production of IL-2 are impaired. Transcriptional activation of genes encoding for CD25, IL-2 and IFN-gamma is mediated by transcription factors of the NFAT family, and we demonstrate that helenalin suppresses nuclear translocation of NFATc2 in activated CD4+ T cells. Thus, helenalin can be defined as a new immunosuppressive compound suited for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:19656571

  10. Current tools for predicting cancer-specific T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, David; Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Schmidt, Julien; Luescher, Immanuel F

    2016-07-01

    Tumor exome and RNA sequencing data provide a systematic and unbiased view on cancer-specific expression, over-expression, and mutations of genes, which can be mined for personalized cancer vaccines and other immunotherapies. Of key interest are tumor-specific mutations, because T cells recognizing neoepitopes have the potential to be highly tumoricidal. Here, we review recent developments and technical advances in identifying MHC class I and class II-restricted tumor antigens, especially neoantigen derived MHC ligands, including in silico predictions, immune-peptidome analysis by mass spectrometry, and MHC ligand validation by biochemical methods on T cells. PMID:27622028

  11. An Increased Abundance of Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells Is Correlated with the Progression and Prognosis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yichen; Xu, Xuejun; Guo, Shixiang; Zhang, Chaobin; Tang, Yan; Tian, Yi; Ni, Bing; Lu, Binfeng; Wang, Huaizhi

    2014-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can inhibit cytotoxic responses. Though several studies have analyzed Treg frequency in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patients using flow cytometry (FCM), few studies have examined how intratumoral Tregs might contribute to immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the potential role of intratumoral Tregs in PDA patients remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that the percentages of Tregs, CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were all increased significantly in tumor tissue compared to control pancreatic tissue, as assessed via FCM, whereas the percentages of these cell types in PBMCs did not differ between PDA patients and healthy volunteers. The percentages of CD8+ T cells in tumors were significantly lower than in PDA patient PBMCs. In addition, the relative numbers of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs and CD8+ T cells were negatively correlated in the tissue of PDA patients, and the abundance of Tregs was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation. Additionally, Foxp3+ T cells were observed more frequently in juxtatumoral stroma (immediately adjacent to the tumor epithelial cells). Patients showing an increased prevalence of Foxp3+ T cells had a poorer prognosis, which was an independent factor for patient survival. These results suggest that Tregs may promote PDA progression by inhibiting the antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells at local intratumoral sites. Moreover, a high proportion of Tregs in tumor tissues may reflect suppressed antitumor immunity. PMID:24637664

  12. Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Cindy; Gaber, Timo; Maurizi, Lionel; Hahne, Martin; Rauch, Roman; Hoff, Paula; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine. PMID:26056442

  13. Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Strehl, Cindy; Gaber, Timo; Maurizi, Lionel; Hahne, Martin; Rauch, Roman; Hoff, Paula; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine. PMID:26056442

  14. Role of Innate T Cells in Anti-Bacterial Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yifang; Williams, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Innate T cells are a heterogeneous group of αβ and γδ T cells that respond rapidly (<2 h) upon activation. These innate T cells also share a non MHC class I or II restriction requirement for antigen recognition. Three major populations within the innate T cell group are recognized, namely, invariant NKT cells, mucosal associated invariant T cells, and gamma delta T cells. These cells recognize foreign/self-lipid presented by non-classical MHC molecules, such as CD1d, MR1, and CD1a. They are activated during the early stages of bacterial infection and act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review, we focus on the functional properties of these three innate T cell populations and how they are purposed for antimicrobial defense. Furthermore, we address the mechanisms through which their effector functions are targeted for bacterial control and compare this in human and murine systems. Lastly, we speculate on future roles of these cell types in therapeutic settings such as vaccination. PMID:26124758

  15. The evolving paradigm of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of immunity by cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, M; Rodvold, J J; Mahadevan, N R

    2016-01-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) has been thought to influence tumorigenesis mainly through cell-intrinsic, pro-survival effects. In recent years, however, new evidence has emerged showing that the UPR is also the source of cell-extrinsic effects, particularly directed at those immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Here we will review and discuss this new body of information with focus on the role of cell-extrinsic effects on innate and adaptive immunity, suggesting that the transmission of ER stress from cancer cells to myeloid cells in particular is an expedient used by cancer cells to control the immune microenvironment, which acquires pro-inflammatory as well as immune-suppressive characteristics. These new findings can now be seen in the broader context of similar phenomena described in Caenorhabditis elegans, and an analogy with quorum sensing and 'community effects' in prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be drawn, arguing that a cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of heterologous cells may be phylogenetically conserved. Finally, we will discuss the role of aneuploidy as an inducer of proteotoxic stress and potential initiator of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation. In presenting these new views, we wish to bring attention to the cell-extrinsic regulation of tumor growth, including tumor UPR-based cell-nonautonomous signaling as a mechanism of maintaining tumor heterogeneity and resistance to therapy, and suggest therapeutically targeting such mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25893303

  16. Hyperpolarized NMR of plant and cancer cell extracts at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Lalande-Martin, Julie; Tea, Illa; Yon, Maxime; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Frydman, Lucio; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra of biological extracts are recorded in a single scan provided that the samples are hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization combined with cross polarization. Heteronuclear 2D correlation spectra of hyperpolarized breast cancer cell extracts can also be obtained in a single scan. Hyperpolarized NMR of extracts opens many perspectives for metabolomics. PMID:26215673

  17. NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique - sequential cation mutation - to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment.

  18. CRACC-targeting Fc-fusion protein induces activation of NK cells and DCs and improves T cell immune responses to antigenic targets.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Rastall, David P W; Chen, Weimin; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Kaminski, Norbert E; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cell (CRACC) receptor is a member of the SLAM family of receptors that are found on several types of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that increasing the abundance of the adaptor protein EAT-2 during vaccination enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccine antigens. Engagement of the CRACC receptor in the presence of the EAT-2 adaptor generally results in immune cell activation, while activating CRACC signaling in cells that lack EAT-2 adaptor inhibits their effector and regulatory functions. As EAT-2 is the only SAP adaptor that interacts with the CRACC receptor, we hypothesized that technologies that specifically modulate CRACC signaling during vaccination may also improve antigen specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a CRACC-targeting Fc fusion protein and included it in vaccination attempts. Indeed, mice co-vaccinated with the CRACC-Fc fusion protein and an adenovirus vaccine expressing the HIV-Gag protein had improved Gag-specific T cell responses, as compared to control mice. These responses are characterized by increased numbers of Gag-specific tetramer+ CD8+ T cells and increases in production of IFNγ, TNFα, and IL2, by Gag-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results revealed that use of the CRACC-Fc fusion protein enhances vaccine-elicited innate immune responses, as characterized by increased dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and IFNγ production from NK cells. This study highlights the importance of CRACC signaling during the induction of an immune response generally, and during vaccinations specifically, and also lends insight into the mechanisms underlying our prior results noting EAT-2-dependent improvements in vaccine efficacy. PMID:27151882

  19. Autonomous immunity in mucosal epithelial cells: fortifying the barrier against infection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells express an autonomous innate immune response that controls the overgrowth of invaded bacteria, mitigates the harmful effects of the bacteria carried within, and does not rely on other external arms of the immune response. Epithelial cell autonomous innate immunity "respects" the social biology of invading bacteria to achieve symbiosis, and is the primary protective mechanism against pathogens. PMID:27005450

  20. Cyclosporin A renders target cells resistant to immune cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Hudnall, S D

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of cytolytically susceptible human target cells with therapeutic concentrations of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A renders these cells highly resistant to T cell-mediated, natural killer (NK) cell-mediated, and complement-mediated cytolysis. The resistance is dose dependent, time dependent and reversible. The resistance is accompanied by target cell growth inhibition as measured by thymidine uptake. Surprisingly, target cell growth inhibition induced by serum depletion is associated with cell-mediated cytolytic resistance. These data suggest that cyclosporin A (CsA) may block some target cell biochemical pathway(s) important in the suicidal cytolytic process which is (are) linked to some G0/G1 cell cycle events. In addition, these results suggest that the increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disease in human organ transplant recipients may be contributed to by CsA-induced resistance of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes to immune cytolysis. In the post-transplant setting, CsA probably blocks T cell-dependent responses to EBV-transformed B lymphocytes (Bird, A.G., McLachlan, S.M. and Britton, S., Nature 1981, 289: 300) yet leaving the NK cell and antibody-dependent responses intact (Shao-Hsien, C. et al. Transplantation 1983. 35: 127). However, given the direct effect of CsA upon EBV-transformed B lymphocytes, these cells would be rendered resistant to nearly all forms of cytolytic immune control (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, natural killer, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement). Unregulated EBV-transformed B lymphocytes may then proliferate in the CsA-treated host thus leading to a polyclonal B cell hyperplasia. Our data would suggest that this early pre-malignant process is likely to be reversible following CsA dose reduction. Indeed, EBV-dependent polyclonal B cell hyperplasia is seen in early post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (Hanto, D.W., et al., Transplantation 1989, 47: 458

  1. Ultrastructural and functional characterization of circulating hemocytes from Galleria mellonella larva: Cell types and their role in the innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Liu, Yi; Ding, Ying; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-08-01

    Galleria mellonella larvae have been widely used as a model to study the virulence of various human pathogens. Hemocytes play important roles in the innate immune response of G. mellonella. In this study, the hemocytes of G. mellonella larvae were analyzed by transmission electron microscope, light microscope, and cytochemistry. The cytological and morphological analyses revealed four types of hemocytes; Plasmatocytes, granular cells, spherule cells and oenocytoids. Differential hemocyte counts showed that under our conditions plasmatocytes and granular cells were the most abundant circulating cell types in the hemolymph. We also investigated the role of different types of hemocytes in the cellular and humoral immune defenses. The in-vivo experiment showed that plasmatocytes, granular cells and oenocytoids phagocytized FITC-labelled Escherichia coli bacteria in larvae of G. mellonella, whereas the granular cells exhibited the strongest phagocytic ability against these microbial cells. After incubation with L-DOPA, plasmatocytes, granular cells and oenocytoids are stained brown, indicating the presence of phenoloxidase activity. These results shed new light on our understanding of the immune function of G. mellonella hemocytes. PMID:27378036

  2. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  3. High-Content Quantification of Single-Cell Immune Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Kaestli, Alicia J.; Cheng, Zhang; Jordi, Christian; Albayrak, Cem; Hoffmann, Alexander; Tay, Savaş

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cells receive time-varying signals from the environment and generate functional responses by secreting their own signaling molecules. Characterizing dynamic input-output relationships in single cells is crucial for understanding and modeling cellular systems. We developed an automated microfluidic system that delivers precisely defined dynamical inputs to individual living cells and simultaneously measures key immune parameters dynamically. Our system combines nanoliter immunoassays, microfluidic input generation, and time-lapse microscopy, enabling study of previously untestable aspects of immunity by measuring time-dependent cytokine secretion and transcription factor activity from single cells stimulated with dynamic inflammatory inputs. Employing this system to analyze macrophage signal processing under pathogen inputs, we found that the dynamics of TNF secretion are highly heterogeneous and surprisingly uncorrelated with the dynamics of NF-κB, the transcription factor controlling TNF production. Computational modeling of the LPS/TLR4 pathway shows that post-transcriptional regulation by TRIF is a key determinant of noisy and uncorrelated TNF secretion dynamics in single macrophages. PMID:27050527

  4. Occurrence of immune cells in the intestinal wall of Squalius cephalus infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bahram S; Manera, Maurizio; Giari, Luisa; DePasquale, Joseph A; Bosi, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    A sub-population of 34 specimens of chub, Squalius cephalus, was sampled from the River Brenta (Northern Italy) and examined for ecto- and endo-parasites. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) was the only enteric helminth encountered. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of chub. Near the site of parasite's attachment, mucous cells, mast cells (MCs), neutrophils and rodlet cells (RCs) were found to co-occur within the intestinal epithelium. The numbers of mucous cells, MCs and neutrophils were significantly higher in infected fish (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05). Dual immunofluorescence staining with the lectin Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) and the macrophage-specific MAC387 monoclonal antibody, with parallel transmission electron microscopy, revealed that epithelial MCs often made intimate contact with the mucous cells. Degranulation of a large number of MCs around the site of the acanthocephalan's attachment and in proximity to mucous cells was also documented. MCs and neutrophils were abundant in the submucosa. Immune cells of the intestinal epithelium have been described at the ultrastructural level and their possible functions and interactions are discussed. PMID:26434712

  5. Immunization with adenovirus LIGHT-engineered dendritic cells induces potent T cell responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzheng; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Long, Fengying; Shi, Yaru

    2014-07-31

    LIGHT, a TNF superfamily member (TNFSF14), is a type II transmembrane protein expressed on activated T cells and immature dendritic cells (DCs). However, the expression of LIGHT on mature DCs is down-regulated. Recent studies demonstrated that LIGHT provides potent costimulatory activity for T cells, enhancing proliferation and the production of Th1 cytokines independently of the B7-CD28 pathway. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of peptide-pulsed DC-mediated antiviral immunity in HBV transgenic mice and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT. The bone marrow-derived DCs were modified in vitro with an adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing mouse LIGHT (Ad-LIGHT), the expression of costimulatory molecules was up-regulated and the secretion of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ increased. LIGHT-modified DCs enhanced allostimulation for T cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). HBV peptide-pulsed DCs elicited HBV specific CD8+ T cell response and reduced the level of HBsAg and HBV DNA in sera of HBV transgenic mice. Importantly, LIGHT-modified DCs could induce stronger antiviral immunity. These results support the concept that genetic modification of DCs with a recombinant LIGHT adenovirus vector may be a useful strategy for antiviral immunotherapy. PMID:24951859

  6. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  7. Immune Functions in Mice Lacking Clnk, an SLP-76-Related Adaptor Expressed in a Subset of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Utting, Oliver; Sedgmen, Bradley J.; Watts, Tania H.; Shi, Xiaoshu; Rottapel, Robert; Iulianella, Angelo; Lohnes, David; Veillette, André

    2004-01-01

    The SLP-76 family of immune cell-specific adaptors is composed of three distinct members named SLP-76, Blnk, and Clnk. They have been implicated in the signaling pathways coupled to immunoreceptors such as the antigen receptors and Fc receptors. Previous studies using gene-targeted mice and deficient cell lines showed that SLP-76 plays a central role in T-cell development and activation. Moreover, it is essential for normal mast cell and platelet activation. In contrast, Blnk is necessary for B-cell development and activation. While the precise function of Clnk is not known, it was reported that Clnk is selectively expressed in mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and previously activated T-cells. Moreover, ectopic expression of Clnk was shown to rescue T-cell receptor-mediated signal transduction in an SLP-76-deficient T-cell line, suggesting that, like its relatives, Clnk is involved in the positive regulation of immunoreceptor signaling. Stimulatory effects of Clnk on immunoreceptor signaling were also reported to occur in transfected B-cell and basophil leukemia cell lines. Herein, we attempted to address the physiological role of Clnk in immune cells by the generation of Clnk-deficient mice. The results of our studies demonstrated that Clnk is dispensable for normal differentiation and function of T cells, mast cells, and NK cells. Hence, unlike its relatives, Clnk is not essential for normal immune functions. PMID:15199160

  8. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl2 (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4+FoxP3+CD25+ (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8+CD223+ T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term detrimental

  9. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  10. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  11. “Natural Regulators”: NK Cells as Modulators of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Andoniou, Christopher E.; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known as frontline responders capable of rapidly mediating a response upon encountering transformed or infected cells. Recent findings indicate that NK cells, in addition to acting as innate effectors, can also regulate adaptive immune responses. Here, we review recent studies on the immunoregulatory function of NK cells with a specific focus on their ability to affect the generation of early, as well as long-term antiviral T cell responses, and their role in modulating immune pathology and disease. In addition, we summarize the current knowledge of the factors governing regulatory NK cell responses and discuss origin, tissue specificity, and open questions about the classification of regulatory NK cells as classical NK cells versus group 1 innate lymphoid cells. PMID:27379097

  12. Stem cell educator therapy and induction of immune balance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that causes the deficit of pancreatic islet β cells. A true cure has proven elusive despite intensive research pressure by using conventional approaches over the past 25 years. The situation highlights the challenges we face in conquering this disease. Alternative approaches are needed. Increasing evidence demonstrates that stem cells possess the function of immune modulation. We established the Stem Cell Educator therapy by using cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs). A closed-loop system that circulates a patient's blood through a blood cell separator, briefly co-cultures the patient's lymphocytes with adherent CB-SCs in vitro, and returns the educated lymphocytes (but not the CB-SCs) to the patient's circulation. Our clinical trial reveals that a single treatment with the Stem Cell Educator provides lasting reversal of autoimmunity that allows regeneration of islet β cells and improvement of metabolic control in subjects with long-standing T1D. PMID:22833322

  13. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    PubMed Central

    Man, Yan-gao; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Mason, Jeffrey; Avital, Itzhak; Bilchik, Anton; Bruecher, Bjoern; Protic, Mladjan; Nissan, Aviram; Izadjoo, Mina; Zhang, Xichen; Jewett, Anahid

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness. PMID:23386907

  14. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  15. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8(+) T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8(+) T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed. PMID:26973644

  16. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8+ T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8+ T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed. PMID:26973644

  17. Increased Immune Response Variability during Simultaneous Viral Coinfection Leads to Unpredictability in CD8 T Cell Immunity and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L.; Cornberg, Markus; Chen, Alex T.; Emonet, Sebastien; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT T cell memory is usually studied in the context of infection with a single pathogen in naive mice, but how memory develops during a coinfection with two pathogens, as frequently occurs in nature or after vaccination, is far less studied. Here, we questioned how the competition between immune responses to two viruses in the same naive host would influence the development of CD8 T cell memory and subsequent disease outcome upon challenge. Using two different models of coinfection, including the well-studied lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCMV) and Pichinde (PICV) viruses, several differences were observed within the CD8 T cell responses to either virus. Compared to single-virus infection, coinfection resulted in substantial variation among mice in the size of epitope-specific T cell responses to each virus. Some mice had an overall reduced number of virus-specific cells to either one of the viruses, and other mice developed an immunodominant response to a normally subdominant, cross-reactive epitope (nucleoprotein residues 205 to 212, or NP205). These changes led to decreased protective immunity and enhanced pathology in some mice upon challenge with either of the original coinfecting viruses. In mice with PICV-dominant responses, during a high-dose challenge with LCMV clone 13, increased immunopathology was associated with a reduced number of LCMV-specific effector memory CD8 T cells. In mice with dominant cross-reactive memory responses, during challenge with PICV increased immunopathology was directly associated with these cross-reactive NP205-specific CD8 memory cells. In conclusion, the inherent competition between two simultaneous immune responses results in significant alterations in T cell immunity and subsequent disease outcome upon reexposure. IMPORTANCE Combination vaccines and simultaneous administration of vaccines are necessary to accommodate required immunizations and maintain vaccination rates. Antibody responses generally correlate with

  18. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  19. Regulatory T Cells in Post-stroke Immune Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Liesz, Arthur; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The secondary neuroinflammatory response has come into focus of experimental stroke research. Immunological mechanisms after acute stroke are being investigated in the hope to identify novel and druggable pathways that contribute to secondary infarct growth after stroke. Among a variety of neuroimmunological events after acute brain ischemia, including microglial activation, brain leukocyte invasion, and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors, lymphocytes have been identified as the key leukocyte subpopulation driving the neuroinflammatory response and contributing to stroke outcome. Several studies have shown that pro-inflammatory lymphocyte subpopulations worsen stroke outcome and that inhibiting their invasion to the injured brain is neuroprotective. In contrast to the effector functions of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes, regulatory T cells (Treg) are critically involved in maintaining immune homeostasis and have been characterized as disease-limiting protective cells in several inflammatory conditions, particularly in primary inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). However, due to the complex function of regulatory cells in immune homeostasis and disease, divergent findings have been described for the role of Treg in stroke models. Emerging evidence suggests that this discrepancy arises from potentially differing functions of Treg depending on the predominant site of action within the neurovascular unit and the surrounding inflammatory milieu. This article will provide a comprehensive review of current findings on Treg in brain ischemia models and discuss potential reasons for the observed discrepancies. PMID:27030356

  20. Circulating immune complexes in sickle cell-beta zero thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Donadi, E A; Carvalho, I F; Falcão, R P

    1989-01-01

    A serum fraction from patients with sickle cell-beta zero thalassemia prepared by treatment with polyethyleneglycol showed increased amounts of C1q-precipitable immune complexes, i.e., 216 micrograms/dl (range, 141-266 micrograms/dl) vs 181 micrograms/dl (range, 152-228 micrograms/dl) for controls (P less than 0.05), as well as increased amounts of protein. Levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4 and factor B in the same fraction were within the normal range. PMID:2638196

  1. Predicting the risk of toxic blooms of golden alga from cell abundance and environmental covariates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Reynaldo; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Denny, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) is a toxic haptophyte that has caused considerable ecological damage to marine and inland aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Studies focused primarily on laboratory cultures have indicated that toxicity is poorly correlated with the abundance of golden alga cells. This relationship, however, has not been rigorously evaluated in the field where environmental conditions are much different. The ability to predict toxicity using readily measured environmental variables and golden alga abundance would allow managers rapid assessments of ichthyotoxicity potential without laboratory bioassay confirmation, which requires additional resources to accomplish. To assess the potential utility of these relationships, several a priori models relating lethal levels of golden alga ichthyotoxicity to golden alga abundance and environmental covariates were constructed. Model parameters were estimated using archived data from four river basins in Texas and New Mexico (Colorado, Brazos, Red, Pecos). Model predictive ability was quantified using cross-validation, sensitivity, and specificity, and the relative ranking of environmental covariate models was determined by Akaike Information Criterion values and Akaike weights. Overall, abundance was a generally good predictor of ichthyotoxicity as cross validation of golden alga abundance-only models ranged from ∼ 80% to ∼ 90% (leave-one-out cross-validation). Environmental covariates improved predictions, especially the ability to predict lethally toxic events (i.e., increased sensitivity), and top-ranked environmental covariate models differed among the four basins. These associations may be useful for monitoring as well as understanding the abiotic factors that influence toxicity during blooms.

  2. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  3. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  4. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  5. Human breast cancer cells enhance self tolerance by promoting evasion from NK cell antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Mamessier, Emilie; Sylvain, Aude; Thibult, Marie-Laure; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Castellano, Rémy; Gonçalves, Anthony; André, Pascale; Romagné, François; Thibault, Gilles; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François; Moretta, Alessandro; Olive, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    NK cells are a major component of the antitumor immune response and are involved in controlling tumor progression and metastases in animal models. Here, we show that dysfunction of these cells accompanies human breast tumor progression. We characterized human peripheral blood NK (p-NK) cells and malignant mammary tumor-infiltrating NK (Ti-NK) cells from patients with noninvasive and invasive breast cancers. NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and normal breast tissue were used as controls. With disease progression, we found that expression of activating NK cell receptors (such as NKp30, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and CD16) decreased while expression of inhibitory receptors (such as NKG2A) increased and that this correlated with decreased NK cell function, most notably cytotoxicity. Importantly, Ti-NK cells had more pronounced impairment of their cytotoxic potential than p-NK cells. We also identified several stroma-derived factors, including TGF-β1, involved in tumor-induced reduction of normal NK cell function. Our data therefore show that breast tumor progression involves NK cell dysfunction and that breast tumors model their environment to evade NK cell antitumor immunity. This highlights the importance of developing future therapies able to restore NK cell cytotoxicity to limit/prevent tumor escape from antitumor immunity. PMID:21841316

  6. Locally administered T cells from mice immunized with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) accelerate LPS-induced bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yukio; Ukai, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Miho; Haro, Esperanza R Ayón; Yoshimoto, Mayumi; Kaneko, Takashi; Yoshinaga, Miho; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Shiraishi, Chiaki; Hara, Yoshitaka

    2009-06-01

    T cells play important roles in bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis and are found in chronic destructive bone lesions. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of several pathological factors involved in inflammatory bone destruction. We previously described the importance of T cells in the inflammatory bone resorption that occurs after repeated LPS administration. However, whether local or systemic T cells are important for inflammatory bone resorption and whether immunization of host animals influences bone resorption remain unclear. The present study examines the effects of local extant T cells from LPS-immunized mice on LPS-induced bone resorption. T cells from LPS-immunized or non-immunized mice were injected together with LPS into the gingival tissues of mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease that lack both T and B cells. We histomorphometrically evaluated bone resorption at sites of T cell injections and examined the influence of T cells from LPS-immunized mice on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We found that locally administered T cells from LPS-immunized but not non-immunized mice accelerated LPS-induced bone resorption in vivo. Moreover, T cells from LPS-immunized mice increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro induced by receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand and LPS and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibody inhibited this increase. These results demonstrated that local extant T cells accelerate inflammatory bone resorption. Furthermore, T cells from LPS-immunized mice appear to elevate LPS-induced bone resorption using TNF-alpha. PMID:19437611

  7. Regulatory T Cells: Molecular Actions on Effector Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Álvarez-Luquín, Diana Denisse; Tamaya-Domínguez, Beatriz; Gomez-Fuentes, Sandra; Trejo-García, Abel; Melo-Salas, Marlene; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Juan; Adalid-Peralta, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells play a key role in the control of the immune response, both in health and during illness. While the mechanisms through which T regulatory cells exert their function have been extensively described, their molecular effects on effector cells have received little attention. Thus, this revision is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge on those regulation mechanisms on the target cells from a molecular perspective. PMID:27298831

  8. PI5P Triggers ICAM-1 Degradation in Shigella Infected Cells, Thus Dampening Immune Cell Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Boal, Frédéric; Puhar, Andrea; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Kunduzova, Oksana; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Payrastre, Bernard; Tronchère, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    Shigella flexneri, the pathogen responsible for bacillary dysentery, has evolved multiple strategies to control the inflammatory response. Here, we show that Shigella subverts the subcellular trafficking of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a key molecule in immune cell recruitment, in a mechanism dependent on the injected bacterial enzyme IpgD and its product, the lipid mediator PI5P. Overexpression of IpgD, but not a phosphatase dead mutant, induced the internalization and the degradation of ICAM-1 in intestinal epithelial cells. Remarkably, addition of permeant PI5P reproduced IpgD effects and led to the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment. Finally, these results were confirmed in an in vivo model of Shigella infection where IpgD-dependent ICAM-1 internalization reduced neutrophil adhesion. In conclusion, we describe here an immune evasion mechanism used by the pathogen Shigella to divert the host cell trafficking machinery in order to reduce immune cell recruitment. PMID:26776508

  9. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations.

    PubMed

    Albert, Frank W; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H; Bloom, Joshua S; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-27

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in 'hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  10. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  11. Increasing the immune activity of exosomes: the effect of miRNA-depleted exosome proteins on activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells against pancreatic cancer* #

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ri-sheng; Lin, Cheng; Ding, Guo-ping; Wu, Zheng-rong; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor-derived exosomes were considered to be potential candidates for tumor vaccines because they are abundant in immune-regulating proteins, whereas tumor exosomal miRNAs may induce immune tolerance, thereby having an opposite immune function. Objective: This study was designed to separate exosomal protein and depleted exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs), increasing the immune activity of exosomes for activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells (DC/CIKs) against pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods: PC-derived exosomes (PEs) were extracted from cultured PANC-1 cell supernatants and then ruptured; this was followed by ultrafiltered exosome lysates (UELs). DCs were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PE, and UEL, followed by co-culture with CIKs. The anti-tumor effects of DC/CIKs against PC were evaluated by proliferation and killing rates, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and perforin secretion. Exosomal miRNAs were depleted after lysis and ultrafiltration, while 128 proteins were retained, including several immune-activating proteins. Results: UEL-stimulated DC/CIKs showed a higher killing rate than LPS- and PE-stimulated DC/CIKs. Conclusions: miRNA-depleted exosome proteins may be promising agonists for specifically activating DC/CIKs against PC. PMID:27143262

  12. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders. PMID:26066671

  13. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  14. Continuous enrichment of low-abundance cell samples using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Li, Sixing; Gu, Yeyi; Li, Peng; Ding, Xiaoyun; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-03-01

    Cell enrichment is a powerful tool in a variety of cellular studies, especially in applications with low-abundance cell types. In this work, we developed a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) based microfluidic device for non-contact, continuous cell enrichment. With a pair of parallel interdigital transducers (IDT) deposited on a piezoelectric substrate, a one-dimensional SSAW field was established along disposable micro-tubing channels, generating numerous pressure nodes (and thus numerous cell-enrichment regions). Our method is able to concentrate highly diluted blood cells by more than 100 fold with a recovery efficiency of up to 99%. Such highly effective cell enrichment was achieved without using sheath flow. The SSAW-based technique presented here is simple, bio-compatible, label-free, and sheath-flow-free. With these advantages, it could be valuable for many biomedical applications. PMID:24413889

  15. Cell abundance and microbial community composition along a complete oil sand mining and reclamation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappé, M.; Schneider, B.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbons constitute an important energy source for microbes but can also be of environmental concern. Microbial activity causes hydrocarbon degradation and thereby loss of economical value, but also helps to remove hydrocarbons from the environment. The present study characterizes the abundance of microbes along the oil sand mining process in Alberta, Canada, as a first approach to assess the impact of mining and oil extraction on the microbial population. After mining the oil is extracted from the sediment by a hot-water extraction (50-60°C), resulting in three major fractions: crude oil, tailings sand and fine tailings. The tailings sand is used as substratum for newly developing soils on the reclamation areas. The very liquid fine tailings still have a TOC content of about 4.3% and are pumped into tailings ponds, where they need up to three decades to settle and solidify. After deposition, these mature fine tailings (MFTs) are enriched in organics (TOC content between 9.6 and 16.8%) and dredged out of the ponds and put on dumps for several years for dewatering. Finally they are brought out onto the reclamation sites and deposited below the sand layer. Cells were extracted from oily sediments according to the protocol of Lappé and Kallmeyer (2011), stained with SYBR Green I and counted by fluorescence microscopy. Cell abundance in the unprocessed oil sand is around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. After processing the fresh fine tailings still contain around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. Cell counts in the processed MFTs are 5.8 x 107 cells cm-3, whereas in the sand used as substratum for newly developing soils, they are twice as high (1.4 x 108). In root-bearing horizons, cell counts reach 1.1 x 109 cell cm-3. Cell numbers calculated from cultivation experiments are in the same range. Higher cell counts in the tailings sand are probably due to a higher nitrogen supply through the addition of a 35 cm top layer of a peat-mineral mix. In the sand nitrate concentrations are high

  16. Evolutionary implication of B-1 lineage cells from innate to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lv-yun; Shao, Tong; Nie, Li; Zhu, Ling-yun; Xiang, Li-xin; Shao, Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm that B cells mainly play a central role in adaptive immunity may have to be reevaluated because B-1 lineage cells have been found to exhibit innate-like functions, such as phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Therefore, the evolutionary connection of B-1 lineage cells between innate and adaptive immunities have received much attention. In this review, we summarized various innate-like characteristics of B-1 lineage cells, such as natural antibody production, antigen-presenting function in primary adaptive immunity, and T cell-independent immune responses. These characteristics seem highly conserved between fish B cells and mammalian B-1 cells during vertebrate evolution. We proposed an evolutionary outline of B cells by comparing biological features, including morphology, phenotype, ontogeny, and functional activity between B-1 lineage cells and macrophages or B-2 cells. The B-1 lineage may be a transitional cell type between phagocytic cells (e.g., macrophages) and B-2 cells that functionally connects innate and adaptive immunities. Our discussion would contribute to the understanding on the origination of B cells specialized in adaptive immunity from innate immunity. The results might provide further insight into the evolution of the immune system as a whole. PMID:26573260

  17. Redirecting immune cells against bone metastases: Immunotherapy of prostate cancer metastases using genetically programmed immune effector cells.

    PubMed

    Eshhar, Zelig; Waks, Tova; Pinthus, Jehonathan

    2005-06-01

    Extract: Metastasis of the bone is common in two of the major gender-specific malignancies -- breast and prostate cancers. Although both primary breast and prostate cancer are manageable by "classical" therapies such as surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy, when metastases (secondary cancers) disseminate to the bones these diseases are, by and large, incurable. Metastasis to the bone is implicated in around 70% of prostate and breast cancer deaths. The idea of harnessing the immune system to fight disseminated cancer has proven to be effective in experimental animal models against transplanted tumors. Here, both arms of the immune system, namely, the humoral one characterized by anti-tumor antibodies and the cellular one composed of a type of white blood cell, specifically the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), were found to cause tumor rejection either following immunization of the experimental mice before the tumor inoculations (active-vaccination) or after adoptive transfer of cancer-specific antibodies or CTLs into tumor-bearing mice (passive-vaccination). Encouraged by these results, scientists and clinicians have joined forces in extensive efforts to apply both active and passive vaccination for the immunotherapy of cancer patients. These attempts have flourished over the last fifteen years following the discovery of the first human tumor antigens in melanoma patients. PMID:20704885

  18. [Genetic basis of immune response of lymphocyte-like cells in the mucosal immune system of Lampetra japonica].

    PubMed

    Xin, Liu; Xueying, Song; Xiaoping, Zhang; Yinglun, Han; Ting, Zhu; Rong, Xiao; Qingwei, Li

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the antigen recognition mechanism based on variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) was found in agnathan lamprey. To illuminate the genetic basis of immune response of lymphocyte-like cells in the mucosal immune system of lamprey and explore the evolutionary relationship of adaptive immune responses between the jawless and jawed vertebrates, we constructed cDNA libraries of lamprey (Lampetra japonica) gills before and after stimulation, and then performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and analysis. Through functional annotation of 88 525 assembled unigenes, 21 704 and 9769 unigenes were annotated in Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. Among 999 unigenes involved in multiple pathways of immune system, 184 unigenes were highly homologous to 51 TCR (T cell receptor) and BCR (B cell receptor) signalling molecules in higher vertebrates, indicating that molecules involved in adaptive immune signalling pathways in higher vertebrates also exist in lampreys. In addition, identification of five VLRA, seven VLRB and four VLRC molecules suggest that at least three types of lymphocyte subsets are distributed in lamprey gill mucosal immune tissues. The results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR showed that the expression levels of Lck, Fyn and Zap70 were up-regulated after immune stimulation while those of Syk, Btk and Blnk were not changed significantly, indicating the activation of TCR-like signal transduction pathway after antigen stimulation in lamprey gill tissues. Our studies preliminaryly proved that two parallel adaptive immune systems in jawless and jawed vertebrates have common genetic basis, and also provided valuable clues to the exploration of signalling processes of VLRA⁺, VLRB⁺, and VLRC⁺ lymphocyte-like cells in response to antigens. PMID:26582529

  19. Genomic Correlates of Immune-Cell Infiltrates in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Shukla, Sachet A.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Cohen, Ofir; Nishihara, Reiko; Bahl, Samira; Cao, Yin; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Yamauchi, Mai; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Stewart, Chip; Rosenberg, Mara; Mima, Kosuke; Inamura, Kentaro; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.; Ng, Kimmie; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Wu, Catherine J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Large-scale genomic characterization of tumors from prospective cohort studies may yield new insights into cancer pathogenesis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 619 incident colorectal cancers (CRCs) and integrated the results with tumor immunity, pathology, and survival data. We identified recurrently mutated genes in CRC, such as BCL9L, RBM10, CTCF, and KLF5, that were not previously appreciated in this disease. Furthermore, we investigated the genomic correlates of immune-cell infiltration and found that higher neoantigen load was positively associated with overall lymphocytic infiltration, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), memory T cells, and CRC-specific survival. The association with TILs was evident even within microsatellite-stable tumors. We also found positive selection of mutations in HLA genes and other components of the antigen-processing machinery in TIL-rich tumors. These results may inform immunotherapeutic approaches in CRC. More generally, this study demonstrates a framework for future integrative molecular epidemiology research in colorectal and other malignancies. PMID:27149842

  20. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  1. Immune-inflammatory responses in atherosclerosis: Role of an adaptive immunity mainly driven by T and B cells.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive immune response plays an important role in atherogenesis. In atherosclerosis, the proinflammatory immune response driven by Th1 is predominant but the anti-inflammatory response mediated mainly by regulatory T cells is also present. The role of Th2 and Th17 cells in atherogenesis is still debated. In the plaque, other T helper cells can be observed such as Th9 and Th22 but is little is known about their impact in atherosclerosis. Heterogeneity of CD4(+) T cell subsets presented in the plaque may suggest for plasticity of T cell that can switch the phenotype dependening on the local microenvironment and activating/blocking stimuli. Effector T cells are able to recognize self-antigens released by necrotic and apoptotic vascular cells and induce a humoral immune reaction. Tth cells resided in the germinal centers help B cells to switch the antibody class to the production of high-affinity antibodies. Humoral immunity is mediated by B cells that release antigen-specific antibodies. A variety of B cell subsets were found in human and murine atherosclerotic plaques. In mice, B1 cells could spontaneously produce atheroprotective natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B2 lymphocytes secrete either proatherogenic IgG, IgA, and IgE or atheroprotective IgG and IgM antibodies reactive with oxidation-specific epitopes on atherosclerosis-associated antigens. A small population of innate response activator (IRA) B cells, which is phenotypically intermediate between B1 and B2 cells, produces IgM but possesses proatherosclerotic properties. Finally, there is a minor subset of splenic regulatory B cells (Bregs) that protect against atherosclerotic inflammation through support of generation of Tregs and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β and proapoptotic molecules. PMID:27262513

  2. Intestinal epithelial cells as mediators of the commensal–host immune crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ivanov, Ivaylo I

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria regulate the homeostasis of host effector immune cell subsets. The mechanisms involved in this commensal–host crosstalk are not well understood. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only create a physical barrier between the commensals and immune cells in host tissues, but also facilitate interactions between them. Perturbations of epithelial homeostasis or function lead to the development of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and intestinal cancer. IECs receive signals from commensals and produce effector immune molecules. IECs also affect the function of immune cells in the lamina propria. Here we discuss some of these properties of IECs that define them as innate immune cells. We focus on how IECs may integrate and transmit signals from individual commensal bacteria to mucosal innate and adaptive immune cells for the establishment of the unique mucosal immunological equilibrium. PMID:23318659

  3. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  4. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  5. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  6. The Immune-Metabolic Basis of Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Function under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dimeloe, Sarah; Mehling, Matthias; Frick, Corina; Loeliger, Jordan; Bantug, Glenn R; Sauder, Ursula; Fischer, Marco; Belle, Réka; Develioglu, Leyla; Tay, Savaş; Langenkamp, Anja; Hess, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Effector memory (EM) CD4(+) T cells recirculate between normoxic blood and hypoxic tissues to screen for cognate Ag. How mitochondria of these cells, shuttling between normoxia and hypoxia, maintain bioenergetic efficiency and stably uphold antiapoptotic features is unknown. In this study, we found that human EM CD4(+) T cells had greater spare respiratory capacity (SRC) than did naive counterparts, which was immediately accessed under hypoxia. Consequently, hypoxic EM cells maintained ATP levels, survived and migrated better than did hypoxic naive cells, and hypoxia did not impair their capacity to produce IFN-γ. EM CD4(+) T cells also had more abundant cytosolic GAPDH and increased glycolytic reserve. In contrast to SRC, glycolytic reserve was not tapped under hypoxic conditions, and, under hypoxia, glucose metabolism contributed similarly to ATP production in naive and EM cells. However, both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, glucose was critical for EM CD4(+) T cell survival. Mechanistically, in the absence of glycolysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of EM cells declined and intrinsic apoptosis was triggered. Restoring pyruvate levels, the end product of glycolysis, preserved ΔΨm and prevented apoptosis. Furthermore, reconstitution of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whose production depends on ΔΨm, also rescued viability, whereas scavenging mitochondrial ROS exacerbated apoptosis. Rapid access of SRC in hypoxia, linked with built-in, oxygen-resistant glycolytic reserve that functionally insulates ΔΨm and mitochondrial ROS production from oxygen tension changes, provides an immune-metabolic basis supporting survival, migration, and function of EM CD4(+) T cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:26621861

  7. A monoallelic-to-biallelic T-cell transcriptional switch regulates GATA3 abundance

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Lim, Kim-Chew; Kalantry, Sundeep; Maillard, Ivan; Engel, James Douglas; Hosoya, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Protein abundance must be precisely regulated throughout life, and nowhere is the stringency of this requirement more evident than during T-cell development: A twofold increase in the abundance of transcription factor GATA3 results in thymic lymphoma, while reduced GATA3 leads to diminished T-cell production. GATA3 haploinsufficiency also causes human HDR (hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia) syndrome, often accompanied by immunodeficiency. Here we show that loss of one Gata3 allele leads to diminished expansion (and compromised development) of immature T cells as well as aberrant induction of myeloid transcription factor PU.1. This effect is at least in part mediated transcriptionally: We discovered that Gata3 is monoallelically expressed in a parent of origin-independent manner in hematopoietic stem cells and early T-cell progenitors. Curiously, half of the developing cells switch to biallelic Gata3 transcription abruptly at midthymopoiesis. We show that the monoallelic-to-biallelic transcriptional switch is stably maintained and therefore is not a stochastic phenomenon. This unique mechanism, if adopted by other regulatory genes, may provide new biological insights into the rather prevalent phenomenon of monoallelic expression of autosomal genes as well as into the variably penetrant pathophysiological spectrum of phenotypes observed in many human syndromes that are due to haploinsufficiency of the affected gene. PMID:26385963

  8. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malinovsky, Frederikke G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant’s immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle processes underlying cell wall modification poses special challenges for plant glycobiology. In this review we describe the major molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the roles of cell walls in plant defense against pathogen attack. In so doing, we also highlight some of the challenges inherent in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:24834069

  9. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions. PMID:25287236

  10. Effect of dietary selenium on T cell immunity and cancer xenograft in nude mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium is known to regulate carcinogenesis and immunity at nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides one of the main body defenses against cancer, we asked whether T cell immunity can modulate selenium chemoprevention. Twenty-four homozygous NU/J nude mice were fe...

  11. Role of B Cells in Vaccine-Induced Immunity against Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Magee, D. Mitchell; Friedberg, Rhonda L.; Woitaske, Melanie D.; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Cox, Rebecca A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated secondary immunity against coccidioidomycosis by using gene expression microarrays. Surprisingly, a high percentage of B-cell-related genes were associated with protective immunity. A functional confirmation of the importance of B cells against coccidioidomycosis was achieved by demonstrating that vaccination was not fully protective in B-cell-deficient MuMT mice. PMID:16177382

  12. Development of Earth-Abundant and Non-Toxic Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Helen Hejin

    Although solar energy is the most abundant energy resource available, photovoltaic solar cells must consist of sufficiently abundant and environmentally friendly elements, for scalable low-cost production to provide a major amount of the world's energy supply. However, scalability is limited in current thin-film solar cell technologies based on Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 and CdTe due to scarce, expensive, and toxic elements. Thin-film solar cells consisting of earth-abundant and non-toxic materials were made from pulsed chemical vapor deposition (pulsed-CVD) of SnS as the p-type absorber layer and atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Zn(O,S) as the n-type buffer layer. Solar cells with a structure of Mo/SnS/Zn(O,S)/ZnO/ITO were studied by varying the synthesis conditions of the SnS and Zn(O,S) layers. Annealing SnS in hydrogen sulfide increased the mobility by more than one order of magnitude, and improved the power conversion efficiency of the solar cell devices. Solar cell performance can be further optimized by adjusting the stoichiometry of Zn(O,S), and by tuning the electrical properties of Zn(O,S) through various in situ or post-annealing treatments. Zn(O,S) can be post-annealed in oxygen atmosphere or doped with nitrogen, by ammonium hydroxide or ammonia gas, during the ALD growth to reduce the carrier concentration, which can be critical for reducing interface recombination at the p-n junction. High carrier concentration buffer layers can be critical for reducing contact resistance with the ITO layer. Zn(O,S) can also be incorporated with aluminum by trimethylaluminum (TMA) doses to either increase or decrease the carrier concentration based on the stoichiometry of Zn(O,S).

  13. Survival of priceless cells: active and passive protection of embryonic stem cells against immune destruction.

    PubMed

    Utermöhlen, Olaf; Krönke, Martin

    2007-06-15

    This review focuses on our current knowledge of the mechanisms employed by embryonic stem (ES) cells to avoid destruction by cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, ES cells have been found to shield themselves against cytotoxic effector cells by expressing CD95L and serine protease inhibitor SPI-6 mediating apoptosis of the cytotoxic cells and inactivation of granzyme B, respectively. These findings are discussed in view of their implications for using ES cell-derived transplants in regenerative medicine as well as for our understanding of early embryonic stages during invasion and implantation. PMID:17459325

  14. Rapid reuptake of granzyme B leads to emperitosis: an apoptotic cell-in-cell death of immune killer cells inside tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; He, M-f; Chen, Y-h; Wang, M-y; Yu, X-M; Bai, J; Zhu, H-y; Wang, Y-y; Zhao, H; Mei, Q; Nie, J; Ma, J; Wang, J-f; Wen, Q; Ma, L; Wang, Y; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    A cell-in-cell process refers to the invasion of one living cell into another homotypic or heterotypic cell. Different from non-apoptotic death processes of internalized cells termed entosis or cannibalism, we previously reported an apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurring during heterotypic cell-in-cell formation. In this study, we further demonstrated that the apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurred only in internalized immune killer cells expressing granzyme B (GzmB). Vacuole wrapping around the internalized cells inside the target cells was the common hallmark during the early stage of all cell-in-cell processes, which resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent mitochondrial injury of encapsulated killer or non-cytotoxic immune cells. However, internalized killer cells mediated rapid bubbling of the vacuoles with the subsequent degranulation of GzmB inside the vacuole of the target cells and underwent the reuptake of GzmB by killer cells themselves. The confinement of GzmB inside the vacuole surpassed the lysosome-mediated cell death occurring in heterotypic or homotypic entosis processes, resulting in a GzmB-triggered caspase-dependent apoptotic cell-in-cell death of internalized killer cells. On the contrary, internalized killer cells from GzmB-deficient mice underwent a typical non-apoptotic entotic cell-in-cell death similar to that of non-cytotoxic immune cells or tumor cells. Our results thus demonstrated the critical involvement of immune cells with cytotoxic property in apoptotic cell-in-cell death, which we termed as emperitosis taken from emperipolesis and apoptosis. Whereas entosis or cannibalism may serve as a feed-on mechanism to exacerbate and nourish tumor cells, emperitosis of immune killer cells inside tumor cells may serve as an in-cell danger sensation model to prevent the killing of target cells from inside, implying a unique mechanism for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance. PMID:24113190

  15. Non-neuronal Cells in ALS: Role of Glial, Immune cells and Blood-CNS Barriers.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Fabiola; Malaspina, Andrea; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Neurological dysfunction and motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is strongly associated with neuroinflammation reflected by activated microglia and astrocytes in the CNS. In ALS endogenous triggers in the CNS such as aggregated protein and misfolded proteins activate a pathogenic response by innate immune cells. However, there is also strong evidence for a neuroprotective immune response in ALS. Emerging evidence also reveals changes in the peripheral adaptive immune responses as well as alterations in the blood brain barrier that may aid traffic of lymphocytes and antibodies into the CNS. Understanding the triggers of neuroinflammation is key to controlling neuronal loss. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the roles of non-neuronal cells as well as the innate and adaptive immune responses in ALS. Existing ALS animal models, in particular genetic rodent models, are very useful to study the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. We also discuss the approaches used to target the pathogenic immune responses and boost the neuroprotective immune pathways as novel immunotherapies for ALS. PMID:26780491

  16. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptors in immune cells: emerging role in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bene, Nicholas C; Alcaide, Pilar; Wortis, Henry H; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2014-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans. As such, MR antagonists improve cardiovascular outcomes but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The actions of the MR in the kidney to increase blood pressure are well known, but the recent identification of MRs in immune cells has led to novel discoveries in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that are reviewed here. MR regulates macrophage activation to the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype and this process contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis in response to hypertension and to outcomes in mouse models of stroke. T lymphocytes have recently been implicated in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular fibrosis in mouse models. MR activation in vivo promotes T lymphocyte differentiation to the pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 subsets while decreasing the number of anti-inflammatory T regulatory lymphocytes. The mechanism likely involves activation of MR in antigen presenting dendritic cells that subsequently regulate Th1/Th17 polarization by production of cytokines. Alteration of the balance between T helper and T regulatory lymphocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis and the associated complications. B lymphocytes also express the MR and specific B lymphocyte-derived antibodies modulate the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the role of MR in B lymphocyte function remains to be explored. Overall, recent studies of MR in immune cells have identified new mechanisms by which MR activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of organ damage in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Conversely, inhibition of leukocyte MR may contribute to the protective effects of MR antagonist drugs in cardiovascular patients. Further understanding of the role of MR in leukocyte function could yield novel drug targets for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24769248

  18. Peptide assemblies: from cell scaffolds to immune adjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Joel

    2011-03-01

    This talk will discuss two interrelated aspects of peptide self-assemblies in biological applications: their use as matrices for regenerative medicine, and their use as chemically defined adjuvants for directing immune responses against engineered antigens. In the first half of the presentation, the design of peptide self-assemblies as analogues for the extracellular matrix will be described, with a focus on self-assemblies displaying multiple different cell-binding peptides. We conducted multi-factorial investigations of peptide co-assemblies containing several different ligand-bearing peptides using statistical ``design of experiments'' (DoE). Using the DoE techniques of factorial experimentation and response surface modeling, we systematically explored how precise combinations of ligand-bearing peptides modulated endothelial cell growth, in the process finding interactions between ligands not previously appreciated. By investigating immune responses against the materials intended for tissue engineering applications, we discovered that the basic self-assembling peptides were minimally immunogenic or non-immunogenic, even when delivered in strong adjuvants. -But when they were appended to an appropriately restricted epitope peptide, these materials raised strong and persistent antibody responses. These responses were dependent on covalent conjugation between the epitope and self-assembling domains of the peptides, were mediated by T cells, and could be directed towards both peptide epitopes and conjugated protein antigens. In addition to their demonstrated utility as scaffolds for regenerative medicine, peptide self-assemblies may also be useful as chemically defined adjuvants for vaccines and immunotherapies. This work was funded by NIH/NIDCR (1 R21 DE017703-03), NIH/NIBIB (1 R01 EB009701-01), and NSF (CHE-0802286).

  19. Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Immune Cells; Emerging Role in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bene, Nicholas C.; Alcaide, Pilar; Wortis, Henry H.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans. As such, MR antagonists improve cardiovascular outcomes but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The actions of the MR in the kidney to increase blood pressure are well known, but the recent identification of MRs in immune cells has led to novel discoveries in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that are reviewed here. MR regulates macrophage activation to the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype and this process contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis in response to hypertension and to outcomes in mouse models of stroke. T lymphocytes have recently been implicated in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular fibrosis in mouse models. MR activation in vivo promotes T lymphocyte differentiation to the pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 subsets while decreasing the number of anti-inflammatory T regulatory lymphocytes. The mechanism likely involves activation of MR in antigen presenting dendritic cells that subsequently regulate Th1/Th17 polarization by production of cytokines. Alteration of the balance between T helper and T regulatory lymphocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis and the associated complications. B lymphocytes also express the MR and specific B lymphocyte-derived antibodies modulate the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the role of MR in B lymphocyte function remains to be explored. Overall, recent studies of MR in immune cells have identified new mechanisms by which MR activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of organ damage in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Conversely, inhibition of leukocyte MR may contribute to the protective effects of MR antagonist drugs in cardiovascular patients. Further understanding of the role of MR in leukocyte function could yield novel drug targets for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24769248

  20. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana M.; Fernandes, Joana G.; Silva, Liana C.; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena F.; Barata, Teresa S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options

  1. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Liana; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena; Barata, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options.

  2. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  3. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells in autoimmunity, immune-mediated diseases and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Timothy S C

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans imply a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However, MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless, the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely, MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools that are now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. PMID:26778581

  4. Dynamic changes in immune cell profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Immunomodulatory effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Sakakura, Koichi; Mito, Ikko; Ida, Shota; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cells have evolved sophisticated means of escape from the host immune system. To date, several important immunological phenomena have been revealed in peripheral blood as well as within tumors. In the present study, we first investigated the proportion and activation status of peripheral immune regulatory cells and CD8(+) T-cell subsets in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a multicolor flow cytometer, and then evaluated how therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil modulated the immune cell profile in peripheral blood. The proportion of naïve T cells was lower and that of effector memory T cells (TEM ) was higher in HNSCC patients than in healthy donors. Moreover, the proportions of activated TEM cells and effector T cells (TEFF ) were dramatically increased in patients with advanced stage disease. The proportion of regulatory T cells and CD14(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid-derived suppressor cells was elevated in HNSCC patients. Of note, after therapy, in addition to the transient reduction in immune regulatory cells, decreases in central memory T cells and increases in TEFF cells were observed among CD8(+) T-cell subsets, suggesting differentiation from central memory T cells into TEFF cells. Our results suggested that, despite the immunosuppressive status in HNSCC patients, tumor-specific immune responses mediated by CD8(+) T cells might be induced and maintained. Moreover, chemotherapy can trigger not only a transient reduction in immune regulatory cells but also further activation of CD8(+) T cells. PMID:27228557

  5. Cell death, clearance and immunity in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sciorati, C; Rigamonti, E; Manfredi, A A; Rovere-Querini, P

    2016-06-01

    accumulation and promoting autoimmunity itself. There is strong promise for novel treatments based on new knowledge of cell death, clearance and immunity in the muscle. PMID:26868912

  6. Immune Repertoire Profiling Reveals that Clonally Expanded B and T Cells Infiltrating Diseased Human Kidneys Can Also Be Tracked in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Susanne; Suessner, Susanne; Sunzenauer, Judith; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Weiss, Richard; Winkler, Stephan; Gabriel, Christian; Danzer, Martin; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing allow for the competitive analysis of the human B and T cell immune repertoire. In this study we compared Immunoglobulin and T cell receptor repertoires of lymphocytes found in kidney and blood samples of 10 patients with various renal diseases based on next-generation sequencing data. We used Biomed-2 primer panels and ImmunExplorer software to sequence, analyze and compare complementarity determining regions and V-(D)-J elements. While generally an individual’s renal receptor repertoire is different from the repertoire present in blood, 94% (30/32) of the lymphocytes with clonal expansion in kidney can also be traced in blood however, not all of these clonotypes are equally abundant. Summarizing the data of all analyzed patients, 68% of highly expanded T cell clonotypes and 30% of the highly expanded B cell clonotypes that have infiltrated the kidney can be found amongst the five most abundant clonotypes in blood. In addition, complementarity determining region 3 sequences of the immunoglobulin heavy chains are on average more diverse than T cell receptor beta chains. Immune repertoire analysis of tissue infiltrating B and T cells adds new approaches to the assessment of adaptive immune response in kidney diseases. Our data suggest that expanded clonotypes in the tissues might be traceable in blood samples in the course of treatment or the natural history of the disease. PMID:26600245

  7. Abundance of mixed linkage glucan in mature tissues and secondary cell walls of grasses.

    PubMed

    Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Scheller, Henrik V; Ronald, Pamela C

    2013-02-01

    (1,3; 1,4)-β-D-glucan, also known as mixed linkage glucan (MLG), is a polysaccharide that in flowering plants is unique to the cell walls of grasses and other related members of Poales. MLG is highly abundant in endosperm cell walls, where it is considered a storage carbohydrate. In vegetative tissues, MLG transiently accumulates in the primary cell walls of young, elongating organs. In evolutionary distant species such as Equisetum, MLG accumulates predominantly in old tissues in the stems. Similarly, we have recently shown that rice accumulates a large amount of MLG in mature stems, which prompted us to re-evaluate the hypothesis that MLG is solely related to growth in grass vegetative tissues. Here, we summarize data that confirms the presence of MLG in secondary cell walls and mature tissues in rice and other grasses. Along with these results, we discuss additional evidence indicating a broader role for MLG than previously considered. PMID:23299432

  8. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Shaun M.; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C.; Savage, Caroline O.; Henderson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4+ T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95+ naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26969086

  9. VHL-dependent alterations in the secretome of renal cell carcinoma: Association with immune cell response?

    PubMed

    Stehle, Franziska; Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Schwurack, Nicolle; Weber, Nico; Massa, Chiara; Kalich, Jana; Fahldieck, Corinna; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Secreted proteins could modulate the interaction between tumor, stroma and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment thereby mounting an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In order to determine the secretome-mediated, von Hippel Lindau (VHL)-regulated cross-talk between tumor cells and T lymphocytes peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were either cultured in conditioned media obtained from normoxic and hypoxic human VHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (786-0VHL-) and its wild type (wt) VHL-transfected counterpart (786-0VHL+) or directly co-cultured with both cell lines. An increased T cell proliferation was detected in the presence of 786-0VHL+-conditioned medium. By applying a quantitative proteomic-based approach using differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry fourteen proteins were identified to be differentially expressed within the secretome of 786-0VHL- cells when compared to that of 786-0VHL+ cells. All proteins identified were involved in multiple tumor-associated biological functions including immune responses. Functional studies on manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD2) demonstrated that it was a regulator of T cell activation-induced oxidative signaling and cell death. Direct effects of soluble MnSOD2 on the growth properties and interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion of T cells could be demonstrated underlining the critical role of extracellular MnSOD2 levels for T cell proliferation and activation. PMID:26486078

  10. A comparative study of colorimetric cell proliferation assays in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Madoka; Kawakabe, So; Arimura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Cell proliferation assays are basic and essential techniques for assessing cellular function. Various colorimetric assays, such as MTT-, WST-1-, and resazurin-based assays, are available; however, studies directly comparing the suitability of each method for immune cell proliferation are scarce. Thus, we aimed to determine the best reagent and its optimal conditions based on variables such as cell number range, stimulation dose, kinetics, and compatibility with the cell division assay using CFSE fluorescence dye which is able to directly monitor divided cells by flow cytometry. In the absence of stimulation, MTT solubilized with SDS (MTT-SDS) and resazurin appeared to accurately reflect the cell numbers in a linear fashion. On the other hand, WST-1 exhibited a higher stimulation index following strong stimulation, whereas MTT-SDS and resazurin exhibited a better sensitivity to weak stimulation. A longer duration for stimulation did not necessarily increase sensitivity. CFSE staining revealed incremental cell division in response to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. The cell numbers indirectly estimated from cell division profiles were consistent with the dose-response curve in the absorbance of MTT-SDS and resazurin. The absorbance does not increase before cell division, irrespective of T cell activation status, suggesting that these reagents reflect the cell number but not the cellular volume. Collectively, resazurin and MTT-SDS seem to be more reliable than others, and thus appear applicable in various conditions for the immune cell experiments. PMID:26280992

  11. VHL-dependent alterations in the secretome of renal cell carcinoma: Association with immune cell response?

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Franziska; Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Schwurack, Nicolle; Weber, Nico; Massa, Chiara; Kalich, Jana; Fahldieck, Corinna; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Secreted proteins could modulate the interaction between tumor, stroma and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment thereby mounting an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In order to determine the secretome-mediated, von Hippel Lindau (VHL)-regulated cross-talk between tumor cells and T lymphocytes peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were either cultured in conditioned media obtained from normoxic and hypoxic human VHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (786-0VHL−) and its wild type (wt) VHL-transfected counterpart (786-0VHL+) or directly co-cultured with both cell lines. An increased T cell proliferation was detected in the presence of 786-0VHL+-conditioned medium. By applying a quantitative proteomic-based approach using differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry fourteen proteins were identified to be differentially expressed within the secretome of 786-0VHL− cells when compared to that of 786-0VHL+ cells. All proteins identified were involved in multiple tumor-associated biological functions including immune responses. Functional studies on manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD2) demonstrated that it was a regulator of T cell activation-induced oxidative signaling and cell death. Direct effects of soluble MnSOD2 on the growth properties and interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion of T cells could be demonstrated underlining the critical role of extracellular MnSOD2 levels for T cell proliferation and activation. PMID:26486078

  12. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors DCs are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence DCs behavior through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarize current understanding of how allergens are recognized by DCs and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitization and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signaling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitization hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases. PMID:24204367

  13. Ex vivo generation of functional immune cells by mitochondria-targeted photosensitization of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Tundup, Smanla; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the immune system for potent immune therapy against cancer is potentially a revolutionary method to eradicate cancer. Tumors stimulated with photosensitizers (PSs) not only kill cancer cells but also help to boost the immune system. We recently reported that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generated by delivery of a mitochondria-acting PS zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to MCF-7 breast cancer cells followed by laser irradiation can lead to ex vivo stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). The antigens generated from the breast cancer cells were also found to cause significant DC maturation and the activated DCs were able to stimulate T cells to cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. In this protocol, we describe methods to engineer a mitochondria-targeted biodegradable nanoparticle (NP) formulation, T-ZnPc-NPs for delivery of ZnPc to the mitochondria of MCF-7 cells, subsequent photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a long wavelength laser irradiation to produce TAAs, DC stimulation by the TAAs to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and matured DC-driven T-cell activation. PMID:25634271

  14. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  15. DISTINCTIVE LOCALIZATION OF GROUP 3 LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT SYNTHESIZING CELLS DURING BRINE SHRIMP DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Yong; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Bong Hee; Kim, Kyung Joo; Jo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Suhng Wook; Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Boo Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, their functions, roles, and localizations during developmental stages in arthropods remain unknown. LEA proteins protect crucial proteins against osmotic stress during the development and growth of various organisms. Thus, in this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to determine the crucial regions protected against osmotic stress as well as the distinctive localization of group 3 (G3) LEA(+) cells during brine shrimp development. Several cell types were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA, including neurons, muscular cells, APH-1(+) cells, and renal cells. The G3 LEA(+) neuronal cell bodies outside of the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles to the central body, but those inside the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles toward the deutocerebrum without innervating the central body. The cell bodies inside the mushroom body received axons of the G3 LEA(+) sensory cells at the medial ventral cup of the nauplius eye. Several glands were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA during the nauplius stages of brine shrimp, including the sinus, antennal I and II, salt, and three ectodermal glands. This study provides the first demonstration of the formation of G3 LEA(+) sinus glands at the emergence stages of brine shrimp. These results suggest that G3 LEA protein is synthesized in several cell types. In particular, specific glands play crucial roles during the emergence and nauplius stages of brine shrimp. PMID:25781424

  16. Tuft cells, taste-chemosensory cells, orchestrate parasite type 2 immunity in the gut.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Michael R; Lavoie, Sydney; Michaud, Monia; Blum, Arthur M; Tran, Sara V; Weinstock, Joel V; Gallini, Carey Ann; Redding, Kevin; Margolskee, Robert F; Osborne, Lisa C; Artis, David; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-03-18

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential barrier between a host and its microbiota. Protozoa and helminths are members of the gut microbiota of mammals, including humans, yet the many ways that gut epithelial cells orchestrate responses to these eukaryotes remain unclear. Here we show that tuft cells, which are taste-chemosensory epithelial cells, accumulate during parasite colonization and infection. Disruption of chemosensory signaling through the loss of TRMP5 abrogates the expansion of tuft cells, goblet cells, eosinophils, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells during parasite colonization. Tuft cells are the primary source of the parasite-induced cytokine interleukin-25, which indirectly induces tuft cell expansion by promoting interleukin-13 production by innate lymphoid cells. Our results identify intestinal tuft cells as critical sentinels in the gut epithelium that promote type 2 immunity in response to intestinal parasites. PMID:26847546

  17. Depressed cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Fourteen coeliac patients on a gluten free diet (GFD) and 10 on a normal diet were studied by lymphocyte transformation in response to PHA to assess the integrity of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Transformation was depressed in the majority taking a normal diet, with improvement after a GFD. In some patients the depression may have been due to a serum factor, as transformation was more nearly normal when the lymphocytes were cultured in pooled AB serum than in their own serum. There was no correlation between transformation and nutritional deficiencies. Mantoux tests were performed in some of these and other coeliac patients and there was a very significant reduction in the incidence of positive tests compared with controls. These findings provide evidence of depressed CMI in coeliac patients taking a normal diet with improvement on a GFD and may be of relevance to the high risk of malignancy in coeliac disease, further strengthening the case for a strict GFD. PMID:1087262

  18. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli; Carrasco, Solange; Neto, Cyro Festa; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-03-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare disease that usually begins in childhood and is characterized by a generalized infection by human papilloma virus (HPV), frequent associations with cutaneous carcinomas, and abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). We studied nonspecific CMI in 13 patients with EV by bacterial skin tests, allergic reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), measurement of responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and quantification of T lymphocytes and T lymphocytes subsets in peripheral blood. Impairment of CMI was manifested by the cutaneous anergy to a variety of common skin antigens and, by the reduction of the lymphocyte transformation to PHA. There were no correlation between the severity of cases and abnormalities of CMI in our patients, however; the impairment of CMI was lower in cases of short duration, suggesting that the impairment of CMI in EV might reflect a long period of disease. PMID:12692356

  19. Empowering gamma delta T cells with antitumor immunity by dendritic cell-based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen H; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Lion, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells are the all-rounders of our immune-system with their major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytotoxicity, capacity to secrete immunosti-mulatory cytokines and ability to promote the generation of tumor antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine therapy has the prospective to harness these unique features of the γδ T cells in the fight against cancer. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge on DC-mediated γδ T cell activation and related opportunities for tumor immunologists. PMID:26405575

  20. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets.

    PubMed

    Bandrick, Meggan; Ariza-Nieto, Claudia; Baidoo, Samuel K; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suckling were assessed to investigate transfer and function of maternal immunity in the piglet. CD4, CD8, and γδ lymphocytes were found in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood PS and AS; each had a unique T lymphocyte profile. Immunoglobulins were detected in sow blood, colostrum, and in piglet blood AS; the immunoglobulin profile of piglet serum AS mimicked that of sow serum. These results suggest selectivity in lymphocyte concentration into colostrum and subsequent lymphocyte transfer into the neonate, but that immunoglobulin transfer is unimpeded. Assessment of colostral natural killer activity and antigen-specific proliferation revealed that colostral cells are capable of influencing the innate and specific immune response of neonatal pigs. PMID:24252519

  1. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  2. Patterns in Abundance, Cell Size and Pigment Content of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria along Environmental Gradients in Northern Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, Lisa; Cottrell, Matthew T.; Kirchman, David L.; Borrego, Carles M.; Garcia-Chaves, Maria Carolina; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    There is now evidence that aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are widespread across aquatic systems, yet the factors that determine their abundance and activity are still not well understood, particularly in freshwaters. Here we describe the patterns in AAP abundance, cell size and pigment content across wide environmental gradients in 43 temperate and boreal lakes of Québec. AAP bacterial abundance varied from 1.51 to 5.49 x 105 cells mL-1, representing <1 to 37% of total bacterial abundance. AAP bacteria were present year-round, including the ice-cover period, but their abundance relative to total bacterial abundance was significantly lower in winter than in summer (2.6% and 7.7%, respectively). AAP bacterial cells were on average two-fold larger than the average bacterial cell size, thus AAP cells made a greater relative contribution to biomass than to abundance. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) concentration varied widely across lakes, and was not related to AAP bacterial abundance, suggesting a large intrinsic variability in the cellular pigment content. Absolute and relative AAP bacterial abundance increased with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas cell-specific BChla content was negatively related to chlorophyll a (Chla). As a result, both the contribution of AAP bacteria to total prokaryotic abundance, and the cell-specific BChla pigment content were positively correlated with the DOC:Chla ratio, both peaking in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes. Our results suggest that photoheterotrophy might represent a significant ecological advantage in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes, where DOC pool is chemically and structurally more complex. PMID:25927833

  3. Apoptotic epithelial cells control the abundance of Treg cells at barrier surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yuta; Totsuka, Naoya; Miki, Haruka; Iino, Shuichi; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial tissues continually undergo apoptosis. Commensal organisms that inhabit the epithelium influence tissue homeostasis, in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a central role. However, the physiological importance of epithelial cell apoptosis and how the number of Treg cells is regulated are both incompletely understood. Here we found that apoptotic epithelial cells negatively regulated the commensal-stimulated proliferation of Treg cells. Gut commensals stimulated CX3CR1(+)CD103(-)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon-β (IFN-β), which augmented the proliferation of Treg cells in the intestine. Conversely, phosphatidylserine exposed on apoptotic epithelial cells suppressed IFN-β production by the DCs via inhibitory signaling mediated by the cell-surface glycoprotein CD300a and thus suppressed Treg cell proliferation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for apoptotic epithelial cells in maintaining the number of Treg cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26855029

  4. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy. PMID:26543091

  5. Suppression of Adaptive Immune Cell Activation Does Not Alter Innate Immune Adipose Inflammation or Insulin Resistance in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Ozcan, Lale; Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Tabas, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a major contributor to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whereas innate immune cells, notably macrophages, contribute to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation and insulin resistance, the role of adaptive immunity is less well defined. To address this critical gap, we used a model in which endogenous activation of T cells was suppressed in obese mice by blocking MyD88-mediated maturation of CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. VAT CD11c+ cells from Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control Myd88fl/fl mice were defective in activating T cells in vitro, and VAT T and B cell activation was markedly reduced in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl obese mice. However, neither macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation nor systemic inflammation were altered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl mice, thereby enabling a focused analysis on adaptive immunity. Unexpectedly, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and the glucose response to glucose and insulin were completely unaltered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control obese mice. Thus, CD11c+ cells activate VAT T and B cells in obese mice, but suppression of this process does not have a discernible effect on macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation or systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26317499

  6. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  7. [Management of feto-maternal red cell allo-immunizations].

    PubMed

    Bricca, P; Guinchard, E; Guitton Bliem, C

    2011-04-01

    Feto-maternal red cell alloimmunization is defined by the presence in a pregnant woman of alloantibodies directed against blood group antigens present on the red blood cells of the fetus and inherited from the father. It arises from the immune response to a first contact to these same antigens during a prior transfusion, transplant or pregnancy. The placental transfer and the fixation of the antibodies on the fetal red cells antigenic targets lead to a haemolysis in the fetus and the newborn. The resulting haemolytic disease can show different clinical forms, from a mild anaemia with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia to a major fetal damage with stillbirth caused by hydrops fetalis. The objective of management strategies of feto-maternal alloimmunization is to detect and monitor maternal alloimmunization and to appreciate the effects on the fetus or the newborn. Since a few years, some new non-invasive techniques of surveillance are used, for instance fetal RHD genotyping on maternal plasma and evaluation of fetal anaemia through velocimetry measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery. The need for a careful postnatal surveillance has to be emphasized due to the neonatal anaemia, which can be prolonged, and to the resurgence of cases of severe neonatal icteruses recently reported by the Académie de Médecine. The policy of prevention of anti-RH1 alloimmunization should also benefit from the evolution of biological techniques by allowing an improved targeting of concerned women. PMID:21397546

  8. Sex differences in pain: a tale of two immune cells.

    PubMed

    Mapplebeck, Josiane C S; Beggs, Simon; Salter, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Substantial evidence has implicated microglia in neuropathic pain. After peripheral nerve injury, microglia in the spinal cord proliferate and increase cell-surface expression of the purinergic receptor P2X4. Activation of P2X4 receptors results in release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which acts on neurons to produce disinhibition of dorsal horn neurons which transmit nociceptive information to the brain. Disinhibition of these neurons produces pain hypersensitivity, a hallmark symptom of neuropathic pain. However, elucidating this microglia-neuronal signalling pathway was based on studies using only male rodents. Recent evidence has shown that the role of microglia in pain is sexually dimorphic. Despite similar microglia proliferation in the dorsal horn in both sexes, females do not upregulate P2X4Rs and use a microglia-independent pathway to mediate pain hypersensitivity. Instead, adaptive immune cells, possibly T cells, may mediate pain hypersensitivity in female mice. This profound sex difference highlights the importance of including subjects of both sexes in preclinical pain research. PMID:26785152

  9. Modulation of liver tolerance by conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells and regulatory immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Andrea Kristina; Neumann, Katrin; Diehl, Linda; Tiegs, Gisa

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a tolerogenic organ with exquisite mechanisms of immune regulation that ensure upkeep of local and systemic immune tolerance to self and foreign antigens, but that is also able to mount effective immune responses against pathogens. The immune privilege of liver allografts was recognized first in pigs in spite of major histo-compatibility complex mismatch, and termed the “liver tolerance effect”. Furthermore, liver transplants are spontaneously accepted with only low-dose immunosuppression, and induce tolerance for non-hepatic co-transplanted allografts of the same donor. Although this immunotolerogenic environment is favorable in the setting of organ transplantation, it is detrimental in chronic infectious liver diseases like hepatitis B or C, malaria, schistosomiasis or tumorigenesis, leading to pathogen persistence and weak anti-tumor effects. The liver is a primary site of T-cell activation, but it elicits poor or incomplete activation of T cells, leading to their abortive activation, exhaustion, suppression of their effector function and early death. This is exploited by pathogens and can impair pathogen control and clearance or allow tumor growth. Hepatic priming of T cells is mediated by a number of local conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which promote tolerance by immune deviation, induction of T-cell anergy or apoptosis, and generating and expanding regulatory T cells. This review will focus on the communication between classical and nonclassical APCs and lymphocytes in the liver in tolerance induction and will discuss recent insights into the role of innate lymphocytes in this process. PMID:27041638

  10. Targeting KIT on innate immune cells to enhance the antitumor activity of checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Maximilian; Gedrich, Richard; Peck, Ronald; LaVallee, Theresa; Eder, Joseph Paul

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune cells such as mast cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key components of the tumor microenvironment. Recent evidence indicates that levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma patients are associated with poor survival to checkpoint inhibitors. This suggests that targeting both the innate and adaptive suppressive components of the immune system will maximize clinical benefit and elicit more durable responses in cancer patients. Preclinical data suggest that targeting signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, particularly on mast cells, may modulate innate immune cell numbers and activity in tumors. Here, we review data highlighting the importance of the KIT signaling in regulating antitumor immune responses and the potential benefit of combining selective KIT inhibitors with immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27349976

  11. Appearance of peripheral blood plasma cells and memory B cells in a primary and secondary immune response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pulickal, Anoop S.; Jol-van der Zijde, Cornelia M.; Snape, Matthew D.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the kinetics of the appearance of memory B cells and plasma cells during primary immunization are not well defined. In this study, we assessed the primary B-cell response of rabies-antigen naive volunteers during a 3-dose course of rabies vaccine compared with the B-cell response to a booster dose of rabies vaccine given to previously immunized volunteers. After a single dose of vaccine, in the naive group plasma and memory B cells appeared later (peak at day 10) than in the primed group (peak at day 7) and were at lower frequency. The most rapid responses (day 4) were detected after a third immunization in the naive group. This is the first study to document the detailed kinetics of the plasma cell and memory B-cell responses to immunization in adult humans and to demonstrate differences in the responses that relate to the preexisting immune status of the persons. PMID:19843885

  12. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288

  13. Epithelial immunization induces polyfunctional CD8+ T cells and optimal mousepox protection.

    PubMed

    Hersperger, Adam R; Siciliano, Nicholas A; DeHaven, Brian C; Snook, Adam E; Eisenlohr, Laurence C

    2014-08-01

    We assessed several routes of immunization with vaccinia virus (VACV) in protecting mice against ectromelia virus (ECTV). By a wide margin, skin scarification provided the greatest protection. Humoral immunity and resident-memory T cells notwithstanding, several approaches revealed that circulating, memory CD8(+) T cells primed via scarification were functionally superior and conferred enhanced virus control. Immunization via the epithelial route warrants further investigation, as it may also provide enhanced defense against other infectious agents. PMID:24899206

  14. Immune Adaptation to Environmental Influence: The Case of NK Cells and HCMV.

    PubMed

    Rölle, Alexander; Brodin, Petter

    2016-03-01

    The immune system of an individual human is determined by heritable traits and a continuous process of adaptation to a broad variety of extrinsic, non-heritable factors such as viruses, bacteria, dietary components and more. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) successfully infects the majority of the human population and establishes latency, thereby exerting a life-long influence on the immune system of its host. CMV has been shown to influence the majority of immune parameters in healthy individuals. Here we focus on adaptive changes induced by CMV in subsets of Natural Killer (NK) cells, changes that question our very definition of adaptive and innate immunity by suggesting that adaptations of immune cells to environmental influences occur across the entire human immune system and not restricted to the classical adaptive branch of the immune system. PMID:26869205

  15. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  16. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  17. Imaging tumour cell heterogeneity following cell transplantation into optically clear immune-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Tenente, Inês M.; Hayes, Madeline N.; Garcia, Elaine G.; Torres Yordán, Nora; Bourque, Caitlin; He, Shuning; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Look, A. Thomas; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers contain a wide diversity of cell types that are defined by differentiation states, genetic mutations and altered epigenetic programmes that impart functional diversity to individual cells. Elevated tumour cell heterogeneity is linked with progression, therapy resistance and relapse. Yet, imaging of tumour cell heterogeneity and the hallmarks of cancer has been a technical and biological challenge. Here we develop optically clear immune-compromised rag2E450fs (casper) zebrafish for optimized cell transplantation and direct visualization of fluorescently labelled cancer cells at single-cell resolution. Tumour engraftment permits dynamic imaging of neovascularization, niche partitioning of tumour-propagating cells in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, emergence of clonal dominance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and tumour evolution resulting in elevated growth and metastasis in BRAFV600E-driven melanoma. Cell transplantation approaches using optically clear immune-compromised zebrafish provide unique opportunities to uncover biology underlying cancer and to dynamically visualize cancer processes at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:26790525

  18. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression. PMID:19726579

  19. Dynamic Visualization of Dendritic Cell-Antigen Interactions in the Skin Following Transcutaneous Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Rattanapak, Teerawan; Birchall, James C.; Young, Katherine; Kubo, Atsuko; Fujimori, Sayumi; Ishii, Masaru; Hook, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of vaccines into the skin provides many advantages over traditional parenteral vaccination and is a promising approach due to the abundance of antigen presenting cells (APC) residing in the skin including Langerhans cells (LC) and dermal dendritic cells (DDC). However, the main obstacle for transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is the effective delivery of the vaccine through the stratum corneum (SC) barrier to the APC in the deeper skin layers. This study therefore utilized microneedles (MN) and a lipid-based colloidal delivery system (cubosomes) as a synergistic approach for the delivery of vaccines to APC in the skin. The process of vaccine uptake and recruitment by specific types of skin APC was investigated in real-time over 4 hours in B6.Cg-Tg (Itgax-EYFP) 1 Mnz/J mice by two-photon microscopy. Incorporation of the vaccine into a particulate delivery system and the use of MN preferentially increased vaccine antigen uptake by a highly motile subpopulation of skin APC known as CD207+ DC. No uptake of antigen or any response to immunisation by LC could be detected. PMID:24586830

  20. Pectic homogalacturonan masks abundant sets of xyloglucan epitopes in plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Susan E; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Hervé, Cécile; Ordaz-Ortiz, José J; Farkas, Vladimir; Pedersen, Henriette L; Willats, William GT; Knox, J Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Molecular probes are required to detect cell wall polymers in-situ to aid understanding of their cell biology and several studies have shown that cell wall epitopes have restricted occurrences across sections of plant organs indicating that cell wall structure is highly developmentally regulated. Xyloglucan is the major hemicellulose or cross-linking glycan of the primary cell walls of dicotyledons although little is known of its occurrence or functions in relation to cell development and cell wall microstructure. Results Using a neoglycoprotein approach, in which a XXXG heptasaccharide of tamarind seed xyloglucan was coupled to BSA to produce an immunogen, we have generated a rat monoclonal antibody (designated LM15) to the XXXG structural motif of xyloglucans. The specificity of LM15 has been confirmed by the analysis of LM15 binding using glycan microarrays and oligosaccharide hapten inhibition of binding studies. The use of LM15 for the analysis of xyloglucan in the cell walls of tamarind and nasturtium seeds, in which xyloglucan occurs as a storage polysaccharide, indicated that the LM15 xyloglucan epitope occurs throughout the thickened cell walls of the tamarind seed and in the outer regions, adjacent to middle lamellae, of the thickened cell walls of the nasturtium seed. Immunofluorescence analysis of LM15 binding to sections of tobacco and pea stem internodes indicated that the xyloglucan epitope was restricted to a few cell types in these organs. Enzymatic removal of pectic homogalacturonan from equivalent sections resulted in the abundant detection of distinct patterns of the LM15 xyloglucan epitope across these organs and a diversity of occurrences in relation to the cell wall microstructure of a range of cell types. Conclusion These observations support ideas that xyloglucan is associated with pectin in plant cell walls. They also indicate that documented patterns of cell wall epitopes in relation to cell development and cell differentiation

  1. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimera tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated or non-incubated with an anti-tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab), were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs exp...

  2. Toxicological studies of semiconductor quantum dots on immune cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricken, James Bryce; Rios, Lynette; Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2008-11-01

    Nanoengineered materials hold a vast promise of enabling revolutionary technologies, but also pose an emerging and potentially serious threat to human and environmental health. While there is increasing knowledge concerning the risks posed by engineered nanomaterials, significant inconsistencies exist within the current data based on the high degree of variability in the materials (e.g., synthesis method, coatings, etc) and biological test systems (e.g., cell lines, whole organism, etc). In this project, we evaluated the uptake and response of two immune cell lines (RAW macrophage and RBL mast cells) to nanocrystal quantum dots (Qdots) with different sizes and surface chemistries, and at different concentrations. The basic experimental design followed a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial model: two Qdot sizes (Qdot 520 and 620), two surface chemistries (amine 'NH{sub 2}' and carboxylic acid 'COOH'), and three concentrations (0, 1 nM, and 1 {micro}M). Based on this design, the following Qdots from Evident Technologies were used for all experiments: Qdot 520-COOH, Qdot 520-NH{sub 2}, Qdot 620-COOH, and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2}. Fluorescence and confocal imaging demonstrated that Qdot 620-COOH and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2} nanoparticles had a greater level of internalization and cell membrane association in RAW and RBL cells, respectively. From these data, a two-way interaction between Qdot size and concentration was observed in relation to the level of cellular uptake in RAW cells, and association with RBL cell membranes. Toxicity of both RBL and RAW cells was also significantly dependent on the interaction of Qdot size and concentration; the 1 {micro}M concentrations of the larger, Qdot 620 nanoparticles induced a greater toxic effect on both cell lines. The RBL data also demonstrate that Qdot exposure can induce significant toxicity independent of cellular uptake. A significant increase in TNF-{alpha} and decrease in IL-10 release was observed in RAW cells, and suggested that Qdot exposure

  3. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development. PMID:26586228

  4. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  5. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  6. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  7. Strategies to accelerate immune recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Barbarella; Merli, Pietro; Bertaina, Valentina; Locatelli, Franco

    2016-03-01

    The interplay existing between immune reconstitution and patient outcome has been extensively demonstrated in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. One of the leading causes of infection-related mortality is the slow recovery of T-cell immunity due to the conditioning regimen and/or age-related thymus damage, poor naïve T-cell output, and restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires. With the aim of improving posttransplantation immune reconstitution, several immunotherapy approaches have been explored. Donor leukocyte infusions are widely used to accelerate immune recovery, but they carry the risk of provoking graft-versus-host disease. This review will focus on sophisticated strategies of thymus function-recovery, adoptive infusion of donor-derived, allodepleted T cells, T-cell lines/clones specific for life-threatening pathogens, regulatory T cells, and of T cells transduced with suicide genes. PMID:26588325

  8. T Cell Receptors and the Evolution of Recognition Mechanisms in Immunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inchley, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses recent advances in the study of mammalian immunology. Explains the roles of two families of lymphocytes, the B cells and T cells. Also examines evolutionary mechanisms related to the immune system. (ML)

  9. THE NEUROPEPTIDE VIP: DIRECT EFFECTS ON IMMUNE CELLS AND INVOLVEMENT IN INFLAMMATORY AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, Doina; Hooper, Kirsten M.; Kong, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent an important category of endogenous contributors to the establishment and maintenance of immune deviation in immune privileged organs such as the CNS, and in the control of acute inflammation in the peripheral immune organs. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a major immunoregulatory neuropeptide widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system. In addition to neurons, VIP is synthesized by immune cells which also express VIP receptors. Here we review the current information on VIP production and VIP receptor mediated effects in the immune system, the role of endogenous and exogenous VIP in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and present and future VIP therapeutic approaches. PMID:25422088

  10. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors. PMID:25996049

  11. Injectable, spontaneously assembling inorganic scaffolds modulate immune cells in vivo and increase vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyun; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Choi, Youngjin; Lewin, Sarah A.; Verbeke, Catia S.; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Materials implanted in the body to program host immune cells are a promising alternative to transplantation of ex vivo–manipulated cells to direct an immune response, but required a surgical procedure. Here we demonstrate that high-aspectratio, mesoporous silica rods (MSRs) injected with a needle spontaneously assemble in vivo to form macroporous structures that provide a 3D cellular microenvironment for host immune cells. In mice, substantial numbers of DCs are recruited to the pores between the scaffold rods. The recruitment of DCs and their subsequent homing to lymph nodes can be modulated by sustained release of inflammatory signals and adjuvants from the scaffold. Moreover, injection of an MSR-based vaccine formulation enhances systemic TH1 and TH2 serum antibody and cytotoxic T cell levels compared to bolus controls. These findings suggest that injectable MSRs may serve as a multifunctional vaccine platform to modulate host immune cell function and provoke adaptive immune responses. PMID:25485616

  12. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Franki, Suzanne N; Steward, Kristopher K; Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E; Timmerman, John M

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow-derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8(+) T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell-DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  13. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  14. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    As the 2014–15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally ‘target’ virus-infected cells, here called ‘cell-targeting antibody’, or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  15. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  16. Thyroid signaling in immune organs and cells of the teleost fish rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Quesada-García, A; Valdehita, A; Kropf, C; Casanova-Nakayama, A; Segner, H; Navas, J M

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid hormones are involved in modulating the immune system in mammals. In contrast, there is no information on the role played by these hormones in the immune system of teleost fish. Here we provide initial evidence for the presence of active thyroid signaling in immune organs and cells of teleosts. We demonstrate that immune organs (head kidney and spleen) and isolated leukocytes (from head kidney and peripheral blood) of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) express both thyroid receptor α (THRA) and β (THRB). Absolute mRNA levels of THRA were significantly higher than those of THRB. THRA showed higher expression in immune organs and isolated immune cells compared to the reference organ, liver, while THRB showed the opposite. In vivo exposure of trout to triiodothryronine (T3) or the anti-thyroid agent propylthiouracil (PTU) altered THR expression in immune organs and cells. Effect of T3 and PTU over the relative expression of selected marker genes of immune cell subpopulations was also studied. Treatments changed the relative expression of markers of cytotoxic, helper and total T cells (cd4, cd8a, trb), B lymphocytes (mIgM) and macrophages (csf1r). These findings suggest that the immune system of rainbow trout is responsive to thyroid hormones. PMID:24657316

  17. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Uddback, Ida E. M.; Pedersen, Line M. I.; Pedersen, Sara R.; Steffensen, Maria A.; Holst, Peter J.; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  18. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Uddback, Ida E M; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R; Steffensen, Maria A; Holst, Peter J; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  19. Renal Type A Intercalated Cells Contain Albumin in Organelles with Aldosterone-Regulated Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells. PMID:25874770

  20. Scavenger receptor B1, the HDL receptor, is expressed abundantly in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Latha P.; Mates, Jessica M.; Cheplowitz, Alana M.; Avila, Christina L.; Zimmerer, Jason M.; Yao, Zhili; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Robinson, John M.; Anderson, Clark L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol from peripheral tissue, carried by HDL, is metabolized in the liver after uptake by the HDL receptor, SR-B1. Hepatocytes have long been considered the only liver cells expressing SR-B1; however, in this study we describe two disparate immunofluorescence (IF) experiments that suggest otherwise. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy employing ultrathin (120 nm) sections of mouse liver, improving z-axis resolution, we identified the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), marked by FcγRIIb, as the cell within the liver expressing abundant SR-B1. In contrast, the hepatocyte, identified with β-catenin, expressed considerably weaker levels, although optical resolution of SR-B1 was inadequate. Thus, we moved to a different IF strategy, first separating dissociated liver cells by gradient centrifugation into two portions, hepatocytes (parenchymal cells) and LSEC (non-parenchymal cells). Characterizing both portions for the cellular expression of SR-B1 by flow cytometry, we found that LSEC expressed considerable amounts of SR-B1 while in hepatocytes SR-B1 expression was barely perceptible. Assessing mRNA of SR-B1 by real time PCR we found messenger expression in LSEC to be about 5 times higher than in hepatocytes. PMID:26865459

  1. IMMUNE TOLERANCE INDUCTION BY APOPTOTIC CELLS REQUIRES CASPASE-DEPENDENT OXIDATION OF HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Hirotaka; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Herndon, John M.; Hoppe, George; Green, Douglas R.; Ferguson, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian immune system discriminates between modes of cell death, with necrosis often resulting in inflammation and adaptive immunity, while apoptosis tends to be anti-inflammatory, promoting immune tolerance. In many systems immune tolerance can be established through cross presentation of antigens derived from apoptotic cells via the MHC class I pathway to CD8+ T cells. We have examined the features of apoptosis responsible for tolerance to cell-mediated immune responses in vivo, specifically the roles of caspases and the mitochondria. Our results show that caspase activation targets the mitochondria to produce ROS, which are critical to tolerance induction by apoptotic cells. ROS oxidizes the potential danger signal HMGB1 released from dying cells, thereby neutralizing its stimulatory activity and promoting tolerance. Apoptotic cells failed to induce tolerance and instead stimulated immune responses when caspase-dependent ROS activity was prohibited by scavenging or by mutation of a mitochondrial caspase target, p75 NDUSF1. Similarly blocking sites of oxidation in HMGB1 prevented tolerance induction by apoptotic cells. These results suggest that caspase orchestrated mitochondrial events determine the impact of apoptotic cells on the immune response. PMID:18631454

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Cell Receptors, Coreceptors, and Cofactors: Implications for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Skeate, Joseph G; Sanna, Adriana M; Taylor, Julia R; Da Silva, Diane M; Cannon, Paula M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) receptor and either the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) or C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) coreceptors, HIV has also been found to enter other important immune cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, B cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, the expression of distinct cellular cofactors partially regulates the rate in which HIV infects each distinct cell type. Furthermore, HIV can benefit from the acquisition of new proteins incorporated into its envelope during budding events. While several publications have investigated details of how HIV manipulates particular cell types or subtypes, an up-to-date comprehensive review on HIV tropism for different immune cells is lacking. Therefore, this review is meant to focus on the different receptors, coreceptors, and cofactors that HIV exploits to enter particular immune cells. Additionally, prophylactic approaches that have targeted particular molecules associated with HIV entry and infection of different immune cells will be discussed. Unveiling the underlying cellular receptors and cofactors that lead to HIV preference for specific immune cell populations is crucial in identifying novel preventative/therapeutic targets for comprehensive strategies to eliminate viral infection. PMID:27410493

  3. Dissociation of skeletal muscle for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells in macaques.

    PubMed

    Liang, Frank; Ploquin, Aurélie; Hernández, José DelaO; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Lindgren, Gustaf; Stanley, Daphne; Martinez, Aiala Salvador; Brenchley, Jason M; Koup, Richard A; Loré, Karin; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2015-10-01

    The majority of vaccines and several treatments are administered by intramuscular injection. The aim is to engage and activate immune cells, although they are rare in normal skeletal muscle. The phenotype and function of resident as well as infiltrating immune cells in the muscle after injection are largely unknown. While methods for obtaining and characterizing murine muscle cell suspensions have been reported, protocols for nonhuman primates (NHPs) have not been well defined. NHPs comprise important in vivo models for studies of immune cell function due to their high degree of resemblance with humans. In this study, we developed and systematically compared methods to collect vaccine-injected muscle tissue to be processed into single cell suspensions for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells. We found that muscle tissue processed by mechanical disruption alone resulted in significantly lower immune cell yields compared to enzymatic digestion using Liberase. Dendritic cell subsets, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, B cells, T cells and NK cells were readily detected in the muscle by the classic human markers. The methods for obtaining skeletal muscle cell suspension established here offer opportunities to increase the understanding of immune responses in the muscle, and provide a basis for defining immediate post-injection vaccine responses in primates. PMID:26099800

  4. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P < 0.05). In addition, valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05), down-regulated mRNA levels of interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β1, IκBα and target of rapamycin (TOR) (P < 0.05), and up-regulated tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8 and nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P < 0.05), and improved Claudin 15 expression in the fish intestine (P < 0.05). However, valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively. PMID:25014314

  5. Immune surveillance of mammary tissue by phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Paape, M J; Shafer-Weaver, K; Capuco, A V; Van Oostveldt, K; Burvenich, C

    2000-01-01

    The leukocytes in milk consist of lymphocytes, neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages. Lymphocytes together with antigen-presenting cells function in the generation of an effective immune response. Lymphocytes can be divided into two distinct subsets, T- and B-lymphocytes, that differ in function and protein products. The professional phagocytic cells of the bovine mammary gland are PMN and macrophages. In the normal mammary gland macrophages are the predominate cells which act as sentinels to invading mastitis causing pathogens. Once the invaders are detected, macrophages release chemical messengers called chemoattractants that cause the directed migration of PMN into the infection. Migration of neutrophils into mammary tissue provides the first immunological line of defense against bacteria that penetrate the physical barrier of the teat canal. However, their presence is like a double-edged sword. While the PMN are phagocytosing and destroying the invading pathogens, they inadvertently release chemicals which induces swelling of secretory epithelium cytoplasm, sloughing of secretory cells, and decreased secretory activity. Permanent scarring will result in a loss of milk production. Resident and newly migrated macrophages help reduce the damage to the epithelium by phagocytosing PMN that undergo programmed cell death through a process called apoptosis. Specific ligands on the neutrophil surface are required for directed migration and phagocytosis. In response to infection, freshly migrated leukocytes express greater numbers of cell surface receptors for immunoglobulins and complement and are more phagocytic than their counterparts in blood. However, phagocytic activity rapidly decreases with continued exposure to inhibitory factors such as milk fat globules and casein in mammary secretions. Compensatory hypertrophy in non-mastitic quarters partially compensates for lost milk production in diseased quarters. Advances in molecular biology are

  6. Aire Enforces Immune Tolerance by Directing Autoreactive T Cells into the Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Lee, Victoria; Nishi, Saki; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-05-17

    The promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens in the thymus, driven in part by autoimmune regulator (Aire), is critical for the protection of peripheral tissues from autoimmune attack. Aire-dependent processes are thought to promote both clonal deletion and the development of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, suggesting that autoimmunity associated with Aire deficiency results from two failed tolerance mechanisms. Here, examination of autoimmune lesions in Aire(-/-) mice revealed an unexpected third possibility. We found that the predominant conventional T cell clonotypes infiltrating target lesions express antigen receptors that were preferentially expressed by Foxp3(+) Treg cells in Aire(+/+) mice. Thus, Aire enforces immune tolerance by ensuring that distinct autoreactive T cell specificities differentiate into the Treg cell lineage; dysregulation of this process results in the diversion of Treg cell-biased clonotypes into pathogenic conventional T cells. PMID:27130899

  7. The Metastasis-Promoting Roles of Tumor-Associated Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is driven not only by the accumulation of intrinsic alterations in malignant cells, but also by the interactions of cancer cells with various stromal cell components of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, inflammation and infiltration of the tumor tissue by host immune cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells have been shown to support tumor growth in addition to invasion and metastasis. Each step of tumor development, from initiation through metastatic spread, is promoted by communication between tumor and immune cells via the secretion of cytokines, growth factors and proteases that remodel the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis requires neovascularization, breakdown of the basement membrane, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The subsequent dissemination of tumor cells to distant organ sites necessitates a treacherous journey through the vasculature, which is fostered by close association with platelets and macrophages. Additionally, the establishment of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is fostered by neutrophils and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells and other inflammatory cytokines derived from tumor and immune cells, which alter the local environment of the tissue to promote adhesion of circulating tumor cells. This review focuses on the interactions between tumor cells and immune cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment, and examines the factors allowing these cells to promote each stage of metastasis. PMID:23515621

  8. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chenjie; Pemberton, Joshua G.; Lillico, Dustin M. E.; Zwozdesky, Myron A.; Stafford, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s), and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs), which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well as unique

  9. Immunization with Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Whole Cells Provides Protective Immunity in an Experimental Mouse Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R.; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010), one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells) compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii. PMID:25485716

  10. Semaphorins and their receptors in immune cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Kikutani, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Semaphorins are newcomers to the growing panoply of immunoregulatory proteins. Members of this family were originally identified as proteins that provide axonal guidance cues during neuronal development. However, accumulating evidence indicates that several semaphorins, called 'immune semaphorins', are crucial to various phases of the immune response, from initiation to terminal inflammatory processes. Extensive studies of immune semaphorins have shown not only differences but also parallels in semaphorin functions among physiologically distinct systems, providing unexpected but meaningful insights into the biological activities of this protein family. Here we review the present knowledge of the function of semaphorins and their receptors in the immune system, including the most recent advances in this field. PMID:18087252

  11. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  12. Concise review: alchemy of biology: generating desired cell types from abundant and accessible cells.

    PubMed

    Pournasr, Behshad; Khaloughi, Keynoush; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Totonchi, Mehdi; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Baharvand, Hossein

    2011-12-01

    A major goal of regenerative medicine is to produce cells to participate in the generation, maintenance, and repair of tissues that are damaged by disease, aging, or trauma, such that function is restored. The establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells, followed by directed differentiation, offers a powerful strategy for producing patient-specific therapies. Given how laborious and lengthy this process can be, the conversion of somatic cells into lineage-specific stem/progenitor cells in one step, without going back to, or through, a pluripotent stage, has opened up tremendous opportunities for regenerative medicine. However, there are a number of obstacles to overcome before these cells can be widely considered for clinical applications. Here, we focus on induced transdifferentiation strategies to convert mature somatic cells to other mature cell types or progenitors, and we summarize the challenges that need to be met if the potential applications of transdifferentiation technology are to be achieved. PMID:21997905

  13. Stromal cell contributions to the homeostasis and functionality of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Scott N.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2009-01-01

    A defining characteristic of the immune system is the constant movement of many of its constituent cells through the secondary lymphoid tissues, mainly the spleen and lymph nodes, where crucial interactions that underlie homeostatic regulation, peripheral tolerance, and effective development of adaptive immunity take place. What has only recently been recognized is the role that non-haematopoietic stromal elements have in multiple aspects of immune cell migration, activation and survival. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of lymphoid compartment stromal cells, examine their possible heterogeneity, discuss how these cells contribute to immune homeostasis and the efficient initiation of adaptive immunity, and highlight how targeting of these elements by some pathogens can influence the host response. PMID:19644499

  14. Maternal Milk T Cells Drive Development of Transgenerational Th1 Immunity in Offspring Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Nguyen, Virginia; Muller, H. Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Using multiple murine foster-nursing protocols, thereby eliminating placental transfer and allowing a distinction between dam- and pup-derived cells, we show that foster nursing by an immunized dam results in development of CD8+ T cells in nonimmunized foster pups that are specific for Ags against which the foster dam was immunized (Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Candida albicans). We have dubbed this process “maternal educational immunity” to distinguish it from passive cellular immunity. Of the variety of maternal immune cells present in milk, only T cells were detected in pup tissues. Maternal T cells, a substantial percentage of which were CD4+MHC class II+, accumulated in the pup thymus and spleen during the nursing period. Further analysis of maternal cells in the pup thymus showed that a proportion was positive for maternal immunogen-specific MHC class II tetramers. To determine the outcome of Ag presentation in the thymus, the maternal or foster pup origin of immunogen-responding CD8+ cells in foster pup spleens was assessed. Whereas ∼10% were maternally derived in the first few weeks after weaning, all immunogen-responding CD8+ T cells were pup derived by 12 wk of age. Pup-derived immunogen-responsive CD8+ cells persisted until at least 1 y of age. Passive cellular immunity is well accepted and has been demonstrated in the human population. In this study, we show an arguably more important role for transferred immune cells: the direction of offspring T cell development. Harnessing maternal educational immunity through prepregnancy immunization programs has potential for improvement of infant immunity. PMID:27496970

  15. Label-free haemogram using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy for identifying immune-cell subset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Powis, Simon J.

    2014-03-01

    Leucocytes in the blood of mammals form a powerful protective system against a wide range of dangerous pathogens. There are several types of immune cells that has specific role in the whole immune system. The number and type of immune cells alter in the disease state and identifying the type of immune cell provides information about a person's state of health. There are several immune cell subsets that are essentially morphologically identical and require external labeling to enable discrimination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy (WMRS) with suitable machine learning algorithms as a label-free method to distinguish between different closely lying immune cell subset. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on WMRS data from single cells, obtained using confocal Raman microscopy for feature reduction, followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) for binary discrimination of various cell subset, which yielded an accuracy >85%. The method was successful in discriminating between untouched and unfixed purified populations of CD4+CD3+ and CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte subsets, and CD56+CD3- natural killer cells with a high degree of specificity. It was also proved sensitive enough to identify unique Raman signatures that allow clear discrimination between dendritic cell subsets, comprising CD303+CD45+ plasmacytoid and CD1c+CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells. The results of this study clearly show that WMRS is highly sensitive and can distinguish between cell types that are morphologically identical.

  16. The skin-resident and migratory immune system in steady state and memory: innate lymphocytes, dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Heath, William R; Carbone, Francis R

    2013-10-01

    The skin is a highly complex organ interspersed with a variety of smaller organ-like structures and a plethora of cell types that together perform essential functions such as physical sensing, temperature control, barrier maintenance and immunity. In this Review, we outline many of the innate and adaptive immune cell types associated with the skin, focusing on the steady state in mice and men, and include a broad update of dendritic cell function and T cell surveillance. PMID:24048119

  17. Essential role for caspase 8 in T-cell homeostasis and T-cell-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Salmena, Leonardo; Lemmers, Benedicte; Hakem, Anne; Matysiak-Zablocki, Elzbieta; Murakami, Kiichi; Au, P.Y. Billie; Berry, Donna M.; Tamblyn, Laura; Shehabeldin, Amro; Migon, Eva; Wakeham, Andrew; Bouchard, Denis; Yeh, Wen Chen; McGlade, Jane C.; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hakem, Razqallah

    2003-01-01

    Defects in death receptor-mediated apoptosis have been linked to cancer and autoimmune disease in humans. The in vivo role of caspase 8, a component of this pathway, has eluded analysis in postnatal tissues because of the lack of an appropriate animal model. Targeted disruption of caspase 8 is lethal in utero. We generated mice with a targeted caspase 8 mutation that is restricted to the T-cell lineage. Despite normal thymocyte development in the absence of caspase 8, we observed a marked decrease in the number of peripheral T-cells and impaired T-cell response ex vivo to activation stimuli. caspase 8 ablation protected thymocytes and activated T-cells from CD95 ligand but not anti-CD3-induced apoptosis, or apoptosis activated by agents that are known to act through the mitochondria. caspase 8 mutant mice were unable to mount an immune response to viral infection, indicating that caspase 8 deletion in T-cells leads to immunodeficiency. These findings identify an essential, cell-stage-specific role for caspase 8 in T-cell homeostasis and T-cell-mediated immunity. This is consistent with the recent identification of caspase 8 mutations in human immunodeficiency. PMID:12654726

  18. PD-L1hi B cells are critical regulators of humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adnan R; Hams, Emily; Floudas, Achilleas; Sparwasser, Tim; Weaver, Casey T; Fallon, Padraic G

    2015-01-01

    Specific B-cell subsets can regulate T-cell immune responses, and are termed regulatory B cells (Breg). The majority of Breg cells described in mouse and man have been identified by IL-10 production and are known to suppress allergy and autoimmunity. However, Breg cell mediated immune suppression, independent of IL-10, also occurs. Here we show that Breg cells play a critical role in regulating humoral immunity mediated by CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular helper T cells, and can suppress inflammation in autoimmune disease through elevated expression of PD-L1. We have also identified that these B cells are resistant to αCD20 B-cell depletion. This work describes how Breg cells are critical in humoral homoeostasis and may have implications for the regulation of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25609381

  19. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Christopher; Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-02-24

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them. PMID:26888036

  20. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A.; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them. PMID:26888036

  1. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  2. Inhibition of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in man by distinct suppressor cell systems.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, P I; Spencer, C E

    1979-01-01

    Studies were designed to investigate whether the suppressor cell systems that regulate the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses belong to the same subsets of T cells or different subsets. Mitogen-activated suppressor cells were simultaneously assayed for their ability to inhibit (a) pokeweed mitogen-induced generation of plasma cells, (b) blastogenic response of lymphocytes to allogeneic cells, and (c) generation of killer cells in the cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity assay. We found that suppressor cells that inhibited the generation of plasma cells were activated by concanavalin A (Con A) and were both radiation and prednisone sensitive. Suppressors that inhibited the blastogenic response in lymphocytes to allogenic cells were also activated by Con A but differed in that they were both radiation and prednisone resistant. In contrast, suppressors that inhibited the generation of the killer cells were activated with phytohemagglutinin and not Con A. These suppressors were prednisone and radiation resistant. These observations cannot be explained by differences at the pro-suppressor or suppressor activator levels as both T cell subsets are radiosensitive. Alternatively, heterogeneity of suppressor cell systems may explain these differences. PMID:156197

  3. Characterization of the Immune Cell Repertoire in the Normal Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Ardighieri, Laura; Lonardi, Silvia; Moratto, Daniele; Facchetti, Fabio; Shih, Ie-Ming; Vermi, William; Kurman, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies implicating the fallopian tube as the site of putative precursors of ovarian serous carcinoma and the hypothesis that injury, inflammation and repair of the ovarian surface epithelium at the time of ovulation may be contributing factors to ovarian carcinogenesis, prompted us to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the immune cells in the normal fallopian tube. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to provide a base line for future studies exploring the relationship of inflammation to the early events of ovarian carcinogenesis by characterizing the immune cell repertoire in thirteen normal human fallopian tube, combining digital microscopy of immunostained slides and flow cytometry of fresh single cell suspensions, with a panel of markers that identify the most important adaptive and innate immune cells. We found that CD45+ leucocytes are regularly observed in the fallopian tube and are mainly composed of CD163+ macrophages, CD11c+ dendritic cells and CD8+ T-cells. In addition, there are minor populations of CD56+ NK cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD20+ B-cells, TCRγδ+ T-cells, and, among dendritic cells, CD207(Langerin)+ Langerhans cells. The cellular mapping that we performed indicates that the local immune system in the human fallopian tube is composed of a mixture of innate and adaptive immune cells, many of which are recognized as playing a role in cancer immune surveillance. This local immune system could provide a first line of defense against early precancerous lesions and could potentially be exploited for immune-based therapies. PMID:25272297

  4. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A; van Beek, Adriaan A; van Gulik, Thomas M; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  5. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A.; van Beek, Adriaan A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  6. Stability of cytokines in supernatants of stimulated mouse immune cells.

    PubMed

    G, Ozbey; R, Gorczynski; N, Erin

    2014-06-01

    Measurements of cytokines in cell culture supernatants are widely used to evaluate the immune response. Cytokine levels in secretomes are usually quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), which have easy, sensitive, specific, rapid, cost-effective, and reproducible protocols. To our knowledge, the stability of cytokines in secretomes has not been hitherto investigated. We present data that involve; time-dependent changes during storage at +4°C, and the effects of freeze-thaw cycles in samples frozen at -80(o)C, instant freezing of samples with liquid nitrogen, and addition of protease inhibitors on the stability of certain cytokines (TNF-α, MIP-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A), in secrotomes of spleen and lymph nodes from tumor-bearing animals. Our results show that IL-6 remains stable, MIP-2, IFN-γ and IL-10 are somewhat stable, while TNF-α and IL-17A are degradable cytokines: instant freezing by liquid nitrogen or adding protease inhibitor does not preserve the stability of these cytokines. From these results it can be concluded that, if possible, TNF-α measurements should be perform in fresh samples, and IL-17A and IL-10 samples can be stored at -80°C, but should be used at the first thaw. PMID:25109830

  7. T cell immunity in the teleost digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Tafalla, Carolina; Leal, Esther; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Fischer, Uwe

    2016-11-01

    Fish (along with cyclostomes) constitute the most ancient animal group in which an acquired immune system is present. As in higher vertebrates, both B and T lymphocytes cooperate in implementing an adequate response. Although there is still a debate on whether fish possess a true gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the presence of diffuse B and T lymphocytes throughout all mucosal surfaces has been demonstrated in a wide variety of fish species. The lack of antibodies against T lymphocyte markers has hampered the performance of functional assays in both systemic and mucosal compartments. However, most components associated with T lymphocyte function have been identified in fish through extensive genomic research, suggesting similar functionalities for fish and mammalian T lymphocytes. Thus, the aim of this review is to briefly summarize what is known in teleost concerning the characteristics and functionalities of the different T cell subsets, to then focus on what is known to date regarding their presence and role in the gastrointestinal tract, through either direct functional assays or indirectly by conclusions drawn from transcriptomic analysis. PMID:26905634

  8. Brief Report: Immune Microenvironment Determines the Immunogenicity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Dilyana; Kim, Jinchul; Hamzeinejad, Sara; He, Jingjin; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    The breakthrough of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility that patient-specific iPSCs can provide autologous cells for cell therapy without the concern for immune rejection. However, the immunogenicity of iPSC-derived cells remains controversial. Using syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) mouse transplantation model, several studies indicate that B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit some levels of immunogenicity when transplanted into B6 mice subcutaneously. In contrast, one recent study has concluded that various lineages of B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit no immunogenicity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of B6 mice. To resolve the controversy concerning this critical issue of iPSC biology, we used the same B6 transplantation model to demonstrate that the immune response toward antigens is dependent on the immune environment of the transplantation site. Immunogenic antigen-expressing B6 embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as well as B6 iPSCs and their terminally differentiated cells survived under the kidney capsule but are immune rejected when transplanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The cotransplantation of mature B6 dendritic cells under the kidney capsule leads to immune rejection of B6 iPSC-derived grafts but not B6 ESC-derived grafts, indicating that the lack of detectable immune response to iPSC-derived grafts under the kidney capsule is due to the lack of functional antigen presenting cells. PMID:26439188

  9. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Franki, Suzanne N.; Steward, Kristopher K.; Betting, David J.; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E.

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow–derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell–DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8+ T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4+ T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell–DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell–DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  10. Tumoral NKG2D alters cell cycle of acute myeloid leukemic cells and reduces NK cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingying; Acheampong, Desmond Omane; Wang, Youfu; Xie, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) lymphocyte receptor, initially discovered and expressed mostly on natural killer (NK) cells, T cells and natural killer T cells, can promote tumor immune surveillance. However, with increasing tumor grade, tumors themselves express NKG2D to self-stimulate oncogenic pathways. To confirm that cancer cells themselves express NKG2D, we have now investigated the role of the tumoral NKG2D in NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Both anti-NKG2D and shRNA to that down-regulated tumoral NKG2D increased the number of cells in G1 phase and S phase, increased the expression of cyclin E-CDK2 and decreased P21. In addition, CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α increased when the cells were treated with anti-NKG2D which suggests that blocking tumoral NKG2D could augment tumor surveillance of NK cells. Altogether, tumoral NKG2D stimulates cell propagation and immune escape in acute myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26740330

  11. Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenotyping of Subpopulations of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Boram; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Fan, Rong; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    An accurate measurement of the immune status in patients with immune system disorders is critical in evaluating the stage of diseases and tailoring drug treatments. The functional cellular immunity test is a promising method to establish the diagnosis of immune dysfunctions. The conventional functional cellular immunity test involves measurements of the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines when stimulated ex vivo. However, this “bulk” assay measures the overall reactivity of a population of lymphocytes and monocytes, making it difficult to pinpoint the phenotype or real identity of the reactive immune cells involved. In this research, we develop a large surface micromachined polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfiltration membrane (PMM) with high porosity, which is integrated in a microfluidic microfiltration platform. Using the PMM with functionalized microbeads conjugated with antibodies against specific cell surface proteins, we demonstrated rapid, efficient and high-throughput on-chip isolation, enrichment, and stimulation of subpopulations of immune cells from blood specimens. Furthermore, the PMM-integrated microfiltration platform, coupled with a no-wash homogeneous chemiluminescence assay (“AlphaLISA”), enables us to demonstrate rapid and sensitive on-chip immunophenotyping assays for subpopulations of immune cells isolated directly from minute quantities of blood samples. PMID:23335389

  12. Natural Interferon α/β–Producing Cells Link Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Antonenko, Svetlana; Lau, Johnson Yiu-Nam; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2000-01-01

    Innate immune responses to pathogens critically impact the development of adaptive immune responses. However, it is not completely understood how innate immunity controls the initiation of adaptive immunities or how it determines which type of adaptive immunity will be induced to eliminate a given pathogen. Here we show that viral stimulation not only triggers natural interferon (IFN)-α/β–producing cells (IPCs) to produce vast amounts of antiviral IFN-α/β but also induces these cells to differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs). IFN-α/β and tumor necrosis factor α produced by virus-activated IPCs act as autocrine survival and DC differentiation factors, respectively. The virus-induced DCs stimulate naive CD4+ T cells to produce IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-10, in contrast to IL-3–induced DCs, which stimulate naive CD4+ T cells to produce T helper type 2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. Thus, IPCs may play two master roles in antiviral immune responses: directly inhibiting viral replication by producing large amounts of IFN-α/β, and subsequently triggering adaptive T cell–mediated immunity by differentiating into DCs. IPCs constitute a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:10899908

  13. Orthotopic Implantation and Peripheral Immune Cell Monitoring in the II-45 Syngeneic Rat Mesothelioma Model.

    PubMed

    Weir, Chris J; Hudson, Amanda L; Peters, Lyndsay; Howell, Viive M

    2015-01-01

    The enormous upsurge of interest in immune-based treatments for cancer such as vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors, and increased understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in treatment response, collectively point to the need for immune-competent orthotopic models for pre-clinical testing of these new therapies. This paper demonstrates how to establish an orthotopic immune-competent rat model of pleural malignant mesothelioma. Monitoring disease progression in orthotopic models is confounded by the internal location of the tumors. To longitudinally monitor disease progression and its effect on circulating immune cells in this and other rat models of cancer, a single tube flow cytometry assay requiring only 25 µl whole blood is described. This provides accurate quantification of seven immune parameters: total lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils, as well as the T-cell subsets CD4 and CD8, B-cells and Natural Killer cells. Different subsets of these parameters are useful in different circumstances and models, with the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio having the greatest utility for monitoring disease progression in the mesothelioma model. Analyzing circulating immune cell levels using this single tube method may also assist in monitoring the response to immune-based treatments and understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to success or failure of treatment. PMID:26485154

  14. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  15. Neutralizing antibodies and broad, functional T cell immune response following immunization with hepatitis C virus proteins-based vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Donato, Gillian; Amador-Cañizares, Yalena; Alvarez-Lajonchere, Liz; Guerra, Ivis; Pérez, Angel; Dubuisson, Jean; Wychowsk, Czeslaw; Musacchio, Alexis; Aguilar, Daylen; Dueñas-Carrera, Santiago

    2014-03-26

    HCV is a worldwide health problem despite the recent advances in the development of more effective therapies. No preventive vaccine is available against this pathogen. However, non-sterilizing immunity has been demonstrated and supports the potential success of HCV vaccines. Induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies and T cell responses targeting several conserved epitopes, have been related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance. Therefore, in this work, the immunogenicity of a preparation (MixprotHC) based on protein variants of HCV Core, E1, E2 and NS3 was evaluated in mice and monkeys. IgG from MixprotHC immunized mice and monkeys neutralized the infectivity of heterologous HCVcc. Moreover, strong CD4+ and CD8+ T cells proliferative and IFN-γ secretion responses were elicited against HCV proteins. Remarkably, immunization with MixprotHC induced control of viremia in a surrogate challenge model in mice. These results suggest that MixprotHC might constitute an effective immunogen against HCV in humans with potential for reducing the likelihood of immune escape and viral persistence. PMID:24486345

  16. Ecological effects of cell-level processes: genome size, functional traits and regional abundance of herbaceous plant species

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Suda, Jan; Klimešová, Jitka; Mihulka, Stanislav; Říha, Pavel; Šímová, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is known to be correlated with a number of phenotypic traits associated with cell sizes and cell-division rates. Genome size was therefore used as a proxy for them in order to assess how common plant traits such as height, specific leaf area and seed size/number predict species regional abundance. In this study it is hypothesized that if there is residual correlation between genome size and abundance after these traits are partialled out, there must be additional ecological effects of cell size and/or cell-division rate. Methods Variation in genome size, plant traits and regional abundance were examined in 436 herbaceous species of central European flora, and relationships were sought for among these variables by correlation and path analysis. Key Results Species regional abundance was weakly but significantly correlated with genome size; the relationship was stronger for annuals (R2 = 0·145) than for perennials (R2 = 0·027). In annuals, genome size was linked to abundance via its effect on seed size, which constrains seed number and hence population growth rate. In perennials, it weakly affected (via height and specific leaf area) competitive ability. These relationships did not change qualitatively after phylogenetic correction. In both annuals and perennials there was an unresolved effect of genome size on abundance. Conclusions The findings indicate that additional predictors of regional abundance should be sought among variables that are linked to cell size and cell-division rate. Signals of these cell-level processes remain identifiable even at the landscape scale, and show deep differences between perennials and annuals. Plant population biology could thus possibly benefit from more systematic use of indicators of cell-level processes. PMID:22628380

  17. Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Samuele; Gallman, Antonia; Gowthaman, Uthaman; Liu, Dong; Chen, Pei; Liu, Jingchun; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Nascimento, Manuela Sales L; Xu, Lan; Patel, Seema R; Williams, Adam; Tormey, Christopher A; Hod, Eldad A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C

    2016-05-30

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving therapeutic tool. However, a major complication in transfusion recipients is the generation of antibodies against non-ABO alloantigens on donor RBCs, potentially resulting in hemolysis and renal failure. Long-lived antibody responses typically require CD4(+) T cell help and, in murine transfusion models, alloimmunization requires a spleen. Yet, it is not known how RBC-derived antigens are presented to naive T cells in the spleen. We sought to answer whether splenic dendritic cells (DCs) were essential for T cell priming to RBC alloantigens. Transient deletion of conventional DCs at the time of transfusion or splenic DC preactivation before RBC transfusion abrogated T and B cell responses to allogeneic RBCs, even though transfused RBCs persisted in the circulation for weeks. Although all splenic DCs phagocytosed RBCs and activated RBC-specific CD4(+) T cells in vitro, only bridging channel 33D1(+) DCs were required for alloimmunization in vivo. In contrast, deletion of XCR1(+)CD8(+) DCs did not alter the immune response to RBCs. Our work suggests that blocking the function of one DC subset during a narrow window of time during RBC transfusion could potentially prevent the detrimental immune response that occurs in patients who require lifelong RBC transfusion support. PMID:27185856

  18. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  19. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  20. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3+CD4+, and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14+ cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells. PMID:27586092

  1. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3(+)CD4(+), and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14(+) cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells. PMID:27586092

  2. The role of IL-33/ST2L signals in the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingli; Kang, Jian; Zhang, Chengliang; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 signals influence various immune cells during differentiation, immune responses and homeostasis. As discussed in this Review, IL-33 via TI/ST2L regulates the functions of immune cells including T cells, B cells, DCs, macrophages, mast cells, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Stimulation with IL-33 is crucial for CD4+ T cell polarized into Th2 immunity and for the induction of Treg. CD8+ T cells can also express ST2L and IL-33 promotes features of effector CD8+ T cells. For macrophages and ILCs, ST2L presents on these cells and IL-33 induces Th2 cytokine production. IL-33 modulates adhesion, activation, maturation, and cytokine production by mast cells. ST2 is expressed in B1 and is important for differentiation of IL-10-producing B cells. Understanding the specific role of IL-33/ST2L in different immune cells will help to answer the remaining questions that are important for diseases pathologies and intervention strategies by targeting the IL-33/ST2L signals. PMID:25662624

  3. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection. PMID:27183639

  4. Tadalafil augments tumor specific immunity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Joseph A; Khan, Zubair; Noonan, Kimberly A.; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hao; Goodman, Steven; Gourin, Christine G.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John; Levine, Marshall; Tang, Mei; Neuner, Geoffrey; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Blanco, Ray; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne M.; Marur, Shanthi; Weed, Donald T.; Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors can augment immune function in head and neck cancer patients through inhibition of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Experimental Design We performed a randomized, prospective, double blinded, placebo controlled, phase II clinical trial to determine the in vivo effects of systemic PDE5 inhibition on immune function in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Results Tadalafil augmented immune response, increasing ex vivo T cell expansion to a mean 2.4 fold increase compared to 1.1 fold in control patients (P= 0.01), reducing peripheral MDSC numbers to mean 0.81 fold change compared to a 1.26 fold change in control patients (P=0.001), and increasing general immunity as measured by delayed type hypersensitivity response (P=0.002). Tumor specific immunity in response to HNSCC tumor lysate was augmented in tadalafil treated patients (P=0.04). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that tadalafil augments general and tumor-specific immunity in HNSCC patients and has therapeutic potential in HNSCC. Evasion of immune surveillance and suppression of systemic and tumor specific immunity is a significant feature of head and neck cancer development. This study demonstrates that a PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, can reverse tumor specific immune suppression in head and neck cancer patients, with potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25564570

  5. Classical Flt3L-dependent dendritic cells control immunity to protein vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Rachel; Mollah, Shamim; Tse, Sze-Wah; Longhi, Maria Paula; Mehandru, Saurabh; Matos, Ines; Cheong, Cheolho; Ruane, Darren; Brane, Lucas; Teixeira, Angela; Dobrin, Joseph; Mizenina, Olga; Park, Chae Gyu; Meredith, Matthew; Clausen, Björn E.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2014-01-01

    DCs are critical for initiating immunity. The current paradigm in vaccine biology is that DCs migrating from peripheral tissue and classical lymphoid-resident DCs (cDCs) cooperate in the draining LNs to initiate priming and proliferation of T cells. Here, we observe subcutaneous immunity is Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) dependent. Flt3L is rapidly secreted after immunization; Flt3 deletion reduces T cell responses by 50%. Flt3L enhances global T cell and humoral immunity as well as both the numbers and antigen capture capacity of migratory DCs (migDCs) and LN-resident cDCs. Surprisingly, however, we find immunity is controlled by cDCs and actively tempered in vivo by migDCs. Deletion of Langerin+ DC or blockade of DC migration improves immunity. Consistent with an immune-regulatory role, transcriptomic analyses reveals different skin migDC subsets in both mouse and human cluster together, and share immune-suppressing gene expression and regulatory pathways. These data reveal that protective immunity to protein vaccines is controlled by Flt3L-dependent, LN-resident cDCs. PMID:25135299

  6. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Michelle T.; Gould, James C.; Salyer, Sarah A.; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  7. Enzymatic passaging of human embryonic stem cells alters central carbon metabolism and glycan abundance

    PubMed Central

    Badur, Mehmet G.; Zhang, Hui; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    To realize the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications, large numbers of cells that accurately recapitulate cell and tissue function must be robustly produced. Previous studies have suggested that genetic instability and epigenetic changes occur as a consequence of enzymatic passaging. However, the potential impacts of such passaging methods on the metabolism of hESCs have not been described. Using stable isotope tracing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we have explored how different passaging reagents impact hESC metabolism. Enzymatic passaging caused significant decreases in glucose utilization throughout central carbon metabolism along with attenuated de novo lipogenesis. In addition, we developed and validated a method for rapidly quantifying glycan abundance and isotopic labeling in hydrolyzed biomass. Enzymatic passaging reagents significantly altered levels of glycans immediately after digestion but surprisingly glucose contribution to glycans was not affected. These results demonstrate that there is an immediate effect on hESC metabolism after enzymatic passaging in both central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis. HESCs subjected to enzymatic passaging are routinely placed in a state requiring re-synthesis of biomass components, subtly influencing their metabolic needs in a manner that may impact cell performance in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26289220

  8. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Barati, Michelle T; Gould, James C; Salyer, Sarah A; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG(⁎)) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  9. Type 1 regulatory T cells: a new mechanism of peripheral immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanyu; Zhang, Rong; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The lack of immune response to an antigen, a process known as immune tolerance, is essential for the preservation of immune homeostasis. To date, two mechanisms that drive immune tolerance have been described extensively: central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Under the new nomenclature, thymus-derived regulatory T (tT(reg)) cells are the major mediators of central immune tolerance, whereas peripherally derived regulatory T (pT(reg)) cells function to regulate peripheral immune tolerance. A third type of T(reg) cells, termed iT(reg), represents only the in vitro-induced T(reg) cells(1). Depending on whether the cells stably express Foxp3, pT(reg), and iT(reg) cells may be divided into two subsets: the classical CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells and the CD4(+)Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells(2). This review focuses on the discovery, associated biomarkers, regulatory functions, methods of induction, association with disease, and clinical trials of Tr1 cells. PMID:26051475

  10. Vaginal Immunization to Elicit Primary T-Cell Activation and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Elena; Prota, Gennaro; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Boianelli, Alessandro; Fiorino, Fabio; Pozzi, Gianni; Vicino, Antonio; Medaglini, Donata

    2013-01-01

    Primary T-cell activation at mucosal sites is of utmost importance for the development of vaccination strategies. T-cell priming after vaginal immunization, with ovalbumin and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant as model vaccine formulation, was studied in vivo in hormone-synchronized mice and compared to the one induced by the nasal route. Twenty-four hours after both vaginal or nasal immunization, antigen-loaded dendritic cells were detected within the respective draining lymph nodes. Vaginal immunization elicited a strong recruitment of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells into draining lymph nodes that was more rapid than the one observed following nasal immunization. T-cell clonal expansion was first detected in iliac lymph nodes, draining the genital tract, and proliferated T cells disseminated towards distal lymph nodes and spleen similarly to what observed following nasal immunization. T cells were indeed activated by the antigen encounter and acquired homing molecules essential to disseminate towards distal lymphoid organs as confirmed by the modulation of CD45RB, CD69, CD44 and CD62L marker expression. A multi-type Galton Watson branching process, previously used for in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation, was applied to model in vivo CFSE proliferation data in draining lymph nodes 57 hours following immunization, in order to calculate the probabilistic decision of a cell to enter in division, rest in quiescence or migrate/die. The modelling analysis indicated that the probability of a cell to proliferate was higher following vaginal than nasal immunization. All together these data show that vaginal immunization, despite the absence of an organized mucosal associated inductive site in the genital tract, is very efficient in priming antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and inducing their dissemination from draining lymph nodes towards distal lymphoid organs. PMID:24349003

  11. The composition of immune cells serves as a predictor of adaptive immunity in a cohort of 50- to 74-year-old adults.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard B; Simon, Whitney L; Gibson, Michael J; Goergen, Krista M; Grill, Diane E; Oberg, Ann L; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-07-01

    Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality annually. Although vaccination offers a considerable amount of protection, it is far from perfect, especially in aging populations. This is due to age-related defects in immune function, a process called immunosenescence. To date, there are no assays or methods to predict or explain variations in an individual's level of response to influenza vaccination. In this study, we measured levels of several immune cell subsets at baseline (Day 0) and at Days 3 and 28 post-vaccination using flow cytometry. Statistical modelling was performed to assess correlations between levels of cell subsets and Day 28 immune responses - haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay, virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) assay, and memory B cell ELISPOT. Changes in several groups of cell types from Day 0 to Day 28 and Day 3 to Day 28 were found to be significantly associated with immune response. Baseline levels of several immune cell subsets, including B cells and regulatory T cells, were able to partially explain variation in memory B-cell ELISPOT results. Increased expression of HLA-DR on plasmacytoid dendritic cells after vaccination was correlated with increased HAI and VNA responses. Our data suggest that the expression of activation markers (HLA-DR and CD86) on various immune cell subsets, as well as the relative distribution of cell subsets, both have value in predicting immune responses to influenza vaccination in older individuals. PMID:27188667

  12. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Winning, Sandra; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia) which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate) immunity. PMID:26966693

  13. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Kao, John Y.; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of retinol synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric DCs. Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation. PMID:25249167

  14. NIH scientists find way to enhance immune attack on tumor cells

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators have identified a new class of human immune cells that behave like stem cells. These cells, a subtype of T lymphocytes, which comprise a small fraction of white blood cells, may prove more effective than any previously reported type of T ce

  15. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974

  16. Physiological Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Their Potential Use in Cancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Schettini, Jorge; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the control of innate and adaptive immune responses. They are a heterogeneous cell population, where plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a unique subset capable of secreting high levels of type I IFNs. It has been demonstrated that pDCs can coordinate events during the course of viral infection, atopy, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Therefore, pDC, as a main source of type I IFN, is an attractive target for therapeutic manipulations of the immune system to elicit a powerful immune response against tumor antigens in combination with other therapies. The therapeutic vaccination with antigen-pulsed DCs has shown a limited efficacy to generate an effective long-lasting immune response against tumor cells. A rational manipulation and design of vaccines which could include DC subsets outside “Langerhans cell paradigm” might allow us to improve the therapeutic approaches for cancer patients. PMID:19190769

  17. mTOR Regulation of Lymphoid Cells in Immunity to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Rachael; McGargill, Maureen Ann

    2016-01-01

    Immunity to pathogens exists as a fine balance between promoting activation and expansion of effector cells, while simultaneously limiting normal and aberrant responses. These seemingly opposing functions are kept in check by immune regulators. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that senses nutrient availability and, in turn, regulates cell metabolism, growth, and survival accordingly. mTOR plays a pivotal role in facilitating immune defense against invading pathogens by regulating the differentiation, activation, and effector functions of lymphoid cells. Here, we focus on the emerging and sometimes contradictory roles of mTOR in orchestrating lymphoid cell-mediated host immune responses to pathogens. A thorough understanding of how mTOR impacts lymphoid cells in pathogen defense will provide the necessary base for developing therapeutic interventions for infectious diseases. PMID:27242787

  18. mTOR Regulation of Lymphoid Cells in Immunity to Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Keating, Rachael; McGargill, Maureen Ann

    2016-01-01

    Immunity to pathogens exists as a fine balance between promoting activation and expansion of effector cells, while simultaneously limiting normal and aberrant responses. These seemingly opposing functions are kept in check by immune regulators. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that senses nutrient availability and, in turn, regulates cell metabolism, growth, and survival accordingly. mTOR plays a pivotal role in facilitating immune defense against invading pathogens by regulating the differentiation, activation, and effector functions of lymphoid cells. Here, we focus on the emerging and sometimes contradictory roles of mTOR in orchestrating lymphoid cell-mediated host immune responses to pathogens. A thorough understanding of how mTOR impacts lymphoid cells in pathogen defense will provide the necessary base for developing therapeutic interventions for infectious diseases. PMID:27242787

  19. Contributions of Nonhematopoietic Cells and Mediators to Immune Responses: Implications For Immunotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Barbara L. F.; Li, Jinze; LaPres, John J.; Pruett, Stephen B.; Karmaus, Peer W. F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotoxicology assessments have historically focused on the effects that xenobiotics exhibit directly on immune cells. These studies are invaluable as they identify immune cell targets and help characterize mechanisms and/or adverse outcome pathways of xenobiotics within the immune system. However, leukocytes can receive environmental cues by cell-cell contact or via released mediators from cells of organs outside of the immune system. These organs include, but are not limited to, the mucosal areas such as the lung and the gut, the liver, and the central nervous system. Homeostatic perturbation in these organs induced directly by toxicants can initiate and alter the outcome of local and systemic immunity. This review will highlight some of the identified nonimmune influences on immune homeostasis and provide summaries of how immunotoxic mechanisms of selected xenobiotics involve nonimmune cells or mediators. Thus, this review will identify data gaps and provide possible alternative mechanisms by which xenobiotics alter immune function that could be considered during immunotoxicology safety assessment. PMID:26008184

  20. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  1. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  2. Obesity impairs cell-mediated immunity during the second trimester of pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with impaired immunity. In obese pregnancy, both mother and fetus are susceptible to the short- and long-term deleterious effects of infectious illness. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of obesity on maternal blood immune cell subsets, intracellular and s...

  3. Commensal-dendritic-cell interaction specifies a unique protective skin immune signature.

    PubMed

    Naik, Shruti; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Linehan, Jonathan L; Han, Seong-Ji; Harrison, Oliver J; Wilhelm, Christoph; Conlan, Sean; Himmelfarb, Sarah; Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clayton; Quinones, Mariam; Brenchley, Jason M; Kong, Heidi H; Tussiwand, Roxanne; Murphy, Kenneth M; Merad, Miriam; Segre, Julia A; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-04-01

    The skin represents the primary interface between the host and the environment. This organ is also home to trillions of microorganisms that play an important role in tissue homeostasis and local immunity. Skin microbial communities are highly diverse and can be remodelled over time or in response to environmental challenges. How, in the context of this complexity, individual commensal microorganisms may differentially modulate skin immunity and the consequences of these responses for tissue physiology remains unclear. Here we show that defined commensals dominantly affect skin immunity and identify the cellular mediators involved in this specification. In particular, colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis induces IL-17A(+) CD8(+) T cells that home to the epidermis, enhance innate barrier immunity and limit pathogen invasion. Commensal-specific T-cell responses result from the coordinated action of skin-resident dendritic cell subsets and are not associated with inflammation, revealing that tissue-resident cells are poised to sense and respond to alterations in microbial communities. This interaction may represent an evolutionary means by which the skin immune system uses fluctuating commensal signals to calibrate barrier immunity and provide heterologous protection against invasive pathogens. These findings reveal that the skin immune landscape is a highly dynamic environment that can be rapidly and specifically remodelled by encounters with defined commensals, findings that have profound implications for our understanding of tissue-specific immunity and pathologies. PMID:25539086

  4. Commensal–dendritic-cell interaction specifies a unique protective skin immune signature

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Shruti; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Han, Seong-Ji; Harrison, Oliver J.; Wilhelm, Christoph; Conlan, Sean; Himmelfarb, Sarah; Byrd, Allyson L.; Deming, Clayton; Quinones, Mariam; Brenchley, Jason M.; Kong, Heidi H.; Tussiwand, Roxanne; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Merad, Miriam; Segre, Julia A; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    The skin represents the primary interface between the host and the environment. This organ is also home to trillions of microorganisms that play an important role in tissue homeostasis and local immunity1–4. Skin microbial communities are highly diverse and can be remodelled over time or in response to environmental challenges5–7. How, in the context of this complexity, individual commensal microorganisms may differentially modulate skin immunity and the consequences of these responses for tissue physiology remains unclear. Here we show that defined commensals dominantly affect skin immunity and identify the cellular mediators involved in this specification. In particular, colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis induces IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells that home to the epidermis, enhance innate barrier immunity and limit pathogen invasion. Commensal-specific T-cell responses result from the coordinated action of skin-resident dendritic cell subsets and are not associated with inflammation, revealing that tissue-resident cells are poised to sense and respond to alterations in microbial communities. This interaction may represent an evolutionary means by which the skin immune system uses fluctuating commensal signals to calibrate barrier immunity and provide heterologous protection against invasive pathogens. These findings reveal that the skin immune landscape is a highly dynamic environment that can be rapidly and specifically remodelled by encounters with defined commensals, findings that have profound implications for our understanding of tissue-specific immunity and pathologies. PMID:25539086

  5. Single immunizing dose of recombinant adenovirus efficiently induces CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E G; Zavala, F; Eichinger, D; Wilson, J M; Tsuji, M

    1997-02-01

    The immunogenicity of a recombinant replication defective adenovirus expressing a major malaria Ag, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein (AdPyCS), was determined using a rodent malaria model. A single immunizing dose of this construct induced a large number of CS-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the spleens of these animals, particularly when given by the s.c. or i.m. route. A single dose of AdPyCS also induced high titers of Abs to Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites in mice. No other form of presentation of the CS protein given as a single immunizing dose, i.e., irradiated sporozoites, recombinant vaccinia, or influenza virus, etc., elicits comparably high numbers of CS-specific CD8+ T cells. The high concentration of CS-specific CD8+ T cells in the spleen was relatively short-lived, decreasing to half of its original value by 4 wk and to one-third at 8 wk after AdPyCS inoculation. The decrease in splenic CS-specific CD4+ T cells was even more rapid. Most importantly, a single dose of inoculation of AdPyCS into mice rendered them highly resistant to sporozoite challenge, resulting in a 93% inhibition of liver stage development of the parasites. This protective effect was primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, as shown by depletion of this T cell population, while depletion of the CD4+ T cell population had only a minor effect on anti-plasmodial activity. Moreover, the inoculation of mice with AdPyCS induces sterile immunity in a significant proportion of mice, preventing the occurrence of parasitemia. PMID:9013969

  6. RNA-seq Analysis of δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-treated T Cells Reveals Altered Gene Expression Profiles That Regulate Immune Response and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoming; Bam, Marpe; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-07-22

    Marijuana has drawn significant public attention and concern both for its medicinal and recreational use. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main bioactive component in marijuana, has also been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of its ability to activate cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB-2) expressed on immune cells. In this study, we used RNA-seq to quantify the transcriptomes and transcript variants that are differentially regulated by THC in super antigen-activated lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. We found that the expressions of many transcripts were altered by THC in both total lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the abundance of many miRNA precursors and long non-coding RNAs was dramatically altered in THC-treated mice. For example, the expression of miR-17/92 cluster and miR-374b/421 cluster was down-regulated by THC. On the other hand miR-146a, which has been shown to induce apoptosis, was up-regulated by THC. Long non-coding RNAs that are expressed from the opposite strand of CD27 and Appbp2 were induced by THC. In addition, THC treatment also caused alternative promoter usage and splicing. The functions of those altered transcripts were mainly related to immune response and cell proliferation. PMID:27268054

  7. A critical role for pannexin-1 in activation of innate immune cells of the choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Maslieieva, Valentyna; Thompson, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Epiplexus cells are a population of innate immune cells in the choroid plexus of the brain ventricles. They are thought to contribute to the immune component of the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid-barrier (BCSFB). Here we have developed a novel technique for studying epiplexus cells in acutely isolated, live and intact choroid plexus. We show that epiplexus cells are potently activated by exogenous ATP, increasing their motility within the tissue. This ATP-induced chemokinesis required activation of pannexin-1 channels, which are expressed by the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and not the epiplexus cells themselves. Furthermore, ATP acts at least in part through the P2X4 ionotropic purinergic receptor. Thus, the resident immune cells of the choroid plexus appear to be in communication with the epithelial cells through pannexin-1 channels. PMID:24418937

  8. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD-an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  9. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  10. Immune Contexture, Immunoscore, and Malignant Cell Molecular Subgroups for Prognostic and Theranostic Classifications of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Becht, Etienne; Giraldo, Nicolas A; Germain, Claire; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fridman, Wolf H

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of tumors results from genetic and epigenetic modifications of the transformed cells and also from the interactions of the malignant cells with their tumor microenvironment (TME), which includes immune and inflammatory cells. For a given cancer type, the composition of the immunological TME is not homogeneous. Heterogeneity is found between different cancer types and also between tumors from patients with the same type of cancer. Some tumors exhibit a poor infiltration by immune cells, and others are highly infiltrated by lymphocytes. Among the latter, the architecture of the TME, with the localization of immune cells in the invasive front and the center of the tumor, the presence of tumor-adjacent organized lymphoid aggregates, and the type of inflammatory context, determines the prognostic impact of the infiltrating cells. The description and the understanding of the immune and inflammatory landscape in human tumors are of paramount importance at different levels of patient's care. It completes the mutational, transcriptional, and epigenetic patterns of the malignant cells and open paths to understand how tumor cells shape their immune microenvironment and are shaped by the immune reaction. It provides prognostic and theranostic markers, as well as novel targets for immunotherapies. PMID:26923001

  11. Innate lymphoid cells integrate stromal and immune signals to enhance antibody production by splenic marginal zone B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bascones, Sabrina; Mortha, Arthur; Puga, Irene; Cassis, Linda; Barra, Carolina M.; Comerma, Laura; Chudnovskiy, Aleksey; Gentile, Maurizio; Llige, David; Cols, Montserrat; Serrano, Sergi; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Juan, Manel; Yagüe, Jordi; Merad, Miriam; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) regulate stromal, epithelial and immune cells, but their impact on B cells remains unclear. We identified RORγt+ ILCs nearby the marginal zone (MZ), a splenic compartment containing innate-like B cells that respond to circulating T cell-independent (TI) antigens. Spenic ILCs established a bidirectional crosstalk with MAdCAM-1+ marginal reticular cells by providing tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin, and activated MZ B cells via BAFF, CD40 ligand and the Notch ligand, Delta-like 1. Splenic ILCs further helped MZ B cells and their plasma cell progeny by co-opting neutrophils through the release of GM-CSF. Consequently, ILC depletion impaired both pre- and post-immune TI antibody responses. Thus, ILCs integrate stromal and myeloid signals to orchestrate innate-like antibody production at the interface between the immune and circulatory systems. PMID:24562309

  12. Follicular regulatory T cells can be specific for the immunizing antigen and derive from naive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Aloulou, Meryem; Carr, Edward J.; Gador, Mylène; Bignon, Alexandre; Liblau, Roland S.; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Linterman, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a subset of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells that form in response to immunization or infection, which localize to the germinal centre where they control the magnitude of the response. Despite an increased interest in the role of Tfr cells in humoral immunity, many fundamental aspects of their biology remain unknown, including whether they recognize self- or foreign antigen. Here we show that Tfr cells can be specific for the immunizing antigen, irrespective of whether it is a self- or foreign antigen. We show that, in addition to developing from thymic derived Treg cells, Tfr cells can also arise from Foxp3− precursors in a PD-L1-dependent manner, if the adjuvant used is one that supports T-cell plasticity. These findings have important implications for Tfr cell biology and for improving vaccine efficacy by formulating vaccines that modify the Tfr:Tfh cell ratio. PMID:26818004

  13. Antigen mRNA-transfected, allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with NKT-cell ligand confer antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Goto, Akira; Shimizu, Kanako

    2009-04-30

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in situ by danger signals plays a central role in linking innate and adaptive immunity. We previously demonstrated that the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells by administration of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer)-loaded tumor cells can act as a cellular adjuvant through the DC maturation. In the current study, we used allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer and transfected with antigen-encoding mRNA, thus combining the adjuvant effects of iNKT-cell activation with delivery of antigen to DCs in vivo. We found that these cells produce antigen protein and activate NK and iNKT cells. When injected into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mice, they elicited antigen-specific T-cell responses and provided tumor protection, suggesting that these immune responses depend on host DCs. In addition, antigen-expressing fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer lead to a more potent T-cell response than those expressing NK cell ligands. Thus, glycolipid-loaded, mRNA-transfected allogeneic fibroblasts act as cellular vectors to provide iNKT-cell activation, leading to DC maturation and T-cell immunity. By harnessing the innate immune system and generating an adaptive immune response to a variety of antigens, this unique tool could prove clinically beneficial in the development of immunotherapies against malignant and infectious diseases. PMID:19164596

  14. NKp46 Clusters at the Immune Synapse and Regulates NK Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Uzi; Thauland, Timothy J.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Butte, Manish J.; Porgador, Angel; Krams, Sheri M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in first-line defense against tumor and virus-infected cells. The activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a repertoire of cell surface expressed inhibitory and activating receptors. NKp46 is a major NK cell-activating receptor that is involved in the elimination of target cells. NK cells form different types of synapses that result in distinct functional outcomes: cytotoxic, inhibitory, and regulatory. Recent studies revealed that complex integration of NK receptor signaling controls cytoskeletal rearrangement and other immune synapse-related events. However, the distinct nature by which NKp46 participates in NK immunological synapse formation and function remains unknown. In this study, we determined that NKp46 forms microclusters structures at the immune synapse between NK cells and target cells. Over-expression of human NKp46 is correlated with increased accumulation of F-actin mesh at the immune synapse. Concordantly, knock-down of NKp46 in primary human NK cells decreased recruitment of F-actin to the synapse. Live cell imaging experiments showed a linear correlation between NKp46 expression and lytic granules polarization to the immune synapse. Taken together, our data suggest that NKp46 signaling directly regulates the NK lytic immune synapse from early formation to late function. PMID:26441997

  15. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039. PMID:27145382

  16. THP-1 cell line: an in vitro cell model for immune modulation approach.

    PubMed

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Mes, Jurriaan J; Wichers, Harry J

    2014-11-01

    THP-1 is a human leukemia monocytic cell line, which has been extensively used to study monocyte/macrophage functions, mechanisms, signaling pathways, and nutrient and drug transport. This cell line has become a common model to estimate modulation of monocyte and macrophage activities. This review attempts to summarize and discuss recent publications related to the THP-1 cell model. An overview on the biological similarities and dissimilarities between the THP-1 cell line and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) derived-monocytes and macrophages, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the use of THP-1 cell line, is included. The review summarizes different published co-cultivation studies of THP-1 cells with other cell types, for instance, intestinal cells, adipocytes, T-lymphocytes, platelets, and vascular smooth muscle cells, which can be an option to study cell-cell interaction in vitro and can be an approach to better mimic in vivo conditions. Macrophage polarization is a relatively new topic which gains interest for which the THP-1 cell line also may be relevant. Besides that an overview of newly released commercial THP-1 engineered-reporter cells and THP-1 inflammasome test-cells is also given. Evaluation of recent papers leads to the conclusion that the THP-1 cell line has unique characteristics as a model to investigate/estimate immune-modulating effects of compounds in both activated and resting conditions of the cells. Although the THP-1 response can hint to potential responses that might occur ex vivo or in vivo, these should be, however, validated by in vivo studies to draw more definite conclusions. PMID:25130606

  17. A novel innexin2 forming membrane hemichannel exhibits immune responses and cell apoptosis in Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Ping; Chen, Fang-Yi; Dong, Li-Xia; Zhang, Ya-Qun; Chen, Hui-Yun; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2015-11-01

    Innexins are a class of transmembrane proteins that are important for embryonic development, morphogenesis and electrical synapse formation. In the present study, a novel innexin2 gene from Scylla paramamosain was named Sp-inx2 and characterized. The complete cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of Sp-inx2 were revealed. Sp-inx2 mRNA transcripts were distributed in various tissues of S. paramamosain and were most abundant in the hemocytes. The Sp-inx2 was significantly upregulated in hemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas tissues with the challenge of either Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus or lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) when analyzed at 3 and 6 h using quantitative real-time PCR, suggesting that it could activate an immune response against the challenge of LPSs or Vibrio species. Using the chemical inhibitors carbenoxolone and probenecid, the absorption of the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow decreased in the primary cultured hemocytes of crabs, thus confirming that hemichannels composed of Sp-inx2 existed in the crab hemocytes. With LPS stimulation, the level of mRNA transcripts and protein expression of Sp-inx2 in the same cultured hemocytes gradually increased from 6 to 48 h, while the activity of hemichannels was down-regulated at 6 and 12 h, demonstrating that LPSs could modulate the absorption activity of hemichannels in addition to its upregulation of Sp-inx2 gene expression. Furthermore, the dye uptake rate in HeLa cells in which Sp-inx2 was ectopically expressed increased dramatically but the increase was significantly down-regulated with the addition of 50 μg mL(-1) LPS, suggesting that the LPS stimulation could effectively reduce the activity of hemichannels. Interestingly, with the ectopic expression of Sp-inx2 in HeLa and EPC cells, apoptosis spontaneously occurred in both cultured cell lines when detected using TUNEL assay. In summary, a new Sp-inx2 gene was first characterized in a marine animal S. paramamosain and it had a function associated with

  18. Cell-mediated immune responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Geevarghese, Bessey; Weinberg, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to RSV acute infection including the magnitude, kinetics and correlates with morbidity and age. Twenty-nine RSV-infected patients with mean ± SD age of 15 ± 14 months were enrolled during their first week of disease. Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17 and Th22 responses were measured at entry and 2 and 6 weeks later. All subjects were hospitalized for a median (range) of 5 (3–11) days. RSV-specific effector and memory Th1 CMI measured by lymphocyte proliferation and IFNγ ELISPOT significantly increased over time (P ≤ 0.03). In contrast, Th22 responses decreased over time (P ≤ 0.03). Other changes did not reach statistical significance. The severity of RSV disease measured by the length of hospitalization positively correlated with the magnitude of Th9, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and negatively with memory CMI (rho = –0.45; P = 0.04). The corollary of this observation is that robust Th1 and/or low Th9, Th22, and TNFα inflammatory responses may be associated with efficient clearance of RSV infection and therefore desirable characteristics of an RSV vaccine. Young age was associated with low memory and effector Th1 responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and high Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≤ –0.4; P ≤ 0.04), indicating that age at vaccination may be a major determinant of the CMI response pattern. PMID:24513666

  19. Endometriotic mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a distinct immune phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koippallil Gopalakrishnan Nair, Aghila Rani; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Warty, Neeta; Madan, Taruna

    2015-04-01

    Endometriosis is a significant debilitating gynecological problem affecting women of the reproductive age group and post-menopause. Recent reports suggest a role for endometriotic mesenchymal stem cells (ectopic MSCs) in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. To investigate the plausible mechanisms leading to the pathogenic behavior of ectopic MSCs, we compared the immunomodulatory properties of eutopic (healthy) and ectopic MSCs. We analyzed MSC phenotypes, differentiation potential, differential gene expression for an array of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and pro-inflammatory cytokine release along with markers of migration and angiogenesis among eutopic and ectopic MSCs. Further, alterations in immunosuppressive functions of eutopic and ectopic MSCs were examined by co-culturing them with mitogen-activated allogeneic PBMCs. Transcripts of PRRs such as all Toll-like receptors (TLR1-10), except TLR8, collectins (CL-L1, CL-P1 and CL-K1), NOD-1 and NOD-2 receptors and secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-6, IFN-γ, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor and MCP-1 were significantly up-regulated in ectopic MSCs. The anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor-β showed significant down-regulation, while IL-10 showed a significant increase in ectopic MSCs. Further, ectopic MSCs showed up-regulated expression for markers of migration and angiogenesis such as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-3 and MMP-9 and VEGF, respectively. We report here that proliferation of PBMCs was less inhibited upon co-culture with ectopic MSCs compared with eutopic MSCs. The findings suggest that ectopic MSCs with increased levels of TLRs, collectins, pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of migration and angiogenesis exhibit a distinct immune phenotype compared to eutopic MSCs. This distinct phenotype may be responsible for the reduced immunosuppressive property of ectopic MSCs and may be associated with the pathogenesis of

  20. Electronic Sorting of Immune Cell Subpopulations Based on Highly Plastic Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingzhang; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2016-07-15

    Immune cells are highly heterogeneous and plastic with regard to gene expression and cell phenotype. In this study, we categorized genes into those with low and high gene plasticity, and those categories revealed different functions and applications. We proposed that highly plastic genes could be suited for the labeling of immune cell subpopulations; thus, novel immune cell subpopulations could be identified by gene plasticity analysis. For this purpose, we systematically analyzed highly plastic genes in human and mouse immune cells. In total, 1,379 human and 883 mouse genes were identified as being extremely plastic. We also expanded our previous immunoinformatic method, electronic sorting, which surveys big data to perform virtual analysis. This approach used correlation analysis and took dosage changes into account, which allowed us to identify the differentially expressed genes. A test with human CD4(+) T cells supported the method's feasibility, effectiveness, and predictability. For example, with the use of human nonregulatory T cells, we found that FOXP3(hi)CD4(+) T cells were highly expressive of certain known molecules, such as CD25 and CTLA4, and that this process of investigation did not require isolating or inducing these immune cells in vitro. Therefore, the sorting process helped us to discover the potential signature genes or marker molecules and to conduct functional evaluations for immune cell subpopulations. Finally, in human CD4(+) T cells, 747 potential immune cell subpopulations and their candidate signature genes were identified, which provides a useful resource for big data-driven knowledge discoveries. PMID:27288532

  1. B cells expressing IL-10 mRNA modulate memory T cells after DNA-Hsp65 immunization

    PubMed Central

    Fontoura, I. C.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Almeida, L. P.; Lorenzi, J. C. C.; Rossetti, R. A. M.; Malardo, T.; Padilha, E.; Schl