Science.gov

Sample records for abundant lipid droplets

  1. Lipid droplets go nuclear.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are sometimes found in the nucleus of some cells. In this issue, Ohsaki et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507122) show that the nuclear membrane, promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and the protein PML-II play a role in nuclear LD formation, suggesting functional relationships between these structures. PMID:26728852

  2. Surface features of the lipid droplet mediate perilipin 2 localization

    PubMed Central

    Sletten, Arthur; Seline, Alison; Rudd, Andrew; Logsdon, Michelle; Listenberger, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    All eukaryotic organisms store excess lipid in intracellular lipid droplets. These dynamic structures are associated with and regulated by numerous proteins. Perilipin 2, an abundant protein on most lipid droplets, promotes neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets. However, the mechanism by which perilipin 2 binds to and remains anchored on the lipid droplet surface is unknown. Here we identify features of the lipid droplet surface that influence perilipin 2 localization. We show that perilipin 2 binding to the lipid droplet surface requires both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Reagents that disrupt these interactions also decrease binding. Moreover, perilipin 2 binding does not depend on other lipid droplet-associated proteins but is influenced by the lipid composition of the surface. Perilipin 2 binds to synthetic vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, a phospholipid with unsaturated acyl chains. Decreasing the temperature of the binding reaction, or introducing phospholipids with saturated acyl chains, decreases binding. We therefore demonstrate a role for surface lipids and acyl chain packing in perilipin 2 binding to lipid droplets. The ability of the lipid droplet phospholipid composition to impact protein binding may link changes in nutrient availability to lipid droplet homeostasis. PMID:25172666

  3. Lipid droplets, lipophagy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are essential components for life. Their various structural and physical properties influence diverse cellular processes and, thereby, human health. Lipids are not genetically encoded but are synthesized and modified by complex metabolic pathways, supplying energy, membranes, signaling molecules, and hormones to affect growth, physiology, and response to environmental insults. Lipid homeostasis is crucial, such that excess fatty acids (FAs) can be harmful to cells. To prevent such lipotoxicity, cells convert excess FAs into neutral lipids for storage in organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). These organelles do not simply manage lipid storage and metabolism but also are involved in protein quality management, pathogenesis, immune responses, and, potentially, neurodegeneration. In recent years, a major trend in LD biology has centered around the physiology of lipid mobilization via lipophagy of fat stored within LDs. This review summarizes key findings in LD biology and lipophagy, offering novel insights into this rapidly growing field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26713677

  4. Lipidomic and proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets and identification of ACS-4 as a lipid droplet-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Vrablik, Tracy L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Larson, Emily M.; Smith, Richard D.; Watts, Jennifer

    2015-06-27

    Lipid droplets are cytoplasmic organelles that store neutral lipids for membrane synthesis and energy reserves. In this study, we characterized the lipid and protein composition of purified C. elegans lipid droplets. These lipid droplets are composed mainly of triacylglycerols, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer composed primarily of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols was rich in fatty acid species obtained from the dietary E. coli, including cyclopropane fatty acids and cis-vaccenic acid. Unlike other organisms, C. elegans lipid droplets contain very little cholesterol or cholesterol esters. Comparison of the lipid droplet proteomes of wild type and high-fat daf-2 mutant strains shows a relative decrease of MDT-28 abundance in lipid droplets isolated from daf-2 mutants. Functional analysis of lipid droplet proteins identified in our proteomic studies indicated an enrichment of proteins required for growth and fat homeostasis in C. elegans.

  5. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  6. Identification of a Major Lipid Droplet Protein in a Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kohei; Yoshida, Masaki; Suzuki, Iwane; Watanabe, Makoto M

    2016-02-01

    Various kinds of organisms, including microalgae, accumulate neutral lipids in distinct intracellular compartments called lipid droplets. Generally, lipid droplets are generated from the endoplasmic reticulum, and particular proteins localize on their surface. Some of these proteins function as structural proteins to prevent fusion between the lipid droplets, and the others could have an enzymatic role or might be involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. However, information about lipid droplet proteins in microalgae is scarce as compared with that in animals and land plants. We focused on the oil-producing, marine, pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum that forms lipid droplets during nitrogen deprivation and we investigated the proteins located on the lipid droplets. After 6 d of cultivation in a nitrate-deficient medium, the mature lipid droplets were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Proteomic analyses revealed five proteins, with Stramenopile-type lipid droplet protein (StLDP) being the most abundant protein in the lipid droplet fraction. Although the primary sequence of StLDP did not have homology to any known lipid droplet proteins, StLDP had a central hydrophobic domain. This structural feature is also detected in oleosin of land plants and in lipid droplet surface protein (LDSP) of Nannochloropsis species. As a proline knot motif of oleosin, conservative proline residues existed in the hydrophobic domain. StLDP was up-regulated during nitrate deprivation, and fluctuations of StLDP expression levels corresponded to the size of the lipid droplets. PMID:26738549

  7. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  8. Dictyostelium Lipid Droplets Host Novel Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  9. Dictyostelium lipid droplets host novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W; Maniak, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  10. Deciphering the mechanisms for targeting and interaction of Arabidopsis Lipid Droplet Associated Protein (LDAP) to the lipid droplet surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently identified a new class of lipid-droplet associated proteins (LDAPs) in plants that share extensive sequence similarity with abundant structural proteins that coat rubber particles in rubber-producing plants. A majority of higher plants, however, including those that do not produce rubber...

  11. ARF1 activation dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets to promote HCV assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yin, Peiqi; Zhou, Liya; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Leiliang

    2016-06-17

    Lipid droplets are the place for HCV assembly and ADRP is an abundant lipid droplets-associated protein. However, little is known about the mechanisms how ADRP is involved in HCV life cycle. Here we demonstrate that activation of ARF1 dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets. A constitute active form of ARF1 (ARF1Q71I) promotes HCV assembly. We found that ADRP plays a positive role in HCV replication and a negative role in HCV assembly. Overexpression of ADRP increases the size of lipid droplets, while silencing ADRP reduces the size of lipid droplets. These findings provide new insight into the role of lipid droplets proteins in life cycle of HCV. PMID:27157138

  12. Nuclear lipid droplets: a novel nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Layerenza, J P; González, P; García de Bravo, M M; Polo, M P; Sisti, M S; Ves-Losada, A

    2013-02-01

    We investigated nuclear neutral-lipid (NL) composition and organization, as NL may represent an alternative source for providing fatty acids and cholesterol (C) to membranes, signaling paths, and transcription factors in the nucleus. We show here that nuclear NL were organized into nonpolar domains in the form of nuclear-lipid droplets (nLD). By fluorescent confocal microscopy, representative nLD were observed in situ within the nuclei of rat hepatocytes in vivo and HepG2 cells, maintained under standard conditions in culture, and within nuclei isolated from rat liver. nLD were resistant to Triton X-100 and became stained with Sudan Red, OsO4, and BODIPY493/503. nLD and control cytosolic-lipid droplets (cLD) were isolated from rat-liver nuclei and from homogenates, respectively, by sucrose-gradient sedimentation. Lipids were extracted, separated by thin-layer chromatography, and quantified. nLD were composed of 37% lipids and 63% proteins. The nLD lipid composition was as follows: 19% triacylglycerols (TAG), 39% cholesteryl esters, 27% C, and 15% polar lipids; whereas the cLD composition contained different proportions of these same lipid classes, in particular 91% TAG. The TAG fatty acids from both lipid droplets were enriched in oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids. The TAG from the nLD corresponded to a small pool, whereas the TAG from the cLD constituted the main cellular pool (at about 100% yield from the total homogenate). In conclusion, nLD are a domain within the nucleus where NL are stored and organized and may be involved in nuclear lipid homeostasis. PMID:23098923

  13. Proteomic analysis of murine testes lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyi; Wei, Suning; Li, Linghai; Su, Xueying; Du, Congkuo; Li, Fengjuan; Geng, Bin; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Guoheng

    2015-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells contain abundant cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) as a cholesteryl-ester store for releasing cholesterols as the precursor substrate for testosterone biosynthesis. Here, we identified the protein composition of testicular LDs purified from adult mice by using mass spectrometry and immunodetection. Among 337 proteins identified, 144 were previously detected in LD proteomes; 44 were confirmed by microscopy. Testicular LDs contained multiple Rab GTPases, chaperones, and proteins involved in glucuronidation, ubiquination and transport, many known to modulate LD formation and LD-related cellular functions. In particular, testicular LDs contained many members of both the perilipin family and classical lipase/esterase superfamily assembled predominately in adipocyte LDs. Thus, testicular LDs might be regulated similar to adipocyte LDs. Remarkably, testicular LDs contained a large number of classical enzymes for biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and hormonal steroids, so steroidogenic reactions might occur on testicular LDs or the steroidogenic enzymes and products could be transferred through testicular LDs. These characteristics differ from the LDs in most other types of cells, so testicular LDs could be an active organelle functionally involved in steroidogenesis. PMID:26159641

  14. Many Roads Lead to the Lipid Droplet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this journal article, we review the recent work by Farese and colleagues (Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. Guo Y, Walther TC, Rao M, Stuurman N, Goshima G, Terayama K, Wong JS, Vale RD, Walter P, Farese RV. Nature. 2008 May 29;453(7195):...

  15. Biogenesis of the multifunctional lipid droplet: Lipids, proteins, and sites

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous dynamic organelles that store and supply lipids in all eukaryotic and some prokaryotic cells for energy metabolism, membrane synthesis, and production of essential lipid-derived molecules. Interest in the organelle’s cell biology has exponentially increased over the last decade due to the link between LDs and prevalent human diseases and the discovery of new and unexpected functions of LDs. As a result, there has been significant recent progress toward understanding where and how LDs are formed, and the specific lipid pathways that coordinate LD biogenesis. PMID:24590170

  16. Lipid droplets and associated proteins in sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R

    2016-01-15

    Mammalian skin is characterized by the presence of sebaceous glands (SGs), which develop with the hair follicle and whose predominant cell type is the sebocyte. Sebocytes are epithelial cells that progressively accumulate lipids and eventually release their content (sebum) by holocrine secretion as cells disrupt. In addition to thermoregulatory and pheromonal actions, numerous additional functions have been demonstrated or postulated for sebum, including antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The SG has also been involved in the pathogenesis of skin diseases as acne vulgaris and some forms of alopecia. Although lipid accumulation culminating in cell disruption and content release is the hallmark of sebocyte differentiation, only a surprisingly low number of studies have so far focused on sebocyte lipid droplets and their associated proteins. PMID:26571075

  17. Expression of perilipin 5 promotes lipid droplet formation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shirish; Schneiter, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Neutral lipids are packed into dedicated intracellular compartments termed lipid droplets (LDs). LDs are spherical structures delineated by an unusual lipid monolayer and they harbor a specific set of proteins, many of which function in lipid synthesis and lipid turnover. In mammals, LDs are covered by abundant scaffolding proteins, the perilipins (PLIN1-5). LDs in yeast are functionally similar to that of mammalian cells, but they lack the perilipins. We have previously shown that perilipins (PLIN1-3) are properly targeted to LDs when expressed in yeast and that they promote LD formation from the ER membrane enriched in neutral lipids. Here we address the question whether PLIN5 (OXPAT) has a similar function. Both human and murine PLIN5 were properly targeted to yeast LDs, but the protein localized to the cytosol and its steady-state level was reduced when expressed in yeast mutants lacking the capacity to synthesize storage lipids. When expressed in cells containing high levels of neutral lipids within the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum, PLIN5 promoted the formation of LDs. Interestingly, PLIN5 was properly targeted to LDs, irrespective of whether these LDs were filled with triacylglycerol or steryl esters, indicating that PLIN5 did not exhibit targeting specificity for a particular subtypes of LDs as was reported for mammalian cells. PMID:27066172

  18. Keeping FIT, storing fat: Lipid droplet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vineet; Golden, Andy; Prinz, William A

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotes store excess lipids in organelles known as lipid droplets (LDs), which play central roles in lipid metabolism. Understanding LD biogenesis and metabolism is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of lipid metabolic disorders like obesity and atherosclerosis. LDs are composed of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids that often contains coat proteins. Nascent LDs bud from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but the mechanism is not known. In this commentary we discuss our recent finding that a conserved family of proteins called fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins is necessary for LDs budding from the ER. In cells lacking FIT proteins, LDs remain in the ER membrane. C. elegans has a single FIT protein (FITM-2), which we found is essential; almost all homozygous fitm-2 animals die as larvae and those that survive to adulthood give rise to embryos that die as L1 and L2 larvae. Homozygous fitm-2 animals have a number of abnormalities including a significant decrease in intestinal LDs and dramatic defects in muscle development. Understanding how FIT proteins mediate LD biogenesis and what roles they play in lipid metabolism and development are fascinating challenges for the future. PMID:27383728

  19. ARFGAP1 Is Dynamically Associated with Lipid Droplets in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alamri, Hussam; Feng, Shi Bo; Kalantari, Fariba; Negi, Sarita; Wong, Amy H. Y.; Mazur, Alexander; Asp, Lennart; Fazel, Ali; Salman, Ayat; Lazaris, Anthoula; Metrakos, Peter; Bergeron, John J. M.; Nilsson, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The ARF GTPase Activating Protein 1 (ARFGAP1) associates mainly with the cytosolic side of Golgi cisternal membranes where it participates in the formation of both COPI and clathrin-coated vesicles. In this study, we show that ARFGAP1 associates transiently with lipid droplets upon addition of oleate in cultured cells. Also, that addition of cyclic AMP shifts ARFGAP1 from lipid droplets to the Golgi apparatus and that overexpression and knockdown of ARFGAP1 affect lipid droplet formation. Examination of human liver tissue reveals that ARFGAP1 is found associated with lipid droplets at steady state in some but not all hepatocytes. PMID:25397679

  20. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  1. Microorganism lipid droplets and biofuel development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Congyan; Shen, Xipeng; Zhang, Xuelin; Cichello, Simon; Guan, Hongbin; Liu, Pingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids as a source of energy and carbon. However, recent research has emerged that the organelle is involved in lipid synthesis, transportation, and metabolism, as well as mediating cellular protein storage and degradation. With the exception of multi-cellular organisms, some unicellular microorganisms have been observed to contain LDs. The organelle has been isolated and characterized from numerous organisms. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in LDs can be in excess of 50% of the dry weight in some microorganisms, and a maximum of 87% in some instances. These microorganisms include eukaryotes such as yeast and green algae as well as prokaryotes such as bacteria. Some organisms obtain carbon from CO2 via photosynthesis, while the majority utilizes carbon from various types of biomass. Therefore, high TAG content generated by utilizing waste or cheap biomass, coupled with an efficient conversion rate, present these organisms as bio-tech ‘factories’ to produce biodiesel. This review summarizes LD research in these organisms and provides useful information for further LD biological research and microorganism biodiesel development. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(12): 575-581] PMID:24355300

  2. Morphologically and Functionally Distinct Lipid Droplet Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Cui, Liujuan; Deng, Yaqin; Xu, Shimeng; Yu, Jinhai; Cichello, Simon; Serrero, Ginette; Ying, Yunshu; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD), a multi-functional organelle, is often found to associate with other cellular membranous structures and vary in size in a given cell, which may be related to their functional diversity. Here we established a method to separate LD subpopulations from isolated CHO K2 LDs into three different size categories. The subpopulation with smallest LDs was nearly free of ER and other membranous structures while those with larger LDs contained intact ER. These distinct subpopulations of LDs differed in their protein composition and ability to recruit proteins. This method was also applicable to LDs obtained from other sources, such as Huh7 cells, mouse liver and brown adipose tissue, et al. We developed an in vitro assay requiring only isolated LDs, Coenzyme A, and ATP to drive lipid synthesis. The LD subpopulation nearly depleted of ER was able to incorporate fatty acids into triacylglycerol and phospholipids. Together, our data demonstrate that LDs in a given cell are heterogeneous in size and function, and suggest that LDs are one of cellular lipid synthetic organelles. PMID:27386790

  3. Isolation of Lipid Droplets from Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Wolins, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets are organelles found in most mammalian cells, as well as in various plant tissues and yeast. They are composed of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a membrane monolayer of phospholipids and cholesterol in which specific proteins are embedded. This unit provides protocols for isolating lipid droplets from mammalian cells by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580706

  4. Spatial distribution of lipid droplets during starvation: Implications for lipophagy.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Survival during starvation depends largely on metabolic energy, which is stored in the form of neutral lipids in specialized organelles known as lipid droplets. The precursors for the synthesis of neutral lipids are also used for membrane biogenesis, which is required for cell growth and proliferation. Therefore cells must possess mechanisms to preferentially channel lipid precursors toward either membrane synthesis or lipid droplet storage, in response to nutrient status. How this partitioning is spatially regulated within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where lipid droplets co-localize, remains poorly understood. We have recently shown that at the onset of starvation lipid droplets concentrate at a perinuclear ER subdomain flanking the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ) and that this is crucial for maintaining proper nuclear shape and ER membrane organization. Here we show that disruption of the NVJ does not block the translocation and internalization of lipid droplets into the vacuole for their degradation, which takes place at later stages of starvation. We propose that alternative pathways of lipid droplet translocation from the ER to the vacuole may exist to enable stationary phase-induced lipophagy. PMID:27574533

  5. Microalgal lipid droplets: composition, diversity, biogenesis and functions.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2015-04-01

    Lipid droplet is the major site of neutral lipid storage in eukaryotic cells, and increasing evidence show its involvement in numerous cellular processes such as lipid homeostasis, signaling, trafficking and inter-organelle communications. Although the biogenesis, structure, and functions of lipid droplets have been well documented for seeds of vascular plants, mammalian adipose tissues, insects and yeasts, relative little is known about lipid droplets in microalgae. Over the past 5 years, the growing interest of microalgae as a platform for biofuel, green chemicals or value-added polyunsaturated fatty acid production has brought algal lipid droplets into spotlight. Studies conducted on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other model microalgae such as Haematococcus and Nannochloropsis species have led to the identification of proteins associated with lipid droplets, which include putative structural proteins different from plant oleosins and animal perilipins, as well as candidate proteins for lipid biosynthesis, mobilization, trafficking and homeostasis. Biochemical and microscopy studies have also started to shed light on the role of chloroplasts in the biogenesis of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas. PMID:25433857

  6. Spatial distribution of lipid droplets during starvation: Implications for lipophagy

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Survival during starvation depends largely on metabolic energy, which is stored in the form of neutral lipids in specialized organelles known as lipid droplets. The precursors for the synthesis of neutral lipids are also used for membrane biogenesis, which is required for cell growth and proliferation. Therefore cells must possess mechanisms to preferentially channel lipid precursors toward either membrane synthesis or lipid droplet storage, in response to nutrient status. How this partitioning is spatially regulated within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where lipid droplets co-localize, remains poorly understood. We have recently shown that at the onset of starvation lipid droplets concentrate at a perinuclear ER subdomain flanking the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ) and that this is crucial for maintaining proper nuclear shape and ER membrane organization. Here we show that disruption of the NVJ does not block the translocation and internalization of lipid droplets into the vacuole for their degradation, which takes place at later stages of starvation. We propose that alternative pathways of lipid droplet translocation from the ER to the vacuole may exist to enable stationary phase-induced lipophagy. PMID:27574533

  7. Increased lipid droplet accumulation associated with a peripheral sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lee L; Stimpson, Scott E; Hyland, Ryan; Coorssen, Jens R; Myers, Simon J

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN-1) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by missense mutations in the SPTLC1 gene. The SPTLC1 protein is part of the SPT enzyme which is a ubiquitously expressed, critical and thus highly regulated endoplasmic reticulum bound membrane enzyme that maintains sphingolipid concentrations and thus contributes to lipid metabolism, signalling, and membrane structural functions. Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles containing sphingolipids and membrane bound proteins surrounding a core of neutral lipids, and thus mediate the intracellular transport of these specific molecules. Current literature suggests that there are increased numbers of lipid droplets and alterations of lipid metabolism in a variety of other autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. This study establishes for the first time, a significant increase in the presence of lipid droplets in HSN-1 patient-derived lymphoblasts, indicating a potential connection between lipid droplets and the pathomechanism of HSN-1. However, the expression of adipophilin (ADFP), which has been implicated in the regulation of lipid metabolism, was not altered in lipid droplets from the HSN-1 patient-derived lymphoblasts. This appears to be the first report of increased lipid body accumulation in a peripheral neuropathy, suggesting a fundamental molecular linkage between a number of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24711860

  8. Dropping in on the lipid droplet- tumor protein D52 (TPD52) as a new regulator and resident protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyan; Frost, Sarah; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets are essential for both the storage and retrieval of excess cellular nutrients, and their biology is regulated by a diverse range of cellular proteins, some of which function at the lipid droplet. Numerous studies have characterized lipid droplet proteomes in different organisms and cell types, and RNAi whole genome screening studies have examined the genetic regulation of lipid storage in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. While tumor protein D52 (TPD52) did not emerge from earlier studies as a strong candidate, exogenous expression of human TPD52 in cultured cells resulted in significantly increased numbers of lipid droplets, and oleic acid supplementation increased TPD52 detection at both lipid droplets and the Golgi apparatus. These results suggest that direct testing of proteins that are infrequently but recurrently identified in proteomic and RNAi screening studies may identify novel lipid droplet regulators. While the analysis of these possibly lower-abundance or itinerant lipid droplet proteins may be more technically challenging, such proteins could facilitate a more detailed interrogation of emerging aspects of lipid droplet biology. PMID:27617178

  9. The lipid-rich core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. Prevalence of small lipid droplets and vesicles by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1989-01-01

    Abundant extracellular lipid deposits are associated with cell necrosis and tissue weakening in the core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. The ultrastructural morphology of the core region, previously undefined because of lipid extraction artifacts, was studied with the aid of new osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium and osmium-tannic acid-paraphenylenediamine sequences for tissue processing. Small droplets of neutral lipid (30 to 400 nm profile diameter) and lipid vesicles with aqueous centers accounted for more than 90% of the area occupied by lipid-rich structures in the core region. No foam cells were present. Cholesterol crystals, lipid droplets of a size similar to those in foam cells (0.4 to 6 mu), and larger neutral lipid deposits (greater than 6 mu) together occupied less than 10% of the total area of lipid structures. Abundant lipid vesicles were associated with the nearby presence of cholesterol crystals, whereas small lipid droplets were predominant in areas without crystals. Many droplets had surface defects in the form of pits and vesicular blebs. These morphologic findings are explained most concisely by postulating direct accumulation of extracellular lipid from interstitial lipoproteins as a major process in core region formation. Moreover, a dynamic state of ongoing physical/metabolic transformation of extracellular lipid deposits is suggested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2646938

  10. Biogenesis and functions of lipid droplets in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The compartmentation of neutral lipids in plant tissues is mostly associated with seed tissues, where triacylglycerols (TAGs) stored within lipid droplets (LDs) serve as an essential physiological energy and carbon reserve during post-germinative growth. However, some non-seed tissues, such as leave...

  11. Adipocyte size fluctuation, mechano-active lipid droplets and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, Soazig; Briand, Nolwenn; Dugail, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell size fluctuation, a key property in adipocyte pathophysiology primarily dependent on lipid storage, is linked to a novel function of lipid droplet organelles acting as mechano-active organelles to regulate cell membrane remodeling and caveolae dynamics. PMID:26167412

  12. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  13. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets ...

  14. Spastin Binds to Lipid Droplets and Affects Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Chrisovalantis; Orso, Genny; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Herholz, Marija; Gumeni, Sentiljana; Tadepalle, Nimesha; Jüngst, Christian; Tzschichholz, Anne; Schauss, Astrid; Höning, Stefan; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Daga, Andrea; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT)-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87). We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs). A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP. PMID:25875445

  15. Lipid droplet detection by the cavity perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakey, R. T.; Mason, A.; Rolph, C. E.; Bond, G.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    There are currently no point-of-care diagnosis strategies available to indicate the presence of neoplasmic growth. This research aims to develop a novel diagnostic strategy based on detecting TAG accumulation in cells. This element of the research is a preliminary experiment to prove the concept of detecting TAG lipid droplets in YEPD media. It was found that a change in mono-unsaturated concentration can be detected by the frequency shift in a resonant cavity. The dielectric constant of TAG vegetable oils was calculated at 2.34-2.39. It was also found that concentrations of lipid droplet can be differentiated up to 5% (v/v).

  16. Imaging lipid droplets in Arabidopsis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was adapted for the imaging of neutral lipids in plant leaves with defects in normal lipid metabolism using two different fluorescent dyes. Disruptions in a gene locus, At4g24160, yielded Arabidopsis thaliana plants with a preponderance of oil bodies in their leaves ...

  17. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  18. The Causative Gene in Chanarian Dorfman Syndrome Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meng; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of many cellular mechanisms required for adjustment to various stresses induced by the changing environment. In C. elegans dauer larvae AMPK-null mutants expire prematurely due to hyperactive Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL-1) followed by rapid depletion of triglyceride stores. We found that the compromise of one of the three C. elegans orthologues of human cgi-58 significantly improves the survival of AMPK-deficient dauers. We also provide evidence that C. elegans CGI-58 acts as a co-activator of ATGL-1, while it also functions cooperatively to maintain regular lipid droplet structure. Surprisingly, we show that it also acts independently of ATGL-1 to restrict lipid droplet coalescence by altering the surface abundance and composition of long chain (C20) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Our data reveal a novel structural role of CGI-58 in maintaining lipid droplet homeostasis through its effects on droplet composition, morphology and lipid hydrolysis; a conserved function that may account for some of the ATGL-1-independent features unique to Chanarin-Dorfman Syndrome. PMID:26083785

  19. Spinal teratoma concomitant with intracranial lipid droplet dissemination.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyung Sug; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Kwan Ho

    2015-03-01

    A teratoma is a neoplasm that contains tissues originating from three germ cell layers at ectopic sites. The embryology of teratomas remains unclear. Teratomas are usually composed of cystic and solid components, and they are usually associated with syringomyelia. Cystic lesions of teratomas may rupture in a spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic manner. Lipid droplets in the ventricles and subarachnoid space are rare. We managed a case of a spinal teratoma in the lumbar region in a 67-year-old man. He complained of nocturia, frequent urination, and difficulty in walking for 2 months. Radiographic imaging revealed a lumbar spinal intradural mass. Intracranial lipid droplets dissemination was also existed. The patient underwent surgery, and a diagnosis of mature teratoma was confirmed histopathologically. During the operation, the cystic portion of the intradural mass ruptured. During the hospital stay, the patient's mental status declined. On radiological examination, slightly enlarged ventricle size was observed. Dissemination of lipid droplets within ventricles occurs because of spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic rupture. Additional lipid droplet dissemination to the intracranial space associated with neurologic deterioration after a spinal teratoma surgery should be considered when iatrogenic rupture of the cyst portion occurs. PMID:25883663

  20. Lipogenic Enzymes Complexes and Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplet Formation During Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Velez-delValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2016-10-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that store triglycerides and participate in their mobilization in adipose cells. These organelles require the reorganization of some structural components, the cytoskeleton, and the activation of lipogenic enzymes. Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the participation of cytoskeletal components and two lipogenic enzymes, fatty acid synthase and glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, during lipid droplet biogenesis in differentiating 3T3-F442A cells into adipocytes. We show that subcortical actin microfilaments are extended at the basal side of the cells in parallel arrangement to the culture dish substrate, and that the microtubule network traverses the cytoplasm as a scaffold that supports the round shape of the mature adipocyte. By immunoprecipitation, we show that vimentin and perilipin1a associate during the early stages of the differentiation process for lipid droplet formation. We also report that the antibody against perilipin1 detected a band that might correspond to a modified form of the molecule. Finally, the cytosolic distribution and punctate organization of lipogenic enzymes and their co-localization in the proximity of lipid droplets suggest the existence of dynamic protein complexes involved in synthesis and storage of triglycerides. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2315-2326, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928794

  1. Lipid droplet meets a mitochondrial protein to regulate adipocyte lipolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to adrenergic stimulation, adipocytes undergo protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated lipolysis. A key PKA target in this context is perilipin 1, a major regulator of lipolysis on lipid droplets (LDs). A study published in this issue of The EMBO Journal (Pidoux et al, 2011) identifies optic at...

  2. Apoptosis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes cytoplasmic lipid droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Boren, J; Brindle, K M

    2012-09-01

    A characteristic of apoptosis is the rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets, which are composed largely of neutral lipids. The proton signals from these lipids have been used for the non-invasive detection of cell death using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We show here that despite an apoptosis-induced decrease in the levels and activities of enzymes involved in lipogenesis, which occurs downstream of p53 activation and inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway, the increase in lipid accumulation is due to increased de novo lipid synthesis. This results from inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which coupled with an increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity, diverts fatty acids away from oxidation and into lipid synthesis. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation can be explained by a rapid rise in mitochondrial membrane potential and an attendant increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:22460322

  3. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids[S

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists’ induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot. PMID:25030662

  4. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the catabolism

  5. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Allmann, Stefan; Mazet, Muriel; Ziebart, Nicole; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Fouillen, Laetitia; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Moreau, Patrick; Bringaud, Frédéric; Boshart, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4–5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content also increased 4–5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse. PMID:25493940

  6. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Allmann, Stefan; Mazet, Muriel; Ziebart, Nicole; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Fouillen, Laetitia; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Moreau, Patrick; Bringaud, Frédéric; Boshart, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse. PMID:25493940

  7. The physics of lipid droplet nucleation, growth and budding.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Forêt, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular oil-in-water emulsion droplets, covered by a phospholipid monolayer and mainly present in the cytosol. Despite their important role in cellular metabolism and growing number of newly identified functions, LD formation mechanism from the endoplasmic reticulum remains poorly understood. To form a LD, the oil molecules synthesized in the ER accumulate between the monolayer leaflets and induce deformation of the membrane. This formation process works through three steps: nucleation, growth and budding, exactly as in phase separation and dewetting phenomena. These steps involve sequential biophysical membrane remodeling mechanisms for which we present basic tools of statistical physics, membrane biophysics, and soft matter science underlying them. We aim to highlight relevant factors that could control LD formation size, site and number through this physics description. An emphasis will be given to a currently underestimated contribution of the molecular interactions between lipids to favor an energetically costless mechanism of LD formation. PMID:27131867

  8. Dynamics of the Lipid Droplet Proteome of the Oleaginous Yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Ding, Yunfeng; Gong, Zhiwei; Yang, Li; Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Congyan; Lin, Xinping; Shen, Hongwei; Zou, Hanfa; Xie, Zhensheng; Yang, Fuquan; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that serve as a neutral lipid reservoir and a hub for lipid metabolism. Manipulating LD formation, evolution, and mobilization in oleaginous species may lead to the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals. However, key factors regulating LD dynamics remain poorly characterized. Here we purified the LDs and identified LD-associated proteins from cells of the lipid-producing yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides cultured under nutrient-rich, nitrogen-limited, and phosphorus-limited conditions. The LD proteome consisted of 226 proteins, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism and LD formation and evolution. Further analysis of our previous comparative transcriptome and proteome data sets indicated that the transcription level of 85 genes and protein abundance of 77 proteins changed under nutrient-limited conditions. Such changes were highly relevant to lipid accumulation and partially confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. We demonstrated that the major LD structure protein Ldp1 is an LD marker protein being upregulated in lipid-rich cells. When overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ldp1 localized on the LD surface and facilitated giant LD formation, suggesting that Ldp1 plays an important role in controlling LD dynamics. Our results significantly advance the understanding of the molecular basis of lipid overproduction and storage in oleaginous yeasts and will be valuable for the development of superior lipid producers. PMID:25576482

  9. Epithelial thickness and lipid droplets in the hepatopancreas of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda) in different physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Vilhar, Barbara; Kladnik, Ales; Znidarsic, Nada; Strus, Jasna

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the morphometric characteristics of the hepatopancreatic epithelium in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber during acclimatization to laboratory conditions, during the daily cycle, the molt cycle, and fasting. The hepatopancreatic epithelium was analyzed using computer-assisted microscopy of serial sections of the hepatopancreatic tubes. In addition, the abundance, the distribution, and the size of lipid droplets in the hepatopancreatic epithelium were recorded. The experimental animals were collected in the field and transferred to the laboratory. The hepatopancreatic epithelium was thinner and lipid droplets reduced after 2 months of acclimatization to laboratory conditions. The daily cycle and the molt cycle affected neither the epithelial thickness nor the abundance of lipid droplets. But in animals fasted for 2 weeks, these two parameters were significantly reduced. Based on both the epithelial thickness and the abundance of lipid droplets in B cells, we propose criteria for estimating the stress status of the animals. With the possibility to determine the stress status, many studies on isopods gain in relevance. PMID:18656333

  10. Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins (LDAPs) Are Required for the Dynamic Regulation of Neutral Lipid Compartmentation in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Gidda, Satinder K; Park, Sunjung; Pyc, Michal; Yurchenko, Olga; Cai, Yingqi; Wu, Peng; Andrews, David W; Chapman, Kent D; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols in seeds, their biogenesis and function in nonseed tissues are poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-specific, lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) that are abundant components of LDs in nonseed cell types. Here, we characterized the three LDAPs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to gain insight to their targeting, assembly, and influence on LD function and dynamics. While all three LDAPs targeted specifically to the LD surface, truncation analysis of LDAP3 revealed that essentially the entire protein was required for LD localization. The association of LDAP3 with LDs was detergent sensitive, but the protein bound with similar affinity to synthetic liposomes of various phospholipid compositions, suggesting that other factors contributed to targeting specificity. Investigation of LD dynamics in leaves revealed that LD abundance was modulated during the diurnal cycle, and characterization of LDAP misexpression mutants indicated that all three LDAPs were important for this process. LD abundance was increased significantly during abiotic stress, and characterization of mutant lines revealed that LDAP1 and LDAP3 were required for the proper induction of LDs during heat and cold temperature stress, respectively. Furthermore, LDAP1 was required for proper neutral lipid compartmentalization and triacylglycerol degradation during postgerminative growth. Taken together, these studies reveal that LDAPs are required for the maintenance and regulation of LDs in plant cells and perform nonredundant functions in various physiological contexts, including stress response and postgerminative growth. PMID:26896396

  11. Identification of major proteins in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction isolated from the human hepatocyte cell line HuH7.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Jun; Makita, Minoru; Noda, Junich; Mori, Masahiro; Higashi, Yusuke; Kojima, Shinichi; Takano, Tatsuya

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed the presence of intracellular lipid droplets in wide variety of species. In mammalian cells, there exist proteins specifically localize in lipid droplets. However, the protein profile in the droplet remains yet to be clarified. In this study, a fraction enriched with lipid droplets was isolated from a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7 using sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and 17 major proteins in the fraction were identified using nano LC-MS/MS techniques. Adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) was the most abundant protein in the fraction. The secondary abundant proteins were identified to be acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACS3) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 11 (17betaHSD11). Included in the identified proteins were five lipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as two lipid droplet-specific proteins. When HuH7 cell lysate was fractionated by a density gradient, most of 17betaHSD11 was found in the droplet-enriched fraction. In immunocytochemical analysis, 17betaHSD11 showed ring-shaped images which overlapped with those for ADRP. These results suggest that a specific set of proteins is enriched in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction and that 17betaHSD11 localizes specifically in the fraction. PMID:14741744

  12. Characterization of major lipid droplet proteins from Dunaliella.

    PubMed

    Davidi, Lital; Katz, Adriana; Pick, Uri

    2012-07-01

    Many green algal species can accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerides (TAG) under nutrient deprivation, making them a potential source for production of biodiesel. TAG are organized in cytoplasmic lipid bodies, which contain a major lipid droplet protein termed MLDP. Green algae MLDP differ in sequence from plant oleosins and from animal perilipins, and their structure and function are not clear. In this study, we describe the isolation of MLDP from three species of the extreme halotolerant green algae Dunaliella. Sequence alignment with other green algae MLDP proteins identified a conserved 4-proline domain that may be considered as a signature domain of Volvocales green algae MLDP. Gold immunolabeling localized MLDP at the surface of lipid droplets in D. salina. The induction of MLDP by nitrogen deprivation is kinetically correlated with TAG accumulation, and inhibition of TAG biosynthesis impairs MLDP accumulation suggesting that MLDP induction is co-regulated with TAG accumulation. These results can lead to a better understanding of the structure and function of Volvocales green algae MLDP proteins. PMID:22231009

  13. GRAF1a is a brain-specific protein that promotes lipid droplet clustering and growth, and is enriched at lipid droplet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lucken-Ardjomande Häsler, Safa; Vallis, Yvonne; Jolin, Helen E.; McKenzie, Andrew N.; McMahon, Harvey T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid droplets are found in all cell types. Normally present at low levels in the brain, they accumulate in tumours and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling their homeostasis in the brain. We found that GRAF1a, the longest GRAF1 isoform (GRAF1 is also known as ARHGAP26), was enriched in the brains of neonates. Endogenous GRAF1a was found on lipid droplets in oleic-acid-fed primary glial cells. Exclusive localization required a GRAF1a-specific hydrophobic segment and two membrane-binding regions, a BAR and a PH domain. Overexpression of GRAF1a promoted lipid droplet clustering, inhibited droplet mobility and severely perturbed lipolysis following the chase of cells overloaded with fatty acids. Under these conditions, GRAF1a concentrated at the interface between lipid droplets. Although GRAF1-knockout mice did not show any gross abnormal phenotype, the total lipid droplet volume that accumulated in GRAF1−/− primary glia upon incubation with fatty acids was reduced compared to GRAF1+/+ cells. These results provide additional insights into the mechanisms contributing to lipid droplet growth in non-adipocyte cells, and suggest that proteins with membrane sculpting BAR domains play a role in droplet homeostasis. PMID:25189622

  14. A lipid droplet protein of Nannochloropsis with functions partially analogous to plant oleosins.

    PubMed

    Vieler, Astrid; Brubaker, Shane B; Vick, Bertrand; Benning, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    As our understanding of the dynamics of lipid droplets (LDs) in animal, plant, and fungal cells is rapidly evolving, still little is known about the formation and turnover of these organelles in microalgae. Yet with the growing importance of algal feedstock for the production of biofuels and high-value lipids, there is a need to understand the mechanisms of LD dynamics in microalgae. Thus, we investigated the proteins associated with LDs of the emerging heterokont model alga Nannochloropsis sp. and discovered an abundant hydrophobic lipid droplet surface protein (LDSP) with unique primary sequence but structural similarities to other LD proteins. LDSP abundance in Nannochloropsis cells closely tracked the amount of triacylglycerols during conditions of oil accumulation and degradation. Functional characterization of LDSP in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) OLEOSIN1-deficient mutant allowed a separation of its physical and structural properties in its interaction with LDs from its physiological or biochemical activities. Although LDSP presence in Arabidopsis predictably affected LD size, it could not reverse the physiological impact of OLEOSIN deficiency on triacylglycerol hydrolysis during germination. PMID:22307965

  15. Lipid droplets form complexes with viroplasms and are crucial for rotavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sue E; Desselberger, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that a variety of pathogens target cellular lipid metabolism for their replication. Lipid droplets are a major contributor to lipid homeostasis and contain neutral fats but are also recognized as dynamic organelles involved in signal transduction, membrane trafficking and modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Rotaviruses co-opt lipid droplets for their replication. Rotavirus viroplasms, sites of viral RNA replication and immature particle assembly, form complexes with cellular lipid droplets early in infection. Chemical compounds blocking fatty acid synthesis or interfering with lipid droplet homeostasis decrease viroplasm formation and the yield of infectious viral progeny. Lipid droplets are vital for the replication of rotaviruses as well as various members of the Flaviviridae family and several intracellular bacteria. Chemical compounds decreasing intracellular triglyceride content reduced rotavirus replication in an animal model and should be considered as potential therapeutic agents against disease caused by rotaviruses, flaviviruses and intracellular bacteria. PMID:27341619

  16. Fast and long term lipid droplet tracking with CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jüngst, Christian; Winterhalder, Martin J; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Photobleaching of organic fluorophores commonly used in fluorescence microscopy puts a limit to the number of images which can be acquired. Label-free imaging techniques therefore offer advantages both for rapid image acquisition and for long-term observations. CARS microscopy is a label-free imaging technique offering molecule specific contrast. Here we demonstrate that CARS microscopy allows video-rate tracking of intracellular transport of lipid droplets, but also continuous long-term observation of cells over several hours. PMID:21445955

  17. Proteome Analysis of Cytoplasmatic and Plastidic β-Carotene Lipid Droplets in Dunaliella bardawil1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidi, Lital; Levin, Yishai; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The halotolerant green alga Dunaliella bardawil is unique in that it accumulates under stress two types of lipid droplets: cytoplasmatic lipid droplets (CLD) and β-carotene-rich (βC) plastoglobuli. Recently, we isolated and analyzed the lipid and pigment compositions of these lipid droplets. Here, we describe their proteome analysis. A contamination filter and an enrichment filter were utilized to define core proteins. A proteome database of Dunaliella salina/D. bardawil was constructed to aid the identification of lipid droplet proteins. A total of 124 and 42 core proteins were identified in βC-plastoglobuli and CLD, respectively, with only eight common proteins. Dunaliella spp. CLD resemble cytoplasmic droplets from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and contain major lipid droplet-associated protein and enzymes involved in lipid and sterol metabolism. The βC-plastoglobuli proteome resembles the C. reinhardtii eyespot and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastoglobule proteomes and contains carotene-globule-associated protein, plastid-lipid-associated protein-fibrillins, SOUL heme-binding proteins, phytyl ester synthases, β-carotene biosynthesis enzymes, and proteins involved in membrane remodeling/lipid droplet biogenesis: VESICLE-INDUCING PLASTID PROTEIN1, synaptotagmin, and the eyespot assembly proteins EYE3 and SOUL3. Based on these and previous results, we propose models for the biogenesis of βC-plastoglobuli and the biosynthesis of β-carotene within βC-plastoglobuli and hypothesize that βC-plastoglobuli evolved from eyespot lipid droplets. PMID:25404729

  18. Targeting Fat: Mechanisms of Protein Localization to Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Kory, Nora; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-07-01

    How proteins specifically localize to the phospholipid monolayer surface of lipid droplets (LDs) is being unraveled. We review here the major known pathways of protein targeting to LDs and suggest a classification framework based on the localization origin for the protein. Class I proteins often have a membrane-embedded, hydrophobic 'hairpin' motif, and access LDs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) either during LD formation or after formation via ER-LD membrane bridges. Class II proteins access the LD surface from the cytosol and bind through amphipathic helices or other hydrophobic domains. Other proteins require lipid modifications or protein-protein interactions to bind to LDs. We summarize knowledge for targeting and removal of the different classes, and highlight areas needing investigation. PMID:26995697

  19. TIP47 functions in the biogenesis of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bulankina, Anna V.; Deggerich, Anke; Wenzel, Dirk; Mutenda, Kudzai; Wittmann, Julia G.; Rudolph, Markus G.; Burger, Koert N.J.

    2009-01-01

    TIP47 (tail-interacting protein of 47 kD) was characterized as a cargo selection device for mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs), directing their transport from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. In contrast, our current analysis shows that cytosolic TIP47 is not recruited to organelles of the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways. Knockdown of TIP47 expression had no effect on MPR distribution or trafficking and did not affect lysosomal enzyme sorting. Therefore, our data argue against a function of TIP47 as a sorting device. Instead, TIP47 is recruited to lipid droplets (LDs) by an amino-terminal sequence comprising 11-mer repeats. We show that TIP47 has apolipoprotein-like properties and reorganizes liposomes into small lipid discs. Suppression of TIP47 blocked LD maturation and decreased the incorporation of triacylglycerol into LDs. We conclude that TIP47 functions in the biogenesis of LDs. PMID:19451273

  20. Dynamics of lipid droplet-associated proteins during hormonally stimulated lipolysis in engineered adipocytes: stabilization and lipid droplet binding of adipocyte differentiation-related protein/adipophilin.

    PubMed

    Gross, Danielle N; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Hosaka, Toshio; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Pino, Elizabeth C; Souza, Sandra; Obin, Martin; Greenberg, Andrew S; Pilch, Paul F

    2006-02-01

    In mature adipocytes, triglyceride is stored within lipid droplets, which are coated with the protein perilipin, which functions to regulate lipolysis by controlling lipase access to the droplet in a hormone-regulatable fashion. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP) is a widely expressed lipid droplet binding protein that is coexpressed with perilipin in differentiating fat cells but is minimally present in fully differentiated cultured adipocytes. We find that fibroblasts ectopically expressing C/EBPalpha (NIH-C/EBPalpha cells) differentiate into mature adipocytes that simultaneously express perilipin and ADRP. In response to isoproterenol, perilipin is hyperphosphorylated, lipolysis is enhanced, and subsequently, ADRP expression increases coincident with it surrounding intracellular lipid droplets. In the absence of lipolytic stimulation, inhibition of proteasomal activity with MG-132 increased ADRP levels to those of cells treated with 10 mum isoproterenol, but ADRP does not surround the lipid droplet in the absence of lipolytic stimulation. We overexpressed a perilipin A construct in NIH-C/EBPalpha cells where the six serine residues known to be phosphorylated by protein kinase A were changed to alanine (Peri A Delta1-6). These cells show no increase in ADRP expression in response to isoproterenol. We propose that ADRP can replace perilipin on existing lipid droplets or those newly formed as a result of fatty acid reesterification, under dynamic conditions of hormonally stimulated lipolysis, thus preserving lipid droplet morphology/structure. PMID:16239256

  1. SUMO1 depletion prevents lipid droplet accumulation and HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Akil, Abdellah; Wedeh, Ghaith; Zahid Mustafa, Mohammad; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public-health problem. Chronic infection often leads to cirrhosis, steatosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The life cycle of HCV depends on the host cell machinery and involves intimate interaction between viral and host proteins. However, the role of host proteins in the life cycle of HCV remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO1) as a key host factor required for HCV replication. We performed a series of cell biology and biochemistry experiments using the HCV JFH-1 (Japanese fulminate hepatitis 1) genotype 2a strain, which produces infectious particles and recapitulates all the steps of the HCV life cycle. We observed that SUMO1 is upregulated in Huh7.5 infected cells. Reciprocally, SUMO1 was found to regulate the expression of viral core protein. Moreover, knockdown of SUMO1 using specific siRNA influenced the accumulation of lipid droplets and reduced HCV replication as measured by qRT-PCR. Thus, we identify SUMO1 as a key host factor required for HCV replication. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that SUMO1 regulates lipid droplets in the context of viral infection. Our report provides a meaningful insight into how HCV replicates and interacts with host proteins and is of significant importance for the field of HCV and RNA viruses. PMID:26449956

  2. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Plakkal Ayyappan, Janeesh; Paul, Antoni; Goo, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL‑derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD‑associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell‑targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  3. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AYYAPPAN, JANEESH PLAKKAL; PAUL, ANTONI; GOO, YOUNG-HWA

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL-derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell-targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  4. Topography of Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins: Insights from Freeze-Fracture Replica Immunogold Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Robenek, Horst; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Mirko J.; Hofnagel, Oliver; Ruebel, Anneke; Troyer, David; Severs, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are not merely storage depots for superfluous intracellular lipids in times of hyperlipidemic stress, but metabolically active organelles involved in cellular homeostasis. Our concepts on the metabolic functions of lipid droplets have come from studies on lipid droplet-associated proteins. This realization has made the study of proteins, such as PAT family proteins, caveolins, and several others that are targeted to lipid droplets, an intriguing and rapidly developing area of intensive inquiry. Our existing understanding of the structure, protein organization, and biogenesis of the lipid droplet has relied heavily on microscopical techniques that lack resolution and the ability to preserve native cellular and protein composition. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling overcomes these disadvantages and can be used to define at high resolution the precise location of lipid droplet-associated proteins. In this paper illustrative examples of how freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry has contributed to our understanding of the spatial organization in the membrane plane and function of PAT family proteins and caveolin-1 are presented. By revisiting the lipid droplet with freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry, new perspectives have emerged which challenge prevailing concepts of lipid droplet biology and may hopefully provide a timely impulse for many ongoing studies. PMID:21490801

  5. DYNAMICS OF LIPID DROPLET-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS DURING HORMONALLY STIMULATED LIPOLYSIS IN ENGINEERED ADIPOCYTES: STABILIZATION AND LIPID DROPLET BINDING OF ADIPOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION-RELATED PROTEIN/ADIPOPHILIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mature adipocytes, triglyceride is stored within lipid droplets, which are coated with the protein perilipin, which functions to regulate lipolysis by controlling lipase access to the droplet in a hormone-regulatable fashion. Adipocyte-differentiation related protein (ADRP) is a widely expressed ...

  6. Lipid droplets of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi emerge in concert with arbuscule collapse.

    PubMed

    Kobae, Yoshihiro; Gutjahr, Caroline; Paszkowski, Uta; Kojima, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Toru; Hata, Shingo

    2014-11-01

    Plants share photosynthetically fixed carbon with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to maintain their growth and nutrition. AM fungi are oleogenic fungi that contain numerous lipid droplets in their syncytial mycelia during most of their life cycle. These lipid droplets are probably used for supporting growth of extraradical mycelia and propagation; however, when and where the lipid droplets are produced remains unclear. To address these issues, we investigated the correlation between intracellular colonization stages and the appearance of fungal lipid droplets in roots by a combination of vital staining of fungal structures, selective staining of lipids and live imaging. We discovered that a surge of lipid droplets coincided with the collapse of arbuscular branches, indicating that arbuscule collapse and the emergence of lipid droplets may be associated processes. This phenomenon was observed in the model AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis and the ancestral member of AM fungi Paraglomus occultum. Because the collapsing arbuscules were metabolically inactive, the emerged lipid droplets are probably derived from preformed lipids but not de novo synthesized. Our observations highlight a novel mode of lipid release by AM fungi. PMID:25231957

  7. Changes in lipid droplet localization during embryogenesis of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamahama, Yumi; Seno, Keiji; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2008-06-01

    Lipid droplets are considered one of the most important energy sources in lepidopteran eggs during late embryogenesis, but the process of their incorporation into the embryo is as yet unknown. The present study focused on the process of transition of lipid droplets from the extraembryonic yolk to the embryo of the silkworm Bombyx mori, using morphological and biochemical approaches. The morphological study revealed that the incorporation of lipid droplets from the extraembryonic yolk into the embryo occurs at three points and in three different ways during the development of the embryo. Some lipid droplets were translocated directly from the extraembryonic yolk to the embryo before the blastokinesis stage. However, the majority of lipid droplets together with the other components of the extraembryonic yolk were incorporated in the embryo via both morphogenetic inclusion during dorsal closure and ingestion of the extraembyonic yolk by the developing caterpillar prior to hatching. Similar results were obtained from the biochemical study. Thus, we propose that there are three steps in the incorporation of lipid droplets from the extraembryonic yolk into the embryo. In addition, morphological and biochemical data concerning the total amount of lipid droplets in the egg suggested that lipid droplets were mainly consumed during late embryogenesis, seeming to synchronize with tracheal development. PMID:18624568

  8. Linoleic acid stimulates neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets of maturing bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Carro, M; Buschiazzo, J; Ríos, G L; Oresti, G M; Alberio, R H

    2013-03-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in high concentrations in bovine follicular fluid; when added to maturation culture media, it affects oocyte competence (depending on the type and concentration of LA used). To date, little is known about the effective level of incorporation of LA and there is apparently no information regarding its esterification into various lipid fractions of the oocyte and its effect on neutral lipid storage. Therefore, the objective was to assess the uptake and subcellular lipid distribution of LA by analyzing incorporation of radiolabeled LA into oocyte polar and neutral lipid classes. The effects of various concentrations of LA on the nuclear status and cytoplasmic lipid content of bovine oocytes matured in vitro was also analyzed, with particular emphasis on intermediate concentrations of LA. Neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets were quantified with a fluorescence approach. Linoleic acid at 9 and 43 μM did not affect the nuclear status of oocytes matured in vitro, and 100 μM LA inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown, resulting in a higher percentage of oocytes arrested at the germinal state (43.5 vs. 3.0 in controls; P < 0.05). Bovine oocytes actively incorporated LA from the maturation medium (83.4 pmol LA per 100 oocytes at 22 hours of incubation; P < 0.05) and metabolized it mainly into major lipid classes, e.g., triacylglycerols and phospholipids (61.1% and 29.3%, respectively). Supplementation of the maturation medium with LA increased triacylglycerol accumulation in cytoplasmic lipid droplets at all concentrations assayed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, LA added to a defined maturation medium at concentrations that did not alter the nuclear status of bovine oocytes matured in vitro (9 and 43 μM) improved their quality by increasing the content of neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets. By directing the free fatty acid (LA) to triacylglycerol synthesis pathways and increasing the degree of unsaturation of

  9. TORC1 Inhibition Induces Lipid Droplet Replenishment in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Juliana B.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Matos, Gabriel Soares; Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular structures that regulate neutral lipid homeostasis. In mammals, LD synthesis is inhibited by rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTORC1 pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LD dynamics are modulated by the growth phase; however, the regulatory pathways involved are unknown. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the TORC1 pathway on LD metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, rapamycin treatment resulted in a fast LD replenishment and growth inhibition. The discovery that osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol) also induced LD synthesis but not growth inhibition suggested that the induction of LDs in yeast is not a secondary response to reduced growth. The induction of LDs by rapamycin was due to increased triacylglycerol but not sterol ester synthesis. Induction was dependent on the TOR downstream effectors, the PP2A-related phosphatase Sit4p and the regulatory protein Tap42p. The TORC1-controlled transcriptional activators Gln3p, Gat1p, Rtg1p, and Rtg3p, but not Msn2p and Msn4p, were required for full induction of LDs by rapamycin. Furthermore, we show that the deletion of Gln3p and Gat1p transcription factors, which are activated in response to nitrogen availability, led to abnormal LD dynamics. These results reveal that the TORC1 pathway is involved in neutral lipid homeostasis in yeast. PMID:25512609

  10. Heat shock protein 70 is translocated to lipid droplets in rat adipocytes upon heat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongfeng; He, Jinhan; Pu, Shenshen; Tang, Chaoshu; Xu, Guoheng

    2007-01-01

    In mammalian cells, lipid storage droplets contain a triacylglycerol and cholesterol ester core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer into which a number of proteins are imbedded. These proteins are thought to be involved in modulating the formation and metabolic functions of the lipid droplet. In this study, we show that heat stress upregulates several heat shock proteins (Hsps), including Hsp27, Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Grp78, in primary and differentiated adipocytes. Immunostaining and immunoblotting data indicate that among the Hsps examined, only Hsp70 is induced to redirect to the lipid droplet surface in heat-stressed adipocytes. The thermal induction of Hsp70 translocation to lipid droplet does not typically happen in a temperature- or time-dependent manner and occurs abruptly at 30-40 min and rapidly achieves a steady state within 60 min after 40 degrees C stress of adipocytes. Though Hsp70 is co-localized with perilipin on the lipid droplets in stressed adipocytes, immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Hsp70 does not directly interact with perilipin. Alkaline treatments indicate that Hsp70 associates with the droplet surface through non-hydrophobic interactions. We speculate that Hsp70 might noncovalently associate with monolayer microdomains of the lipid droplet in a manner similar to its interaction with lipid bilayer moieties composed of specific fatty acids. As an acute and specific cellular response to the heat stimulation, accumulation of Hsp70 on adipocytes lipid droplets might be involved in stabilizing the droplet monolayer, transferring nascent proteins to the lipid droplets, or chaperoning denatured proteins on the droplet for subsequent refolding. PMID:17175194

  11. Lipid Droplets Form from Distinct Regions of the Cell in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Alex; Del Rio, Zuania P; Beaver, Rachael A; Morris, Ryan M; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Alshibli, Amany K; Mannik, Jaana; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation around the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. The results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell. PMID:26990381

  12. Increased fatty acid synthesis inhibits nitrogen starvation-induced autophagy in lipid droplet-deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Régnacq, Matthieu; Voisin, Pierre; Sere, Yves Y; Wan, Bin; Soeroso, Venty M S; Bernard, Marianne; Camougrand, Nadine; Bernard, François-Xavier; Barrault, Christine; Bergès, Thierry

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy is a degradative pathway whereby cells encapsulate and degrade cytoplasmic material within endogenously-built membranes. Previous studies have suggested that autophagosome membranes originate from lipid droplets. However, it was recently shown that rapamycin could induce autophagy in cells lacking these organelles. Here we show that lipid droplet-deprived cells are unable to perform autophagy in response to nitrogen-starvation because of an accelerated lipid synthesis that is not observed with rapamycin. Using cerulenin, a potent inhibitor of fatty acid synthase, and exogenous addition of palmitic acid we could restore nitrogen-starvation induced autophagy in the absence of lipid droplets. PMID:27270031

  13. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  14. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a broad research trying to understand lipid droplets it has not been possible to determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we prese...

  15. Nitrogen-deprivation elevates lipid levels in Symbiodinium spp. by lipid droplet accumulation: morphological and compositional analyses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Luen; Pasaribu, Buntora; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2014-01-01

    Stable cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbioses depend on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. It has been previously shown that the host cytosol is a nitrogen-deficient environment for the intracellular Symbiodinium and may act to limit growth rates of symbionts during the symbiotic association. This study aimed to investigate the cell proliferation, as well as ultrastructural and lipid compositional changes, in free-living Symbiodinium spp. (clade B) upon nitrogen (N)-deprivation. The cell proliferation of the N-deprived cells decreased significantly. Furthermore, staining with a fluorescent probe, boron dipyrromethane 493/503 (BODIPY 493/503), indicated that lipid contents progressively accumulated in the N-deprived cells. Lipid analyses further showed that both triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesterol ester (CE) were drastically enriched, with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; i.e., docosahexaenoic acid, heneicosapentaenoic acid, and oleic acid) became more abundant. Ultrastructural examinations showed that the increase in concentration of these lipid species was due to the accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs), a cellular feature that have previously shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of intact endosymbioses. Integrity of these stable LDs was maintained via electronegative repulsion and steric hindrance possibly provided by their surface proteins. Proteomic analyses of these LDs identified proteins putatively involved in lipid metabolism, signaling, stress response and energy metabolism. These results suggest that LDs production may be an adaptive response that enables Symbiodinium to maintain sufficient cellular energy stores for survival under the N-deprived conditions in the host cytoplasm. PMID:24475285

  16. Autophagy regulation depends on ER homeostasis controlled by lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Ariadna P; Graef, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a highly conserved homeostasis and quality control process critically linked to neurodegeneration, metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. A key feature of autophagy is the de novo formation of autophagosomes, double-membrane vesicular structures encapsulating cytoplasmic cargo for vacuolar turnover and recycling. The membrane rearrangements underlying nucleation, expansion, closure, and vacuolar fusion of autophagosomes are driven by multicomponent core autophagy machinery in cooperation with numerous factors involved in a variety of cellular processes. Our current understanding of the origin and contribution of diverse membrane sources to autophagosome biogenesis and of cellular functions enabling stress-appropriate autophagy responses critical for cell health and survival remains limited. Here, we summarize and discuss our recent findings analyzing the role of lipid droplets (LDs), conserved intracellular storage compartments for neutral lipids, for autophagy regulation. Our data indicate that LDs are dispensable as membrane sources, but fulfill critical functions for maintaining endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, including buffering of newly synthesized fatty acids and maintenance of phospholipid composition, required for intact autophagy regulation and cell survival during nutrient stress. PMID:27245853

  17. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain’s LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain. PMID:26148013

  18. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain's LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain. PMID:26148013

  19. EHD1 regulates cholesterol homeostasis and lipid droplet storage

    PubMed Central

    Naslavsky, Naava; Rahajeng, Juliati; Rapaport, Debora; Horowitz, Mia; Caplan, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Endocytic transport is critical for the subcellular distribution of free cholesterol and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) is an important organelle that stores cholesterol and regulates its trafficking. The C-terminal EHD protein, EHD1, controls receptor recycling through the ERC and affects free cholesterol distribution in the cell. We utilized embryonic fibroblasts from EHD1 knockout mice (Ehd1-/-MEF) and SiRNA in normal MEF cells to assess the role of EHD1 in intracellular transport of cholesterol. Surprisingly, Ehd1-/-MEFs displayed reduced levels of esterified and free cholesterol, which returned to normal level upon re-introduction of wild-type, but not dysfunctional EHD1. Moreover, triglyceride and cholesterol storage organelles known as ‘lipid droplets’ were smaller in size in cells lacking EHD1, indicating that less esterified cholesterol and triglycerides were being stored. Decreased cellular cholesterol and reduced lipid droplet size in Ehd1-/-MEFs correlated with ineffectual cholesterol uptake via LDL receptor, suggesting involvement of EHD1 in LDL receptor internalization. PMID:17451652

  20. Protein kinase Cη is targeted to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Iio, Yuri; Saito, Naoaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of kinases that regulate numerous cellular functions. They are classified into three subfamilies, i.e., conventional PKCs, novel PKCs, and atypical PKCs, that have different domain structures. Generally, PKCs exist as a soluble protein in the cytosol in resting cells and they are recruited to target membranes upon stimulation. In the present study, we found that PKCη tagged with EGFP distributed in lipid droplets (LD) and induced a significant reduction in LD size. Two other novel PKCs, PKCδ and PKCε, also showed some concentration around LDs, but it was less distinct and less frequent than that of PKCη. Conventional and atypical PKCs (α, βII, γ, and ζ) did not show any preferential distribution around LDs. 1,2-Diacylglycerol, which can activate novel PKCs without an increase of Ca(2+) concentration, is the immediate precursor of triacylglycerol and exists in LDs. The present results suggest that PKCη modifies lipid metabolism by phosphorylating unidentified targets in LDs. PMID:23436195

  1. Fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induce lipid droplet accumulation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    den Hartigh, Laura J; Connolly-Rohrbach, Jaime E; Fore, Samantha; Huser, Thomas R; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which monocytes become activated postprandially is by exposure to triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) at the blood-endothelial cell interface, releasing free fatty acids. In this study, we examined postprandial monocyte activation in more detail, and found that lipolysis products generated from postprandial VLDL induce the formation of lipid-filled droplets within cultured THP-1 monocytes, characterized by coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy. Organelle-specific stains revealed an association of lipid droplets with the endoplasmic reticulum, confirmed by electron microscopy. Lipid droplet formation was reduced when LpL-released fatty acids were bound by bovine serum albumin, which also reduced cellular inflammation. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids induced more lipid droplet formation in monocytes compared to mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monocytes treated with postprandial VLDL lipolysis products contained lipid droplets with more intense saturated Raman spectroscopic signals than monocytes treated with fasting VLDL lipolysis products. In addition, we found that human monocytes isolated during the peak postprandial period contain more lipid droplets compared to those from the fasting state, signifying that their development is not limited to cultured cells but also occurs in vivo. In summary, circulating free fatty acids can mediate lipid droplet formation in monocytes and potentially be used as a biomarker to assess an individual’s risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20208007

  2. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues. PMID:23821652

  3. Isolation of Cellular Lipid Droplets: Two Purification Techniques Starting from Yeast Cells and Human Placentas

    PubMed Central

    Dalhaimer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that can be found in most eukaryotic and certain prokaryotic cells. Structurally, the droplets consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer. One of the most useful techniques in determining the cellular roles of droplets has been proteomic identification of bound proteins, which can be isolated along with the droplets. Here, two methods are described to isolate lipid droplets and their bound proteins from two wide-ranging eukaryotes: fission yeast and human placental villous cells. Although both techniques have differences, the main method - density gradient centrifugation - is shared by both preparations. This shows the wide applicability of the presented droplet isolation techniques. In the first protocol, yeast cells are converted into spheroplasts by enzymatic digestion of their cell walls. The resulting spheroplasts are then gently lysed in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Ficoll is added to the lysate to provide a density gradient, and the mixture is centrifuged three times. After the first spin, the lipid droplets are localized to the white-colored floating layer of the centrifuge tubes along with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the plasma membrane, and vacuoles. Two subsequent spins are used to remove these other three organelles. The result is a layer that has only droplets and bound proteins. In the second protocol, placental villous cells are isolated from human term placentas by enzymatic digestion with trypsin and DNase I. The cells are homogenized in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Low-speed and medium-speed centrifugation steps are used to remove unbroken cells, cellular debris, nuclei, and mitochondria. Sucrose is added to the homogenate to provide a density gradient and the mixture is centrifuged to separate the lipid droplets from the other cellular fractions. The purity of the lipid droplets in both protocols is confirmed by Western Blot analysis. The droplet fractions from both preps

  4. Subsarcolemmal lipid droplet responses to a combined endurance and strength exercise intervention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuchuan; Lee, Sindre; Langleite, Torgrim; Norheim, Frode; Pourteymour, Shirin; Jensen, Jørgen; Stadheim, Hans K.; Storås, Tryggve H.; Davanger, Svend; Gulseth, Hanne L.; Birkeland, Kåre I.; Drevon, Christian A.; Holen, Torgeir

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Muscle lipid stores and insulin sensitivity have a recognized association although the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated how a 12‐week supervised combined endurance and strength exercise intervention influenced muscle lipid stores in sedentary overweight dysglycemic subjects and normal weight control subjects (n = 18). Muscle lipid stores were measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), electron microscopy (EM) point counting, and direct EM lipid droplet measurements of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intramyofibrillar (IMF) regions, and indirectly, by deep sequencing and real‐time PCR of mRNA of lipid droplet‐associated proteins. Insulin sensitivity and VO2max increased significantly in both groups after 12 weeks of training. Muscle lipid stores were reduced according to MRS at baseline before and after the intervention, whereas EM point counting showed no change in LD stores post exercise, indicating a reduction in muscle adipocytes. Large‐scale EM quantification of LD parameters of the subsarcolemmal LD population demonstrated reductions in LD density and LD diameters. Lipid droplet volume in the subsarcolemmal LD population was reduced by ~80%, in both groups, while IMF LD volume was unchanged. Interestingly, the lipid droplet diameter (n = 10 958) distribution was skewed, with a lack of small diameter lipid droplets (smaller than ~200 nm), both in the SS and IMF regions. Our results show that the SS LD lipid store was sensitive to training, whereas the dominant IMF LD lipid store was not. Thus, net muscle lipid stores can be an insufficient measure for the effects of training. PMID:25413318

  5. The FATP1–DGAT2 complex facilitates lipid droplet expansion at the ER–lipid droplet interface

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyi; Zhang, Shaobing O.; Cole, Ronald A.; McKinney, Sean A.; Guo, Fengli; Haas, Joel T.; Bobba, Sudheer; Farese, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    At the subcellular level, fat storage is confined to the evolutionarily conserved compartments termed lipid droplets (LDs), which are closely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the molecular mechanisms that enable ER–LD interaction and facilitate neutral lipid loading into LDs are poorly understood. In this paper, we present evidence that FATP1/acyl-CoA synthetase and DGAT2/diacylglycerol acyltransferase are components of a triglyceride synthesis complex that facilitates LD expansion. A loss of FATP1 or DGAT2 function blocked LD expansion in Caenorhabditis elegans. FATP1 preferentially associated with DGAT2, and they acted synergistically to promote LD expansion in mammalian cells. Live imaging indicated that FATP1 and DGAT2 are ER and LD resident proteins, respectively, and electron microscopy revealed FATP1 and DGAT2 foci close to the LD surface. Furthermore, DGAT2 that was retained in the ER failed to support LD expansion. We propose that the evolutionarily conserved FATP1–DGAT2 complex acts at the ER–LD interface and couples the synthesis and deposition of triglycerides into LDs both physically and functionally. PMID:22927462

  6. Conserved Amphipathic Helices Mediate Lipid Droplet Targeting of Perilipins 1–3*

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Emily R.; Mimmack, Michael L.; Barbosa, Antonio D.; Haider, Afreen; Isaac, Iona; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Savage, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Perilipins (PLINs) play a key role in energy storage by orchestrating the activity of lipases on the surface of lipid droplets. Failure of this activity results in severe metabolic disease in humans. Unlike all other lipid droplet-associated proteins, PLINs localize almost exclusively to the phospholipid monolayer surrounding the droplet. To understand how they sense and associate with the unique topology of the droplet surface, we studied the localization of human PLINs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating that the targeting mechanism is highly conserved and that 11-mer repeat regions are sufficient for droplet targeting. Mutations designed to disrupt folding of this region into amphipathic helices (AHs) significantly decreased lipid droplet targeting in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we demonstrated a substantial increase in the helicity of this region in the presence of detergent micelles, which was prevented by an AH-disrupting missense mutation. We conclude that highly conserved 11-mer repeat regions of PLINs target lipid droplets by folding into AHs on the droplet surface, thus enabling PLINs to regulate the interface between the hydrophobic lipid core and its surrounding hydrophilic environment. PMID:26742848

  7. Conserved Amphipathic Helices Mediate Lipid Droplet Targeting of Perilipins 1-3.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Emily R; Mimmack, Michael L; Barbosa, Antonio D; Haider, Afreen; Isaac, Iona; Ouberai, Myriam M; Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Savage, David B

    2016-03-25

    Perilipins (PLINs) play a key role in energy storage by orchestrating the activity of lipases on the surface of lipid droplets. Failure of this activity results in severe metabolic disease in humans. Unlike all other lipid droplet-associated proteins, PLINs localize almost exclusively to the phospholipid monolayer surrounding the droplet. To understand how they sense and associate with the unique topology of the droplet surface, we studied the localization of human PLINs inSaccharomyces cerevisiae,demonstrating that the targeting mechanism is highly conserved and that 11-mer repeat regions are sufficient for droplet targeting. Mutations designed to disrupt folding of this region into amphipathic helices (AHs) significantly decreased lipid droplet targetingin vivoandin vitro Finally, we demonstrated a substantial increase in the helicity of this region in the presence of detergent micelles, which was prevented by an AH-disrupting missense mutation. We conclude that highly conserved 11-mer repeat regions of PLINs target lipid droplets by folding into AHs on the droplet surface, thus enabling PLINs to regulate the interface between the hydrophobic lipid core and its surrounding hydrophilic environment. PMID:26742848

  8. Low abundances of synthetics lipids in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Aguilar-Soto, J.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    Phantoms simulate optical characteristics of tissues. Phantoms use to mimic light distributions in living tissue. Several Phantoms compositions made of silicone, polyester, polyurethane, and epoxy resin have been described in the literature. These kinds of phantoms have the problem of long time preservation. In this work, we describe the fabrication and characterization of phantoms with low concentrations of synthetic lipid using Raman spectroscopy. We fabricate four phantoms made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These phantoms have synthetic lipid content of cholesterol and triglycerides. The size of our phantoms is 1 x 1 cm and 5 mm of thickness.We used the point-to-point mapping technique. Finally, we compared advantages and performance of made PDMS and gelatin phantoms.

  9. The phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin a directs lipid droplet fragmentation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Gauthier, Denise; Garcia, Anne; Brasaemle, Dawn L

    2006-04-28

    Perilipin A is a key regulator of triacylglycerol storage and hydrolysis in adipocytes; phosphorylation of perilipin A by protein kinase A facilitates maximal lipolysis. Chronic stimulation of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes causes large perinuclear lipid droplets to fragment into myriad dispersed perilipin A-covered microlipid droplets. In cultured fibroblasts stably expressing ectopic perilipin A, clustered lipid droplets disperse throughout the cytoplasm upon incubation of the cells with forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) to elevate levels of cAMP and activate protein kinase A, mirroring events observed in adipocytes. Furthermore, diethylum-belliferyl phosphate inhibits stimulated lipolysis but not the dispersion of lipid droplets, suggesting that products of lipolysis are not required for this remodeling process. We hypothesized that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of perilipin A triggers the remodeling of lipid droplets. The mutation of serine 492 of perilipin A to alanine prevented the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in fibroblasts stably expressing the mutated perilipin upon incubation with forskolin and IBMX. In contrast, the substitution of serines 81, 222, 276, or 433 with alanine, either singly or in combinations, did not affect the protein kinase A-mediated remodeling of lipid droplets. Interestingly, substitution of serines 433, 492, and 517 of perilipin A with glutamic acid residues blocked the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in cells incubated with forskolin and IBMX, indicating that the addition of a negative charge does not mimic a phosphate group. We conclude that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin A drives the fragmentation and dispersion of lipid droplets. PMID:16488886

  10. Specific Fluorescence Probes for Lipid Droplets Based on Simple AIEgens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiming; Gui, Chen; Zhao, Engui; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Qin, Anjun; Zhao, Zujin; Yu, Zhenqiang; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-04-27

    Lipid droplets (LDs), as dynamic complex organelles, are involved in various physiological processes, and their numbers and activity are related to many diseases, even cancer. Hence, locating and concentration monitoring of LDs are very important to scientific bioresearch and health care. In this work, we prepared two simple luminogens (FAS and DPAS) via very facile synthetic procedures and purification. They feature aggregation-induced emission and excited state intramolecular proton transfer characteristics. They exhibit large Stokes shifts and bright orange and yellow emissions in the aggregated state, and the emissions can be reversibly turned "off" and "on" for many cycles by controlling buffer pH values. Both FAS and DPAS are cytocompatible and can selectively accumulate in and light up the LDs in living cells with superior resolution and high contrast. They also outperform the commercial LD probes in terms of photostability. Combining the advantages of high LD-specificity, good biocompatibility, surperb photostability, and low preparation cost, FAS and DPAS may become powerful tools to the study on LDs-related intracellular activities, such as LDs-based pathology and pharmacology. PMID:27053008

  11. Adipocyte Stiffness Increases with Accumulation of Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, Naama; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Katzengold, Rona; Shaked, Natan T.; Benayahu, Dafna; Gefen, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Adipogenesis and increase in fat tissue mass are mechanosensitive processes and hence should be influenced by the mechanical properties of adipocytes. We evaluated subcellular effective stiffnesses of adipocytes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), and we verified the empirical results using finite element (FE) simulations. In the AFM studies, we found that the mean ratio of stiffnesses of the lipid droplets (LDs) over the nucleus was 0.83 ± 0.14, from which we further evaluated the ratios of LDs over cytoplasm stiffness, as being in the range of 2.5 to 8.3. These stiffness ratios, indicating that LDs are stiffer than cytoplasm, were verified by means of FE modeling, which simulated the AFM experiments, and provided good agreement between empirical and model-predicted structural behavior. In the IPM studies, we found that LDs mechanically distort their intracellular environment, which again indicated that LDs are mechanically stiffer than the surrounding cytoplasm. Combining these empirical and simulation data together, we provide in this study evidence that adipocytes stiffen with differentiation as a result of accumulation of LDs. Our results are relevant to research of adipose-related diseases, particularly overweight and obesity, from a mechanobiology and cellular mechanics perspectives. PMID:24655518

  12. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H; Hirsch, Hans H

    2010-04-10

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function. PMID:20138326

  13. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H.; Hirsch, Hans H.

    2010-04-10

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function.

  14. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are required for the dynamic regulation of neutral lipid compartmentation in plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols (TAGs) in seeds, their biogenesis and function in non-seed tissues is poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-sp...

  15. The Perilipins: Major Cytosolic Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins and Their Roles in Cellular Lipid Storage, Mobilization, and Systemic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Alan R; Sztalryd, Carole

    2016-07-17

    The discovery by Dr. Constantine Londos of perilipin 1, the major scaffold protein at the surface of cytosolic lipid droplets in adipocytes, marked a fundamental conceptual change in the understanding of lipolytic regulation. Focus then shifted from the enzymatic activation of lipases to substrate accessibility, mediated by perilipin-dependent protein sequestration and recruitment. Consequently, the lipid droplet became recognized as a unique, metabolically active cellular organelle and its surface as the active site for novel protein-protein interactions. A new area of investigation emerged, centered on lipid droplets' biology and their role in energy homeostasis. The perilipin family is of ancient origin and has expanded to include five mammalian genes and a growing list of evolutionarily conserved members. Universally, the perilipins modulate cellular lipid storage. This review provides a summary that connects the perilipins to both cellular and whole-body homeostasis. PMID:27431369

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of lipid droplet formation enhances the effectiveness of curcumin in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Issan; Cui, Yiming; Amiri, Abdolali; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E; Maysinger, Dusica

    2016-03-01

    Increased lipid droplet number and fatty acid synthesis allow glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer, to withstand accelerated metabolic rates and resist therapeutic treatments. Lipid droplets are postulated to sequester hydrophobic therapeutic agents, thereby reducing drug effectiveness. We hypothesized that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation in glioblastoma cells using pyrrolidine-2, a cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 alpha inhibitor, can sensitize cancer cells to the killing effect of curcumin, a promising anticancer agent isolated from the turmeric spice. We observed that curcumin localized in the lipid droplets of human U251N glioblastoma cells. Reduction of lipid droplet number using pyrrolidine-2 drastically enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin in both 2D and 3D glioblastoma cell models. The mode of cell death involved was found to be mediated by caspase-3. Comparatively, the current clinical chemotherapeutic standard, temozolomide, was significantly less effective in inducing glioblastoma cell death. Together, our results suggest that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation is an effective way to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin against glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:26763536

  17. Regulation of Lipid Droplet Size in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Remodeling of Membrane Lipid Composition—A Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bat-Chen; Shamay, Avi; Argov-Argaman, Nurit

    2015-01-01

    Milk fat globule size is determined by the size of its precursors—intracellular lipid droplets—and is tightly associated with its composition. We examined the relationship between phospholipid composition of mammary epithelial cells and the size of both intracellular and secreted milk fat globules. Primary culture of mammary epithelial cells was cultured in medium without free fatty acids (control) or with 0.1 mM free capric, palmitic or oleic acid for 24 h. The amount and composition of the cellular lipids and the size of the lipid droplets were determined in the cells and medium. Mitochondrial quantity and expression levels of genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and polar lipid composition were determined. Cells cultured with oleic and palmitic acids contained similar quantities of triglycerides, 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than in controls, respectively (P < 0.0001). When cultured with oleic acid, 22% of the cells contained large lipid droplets (>3 μm) and phosphatidylethanolamine concentration was higher by 23 and 63% compared with that in the control and palmitic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the presence of palmitic acid, only 4% of the cells contained large lipid droplets and the membrane phosphatidylcholine concentration was 22% and 16% higher than that in the control and oleic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the oleic acid treatment, approximately 40% of the lipid droplets were larger than 5 μm whereas in that of the palmitic acid treatment, only 16% of the droplets were in this size range. Triglyceride secretion in the oleic acid treatment was 2- and 12-fold higher compared with that in the palmitic acid and control treatments, respectively. Results imply that membrane composition of bovine mammary epithelial cells plays a role in controlling intracellular and secreted lipid droplets size, and that this process is not associated with cellular triglyceride content. PMID:25756421

  18. A New Fluorescence-Based Method Identifies Protein Phosphatases Regulating Lipid Droplet Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L.; Madeira, Juliana B.; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Montero-Lomeli, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    In virtually every cell, neutral lipids are stored in cytoplasmic structures called lipid droplets (LDs) and also referred to as lipid bodies or lipid particles. We developed a rapid high-throughput assay based on the recovery of quenched BODIPY-fluorescence that allows to quantify lipid droplets. The method was validated by monitoring lipid droplet turnover during growth of a yeast culture and by screening a group of strains deleted in genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. In both tests, the fluorimetric assay showed high sensitivity and good agreement with previously reported data using microscopy. We used this method for high-throughput identification of protein phosphatases involved in lipid droplet metabolism. From 65 yeast knockout strains encoding protein phosphatases and its regulatory subunits, 13 strains revealed to have abnormal levels of lipid droplets, 10 of them having high lipid droplet content. Strains deleted for type I protein phosphatases and related regulators (ppz2, gac1, bni4), type 2A phosphatase and its related regulator (pph21 and sap185), type 2C protein phosphatases (ptc1, ptc4, ptc7) and dual phosphatases (pps1, msg5) were catalogued as high-lipid droplet content strains. Only reg1, a targeting subunit of the type 1 phosphatase Glc7p, and members of the nutrient-sensitive TOR pathway (sit4 and the regulatory subunit sap190) were catalogued as low-lipid droplet content strains, which were studied further. We show that Snf1, the homologue of the mammalian AMP-activated kinase, is constitutively phosphorylated (hyperactive) in sit4 and sap190 strains leading to a reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In conclusion, our fast and highly sensitive method permitted us to catalogue protein phosphatases involved in the regulation of LD metabolism and present evidence indicating that the TOR pathway and the SNF1/AMPK pathway are connected through the Sit4p-Sap190p pair in the control of lipid droplet biogenesis. PMID:21060891

  19. Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP) Associates with Cytosolic Lipid Droplets in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Delia B.; Harris, Carla M.; Johnson, Joyce E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Jerome, W. Gray; Swift, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets are intracellular energy storage organelles composed of a hydrophobic core of neutral lipid, surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipid and a diverse array of proteins. The function of the vast majority of these proteins with regard to the formation and/or turnover of lipid droplets is unknown. Our laboratory was the first to report that microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), a lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, was expressed in adipose tissue of humans and mice. In addition, our studies suggested that MTP was associated with lipid droplets in both brown and white fat. Our observations led us to hypothesize that MTP plays a key role in lipid droplet formation and/or turnover. The objective of these studies was to gain insight into the function of MTP in adipocytes. Using molecular, biochemical, and morphologic approaches we have shown: 1) MTP protein levels increase nearly five-fold as 3T3-L1 cells differentiate into adipocytes. 2) As 3T3-L1 cells undergo differentiation, MTP moves from the juxtanuclear region of the cell to the surface of lipid droplets. MTP and perilipin 2, a major lipid droplet surface protein, are found on the same droplets; however, MTP does not co-localize with perilipin 2. 3) Inhibition of MTP activity has no effect on the movement of triglyceride out of the cell either as a lipid complex or via lipolysis. 4) MTP is found associated with lipid droplets within hepatocytes from human fatty livers, suggesting that association of MTP with lipid droplets is not restricted to adipocytes. In summary, our data demonstrate that MTP is a lipid droplet-associated protein. Its location on the surface of the droplet in adipocytes and hepatocytes, coupled with its known function as a lipid transfer protein and its increased expression during adipocyte differentiation suggest a role in lipid droplet biology. PMID:26267806

  20. Antioxidant Role for Lipid Droplets in a Stem Cell Niche of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andrew P.; Koster, Grielof; Guillermier, Christelle; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; MacRae, James I.; Lechene, Claude P.; Postle, Anthony D.; Gould, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells reside in specialized microenvironments known as niches. During Drosophila development, glial cells provide a niche that sustains the proliferation of neural stem cells (neuroblasts) during starvation. We now find that the glial cell niche also preserves neuroblast proliferation under conditions of hypoxia and oxidative stress. Lipid droplets that form in niche glia during oxidative stress limit the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibit the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). These droplets protect glia and also neuroblasts from peroxidation chain reactions that can damage many types of macromolecules. The underlying antioxidant mechanism involves diverting PUFAs, including diet-derived linoleic acid, away from membranes to the core of lipid droplets, where they are less vulnerable to peroxidation. This study reveals an antioxidant role for lipid droplets that could be relevant in many different biological contexts. PMID:26451484

  1. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA, destruction of mitochondria, and accumulation of lipid droplets result from fialuridine treatment in woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed

    Lewis, W; Griniuviene, B; Tankersley, K O; Levine, E S; Montione, R; Engelman, L; de Courten-Myers, G; Ascenzi, M A; Hornbuckle, W E; Gerin, J L; Tennant, B C

    1997-01-01

    Fialuridine (FIAU, 1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil) is toxic to liver, heart, muscle, and nerve in clinical trials for chronic viral hepatitis (CH). Mitochondrial toxicity was hypothesized. To address pathophysiologic mechanisms, we examined mitochondrial changes in FIAU-treated woodchucks (WC) with CH from woodchuck hepatitis virus infection. WC (with and without CH from woodchuck hepatitis virus infection) were treated with FIAU (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks. WC were killed. Liver, heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney samples underwent DNA extraction and were analyzed ultrastructurally (transmission electron microscopy). Myocardium, skeletal muscles, and liver samples were analyzed histologically. Abundance of hepatic, myocardial, muscle, and kidney mtDNA decreased in FIAU-treated WC, but the magnitude varied. mtDNA decreased 55% in heart, 65% in kidney, 74% in liver, and 87% in muscle (p < 0.02 for each tissue: FIAU-treated versus FIAU-untreated). Cellular damage was characterized ultrastructurally by mitochondrial enlargement, cristae dissolution, and lipid droplets. Lipid droplets found in the heart, diaphragm, biceps, and liver were sufficient to identify FIAU-treated WC (p < 0.05 each). Widespread mitochondrial damage to many tissues resulted from chronic FIAU treatment and occurred irrespective of CH. It manifested with mtDNA depletion, intracytoplasmic lipid droplets, and destroyed mitochondrial cristae. Defective mtDNA replication with mtDNA depletion seems central to the subcellular pathophysiology of altered energy metabolism and multiorgan failure in FIAU toxicity. PMID:9010451

  2. Characterisation of mobile lipid resonances in tissue biopsies from patients with cervical cancer and correlation with cytoplasmic lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zietkowski, D; deSouza, N M; Davidson, R L; Payne, G S

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to characterise the major saturated and unsaturated lipid peaks in histologically normal cervical epithelium and stroma, dysplastic epithelium (low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, CIN) and cancer-containing tissue samples from patients with cervical cancer using diffusion-weighted (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS, to determine whether mobile lipid resonances (MLRs) distinguish tissue types and to test for a correlation between MLRs and the number of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Diffusion-weighted spectra of tissue biopsies were acquired using a stimulated echo sequence with bipolar gradients. Major saturated and unsaturated MLRs were identified and multivariate analysis of peak combinations was used to determine the best separation between tissue classes. Lipid droplets were visualised with Nile red staining and fluorescence microscopy. Correlations of saturated lipid resonances (0.9 and 1.3 ppm), polyunsaturated resonances (2.8 ppm), triglycerides (4.3 ppm) and unsaturated resonances (5.3 ppm) with average droplet number (per image) were investigated using a Spearman rank test. A large heterogeneity in lipid content among samples was observed, resulting in no significant differences in MLR intensities of individual peaks between the three tissue classes. Linear discriminant analysis separated 'no cancer' from 'cancer' based on the intensities at 0.9, 1.3, 2.2 and 2.8 ppm [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.939, p < 0.001], 'low-grade CIN' from 'cancer' based on the intensities at 0.9, 4.1, 4.3 and 5.3 ppm (AUC = 0.987, p < 0.001) and 'no cancer' from 'low-grade CIN' based on intensities at 0.9, 2.2 and 4.3 ppm (AUC = 0.984, p < 0.001). The distribution of cytoplasmic lipid droplets was nonuniform and was not related to the presence of epithelial or stromal components. On average, there were more droplets visible in low-grade CIN and cancer-containing tissues. Significant correlations between MLR peaks and lipid

  3. Lipid droplet dynamics at early stages of Mycobacterium marinum infection in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Hagedorn, Monica; Maniak, Markus; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Lipid droplets exist in virtually every cell type, ranging not only from mammals to plants, but also to eukaryotic and prokaryotic unicellular organisms such as Dictyostelium and bacteria. They serve among other roles as energy reservoir that cells consume in times of starvation. Mycobacteria and some other intracellular pathogens hijack these organelles as a nutrient source and to build up their own lipid inclusions. The mechanisms by which host lipid droplets are captured by the pathogenic bacteria are extremely poorly understood. Using the powerful Dictyostelium discoideum/Mycobacterium marinum infection model, we observed that, immediately after their uptake, lipid droplets translocate to the vicinity of the vacuole containing live but not dead mycobacteria. Induction of lipid droplets in Dictyostelium prior to infection resulted in a vast accumulation of neutral lipids and sterols inside the bacterium-containing compartment. Subsequently, under these conditions, mycobacteria accumulated much larger lipid inclusions. Strikingly, the Dictyostelium homologue of perilipin and the murine perilipin 2 surrounded bacteria that had escaped to the cytosol of Dictyostelium or microglial BV-2 cells respectively. Moreover, bacterial growth was inhibited in Dictyostelium plnA knockout cells. In summary, our results provide evidence that mycobacteria actively manipulate the lipid metabolism of the host from very early infection stages. PMID:25772333

  4. A test of current models for the mechanism of milk-lipid droplet secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaekwang; Lisinski, Ivonne; Kadegowda, Anil K.G.; Shin, Hyunsu; Wooding, F.B. Peter; Daniels, Brian R.; Schaack, Jerome; Mather, Ian H.

    2013-01-01

    Milk lipid is secreted by a unique process, during which triacylglycerol droplets bud from mammary cells coated with an outer bilayer of apical membrane. In all current schemes, the integral protein butyrophilin 1A1 (BTN) is postulated to serve as a transmembrane scaffold, which interacts, either with itself, or with the peripheral proteins, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and possibly perilipin-2 (PLIN2), to form an immobile bridging complex between the droplet and apical surface. In one such scheme, BTN on the surface of cytoplasmic lipid droplets interacts directly with BTN in the apical membrane without binding to either XOR or PLIN2. We tested these models using both biochemical and morphological approaches. BTN was concentrated in the apical membrane in all species examined and contained mature N-linked glycans. We found no evidence for the association of unprocessed BTN with intracellular lipid droplets. BTN-enhanced-green-fluorescent-protein was highly mobile in areas of mouse milk-lipid droplets that had not undergone post-secretion changes, and endogenous mouse BTN comprised only 0.5–0.7%, (w/w) of the total protein, i.e., over fifty-fold less than in the milk-lipid droplets of cow and other species. These data are incompatible with models of milk-lipid secretion in which BTN is the major component of an immobile global adhesive complex and suggest that interactions between BTN and other proteins at the time of secretion are more transient than previously predicted. The high mobility of BTN in lipid droplets, mark it as a potential mobile signaling molecule in milk. PMID:23738536

  5. COPI buds 60-nm lipid droplets from reconstituted water–phospholipid–triacylglyceride interfaces, suggesting a tension clamp function

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Antonny, Bruno; Wang, Jing; Delacotte, Jérôme; Wilfling, Florian; Walther, Tobias C.; Beck, Rainer; Rothman, James E.; Pincet, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking between organelles is achieved by coat protein complexes, coat protomers, that bud vesicles from bilayer membranes. Lipid droplets are protected by a monolayer and thus seem unsuitable targets for coatomers. Unexpectedly, coat protein complex I (COPI) is required for lipid droplet targeting of some proteins, suggesting a possible direct interaction between COPI and lipid droplets. Here, we find that COPI coat components can bud 60-nm triacylglycerol nanodroplets from artificial lipid droplet (LD) interfaces. This budding decreases phospholipid packing of the monolayer decorating the mother LD. As a result, hydrophobic triacylglycerol molecules become more exposed to the aqueous environment, increasing LD surface tension. In vivo, this surface tension increase may prime lipid droplets for reactions with neighboring proteins or membranes. It provides a mechanism fundamentally different from transport vesicle formation by COPI, likely responsible for the diverse lipid droplet phenotypes associated with depletion of COPI subunits. PMID:23901109

  6. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:26122084

  7. A Lipid Droplet Protein of Nannochloropsis with Functions Partially Analogous to Plant Oleosins1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vieler, Astrid; Brubaker, Shane B.; Vick, Bertrand; Benning, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of the dynamics of lipid droplets (LDs) in animal, plant, and fungal cells is rapidly evolving, still little is known about the formation and turnover of these organelles in microalgae. Yet with the growing importance of algal feedstock for the production of biofuels and high-value lipids, there is a need to understand the mechanisms of LD dynamics in microalgae. Thus, we investigated the proteins associated with LDs of the emerging heterokont model alga Nannochloropsis sp. and discovered an abundant hydrophobic lipid droplet surface protein (LDSP) with unique primary sequence but structural similarities to other LD proteins. LDSP abundance in Nannochloropsis cells closely tracked the amount of triacylglycerols during conditions of oil accumulation and degradation. Functional characterization of LDSP in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) OLEOSIN1-deficient mutant allowed a separation of its physical and structural properties in its interaction with LDs from its physiological or biochemical activities. Although LDSP presence in Arabidopsis predictably affected LD size, it could not reverse the physiological impact of OLEOSIN deficiency on triacylglycerol hydrolysis during germination. PMID:22307965

  8. Use of Droplet Digital PCR for Estimation of Fish Abundance and Biomass in Environmental DNA Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hideyuki; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    An environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis method has been recently developed to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals by quantifying the number of target DNA copies with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A new quantitative PCR technology, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), partitions PCR reactions into thousands of droplets and detects the amplification in each droplet, thereby allowing direct quantification of target DNA. We evaluated the quantification accuracy of qPCR and ddPCR to estimate species abundance and biomass by using eDNA in mesocosm experiments involving different numbers of common carp. We found that ddPCR quantified the concentration of carp eDNA along with carp abundance and biomass more accurately than qPCR, especially at low eDNA concentrations. In addition, errors in the analysis were smaller in ddPCR than in qPCR. Thus, ddPCR is better suited to measure eDNA concentration in water, and it provides more accurate results for the abundance and biomass of the target species than qPCR. We also found that the relationship between carp abundance and eDNA concentration was stronger than that between biomass and eDNA by using both ddPCR and qPCR; this suggests that abundance can be better estimated by the analysis of eDNA for species with fewer variations in body mass. PMID:25799582

  9. Storable droplet interface lipid bilayers for cell-free ion channel studies.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Ho; Choi, Sangbaek; Kim, Young-Rok; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2012-01-01

    An artificially created lipid bilayer is an important platform in studying ion channels and engineered biosensor applications. However, a lipid bilayer created using conventional techniques is fragile and short-lived, and the measurement of ion channels requires expertise and laborious procedures, precluding practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a storable droplet lipid bilayer precursor frozen with ion channels, resulting in a droplet interface bilayer upon thawing. A small vial with an aqueous droplet in organic solution was flash frozen in -80 °C methanol immediately after an aqueous droplet was introduced into the organic solution and gravity draws the droplet down to the interface upon thawing. A lipid bilayer created along the interface using this method had giga-ohm resistance and typical specific capacitance values. The noise level of this system is favorably comparable to the conventional system. The subsequent incorporation of ion channels, alpha-hemolysin and gramicidin A, showed typical conductance values consistent with those in previous literatures. This novel system to create a lipid bilayer as a whole can be automated from its manufacture to use and indefinitely stored when frozen. As a result, ion channel measurements can be carried out in any place, increasing the accessibility of ion channel studies as well as a number of applications, such as biosensors, ion channel drug screening, and biophysical studies. PMID:21909672

  10. SLDP: a novel protein related to caleosin is associated with the endosymbiotic Symbiodinium lipid droplets from Euphyllia glabrescens.

    PubMed

    Pasaribu, Buntora; Lin, I-Ping; Tzen, Jason T C; Jauh, Guang-Yuh; Fan, Tung-Yung; Ju, Yu-Min; Cheng, Jing-O; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2014-10-01

    Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) have been proposed to play a key role in the mutualistic endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and the dinoflagellate endosymbiont Symbiodinium spp. This study investigates and identifies LD proteins in Symbiodinium from Euphyllia glabrescens. Discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation was used to separate Symbiodinium cells from E. glabrescens tentacles. Furthermore, staining with a fluorescent probe, Nile red, indicated that lipids accumulated in that freshly isolated Symbiodinium cells and lipid analyses further showed polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was abundant. The stable LDs were purified from endosymbiotic Symbiodinium cells. The structural integrity of the Symbiodinium LDs was maintained via electronegative repulsion and steric hindrance possibly provided by their surface proteins. Protein extracts from the purified LDs revealed a major protein band with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, which was termed Symbiodinium lipid droplet protein (SLDP). Interestingly, immunological cross-recognition analysis revealed that SLDP was detected strongly by the anti-sesame and anti-cycad caleosin antibodies. It was suggested that the stable Symbiodinium LDs were sheltered by this unique structural protein and was suggested that SLDP might be homologous to caleosin to a certain extent. PMID:24820937

  11. Squalene is lipotoxic to yeast cells defective in lipid droplet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valachovic, Martin; Garaiova, Martina; Holic, Roman; Hapala, Ivan

    2016-01-22

    The toxic effect of overloaded lipids on cell physiology and viability was described in various organisms. In this study we focused on the potential lipotoxicity of squalene, a linear triterpene synthesized in eukaryotic cells as an intermediate in sterol biosynthesis. Squalene toxicity was studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model unicellular eukaryote established in lipotoxicity studies. Squalene levels in yeast are typically low but its accumulation can be induced under specific conditions, e.g. by inhibition of squalene monooxygenase with the antimycotic terbinafine. At higher levels squalene is stored in lipid droplets. We demonstrated that low doses of terbinafine caused severe impairment of growth and loss of viability of the yeast mutant dga1Δ lro1Δ are1Δ are2Δ unable to form lipid droplets and that these defects were linked to squalene accumulation. The hypersensitivity of the lipid droplet-less mutant to terbinafine was alleviated by decreasing squalene accumulation with low doses of squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid. Our results proved that accumulated squalene is lipotoxic to yeast cells if it cannot be efficiently sequestered in lipid droplets. This supports the hypothesis about the role of squalene in the fungicidal activity of terbinafine. Squalene toxicity may represent also a limiting factor for production of this high-value lipid in yeast. PMID:26703208

  12. Chains, Sheets and Droplets: Assemblies of Hydrophobic Gold Nanocrystals with Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Lipid and Squalene

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Michael R.; Bosoy, Christian; Yu, Yixuan; Korgel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Assemblies of saturated 1,2-diacyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid and hydrophobic dodecanethiol-capped 1.8 nm diameter gold nanocrystals were studied as a function of lipid chain length and the addition of the naturally-occurring oil, squalene. The gold nanocrystals formed various lipid-stabilized agglomerates, sometimes fusing with lipid vesicle bilayers. The nanocrystal assembly structure depended on the hydrocarbon chain length of the lipid fatty acids. Lipid with the shortest fatty acid length studied, dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine, created extended chains of gold nanocrystals. Lipid with slightly longer fatty acid chains created planar sheets of nanocrystals. Further increases of the fatty acid chain length led to spherical agglomerates. The inclusion of squalene led to lipid- and nanocrystal-coated oil droplets. PMID:23033891

  13. Response of pigeon guillemots to variable abundance of high-lipid and low-lipid prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Prichard, A.K.; Roby, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    Populations of the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) and other piscivores have been in decline for several decades in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, and a decline in abundance of lipid-rich schooling fishes is hypothesized as the major cause. We tested this hypothesis by studying the breeding biology of pigeon guillemots during 1995-1999 while simultaneously measuring prey abundance with beach seines and bottom trawls. Our study area (Kachemak Bay, Alaska) comprises two oceanographically distinct areas. Populations of a lipid-rich schooling fish, Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), were higher in the warmer Inner Bay than in the colder Outer Bay, and sand lance abundance was higher during warm years. Populations of low-lipid content demersal fishes were similar between areas. Chick survival to age 15 days was 47% higher in the Inner Bay (high-lipid diet) than in the Outer Bay (low-lipid diet), and estimated reproductive success (chicks fledged nest-1) was 62% higher in the Inner Bay than in the Outer Bay. Chick provisioning rate (kJ chick-1 h-1) increased with the proportion of sand lance in the diet (r2=0.21), as did growth rate (g day-1) of younger (beta) chicks in two-chick broods (r2=0.14). Pigeon guillemots in the Inner Bay switched to demersal prey during years of below-average sand lance abundance, and these birds reacted to 38-fold interannual changes in sand lance abundance with reductions in beta chick growth rates, with no decline in beta chick survival. In contrast, the proportion of nests experiencing brood reduction in the Outer Bay (demersal diet) increased >300% during years of below-average demersal abundance, although demersal fish abundance varied only 4-fold among years. Our results support the hypothesis that recovery of pigeon guillemot populations from the effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is limited by availability of lipid-rich prey.

  14. Lipid droplet organelle distribution in populations of dividing cells studied by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhaimer, Paul

    2013-06-01

    One of the key questions in cell biology is how organelles are passed from parent to daughter cells. To help address this question, I used Brownian dynamics to simulate lipid droplets as model organelles in populations of dividing cells. Lipid droplets are dynamic bodies that can form both de novo and by fission, they can also be depleted. The quantitative interplay among these three events is unknown but would seem crucial for controlling droplet distribution in populations of dividing cells. Surprisingly, of the three main events studied: biogenesis, fission, and depletion, the third played the key role in maintaining droplet organelle number—and to a lesser extent volume—in populations of dividing cells where formation events would have seemed paramount. In the case of lipid droplets, this provides computational evidence that they must be sustained, most likely through contacts with the endoplasmic reticulum. The findings also agree with video microscopy experiments over much shorter timescales where droplet depletion in fission yeast cells was not observed. In general, this work shows that organelle maintenance is invaluable and lack thereof cannot necessarily be compensated for by organelle formation. This study provides a time-accurate, physical-based template for long-term cell division studies.

  15. Entangled in a membranous web: ER and lipid droplet reorganization during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Nathan L; Fontaine, Krystal A; Kumar, G Renuka; Ott, Melanie

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. To establish and maintain chronic infection, HCV extensively rearranges cellular organelles to generate distinct compartments for viral RNA replication and virion assembly. Here, we review our current knowledge of how HCV proliferates and remodels ER-derived membranes while preserving and expanding associated lipid droplets during viral infection. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms responsible for HCV-induced membrane reorganization will enhance our understanding of the HCV life-cycle, the associated liver pathology, and the biology of the ER:lipid droplet interface in general. PMID:27240021

  16. Beauveriolides, specific inhibitors of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, produced by Beauveria sp. FO-6979.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Si, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Masuma, R; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    Beauveria sp. FO-6979, a soil isolate, was found to produce inhibitors of lipid droplet formation in mouse peritoneal macrophages. A new compound beauveriolide III was isolated along with a known compound beauveriolide I from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, ODS column chromatography, silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Beauveriolides I and III caused a reduction in the number and size of cytosolic lipid droplets in macrophages at 10 microM without any cytotoxic effect on macrophages. PMID:10092189

  17. Unexpected roles of plastoglobules (plastid lipid droplets) in vitamin K1 and E metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spicher, Livia; Kessler, Felix

    2015-06-01

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) and phylloquinone (vitamin K1) are lipid-soluble antioxidants that can only be synthesized by photosynthetic organisms. These compounds function primarily at the thylakoid membrane but are also present in chloroplast lipid droplets, also known as plastoglobules (PG). Depending on environmental conditions and stage of plant development, changes in the content, number and size of PG occur. PG are directly connected to the thylakoid membrane via the outer lipid leaflet. Apart from storage, PG are active in metabolism and likely trafficking of diverse lipid species. This review presents recent advances on how plastoglobules are implicated in the biosynthesis and metabolism of vitamin E and K. PMID:26037391

  18. CARS based label-free assay for assessment of drugs by monitoring lipid droplets in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Steuwe, Christian; Patel, Imran I; Ul-Hasan, Mahmud; Schreiner, Alexander; Boren, Joan; Brindle, Kevin M; Reichelt, Stefanie; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2014-11-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is becoming an established tool for label-free multi-photon imaging based on molecule specific vibrations in the sample. The technique has proven to be particularly useful for imaging lipids, which are abundant in cells and tissues, including cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LD), which are recognized as dynamic organelles involved in many cellular functions. The increase in the number of lipid droplets in cells undergoing cell proliferation is a common feature in many neoplastic processes [1] and an increase in LD number also appears to be an early marker of drug-induced cell stress and subsequent apoptosis [3]. In this paper, a CARS-based label-free method is presented to monitor the increase in LD content in HCT116 colon tumour cells treated with the chemotherapeutic drugs Etoposide, Camptothecin and the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine. Using CARS, LDs can easily be distinguished from other cell components without the application of fluorescent dyes and provides a label-free non-invasive drug screening assay that could be used not only with cells and tissues ex vivo but potentially also in vivo. PMID:24343869

  19. Small Drops Get Fat: Unexpected Fatty Acid in Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Thurnher, Martin

    2016-06-23

    In a model of transcellular lipid biosynthesis, Guijas et al. (2016), in this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, demonstrate that lipid droplet-containing "foamy" monocytes unexpectedly accumulate 16:1n9-palmitoleic acid, which has anti-inflammatory function in vitro and in vivo. This uncommon positional isomer of 16:1n7-palmitoleic acid represents a candidate biomarker for early cardiovascular disease detection. PMID:27341429

  20. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are involved in the compartmentalization of lipophilic compounds in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gidda, Satinder K; Watt, Samantha; Collins-Silva, Jillian; Kilaru, Aruna; Arondel, Vincent; Yurchenko, Olga; Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Shintani, David; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D; Mullen, Robert T; Dyer, John M

    2013-11-01

    While lipid droplets have traditionally been considered as inert sites for the storage of triacylglycerols and sterol esters, they are now recognized as dynamic and functionally diverse organelles involved in energy homeostasis, lipid signaling, and stress responses. Unlike most other organelles, lipid droplets are delineated by a half-unit membrane whose protein constituents are poorly understood, except in the specialized case of oleosins, which are associated with seed lipid droplets. Recently, we identified a new class of lipid-droplet associated proteins called LDAPs that localize specifically to the lipid droplet surface within plant cells and share extensive sequence similarity with the small rubber particle proteins (SRPPs) found in rubber-accumulating plants. Here, we provide additional evidence for a role of LDAPs in lipid accumulation in oil-rich fruit tissues, and further explore the functional relationships between LDAPs and SRPPs. In addition, we propose that the larger LDAP/SRPP protein family plays important roles in the compartmentalization of lipophilic compounds, including triacylglycerols and polyisoprenoids, into lipid droplets within plant cells. Potential roles in lipid droplet biogenesis and function of these proteins also are discussed. PMID:24305619

  1. A droplet microfluidic system for sequential generation of lipid bilayers and transmembrane electrical recordings.

    PubMed

    Czekalska, Magdalena A; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Jakiela, Slawomir; Tanuj Sapra, K; Bayley, Hagan; Garstecki, Piotr

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates a microfluidic system that automates i) formation of a lipid bilayer at the interface between a pair of nanoliter-sized aqueous droplets in oil, ii) exchange of one droplet of the pair to form a new bilayer, and iii) current measurements on single proteins. A new microfluidic architecture is introduced - a set of traps designed to localize the droplets with respect to each other and with respect to the recording electrodes. The system allows for automated execution of experimental protocols by active control of the flow on chip with the use of simple external valves. Formation of stable artificial lipid bilayers, incorporation of α-hemolysin into the bilayers and electrical measurements of ionic transport through the protein pore are demonstrated. PMID:25412368

  2. Lipid droplets as a novel cargo of tunnelling nanotubes in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Astanina, Ksenia; Koch, Marcus; Jüngst, Christian; Zumbusch, Andreas; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication is a fundamental process in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms. Recently, an essentially new type of intercellular communication, based on thin membrane channels between cells, has been reported. These structures, termed intercellular or tunnelling nanotubes (TNTs), permit the direct exchange of various components or signals (e.g., ions, proteins, or organelles) between non-adjacent cells at distances over 100 μm. Our studies revealed the presence of tunnelling nanotubes in microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The TNTs were studied with live cell imaging, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS). Tunneling nanotubes showed marked persistence: the TNTs could connect cells over long distances (up to 150 μm) for several hours. Several cellular organelles were present in TNTs, such as lysosomes and mitochondria. Moreover, we could identify lipid droplets as a novel type of cargo in the TNTs. Under angiogenic conditions (VEGF treatment) the number of lipid droplets increased significantly. Arachidonic acid application not only increased the number of lipid droplets but also tripled the extent of TNT formation. Taken together, our results provide the first demonstration of lipid droplets as a cargo of TNTs and thereby open a new field in intercellular communication research. PMID:26095213

  3. FSP27 and PLIN1 interaction promotes the formation of large lipid droplets in human adipocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human adipocytes express high levels of two distinct lipid droplet proteins, fat specific protein 27 (FSP27; also called CIDEC), a member of the CIDE family, and perilipin1 (PLIN1), a member of the PAT family. Both proteins play a role in fat metabolism in adipocytes, but how they interact is not kn...

  4. A near-infrared AIEgen for specific imaging of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Kang, Miaomiao; Gu, Xinggui; Kwok, Ryan T K; Leung, Chris W T; Lam, Jacky W Y; Li, Feng; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-05-21

    A new near-infrared AIE luminogen (TPE-AC) with high specificity, good biocompatibility and excellent photostability is designed and synthesized for lipid droplet (LD) imaging in cells. TPE-AC can monitor the process of LD accumulation in cells, thus making it potential for the diagnosis of early-stage fat-related diseases. PMID:27055861

  5. Arabidopsis SEIPIN proteins modulate triacylglycerol accumulation and influence lipid droplet proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lipodystrophy protein SEIPIN is important for lipid droplet (LD) biogenesis in human and yeast cells. By contrast to the single SEIPIN genes in humans and yeast, there are three SEIPIN homologues in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated At-SEIPIN1, At-SEIPIN2 and At-SEIPIN3. Here, a yeast (Saccharomy...

  6. Structure elucidation of fungal beauveriolide III, a novel inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Tabata, N; Si, S; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fungal beauveriolide III, an inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, was elucidated to be cyclo-[(3S,4S)-3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanyl- D-allo-isoleucyl] by spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10092190

  7. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L; Zhou, Donghua H

    2014-03-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  8. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L.; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L.; Zhou, Donghua H.

    2014-01-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  9. Droplet immobilization within a polymeric organogel improves lipid bilayer durability and portability.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Guru A; Sarles, Stephen A

    2016-05-24

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a promising technique for assembling lipid membrane-based materials and devices using water droplets in oil, but it has largely been limited to laboratory environments due to its liquid construction. With a vision to transform this lab-based technique into a more-durable embodiment, we investigate the use of a polymer-based organogel to encapsulate DIBs within a more-solid material matrix to improve their handling and portability. Specifically, a temperature-sensitive organogel formed from hexadecane and poly[styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene] (SEBS) triblock copolymer is used to replace the liquid solvent that surrounds the lipid-coated droplets to establish a novel liquid-in-gel DIB system. Through specific capacitance measurements and single-channel recordings of the pore forming peptide alamethicin, we verify that the structural and functional membrane properties are retained when DIBs are assembled within SEBS organogel. In addition, we demonstrate that organogel encapsulation offers improved handling of droplets and yields DIBs with a near 3× higher bilayer durability, as quantified by the lateral acceleration required to rupture the membrane, compared to liquid-in-liquid DIBs in oil. This encapsulated DIB system provides a barrier against contamination from the environment and offers a new material platform for supporting multilayered DIB-based devices as well as other digital microfluidic systems that feature water droplets in oil. PMID:27164314

  10. Motor-mediated Cortical versus Astral Microtubule Organization in Lipid-monolayered Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5–100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  11. Motor-mediated cortical versus astral microtubule organization in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5-100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  12. Wnt directs the endosomal flux of LDL-derived cholesterol and lipid droplet homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Cameron C; Vossio, Stefania; Vacca, Fabrizio; Snijder, Berend; Larios, Jorge; Schaad, Olivier; Guex, Nicolas; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Martin, Olivier; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Pelkmans, Lucas; Gruenberg, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt pathway, which controls crucial steps of the development and differentiation programs, has been proposed to influence lipid storage and homeostasis. In this paper, using an unbiased strategy based on high-content genome-wide RNAi screens that monitored lipid distribution and amounts, we find that Wnt3a regulates cellular cholesterol. We show that Wnt3a stimulates the production of lipid droplets and that this stimulation strictly depends on endocytosed, LDL-derived cholesterol and on functional early and late endosomes. We also show that Wnt signaling itself controls cholesterol endocytosis and flux along the endosomal pathway, which in turn modulates cellular lipid homeostasis. These results underscore the importance of endosome functions for LD formation and reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism of the cellular programs controlling lipid storage and endosome transport under the control of Wnt signaling. PMID:25851648

  13. Lipid droplets of neuroepithelial cells are a major calcium storage site during neural tube formation in chick and mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Bush, K T; Lee, H; Nagele, R G

    1992-05-15

    In situ precipitation of calcium (Ca2+) with fluoride and antimonate shows that Ca(2+)-specific precipitate is localized almost exclusively within lipid droplets of neuroepithelial cells during neural tube formation in chick and mouse embryos. The density of Ca2+ precipitate within lipid droplets is generally greater in the apical ends of cells situated in regions of the neuroepithelium that are actively engaged in bending. These findings suggest that lipid droplets, in addition to providing a source of metabolic fuel for developing neuroepithelial cells, also serve as Ca(2+)-storage and -releasing sites during neurulation. PMID:1601118

  14. Lipid droplets fusion in adipocyte differentiated 3T3-L1 cells: A Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2014-02-15

    Several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis, atherosclerosis and other metabolic pathologies are related to the excessive accumulation of lipids in cells. Lipids accumulate in spherical cellular inclusions called lipid droplets (LDs) whose sizes range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to a fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained with spherical shape and volume equal to the sum of the progenitors’ ones. In this study, the size distribution of two populations of LDs was analyzed in immature and mature (5-days differentiated) 3T3-L1 adipocytes (first and second populations, respectively) after Oil Red O staining. A Monte Carlo simulation of interaction between LDs has been developed in order to quantify the size distribution and the number of fusion events needed to obtain the distribution of the second population size starting from the first one. Four models are presented here based on different kinds of interaction: a surface weighted interaction (R2 Model), a volume weighted interaction (R3 Model), a random interaction (Random model) and an interaction related to the place where the LDs are born (Nearest Model). The last two models mimic quite well the behavior found in the experimental data. This work represents a first step in developing numerical simulations of the LDs growth process. Due to the complex phenomena involving LDs (absorption, growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in existing droplets, de novo formation and catabolism) the study focuses on the fusion process. The results suggest that, to obtain the observed size distribution, a number of fusion events comparable with the number of LDs themselves is needed. Moreover the MC approach results a powerful tool for investigating the LDs growth process. Highlights: • We evaluated the role of the fusion process in the synthesis of the lipid droplets. • We compared the

  15. Olanzapine promotes the accumulation of lipid droplets and the expression of multiple perilipins in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Nimura, Satomi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Koki; Kadokura, Karin; Aiuchi, Toshihiro; Kato, Rina; Obama, Takashi; Itabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-27

    Second generation antipsychotics are useful for the treatment of schizophrenia, but concerns have been raised about the side effects of diabetes mellitus and obesity. Olanzapine, especially, is associated with more weight gain than the others. It has been reported that olanzapine promotes adipocyte-differentiation in rodents both in vivo and in vitro. In this study the effects of antipsychotics on human adipocytes were investigated by using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). When hMSCs were differentiated and treated with various antipsychotics, olanzapine and clozapine increased intracellular lipids. Olanzapine induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis revealed that PLIN4 and several enzymes for lipid metabolism were increased in the hMSCs after olanzapine treatment. During adipocyte differentiation, olanzapine increased the protein expression of PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN4. These proteins are known to be associated with the initial stage of lipid droplet formation. Immunocytochemistry showed that olanzapine increased and enlarged the lipid droplets coated with PLIN1 and PLIN2 while PLIN4 was largely distributed in the cytosol. mRNA expression of PLIN2, but not PLIN1 or PLIN4, was increased by olanzapine. On the other hand, olanzapine did not alter the mRNA level of transcription regulators involved in adipocyte-differentiation or adipokines. The present study shows that olanzapine induced transient PLIN2 expression in hMSCs that could result in an accumulation of lipid droplets and overexpression of PLIN1 and PLIN4, providing information of possible interest for olanzapine-induced weight gain. PMID:26471304

  16. 17{beta}-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 13 is a liver-specific lipid droplet-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Horiguchi, Yuka; Araki, Makoto; Motojima, Kiyoto

    2008-05-30

    17{beta}-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17{beta}HSD) type 13 is identified as a new lipid droplet-associated protein. 17{beta}HSD type 13 has an N-terminal sequence similar to that of 17{beta}HSD type 11, and both sequences function as an endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplet-targeting signal. Localization of native 17{beta}HSD type 13 on the lipid droplets was confirmed by subcellular fractionation and Western blotting. In contrast to 17{beta}HSD type 11, however, expression of 17{beta}HSD type 13 is largely restricted to the liver and is not enhanced by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and its ligand. Instead the expression level of 17{beta}HSD type 13 in the receptor-null mice was increased several-fold. 17{beta}HSD type 13 may have a distinct physiological role as a lipid droplet-associated protein in the liver.

  17. Selection of In Vitro-Matured Porcine Oocytes Based on Localization Patterns of Lipid Droplets to Evaluate Developmental Competence

    PubMed Central

    HIRAGA, Kou; HOSHINO, Yumi; TANEMURA, Kentaro; SATO, Eimei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Localization patterns of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of porcine oocytes were evaluated as a novel marker for in vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes with high developmental competence. Porcine oocytes were cultured in TCM-199, which is a complete synthetic medium, for 44 h at 38.5 C. Localization patterns were divided into 2 classes: lipid droplets localized uniformly in the whole cytoplasm (class I) and those that were centrally located (class II). After IVM in TCM-199, 60% of matured oocytes exhibited the class II pattern. To investigate the relation between the distribution of lipid droplets and the developmental rate of the oocyte, the developmental rates of class I and class II oocytes were compared after in vitro fertilization (IVF). Class II oocytes showed a significantly higher rate of blastocyst development than class I oocytes. These results suggest that porcine oocytes with high developmental competence can be selected based on the localization patterns of lipid droplets. PMID:23594924

  18. The adaptor protein alpha-syntrophin regulates adipocyte lipid droplet growth.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Kristina; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-07-01

    The scaffold protein alpha-syntrophin (SNTA) regulates lipolysis indicating a role in lipid homeostasis. Adipocytes are the main lipid storage cells in the body, and here, the function of SNTA has been analyzed in 3T3-L1 cells. SNTA is expressed in preadipocytes and is induced early during adipogenesis. Knock-down of SNTA in preadipocytes increases their proliferation. Proteins which are induced during adipogenesis like adiponectin and caveolin-1, and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 are at normal levels in the mature cells differentiated from preadipocytes with low SNTA. This suggests that SNTA does neither affect differentiation nor inflammation. Expression of proteins with a role in cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis is unchanged. Consequently, basal and epinephrine induced lipolysis as well as insulin stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 are normal. Importantly, adipocytes with low SNTA form smaller lipid droplets and store less triglycerides. Stearoyl-CoA reductase and MnSOD are reduced upon SNTA knock-down but do not contribute to lower lipid levels. Oleate uptake is even increased in cells with SNTA knock-down. In summary, current data show that SNTA is involved in the expansion of lipid droplets independent of adipogenesis. Enhanced preadipocyte proliferation and capacity to store surplus fatty acids may protect adipocytes with low SNTA from lipotoxicity in obesity. PMID:27242274

  19. Targeting of Nir2 to lipid droplets is regulated by a specific threonine residue within its PI-transfer domain.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Vladimir; Shaul, Yoav D; Shulewitz, Mark; Amarilio, Roy; Carmon, Shari; Lev, Sima

    2002-09-01

    Nir2, like its Drosophila homolog retinal degeneration B (RdgB), contains an N-terminal phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein (PI-TP)-like domain. Previous studies have suggested that RdgB plays an important role in the fly phototransduction cascade and that its PI-transfer domain is critical for this function. In this domain, a specific mutation, T59E, induces a dominant retinal degeneration phenotype. Here we show that a similar mutation, T59E in the human Nir2 protein, targets Nir2 to spherical cytosolic structures identified as lipid droplets by the lipophilic dye Nile red. A truncated Nir2T59E mutant consisting of only the PI-transfer domain was also targeted to lipid droplets, whereas neither the wild-type Nir2 nor the Nir2T59A mutant was associated with lipid droplets under regular growth conditions. However, oleic-acid treatment caused translocation of wild-type Nir2, but not translocation of the T59A mutant, to lipid droplets. This treatment also induced partial targeting of endogenous Nir2, which is mainly associated with the Golgi apparatus, to lipid droplets. Targeting of Nir2 to lipid droplets was attributed to its enhanced threonine phosphorylation. These results suggest that a specific threonine within the PI-transfer domain of Nir2 provides a regulatory site for targeting to lipid droplets. In conjunction with the role of PI-TPs in lipid transport, this targeting may affect intracellular lipid trafficking and distribution and may provide the molecular basis underlying the dominant effect of the RdgB-T59E mutant on retinal degeneration. PMID:12225667

  20. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating to Adipocytes Accumulate Autophagic Vesicles Instead of Functional Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Alexandra T; Suciu, Maria; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Azghadi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Cristea, Mirabela I; Nica, Dragos V; Vaduva, Adrian; Muntean, Danina; Mic, Ani Aurora; Mic, Felix A

    2016-04-01

    Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) can easily be differentiated into a variety of cells. In vivo transplantation of BMSCs-differentiated cells has had limited success, suggesting that these cells may not be fully compatible with the cells they are intended to replace in vivo. We investigated the structural and functional features of BMSCs-derived adipocytes as compared with adipocytes from adipose tissue, and the structure and functionality of lipid vesicles formed during BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed fatty acid composition of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and adipocytes from the adipose tissue to be very different, as is the lipid rafts composition, caveolin-1 expression, caveolae distribution in their membranes, and the pattern of expression of fatty acid elongases. Confocal microscopy confirmed the absence from BMSCs-derived adipocytes of markers of lipid droplets. BMSCs-derived adipocytes cannot convert deuterated glucose into deuterated species of fatty acids and cannot uptake the deuterated fatty acid-bovine serum albumin complexes from the culture medium, suggesting that intra-cellular accumulation of lipids does not occur by lipogenesis. We noted that BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes is accompanied by an increase in autophagy. Autophagic vesicles accumulate in the cytoplasm of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and their size and distribution resembles that of Nile Red-stained lipid vesicles. Stimulation of autophagy in BMSCs triggers the intra-cellular accumulation of lipids, while inhibition of autophagy prevents this accumulation. In conclusion, differentiation of BMSCs-derived adipocytes leads to intra-cellular accumulation of autophagic vesicles rather than functional lipid droplets, suggesting that these cells are not authentic adipocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 863-875, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26332160

  1. The seipin complex Fld1/Ldb16 stabilizes ER–lipid droplet contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Grippa, Alexandra; Buxó, Laura; Mora, Gabriel; Funaya, Charlotta; Idrissi, Fatima-Zahra; Mancuso, Francesco; Gomez, Raul; Muntanyà, Júlia; Sabidó, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles consisting of a neutral lipid core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and a set of LD-specific proteins. Most LD components are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that is often physically connected with LDs. How LD identity is established while maintaining biochemical and physical connections with the ER is not known. Here, we show that the yeast seipin Fld1, in complex with the ER membrane protein Ldb16, prevents equilibration of ER and LD surface components by stabilizing the contact sites between the two organelles. In the absence of the Fld1/Ldb16 complex, assembly of LDs results in phospholipid packing defects leading to aberrant distribution of lipid-binding proteins and abnormal LDs. We propose that the Fld1/Ldb16 complex facilitates the establishment of LD identity by acting as a diffusion barrier at the ER–LD contact sites. PMID:26572621

  2. Degradation of lipid droplet-associated proteins by chaperone-mediated autophagy facilitates lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) selectively degrades a subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. A potent physiological activator of CMA is nutrient deprivation, a condition in which intracellular triglyceride stores or lipid droplets (LD) also undergo hydrolysis (lipolysis) to generate free fatty acids for energetic purposes. Here we report that LD-associated proteins perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 3 (PLIN3) are CMA substrates and their degradation via CMA precedes lipolysis. In vivo studies revealed that CMA degradation of PLIN2 and PLIN3 was enhanced during starvation, concurrent with elevated levels of cytosolic adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and macroautophagy proteins on LD. CMA blockage both in cultured cells and mouse liver or expression of CMA-resistant PLINs lead to reduced association of ATGL and macrolipophagy-related proteins with LD and the subsequent decrease in lipid oxidation and accumulation of LD. We propose a role of CMA in LD biology and in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. PMID:25961502

  3. Glial Lipid Droplets and ROS Induced by Mitochondrial Defects Promote Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lucy; Zhang, Ke; Sandoval, Hector; Yamamoto, Shinya; Jaiswal, Manish; Sanz, Elisenda; Li, Zhihong; Hui, Jessica; Graham, Brett H.; Quintana, Albert; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial defects in neurons are implicated in neurodegenerative disease. Here we find that a key consequence of ROS and neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction is the accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) in glia. In Drosophila, ROS triggers c-Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP) activity in neurons leading to LD accumulation in glia prior to or at the onset of neurodegeneration. The accumulated lipids are peroxidated in the presence of ROS. Reducing LD accumulation in glia and lipid peroxidation via targeted lipase overexpression and/or lowering ROS significantly delays the onset of neurodegeneration. Furthermore, a similar pathway leads to glial LD accumulation in Ndufs4 mutant mice with neuronal mitochondrial defects, suggesting that LD accumulation following mitochondrial dysfunction is an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon, and represents an early, transient indicator and promoter of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25594180

  4. Specific Accumulation of Lipid Droplets in Hepatocyte Nuclei of PFOA-exposed BALB/c Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-07-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs), which are important storage structures for neutral lipids and organelles of diverse functions, participate in various cellular activities. In this study, BALB/c mice, fed a regular or a high-fat diet, were exposed to the synthetic perfluorinated compound, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFOA-exposed mice had altered serum lipid and lipoprotein levels, and hydropic degeneration or ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes. Moreover, we report for the first time that LDs accumulate in hepatic nuclei after PFOA exposure. As PFOA resembles fatty acids (FA) in its structure, this chemical may interfere with the transportation and metabolism of FA as well as LDs in the cell. This abnormal localization of LDs in the nucleus may be related to the cause of PFOA toxicity.

  5. Stable, biocompatible lipid vesicle generation by solvent extraction-based droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Shia-Yen; Khnouf, Ruba; Fan, Hugh; Lee, Abraham P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a microfluidic platform for the continuous generation of stable, monodisperse lipid vesicles 20–110 μm in diameter. Our approach utilizes a microfluidic flow-focusing droplet generation design to control the vesicle size by altering the system’s fluid flow rates to generate vesicles with narrow size distribution. Double emulsions are first produced in consecutive flow-focusing channel geometries and lipid membranes are then formed through a controlled solvent extraction process. Since no strong solvents are used in the process, our method allows for the safe encapsulation and manipulation of an assortment of biological entities, including cells, proteins, and nucleic acids. The vesicles generated by this method are stable and have a shelf life of at least 3 months. Here, we demonstrate the cell-free in vitro synthesis of proteins within lipid vesicles as an initial step towards the development of an artificial cell. PMID:22685501

  6. Arabidopsis SEIPIN Proteins Modulate Triacylglycerol Accumulation and Influence Lipid Droplet Proliferation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lipodystrophy protein SEIPIN is important for lipid droplet (LD) biogenesis in human and yeast cells. In contrast with the single SEIPIN genes in humans and yeast, there are three SEIPIN homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated SEIPIN1, SEIPIN2, and SEIPIN3. Essentially nothing is known about the functions of SEIPIN homologs in plants. Here, a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SEIPIN deletion mutant strain and a plant (Nicotiana benthamiana) transient expression system were used to test the ability of Arabidopsis SEIPINs to influence LD morphology. In both species, expression of SEIPIN1 promoted accumulation of large-sized lipid droplets, while expression of SEIPIN2 and especially SEIPIN3 promoted small LDs. Arabidopsis SEIPINs increased triacylglycerol levels and altered composition. In tobacco, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized SEIPINs reorganized the normal, reticulated ER structure into discrete ER domains that colocalized with LDs. N-terminal deletions and swapping experiments of SEIPIN1 and 3 revealed that this region of SEIPIN determines LD size. Ectopic overexpression of SEIPIN1 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in leaves, as well as in seeds, and increased seed oil content by up to 10% over wild-type seeds. By contrast, RNAi suppression of SEIPIN1 resulted in smaller seeds and, as a consequence, a reduction in the amount of oil per seed compared with the wild type. Overall, our results indicate that Arabidopsis SEIPINs are part of a conserved LD biogenesis machinery in eukaryotes and that in plants these proteins may have evolved specialized roles in the storage of neutral lipids by differentially modulating the number and sizes of lipid droplets. PMID:26362606

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Droplets from Caco-2/TC7 Enterocytes Identifies Novel Modulators of Lipid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Beilstein, Frauke; Bouchoux, Julien; Rousset, Monique; Demignot, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    In enterocytes, the dynamic accumulation and depletion of triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LD) during fat absorption suggests that cytosolic LD-associated TAG contribute to TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL) production. To get insight into the mechanisms controlling the storage/secretion balance of TAG, we used as a tool hepatitis C virus core protein, which localizes onto LDs, and thus may modify their protein coat and decrease TRL secretion. We compared the proteome of LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes expressing or not hepatitis C virus core protein by a differential proteomic approach (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry). We identified 42 proteins, 21 being involved in lipid metabolism. Perilipin-2/ADRP, which is suggested to stabilize long term-stored TAG, was enriched in LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 expressing core protein while perilipin-3/TIP47, which is involved in LD synthesis from newly synthesized TAG, was decreased. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins were strongly decreased, suggesting reduced interactions between LD and endoplasmic reticulum, where TRL assembly occurs. For the first time, we show that 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (DHB2), which catalyzes the conversion of 17-keto to 17 β-hydroxysteroids and which was the most highly enriched protein in core expressing cells, is localized to LD and interferes with TAG secretion, probably through its capacity to inactivate testosterone. Overall, we identified potential new players of lipid droplet dynamics, which may be involved in the balance between lipid storage and secretion, and may be altered in enterocytes in pathological conditions such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes and obesity. PMID:23301014

  8. Quantitative Spatiotemporal Chemical Profiling of Individual Lipid Droplets by Hyperspectral CARS Microscopy in Living Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Langbein, Wolfgang; Watson, Pete; Borri, Paola

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that cytosolic lipid droplets, present in all eukaryotic cells, play a key role in many cellular functions. Yet their composition at the individual droplet level and how it evolves over time in living cells is essentially unknown due to the lack of suitable quantitative nondestructive measurement techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of label-free hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, together with a quantitative image analysis algorithm developed by us, to quantify the lipid type and content in vol/vol concentration units of individual lipid droplets in living human adipose-derived stem cells during differentiation over 9 days in media supplemented with different fatty acids. Specifically, we investigated the addition of the polyunsaturated linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids into the normal differentiation medium (mostly containing monounsaturated fatty acids). We observe a heterogeneous uptake which is droplet-size dependent, time dependent, and lipid dependent. Cells grown in linoleic-acid-supplemented medium show the largest distribution of lipid content across different droplets at all times during differentiation. When analyzing the average lipid content, we find that adding linoleic or alpha-linolenic fatty acids at day 0 results in uptake of the new lipid components with an exponential time constant of 22 ± 2 h. Conversely, switching lipids at day 3 results in an exponential time constant of 60 ± 5 h. These are unprecedented findings, exemplifying that the quantitative imaging method demonstrated here could open a radically new way of studying and understanding cytosolic lipid droplets in living cells. PMID:26937957

  9. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D.; Goode, Joel M.; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C.; Muscat, George E. O.; Stow, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  10. Bioactive Hybrid Particles from Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) Nanoparticle Stabilized Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Whitby, Catherine P; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-08-12

    Biodegradable and bioactive hybrid particles composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles and medium-chain triglycerides were prepared by spray drying lipid-in-water emulsions stabilized by PLGA nanoparticles, to form PLGA-lipid hybrid (PLH) microparticles approximately 5 μm in mean diameter. The nanoparticle stabilizer was varied and mannitol was also incorporated during the preparation to investigate the effect of stabilizer charge and cryoprotectant content on the particle microstructure. An in vitro lipolysis model was used to demonstrate the particles' bioactivity by manipulating the digestion kinetics of encapsulated lipid by pancreatic lipase in simulated gastrointestinal fluid. Lipid digestion kinetics were enhanced in PLH and PLGA-lipid-mannitol hybrid (PLMH) microparticles for both stabilizers, compared to a coarse emulsion, in biorelevant media. An optimal digestion rate was observed for the negatively charged PLMH system, evidenced by a 2-fold increase in the pseudo-first-order rate constant compared to a coarse emulsion. Improved microparticle redispersion, probed by dual dye confocal fluorescence microscopy, increased the available surface area of lipid for lipase adsorption, enhancing digestion kinetics. Thereby, lipase action was controlled in hybrid microparticles by altering the surface charge and carbohydrate content. Our results demonstrate that bioactive microparticles composed of versatile and biodegradable polymeric particles and oil droplets have great potential for use in smart food and nutrient delivery, as well as safer and more efficacious oral delivery of drugs and drug combinations. PMID:26181279

  11. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D; Goode, Joel M; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C; Muscat, George E O; Stow, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are involved in the compartmentalization of lipophilic compounds in plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While lipid droplets have traditionally been considered as inert sites for the storage of triacylglycerols and sterol esters, they are now recognized as dynamic and functionally diverse organelles involved in energy homeostasis, lipid signaling, and stress responses. Unlike most other organelles, li...

  13. Disruption of the human CGI-58 homologue in Arabidopsis results in lipid droplet accumulation in the cytosol of plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CGI-58 has been identified as the causative gene in the human neutral lipid storage disease called Chanarin-Dorfman Syndrome. This disorder results in accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets in non-adipose tissues. Here we show that disruption of the homologous CGI-58 gene in Arabidopsis thal...

  14. Biology and pathobiology of lipid droplets and their potential role in the protection of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Raul A; Kalinec, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The current review article seeks to extend our understanding on the role of lipid droplets within the organ of Corti. In addition to presenting an overview of the current information about the origin, structure and function of lipid droplets we draw inferences from the collective body of knowledge about this cellular organelle to build a conceptual framework to better understanding their role in auditory function. This conceptual model considers that lipid droplets play a significant role in the synthesis, storage, and release of lipids and proteins for energetic use and/or modulating cell signaling pathways. We describe the role and mechanism by which LD play a role in human diseases, and we also review emerging data from our laboratory revealing the potential role of lipid droplets from Hensen cells in the auditory organ. We suggest that lipid droplets might help to develop rapidly and efficiently the resolution phase of inflammatory responses in the mammalian cochlea, preventing inflammatory damage of the delicate inner ear structures and, consequently, sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25987503

  15. Visualization and Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Structural Proteins at Lipid Droplets by Super-Resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Rudolph; Herker, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets are central organelles in the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) life cycle. The viral capsid protein core localizes to lipid droplets and initiates the production of viral particles at lipid droplet–associated ER membranes. Core is thought to encapsidate newly synthesized viral RNA and, through interaction with the two envelope proteins E1 and E2, bud into the ER lumen. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of HCV structural proteins core and E2 in vicinity of small lipid droplets by three-color 3D super-resolution microscopy. We observed and analyzed small areas of colocalization between the two structural proteins in HCV-infected cells with a diameter of approximately 100 nm that might represent putative viral assembly sites. PMID:25019511

  16. HCV 3a Core Protein Increases Lipid Droplet Cholesteryl Ester Content via a Mechanism Dependent on Sphingolipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Branche, Emilie; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Parisot, Clotilde; Potma, Eric O.; Riezman, Howard; Negro, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often develop steatosis and the HCV core protein alone can induce this phenomenon. To gain new insights into the pathways leading to steatosis, we performed lipidomic profiling of HCV core protein expressing-Huh-7 cells and also assessed the lipid profile of purified lipid droplets isolated from HCV 3a core expressing cells. Cholesteryl esters, ceramides and glycosylceramides, but not triglycerides, increased specifically in cells expressing the steatogenic HCV 3a core protein. Accordingly, inhibitors of cholesteryl ester biosynthesis such as statins and acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase inhibitors prevented the increase of cholesteryl ester production and the formation of large lipid droplets in HCV core 3a-expressing cells. Furthermore, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis by myriocin - but not of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis by miglustat - affected both lipid droplet size and cholesteryl ester level. The lipid profile of purified lipid droplets, isolated from HCV 3a core-expressing cells, confirmed the particular increase of cholesteryl ester. Thus, both sphingolipid and cholesteryl ester biosynthesis are affected by the steatogenic core protein of HCV genotype 3a. These results may explain the peculiar lipid profile of HCV-infected patients with steatosis. PMID:25522003

  17. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods andmore » exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid

  18. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods and exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid placement and

  19. Long-term live cell microscopy studies of lipid droplet fusion dynamics in adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Jüngst, Christian; Klein, Matthias; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During the adipogenic differentiation process of mesenchymal stem cells, lipid droplets (LDs) grow slowly by transferring lipids between each other. Recent findings hint at the possibility that a fusion pore is involved. In this study, we analyze lipid transfer data obtained in long-term label-free microscopy studies in the framework of a Hagen-Poiseuille model. The data obtained show a LD fusion process in which the lipid transfer directionality depends on the size difference between LDs, whereas the respective rates depend on the size difference and additionally on the diameter of the smaller LDs. For the data analysis, the viscosity of the transferred material has to be known. We demonstrate that a viscosity-dependent molecular rotor dye can be used to measure LD viscosities in live cells. On this basis, we calculate the diameter of a putative lipid transfer channel which appears to have a direct dependence on the diameter of the smaller of the two participating LDs. PMID:24103784

  20. Imaging the Lipid-Phase-Dependent Pore Formation of Equinatoxin II in Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rojko, N.; Cronin, B.; Danial, J.S.H.; Baker, M.A.B.; Anderluh, G.; Wallace, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Using phase-separated droplet interface bilayers, we observe membrane binding and pore formation of a eukaryotic cytolysin, Equinatoxin II (EqtII). EqtII activity is known to depend on the presence of sphingomyelin in the target membrane and is enhanced by lipid phase separation. By imaging the ionic flux through individual pores in vitro, we observe that EqtII pores form predominantly within the liquid-disordered phase. We observe preferential binding of labeled EqtII at liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered domain boundaries before it accumulates in the liquid-disordered phase. PMID:24739162

  1. The Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Lro1 Is Responsible for Hepatitis C Virus Core-Induced Lipid Droplet Formation in a Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Hsin; Irokawa, Hayato; Hwang, Gi-Wook; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus frequently induces steatosis, which is a significant risk factor for liver pathogenesis. Steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. The structural protein core of the virus induces lipid droplet formation and localizes on the surface of the lipid droplets. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for the core-induced formation of lipid droplets remain elusive. Recently, we showed that the expression of the core protein in yeast as a model system could induce lipid droplet formation. In this study, we probed the cellular factors responsible for the formation of core-induced lipid-droplets in yeast cells. We demonstrated that one of the enzymes responsible for triglyceride synthesis, a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1), is required for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. While core proteins inhibit Lro1 degradation and alter Lro1 localization, the characteristic localization of Lro1 adjacent to the lipid droplets appeared to be responsible for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. RNA virus genomes have evolved using high mutation rates to maintain their ability to replicate. Our observations suggest a functional relationship between the core protein with hepatocytes and yeast cells. The possible interactions between core proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane affect the mobilization of specific proteins. PMID:27459103

  2. Composition and occurrence of lipid droplets in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Peramuna, Anantha; Summers, Michael L

    2014-12-01

    Inclusions of neutral lipids termed lipid droplets (LDs) located throughout the cell were identified in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme by staining with lipophylic fluorescent dyes. LDs increased in number upon entry into stationary phase and addition of exogenous fructose indicating a role for carbon storage, whereas high-light stress did not increase LD numbers. LD accumulation increased when nitrate was used as the nitrogen source during exponential growth as compared to added ammonia or nitrogen-fixing conditions. Analysis of isolated LDs revealed enrichment of triacylglycerol (TAG), α-tocopherol, and C17 alkanes. LD TAG from exponential phase growth contained mainly saturated C16 and C18 fatty acids, whereas stationary phase LD TAG had additional unsaturated fatty acids characteristic of whole cells. This is the first characterization of cyanobacterial LD composition and conditions leading to their production. Based upon their abnormally large size and atypical location, these structures represent a novel sub-organelle in cyanobacteria. PMID:25135835

  3. A conserved family of proteins facilitates nascent lipid droplet budding from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Vineet; Ojha, Namrata; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all cells and play critical roles in lipid metabolism. De novo LD biogenesis occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is not well understood. We imaged early stages of LD biogenesis using electron microscopy and found that nascent LDs form lens-like structures that are in the ER membrane, raising the question of how these nascent LDs bud from the ER as they grow. We found that a conserved family of proteins, fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins, is required for proper budding of LDs from the ER. Elimination or reduction of FIT proteins in yeast and higher eukaryotes causes LDs to remain in the ER membrane. Deletion of the single FIT protein in Caenorhabditis elegans is lethal, suggesting that LD budding is an essential process in this organism. Our findings indicated that FIT proteins are necessary to promote budding of nascent LDs from the ER. PMID:26504167

  4. Composition and occurrence of lipid droplets in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme

    PubMed Central

    Peramuna, Anantha; Summers, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusions of neutral lipids termed lipid droplets (LDs) located throughout the cell were identified in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme by staining with lipophyllic fluorescent dyes. LDs increased in number upon entry into stationary phase and addition of exogenous fructose indicating a role for carbon storage, whereas high-light stress did not increase LD numbers. LD accumulation increased when nitrate was used as the nitrogen source during exponential growth as compared to added ammonia or nitrogen–fixing conditions. Analysis of isolated LDs revealed enrichment of triacylglycerol (TAG), - tochopherol, and C17 alkanes. LD TAG from exponential phase growth contained mainly saturated C16 and C18 fatty acids whereas stationary phase LD TAG had additional unsaturated fatty acids characteristic of whole cells. This is the first characterization of cyanobacterial LD composition and conditions leading to their production. Based upon their abnormally large size and atypical location these structures represent a novel sub-organelle in cyanobacteria. PMID:25135835

  5. Conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulate lipid droplet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fei, Weihua; Wang, Han; Fu, Xin; Bielby, Christopher; Yang, Hongyuan

    2009-11-15

    LDs (lipid droplets) are cellular organelles which can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Despite their importance in cell biology, the mechanism underlying LD biogenesis remains largely unknown. In the present study we report that conditions of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress stimulate LD formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LDs accumulated in yeast mutants with compromised protein glycosylation or ER-associated protein degradation. Moreover, tunicamycin and Brefeldin A, agents which induce ER stress, were found to stimulate LD formation. In contrast, the restoration of protein glycosylation reduced LD accumulation. Interestingly, enhanced neutral lipids synthesis and LD formation under conditions of ER stress was not dependent on Ire1p. Lastly, we demonstrated that the absence of LDs did not compromise cell viability under ER stress. Our results suggest that although more LDs are produced, LDs are not essential to cell survival under ER stress. PMID:19708857

  6. Lipid Droplets: A New Player in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells Unveiled by Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tirinato, Luca; Liberale, Carlo; Di Franco, Simone; Candeloro, Patrizio; Benfante, Antonina; La Rocca, Rosanna; Potze, Lisette; Marotta, Roberto; Ruffilli, Roberta; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar P; Malerba, Mario; De Angelis, Francesco; Falqui, Andrea; Carbone, Ennio; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model is describing tumors as a hierarchical organized system and CSCs are suggested to be responsible for cancer recurrence after therapy. The identification of specific markers of CSCs is therefore of paramount importance. Here, we show that high levels of lipid droplets (LDs) are a distinctive mark of CSCs in colorectal (CR) cancer. This increased lipid content was clearly revealed by label-free Raman spectroscopy and it directly correlates with well-accepted CR-CSC markers as CD133 and Wnt pathway activity. By xenotransplantation experiments, we have finally demonstrated that CR-CSCs overexpressing LDs retain most tumorigenic potential. A relevant conceptual advance in this work is the demonstration that a cellular organelle, the LD, is a signature of CSCs, in addition to molecular markers. A further functional characterization of LDs could lead soon to design new target therapies against CR-CSCs. Stem Cells 2015;33:35–44 PMID:25186497

  7. Localized lipid autoxidation initiated by two-photon irradiation within single oil droplets in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp, Piret; Brüggemann, Dagmar A; Knudsen, Jes C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2016-05-15

    The initiation of lipid autoxidation within single oil droplets in Tween-20-stabilized oil-in-water emulsion was achieved by highly focused two-photon (2P) irradiation at excitation wavelength (λex) 700 nm. The radical formation was enhanced by inclusion of the photo-cleavable radical initiator di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP) into the droplets, and demonstrated with confocal microscopy using radical-sensitive probe BODIPY(665/676). The radical chain reactions progressed up to 60 μm; however, there were no indications of oxidation in neighboring droplets demonstrating that radicals and oxidized probe molecules were not able to migrate between oil droplets. In addition, the spatial propagation of lipid autoxidation increased with the degree of oil unsaturation. PMID:26776033

  8. Lipid Droplets Purified from Drosophila Embryos as an Endogenous Handle for Precise Motor Transport Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Tobias F.; Longoria, Rafael A.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Shubeita, George T.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins are responsible for long-range transport of vesicles and organelles. Recent works have elucidated the richness of the transport complex, with multiple teams of similar and dissimilar motors and their cofactors attached to individual cargoes. The interaction among these different proteins, and with the microtubules along which they translocate, results in the intricate patterns of cargo transport observed in cells. High-precision and high-bandwidth measurements are required to capture the dynamics of these interactions, yet the crowdedness in the cell necessitates performing such measurements in vitro. Here, we show that endogenous cargoes, lipid droplets purified from Drosophila embryos, can be used to perform high-precision and high-bandwidth optical trapping experiments to study motor regulation in vitro. Purified droplets have constituents of the endogenous transport complex attached to them and exhibit long-range motility. A novel method to determine the quality of the droplets for high-resolution measurements in an optical trap showed that they compare well with plastic beads in terms of roundness, homogeneity, position sensitivity, and trapping stiffness. Using high-resolution and high-bandwidth position measurements, we demonstrate that we can follow the series of binding and unbinding events that lead to the onset of active transport. PMID:24010661

  9. Droplet-Shooting and Size-Filtration (DSSF) Method for Synthesis of Cell-Sized Liposomes with Controlled Lipid Compositions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masamune; Onoe, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Miho; Ito, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Kei; Saito, Hirohide; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2015-09-21

    We report a centrifugal microfluidic method, droplet-shooting and size-filtration (DSSF), for the production of cell-sized liposomes with controlled lipid compositions. This involves the generation of large and small droplets from the tip of a glass capillary and the selective transfer of small droplets through an oil-water interface, thus resulting in the generation of cell-sized liposomes. We demonstrate control of the microdomain formation as well as the formation of asymmetric lipid bilayer liposomes of uniform size by the control of lipid composition. The DSSF method involves simple microfluidics and is easy to use. In addition, only a small volume (0.5-2 μL) of sample solution is required for the formation of hundreds of cell-sized liposomes. We believe that this method can be applied to generate cell-sized liposomes for a wide variety of uses, such as the construction of artificial cell-like systems. PMID:26212462

  10. Function of Lipid Storage Droplet 1 (Lsd1) in Wing Development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Men, Tran Thanh; Binh, Tran Duy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Perilipins are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to humans, the lipid storage droplet 1 (Lsd1) is a Drosophila homolog of human perilipin 1. The function of Lsd1 as a regulator of lipolysis in Drosophila has been demonstrated, as the Lsd1 mutant causes an increase of lipid droplet size. However, the functions of this gene during development are still under investigation. In order to determine the function of Lsd1 during development, Lsd1 was knocked down in Drosophila using the GAL4-UAS system. Selective knockdown of Lsd1 in the dorsal wing disc caused an atrophied wing phenotype. The generation of reactive oxygen species in the wing pouch compartment of the Lsd1-knockdown flies was significantly higher than in the control. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibody revealed a greater number of apoptotic cells in Lsd1-knockdown wing discs than in the control. Cell death by autophagy was also induced in the knockdown flies. Moreover, cells deprived of Lsd1 showed mitochondrial expansion and decreased ATP levels. These results strongly suggest that knockdown of Lsd1 induces mitochondrial stress and the production of reactive oxygen species that result in cell death, via apoptosis and the autophagy pathway. These results highlight the roles of Drosophila Lsd1 during wing development. PMID:27136547

  11. Function of Lipid Storage Droplet 1 (Lsd1) in Wing Development of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Men, Tran Thanh; Binh, Tran Duy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Perilipins are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to humans, the lipid storage droplet 1 (Lsd1) is a Drosophila homolog of human perilipin 1. The function of Lsd1 as a regulator of lipolysis in Drosophila has been demonstrated, as the Lsd1 mutant causes an increase of lipid droplet size. However, the functions of this gene during development are still under investigation. In order to determine the function of Lsd1 during development, Lsd1 was knocked down in Drosophila using the GAL4-UAS system. Selective knockdown of Lsd1 in the dorsal wing disc caused an atrophied wing phenotype. The generation of reactive oxygen species in the wing pouch compartment of the Lsd1-knockdown flies was significantly higher than in the control. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibody revealed a greater number of apoptotic cells in Lsd1-knockdown wing discs than in the control. Cell death by autophagy was also induced in the knockdown flies. Moreover, cells deprived of Lsd1 showed mitochondrial expansion and decreased ATP levels. These results strongly suggest that knockdown of Lsd1 induces mitochondrial stress and the production of reactive oxygen species that result in cell death, via apoptosis and the autophagy pathway. These results highlight the roles of Drosophila Lsd1 during wing development. PMID:27136547

  12. A Genetic Screen for Mutants with Supersized Lipid Droplets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiwei; Xu, Shibin; Ma, Yanli; Wu, Shuang; Feng, Yu; Cui, Qingpo; Chen, Lifeng; Zhou, Shuang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Jialei; Wu, Mengdi; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2016-01-01

    To identify genes that regulate the dynamics of lipid droplet (LD) size, we have used the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, whose wild-type LD population displays a steady state of size with an upper limit of 3 μm in diameter. From a saturated forward genetic screen of 6.7 × 10(5) mutagenized haploid genomes, we isolated 118 mutants with supersized intestinal LDs often reaching 10 μm. These mutants define nine novel complementation groups, in addition to four known genes (maoc-1, dhs-28, daf-22, and prx-10). The nine groups are named drop (lipid droplet abnormal) and categorized into four classes. Class I mutants drop-5 and drop-9, similar to prx-10, are up-regulated in ACS-22-DGAT-2-dependent LD growth, resistant to LD hydrolysis, and defective in peroxisome import. Class II mutants drop-2, drop-3, drop-6, and drop-7 are up-regulated in LD growth, are resistant to LD hydrolysis, but are not defective in peroxisome import. Class III mutants drop-1 and drop-8 are neither up-regulated in LD growth nor resistant to LD hydrolysis, but seemingly up-regulated in LD fusion. Class IV mutant drop-4 is cloned as sams-1 and, different to the other three classes, is ACS-22-independent and hydrolysis-resistant. These four classes of supersized LD mutants should be valuable for mechanistic studies of LD cellular processes including growth, hydrolysis, and fusion. PMID:27261001

  13. A Genetic Screen for Mutants with Supersized Lipid Droplets in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiwei; Xu, Shibin; Ma, Yanli; Wu, Shuang; Feng, Yu; Cui, Qingpo; Chen, Lifeng; Zhou, Shuang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Jialei; Wu, Mengdi; Zhang, Shaobing O.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genes that regulate the dynamics of lipid droplet (LD) size, we have used the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, whose wild-type LD population displays a steady state of size with an upper limit of 3 μm in diameter. From a saturated forward genetic screen of 6.7 × 105 mutagenized haploid genomes, we isolated 118 mutants with supersized intestinal LDs often reaching 10 μm. These mutants define nine novel complementation groups, in addition to four known genes (maoc-1, dhs-28, daf-22, and prx-10). The nine groups are named drop (lipid droplet abnormal) and categorized into four classes. Class I mutants drop-5 and drop-9, similar to prx-10, are up-regulated in ACS-22-DGAT-2-dependent LD growth, resistant to LD hydrolysis, and defective in peroxisome import. Class II mutants drop-2, drop-3, drop-6, and drop-7 are up-regulated in LD growth, are resistant to LD hydrolysis, but are not defective in peroxisome import. Class III mutants drop-1 and drop-8 are neither up-regulated in LD growth nor resistant to LD hydrolysis, but seemingly up-regulated in LD fusion. Class IV mutant drop-4 is cloned as sams-1 and, different to the other three classes, is ACS-22-independent and hydrolysis-resistant. These four classes of supersized LD mutants should be valuable for mechanistic studies of LD cellular processes including growth, hydrolysis, and fusion. PMID:27261001

  14. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  15. Lipidomic analysis of lipid droplets from murine hepatocytes reveals distinct signatures for nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Chitraju, Chandramohan; Trötzmüller, Martin; Hartler, Jürgen; Wolinski, Heimo; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Köfeler, Harald C; Spener, Friedrich

    2012-10-01

    Liver steatosis can be induced by fasting or high-fat diet. We investigated by lipidomic analysis whether such metabolic states are reflected in the lipidome of hepatocyte lipid droplets (LDs) from mice fed normal chow diet (FED), fasted (FAS), or fed a high-fat diet (HFD). LC-MS/MS at levels of lipid species profiles and of lipid molecular species uncovered a FAS phenotype of LD enriched in triacylglycerol (TG) molecular species with very long-chain (VLC)-PUFA residues and an HFD phenotype with less unsaturated TG species in addition to characteristic lipid marker species. Nutritional stress did not result in dramatic structural alterations in diacylglycerol (DG) and phospholipid (PL) classes. Moreover, molecular species of bulk TG and of DG indicated concomitant de novo TG synthesis and lipase-catalyzed degradation to be active in LDs. DG species with VLC-PUFA residues would be preferred precursors for phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, the others for TG molecular species. In addition, molecular species of PL classes fitted the hepatocyte Kennedy and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase pathways. We demonstrate that lipidomic analysis of LDs enables phenotyping of nutritional stress. TG species are best suited for such phenotyping, whereas structural analysis of TG, DG, and PL molecular species provides metabolic insights. PMID:22872753

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection Leads to Defined Alterations to the Lipid Droplet Proteome in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Hector Alex; Thompson, J. Will; Chen, Yi-Shan; Dubois, Laura G.; Haas, Joel T.; Moseley, Arthur; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen and a main cause of genital and ocular diseases. During its intracellular cycle, C. trachomatis replicates inside a membrane-bound vacuole termed an “inclusion”. Acquisition of lipids (and other nutrients) from the host cell is a critical step in chlamydial replication. Lipid droplets (LD) are ubiquitous, ER-derived neutral lipid-rich storage organelles surrounded by a phospholipids monolayer and associated proteins. Previous studies have shown that LDs accumulate at the periphery of, and eventually translocate into, the chlamydial inclusion. These observations point out to Chlamydia-mediated manipulation of LDs in infected cells, which may impact the function and thereby the protein composition of these organelles. By means of a label-free quantitative mass spectrometry approach we found that the LD proteome is modified in the context of C. trachomatis infection. We determined that LDs isolated from C. trachomatis-infected cells were enriched in proteins related to lipid metabolism, biosynthesis and LD-specific functions. Interestingly, consistent with the observation that LDs intimately associate with the inclusion, a subset of inclusion membrane proteins co-purified with LD protein extracts. Finally, genetic ablation of LDs negatively affected generation of C. trachomatis infectious progeny, consistent with a role for LD biogenesis in optimal chlamydial growth. PMID:25909443

  17. Emerging role of lipid droplets in Aedes aegypti immune response against bacteria and Dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Ana Beatriz Ferreira; Alves, Liliane Rosa; Nascimento Silva, Maria Clara L.; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Liechocki, Sally; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Sorgine, Marcos H. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that modulate immune and inflammatory responses through the production of lipid mediators. In insects, it is unknown whether LDs play any role during the development of immune responses. We show that Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells – an immune responsive cell lineage – accumulates LDs when challenged with Enterobacter cloacae, Sindbis, and Dengue viruses. Microarray analysis of Aag2 challenged with E.cloacae or infected with Dengue virus revealed high transcripts levels of genes associated with lipid storage and LDs biogenesis, correlating with the increased LDs numbers in those conditions. Similarly, in mosquitoes, LDs accumulate in midgut cells in response to Serratia marcescens and Sindbis virus or when the native microbiota proliferates, following a blood meal. Also, constitutive activation of Toll and IMD pathways by knocking-down their respective negative modulators (Cactus and Caspar) increases LDs numbers in the midgut. Our results show for the first time an infection-induced LDs accumulation in response to both bacterial and viral infections in Ae. Aegypti, and we propose a role for LDs in mosquito immunity. These findings open new venues for further studies in insect immune responses associated with lipid metabolism. PMID:26887863

  18. Emerging role of lipid droplets in Aedes aegypti immune response against bacteria and Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Ana Beatriz Ferreira; Alves, Liliane Rosa; Silva, Maria Clara L Nascimento; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Liechocki, Sally; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Sorgine, Marcos H Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that modulate immune and inflammatory responses through the production of lipid mediators. In insects, it is unknown whether LDs play any role during the development of immune responses. We show that Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells - an immune responsive cell lineage - accumulates LDs when challenged with Enterobacter cloacae, Sindbis, and Dengue viruses. Microarray analysis of Aag2 challenged with E.cloacae or infected with Dengue virus revealed high transcripts levels of genes associated with lipid storage and LDs biogenesis, correlating with the increased LDs numbers in those conditions. Similarly, in mosquitoes, LDs accumulate in midgut cells in response to Serratia marcescens and Sindbis virus or when the native microbiota proliferates, following a blood meal. Also, constitutive activation of Toll and IMD pathways by knocking-down their respective negative modulators (Cactus and Caspar) increases LDs numbers in the midgut. Our results show for the first time an infection-induced LDs accumulation in response to both bacterial and viral infections in Ae. Aegypti, and we propose a role for LDs in mosquito immunity. These findings open new venues for further studies in insect immune responses associated with lipid metabolism. PMID:26887863

  19. Function and structure of lipid storage droplet protein 1 studied in lipoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Estela L; Rivera, Laticia; Hamada, Masakazu; Mirza, Saima; Hartson, Steve D; Weintraub, Susan; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    Triglycerides (TG) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are the main energy reserve in all animals. The mechanism by which animals mobilize TG is complex and not fully understood. Several proteins surrounding the LDs have been implicated in TG homeostasis such as mammalian perilipin A and insect lipid storage proteins (Lsd). Most of the knowledge on LD-associated proteins comes from studies using cells or LDs leaving biochemical properties of these proteins uncharacterized. Here we describe the purification of recombinant Lsd1 and its reconstitution with lipids to form lipoprotein complexes suitable for functional and structural studies. Lsd1 in the lipid bound state is a predominately alpha-helical protein. Using lipoprotein complexes containing triolein it is shown that PKA mediated phosphorylation of Lsd1 promoted a 1.7-fold activation of the main fat body lipase demonstrating the direct link between Lsd1 phosphorylation and activation of lipolysis. Serine 20 was identified as the Lsd1-phosphorylation site triggering this effect. PMID:18342616

  20. Lipid droplet-mediated ER homeostasis regulates autophagy and cell survival during starvation.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Ariadna P; Tatsuta, Takashi; Ghillebert, Ruben; Drescher, Ingmar; Graef, Martin

    2016-03-14

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are conserved organelles for intracellular neutral lipid storage. Recent studies suggest that LDs function as direct lipid sources for autophagy, a central catabolic process in homeostasis and stress response. Here, we demonstrate that LDs are dispensable as a membrane source for autophagy, but fulfill critical functions for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis linked to autophagy regulation. In the absence of LDs, yeast cells display alterations in their phospholipid composition and fail to buffer de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis causing chronic stress and morphologic changes in the ER. These defects compromise regulation of autophagy, including formation of multiple aberrant Atg8 puncta and drastically impaired autophagosome biogenesis, leading to severe defects in nutrient stress survival. Importantly, metabolically corrected phospholipid composition and improved FA resistance of LD-deficient cells cure autophagy and cell survival. Together, our findings provide novel insight into the complex interrelation between LD-mediated lipid homeostasis and the regulation of autophagy potentially relevant for neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. PMID:26953354

  1. Saturating Light Induces Sustained Accumulation of Oil in Plastidal Lipid Droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Cuiné, Stéphan; Légeret, Bertrand; Liang, Yuanxue; Brugière, Sabine; Auroy, Pascaline; Javot, Hélène; Tardif, Marianne; Jones, Brian; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    Enriching algal biomass in energy density is an important goal in algal biotechnology. Nitrogen (N) starvation is considered the most potent trigger of oil accumulation in microalgae and has been thoroughly investigated. However, N starvation causes the slow down and eventually the arrest of biomass growth. In this study, we show that exposing a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture to saturating light (SL) under a nonlimiting CO2 concentration in turbidostatic photobioreactors induces a sustained accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) without compromising growth, which results in much higher oil productivity than N starvation. We also show that the polar membrane lipid fraction of SL-induced LDs is rich in plastidial lipids (approximately 70%), in contrast to N starvation-induced LDs, which contain approximately 60% lipids of endoplasmic reticulum origin. Proteomic analysis of LDs isolated from SL-exposed cells identified more than 200 proteins, including known proteins of lipid metabolism, as well as 74 proteins uniquely present in SL-induced LDs. LDs induced by SL and N depletion thus differ in protein and lipid contents. Taken together, lipidomic and proteomic data thus show that a large part of the sustained oil accumulation occurring under SL is likely due to the formation of plastidial LDs. We discuss our data in relation to the different metabolic routes used by microalgae to accumulate oil reserves depending on cultivation conditions. Finally, we propose a model in which oil accumulation is governed by an imbalance between photosynthesis and growth, which can be achieved by impairing growth or by boosting photosynthetic carbon fixation, with the latter resulting in higher oil productivity. PMID:27297678

  2. Disruption of the Arabidopsis CGI-58 homologue produces Chanarin-Dorfman-like lipid droplet accumulation in plants.

    PubMed

    James, Christopher N; Horn, Patrick J; Case, Charlene R; Gidda, Satinder K; Zhang, Daiyuan; Mullen, Robert T; Dyer, John M; Anderson, Richard G W; Chapman, Kent D

    2010-10-12

    CGI-58 is the defective gene in the human neutral lipid storage disease called Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome. This disorder causes intracellular lipid droplets to accumulate in nonadipose tissues, such as skin and blood cells. Here, disruption of the homologous CGI-58 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in the accumulation of neutral lipid droplets in mature leaves. Mass spectroscopy of isolated lipid droplets from cgi-58 loss-of-function mutants showed they contain triacylglycerols with common leaf-specific fatty acids. Leaves of mature cgi-58 plants exhibited a marked increase in absolute triacylglycerol levels, more than 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants. Lipid levels in the oil-storing seeds of cgi-58 loss-of-function plants were unchanged, and unlike mutations in β-oxidation, the cgi-58 seeds germinated and grew normally, requiring no rescue with sucrose. We conclude that the participation of CGI-58 in neutral lipid homeostasis of nonfat-storing tissues is similar, although not identical, between plant and animal species. This unique insight may have implications for designing a new generation of technologies that enhance the neutral lipid content and composition of crop plants. PMID:20876112

  3. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Ragunath; Lyn, Rodney K.; Srinivasan, Prashanth; Delcorde, Julie; Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne; Pezacki, John P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1α and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1α, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1α/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

  4. The ARF-Like GTPase ARFRP1 Is Essential for Lipid Droplet Growth and Is Involved in the Regulation of Lipolysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Angela; Hesse, Deike; Völker, Wolfgang; Jaschke, Alexander; Moser, Markus; Engel, Thomas; Blüher, Matthias; Zahn, Claudia; Chadt, Alexandra; Ruschke, Karen; Vogel, Heike; Kluge, Reinhart; Robenek, Horst; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) is a GTPase regulating protein trafficking between intracellular organelles. Here we show that mice lacking Arfrp1 in adipocytes (Arfrp1ad−/−) are lipodystrophic due to a defective lipid droplet formation in adipose cells. Ratios of mono-, di-, and triacylglycerol, as well as the fatty acid composition of triglycerides, were unaltered. Lipid droplets of brown adipocytes of Arfrp1ad−/− mice were considerably smaller and exhibited ultrastructural alterations, such as a disturbed interaction of small lipid-loaded particles with the larger droplets, suggesting that ARFRP1 mediates the transfer of newly formed small lipid particles to the large storage droplets. SNAP23 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa) associated with small lipid droplets of control adipocytes but was located predominantly in the cytosol of Arfrp1ad−/− adipocytes, suggesting that lipid droplet growth is defective in Arfrp1ad−/− mice. In addition, levels of phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were elevated, and association of adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) with lipid droplets was enhanced in brown adipose tissue from Arfrp1ad−/− mice. Accordingly, basal lipolysis was increased after knockdown of Arfrp1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The data indicate that disruption of ARFRP1 prevents the normal enlargement of lipid droplets and produces an activation of lipolysis. PMID:20038528

  5. Intestinal inflammation requires FOXO3 and prostaglandin E2-dependent lipogenesis and elevated lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe; Penrose, Harrison; Makboul, Rania; Biswas, Debjani; Cabe, Maleen; Crawford, Susan E; Savkovic, Suzana D

    2016-05-15

    Intestinal inflammation has been recently characterized by the dysregulation of lipids as metabolic and energy sources, revealing a novel feature of its pathophysiology. Because intracellular lipids, stored in dynamic lipid droplets (LDs), provide energy for cellular needs, we investigated whether they play a role in intestinal inflammation. In the inflamed intestine of mice, elevated LDs were found in colonic and infiltrating immune cells as shown by staining for the LD coat protein PLIN2 and for lipids with BODIPY. In colonic cells, TNF stimulated LD increases by receptor signaling rely on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Downstream, TNF triggered a negative regulatory loop between LDs and the transcription factor FOXO3. This was shown in the colon of Foxo3-deficient mice, where elevation in PLIN2 and lipids were further facilitated by inflammation and were more prominent relative to wild-type, whereas, in colonic cells, inhibition of lipogenesis blocked the TNF-mediated loss of FOXO3. Furthermore, blockade of PGE2 synthesis abrogated TNF-stimulated increases in LDs and FOXO3 inactivation. We found in colonic tissue of Foxo3-deficient mice higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2, a mediator of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis, supporting involvement of PGE2 in the LD-FOXO3 regulatory loop. Ultimately, TNF-stimulated lipogenesis leading to elevated LDs facilitated NF-κB-mediated increases in IL-8 protein, which is associated with the surface of LDs found in the lumina of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. This novel immunometabolic mechanism of colonic inflammation involving elevated LDs could provide opportunities for new treatment options. PMID:26968210

  6. Lipid Droplets: A Key Cellular Organelle Associated with Cancer Cell Survival under Normoxia and Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect describes the phenomenon by which cancer cells obtain energy from glycolysis even under normoxic (O₂-sufficient) conditions. Tumor tissues are generally exposed to hypoxia owing to inefficient and aberrant vasculature. Cancer cells have multiple molecular mechanisms to adapt to such stress conditions by reprogramming the cellular metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factors are major transcription factors induced in cancer cells in response to hypoxia that contribute to the metabolic changes. In addition, cancer cells within hypoxic tumor areas have reduced access to serum components such as nutrients and lipids. However, the effect of such serum factor deprivation on cancer cell biology in the context of tumor hypoxia is not fully understood. Cancer cells are lipid-rich under normoxia and hypoxia, leading to the increased generation of a cellular organelle, the lipid droplet (LD). In recent years, the LD-mediated stress response mechanisms of cancer cells have been revealed. This review focuses on the production and functions of LDs in various types of cancer cells in relation to the associated cellular environment factors including tissue oxygenation status and metabolic mechanisms. This information will contribute to the current understanding of how cancer cells adapt to diverse tumor environments to promote their survival. PMID:27589734

  7. AMPK activation promotes lipid droplet dispersion on detyrosinated microtubules to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Herms, Albert; Bosch, Marta; Reddy, Babu J.N.; Schieber, Nicole L.; Fajardo, Alba; Rupérez, Celia; Fernández-Vidal, Andrea; Ferguson, Charles; Rentero, Carles; Tebar, Francesc; Enrich, Carlos; Parton, Robert G.; Gross, Steven P.; Pol, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular organelles that provide fatty acids (FAs) to cellular processes including synthesis of membranes and production of metabolic energy. While known to move bidirectionally along microtubules (MTs), the role of LD motion and whether it facilitates interaction with other organelles are unclear. Here we show that during nutrient starvation, LDs and mitochondria relocate on detyrosinated MT from the cell centre to adopt a dispersed distribution. In the cell periphery, LD–mitochondria interactions increase and LDs efficiently supply FAs for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. This cellular adaptation requires the activation of the energy sensor AMPK, which in response to starvation simultaneously increases LD motion, reorganizes the network of detyrosinated MTs and activates mitochondria. In conclusion, we describe the existence of a specialized cellular network connecting the cellular energetic status and MT dynamics to coordinate the functioning of LDs and mitochondria during nutrient scarcity. PMID:26013497

  8. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  9. Kibizu concentrated liquid suppresses the accumulation of lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Chisato; Kozaki, Tomomi; Morita, Yukiko; Shirouchi, Bungo; Fukami, Katsuya; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Sato, Masao; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    Adipocyte size is closely related to the occurrence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. Thus, researchers are searching for active substances that function to reduce adipocyte size. In the present study, we focused on sugar cane vinegar, Kibizu, and evaluated the function of Kibizu to reduce adipocyte size by using an in vitro model system, because people in Amami Oshima famous for longevity regularly consume Kibizu. Results showed that Kibizu treatment significantly reduced the size and number of lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells, relative to treatment with Kurozu, another traditional vinegar. Results of an extraction experiment suggest that the active components in Kibizu are lipophilic and hydrophobic. In addition, an in vivo experiment on rats treated with Kibizu showed that the active components were contained in large vein blood. Results of an additional in vivo experiment suggest that metabolites generated by Kibizu-treated rats are primarily contained or modified specifically in the large vein blood. PMID:25672941

  10. Self-organization of motors and microtubules in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, the architecture of the microtubule cytoskeleton is intimately linked to its function. The principles determining how microtubules arrange in space are, however, still not fully understood. Biochemical activities controlling microtubule nucleation and dynamics as well as mechanochemical activities exerted by molecular motors and the dynamic microtubules themselves are known to be critical for the correct spatial organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. In vitro reconstitution approaches have revealed the morphogenetic properties of these activities in minimal systems. In most cases, such in vitro experiments were performed in experimental chambers of spatial dimensions that exceeded typical cell sizes by orders of magnitude. Here, we describe a method for the fluorescence microscopic study of the effects of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in micrometer-sized lipid-monolayered droplets emulsified in oil. In the future, this experimental setup can be extended in several ways. Additional proteins can be added, either to the lumen or to the boundary of the microcontainers, and the droplets can be transformed into liposomes. Such more complex in vitro reconstitutions would be another step closer to mimicking intracellular cytoskeleton organization. PMID:25997341

  11. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  12. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Omura, Satoshi

    2004-01-20

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC(50) values of 0.78 and 0.41 microM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.5 microM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  13. Effects of accumulation of lipid droplets on load transfer between and within adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ben-Or Frank, Mor; Shoham, Naama; Benayahu, Dafna; Gefen, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Adipogenesis, a process of cell proliferation followed by the accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs), is accompanied by morphological changes in adipocytes, leading to a gradual rise in the structural stiffness of these cells. The increase in cellular structural stiffness can potentially influence the localized deformations of adjacent adipocytes in weight-bearing fat tissues, which, based on previous work, may accelerate intracytoplasmatic lipid production to form even larger and more tightly packed intracellular LDs. This process is based on mechanotransduction phenomena which are hypothesized (again, following empirical studies), to play a critical role in "en mass" adipocyte hypertrophy, and hence are important to characterize through computational modeling. Accordingly, we examined here how maturing adipocytes may affect localized loads acting on adjacent immature cells, using a set of finite element models of adipocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix. The peak strain energy density at the plasma membrane (PM) of the adipocytes, when constructs were externally loaded, was found to depend on the levels of lipid accumulation in the neighboring cells if the external compressive and shear deformations were large enough ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively). The mechanosignaling transduces through the PM and could therefore affect intracellular pathways to produce more lipid contents. Our results support the theory of deformation-induced differentiation in adipocytes. The findings are thus relevant in the context of a sedentary lifestyle, in which sustained deformations of weight-bearing adipose tissues may activate a positive feedback loop that promotes the "en mass" differentiation of cells, which subsequently increases the total mass of living fat tissues. PMID:24706071

  14. Immunofluorescence microscopy of SNAP23 in human skeletal muscle reveals colocalization with plasma membrane, lipid droplets, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Juliette A; Shaw, Christopher S; Bradley, Helen; Wilson, Oliver J; Dorval, Thierry; Pilling, James; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2016-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) is a SNARE protein expressed abundantly in human skeletal muscle. Its established role is to mediate insulin-stimulated docking and fusion of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) with the plasma membrane. Recent in vitro research has proposed that SNAP23 may also play a role in the fusion of growing lipid droplets (LDs) and the channeling of LD-derived fatty acids (FAs) into neighboring mitochondria for β-oxidation. This study investigates the subcellular distribution of SNAP23 in human skeletal muscle using immunofluorescence microscopy to confirm that SNAP23 localization supports the three proposed metabolic roles. Percutaneous biopsies were obtained from the m. vastus lateralis of six lean, healthy males in the rested, overnight fasted state. Cryosections were stained with antibodies targeting SNAP23, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase and the plasma membrane marker dystrophin, whereas intramuscular LDs were stained using the neutral lipid dye oil red O. SNAP23 displayed areas of intense punctate staining in the intracellular regions of all muscle fibers and continuous intense staining in peripheral regions of the cell. Quantitation of confocal microscopy images showed colocalization of SNAP23 with the plasma membrane marker dystrophin (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.50 ± 0.01). The intense punctate intracellular staining colocalized primarily with the mitochondrial marker cytochrome C oxidase (r = 0.50 ± 0.012) and to a lesser extent with LDs (r = 0.21 ± 0.01) visualized with oil red O. We conclude that the observed subcellular distribution of SNAP23 in human skeletal muscle supports the three aforementioned metabolic roles. PMID:26733245

  15. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) diminishes lipid droplet-coating proteins leading to lipolysis in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Mayumi; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Mikami, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Katsuhisa; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM induces lipolysis in a distinct manner from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM ablates activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM reduces mRNA levels of lipid-droplet coating proteins leading to lipolysis. -- Abstract: Under fasting conditions, triacylglycerol in adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to supply fatty acids as energy substrates. Such lipolysis is regulated by hormones, which activate lipases via stimulation of specific signalling cascades. We previously showed that macrophage-derived soluble protein, AIM induces obesity-associated lipolysis, triggering chronic inflammation in fat tissue which causes insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of how AIM mediates lipolysis remains unknown. Here we show that AIM induces lipolysis in a manner distinct from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis, without activation or augmentation of lipases. In vivo and in vitro, AIM did not enhance phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in adipocytes, a hallmark of hormone-dependent lipolysis activation. Similarly, adipose tissue from obese AIM-deficient and wild-type mice showed comparable HSL phosphorylation. Consistent with the suppressive effect of AIM on fatty acid synthase activity, the amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids was reduced in adipocytes treated with AIM. This response ablated transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}), leading to diminished gene expression of lipid-droplet coating proteins including fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) and Perilipin, which are indispensable for triacylglycerol storage in adipocytes. Accordingly, the lipolytic effect of AIM was overcome by a PPAR{gamma}-agonist or forced expression of FSP27, while it was synergized by a PPAR{gamma}-antagonist. Overall, distinct modes of lipolysis appear to take place in different physiological

  16. Lipid droplets in activated mast cells - a significant source of triglyceride-derived arachidonic acid for eicosanoid production.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Kovanen, Petri T; Schneider, Wolfgang J

    2016-08-15

    Mast cells are potent effectors of immune reactions and key players in various inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cellular defense response of mast cells represents a unique and powerful system, where external signals can trigger cell activation resulting in a stimulus-specific and highly coordinated release of a plethora of bioactive mediators. The arsenal of mediators encompasses preformed molecules stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules, as well as newly synthesized proteinaceous and lipid mediators. The release of mediators occurs in strict chronological order and requires proper coordination between the endomembrane system and various enzymatic machineries. For the generation of lipid mediators, cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been shown to function as a major intracellular pool of arachidonic acid, the precursor for eicosanoid biosynthesis. Recent studies have revealed that not only phospholipids in mast cell membranes, but also triglycerides in mast cell lipid droplets are a substrate source for eicosanoid formation. The present review summarizes current knowledge about mast cell lipid droplet biology, and discusses expansions and challenges of traditional mechanistic models for eicosanoid production. PMID:26164793

  17. ELMOD2 is anchored to lipid droplets by palmitoylation and regulates adipocyte triglyceride lipase recruitment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Murakami, Tatsuro; Cheng, Jinglei; Kano, Hiroyuki; Fukata, Masaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2015-06-15

    Adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of triglycerides. The Arf1-coat protein complex I (COPI) machinery is known to be engaged in the recruitment of ATGL to lipid droplets (LDs), but the regulatory mechanism has not been clarified. In the present study, we found that ELMOD2, a putative noncanonical Arf-GTPase activating protein (GAP) localizing in LDs, plays an important role in controlling ATGL transport to LDs. We showed that knockdown of ELMOD2 by RNA interference induced an increase in the amount of ATGL existing in LDs and decreased the total cellular triglycerides. These effects of ELMOD2 knockdown were canceled by transfection of small interfering RNA-resistant cDNA of wild-type ELMOD2 but not by that of mutated ELMOD2 lacking the Arf-GAP activity. ELMOD2 was distributed in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria as well as in LDs, but palmitoylation was required only for distribution to LDs. An ELMOD2 mutant deficient in palmitoylation failed to reconstitute the ATGL transport after the ELMOD2 knockdown, indicating that distribution in LDs is indispensable to the functionality of ELMOD2. These results indicate that ELMOD2 regulates ATGL transport and cellular lipid metabolism by modulating the Arf1-COPI activity in LDs. PMID:25904333

  18. Characterization of the Proteome of Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplets in Mouse Enterocytes after a Dietary Fat Challenge

    PubMed Central

    D’Aquila, Theresa; Sirohi, Devika; Grabowski, Jeffrey M.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat absorption by the small intestine is a multistep process that regulates the uptake and delivery of essential nutrients and energy. One step of this process is the temporary storage of dietary fat in cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLDs). The storage and mobilization of dietary fat is thought to be regulated by proteins that associate with the CLD; however, mechanistic details of this process are currently unknown. In this study we analyzed the proteome of CLDs isolated from enterocytes harvested from the small intestine of mice following a dietary fat challenge. In this analysis we identified 181 proteins associated with the CLD fraction, of which 37 are associated with known lipid related metabolic pathways. We confirmed the localization of several of these proteins on or around the CLD through confocal and electron microscopy, including perilipin 3, apolipoprotein A-IV, and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5. The identification of the enterocyte CLD proteome provides new insight into potential regulators of CLD metabolism and the process of dietary fat absorption. PMID:25992653

  19. Translation inhibitors induce formation of cholesterol ester-rich lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tatematsu, Tsuyako; Shinohara, Yuki; Maeda, Takashi; Cheng, Jinglei; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) in non-adipocytes contain triglycerides (TG) and cholesterol esters (CE) in variable ratios. TG-rich LDs are generated when unsaturated fatty acids are administered, but the conditions that induce CE-rich LD formation are less well characterized. In the present study, we found that protein translation inhibitors such as cycloheximide (CHX) induced generation of CE-rich LDs and that TIP47 (perilipin 3) was recruited to the LDs, although the expression of this protein was reduced drastically. Electron microscopy revealed that LDs formed in CHX-treated cells possess a distinct electron-dense rim that is not found in TG-rich LDs, whose formation is induced by oleic acid. CHX treatment caused upregulation of mTORC1, but the CHX-induced increase in CE-rich LDs occurred even when rapamycin or Torin1 was given along with CHX. Moreover, the increase in CE was seen in both wild-type and autophagy-deficient Atg5-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that mTORC1 activation and suppression of autophagy are not necessary to induce the observed phenomenon. The results showed that translation inhibitors cause a significant change in the lipid ester composition of LDs by a mechanism independent of mTORC1 signaling and autophagy. PMID:22879956

  20. Trapping toxins within lipid droplets is a resistance mechanism in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Ming; Zheng, Sha; Li, Ying; Li, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Li, Gang; Lin, Zhaomin; Xie, Zhiyu; Zhao, Zuntian; Lou, Hongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as intracellular storage organelles in most types of cells and are principally involved in energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. However, the role of LDs in resistance to toxins in fungi remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the trapping of endogenous toxins by LDs is a self-resistance mechanism in the toxin producer, while absorbing external lipophilic toxins is a resistance mechanism in the toxin recipient that acts to quench the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that an endolichenic fungus that generates phototoxic perylenequinones (PQs) trapped the PQs inside LDs. Using a model that incorporates the fungicidal action of hypocrellin A (HA), a PQ derivative, we showed that yeast cells escaped killing by trapping toxins inside LDs. Furthermore, LD-deficient mutants were hypersusceptible to HA-mediated phototoxins and other fungicides. Our study identified a previously unrecognised function of LDs in fungi that has implications for our understanding of environmental adaptation strategies for fungi and antifungal drug discovery. PMID:26463663

  1. PML isoform II plays a critical role in nuclear lipid droplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohsaki, Yuki; Kawai, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Yukichika; Cheng, Jinglei; Jokitalo, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) in the nucleus of hepatocyte-derived cell lines were found to be associated with premyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) and type I nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) or the extension of the inner nuclear membrane. Knockdown of PML isoform II (PML-II) caused a significant decrease in both nuclear LDs and type I NR, whereas overexpression of PML-II increased both. Notably, these effects were evident only in limited types of cells, in which a moderate number of nuclear LDs exist intrinsically, and PML-II was targeted not only at PML NBs, but also at the nuclear envelope, excluding lamins and SUN proteins. Knockdown of SUN proteins induced a significant increase in the type I NR and nuclear LDs, but these effects were cancelled by simultaneous knockdown of PML-II. Nuclear LDs harbored diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α and incorporated newly synthesized lipid esters. These results corroborated that PML-II plays a critical role in generating nuclear LDs in specific cell types. PMID:26728854

  2. The Proteome of Cholesteryl-Ester-Enriched Versus Triacylglycerol-Enriched Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Victor K.; Ahrends, Robert; Lin, Ye; Shen, Wen-Jun; Adams, Christopher M.; Roseman, Ann Nomoto; Cortez, Yuan; Teruel, Mary N.; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2014-01-01

    Within cells, lipids are stored in the form of lipid droplets (LDs), consisting of a neutral lipid core, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and an outer layer of protein. LDs typically accumulate either triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol or cholesteryl ester (CE), depending on the type of tissue. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the proteins that surround LDs. LD proteins have been found to be quite diverse, from structural proteins to metabolic enzymes, proteins involved in vesicular transport, and proteins that may play a role in LD formation. Previous proteomics analyses have focused on TAG-enriched LDs, whereas CE-enriched LDs have been largely ignored. Our study has compared the LD proteins from CE-enriched LDs to TAG-enriched LDs in steroidogenic cells. In primary rat granulosa cells loaded with either HDL to produce CE-enriched LDs or fatty acids to produce TAG-enriched LDs, 61 proteins were found to be elevated in CE-enriched LDs and 40 proteins elevated in TAG-enriched LDs with 278 proteins in similar amounts. Protein expression was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). SRM verified expression of 25 of 27 peptides that were previously detected by tandem mass tagging MS. Several proteins were confirmed to be elevated in CE-enriched LDs by SRM including the intermediate filament vimentin. This study is the first to compare the proteins found on CE-enriched LDs with TAG-enriched LDs and constitutes the first step in creating a better understanding of the proteins found on CE-enriched LDs in steroidogenic cells. PMID:25111084

  3. Fenofibrate insulates diacylglycerol in lipid droplet/ER and preserves insulin signaling transduction in the liver of high fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stanley M H; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Jo, Eunjung; Zhou, Xiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Songpei; Xu, Aimin; Watt, Matthew J; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic steatosis is often associated with insulin resistance as a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome in the liver. The present study investigated the effects of PPARα activation induced by fenofibrate (FB) on the relationship of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet, which increases lipid influx into the liver. Mice were fed HF diet to induce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis with or without FB. FB activated PPARα and ameliorated HF diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance without altering either hepatic steatosis or inflammation signaling (JNK or IKK). Interestingly, FB treatment simultaneously increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis (50%) and oxidation (66%, both p<0.01) into intermediate lipid metabolites, suggesting a FA oxidation-synthesis cycling in operation. Associated with these effects, diacylglycerols (DAGs) were sequestered within the lipid droplet/ER compartment, thus reducing their deposition in the cellular membrane, which is known to impair insulin signal transduction. These findings suggest that the reduction in membrane DAGs (rather than total hepatic steatosis) may be critical for the protection by fenofibrate-induced PPARα activation against hepatic insulin resistance induced by dietary fat. PMID:25906681

  4. Enhancement of carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots using excipient emulsions: influence of particle size of digestible lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruojie; Zhang, Zipei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Guodong; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of initial lipid droplet size on the ability of excipient emulsions to increase carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots was investigated using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Corn oil-in-water excipient emulsions were fabricated with different surface-weighted mean droplet diameters: d32 = 0.17 μm (fine), 0.46 μm (medium), and, 10 μm (large). Bulk oil containing a similar quantity of lipids as the emulsions was used as a control. The excipient emulsions and control were mixed with pureed carrots, and then passed through a simulated GIT (mouth, stomach, and small intestine), and changes in particle size, charge, microstructure, lipid digestion, and carotenoid bioaccessibility were measured. Carotenoid bioaccessibility significantly increased with decreasing lipid droplet size in the excipient emulsions, which was attributed to the rapid formation of mixed micelles that could solubilize the carotenoids in the intestinal fluids. These results have important implications for designing excipient foods, such as dressings, dips, creams, and sauces, to increase the bioavailability of health-promoting nutraceuticals in foods. PMID:26583923

  5. Lipid droplets in cultured luteal cells in non-pregnant sheep fed different planes of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Khanthusaeng, Vilaivan; Thammasiri, Jiratti; Bass, Casie S; Navanukraw, Chainarong; Borowicz, Pawel; Redmer, Dale A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) in luteal cells likely is important for energy storage and steroidogenesis in the highly metabolically active corpus luteum (CL). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plane of nutrition on progesterone (P4) secretion, and lipid droplet number and size in cultured ovine luteal cells. Ewes were randomly assigned to one of three nutritional groups: control (C; 100% NRC requirements, n=9), overfed (O; 2×C, n=12), or underfed (U; 0.6×C, n=10). Superovulation was induced by follicle stimulating hormone injections. At the early and mid-luteal phases of the estrous cycle, CL were dissected from ovaries, and luteal cells isolated enzymatically. Luteal cells were incubated overnight in medium containing serum in chamber slides. Media were then changed to serum-free and after 24h incubation, media were collected for P4 analysis, and cells were fixed in formalin and stained with BODIPY followed by DAPI staining. Z-stacks of optical sections of large and small luteal cells (LLC and SLC, respectively) were obtained using a laser-scanning microscope. Rendered 3D images of individual LLC and SLC were analyzed for cell volume, and total and individual LD volume, number and percentage of cellular volume occupied by LD by using Imaris software. Concentrations of P4 in serum and media were greater (P<0.05) at the mid than early-luteal phase, and were not affected by nutritional plane. LD total volume and number were greater (P<0.001) in LLC than SLC; however, mean volume of individual LD was greater (P<0.02) in SLC than LLC. In LLC, total LD volume was greater (P<0.02) in O than C and U ewes. In SLC, total LD volume and number was greater (P<0.003) at the mid than early-luteal phase, and percentage of cell volume occupied by LD was greater (P<0.002) in U than C and O ewes. These data demonstrate that both stage of luteal development and nutritional plane affect selected LD measurements and thus may affect luteal functions

  6. Triglyceride Mobilization from Lipid Droplets Sustains the Anti-Steatotic Action of Iodothyronines in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grasselli, Elena; Voci, Adriana; Demori, Ilaria; Vecchione, Giulia; Compalati, Andrea D; Gallo, Gabriella; Goglia, Fernando; De Matteis, Rita; Silvestri, Elena; Vergani, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue, dietary lipids and de novo lipogenesis are sources of hepatic free fatty acids (FFAs) that are stored in lipid droplets (LDs) as triacylglycerols (TAGs). Destiny of TAGs stored in LDs is determined by LD proteomic equipment. When adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) localizes at LD surface the lipid mobilization is stimulated. In this work, an in vitro model of cultured rat hepatocytes mimicking a mild steatosis condition was used to investigate the direct lipid-lowering action of iodothyronines, by focusing, in particular, on LD-associated proteins, FFA oxidation and lipid secretion. Our results demonstrate that in "steatotic" hepatocytes iodothyronines reduced the lipid excess through the recruitment of ATGL on LD surface, and the modulation of the LD-associated proteins Rab18 and TIP47. As an effect of ATGL recruitment, iodothyronines stimulated the lipid mobilization from LDs then followed by the up-regulation of carnitine-palmitoyl-transferase (CPT1) expression and the stimulation of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity that seems to indicate a stimulation of mitochondrial function. The lipid lowering action of iodothyronines did not depend on increased TAG secretion. On the basis of our data, ATGL could be indicated as an early mediator of the lipid-lowering action of iodothyronines able to channel hydrolyzed FFAs toward mitochondrial beta-oxidation rather than secretion. PMID:26793120

  7. Label-free imaging of lipid-droplet intracellular motion in early Drosophila embryos using femtosecond-stimulated Raman loss microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei; Zhang, Delong; Jung, Yookyung; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Umulis, David M

    2012-04-01

    Lipid droplets are complex organelles that exhibit highly dynamic behavior in early Drosophila embryo development. Imaging lipid droplet motion provides a robust platform for the investigation of shuttling by kinesin and dynein motors, but methods for imaging are either destructive or deficient in resolution and penetration to study large populations of droplets in an individual embryo. Here we report real-time imaging and quantification of droplet motion in live embryos using a recently developed technique termed "femtosecond-stimulated Raman loss" microscopy. We captured long-duration time-lapse images of the developing embryo, tracked single droplet motion within large populations of droplets, and measured the velocity and turning frequency of each particle at different apical-to-basal depths and stages of development. To determine whether the quantities for speed and turning rate measured for individual droplets are sufficient to predict the population distributions of droplet density, we simulated droplet motion using a velocity-jump model. This model yielded droplet density distributions that agreed well with experimental observations without any model optimization or unknown parameter estimation, demonstrating the sufficiency of a velocity-jump process for droplet trafficking dynamics in blastoderm embryos. PMID:22500767

  8. Structure of a CGI-58 motif provides the molecular basis of lipid droplet anchoring.

    PubMed

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-10-30

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10-31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp(21) and Trp(25)) and right (harboring Trp(29)) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp(21) and Trp(25) and two adjacent leucines. Trp(29) serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  9. Structure of a CGI-58 Motif Provides the Molecular Basis of Lipid Droplet Anchoring*

    PubMed Central

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10–31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp21 and Trp25) and right (harboring Trp29) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp21 and Trp25 and two adjacent leucines. Trp29 serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  10. Unique regulation of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) by perilipin 5, a lipid droplet-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Bell, Ming; Sreenivasan, Urmila; Sreenevasan, Urmilla; Hu, Hong; Liu, Jun; Dalen, Knut; Londos, Constantine; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Rizzo, Mark A; Coleman, Rosalind; Gong, Dawei; Brasaemle, Dawn; Sztalryd, Carole

    2011-05-01

    Lipolysis is a critical metabolic pathway contributing to energy homeostasis through degradation of triacylglycerides stored in lipid droplets (LDs), releasing fatty acids. Neutral lipid lipases act at the oil/water interface. In mammalian cells, LD surfaces are coated with one or more members of the perilipin protein family, which serve important functions in regulating lipolysis. We investigated mechanisms by which three perilipin proteins control lipolysis by adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a key lipase in adipocytes and non-adipose cells. Using a cell culture model, we examined interactions of ATGL and its co-lipase CGI-58 with perilipin 1 (perilipin A), perilipin 2 (adipose differentiation-related protein), and perilipin 5 (LSDP5) using multiple techniques as follows: anisotropy Forster resonance energy transfer, co-immunoprecipitation, [(32)P]orthophosphate radiolabeling, and measurement of lipolysis. The results show that ATGL interacts with CGI-58 and perilipin 5; the latter is selectively expressed in oxidative tissues. Both proteins independently recruited ATGL to the LD surface, but with opposite effects; interaction of ATGL with CGI-58 increased lipolysis, whereas interaction of ATGL with perilipin 5 decreased lipolysis. In contrast, neither perilipin 1 nor 2 interacted directly with ATGL. Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) increased [(32)P]orthophosphate incorporation into perilipin 5 by 2-fold, whereas neither ATGL nor CGI-58 was labeled under the incubation conditions. Cells expressing both ectopic perilipin 5 and ATGL showed a 3-fold increase in lipolysis following activation of PKA. Our studies establish perilipin 5 as a novel ATGL partner and provide evidence that the protein composition of perilipins at the LD surface regulates lipolytic activity of ATGL. PMID:21393244

  11. Synthetic Hemozoin (β-Hematin) Crystals Nucleate at the Surface of Neutral Lipid Droplets that Control Their Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Ambele, Melvin A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Cummings, Franscious R.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions of monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG) and of a neutral lipid blend (NLB), consisting of MPG, monostearoylglycerol, dipalmitoylglycerol, dioleoylglycerol and dilineoylglycerol (4:2:1:1:1), the composition associated with hemozoin from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, have been used to mediate the formation of β-hematin microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and electron spectroscopic imaging/electron energy loss spectroscopy (ESI/EELS) have been used to characterize both the lipid emulsion and β-hematin crystals. The latter have been compared with β-hematin formed at a pentanol/aqueous interface and with hemozoin both within P. falciparum parasites and extracted from the parasites. When lipid and ferriprotoporphyrin IX solutions in 1:9 v/v acetone/methanol were thoroughly pre-mixed either using an extruder or ultrasound, β-hematin crystals were found formed in intimate association with the lipid droplets. These crystals resembled hemozoin crystals, with prominent {100} faces. Lattice fringes in TEM indicated that these faces made contact with the lipid surface. The average length of these crystals was 0.62 times the average diameter of NLB droplets and their size distributions were statistically equivalent after 10 min incubation, suggesting that the lipid droplets also controlled the sizes of the crystals. This most closely resembles hemozoin formation in the helminth worm Schistosoma mansoni, while in P. falciparum, crystal formation appears to be associated with the much more gently curved digestive vacuole membrane which apparently leads to formation of much larger hemozoin crystals, similar to those formed at the flat pentanol-water interface. PMID:24244110

  12. Recent discoveries on absorption of dietary fat: Presence, synthesis, and metabolism of cytoplasmic lipid droplets within enterocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Aquila, Theresa; Hung, Yu-Han; Carreiro, Alicia; Buhman, Kimberly K

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fat provides essential nutrients, contributes to energy balance, and regulates blood lipid concentrations. These functions are important to health, but can also become dysregulated and contribute to diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Within enterocytes, the digestive products of dietary fat are re-synthesized into triacylglycerol, which is either secreted on chylomicrons or stored within cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLDs). CLDs were originally thought to be inert stores of neutral lipids, but are now recognized as dynamic organelles that function in multiple cellular processes in addition to lipid metabolism. This review will highlight recent discoveries related to dietary fat absorption with an emphasis on the presence, synthesis, and metabolism of CLDs within this process. PMID:27108063

  13. Peroxisomes, lipid droplets, and endoplasmic reticulum “hitchhike” on motile early endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Sofia C.; Schuster, Martin; Bielska, Ewa; Dagdas, Gulay; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Meadows, Ben R.A.; Schrader, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that bind cargo to be transported along the cytoskeleton. Here, we report, for the first time, that peroxisomes (POs), lipid droplets (LDs), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) rely on early endosomes (EEs) for intracellular movement in a fungal model system. We show that POs undergo kinesin-3– and dynein-dependent transport along microtubules. Surprisingly, kinesin-3 does not colocalize with POs. Instead, the motor moves EEs that drag the POs through the cell. PO motility is abolished when EE motility is blocked in various mutants. Most LD and ER motility also depends on EE motility, whereas mitochondria move independently of EEs. Covisualization studies show that EE-mediated ER motility is not required for PO or LD movement, suggesting that the organelles interact with EEs independently. In the absence of EE motility, POs and LDs cluster at the growing tip, whereas ER is partially retracted to subapical regions. Collectively, our results show that moving EEs interact transiently with other organelles, thereby mediating their directed transport and distribution in the cell. PMID:26620910

  14. FoxO1 antagonist suppresses autophagy and lipid droplet growth in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D; Zou, Peng; Brooke, Joseph; Smith, Cayleen; Long, Yun Chau; Almeida, Fabio A; Liu, Dongmin; Cheng, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders constitute one of the most pressing heath concerns worldwide. Increased adiposity is linked to autophagy upregulation in adipose tissues. However, it is unknown how autophagy is upregulated and contributes to aberrant adiposity. Here we show a FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis that regulates adipogenesis and lipid droplet (LD) growth in adipocytes. Adipocyte differentiation was associated with upregulation of autophagy and fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a key regulator of adipocyte maturation and expansion by promoting LD formation and growth. However, FoxO1 specific inhibitor AS1842856 potently suppressed autophagy, FSP27 expression, and adipocyte differentiation. In terminally differentiated adipocytes, AS1842856 significantly reduced FSP27 level and LD size, which was recapitulated by autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin-A1 and leupeptin, BL). Similarly, AS1842856 and BL dampened autophagy activity and FSP27 expression in explant cultures of white adipose tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first study addressing FoxO1 in the regulation of adipose autophagy, shedding light on the mechanism of increased autophagy and adiposity in obese individuals. Given that adipogenesis and adipocyte expansion contribute to aberrant adiposity, targeting the FoxO1-autophagy-FSP27 axis may lead to new anti-obesity options. PMID:27260854

  15. Lipid droplets hypertrophy: a crucial determining factor in insulin regulation by adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjabi, Bahram; Dashty, Monireh; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; van Rooij, Felix; Al-Lahham, Saad; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Kooten, Theo G.; Spek, C. Arnold; Rowshani, Ajda T.; van der Want, Johannes; Klaassen, Rene; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-03-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) hypertrophy in adipocytes is the main cause of energy metabolic system dysfunction, obesity and its afflictions such as T2D. However, the role of adipocytes in linking energy metabolic disorders with insulin regulation is unknown in humans. Human adipocytes constitutively synthesize and secrete insulin, which is biologically functional. Insulin concentrations and release are fat mass- and LDs-dependent respectively. Fat reduction mediated by bariatric surgery repairs obesity-associated T2D. The expression of genes, like PCSK1 (proinsulin conversion enzyme), GCG (Glucagon), GPLD1, CD38 and NNAT, involved in insulin regulation/release were differentially expressed in pancreas and adipose tissue (AT). INS (insulin) and GCG expression reduced in human AT-T2D as compared to AT-control, but remained unchanged in pancreas in either state. Insulin levels (mRNA/protein) were higher in AT derived from prediabetes BB rats with destructed pancreatic β-cells and controls than pancreas derived from the same rats respectively. Insulin expression in 10 human primary cell types including adipocytes and macrophages is an evidence for extrapancreatic insulin-producing cells. The data suggest a crosstalk between AT and pancreas to fine-tune energy metabolic system or may minimize the metabolic damage during diabetes. This study opens new avenues towards T2D therapy with a great impact on public health.

  16. Spatial control of lipid droplet proteins by the ERAD ubiquitin ligase Doa10.

    PubMed

    Ruggiano, Annamaria; Mora, Gabriel; Buxó, Laura; Carvalho, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a central role in the biogenesis of most membrane proteins. Among these are proteins localized to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs), fat storage organelles delimited by a phospholipid monolayer. The LD monolayer is often continuous with the membrane of the ER allowing certain membrane proteins to diffuse between the two organelles. In these connected organelles, how some proteins concentrate specifically at the surface of LDs is not known. Here, we show that the ERAD ubiquitin ligase Doa10 controls the levels of some LD proteins. Their degradation is dependent on the localization to the ER and appears independent of the folding state. Moreover, we show that by degrading the ER pool of these LD proteins, ERAD contributes to restrict their localization to LDs. The signals for LD targeting and Doa10-mediated degradation overlap, indicating that these are competing events. This spatial control of protein localization is a novel function of ERAD that might contribute to generate functional diversity in a continuous membrane system. PMID:27357570

  17. Peroxisomes, lipid droplets, and endoplasmic reticulum "hitchhike" on motile early endosomes.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Sofia C; Schuster, Martin; Bielska, Ewa; Dagdas, Gulay; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Meadows, Ben R A; Schrader, Michael; Steinberg, Gero

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that bind cargo to be transported along the cytoskeleton. Here, we report, for the first time, that peroxisomes (POs), lipid droplets (LDs), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) rely on early endosomes (EEs) for intracellular movement in a fungal model system. We show that POs undergo kinesin-3- and dynein-dependent transport along microtubules. Surprisingly, kinesin-3 does not colocalize with POs. Instead, the motor moves EEs that drag the POs through the cell. PO motility is abolished when EE motility is blocked in various mutants. Most LD and ER motility also depends on EE motility, whereas mitochondria move independently of EEs. Covisualization studies show that EE-mediated ER motility is not required for PO or LD movement, suggesting that the organelles interact with EEs independently. In the absence of EE motility, POs and LDs cluster at the growing tip, whereas ER is partially retracted to subapical regions. Collectively, our results show that moving EEs interact transiently with other organelles, thereby mediating their directed transport and distribution in the cell. PMID:26620910

  18. Nuclear-localized CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α regulates phosphatidylcholine synthesis required for lipid droplet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, Adam J.; Arsenault, Daniel J.; Ridgway, Neale D.

    2015-01-01

    The reversible association of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) with membranes regulates the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by the CDP-choline (Kennedy) pathway. Based on results with insect CCT homologues, translocation of nuclear CCTα onto cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) is proposed to stimulate the synthesis of PC that is required for LD biogenesis and triacylglycerol (TAG) storage. We examined whether this regulatory mechanism applied to LD biogenesis in mammalian cells. During 3T3-L1 and human preadipocyte differentiation, CCTα expression and PC synthesis was induced. In 3T3-L1 cells, CCTα translocated from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope and cytosol but did not associate with LDs. The enzyme also remained in the nucleus during human adipocyte differentiation. RNAi silencing in 3T3-L1 cells showed that CCTα regulated LD size but did not affect TAG storage or adipogenesis. LD biogenesis in nonadipocyte cell lines treated with oleate also promoted CCTα translocation to the nuclear envelope and/or cytoplasm but not LDs. In rat intestinal epithelial cells, CCTα silencing increased LD size, but LD number and TAG deposition were decreased due to oleate-induced cytotoxicity. We conclude that CCTα increases PC synthesis for LD biogenesis by translocation to the nuclear envelope and not cytoplasmic LDs. PMID:26108622

  19. Differential pattern of lipid droplet-associated proteins and de novo perilipin expression in hepatocyte steatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Straub, Beate Katharina; Stoeffel, Pamela; Heid, Hans; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Schirmacher, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Fatty change (steatosis) is the most frequent liver pathology in western countries and is caused by a broad range of disorders such as alcohol abuse and metabolic syndrome. The surface layer of lipid droplets (LDs) contains members of a protein family that share homologous sequences and domains, the so-called PAT proteins, named after their constituents, perilipin, adipophilin, and TIP47. We characterized the LD-associated proteins in normal and diseased liver connected with LD accumulation. Adipophilin and TIP47 are expressed in LDs of vitamin A-storing hepatic stellate cells and additionally in LDs of steatotic hepatocytes. Perilipin, which was thought to be characteristic for LDs of adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, becomes de novo expressed in hepatocytes of human steatotic liver. Perilipin splice variant A was found in human steatotic hepatocytes by biochemical, molecular biological, and immunohistochemical methods. Its association with LDs is different from TIP47 and adipophilin, and depends on size and localization of the LDs, suggesting that the different PAT proteins play specific roles during maturation of LDs. PMID:18393390

  20. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis. PMID:26770990

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induces Formation of Lipid Droplets as a Generalized Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Jin; Zhang, Jinglan; Choi, Augustine M. K.; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) formation is a hallmark of cellular stress. Cells attempt to combat noxious stimuli by switching their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, sparing resources in LDs for generating cellular reducing power and for anabolic biosynthesis. Membrane phospholipids are also a source of LDs. To elucidate the formation of LDs, we exposed mice to hyperoxia, hypoxia, myocardial ischemia, and sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). All the above-mentioned stressors enhanced the formation of LDs, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, with severe mitochondrial swelling. Disruption of mitochondria by depleting mitochondrial DNA (ρ0 cells) significantly augmented the formation of LDs, causing transcriptional activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolic reprogramming to glycolysis. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 counteracts CLP-mediated septic shock in mouse models. In HO-1-deficient mice, LD formation was not observed upon CLP, but a concomitant decrease in “LD-decorating proteins” was observed, implying a link between LDs and cytoprotective activity. Collectively, LD biogenesis during stress can trigger adaptive LD formation, which is dependent on mitochondrial integrity and HO-1 activity; this may be a cellular survival strategy, apportioning energy-generating substrates to cellular defense. PMID:24175011

  2. Identification of Diverse Lipid Droplet Targeting Motifs in the PNPLA Family of Triglyceride Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Eda; Brown, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Patatin-like Phospholipase Domain containing Protein A (PNPLA) family play key roles in triglyceride hydrolysis, energy metabolism, and lipid droplet (LD) homoeostasis. Here we report the identification of two distinct LD targeting motifs (LTM) for PNPLA family members. Transient transfection of truncated versions of human adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, also known as PNPLA2), PNPLA3/adiponutrin, or PNPLA5 (GS2-like) fused to GFP revealed that the C-terminal third of these proteins contains sequences that are sufficient for targeting to LDs. Furthermore, fusing the C-termini of PNPLA3 or PNPLA5 confers LD localization to PNPLA4, which is otherwise cytoplasmic. Analyses of additional mutants in ATGL, PNPLA5, and Brummer Lipase, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian ATGL, identified two different types of LTMs. The first type, in PNPLA5 and Brummer lipase, is a set of loosely conserved basic residues, while the second type, in ATGL, is contained within a stretch of hydrophobic residues. These results show that even closely related members of the PNPLA family employ different molecular motifs to associate with LDs. PMID:23741432

  3. The distribution and abundance of archaeal tetraether lipids in U.S. Great Basin hot springs

    PubMed Central

    Paraiso, Julienne J.; Williams, Amanda J.; Huang, Qiuyuan; Wei, Yuli; Dijkstra, Paul; Hungate, Bruce A.; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (iGDGTs) are core membrane lipids of many archaea that enhance the integrity of cytoplasmic membranes in extreme environments. We examined the iGDGT profiles and corresponding aqueous geochemistry in 40 hot spring sediment and microbial mat samples from the U.S. Great Basin with temperatures ranging from 31 to 95°C and pH ranging from 6.8 to 10.7. The absolute abundance of iGDGTs correlated negatively with pH and positively with temperature. High lipid concentrations, distinct lipid profiles, and a strong relationship between polar and core lipids in hot spring samples suggested in situ production of most iGDGTs rather than contamination from local soils. Two-way cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) of polar iGDGTs indicated that the relative abundance of individual lipids was most strongly related to temperature (r2 = 0.546), with moderate correlations with pH (r2 = 0.359), nitrite (r2 = 0.286), oxygen (r2 = 0.259), and nitrate (r2 = 0.215). Relative abundance profiles of individual polar iGDGTs indicated potential temperature optima for iGDGT-0 (≤70°C), iGDGT-3 (≥55°C), and iGDGT-4 (≥60°C). These relationships likely reflect both physiological adaptations and community-level population shifts in response to temperature differences, such as a shift from cooler samples with more abundant methanogens to higher-temperature samples with more abundant Crenarchaeota. Crenarchaeol was widely distributed across the temperature gradient, which is consistent with other reports of abundant crenarchaeol in Great Basin hot springs and suggests a wide distribution for thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). PMID:24009605

  4. The distribution and abundance of archaeal tetraether lipids in U.S. Great Basin hot springs.

    PubMed

    Paraiso, Julienne J; Williams, Amanda J; Huang, Qiuyuan; Wei, Yuli; Dijkstra, Paul; Hungate, Bruce A; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (iGDGTs) are core membrane lipids of many archaea that enhance the integrity of cytoplasmic membranes in extreme environments. We examined the iGDGT profiles and corresponding aqueous geochemistry in 40 hot spring sediment and microbial mat samples from the U.S. Great Basin with temperatures ranging from 31 to 95°C and pH ranging from 6.8 to 10.7. The absolute abundance of iGDGTs correlated negatively with pH and positively with temperature. High lipid concentrations, distinct lipid profiles, and a strong relationship between polar and core lipids in hot spring samples suggested in situ production of most iGDGTs rather than contamination from local soils. Two-way cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) of polar iGDGTs indicated that the relative abundance of individual lipids was most strongly related to temperature (r (2) = 0.546), with moderate correlations with pH (r (2) = 0.359), nitrite (r (2) = 0.286), oxygen (r (2) = 0.259), and nitrate (r (2) = 0.215). Relative abundance profiles of individual polar iGDGTs indicated potential temperature optima for iGDGT-0 (≤70°C), iGDGT-3 (≥55°C), and iGDGT-4 (≥60°C). These relationships likely reflect both physiological adaptations and community-level population shifts in response to temperature differences, such as a shift from cooler samples with more abundant methanogens to higher-temperature samples with more abundant Crenarchaeota. Crenarchaeol was widely distributed across the temperature gradient, which is consistent with other reports of abundant crenarchaeol in Great Basin hot springs and suggests a wide distribution for thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). PMID:24009605

  5. Label-Free Analysis of Cellular Lipid Droplet Formation by Non-Linear Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schie, Iwan W.

    Cellular lipid droplets (LD) are cellular organelles that can be found in every cell type. Recent research indicates that cellular LD are involved in a large number of cellular metabolic functions, such as lipid metabolism, protection from lipotoxicity, protein storage and degradation, and many more. LD formation is frequently associated with adverse health effects, i.e. alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes type-2, as well as many cardiovascular disorders. Despite their wide presence, LDs are the least studied and most poorly understood cellular organelles. Typically, LDs are investigated using fluorescence-based techniques that require staining with exogenous fluorophores. Other techniques, e.g. biochemical assays, require the destruction of cells that prohibit the analysis of living cells. Therefore, in my thesis research I developed a novel compound fast-scanning nonlinear optical microscope equipped with the ability to also acquire Raman spectra at specific image locations. This system allows us to image label-free cellular LD formation in living cells and analyze the composition of single cellular LDs. Images can be acquired at near video-rate (˜16 frames/s). Furthermore, the system has the ability to acquire very large images of tissue of up to 7.5x15 cm2 total area by stitching together scans with dimensions of 1x1 mm2 in less than 1 minute. The system also enables the user to acquire Raman spectra from points of interest in the multiphoton images and provides chemically-specific data from sample volumes as small as 1 femtoliter. In my thesis I used this setup to determine the effects of VLDL lipolysis products on primary rat hepatocytes. By analyzing the Raman spectra and comparing the peak ratios for saturated and unsaturated fatty acid it was determined that the small cellular LD are highly saturated, while large cellular LDs contain mostly unsaturated lipids. Furthermore, I established a method to determine the specific contribution

  6. Effects of phospholipase A2 and its products on structural stability of human LDL: relevance to formation of LDL-derived lipid droplets[S

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L.; Gursky, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Hydrolysis and oxidation of LDL stimulate LDL entrapment in the arterial wall and promote inflammation and atherosclerosis via various mechanisms including lipoprotein fusion and lipid droplet formation. To determine the effects of FFA on these transitions, we hydrolyzed LDL by phospholipase A2 (PLA2), removed FFA by albumin, and analyzed structural stability of the modified lipoproteins. Earlier, we showed that heating induces LDL remodeling, rupture, and coalescence into lipid droplets resembling those found in atherosclerotic lesions. Here, we report how FFA affect these transitions. Circular dichroism showed that mild LDL lipolysis induces partial β-sheet unfolding in apolipoprotein B. Electron microscopy, turbidity, and differential scanning calorimetry showed that mild lipolysis promotes LDL coalescence into lipid droplets. FFA removal by albumin restores LDL stability but not the protein conformation. Consequently, FFA enhance LDL coalescence into lipid droplets. Similar effects of FFA were observed in minimally oxidized LDL, in LDL enriched with exogenous FFA, and in HDL and VLDL. Our results imply that FFA promote lipoprotein coalescence into lipid droplets and explain why LDL oxidation enhances such coalescence in vivo but hampers it in vitro. Such lipid droplet formation potentially contributes to the pro-atherogenic effects of FFA. PMID:21220788

  7. ATGL and CGI-58 are lipid droplet proteins of the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Thomas O; Grumet, Lukas; Taschler, Ulrike; Hartler, Jürgen; Heier, Christoph; Woblistin, Aaron; Pajed, Laura; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Günter; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contain large amounts of vitamin A [in the form of retinyl esters (REs)] as well as other neutral lipids such as TGs. During times of insufficient vitamin A availability, RE stores are mobilized to ensure a constant supply to the body. To date, little is known about the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of neutral lipid esters, in particular of REs, in HSCs. In this study, we aimed to identify LD-associated neutral lipid hydrolases by a proteomic approach using the rat stellate cell line HSC-T6. First, we loaded cells with retinol and FAs to promote lipid synthesis and deposition within LDs. Then, LDs were isolated and lipid composition and the LD proteome were analyzed. Among other proteins, we found perilipin 2, adipose TG lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), known and established LD proteins. Bioinformatic search of the LD proteome for α/β-hydrolase fold-containing proteins revealed no yet uncharacterized neutral lipid hydrolases. In in vitro activity assays, we show that rat (r)ATGL, coactivated by rat (r)CGI-58, efficiently hydrolyzes TGs and REs. These findings suggest that rATGL and rCGI-58 are LD-resident proteins in HSCs and participate in the mobilization of both REs and TGs. PMID:26330055

  8. ATGL and CGI-58 are lipid droplet proteins of the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6[S

    PubMed Central

    Eichmann, Thomas O.; Grumet, Lukas; Taschler, Ulrike; Hartler, Jürgen; Heier, Christoph; Woblistin, Aaron; Pajed, Laura; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Günter; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contain large amounts of vitamin A [in the form of retinyl esters (REs)] as well as other neutral lipids such as TGs. During times of insufficient vitamin A availability, RE stores are mobilized to ensure a constant supply to the body. To date, little is known about the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of neutral lipid esters, in particular of REs, in HSCs. In this study, we aimed to identify LD-associated neutral lipid hydrolases by a proteomic approach using the rat stellate cell line HSC-T6. First, we loaded cells with retinol and FAs to promote lipid synthesis and deposition within LDs. Then, LDs were isolated and lipid composition and the LD proteome were analyzed. Among other proteins, we found perilipin 2, adipose TG lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), known and established LD proteins. Bioinformatic search of the LD proteome for α/β-hydrolase fold-containing proteins revealed no yet uncharacterized neutral lipid hydrolases. In in vitro activity assays, we show that rat (r)ATGL, coactivated by rat (r)CGI-58, efficiently hydrolyzes TGs and REs. These findings suggest that rATGL and rCGI-58 are LD-resident proteins in HSCs and participate in the mobilization of both REs and TGs. PMID:26330055

  9. Lipid Abundance in Zebrafish Embryos Is Regulated by Complementary Actions of the Endocannabinoid System and Retinoic Acid Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Daniel; Ellis, Megan K; Morrison, Shona; McGee, Sean L; Ward, Alister C; Walder, Ken; Gibert, Yann

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) and retinoic acid (RA) signaling have been associated with influencing lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that modulation of these pathways could modify lipid abundance in developing vertebrates and that these pathways could have a combinatorial effect on lipid levels. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to chemical treatments altering the activity of the ECS and RA pathway. Embryos were stained with the neutral lipid dye Oil-Red-O (ORO) and underwent whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). Mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts were differentiated under exposure to RA-modulating chemicals and subsequently stained with ORO and analyzed for gene expression by qRT-PCR. ECS activation and RA exposure increased lipid abundance and the expression of lipoprotein lipase. In addition, RA treatment increased expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha. Both ECS receptors and RA receptor subtypes were separately involved in modulating lipid abundance. Finally, increased ECS or RA activity ameliorated the reduced lipid abundance caused by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) inhibition. Therefore, the ECS and RA pathway influence lipid abundance in zebrafish embryos and have an additive effect when treated simultaneously. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these pathways act downstream or independently of PPARγ to influence lipid levels. Our study shows for the first time that the RA and ECS pathways have additive function in lipid abundance during vertebrate development. PMID:26181105

  10. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I.; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M.; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L.; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A.; Bickel, Perry E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  11. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A; Bickel, Perry E

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  12. Differential Impacts of Soybean and Fish Oils on Hepatocyte Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Primary Rabbit Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Xiao, Zhihui; Xu, Yumin; Zhao, Xingli; Cheng, Ping; Cui, Ningxun; Cui, Mingling; Li, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a severe ailment associated with long-term parenteral nutrition. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsions (SOLE) are thought to promote PNALD development, whereas fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLE) are thought to protect against PNALD. This study aimed to investigate the effects of SOLE and FOLE on primary rabbit hepatocytes. The results reveal that SOLE caused significant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial damage, ultimately resulting in lipid droplets accumulation and ER stress. While these deleterious events induce hepatocyte injury, FOLE at high doses cause only minor ER and mitochondrial damage, which has no effect on hepatic function. SOLE also significantly upregulated glucose-regulated protein 94 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that SOLE, but not FOLE, damage the ER and mitochondria, resulting in lipid droplets accumulation and ER stress and, finally, hepatocyte injury. This likely contributes to the differential impacts of SOLE and FOLE on PNALD development and progression. PMID:27057162

  13. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life. PMID:27040581

  14. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  15. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Hijacks P-Body and Stress Granule Components around Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Ariumi, Yasuo; Kuroki, Misao; Kushima, Yukihiro; Osugi, Kanae; Hijikata, Makoto; Maki, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The microRNA miR-122 and DDX6/Rck/p54, a microRNA effector, have been implicated in hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that HCV-JFH1 infection disrupted processing (P)-body formation of the microRNA effectors DDX6, Lsm1, Xrn1, PATL1, and Ago2, but not the decapping enzyme DCP2, and dynamically redistributed these microRNA effectors to the HCV production factory around lipid droplets in HuH-7-derived RSc cells. Notably, HCV-JFH1 infection also redistributed the stress granule components GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain)-binding protein 1 (G3BP1), ataxin-2 (ATX2), and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1) to the HCV production factory. In this regard, we found that the P-body formation of DDX6 began to be disrupted at 36 h postinfection. Consistently, G3BP1 transiently formed stress granules at 36 h postinfection. We then observed the ringlike formation of DDX6 or G3BP1 and colocalization with HCV core after 48 h postinfection, suggesting that the disruption of P-body formation and the hijacking of P-body and stress granule components occur at a late step of HCV infection. Furthermore, HCV infection could suppress stress granule formation in response to heat shock or treatment with arsenite. Importantly, we demonstrate that the accumulation of HCV RNA was significantly suppressed in DDX6, Lsm1, ATX2, and PABP1 knockdown cells after the inoculation of HCV-JFH1, suggesting that the P-body and the stress granule components are required for the HCV life cycle. Altogether, HCV seems to hijack the P-body and the stress granule components for HCV replication. PMID:21543503

  17. Increase in cellular triacylglycerol content and emergence of large ER-associated lipid droplets in the absence of CDP-DG synthase function

    PubMed Central

    He, Yue; Yam, Candice; Pomraning, Kyle; Chin, Jacqueline S. R.; Yew, Joanne Y.; Freitag, Michael; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2014-01-01

    Excess fatty acids and sterols are stored as triacylglycerols and sterol esters in specialized cellular organelles, called lipid droplets. Understanding what determines the cellular amount of neutral lipids and their packaging into lipid droplets is of fundamental and applied interest. Using two species of fission yeast, we show that cycling cells deficient in the function of the ER-resident CDP-DG synthase Cds1 exhibit markedly increased triacylglycerol content and assemble large lipid droplets closely associated with the ER membranes. We demonstrate that these unusual structures recruit the triacylglycerol synthesis machinery and grow by expansion rather than by fusion. Our results suggest that interfering with the CDP-DG route of phosphatidic acid utilization rewires cellular metabolism to adopt a triacylglycerol-rich lifestyle reliant on the Kennedy pathway. PMID:25318672

  18. Increase in cellular triacylglycerol content and emergence of large ER-associated lipid droplets in the absence of CDP-DG synthase function.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Yam, Candice; Pomraning, Kyle; Chin, Jacqueline S R; Yew, Joanne Y; Freitag, Michael; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2014-12-15

    Excess fatty acids and sterols are stored as triacylglycerols and sterol esters in specialized cellular organelles, called lipid droplets. Understanding what determines the cellular amount of neutral lipids and their packaging into lipid droplets is of fundamental and applied interest. Using two species of fission yeast, we show that cycling cells deficient in the function of the ER-resident CDP-DG synthase Cds1 exhibit markedly increased triacylglycerol content and assemble large lipid droplets closely associated with the ER membranes. We demonstrate that these unusual structures recruit the triacylglycerol synthesis machinery and grow by expansion rather than by fusion. Our results suggest that interfering with the CDP-DG route of phosphatidic acid utilization rewires cellular metabolism to adopt a triacylglycerol-rich lifestyle reliant on the Kennedy pathway. PMID:25318672

  19. Chloroplast lipid droplet type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase is essential for prenylquinone metabolism and vitamin K1 accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Eugeni Piller, Lucia; Besagni, Céline; Ksas, Brigitte; Rumeau, Dominique; Bréhélin, Claire; Glauser, Gaétan; Kessler, Felix; Havaux, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous cellular structures in eukaryotes and are required for lipid metabolism. Little is currently known about plant lipid droplets other than oil bodies. Here, we define dual roles for chloroplast lipid droplets (plastoglobules) in energy and prenylquinone metabolism. The prenylquinones—plastoquinone, plastochromanol-8, phylloquinone (vitamin K1), and tocopherol (vitamin E)—are partly stored in plastoglobules. This work shows that NAD(P)H dehydrogenase C1 (NDC1) (At5g08740), a type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, associates with plastoglobules. NDC1 reduces a plastoquinone analog in vitro and affects the overall redox state of the total plastoquinone pool in vivo by reducing the plastoquinone reservoir of plastoglobules. Finally, NDC1 is required for normal plastochromanol-8 accumulation and is essential for vitamin K1 production. PMID:21844348

  20. Nitrogen deprivation induces lipid droplet accumulation and alters fatty acid metabolism in symbiotic dinoflagellates isolated from Aiptasia pulchella.

    PubMed

    Weng, Li-Chi; Pasaribu, Buntora; Lin, I-Ping; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2014-01-01

    The stability of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium spp.) endosymbioses depends on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. Previously, we successfully induced the production of lipid droplets in the free-living cultured Symbiodinium (clade B) under the nitrogen-deprivation condition for 5 days. Therefore, the present study aimed at understanding the disruption of the endosymbiotic relationship between the cnidarians and dinoflagellates by nitrogen deprivation using Aiptasia pulchella as an example. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the formation of lipid droplets induced by nitrogen deprivation, and the lipid analyses further showed that polyunsaturated fatty acids were drastically enriched in Symbiodinium after 30 days of nitrogen deprivation, although these were unaffected after 5 days of nitrogen starvation. The present study also suggested that the host provided nitrogen to the symbiotic cells during short-term environmental stress. However, the relationship started to deteriorate after 30 days. These findings provide a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the symbiotic relationship between the symbiotic dinoflagellates in terms of the nitrogen source, which might provide more information for the explanation of the regulatory mechanism underlying endosymbiotic associations. PMID:25047647

  1. Nitrogen Deprivation Induces Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Alters Fatty Acid Metabolism in Symbiotic Dinoflagellates Isolated from Aiptasia pulchella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Li-Chi; Pasaribu, Buntora; -Ping Lin, I.; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2014-07-01

    The stability of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium spp.) endosymbioses depends on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. Previously, we successfully induced the production of lipid droplets in the free-living cultured Symbiodinium (clade B) under the nitrogen-deprivation condition for 5 days. Therefore, the present study aimed at understanding the disruption of the endosymbiotic relationship between the cnidarians and dinoflagellates by nitrogen deprivation using Aiptasia pulchella as an example. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the formation of lipid droplets induced by nitrogen deprivation, and the lipid analyses further showed that polyunsaturated fatty acids were drastically enriched in Symbiodinium after 30 days of nitrogen deprivation, although these were unaffected after 5 days of nitrogen starvation. The present study also suggested that the host provided nitrogen to the symbiotic cells during short-term environmental stress. However, the relationship started to deteriorate after 30 days. These findings provide a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the symbiotic relationship between the symbiotic dinoflagellates in terms of the nitrogen source, which might provide more information for the explanation of the regulatory mechanism underlying endosymbiotic associations.

  2. AMP-Activated Kinase Regulates Lipid Droplet Localization and Stability of Adipose Triglyceride Lipase in C. elegans Dauer Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meng; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Animals have developed diverse mechanisms to adapt to their changing environment. Like many organisms the free-living nematode C. elegans can alternate between a reproductive mode or a diapause-like "dauer" stage during larval development to circumvent harsh environmental conditions. The master metabolic regulator AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for survival during the dauer stage, where it phosphorylates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL-1) at multiple sites to block lipid hydrolysis and ultimately protect the cellular triglyceride-based energy depot from rapid depletion. However, how the AMPK-mediated phosphorylation affects the function of ATGL-1 has not been characterised at the molecular level. Here we show that AMPK phosphorylation leads to the generation of 14-3-3 binding sites on ATGL-1, which are recognized by the C. elegans 14-3-3 protein orthologue PAR-5. Physical interaction of ATGL-1 with PAR-5 results in sequestration of ATGL-1 away from the lipid droplets and eventual proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, we also show that the major AMPK phosphorylation site on ATGL-1, Ser 303, is required for both modification of its lipid droplet localization and its degradation. Our data provide mechanistic insight as to how AMPK functions to enhance survival through its ability to protect the accumulated triglyceride deposits from rapid hydrolysis to preserve the energy stores during periods of extended environmental duress. PMID:26098762

  3. Nitrogen Deprivation Induces Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Alters Fatty Acid Metabolism in Symbiotic Dinoflagellates Isolated from Aiptasia pulchella

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Li-Chi; Pasaribu, Buntora; -Ping Lin, I.; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2014-01-01

    The stability of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium spp.) endosymbioses depends on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. Previously, we successfully induced the production of lipid droplets in the free-living cultured Symbiodinium (clade B) under the nitrogen-deprivation condition for 5 days. Therefore, the present study aimed at understanding the disruption of the endosymbiotic relationship between the cnidarians and dinoflagellates by nitrogen deprivation using Aiptasia pulchella as an example. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the formation of lipid droplets induced by nitrogen deprivation, and the lipid analyses further showed that polyunsaturated fatty acids were drastically enriched in Symbiodinium after 30 days of nitrogen deprivation, although these were unaffected after 5 days of nitrogen starvation. The present study also suggested that the host provided nitrogen to the symbiotic cells during short-term environmental stress. However, the relationship started to deteriorate after 30 days. These findings provide a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the symbiotic relationship between the symbiotic dinoflagellates in terms of the nitrogen source, which might provide more information for the explanation of the regulatory mechanism underlying endosymbiotic associations. PMID:25047647

  4. Diatom Seasonal Abundance, Assemblages and Lipid Biomarkers: Towards a More Robust Reconstruction of Diatom Paleoproductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C.; Zuniga, D.; Hefter, J.; Frójan, M.; Salgueiro, E.; Castro, C. G.; Figueiras, F.; Schefuß, E.; Mollenhauer, G.; Abrantes, F. F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Diatoms are the dominant phytoplankton class in coastal upwelling systems, accounting for a large proportion of global primary production. Their frustules preserved in sediments are powerful paleoceanographic and paleoproductivity proxies. However, despite high diatom abundance in the water column, they are frequently affected by dissolution and their sedimentary record is discontinuous. A more robust reconstruction independent of preservation characteristics in the sediments would thus be desirable. Lipid biomarkers have a specific structure that might remain intact in the sediments and may be better preserved under conditions corrosive to diatom frustules. This research aims to investigate the organic imprint of upwelling-related diatom species, which may allow the reconstruction of past primary productivity in areas where diatoms are not preserved in the sediments. To better understand the preservation and chemical signature of diatoms in the sedimentary record, we are studying diatom abundance, assemblages and lipid biomarkers in samples from the water column, sediment traps, surface sediments and diatom cultures recovered at the Iberian Margin. This study aims 1) to understand the present-day seasonal abundance and diversity of diatoms, their relation to the hydrographic conditions, along with their transfer/preservation pathways into the sediments; 2) to identify the major groups of lipid biomarkers related with upwelling diatom species in this area. Diatom abundances and assemblages observed in the water column and sediment traps evidence seasonal primary productivity. Sediment traps and surface sediment samples are dominated by Leptocylindrus spp. and Chaetoceros spp. resting spores, suggesting these genera as productivity tracers. Preliminary results of the biomarkers study show that sterols, known to be one of the major groups of biomarkers related to diatoms, occur in different composition and concentration in the analyzed diatom cultures, water column

  5. Lipid Droplets and Peroxisomes: Key Players in Cellular Lipid Homeostasis or A Matter of Fat—Store ’em Up or Burn ’em Down

    PubMed Central

    Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) and peroxisomes are central players in cellular lipid homeostasis: some of their main functions are to control the metabolic flux and availability of fatty acids (LDs and peroxisomes) as well as of sterols (LDs). Both fatty acids and sterols serve multiple functions in the cell—as membrane stabilizers affecting membrane fluidity, as crucial structural elements of membrane-forming phospholipids and sphingolipids, as protein modifiers and signaling molecules, and last but not least, as a rich carbon and energy source. In addition, peroxisomes harbor enzymes of the malic acid shunt, which is indispensable to regenerate oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis, thus allowing yeast cells to generate sugars from fatty acids or nonfermentable carbon sources. Therefore, failure of LD and peroxisome biogenesis and function are likely to lead to deregulated lipid fluxes and disrupted energy homeostasis with detrimental consequences for the cell. These pathological consequences of LD and peroxisome failure have indeed sparked great biomedical interest in understanding the biogenesis of these organelles, their functional roles in lipid homeostasis, interaction with cellular metabolism and other organelles, as well as their regulation, turnover, and inheritance. These questions are particularly burning in view of the pandemic development of lipid-associated disorders worldwide. PMID:23275493

  6. Impact of dietary fiber coatings on behavior of protein-stabilized lipid droplets under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Tokle, Tanushree; Lesmes, Uri; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2012-01-01

    Multilayer emulsions containing lipid droplets coated by lactoferrin (LF) - anionic polysaccharide layers have improved resistance to environmental stresses (such as pH, salt, and temperature), but their behavior within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is currently unknown. The objective of this research was therefore to monitor changes in the physicochemical properties and digestibility of these systems under simulated GIT conditions. Primary emulsions (5% corn oil, 0.5% LF) were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizer. Secondary emulsions (5% corn oil, 0.5% LF, 0.5% polysaccharide) were prepared by incorporating alginate, low methoxyl pectin (LMP) or high methoxyl pectin (HMP) into primary emulsions. Emulsions were then subjected to simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) conditions in sequence. LF, LF-LMP and LF-HMP emulsions were stable to droplet aggregation in the stomach but aggregated in the small intestine, whereas LF-alginate emulsions aggregated in both the stomach and small intestine. The presence of a dietary fiber coating around the initial lipid droplets had little influence on the total extent of lipid digestion in SIF, but LF-alginate emulsions had a slower initial digestion rate than the other emulsions. These results suggest that the dietary fiber coatings may become detached in the small intestine, or that they were permeable to digestive enzymes. Pepsin was found to have little influence on the physical stability or digestibility of the emulsions. The knowledge obtained from this study is important for the design of delivery systems for encapsulation and release of lipophilic bioactive ingredients. PMID:22086435

  7. Perilipin 5, a lipid droplet-associated protein, provides physical and metabolic linkage to mitochondria[S

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sreenivasan, Urmilla; Hu, Hong; Saladino, Andrew; Polster, Brian M.; Lund, Linda M.; Gong, Da-wei; Stanley, William C.; Sztalryd, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining cellular lipid homeostasis is crucial to oxidative tissues, and it becomes compromised in obesity. Lipid droplets (LD) play a central role in lipid homeostasis by mediating fatty acid (FA) storage in the form of triglyceride, thereby lowering intracellular levels of lipids that mediate cellular lipotoxicity. LDs and mitochondria have interconnected functions, and anecdotal evidence suggests they physically interact. However, the mechanisms of interaction have not been identified. Perilipins are LD-scaffolding proteins and potential candidates to play a role in their interaction with mitochondria. We examined the contribution of LD perilipin composition to the physical and metabolic interactions between LD and mitochondria using multiple techniques: confocal imaging, electron microscopy (EM), and lipid storage and utilization measurements. Using neonatal cardiomyocytes, reconstituted cell culture models, and rodent heart tissues, we found that perilipin 5 (Plin5) recruits mitochondria to the LD surface through a C-terminal region. Compared with control cells, Plin5-expressing cells show decreased LD hydrolysis, decreased palmitate β-oxidation, and increased palmitate incorporation into triglycerides in basal conditions, whereas in stimulated conditions, LD hydrolysis inhibition is lifted and FA released for β-oxidation. These results suggest that Plin5 regulates oxidative LD hydrolysis and controls local FA flux to protect mitochondria against excessive exposure to FA during physiological stress. PMID:21885430

  8. A pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-fused pyrimidine based novel fluorophore and its bioapplication to probing lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejun; Jo, Ala; Ha, Jaeyoung; Lee, Youngjun; Hwang, Yoon Soo; Park, Seung Bum

    2016-06-14

    A new fluorescent core skeleton containing pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-fused pyrimidine, called fluoremidine (FD), was discovered. FD analogues were prepared via a one-pot silver-catalyzed cascade cyclization. An N,N-dimethylamino group at the R(1)- and R(2)-positions plays important roles in controlling fluorescence brightness and emission wavelength. An N-acetyl group at the R(3) position contributes to red shifting of the emission wavelength. FD shows excellent solvatochromism with turn-on fluorescence in the lipophilic environment, which was utilized to design a fluorescent probe, FD13, for visualizing lipid droplets in living cells. PMID:27240483

  9. Negatively-charged residues in the polar carboxy-terminal region in FSP27 are indispensable for expanding lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Yoshikazu; Tateya, Sanshiro; Ijuin, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Yuki; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    FSP27 has an important role in large lipid droplet (LD) formation because it exchanges lipids at the contact site between LDs. In the present study, we clarify that the amino-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 1-130) is dispensable for LD enlargement, although it accelerates LD growth. LD expansion depends on the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 131-239). Especially, the negative charge of the acidic residues (D215, E218, E219 and E220) in the polar carboxy-terminal region (amino acids 202-239) is essential for the enlargement of LD. We propose that the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 has a crucial role in LD expansion, whereas the amino-terminal domain only has a supportive role. PMID:26921608

  10. Counterion-enhanced cyanine dye loading into lipid nano-droplets for single-particle tracking in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kilin, Vasyl N; Anton, Halina; Anton, Nicolas; Steed, Emily; Vermot, Julien; Vandamme, Thierry F; Mely, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2014-06-01

    Superior brightness of fluorescent nanoparticles places them far ahead of the classical fluorescent dyes in the field of biological imaging. However, for in vivo applications, inorganic nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, are limited due to the lack of biodegradability. Nano-emulsions encapsulating high concentrations of organic dyes are an attractive alternative, but classical fluorescent dyes are inconvenient due to their poor solubility in the oil and their tendency to form non-fluorescent aggregates. This problem was solved here for a cationic cyanine dye (DiI) by substituting its perchlorate counterion for a bulky and hydrophobic tetraphenylborate. This new dye salt, due to its exceptional oil solubility, could be loaded at 8 wt% concentration into nano-droplets of controlled size in the range 30-90 nm. Our 90 nm droplets, which contained >10,000 cyanine molecules, were >100-fold brighter than quantum dots. This extreme brightness allowed, for the first time, single-particle tracking in the blood flow of live zebrafish embryo, revealing both the slow and fast phases of the cardiac cycle. These nano-droplets showed minimal cytotoxicity in cell culture and in the zebrafish embryo. The concept of counterion-based dye loading provides a new effective route to ultra-bright lipid nanoparticles, which enables tracking single particles in live animals, a new dimension of in vivo imaging. PMID:24661553

  11. Label-Free Digital Quantification of Lipid Droplets in Single Cells by Stimulated Raman Microscopy on a Microfluidic Platform.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Zhou, Dong; Chen, Tao; Streets, Aaron M; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative characterization of a single-cell phenotype remains challenging. We combined a scalable microfluidic array of parallel cell culture chambers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to quantitatively characterize the response of lipid droplet (LD) formation to free-fatty-acid stimuli with single-LD resolution at the single-cell level. By enabling the systematic live-cell imaging with SRS microscopy in a microfluidic device, we were able to quantify the morphology of over a thousand live cells in 10 different chemical environments and with 8 replicates for each culture condition, in a single experiment, and without relying on fluorescent labeling. We developed an image processing pipeline for cell segmentation and LD morphology quantification using dual-channel SRS images. This allows us to construct distributions of the morphological parameters of LDs in the cellular population and expose the vast phenotypic heterogeneity among genetically similar cells. Specifically, this approach provides an analytical tool for quantitatively investigating LD morphology in live cells in situ. With this high-throughput, high-resolution, and label-free method, we found that LD growth dynamics showed considerable cell to cell variation. Lipid accumulation in nonadipocyte cells is mainly reflected in the increase of LD number, as opposed to an increase in their size or lipid concentration. Our method allows statistical single-cell quantification of the LD distribution for further investigation of lipid metabolism and dynamic behavior, and also extends the possibility to couple with other "omics" technologies in the future. PMID:27041129

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial interaction mediated by mitofusin-1 or mitofusin-2 is not required for lipid droplet formation or adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    McFie, Pamela J; Ambilwade, Prashant; Vu, Huyen; Stone, Scot J

    2016-09-01

    Organelles in cells physically interact with each other. Specifically, the interaction of ER and mitochondria has been shown to be important for transporting lipids between these two organelles. Lipid droplets are also closely associated with both the ER and mitochondria suggesting the interaction of ER and mitochondria may be important for triacylglycerol storage in lipid droplets. We tested the hypothesis that the efficient synthesis and storage of triacylglycerol in lipid droplets is dependent on the interaction of the ER and mitochondria using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking mitofusin-2 (Mfn2). Mfn2 is a GTPase that is present in mitochondrial-associated membranes (MAM) and is also present in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Mfn2 in MAM and mitochondria interact forming an interorganellar bridge. Cells lacking Mfn2 have loose ER-mitochondria contact. We found that mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Mfn2 have altered lipid droplet morphology. However, triacylglycerol biosynthesis was not dependent on ER-mitochondrial tethering mediated by mitofusins. Lastly, Mfn2 does not have a role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27404125

  13. Transcript Abundance of Putative Lipid Phosphate Phosphatases During Development of Trypanosoma brucei in the Tsetse Fly.

    PubMed

    Alves e Silva, Thiago Luiz; Savage, Amy F; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-04-01

    African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) cause devastating diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosomes differentiate repeatedly during development in tsetse flies before gaining mammalian infectivity in fly salivary glands. Lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) are involved in diverse biological processes, such as cell differentiation and cell migration. Gene sequences encoding two putative T. brucei LPP proteins were used to search the T. brucei genome, revealing two additional putative family members. Putative structural features and transcript abundance during parasite development in tsetse fly were characterized. Three of the four LPP proteins are predicted to have six transmembrane domains, while the fourth shows only one. Semiquantitative gene expression revealed differential regulation of LPPs during parasite development. Transcript abundance for three of the four putative LPP genes was elevated in parasites infecting salivary glands, but not mammalian-infective metacyclic cells in fly saliva, indicating a potential role of this family in parasite establishment in tsetse salivary glands. PMID:26856918

  14. Temporal variations in abundance and composition of intact polar lipids in North Sea coastal marine water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsma, J.; Hopmans, E. C.; Philippart, C. J. M.; Veldhuis, M. J. W.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2011-09-01

    Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of intact polar lipids (IPLs) in North Sea coastal marine water were assessed over a one-year seasonal cycle, and compared with environmental parameters and the microbial community composition. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was the most abundant IPL class, followed by phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diacylglyceryl-(N,N,N)-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS) in roughly equal concentrations, and smaller amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Although the total concentrations of these IPL classes varied substantially throughout the year, the composition of the IPL pool remained remarkably constant. Statistical analysis yielded negative correlations between IPL concentrations and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, but possible phosphorous limitation during the spring bloom did not result in changes in the overall planktonic IPL composition. Significant correlations between SQDG, PC, PG and DGTS concentrations and chlorophyll-a concentrations and algal abundances indicated that eukaryotic primary producers were the predominant source of IPLs at this site. However, whilst IPL concentrations in the water were closely tied to total algal abundances, the rapid succession of different algal groups blooming throughout the year did not result in major shifts in IPL composition. This shows that the most commonly occurring IPLs have limited chemotaxonomic potential, and highlights the need to use targeted assays of more specific biomarker IPLs.

  15. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Taguchi, Sadayoshi

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Long-term hypoxia decreased the size of LDs and lipid storage in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Long-term hypoxia increased basal lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased lipid-associated proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased basal glucose uptake and lipogenic proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia-mediated lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against obesity. -- Abstract: Background: A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Methods: Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O{sub 2} for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). Results: HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (p < 0.01). As estimated by glycerol release, isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly lowered by hypoxia, whereas the release of free fatty acids under the basal condition was prominently enhanced with HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Lipolysis-associated proteins, such as perilipin 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged, whereas adipose triglyceride lipase and its activator protein CGI-58 were decreased with HL in comparison to NC. Interestingly, such lipogenic proteins as fatty acid synthase, lipin-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were decreased. Furthermore, the uptake of glucose, the major precursor of 3-glycerol phosphate for triglyceride synthesis, was significantly reduced in HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: We conclude that hypoxia has a direct impact on reducing the triglyceride content and lipid droplet size via

  16. On the Formation of Lipid Droplets in Human Adipocytes: The Organization of the Perilipin–Vimentin Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heid, Hans; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Winter, Stefanie; Schumacher, Heiderose; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Franke, Werner W.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the heterogeneity and diversity of lipid droplets (LDs) in early stages of adipogenesis by elucidating the cell and molecular biology of amphiphilic and cytoskeletal proteins regulating and stabilizing the generation of LDs in human adipose cells. A plethora of distinct and differently sized LDs was detected by a brief application of adipocyte differentiation medium and additional short treatment with oleic acid. Using these cells and highly specific antibodies for LD-binding proteins of the perilipin (PLIN) family, we could distinguish between endogenously derived LDs (endogenous LDs) positive for perilipin from exogenously induced LDs (exogenous LDs) positive for adipophilin, TIP47 and S3-12. Having optimized these stimulation conditions, we used early adipogenic differentiation stages to investigate small-sized LDs and concentrated on LD-protein associations with the intermediate-sized filament (IF) vimentin. This IF protein was described earlier to surround lipid globules, showing spherical, cage-like structures. Consequently - by biochemical methods, by immunofluorescence microscopy and by electron- and immunoelectron microscopy - various stages of emerging lipid globules were revealed with perilipin as linking protein between LDs and vimentin. For this LD-PLIN-Vimentin connection, a model is now proposed, suggesting an interaction of proteins via opposed charged amino acid domains respectively. In addition, multiple sheaths of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae surrounding concentrically nascent LDs are shown. Based on our comprehensive localization studies we present and discuss a novel pathway for the LD formation. PMID:24587346

  17. The brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion via a phosphatidic acid-binding amphipathic helix

    PubMed Central

    Barneda, David; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Gaspar, Maria L; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Prasannan, Sunil; Dormann, Dirk; Han, Gil-Soo; Jesch, Stephen A; Carman, George M; Kagan, Valerian; Parker, Malcolm G; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Dixon, Ann M; Henry, Susan A; Christian, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of energy homeostasis depends on the highly regulated storage and release of triacylglycerol primarily in adipose tissue, and excessive storage is a feature of common metabolic disorders. CIDEA is a lipid droplet (LD)-protein enriched in brown adipocytes promoting the enlargement of LDs, which are dynamic, ubiquitous organelles specialized for storing neutral lipids. We demonstrate an essential role in this process for an amphipathic helix in CIDEA, which facilitates embedding in the LD phospholipid monolayer and binds phosphatidic acid (PA). LD pairs are docked by CIDEA trans-complexes through contributions of the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal dimerization region. These complexes, enriched at the LD–LD contact site, interact with the cone-shaped phospholipid PA and likely increase phospholipid barrier permeability, promoting LD fusion by transference of lipids. This physiological process is essential in adipocyte differentiation as well as serving to facilitate the tight coupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in activated brown fat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07485.001 PMID:26609809

  18. Enhancement of lycopene bioaccessibility from tomato juice using excipient emulsions: Influence of lipid droplet size.

    PubMed

    Salvia-Trujillo, L; McClements, D J

    2016-11-01

    The use of excipient emulsions to increase the bioaccessibility of lycopene in tomato juice was studied by simulating gastrointestinal conditions. The influence of droplet diameter (d=0.17 or 19μm) and thermal treatment (90°C, 10min) on lycopene bioaccessibility was evaluated. Lycopene bioaccessibility was relatively low (<8%) in the absence of excipient emulsions due to the crystalline nature of the carotenoids and their entrapment within chromoplasts. Emulsions containing small droplets were fully digested within the small intestine phase, and led to a higher bioaccessibility (12.5%) than emulsions containing large droplets (10.0%) or emulsion-free samples (7.5%). The relatively modest increase in bioaccessibility was attributed to the high level of entrapment in crystalline form. Thermal processing did not appreciably disrupt tomato cells, and therefore only led to a slight increase in lycopene bioaccessibility. Overall, this study shows that excipient emulsions may increase the bioaccessibility of carotenoids in tomato juices. PMID:27211650

  19. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA increases adipocyte lipolysis and alters lipid droplet-associated proteins: role of mTOR and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soonkyu; Brown, Jonathan Mark; Sandberg, Maria Boysen; McIntosh, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Lipid droplet-associated proteins play an important role in adipocyte triglyceride (TG) metabolism. Here, we show that trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), but not cis-9,trans-11 CLA, increased lipolysis and altered human adipocyte lipid droplet morphology. Before this change in morphology, there was a rapid trans-10,cis-12 CLA-induced increase in the accumulation of perilipin A in the cytosol, followed by the disappearance of perilipin A protein. In contrast, protein levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) were increased in cultures treated with trans-10,cis-12 CLA. Immunostaining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of small lipid droplets, displacing perilipin. Intriguingly, trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased ADRP protein expression to a much greater extent than ADRP mRNA without affecting stability, suggesting translational control of ADRP. To this end, we found that trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase/S6 ribosomal protein (mTOR/p70S6K/S6) pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the trans-10,cis-12 CLA-mediated reduction of human adipocyte TG content is associated with the differential localization and expression of lipid droplet-associated proteins. This process involves both the translational control of ADRP through the activation of mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling and transcriptional control of perilipin A. PMID:15716587

  20. Autophagy-like processes are involved in lipid droplet degradation in Auxenochlorella protothecoides during the heterotrophy-autotrophy transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that recycles cytoplasmic components in eukaryotes. Although intensively studied in yeast, plants, and mammals, autophagy in microalgae is not well understood. Auxenochlorella protothecoides is a green microalga that has the ability to grow either autotrophically when under light or heterotrophically when in media containing glucose. The two growth modes are inter-convertible and transition between them is accompanied by drastic changes in morphology and cellular composition; however, the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown. In this study, we identified autophagy-related genes and characterized their roles in the degradation of lipid droplets during the heterotrophy-to-autotrophy (HA) transition in A. protothecoides. Most of the proteins constituting the eukaryotic “core machinery” were conserved in A. protothecoides. Two proteins, Atg4 and Atg8, were further investigated. A. protothecoides ATG4 was cloned from a cDNA library and expressed within yeast, and was able to functionally restore the autophagy pathway in atg4Δ yeast during nitrogen starvation. Furthermore, Atg8, which displayed high sequence identity with its yeast homolog, was able to conjugate to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in vitro and was recruited to the phagophore assembly site in yeast. We also identified a C-terminal glycine residue, G118, that was the cleavage site for Atg4. Finally, we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy to reveal that autophagic-like vacuoles were detectable in algal cells during the HA transition. Our data suggested that the lipid droplets in heterotrophic cells were engulfed directly by the autophagic-like vacuole instead of via autophagosomes. PMID:25177326

  1. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species. PMID:25645620

  2. [Deposition of exogenous and endogenously generated unsaturated fatty acids in lipid droplets triacylglycerol as a mechanism of its sequestration in epithelial cells].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, E V; Fok, E M; Bakhteeva, V T; Lavrova, E A; Parnova, R G

    2014-08-01

    Neutral lipids are deposited in intracellular compartments called lipid droplets, which are known to be critically implicated in regulation of cellular lipid metabolism. These organelles consist of a core of neutral lipids, mainly triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesteryl esters, surrounded by phospholipid monolayer. Using Nile red lipid staining and [3H]-arachidonic and [3H]-oleic acids as precursors for lipid biosynthesis, we have evaluated the mechanisms of lipid body induction elicited by exogenous fatty acids within primary cultured epithelial cells from the frog urinary bladder. It was found that arachidonic and oleic acids at concentrations 10-50 tM stimulated lipid droplets formation accompanied by accumulation of TAG and by the significant increase of incorporation of fatty acids into TAG indicating an enhanced TAG biosynthesis. No changes of cholesteryl esters content were observed under these conditions. In cells, prelabelled with [3H]-oleic acids, etomoxir, an inhibitor of O-carnitine palmitroyltansferase 1, decreased oxidation of oleic acid and increased its incorporation into TAG leading to intracellular TAG accumulation. In cells, prelabelled with [3H]-arachidonic acid, diclofenac, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2, led to significant decrease in cellular PGE2 production and to reesterification of free arachidonic acid to TAG but not to phospholipids. Taking together, these data evidence that in isolated frog urinary bladder epithelial cells, reacylation of unsaturated free fatty acids into TAG is a main route of their metabolic conversion under the conditions of the increased cytosolic level of free fatty acids. PMID:25682688

  3. Transient Hepatic Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Induces Free Cholesterol and Lipid Droplet Formation.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Sonja M; Laggai, Stephan; Van Wonterg, Elien; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Ogris, Manfred; Libert, Claude; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of an Igf2 plasmid used for transient Igf2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in Igf2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in Igf2-livers while no signs of inflammation were observed. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography, and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD) size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in Igf2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, Hmgcr/HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBF1 and its target genes. SREBF1 was induced and also SREBF1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic IGF2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27199763

  4. Transient Hepatic Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Induces Free Cholesterol and Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sonja M.; Laggai, Stephan; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Ogris, Manfred; Libert, Claude; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of an Igf2 plasmid used for transient Igf2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in Igf2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in Igf2-livers while no signs of inflammation were observed. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography, and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD) size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in Igf2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, Hmgcr/HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBF1 and its target genes. SREBF1 was induced and also SREBF1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic IGF2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27199763

  5. Trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) interferes with lipid droplet accumulation during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Azadeh; Taylor, Carla G; Tworek, Leslee; Poole, Jenna; Zahradka, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we hypothesize that the biologically active isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), cis-9,trans-11 (c9,t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12) CLA, have different effects on early and late stages 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. Both c9-t11 and t10-c12CLA stimulated early stage pre-adipocyte differentiation (day 2), while t10-c12CLA inhibited late differentiation (day 8) as determined by lipid droplet numbers and both perilipin-1 levels and phosphorylation state. At day 8, the adipokines adiponectin, chemerin and adipsin were all reduced in t10-c12CLA treated cells versus control cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed perilipin-1 was present solely on lipid droplets on day 8 in t10-c12 treated 3T3-L1 cells, whereas preilipin-1 was also located in the perinuclear region in control and c9-t11 treated cells. The t10-c12CLA isomer also decreased levels of hormone-sensitive lipase and inhibited lipolysis. These findings indicate that the decrease in lipid droplets caused by t10-c12CLA is the result of an inhibition of lipid droplet production during adipogenesis rather than a stimulation of lipolysis. Additionally, treatment with Gö6976 blocked the effect of t10-c12CLA on perilipin-1 phosphorylation, implicating PKCα in perilipin-1 phosphorylation, and thus a regulator of triglyceride catabolism. These data are supported by evidence that t10-c12CLA activated PKCα. These are the first data to show that CLA isomers can affect lipid droplet dynamics in adipocytes through PKCα. PMID:27131602

  6. Fast clearance of lipid droplets through MAP1S-activated autophagy suppresses clear cell renal cell carcinomas and promotes patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-De; Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Xun; He, Yongzhong; Jiang, Xianhan; Huang, Hai; Chen, Qi; Jonasch, Eric; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is composed of cells whose cytoplasm filled with lipid droplets, subcellular organelles coated with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADFP) for the storage of triacylglycerol converted from excess free fatty acids. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles such as lipid droplets. MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and promoted the survival of patients with prostate adenocarcinomas by increasing the degradation of aggregated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells causes an impairment of autophagic clearance of lipid droplets. In contrast, an overexpression of MAP1S causes an activation of autophagy flux and a reduction of lipid droplets so less DNA double strand breakage is induced. The levels of MAP1S in normal renal cells are dramatically higher than those in the ccRCC tissues and cell lines derived from renal cell carcinomas. High levels of MAP1S are associated with a reduced malignancy and metastasis of ccRCC and predict a better survival of ccRCC patients. Therefore, autophagy defects in the degradation of lipid droplets triggered by the MAP1S deficiency may enhance the initiation and development of ccRCC and reduce the survival of ccRCC patients. PMID:26701856

  7. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals. PMID:23979461

  8. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  9. The Perilipin Homologue, Lipid Storage Droplet 2, Regulates Sleep Homeostasis and Prevents Learning Impairments Following Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Suzuki, Yasuko; Seugnet, Laurent; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Extended periods of waking result in physiological impairments in humans, rats, and flies. Sleep homeostasis, the increase in sleep observed following sleep loss, is believed to counter the negative effects of prolonged waking by restoring vital biological processes that are degraded during sleep deprivation. Sleep homeostasis, as with other behaviors, is influenced by both genes and environment. We report here that during periods of starvation, flies remain spontaneously awake but, in contrast to sleep deprivation, do not accrue any of the negative consequences of prolonged waking. Specifically, the homeostatic response and learning impairments that are a characteristic of sleep loss are not observed following prolonged waking induced by starvation. Recently, two genes, brummer (bmm) and Lipid storage droplet 2 (Lsd2), have been shown to modulate the response to starvation. bmm mutants have excess fat and are resistant to starvation, whereas Lsd2 mutants are lean and sensitive to starvation. Thus, we hypothesized that bmm and Lsd2 may play a role in sleep regulation. Indeed, bmm mutant flies display a large homeostatic response following sleep deprivation. In contrast, Lsd2 mutant flies, which phenocopy aspects of starvation as measured by low triglyceride stores, do not exhibit a homeostatic response following sleep loss. Importantly, Lsd2 mutant flies are not learning impaired after sleep deprivation. These results provide the first genetic evidence, to our knowledge, that lipid metabolism plays an important role in regulating the homeostatic response and can protect against neuronal impairments induced by prolonged waking. PMID:20824166

  10. Turnover of the actomyosin complex in zebrafish embryos directs geometric remodelling and the recruitment of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Asmita; Kumar Sinha, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs), reservoirs of cholesterols and fats, are organelles that hydrolyse lipids in the cell. In zebrafish embryos, the actomyosin complex and filamentous microtubules control the periodic regulation of the LD geometry. Contrary to the existing hypothesis that LD transport involves the kinesin-microtubule system, we find that their recruitment to the blastodisc depends on the actomyosin turnover and is independent of the microtubules. For the first time we report the existence of two distinct states of LDs, an inactive and an active state, that occur periodically, coupled weakly to the cleavage cycles. LDs are bigger, more circular and more stable in the inactive state in which the geometry of the LDs is maintained by actomyosin as well as microtubules. The active state has smaller and irregularly shaped LDs that show shape fluctuations that are linked to actin depolymerization. Because most functions of LDs employ surface interactions, our findings on the LD geometry and its regulation bring new insights to the mechanisms associated with specific functions of LDs, such as their storage capacity for fats or proteins, lipolysis etc. PMID:26355567

  11. Enhancing Alkane Production in Cyanobacterial Lipid Droplets: A ModeFl Platform for Industrially Relevant Compound Production

    PubMed Central

    Peramuna, Anantha; Morton, Ray; Summers, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial lipid droplets (LDs) are packed with hydrophobic energy-dense compounds and have great potential for biotechnological expression and the compartmentalization of high value compounds. Nostoc punctiforme normally accumulates LDs containing neutral lipids, and small amounts of heptadecane, during the stationary phase of growth. In this study, we further enhanced heptadecane production in N. punctiforme by introducing extrachromosomal copies of aar/adc genes, and report the discovery of a putative novel lipase encoded by Npun_F5141, which further enhanced alkane production. Extra copies of all three genes in high light conditions resulted in a 16-fold higher accumulation of heptadecane compared to the wild type strain in the exponential phase. LD accumulation during exponential phase also increased massively to accommodate the heptadecane production. A large number of small, less fluorescent LDs were observed at the cell periphery in exponential growth phase, whereas fewer number of highly fluorescent, much larger LDs were localized towards the center of the cell in the stationary phase. These advances demonstrate that cyanobacterial LDs are an ideal model platform to make industrially relevant compounds, such as alkanes, during exponential growth, and provide insight into LD formation in cyanobacteria. PMID:25821934

  12. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  13. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  14. Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Contributes to Triacylglycerol Biosynthesis, Lipid Droplet Formation, and Host Invasion in Metarhizium robertsii

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis have been well studied in the model organisms of yeasts and animals. Among these, the isoforms of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) redundantly catalyze the first and rate-limiting step in glycerolipid synthesis. Here, we report the functions of mrGAT, a GPAT ortholog, in an insect-pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii. Unlike in yeasts and animals, a single copy of the mrGAT gene is present in the fungal genome and the gene deletion mutant is viable. Compared to the wild type and the gene-rescued mutant, the ΔmrGAT mutant demonstrated reduced abilities to produce conidia and synthesize TAG, glycerol, and total lipids. More importantly, we found that mrGAT is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and directly linked to the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in fungal cells. Insect bioassay results showed that mrGAT is required for full fungal virulence by aiding fungal penetration of host cuticles. Data from this study not only advance our understanding of GPAT functions in fungi but also suggest that filamentous fungi such as M. robertsii can serve as a good model to elucidate the role of the glycerol phosphate pathway in fungal physiology, particularly to determine the mechanistic connection of GPAT to LD formation. PMID:24077712

  15. Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins regulate perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 lipid-droplet-associated proteins in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Varela, Lourdes M; López, Sergio; Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Horst; Muriana, Francisco J G; Abia, Rocío

    2015-04-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages contributes to atherosclerosis. Within macrophages, lipids are stored in lipid droplets (LDs); perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 are the main LD-associated proteins. Postprandial triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins induce LD accumulation in macrophages. The role of postprandial lipoproteins in perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 regulation was studied. TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) induced the levels of intracellular TGs, LDs and perilipin-2 protein expression in THP-1 macrophages and in Apoe(-/-) mice bone-marrow-derived macrophages with low and high basal levels of TGs. Perilipin-3 was only synthesized in mice macrophages with low basal levels of TGs. The regulation was dependent on the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) more strongly attenuated these effects compared with saturated fatty acids. In THP-1 macrophages, immunofluorescence microscopy and freeze-fracture immunogold labeling indicated that the lipoproteins translocated perilipin-3 from the cytoplasm to the LD surface; only the lipoproteins that were rich in PUFAs suppressed this effect. Chemical inhibition showed that lipoproteins induced perilipin-2 protein expression through the peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor (PPAR) PPARα and PPARγ pathways. Overall, our data indicate that postprandial TRLs may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation through the regulation of perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 proteins in macrophages. Because the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins is dependent on the type of fat consumed, the ingestion of olive oil, which is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, and fish oil, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, can be considered a good nutritional strategy to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by LD-associated proteins decrease. PMID:25595097

  16. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. PMID:27208281

  17. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. PMID:27208281

  18. The proteome of cytosolic lipid droplets isolated from differentiated Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes reveals cell-specific characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bouchoux, Julien; Beilstein, Frauke; Pauquai, Thomas; Guerrera, I. Chiara; Chateau, Danielle; Ly, Nathalie; Alqub, Malik; Klein, Christophe; Chambaz, Jean; Rousset, Monique; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Morel, Etienne; Demignot, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Background information. Intestinal absorption of alimentary lipids is a complex process ensured by enterocytes and leading to TRL [TAG (triacylglycerol)-rich lipoprotein] assembly and secretion. The accumulation of circulating intestine-derived TRL is associated with atherosclerosis, stressing the importance of the control of postprandial hypertriglyceridaemia. During the postprandial period, TAGs are also transiently stored as CLDs (cytosolic lipid droplets) in enterocytes. As a first step for determining whether CLDs could play a role in the control of enterocyte TRL secretion, we analysed the protein endowment of CLDs isolated by sucrose-gradient centrifugation from differentiated Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes, the only human model able to secrete TRL in culture and to store transiently TAGs as CLDs when supplied with lipids. Cells were analysed after a 24 h incubation with lipid micelles and thus in a state of CLD-associated TAG mobilization. Results. Among the 105 proteins identified in the CLD fraction by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem MS), 27 were directly involved in lipid metabolism pathways potentially relevant to enterocyte-specific functions. The transient feature of CLDs was consistent with the presence of proteins necessary for fatty acid activation (acyl-CoA synthetases) and for TAG hydrolysis. In differentiated Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes, we identified for the first time LPCAT2 (lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2), involved in PC (phosphatidylcholine) synthesis, and 3BHS1 (3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1), involved in steroid metabolism, and confirmed their partial CLD localization by immunofluorescence. In enterocytes, LPCAT2 may provide an economical source of PC, necessary for membrane synthesis and lipoprotein assembly, from the lysoPC present in the intestinal lumen. We also identified proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism, such as ApoA-IV (apolipoprotein A-IV), which is specifically expressed by enterocytes and has

  19. Regulation of lipid droplet-associated proteins following growth hormone administration and feed restriction in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Faylon, M P; Koltes, D E; Spurlock, D M

    2014-05-01

    Lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in the adaptation of dairy cows to periods of energy insufficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine if lipolytic proteins are consistently regulated when energy mobilization is stimulated by different factors. We evaluated 2 models of altered energy balance in mid-lactation Holstein cows, including feed restriction (FR) and administration of bovine growth hormone (GH), by quantifying the abundance and (or) phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin (PLIN), and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). For GH administration, adipose tissue and blood samples were collected 4d before and 3 and 7d after administration of GH (n=20 cows). Similarly, adipose and blood samples were obtained 6d before and 1 and 4d after initiation of FR (n=18 cows). Estimated net energy balance decreased and nonesterified fatty acid concentration increased in both experimental models. Decreased ATGL and PLIN protein abundance was observed with GH administration and FR. Additionally, the abundance of phosphorylated HSLSer565 decreased in both models. Decreased abundance of phosphorylated PLIN was observed with GH administration, but not FR. Decreased ATGL protein abundance appears to be a consistent response to energy insufficiency in lactating cows, as this response was also described with negative energy balance at the onset of lactation. In contrast, the abundance of PLIN protein and phosphorylation of HSL using antibodies targeting serine residue 565 of HSL (HSLSer565) were altered in the current research, but not at the onset of lactation. Our findings demonstrate that lipolysis is altered through the regulation of multiple proteins, and that this regulation differs according to physiological state in lactating cows. PMID:24630665

  20. Differential Roles of Cell Death-inducing DNA Fragmentation Factor-α-like Effector (CIDE) Proteins in Promoting Lipid Droplet Fusion and Growth in Subpopulations of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenyi; Wu, Lizhen; Yu, Miao; Chen, Feng-Jung; Arshad, Muhammad; Xia, Xiayu; Ren, Hao; Yu, Jinhai; Xu, Li; Xu, Dijin; Li, John Zhong; Li, Peng; Zhou, Linkang

    2016-02-26

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic subcellular organelles whose growth is closely linked to obesity and hepatic steatosis. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector (CIDE) proteins, including Cidea, Cideb, and Cidec (also called Fsp27), play important roles in lipid metabolism. Cidea and Cidec are LD-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes. Here, we find that CIDE proteins are all localized to LD-LD contact sites (LDCSs) and promote lipid transfer, LD fusion, and growth in hepatocytes. We have identified two types of hepatocytes, one with small LDs (small LD-containing hepatocytes, SLHs) and one with large LDs (large LD-containing hepatocytes, LLHs) in the liver. Cideb is localized to LDCSs and promotes lipid exchange and LD fusion in both SLHs and LLHs, whereas Cidea and Cidec are specifically localized to the LDCSs and promote lipid exchange and LD fusion in LLHs. Cideb-deficient SLHs have reduced LD sizes and lower lipid exchange activities. Fasting dramatically induces the expression of Cidea/Cidec and increases the percentage of LLHs in the liver. The majority of the hepatocytes from the liver of obese mice are Cidea/Cidec-positive LLHs. Knocking down Cidea or Cidec significantly reduced lipid storage in the livers of obese animals. Our data reveal that CIDE proteins play differential roles in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage; Cideb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions, whereas Cidea and Cidec are responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions. PMID:26733203

  1. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in adipose triglyceride lipase as a regulator of lipid droplet localization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xitao; Langlais, Paul; Zhang, Xiaodong; Heckmann, Bradlee L; Saarinen, Alicia M; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Liu, Jun

    2014-06-15

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme for triacylglycerol (TG) hydrolysis, has long been known to be a phosphoprotein. However, the potential phosphorylation events that are involved in the regulation of ATGL function remain incompletely defined. Here, using a combinatorial proteomics approach, we obtained evidence that at least eight different sites of ATGL can be phosphorylated in adipocytes. Among them, Thr³⁷² resides within the hydrophobic region known to mediate lipid droplet (LD) targeting. Although it had no impact on the TG hydrolase activity, substitution of phosphorylation-mimic Asp for Thr³⁷² eliminated LD localization and LD-degrading capacity of ATGL expressed in HeLa cells. In contrast, mutation of Thr³⁷² to Ala gave a protein that bound LDs and functioned the same as the wild-type protein. In nonstimulated adipocytes, the Asp mutation led to decreased LD association and basal lipolytic activity of ATGL, whereas the Ala mutation produced opposite effects. Moreover, the LD translocation of ATGL upon β-adrenergic stimulation was also compromised by the Asp mutation. In accord with these findings, the Ala mutation promoted and the Asp mutation attenuated the capacity of ATGL to mediate lipolysis in adipocytes under both basal and stimulated conditions. Collectively, these studies identified Thr³⁷² as a novel phosphorylation site that may play a critical role in determining subcellular distribution as well as lipolytic action of ATGL. PMID:24801391

  2. Adenovirus RIDα uncovers a novel pathway requiring ORP1L for lipid droplet formation independent of NPC1

    PubMed Central

    Cianciola, Nicholas L.; Greene, Diane J.; Morton, Richard E.; Carlin, Cathleen R.

    2013-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease type C (NPC) is caused by mutations in NPC1 or NPC2, which coordinate egress of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol from late endosomes. We previously reported that the adenovirus-encoded protein RIDα rescues the cholesterol storage phenotype in NPC1-mutant fibroblasts. We show here that RIDα reconstitutes deficient endosome-to-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transport, allowing excess LDL-cholesterol to be esterified by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase and stored in lipid droplets (LDs) in NPC1-deficient cells. Furthermore, the RIDα pathway is regulated by the oxysterol-binding protein ORP1L. Studies have classified ORP1L as a sterol sensor involved in LE positioning downstream of GTP-Rab7. Our data, however, suggest that ORP1L may play a role in transport of LDL-cholesterol to a specific ER pool designated for LD formation. In contrast to NPC1, which is dispensable, the RIDα/ORP1L-dependent route requires functional NPC2. Although NPC1/NPC2 constitutes the major pathway, therapies that amplify minor egress routes for LDL-cholesterol could significantly improve clinical management of patients with loss-of-function NPC1 mutations. The molecular identity of putative alternative pathways, however, is poorly characterized. We propose RIDα as a model system for understanding physiological egress routes that use ORP1L to activate ER feedback responses involved in LD formation. PMID:24025716

  3. Mechanism of hormone-stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes: translocation of hormone-sensitive lipase to the lipid storage droplet.

    PubMed

    Egan, J J; Greenberg, A S; Chang, M K; Wek, S A; Moos, M C; Londos, C

    1992-09-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase activity (HSL), which is found in the supernatant of centrifuged homogenates of lipolytically quiet isolated rat adipocytes, was greatly reduced in or absent from the supernatant of lipolytically stimulated cells. The lipase was purified 100- to 250-fold from the supernatant of lipolytically quiet cells to 10-20% purity by a single passage over phenyl-Sepharose resin with high (greater than 70%) activity yields. Western blotting of adipocyte homogenate fractions with polyclonal antiserum raised against HSL showed that the enzyme shifted quantitatively from the supernatant of control cells to the floating "fat cake" of lipolytically stimulated cells. A similar shift to the fat cake was observed when cells were disrupted by hypotonic lysis and centrifugation rather than by homogenization. We propose that upon lipolytic activation of adipocytes and phosphorylation of HSL by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the critical event is not an increase in catalytic activity (i.e., turnover number) but a translocation of the lipase to its substrate at the surface of the lipid storage droplet. PMID:1528859

  4. Septin 9 induces lipid droplets growth by a phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate and microtubule-dependent mechanism hijacked by HCV

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Abdellah; Peng, Juan; Omrane, Mohyeddine; Gondeau, Claire; Desterke, Christophe; Marin, Mickaël; Tronchère, Hélène; Taveneau, Cyntia; Sar, Sokhavuth; Briolotti, Philippe; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Maurel, Patrick; Thiers, Valérie; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Samuel, Didier; Bréchot, Christian; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) is frequently observed in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and represents an important risk factor for the development of liver steatosis and cirrhosis. The mechanisms of LD biogenesis and growth remain open questions. Here, transcriptome analysis reveals a significant upregulation of septin 9 in HCV-induced cirrhosis compared with the normal liver. HCV infection increases septin 9 expression and induces its assembly into filaments. Septin 9 regulates LD growth and perinuclear accumulation in a manner dependent on dynamic microtubules. The effects of septin 9 on LDs are also dependent on binding to PtdIns5P, which, in turn, controls the formation of septin 9 filaments and its interaction with microtubules. This previously undescribed cooperation between PtdIns5P and septin 9 regulates oleate-induced accumulation of LDs. Overall, our data offer a novel route for LD growth through the involvement of a septin 9/PtdIns5P signalling pathway. PMID:27417143

  5. Septin 9 induces lipid droplets growth by a phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate and microtubule-dependent mechanism hijacked by HCV.

    PubMed

    Akil, Abdellah; Peng, Juan; Omrane, Mohyeddine; Gondeau, Claire; Desterke, Christophe; Marin, Mickaël; Tronchère, Hélène; Taveneau, Cyntia; Sar, Sokhavuth; Briolotti, Philippe; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Maurel, Patrick; Thiers, Valérie; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Samuel, Didier; Bréchot, Christian; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) is frequently observed in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and represents an important risk factor for the development of liver steatosis and cirrhosis. The mechanisms of LD biogenesis and growth remain open questions. Here, transcriptome analysis reveals a significant upregulation of septin 9 in HCV-induced cirrhosis compared with the normal liver. HCV infection increases septin 9 expression and induces its assembly into filaments. Septin 9 regulates LD growth and perinuclear accumulation in a manner dependent on dynamic microtubules. The effects of septin 9 on LDs are also dependent on binding to PtdIns5P, which, in turn, controls the formation of septin 9 filaments and its interaction with microtubules. This previously undescribed cooperation between PtdIns5P and septin 9 regulates oleate-induced accumulation of LDs. Overall, our data offer a novel route for LD growth through the involvement of a septin 9/PtdIns5P signalling pathway. PMID:27417143

  6. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase requires two steps, protein phosphorylation and binding to the PAT-1 domain of lipid droplet coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hu, Liping; Dalen, Knut; Dorward, Heidi; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Russell, Deanna; Gong, Dawei; Londos, Constantine; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Holm, Cecilia; Rizzo, Mark A; Brasaemle, Dawn; Sztalryd, Carole

    2009-11-13

    Lipolysis is an important metabolic pathway controlling energy homeostasis through degradation of triglycerides stored in lipid droplets and release of fatty acids. Lipid droplets of mammalian cells are coated with one or more members of the PAT protein family, which serve important functions in regulating lipolysis. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms by which PAT family members, perilipin A, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP), and LSDP5, control lipolysis catalyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a major lipase in adipocytes and several non-adipose cells. We applied fluorescence microscopic tools to analyze proteins in situ in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and anisotropy Forster resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data show that ADFP and LSDP5 exchange between lipid droplet and cytoplasmic pools, whereas perilipin A does not. Differences in protein mobility do not correlate with PAT protein-mediated control of lipolysis catalyzed by HSL or endogenous lipases. Forster resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that each of the three PAT proteins bind HSL through interaction of the lipase with amino acids within the highly conserved amino-terminal PAT-1 domain. ADFP and LSDP5 bind HSL under basal conditions, whereas phosphorylation of serine residues within three amino-terminal protein kinase A consensus sequences of perilipin A is required for HSL binding and maximal lipolysis. Finally, protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL increases lipolysis in cells expressing ADFP or LSDP5; in contrast, phosphorylation of perilipin A exerts the major control over HSL-mediated lipolysis when perilipin is the main lipid droplet protein. PMID:19717842

  7. Lipid droplet proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p, and Rrt8p, are implicated in membrane protein transport associated with ergosterol.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuma; Nagano, Makoto; Shimizu, Shigeki; Toshima, Junko Y; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-07-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles, enclosed in a monolayer of phospholipid, which store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol and sterol esters. Previous studies have revealed that LDs contain many proteins with various functions required for lipid metabolism and vesicular trafficking. Among them, Lds (Lipid Droplet in Sporulation) proteins, Lds1p and Lds2p, are reportedly induced and localized to LDs during yeast sporulation, but their cellular function has not been clarified. Here we show that the Lds proteins, Lds1p, Lds2p and Rrt8p, are expressed and localized at LDs in vegetative cells, being required for proper localization of plasma membrane proteins. We found that deletion of Lds genes led to mis-sorting of Wsc1p, a cell wall stress sensor, from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. We also demonstrated that lack of these proteins partially suppressed the growth defect and mis-sorting of the high-affinity tryptophan transporter Tat2p, induced by impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis. Furthermore, we identified Sec39p/Dsl3p, a component of the DSL1 tethering complex that mediates the interaction with COPI vesicles, as a binding partner for Lds2p. These results suggest a possible role of Lds proteins in maintenance of membrane lipid homeostasis and accompanying membrane protein transport. PMID:27216456

  8. Direct binding of triglyceride to fat storage-inducing transmembrane proteins 1 and 2 is important for lipid droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Gross, David A; Zhan, Chenyang; Silver, David L

    2011-12-01

    The process of lipid droplet (LD) formation is an evolutionarily conserved process among all eukaryotes and plays an important role in both cellular physiology and disease. Recently, fat storage-inducing transmembrane proteins 1 and 2 (FIT1/FITM1 and FIT2/FITM2) were discovered as an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins involved in fat storage. In mammals, FIT1 is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and FIT2 is expressed primarily in adipose, raising the possibility that FIT1 and FIT2 have unique functions. These proteins are exclusively localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mediate triglyceride-rich LD accumulation when overexpressed in cells, mouse liver, or muscle. Unlike the ER-resident diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase family of triglyceride-synthesizing enzymes, FITs do not synthesize triglyceride, but rather partition triglyceride into LDs. The mechanism by which FIT proteins mediate this process has not been determined. A simple hypothesis was tested that FIT proteins bind to triglyceride to mediate LD formation. Here, it is shown that FIT proteins purified in detergent micelles directly bind triolein with specificity and saturation-binding kinetics. A FIT2 gain-of-function mutant that formed larger LDs, FLL(157-9)AAA, showed increased binding to triolein relative to wild-type FIT2, whereas FIT1 and a FIT2 partial loss-of-function mutant, N80A, had significantly lower triolein binding and produced smaller LDs. In summary, FIT proteins are transmembrane domain-containing proteins shown to bind triglyceride. These findings indicate that FITs have a unique biochemical mechanism in mediating LD formation and implicates triglyceride binding as important for FIT-mediated LD formation. PMID:22106267

  9. Distribution of vitamin A-storing lipid droplets in hepatic stellate cells in liver lobules--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Nobuyo; Senoo, Haruki

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the storage mechanisms of vitamin A, we examined the liver of adult polar bears and arctic foxes, which physiologically store a large amount of vitamin A, by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) morphometry, gold chloride staining, fluorescence microscopy for the detection of autofluorescence of vitamin A, staining with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome, and Ishii and Ishii's silver impregnation. HPLC revealed that the polar bears and arctic foxes contained 1.8-1.9 x 10(4) nmol total retinol (retinol plus retinyl esters) per gram liver. In the arctic foxes, the composition of the retinyl esters was found to be 51.1% palmitate, 26.6% oleate, 15.4% stearate, and 7% linoleate. The hepatic stellate cells of the arctic animals were demonstrated by TEM to contain the bulk of the vitamin A-lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The liver lobules of the arctic animals showed a zonal gradient in the storage of vitamin A. The gradient was expressed as a symmetric crescendo-decrescendo profile starting at the periportal zone, peaking at the middle zone, and sloping down toward the central zone in the liver lobule. The density (i.e., cell number per area) of hepatic stellate cells was essentially the same among the zones. The gradient and the composition of the retinyl esters in storing vitamin A were not changed by differences in the vitamin A amount in the livers. These results indicate that the heterogeneity of vitamin A-storage capacity in hepatic stellate cells of arctic foxes and polar bears is genetically determined. PMID:12552640

  10. Lipid droplet binding thalidomide analogs activate endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppress hepatocellular carcinoma in a chemically induced transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent and aggressive primary tumor of the liver and it has limited treatment options. Results In this study, we report the in vitro and in vivo effects of two novel amino-trifluoro-phtalimide analogs, Ac-915 and Ac-2010. Both compounds bind lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and interact with several proteins with chaperone functions (HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and protein disulfide isomerase) as determined by affinity chromatography and resonant waveguide optical biosensor technology. Both compounds inhibited protein disulfide isomerase activity and induced cell death of different HCC cells at sub or low micromolar ranges detected by classical biochemical end-point assay as well as with real-time label-free measurements. Besides cell proliferation inhibiton, analogs also inhibited cell migration even at 250 nM. Relative biodistribution of the analogs was analysed in native tissue sections of different organs after administration of drugs, and by using fluorescent confocal microscopy based on the inherent blue fluorescence of the compounds. The analogs mainly accumulated in the liver. The effects of Ac-915 and Ac-2010 were also demonstrated on the advanced stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Significantly less tumor development was found in the livers of the Ac-915- or Ac-2010-treated groups compared with control mice, characterized by less liver tumor incidence, fewer tumors and smaller tumor size. Conclusion These results imply that these amino-trifluoro-phthalimide analogs could serve potent clinical candidates against HCC alone or in combination with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:24268070

  11. Characterization of lipid droplets in steroidogenic MLTC-1 Leydig cells: Protein profiles and the morphological change induced by hormone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Fujikawa, Noriyuki; Nimura, Satomi; Tokuoka, Yutaro; Tsuda, Sonoka; Aiuchi, Toshihiro; Kato, Rina; Obama, Takashi; Itabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are functional subcellular organelles involved in multiple intracellular processes. LDs are found in nearly all types of eukaryotic cells, but their properties are highly variable in different types of tissues. Steroidogenic cells synthesize steroid hormones de novo from the cholesterol deposited in cytosolic LDs. However, the roles of LD proteins in steroidogenesis under pituitary hormone stimulation have not been well elucidated. The protein profile of isolated LDs from the mouse Leydig tumor cell line MLTC-1 was distinct from that of hepatic cells or macrophages. By proteomic analysis of the components using mass spectrometry, two enzymes for steroidogenesis, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1) and 17 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 11 (17βHSD11), were identified in two strong bands in the LD fractions. The LD fraction of MLTC-1 cells also included CYP11A1 and CYP17, suggesting that the LDs contain all the enzymes needed for testosterone synthesis. The steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is activated by luteinizing hormone through a PKA-dependent pathway. Stimulation of MLTC-1 cells with luteinizing hormone or 8-bromo-cAMP caused drastic changes in the morphology of the LDs in the MLTC-1 cells. Upon stimulation, large perinuclear LDs are turned into much smaller LDs and dispersed throughout the cytosol. These results raise the possibility that LDs are involved in a regulatory pathway of steroidogenesis, not just by serving as a storage depot for cholesterol esters, but also by providing enzymes and generating sites for enzymatic activity. PMID:26143378

  12. Cloning, structural characterization and expression analysis of a novel lipid storage droplet protein-1 (LSD-1) gene in Chinese honeybee (Apis cerana cerana).

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Gong, Zhihong; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-03-01

    Lipid storage droplet 1 (LSD-1), a PAT family protein located around lipid droplets in insects, is intimately linked to lipid droplets formation and lipid metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and rosiglitazone (Rosi) have previously been shown to modulate the expression of several PAT family proteins through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). In the present study, we isolated and characterized a novel LSD-1 gene, referred to AccLSD-1, from Chinese honeybee (Apis cerana cerana). Sequence analysis indicated that the central region of LSD-1 protein had significant sequence similarity and a typical LSD-1 gene was composed of 8 exons and 7 introns. Interestingly, the first intron of AccLSD-1 including several PPARγ-response elements (PPREs) was located in 5' UTR. Analysis of 5'-flanking region of AccLSD-1 revealed a number of putative cis-acting elements, including three PPREs. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccLSD-1 expressed ubiquitously from feeding larva to adult, and its expression level was highest at brown-eyed pupae (Pb) stage. The effect of CLA, Rosi and combination on AccLSD-1 expressions indicated 1% CLA and 0.5 mg/ml Rosi were considered as the suitable diets for rearing adult workers in laboratory, and AccLSD-1 was down-regulated by CLA whereas up-regulated by Rosi. Furthermore, the combination of CLA and Rosi remarkly rescued the suppression of AccLSD-1 expression by CLA alone. These results suggest that AccLSD-1 is associated with A. cerana cerana development, especially during pupal metamorphosis, and can be regulated by CLA or Rosi possibly via activating PPARγ. PMID:21695433

  13. Association of triacylglyceride content and transcript abundance of genes involving in lipid synthesis of nitrogen deficient Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Han, Jichang; Yang, Guanpin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou

    2014-03-01

    Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a diatom that is rich in lipids. Recently, it has received much attention as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Nitrogen deficiency is widely known to increase the content of neutral lipids (mainly triacylglycerides, or TAGs) of microalgae, including P. tricornutum, but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we deciphered the correlations between TAG content and nine key enzymatic genes involved in lipid synthesis in P. tricornutum. After being cultured under nitrogen-free conditions for 0, 4, 24, 48, 72, 120, and 168 h, the TAG contents of P. tricornutum cells were assayed and the transcript abundances of the target genes were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that the abundances of four target gene transcripts ( LACS3, G3PDH2, G3PDH3, and G3PDH5) were positively correlated with TAG content, indicating that these genes may be involved in TAG synthesis in P. tricornutum. The findings improve our understanding of the metabolic network and regulation of lipid synthesis and will guide the future genetic improvement of the TAG content of P. tricornutum.

  14. Picoliter droplet-based digital peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR and dielectric sorting for low abundant K-ras mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huidan; Sperling, Ralph; Rotem, Assaf; Shan, Lianfeng; Heyman, John; Zhang, Yizhe; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the US, and the 5-year survival of metastatic CRC (mCRC) is less than 10%. Although monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide incremental improvements in survival, approximately 40% of mCRC patients with activating KRAS mutations won't benefit from this therapy. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a synthetic non-extendable oligonucleotides, can bind strongly to completely complementary wild-type KRAS by Watson-Crick base pairing and suppress its amplification during PCR, while any mutant allele will show unhindered amplification. The method is particularly suitable for the simultaneously detection of several adjoining mutant sites, just as mutations of codons 12 and 13 of KRAS gene where there are totally 12 possible mutation types. In this work, we describe the development and validation of this method, based on the droplet-based digital PCR. Using a microfluidic system, single target DNA molecule is compartmentalized in microdroplets together with PNA specific for wild-type KRAS, thermocycled and the fluorescence of each droplet was detected, followed by sorting and sequencing. It enables the precise determination of all possible mutant KRAS simultaneously, and the precise quantification of a single mutated KRAS in excess background unmutated KRAS.

  15. Effect of short-chain fatty acids on triacylglycerol accumulation, lipid droplet formation and lipogenic gene expression in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuting; Luo, Jun; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Shi, Hengbo; Li, Jun; Qiu, Siyuan; Wang, Ping; Loor, Juan J

    2016-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are the major energy sources for ruminants and are known to regulate various physiological functions in other species. However, their roles in ruminant milk fat metabolism are still unclear. In this study, goat mammary gland epithelial cells (GMECs) were treated with 3 mmol/L acetate, propionate or butyrate for 24 h to assess their effects on lipogenesis. Data revealed that the content of triacylglycerol (TAG) and lipid droplet formation were significantly stimulated by propionate and butyrate. The expression of FABP3, SCD1, PPARG, SREBP1, DGAT1, AGPAT6 and ADRP were upregulated by propionate and butyrate treatment. In contrast, the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of FASN and LXRα was not affected by propionate, but reduced by butyrate. Acetate had no obvious effect on the content of TAG and lipid droplets but increased the mRNA expression of SCD1 and FABP3 in GMECs. Additionally, it was observed that propionate significantly increased the relative content of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (C18:1 and C16:1) at the expense of decreased saturated fatty acids (C16:0 and C18:0). Butyrate and acetate had no significant effect on fatty acid composition. Overall, the results from this work help enhance our understanding of the regulatory role of SCFAs on goat mammary cell lipid metabolism. PMID:26304676

  16. Lipid droplets formation in human endothelial cells in response to polyunsaturated fatty acids and 1-methyl-nicotinamide (MNA); confocal Raman imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Majzner, Katarzyna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-04-01

    In this work the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in human endothelial cells culture in response to the uptake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was studied. Additionally, an effect of 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) on the process of LDs formation was investigated. LDs have been previously described structurally and to some degree biochemically, however neither the precise function of LDs nor the factors responsible for LD induction have been clarified. Lipid droplets, sometimes referred in the literature as lipid bodies are organelles known to regulate neutrophil, eosinophil, or tumor cell functions but their presence and function in the endothelium is largely unexplored. 3D linear Raman spectroscopy was used to study LDs formation in vitro in a single endothelial cell. The method provides information about distribution and size of LDs as well as their composition. The incubation of endothelial cells with various PUFAs resulted in formation of LDs. As a complementary method for LDs identification a fluorescence microscopy was applied. Fluorescence measurements confirmed the Raman results suggesting endothelial cells uptake of PUFAs and subsequent LDs formation in the cytoplasm of the endothelium. Furthermore, MNA seem to potentiate intracellular uptake of PUFAs to the endothelium that may bear physiological and pharmacological significance. Confocal Raman imaging of HAoEC cell with LDs. PMID:25966299

  17. Small organic solutes in sticky droplets from orb webs of the spider Zygiella atrica (Araneae; Araneidae): β-alaninamide is a novel and abundant component.

    PubMed

    Townley, Mark A; Pu, Qinglin; Zercher, Charles K; Neefus, Christopher D; Tillinghast, Edward K

    2012-10-01

    In northeastern North America, Zygiella atrica often build their orb webs near the ocean. We analyzed individual field-built Z. atrica webs to determine if organic low-molecular-mass solutes (LMM) in their sticky droplets showed any unusual features not previously seen in orb webs of other species living in less salty environments. While two of the three most abundant organic LMM (putrescine (butane-1,4-diamine) and GABamide (4-aminobutanamide)) are already well-known from webs of inland spiders, the third major LMM, β-alaninamide (3-aminopropanamide), a homolog of GABamide, has not been detected in sticky droplets from any other araneoid spiders (27 species). It remains to be established, however, whether or not use of β-alaninamide is related to proximity to saltwater. We observed variability in organic LMM composition in Z. atrica webs that appeared to be influenced more by an undetermined factor associated with different collecting locations and/or collection dates than by different genders or instars. Shifts in composition when adult females were transferred from the field to the laboratory were also observed. Structural similarities and inverse correlations among β-alaninamide, GABamide, and N-acetylputrescine suggest that they may form a series of LMM fulfilling essentially the same, as yet unknown, role in the webs of those species in which they occur. PMID:23081916

  18. The topology of the triacylglycerol synthesizing enzyme Lro1 indicates that neutral lipids can be produced within the luminal compartment of the endoplasmatic reticulum: Implications for the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vineet; Jacquier, Nicolas; Schneiter, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Eukaryotes store metabolic energy in form of neutral lipids, which are deposited within a dedicated organelle, termed lipid droplet (LD). While neutral lipids are synthesized by ER localized integral membrane proteins, the fate of these lipids after their synthesis and the mechanism resulting in their accumulation in LDs are not well understood. We have recently shown that LDs are functionally connected to the ER membrane allowing for a bidirectional and energy-independent transport of integral membrane proteins and possibly lipids between the two compartments during lipogenesis or lipolysis. To further characterize the nature of this connection, we investigated the topology of triacylglycerol (TAG) formation. Here we show that the active site residues of the TAG biosynthetic enzyme in yeast, Lro1, a homolog of the lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT)-related proteins, are located within the ER luminal domain of the enzyme, suggesting that TAG formed by Lro1 is initially present in the ER luminal leaflets of the ER membrane. The topology of TAG formed by Lro1 thus contrasts that of the second TAG biosynthetic enzyme, Dga1, which has a cytosolic acyl-CoA binding domain and thus is likely to catalyze TAG formation in the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. Since TAG formed by either Dga1 or Lro1 can be efficiently packed into LDs we conclude that neutral lipids from both the cytosolic as well as the luminal leaflets of the ER membrane can be concentrated and packed into LDs. PMID:22446555

  19. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  20. Abundant Genetic Overlap between Blood Lipids and Immune-Mediated Diseases Indicates Shared Molecular Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Ole A.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Albrecht, Mario; Mattingsdal, Morten; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A.; Mills, Ian; Aukrust, Pål; McEvoy, Linda K.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Karlsen, Tom H.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals), applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR) methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG), low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL)] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis). We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88), LDL (n = 87) and HDL (n = 52). Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2) and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1). We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25853426

  1. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV. PMID:26409772

  2. Temporal control of bidirectional lipid-droplet motion in Drosophila depends on the ratio of kinesin-1 and its co-factor Halo.

    PubMed

    Arora, Gurpreet K; Tran, Susan L; Rizzo, Nicholas; Jain, Ankit; Welte, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    During bidirectional transport, individual cargoes move continuously back and forth along microtubule tracks, yet the cargo population overall displays directed net transport. How such transport is controlled temporally is not well understood. We analyzed this issue for bidirectionally moving lipid droplets inDrosophilaembryos, a system in which net transport direction is developmentally controlled. By quantifying how the droplet distribution changes as embryos develop, we characterize temporal transitions in net droplet transport and identify the crucial contribution of the previously identified, but poorly characterized, transacting regulator Halo. In particular, we find that Halo is transiently expressed; rising and falling Halo levels control the switches in global distribution. Rising Halo levels have to pass a threshold before net plus-end transport is initiated. This threshold level depends on the amount of the motor kinesin-1: the more kinesin-1 is present, the more Halo is needed before net plus-end transport commences. Because Halo and kinesin-1 are present in common protein complexes, we propose that Halo acts as a rate-limiting co-factor of kinesin-1. PMID:26906417

  3. Droplet organelles?

    PubMed

    Courchaine, Edward M; Lu, Alice; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-08-01

    Cells contain numerous, molecularly distinct cellular compartments that are not enclosed by lipid bilayers. These compartments are implicated in a wide range of cellular activities, and they have been variously described as bodies, granules, or organelles. Recent evidence suggests that a liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) process may drive their formation, possibly justifying the unifying term "droplet organelle". A veritable deluge of recent publications points to the importance of low-complexity proteins and RNA in determining the physical properties of phase-separated structures. Many of the proteins linked to such structures are implicated in human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We provide an overview of the organizational principles that characterize putative "droplet organelles" in healthy and diseased cells, connecting protein biochemistry with cell physiology. PMID:27357569

  4. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process. PMID:24777097

  5. Expression of the bitter receptor T2R38 in pancreatic cancer: localization in lipid droplets and activation by a bacteria-derived quorum-sensing molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, Matthias M.; Mayer, Christine; Dapunt, Ulrike; Stegmaier, Sabine; Schirmacher, Peter; Wabnitz, Guido H.; Hänsch, G. Maria

    2016-01-01

    T2R38 belongs to the family of bitter receptors and was initially detected in cells of the oral cavity. We now describe expression of T2R38 in tumor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer and in tumor-derived cell lines. T2R38 is localized predominantly intracellular in association with lipid droplets, particularly with the lipid droplet membrane. The receptor can be activated by the bona fide ligand for T2R38, phenylthiourea (PTU), and by N-acetyl-dodecanoyl homoserine (AHL-12), a quorum sensing molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the latter is the only known natural ligand for T2R38. In response to PTU or AHL-12, key transcription factors are activated including phosphorylation of the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2, and upregulation of NFATc1. Moreover, we found increased expression of the multi-drug resistance protein 1 (also known as ABCB1), a transmembrane transporter molecule, participating in shuttling of a plethora of drugs, such as chemotherapeutics or antibiotics. In conclusion, our data indicate a new, additional function of the taste receptor T2R38 beyond sensing ‘bitter’. Moreover, because T2R38 can be stimulated by a bacteria-derived signaling molecule the receptor could link microbiota and cancer. PMID:26862855

  6. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  7. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Pei-Chen Lin, C.; Pathak, M. C.; Temple, B. R. S.; Nile, A. H.; Mousley, C. J.; Duncan, M. C.; Eckert, D. M.; Leiker, T. J.; Ivanova, P. T.; Myers, D. S.; Murphy, R. C.; Brown, H. A.; Verdaasdonk, J.; Bloom, K. S.; Ortlund, E. A.; Neiman, A. M.; Bankaitis, V. A.

    2014-01-08

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  8. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress–induced membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jihui; Pei-Chen Lin, Coney; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches. PMID:24403601

  9. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jihui; Lin, Coney Pei-Chen; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2014-07-11

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  10. RNAi screens reveal novel metabolic regulators: RIP140, MAP4k4 and the lipid droplet associated fat specific protein (FSP) 27.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Virbasius, J V; Guilherme, A; Czech, M P

    2008-01-01

    Adipose tissue modulates whole body metabolism and insulin sensitivity by controlling circulating lipid levels and producing molecules that can regulate fatty acid metabolism in such tissues as muscle and liver. We have developed RNA interference (RNAi) screens to identify genes in cultured adipocytes that regulate insulin signalling and key metabolic pathways. These short interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screens identified the transcriptional corepressor receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140) (J Clin Invest 116: 125, 2006) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP4k4) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103: 2087, 2006) as negative regulators of insulin-responsive hexose uptake and oxidative metabolism. Gene expression profiling revealed that RIP140 depletion upregulates the expression of clusters of genes in the pathways of glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. RIP140-null mice resist weight gain on a high-fat diet and display enhanced glucose tolerance. MAP4k4 depletion in adipocytes increases many of the RIP140-sensitive genes, increases adipogenesis and mediates some actions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Remarkably, another hit in our RNAi screens was fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a highly expressed isoform of Cidea. We discovered that FSP27 unexpectedly associates specifically with lipid droplets and regulates fat storage. We conclude that RIP140, MAP4k4 and the novel lipid droplet protein FSP27 are powerful regulators of adipose tissue metabolism and are potential therapeutic targets for controlling metabolic disease. The discovery of these novel proteins validates the power of RNAi screening for discovery of new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:18171433

  11. Monolayer-bilayer equilibrium of phospholipid: stabilization of neutral lipid droplets in aqueous medium and catabolism of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Handa, T; Nakagaki, M

    1992-03-23

    Phospholipid spreads as monolayer at air/water and oil/water interfaces. Interfacial pressure of the monolayer in equilibrium with a definite bulk phase of the lipid, (equilibrium) spreading pressure, depends on lyotropic and thermotropic polymorphic state of the lipid bulk phase. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) in hydrated liquid crystalline state (bilayers in L alpha state) gives an appreciably large value of spreading pressure, 45-46 mN/m. Monolayer-bilayer equilibrium of a neutral lipid-phospholipid mixture is determined by miscibilities of the lipids in mixed monolayer, PC bilayer and bulk (liquid or solid) phase of the neutral lipid. A neutral lipid of limited solubility in PC bilayer forms a separate phase in aqueous medium. The phase is stabilized as small particles in the medium by PC monolayer at the particle surface. The monolayer is in equilibrium with the bilayer. This sort of equilibrium plays important roles in formation and catabolism of triglyceride- and cholesteryl ester-rich lipoprotein particles in animal plasma. The equilibrium is a critical factor also in stabilization of aqueous dispersion of lipophilic vitamin (neutral lipid). Coexistence of emulsion particles (neutral lipid core covered with PC monolayer) and vesicles made of PC bilayer are observed in a stable dispersion. PMID:1575933

  12. YPR139c/LOA1 encodes a novel lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase associated with lipid droplets and involved in TAG homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ayciriex, Sophie; Le Guédard, Marina; Camougrand, Nadine; Velours, Gisèle; Schoene, Mario; Leone, Sebastien; Wattelet-Boyer, Valerie; Dupuy, Jean-William; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Lessire, René; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Testet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    For many years, lipid droplets (LDs) were considered to be an inert store of lipids. However, recent data showed that LDs are dynamic organelles playing an important role in storage and mobilization of neutral lipids. In this paper, we report the characterization of LOA1 (alias VPS66, alias YPR139c), a yeast member of the glycerolipid acyltransferase family. LOA1 mutants show abnormalities in LD morphology. As previously reported, cells lacking LOA1 contain more LDs. Conversely, we showed that overexpression results in fewer LDs. We then compared the lipidome of loa1Δ mutant and wild-type strains. Steady-state metabolic labeling of loa1Δ revealed a significant reduction in triacylglycerol content, while phospholipid (PL) composition remained unchanged. Interestingly, lipidomic analysis indicates that both PLs and glycerolipids are qualitatively affected by the mutation, suggesting that Loa1p is a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPA AT) with a preference for oleoyl-CoA. This hypothesis was tested by in vitro assays using both membranes of Escherichia coli cells expressing LOA1 and purified proteins as enzyme sources. Our results from purification of subcellular compartments and proteomic studies show that Loa1p is associated with LD and active in this compartment. Loa1p is therefore a novel LPA AT and plays a role in LD formation. PMID:22090344

  13. CK1δ restrains lipin-1 induction, lipid droplet formation and cell proliferation under hypoxia by reducing HIF-1α/ARNT complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Kourti, Maria; Ikonomou, Georgia; Giakoumakis, Nikolaos-Nikiforos; Rapsomaniki, Maria Anna; Landegren, Ulf; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Lygerou, Zoi; Simos, George; Mylonis, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of cells under hypoxia is facilitated by metabolic adaptation, mediated by the transcriptional activator Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1). HIF-1α, the inducible subunit of HIF-1 is regulated by oxygen as well as by oxygen-independent mechanisms involving phosphorylation. We have previously shown that CK1δ phosphorylates HIF-1α in its N-terminus and reduces its affinity for its heterodimerization partner ARNT. To investigate the importance of this mechanism for cell proliferation under hypoxia, we visually monitored HIF-1α interactions within the cell nucleus using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Both methods show that CK1δ-dependent modification of HIF-1α impairs the formation of a chromatin binding HIF-1 complex. This is confirmed by analyzing expression of lipin-1, a direct target of HIF-1 that mediates hypoxic neutral lipid accumulation. Inhibition of CK1δ increases lipid droplet formation and proliferation of both cancer and normal cells specifically under hypoxia and in an HIF-1α- and lipin-1-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel role for CK1δ in regulating lipid metabolism and, through it, cell adaptation to low oxygen conditions. PMID:25744540

  14. Lipid droplet and early autophagosomal membrane targeting of Atg2A and Atg14L in human tumor cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Simon G.; Bakula, Daniela; Frickey, Tancred; Cezanne, Alice; Brigger, Daniel; Tschan, Mario P.; Robenek, Horst; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal bulk degradation pathway for cytoplasmic cargo, such as long-lived proteins, lipids, and organelles. Induced upon nutrient starvation, autophagic degradation is accomplished by the concerted actions of autophagy-related (ATG) proteins. Here we demonstrate that two ATGs, human Atg2A and Atg14L, colocalize at cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) and are functionally involved in controlling the number and size of LDs in human tumor cell lines. We show that Atg2A is targeted to cytoplasmic ADRP-positive LDs that migrate bidirectionally along microtubules. The LD localization of Atg2A was found to be independent of the autophagic status. Further, Atg2A colocalized with Atg14L under nutrient-rich conditions when autophagy was not induced. Upon nutrient starvation and dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] generation, both Atg2A and Atg14L were also specifically targeted to endoplasmic reticulum-associated early autophagosomal membranes, marked by the PtdIns(3)P effectors double-FYVE containing protein 1 (DFCP1) and WD-repeat protein interacting with phosphoinositides 1 (WIPI-1), both of which function at the onset of autophagy. These data provide evidence for additional roles of Atg2A and Atg14L in the formation of early autophagosomal membranes and also in lipid metabolism. PMID:24776541

  15. Alkylresorcinols are abundant lipid components in different strains of Azotobacter chroococcum and Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kozubek, A; Pietr, S; Czerwonka, A

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of various amounts of 5-n-alkylresorcinols was shown in lipids extracted from 14 bacterial strains of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as from strains of Pseudomonas aureofaciens, P. chlororapsis, and P. fluorescens. The amount of alkylresorcinols found varied from 2.3 to 56.2 microg/mg (dry weight) of cells in A. chroococum and from 0.2 to 0.8 microg/mg (dry weight) of cells in Pseudomonas spp. Strains of both genera produce saturated homologs with C13 to C27 side chains. C19, C21, and C23 homologs are predominant in and characteristic for A. chroococum strains, the C15 homolog is predominant in and characteristic for P. chlororapsis and P. fluorescens, and the C17 homolog is predominant in and characteristic for P. aureofaciens. The presence of 5-n-(2-ketoalkyl)resorcinols, not previously observed, was demonstrated in lipids isolated from the cells of A. chroococum Az5. PMID:8763927

  16. CaMKII-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE BOMBYX MORI LIPID STORAGE DROPLET PROTEIN-1 (BmLsd1), AN INSECT PAT FAMILY PROTEIN, IS ESSENTIAL FOR SILKMOTH SEX PHEROMONE BIOSYNTHESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  17. Hormone signaling linked to silkmoth sex pheromone biosynthesis involves Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of the insect PAT family protein Bombyx mori lipid storage droplet protein-1(BmLsd)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  18. Effects on Transcriptional Regulation and Lipid Droplet Characteristics in the Liver of Female Juvenile Pigs after Early Postnatal Feed Restriction and Refeeding Are Dependent on Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Nebendahl, Constance; Krüger, Ricarda; Görs, Solvig; Albrecht, Elke; Martens, Karen; Hennig, Steffen; Storm, Niels; Höppner, Wolfgang; Pfuhl, Ralf; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Hammon, Harald M.; Metges, Cornelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data indicate that caloric restriction in early postnatal life may improve liver lipid metabolism in low birth weight individuals. The present study investigated transcriptional and metabolic responses to low (U) and normal (N) birth weight (d 75, T1) and postnatal feed restriction (R, 60% of controls, d 98, T2) followed by subsequent refeeding until d 131 of age (T3). Liver tissue studies were performed with a total of 42 female pigs which were born by multiparous German landrace sows. Overall, 194 genes were differentially expressed in the liver of U vs. N (T1) animals with roles in lipid metabolism. The total mean area and number of lipid droplets (LD) was about 4.6- and 3.7 times higher in U compared to N. In U, the mean LD size (µm2) was 24.9% higher. 3-week feed restriction reduced total mean area of LDs by 58.3 and 72.7% in U and N, respectively. A functional role of the affected genes in amino acid metabolism was additionally indicated. This was reflected by a 17.0% higher arginine concentration in the liver of UR animals (vs. NR). To evaluate persistency of effects, analyses were also done after refeeding period at T3. Overall, 4 and 22 genes show persistent regulation in U and N animals after 5 weeks of refeeding, respectively. These genes are involved in e.g. processes of lipid and protein metabolism and glucose homeostasis. Moreover, the recovery of total mean LD area in U and N animals back to the previous T1 level was observed. However, when compared to controls, the mean LD size was still reduced by 23.3% in UR, whereas it was increased in NR (+24.7%). The present results suggest that short-term postnatal feed restriction period programmed juvenile U animals for an increased rate of hepatic lipolysis in later life. PMID:24260100

  19. Leptin activation of mTOR pathway in intestinal epithelial cell triggers lipid droplet formation, cytokine production and increased cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fazolini, Narayana P B; Cruz, André L S; Werneck, Miriam B F; Viola, João P B; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Bozza, Patrícia T

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that obesity and enhanced inflammatory reactions are predisposing conditions for developing colon cancer. Obesity is associated with high levels of circulating leptin. Leptin is an adipocytokine that is secreted by adipose tissue and modulates immune response and inflammation. Lipid droplets (LD) are organelles involved in lipid metabolism and production of inflammatory mediators, and increased numbers of LD were observed in human colon cancer. Leptin induces the formation of LD in macrophages in a PI3K/mTOR pathway-dependent manner. Moreover, the mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that plays a key role in cellular growth and is frequently altered in tumors. We therefore investigated the role of leptin in the modulation of mTOR pathway and regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammatory phenotype in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6 cells). We show that leptin promotes a dose- and time-dependent enhancement of LD formation. The biogenesis of LD was accompanied by enhanced CXCL1/CINC-1, CCL2/MCP-1 and TGF-β production and increased COX-2 expression in these cells. We demonstrated that leptin-induced increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and AKT and a dose and time-dependent mTORC activation with enhanced phosphorilation of the downstream protein P70S6K protein. Pre-treatment with rapamycin significantly inhibited leptin effects in LD formation, COX-2 and TGF-β production in IEC-6 cells. Moreover, leptin was able to stimulate the proliferation of epithelial cells on a mTOR-dependent manner. We conclude that leptin regulates lipid metabolism, cytokine production and proliferation of intestinal cells through a mechanism largely dependent on activation of the mTOR pathway, thus suggesting that leptin-induced mTOR activation may contribute to the obesity-related enhanced susceptibility to colon carcinoma. PMID:26017929

  20. Microbial Diversity and Lipid Abundance in Microbial Mats from a Sulfidic, Saline, Warm Spring in Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Edwardson, C.; Mackey, T. J.; Dzaugis, M.; Ibarra, Y.; Course 2012, G.; Frantz, C. M.; Osburn, M. R.; Hirst, M.; Williamson, C.; Hanselmann, K.; Caporaso, J.; Sessions, A. L.; Spear, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The microbial diversity of Stinking Springs, a sulfidic, saline, warm spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake was investigated. The measured pH, temperature, salinity, and sulfide concentration along the flow path ranged from 6.64-7.77, 40-28° C, 2.9-2.2%, and 250 μM to negligible, respectively. Five sites were selected along the flow path and within each site microbial mats were dissected into depth profiles based on the color and texture of the mat layers. Genomic DNA was extracted from each layer, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced on the Roche 454 Titanium platform. Fatty acids were also extracted from the mat layers and analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The mats at Stinking Springs were classified into roughly two morphologies with respect to their spatial distribution: loose, sometimes floating mats proximal to the spring source; and thicker, well-laminated mats distal to the spring source. Loosely-laminated mats were found in turbulent stream flow environments, whereas well-laminated mats were common in less turbulent sheet flows. Phototrophs, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers, methanogens, other bacteria and archaea were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences. Diatoms, identified by microscopy and lipid analysis were found to increase in abundance with distance from the source. Methanogens were generally more abundant in deeper mat laminae. Photoheterotrophs were found in all mat layers. Microbial diversity increased significantly with depth at most sites. In addition, two distinct microbial streamers were identified and characterized at the two fast flowing sites. These two streamer varieties were dominated by either cyanobacteria or flavobacteria. Overall, our genomic and lipid analysis suggest that the physical and chemical environment is more predictive of the community composition than mat morphology. Site Map

  1. The highly abundant protein Ag-lbp55 from Ascaridia galli represents a novel type of lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Radoslavov, Georgi; Fischer, Peter; Torda, Andrew; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Boteva, Raina; Walter, Rolf D; Bankov, Ilia; Liebau, Eva

    2005-12-16

    Lipid-binding proteins exhibit important functions in lipid transport, cellular signaling, gene transcription, and cytoprotection. Their functional analogues in nematodes are nematode polyprotein allergens/antigens and fatty acid and retinoid-binding proteins. This work describes a novel 55-kDa protein, Ag-lbp55, purified from the parasitic nematode Ascaridia galli. By direct N-terminal sequencing, a partial amino acid sequence was obtained that allowed the design of oligonucleotide primers to obtain the full-length cDNA sequence. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide of 25 amino acid residues and a FAR domain at the C terminus. Data base searches showed almost no significant homologies to other described proteins. The secondary structure of Ag-lbp55 was predominantly alpha-helical (65%) as shown by CD spectroscopy. It was found to bind with high affinity fatty acids (caprylic, oleic, and palmitic acid) and their fluorescent analogue dansylaminoundecanic acid. Immunolocalization showed that Ag-lbp55 is a highly abundant protein, mainly distributed in the inner hypodermis and extracellularly in the pseudocoelomatic fluid. A similar staining pattern was observed in other pathogenic nematodes, indicating the existence of similar proteins in these species. PMID:16210327

  2. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III Inhibit Lipoprotein Lipase Activity by Displacement of the Enzyme from Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  3. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III inhibit lipoprotein lipase activity by displacement of the enzyme from lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-11-22

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  4. 6-gingerol prevents adipogenesis and the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liu, I-Min

    2013-04-15

    6-Gingerol ((S)-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-decanone) is one of the pungent constituents of Zingiber zerumbet (L) Smith (Zingiberaceae family). In this study, we investigated the effects of 6-gingerol on the inhibition of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. After treatment with 6-gingerol in differentiation medium for 4 or 8 days, the 3T3-L1 cells were lysed for experimental analysis. Cells were stained with Oil-Red-O to detect oil droplets in adipocytes. The 3T3-L1 cells were lysed and measured for triglyceride contents. The protein expression of adipogenesis-related transcription factor was evaluated by Western blot analysis. 6-Gingerol suppressed oil droplet accumulation and reduced the droplet size in a concentration (5-15 μg/ml)- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with 6-gingerol reduced the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α. Additionally, the protein levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and adipocyte-specific fatty acid binding protein (aP2) decreased upon treatment with 6-gingerol. Meanwhile, 6-gingerol diminished the insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and GSK3β (Ser9). These results suggest that 6-gingerol effectively suppresses adipogenesis and that it exerts its role mainly through the significant down-regulation of PPARγ and C/EBPα and subsequently inhibits FAS and aP2 expression. 6-Gingerol also inhibited differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells by attenuating the Akt/GSK3β pathway. Our findings provide important insights into the mechanisms underlying the anti-adipogenic activity of 6-gingerol. PMID:23369342

  5. Amber Light (590 nm) Induces the Breakdown of Lipid Droplets through Autophagy-Related Lysosomal Degradation in Differentiated Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Sik; Kim, Hyoung-June; Ham, Mira; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis in the adipocytes provides free fatty acids for other tissues in response to the energy demand. With the rapid increase in obesity-related diseases, finding novel stimuli or mechanisms that regulate lipid metabolism becomes important. We examined the effects of visible light (410, 457, 505, 530, 590, and 660 nm) irradiation on lipolysis regulation in adipocytes differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Interestingly, 590 nm (amber) light irradiation significantly reduced the concentration of lipid droplets (LDs). We further investigated the lipolytic signaling pathways that are involved in 590 nm light irradiation-induced breakdown of LDs. Immunoblot analysis revealed that 590 nm light irradiation-induced phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was insufficient to promote reduction of LDs. We observed that 590 nm light irradiation decreased the expression of perilipin 1. We found that 590 nm light irradiation, but not 505 nm, induced conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, a representative autophagic marker. We further demonstrated that the lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin/NH4Cl inhibited 590 nm light irradiation-induced reduction of LDs in differentiated adipocytes. Our data suggest that 590 nm light irradiation-induced LD breakdown is partially mediated by autophagy-related lysosomal degradation, and can be applied in clinical settings to reduce obesity. PMID:27346059

  6. Amber Light (590 nm) Induces the Breakdown of Lipid Droplets through Autophagy-Related Lysosomal Degradation in Differentiated Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Sik; Kim, Hyoung-June; Ham, Mira; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis in the adipocytes provides free fatty acids for other tissues in response to the energy demand. With the rapid increase in obesity-related diseases, finding novel stimuli or mechanisms that regulate lipid metabolism becomes important. We examined the effects of visible light (410, 457, 505, 530, 590, and 660 nm) irradiation on lipolysis regulation in adipocytes differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Interestingly, 590 nm (amber) light irradiation significantly reduced the concentration of lipid droplets (LDs). We further investigated the lipolytic signaling pathways that are involved in 590 nm light irradiation-induced breakdown of LDs. Immunoblot analysis revealed that 590 nm light irradiation-induced phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was insufficient to promote reduction of LDs. We observed that 590 nm light irradiation decreased the expression of perilipin 1. We found that 590 nm light irradiation, but not 505 nm, induced conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, a representative autophagic marker. We further demonstrated that the lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin/NH4Cl inhibited 590 nm light irradiation-induced reduction of LDs in differentiated adipocytes. Our data suggest that 590 nm light irradiation-induced LD breakdown is partially mediated by autophagy-related lysosomal degradation, and can be applied in clinical settings to reduce obesity. PMID:27346059

  7. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with early ichthyosis, associated dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets, hypoglycemia, and later distinctive clinical SDS phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scalais, Emmanuel; Connerotte, Anne-Catherine; Despontin, Karine; Biver, Armand; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Alders, Marielle; Kolivras, Athanassios; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; De Meirleir, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a recessive ribosomopathy, characterized by bone marrow failure and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (ePI) often associated with neurodevelopmental and skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this report is to describe a SDS patient with early ichthyosis associated with dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets (iLDs), hypoglycemia and later a distinctive clinical SDS phenotype. At 3 months of age, she had ichthyosis, growth retardation, and failure to thrive. She had not cytopenia. Ultrasonography (US) showed pancreatic diffuse high echogenicity. Subsequently fasting hypoketotic hypoglycemia occurred without permanent hepatomegaly or hyperlipidemia. Continuous gavage feeding was followed by clinical improvement including ichthyosis and hypoglycemia. After 14 months of age, she developed persistent neutropenia and ePI consistent with SDS. The ichthyotic skin biopsy, performed at 5 months of age, disclosed iLDs in all epidermal layers, in melanocytes, eccrine sweat glands, Schwann cells and dermal fibroblasts. These iLDs were reminiscent of those described in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome (DCS) or Wolman's disease. Both LIPA and CGI-58 analysis did not revealed pathogenic mutation. By sequencing SBDS, a compound heterozygous for a previously reported gene mutation (c.258 + 2T>C) and a novel mutation (c.284T>G) were found. Defective SBDS may hypothetically interfere as in DCS, with neutral lipid metabolism and play a role in the SDS phenotype such as ichthyosis with dermal and epidermal iLDs and hypoglycemia. This interference with neutral lipid metabolism must most likely occur in the cytoplasm compartment as in DCS and not in the lysosomal compartment as in Wolman's disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27127007

  8. Intracellular distribution of yolk droplets, lipid bodies and Golgi apparatus in the chick neuroepithelial cells during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alvarez, J G; de Paz, P; Chamorro, C A; Fernandez-Caso, M; Villar, J M

    1987-01-01

    Vitelline and lipidic inclusions which are present in the neuroepithelial cells during chick embryo neurulation show a typical intracellular localization in the apical zone of the cell. In the same cellular zone the Golgi apparatus can be seen during the successive stages of neurulation. These patterns of inclusion and organelle polarity during chick embryo neurulation may be related to active consumption of the reserves contained in inclusions during this morphogenetic process. Such an active consumption would imply a close relationship between the vitelline and lipidic inclusions and the Golgi apparatus. On the other hand, the apical position of the Golgi apparatus in the neuroepithelial cells reveals the remarkable apicobasal polarity of these cells which remains unchanged during chick embryo neurulation. PMID:3622004

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Basidiomycetous Yeast-Like Fungus Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62, Which Produces an Abundant Amount of the Biosurfactant Mannosylerythritol Lipids.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Hatada, Yuji; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast-like fungus Pseudozyma hubeiensis strain SY62 is capable of producing an abundant amount of the glycolipid biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), which are a major component of monoacetylated MEL (MEL-C). To reveal the synthetic pathway of the MELs of strain SY62, we present the 18.44-Mb draft genome sequence. PMID:23814110

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Basidiomycetous Yeast-Like Fungus Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62, Which Produces an Abundant Amount of the Biosurfactant Mannosylerythritol Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Hatada, Yuji; Horiuchi, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast-like fungus Pseudozyma hubeiensis strain SY62 is capable of producing an abundant amount of the glycolipid biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), which are a major component of monoacetylated MEL (MEL-C). To reveal the synthetic pathway of the MELs of strain SY62, we present the 18.44-Mb draft genome sequence. PMID:23814110

  11. Quantification of hormone sensitive lipase phosphorylation and colocalization with lipid droplets in murine 3T3L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes via automated digital microscopy and high-content analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick M; Ingermanson, Randall S; Loy, Patricia A; Koon, Erick D; Whittaker, Ross; Laris, Casey A; Hilton, Jeffrey M; Nicoll, James B; Buehrer, Benjamin M; Price, Jeffrey H

    2011-06-01

    Lipolysis in adipocytes is associated with phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and translocation of HSL to lipid droplets. In this study, adipocytes were cultured in a high-throughput format (96-well dishes), exposed to lipolytic agents, and then fixed and labeled for nuclei, lipid droplets, and HSL (or HSL phosphorylated on serine 660 [pHSLser660]). The cells were imaged via automated digital fluorescence microscopy, and high-content analysis (HCA) methods were used to quantify HSL phosphorylation and the degree to which HSL (or pHSLser660) colocalizes with the lipid droplets. HSL:lipid droplet colocalization was quantified through use of Pearson's correlation, Mander's M1 Colocalization, and the Tanimoto coefficient. For murine 3T3L1 adipocytes, isoproterenol, Lys-γ3-melanocyte stimulating hormone, and forskolin elicited the appearance and colocalization of pHSLser660, whereas atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) did not. For human subcutaneous adipocytes, isoproterenol, forskolin, and ANP activated HSL phosphorylation/colocalization, but Lys-γ3-melanocyte stimulating hormone had little or no effect. Since ANP activates guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase, HSL serine 660 is likely a substrate for cGMP-dependent protein kinase in human adipocytes. For both adipocyte model systems, adipocytes with the greatest lipid content displayed the greatest lipolytic responses. The results for pHSLser660 were consistent with release of glycerol by the cells, a well-established assay of lipolysis, and the HCA methods yielded Z' values >0.50. The results illustrate several key differences between human and murine adipocytes and demonstrate advantages of utilizing HCA techniques to study lipolysis in cultured adipocytes. PMID:21186937

  12. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  13. The Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Inhibits Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)-mediated Lipid Mobilization and Enhances the ATGL Interaction with Comparative Gene Identification 58 (CGI-58) and Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V.; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F.; Roddy, Thomas P.; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL−/− mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  14. PGC-1α Induces Mitochondrial and Myokine Transcriptional Programs and Lipid Droplet and Glycogen Accumulation in Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mormeneo, Emma; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Palomer, Xavier; De Nigris, Valeria; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Orozco, Anna; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Lerín, Carles; Gómez-Foix, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a chief activator of mitochondrial and metabolic programs and protects against atrophy in skeletal muscle (skm). Here we tested whether PGC-1α overexpression could restructure the transcriptome and metabolism of primary cultured human skm cells, which display a phenotype that resembles the atrophic phenotype. An oligonucleotide microarray analysis was used to reveal the effects of PGC-1α on the whole transcriptome. Fifty-three different genes showed altered expression in response to PGC-1α: 42 upregulated and 11 downregulated. The main gene ontologies (GO) associated with the upregulated genes were mitochondrial components and processes and this was linked with an increase in COX activity, an indicator of mitochondrial content. Furthermore, PGC-1α enhanced mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate and lactate to CO2, but not glucose oxidation. The other most significantly associated GOs for the upregulated genes were chemotaxis and cytokine activity, and several cytokines, including IL-8/CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL5 and CCL8, were within the most highly induced genes. Indeed, PGC-1α highly increased IL-8 cell protein content. The most upregulated gene was PVALB, which is related to calcium signaling. Potential metabolic regulators of fatty acid and glucose storage were among mainly regulated genes. The mRNA and protein level of FITM1/FIT1, which enhances the formation of lipid droplets, was raised by PGC-1α, while in oleate-incubated cells PGC-1α increased the number of smaller lipid droplets and modestly triglyceride levels, compared to controls. CALM1, the calcium-modulated δ subunit of phosphorylase kinase, was downregulated by PGC-1α, while glycogen phosphorylase was inactivated and glycogen storage was increased by PGC-1α. In conclusion, of the metabolic transcriptome deficiencies of cultured skm cells, PGC-1α rescued the expression of genes encoding

  15. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii-skeletal muscle cells interaction increases lipid droplet biogenesis and positively modulates the production of IL-12, IFN-g and PGE2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The interest in the mechanisms involved in Toxoplasma gondii lipid acquisition has steadily increased during the past few decades, but it remains not completely understood. Here, we investigated the biogenesis and the fate of lipid droplets (LD) of skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) during their interaction with T. gondii by confocal and electron microscopy. We also evaluated whether infected SkMC modulates the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-gamma (INF-g), and also the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene induction. Methods Primary culture of skeletal muscle cells were infected with tachyzoites of T. gondii and analysed by confocal microscopy for observation of LD. Ultrastructural cytochemistry was also used for lipid and sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) detection. Dosage of cytokines (IL-12 and INF-g) by ELISA technique and enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) for PGE2 measurement were employed. The COX-2 gene expression analysis was performed by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results We demonstrated that T. gondii infection of SkMC leads to increase in LD number and area in a time course dependent manner. Moreover, the ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that SR and LD are in direct contact with parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), within the vacuolar matrix, around it and interacting directly with the membrane of parasite, indicating that LD are recruited and deliver their content inside the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in T. gondii-infected SkMC. We also observed a positive modulation of the production of IL-12 and IFN-g, increase of COX-2 mRNA levels in the first hour of T. gondii-SkMC interaction and an increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis from 6 h up to 48 h of infection. Conclusions Taken together, the close association between SR and LD with PV could represent a source of lipids as well as other nutrients for the parasite survival, and together with the

  17. Effect on oxidative stress, glucose uptake level and lipid droplet content by Apigenin 7, 4'-dimethyl ether isolated from Piper longum L.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mahesh S; Joy, Beena; Sundaresan, A

    2015-06-01

    Piper longum L. (Family: Piperaceae), is a widely used herb in several Ayurvedic formulations prescribed for various diseases. Potential of the plant material as an antidiabetic and cardio protective agent has not been evaluated so far. In the study, we designed experiments to evaluate antioxidant, glucose uptake potential and lipid content regulating potential of extracts and compound from P. longum fruits. Solvent extracts from Piper longum fruits using hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, 70 % methanol-water were taken and apigenin 7, 4'-dimethyl ether (ADE) was isolated from ethyl acetate extract. Antioxidant activity, glucose uptake potential and adipocyte differentiation assay was performed with extract and pure compound. Antioxidant activity in terms of TRP (196.03 μg/mg GAE), DPPH assay (IC50-173.09 μg/mL), hydroxyl radical scavenging assay (IC50-20.42 μg/mL), inhibiting LDL oxidation (IC50-51.99 μg/mL) and to enhance SOD activity (25.3 %) was higher in ethyl acetate extract (EAP). Phenolic and flavonoid content was measured and showed a positive correlation with antioxidant activity. Presence of apigenin 7, 4'-dimethyl ether (ADE) and piperine (Pip) in EAP was determined by HPTLC analysis and was isolated. ADE inhibited α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzymes and enhanced 2-NBDG uptake in L6 cells. Hypolipidemic effect of ADE on mouse pre-adipocyte (3T3L1) cell lines also showed a dose dependent reduction on lipid droplet content and effective concentration range was determined as 1-2.5 μg/mL. The results suggested that Piper longum fruits can provide a natural source of antioxidants with antidiabetic and anti obesity potential. PMID:26028738

  18. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  19. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  20. Fluorescence-based fixative and vital staining of lipid droplets in Caenorhabditis elegans reveal fat stores using microscopy and flow cytometry approaches[S

    PubMed Central

    Klapper, Maja; Ehmke, Madeleine; Palgunow, Daniela; Böhme, Mike; Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen; Döring, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The proportions of body fat and fat-free mass are determining factors of adiposity-associated diseases. Work in Caenorhabditis elegans has revealed evolutionarily conserved pathways of fat metabolism. Nevertheless, analysis of body composition and fat distribution in the nematodes has only been partially unraveled because of methodological difficulties. We characterized metabolic C. elegans mutants by using novel and feasible BODIPY 493/503-based fat staining and flow cytometry approaches. Fixative as well as vital BODIPY staining procedures visualize major fat stores, preserve native lipid droplet morphology, and allow quantification of fat content per body volume of individual worms. Colocalization studies using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy, Raman microspectroscopy, and imaging of lysosome-related organelles as well as biochemical measurement confirm our approaches. We found that the fat-to-volume ratio of dietary restriction, TGF-β, and germline mutants are specific for each strain. In contrast, the proportion of fat-free mass is constant between the mutants, although their volumes differ by a factor of 3. Our approaches enable sensitive, accurate, and high-throughput assessment of adiposity in large C. elegans populations at a single-worm level. PMID:21421847

  1. Autonomous droplet architectures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth; King, Philip H; Morgan, Hywel; de Planque, Maurits R R; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The quintessential living element of all organisms is the cell-a fluid-filled compartment enclosed, but not isolated, by a layer of amphiphilic molecules that self-assemble at its boundary. Cells of different composition can aggregate and communicate through the exchange of molecules across their boundaries. The astounding success of this architecture is readily apparent throughout the biological world. Inspired by the versatility of nature's architecture, we investigate aggregates of membrane-enclosed droplets as a design concept for robotics. This will require droplets capable of sensing, information processing, and actuation. It will also require the integration of functionally specialized droplets into an interconnected functional unit. Based on results from the literature and from our own laboratory, we argue the viability of this approach. Sensing and information processing in droplets have been the subject of several recent studies, on which we draw. Integrating droplets into coherently acting units and the aspect of controlled actuation for locomotion have received less attention. This article describes experiments that address both of these challenges. Using lipid-coated droplets of Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction medium in oil, we show here that such droplets can be integrated and that chemically driven mechanical motion can be achieved. PMID:25622015

  2. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jason H.; Kaufman, Justin W.; Apicella, Michael A.; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS) has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0) than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer. PMID:27326857

  3. Influence of Growth Phase, pH, and Temperature on the Abundance and Composition of Tetraether Lipids in the Thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Chen, Yufei; Jia, Chengling; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and composition of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) and glycerol tribiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GTGT) lipids were determined as a function of growth phase as a proxy for nutrient availability, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature in cultures of the thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus. Regardless of the cultivation condition, the abundance of GDGTs and GTGTs was greater in the polar than core fraction, with a marked decrease in core GDGTs in cultures harvested during log phase growth. These data are consistent with previous suggestions indicating that core GDGTs are re-functionalized during polar lipid synthesis. Under all conditions examined, polar lipids were enriched in a GDGT with 2 cyclopentyl rings (GDGT-2), indicating GDGT-2 is the preferred lipid in this taxon. However, lag or stationary phase grown cells or cells subjected to pH or thermal stress were enriched in GDGTs with 4, 5, or 6 rings and depleted in GDGTs with 1, 2, 3, rings relative to log phase cells grown under optimal conditions. Variation in the composition of polar GDGT lipids in cells harvested during various growth phases tended to be greater than in cells cultivated over a pH range of 0.3-1.1 and a temperature range of 53-63°C. These results suggest that the growth phase, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature are all important factors that shape the composition of tetraether lipids in Picrophilus. The similarity in enrichment of GDGTs with more rings in cultures undergoing nutrient, pH, and thermal stress points to GDGT cyclization as a generalized physiological response to stress in this taxon. PMID:27625636

  4. Influence of Growth Phase, pH, and Temperature on the Abundance and Composition of Tetraether Lipids in the Thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus

    PubMed Central

    Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Chen, Yufei; Jia, Chengling; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and composition of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) and glycerol tribiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GTGT) lipids were determined as a function of growth phase as a proxy for nutrient availability, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature in cultures of the thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus. Regardless of the cultivation condition, the abundance of GDGTs and GTGTs was greater in the polar than core fraction, with a marked decrease in core GDGTs in cultures harvested during log phase growth. These data are consistent with previous suggestions indicating that core GDGTs are re-functionalized during polar lipid synthesis. Under all conditions examined, polar lipids were enriched in a GDGT with 2 cyclopentyl rings (GDGT-2), indicating GDGT-2 is the preferred lipid in this taxon. However, lag or stationary phase grown cells or cells subjected to pH or thermal stress were enriched in GDGTs with 4, 5, or 6 rings and depleted in GDGTs with 1, 2, 3, rings relative to log phase cells grown under optimal conditions. Variation in the composition of polar GDGT lipids in cells harvested during various growth phases tended to be greater than in cells cultivated over a pH range of 0.3–1.1 and a temperature range of 53–63°C. These results suggest that the growth phase, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature are all important factors that shape the composition of tetraether lipids in Picrophilus. The similarity in enrichment of GDGTs with more rings in cultures undergoing nutrient, pH, and thermal stress points to GDGT cyclization as a generalized physiological response to stress in this taxon. PMID:27625636

  5. Lipid Droplet-Binding Protein TIP47 Regulates Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Interaction with the Viral NS5A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Dorothee A.; Camus, Grégory; Herker, Eva; Webster, Brian R.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Greene, Warner C.; Yen, Tien-Sze Benedict; Ott, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The nonstructural protein NS5A has emerged as a new drug target in antiviral therapies for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. NS5A is critically involved in viral RNA replication that takes place at newly formed membranes within the endoplasmic reticulum (membranous web) and assists viral assembly in the close vicinity of lipid droplets (LDs). To identify host proteins that interact with NS5A, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with the N-terminus of NS5A (amino acids 1–31), a well-studied α-helical domain important for the membrane tethering of NS5A. Our studies identified the LD-associated host protein, Tail-Interacting Protein 47 (TIP47) as a novel NS5A interaction partner. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in Huh7 hepatoma cells confirmed the interaction of TIP47 with full-length NS5A. shRNA-mediated knockdown of TIP47 caused a more than 10-fold decrease in the propagation of full-length infectious HCV in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells. A similar reduction was observed when TIP47 was knocked down in cells harboring an autonomously replicating HCV RNA (subgenomic replicon), indicating that TIP47 is required for efficient HCV RNA replication. A single point mutation (W9A) in NS5A that disrupts the interaction with TIP47 but preserves proper subcellular localization severely decreased HCV RNA replication. In biochemical membrane flotation assays, TIP47 cofractionated with HCV NS3, NS5A, NS5B proteins, and viral RNA, and together with nonstructural viral proteins was uniquely distributed to lower-density LD-rich membrane fractions in cells actively replicating HCV RNA. Collectively, our data support a model where TIP47—via its interaction with NS5A—serves as a novel cofactor for HCV infection possibly by integrating LD membranes into the membranous web. PMID:23593007

  6. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binding to Hepatic Lipid Droplets (LD) Is Potassium Ion Dependent and Is Mediated by LD Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Carneiro, Fabiana A.; Martins, Ivo C.; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Faustino, André F.; Pereira, Renata M.; Bozza, Patricia T.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) affects millions of people, causing more than 20,000 deaths annually. No effective treatment for the disease caused by DENV infection is currently available, partially due to the lack of knowledge on the basic aspects of the viral life cycle, including the molecular basis of the interaction between viral components and cellular compartments. Here, we characterized the properties of the interaction between the DENV capsid (C) protein and hepatic lipid droplets (LDs), which was recently shown to be essential for the virus replication cycle. Zeta potential analysis revealed a negative surface charge of LDs, with an average surface charge of −19 mV. The titration of LDs with C protein led to an increase of the surface charge, which reached a plateau at +13.7 mV, suggesting that the viral protein-LD interaction exposes the protein cationic surface to the aqueous environment. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy measurements were performed by using C protein-functionalized AFM tips. The C protein-LD interaction was found to be strong, with a single (un)binding force of 33.6 pN. This binding was dependent on high intracellular concentrations of potassium ions but not sodium. The inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase in DENV-infected cells resulted in the dissociation of C protein from LDs and a 50-fold inhibition of infectious virus production but not of RNA replication, indicating a biological relevance for the potassium-dependent interaction. Limited proteolysis of the LD surface impaired the C protein-LD interaction, and force measurements in the presence of specific antibodies indicated that perilipin 3 (TIP47) is the major DENV C protein ligand on the surface of LDs. PMID:22130547

  7. Progestin modulates the lipid profile and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Isabel R.; Hitz, Carolyn A.; Gijón, Miguel A.; Bergman, Bryan C.; Eckel, Robert H.; Jacobsen, Britta M.

    2015-01-01

    Progestins induce lipid accumulation in progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer cells. We speculated that progestin-induced alterations in lipid biology confer resistance to chemotherapy. To examine the biology of lipid loaded breast cancer cells, we used a model of progestin-induced lipid synthesis. T47D (PR-positive) and MDA-MB-231(PR-negative) cell lines were used to study progestin response. Oil red O staining of T47D cells treated with progestin showed lipid droplet formation was PR dependent, glucose dependent and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel. This protection was not observed in PR-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Progestin treatment induced stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) enzyme expression and chemical inhibition of SCD-1 diminished lipid droplets and cell viability, suggesting the importance of lipid stores in cancer cell survival. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of phospholipids from progestin-treated T47D cells revealed an increase in unsaturated fatty acids, with oleic acid as most abundant. Cells surviving docetaxel treatment also contained more oleic acid in phospholipids, suggesting altered membrane fluidity as a potential mechanism of chemoresistance mediated in part by SCD-1. Lastly, intact docetaxel molecules were present within progestin induced lipid droplets, suggesting a protective quenching effect of intracellular lipid droplets. Our studies suggest the metabolic adaptations produced by progestin provide novel metabolic targets for future combinatorial therapies for progestin-responsive breast cancers. PMID:22922095

  8. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Sarles, Stephen A; Venkatesan, Guru; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  9. Dancing Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on corona treated glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on clean glass surfaces. These droplets exhibit a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction or repulsion, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors, and propose a detailed model for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: passively sort droplets by surface tension, spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, and cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  10. Swimming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  11. Impact of high dietary lipid intake and related metabolic disorders on the abundance and acyl composition of the unique mitochondrial phospholipid, cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Casas, François; Coudray, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Excessive dietary lipid intake, coupled with lack of exercise, are the major causes of the development and progression of metabolic syndrome features e. g. obesity, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. These metabolic diseases are associated with both structural and functional alterations of mitochondria. Cardiolipin (CL) is a unique phospholipid that is almost exclusively localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Cardiolipin is at the heart of mitochondrial metabolism playing a key role in several processes of mitochondrial bioenergetics as well as in mitochondrial membrane stability and dynamics, and in many of the mitochondrial-dependent steps of apoptosis. Indeed, alterations to CL content and acyl chain profile have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple tissues in Barth syndrome and in many other physio-pathological conditions. After a brief overview of the biological roles of CL, we highlight the consequences of lipid overload-related nutritional manipulations as well as related metabolic disorders on both CL content and its fatty acid composition in the major metabolic tissues, the heart, muscle and liver. The goal of this review is to fill a void in the CL literature concerning the effects of CL abundance and form that arise following high lipid supplementation and the related metabolic disorders. PMID:24951897

  12. Abundant Type III Lipid Transfer Proteins in Arabidopsis Tapetum Are Secreted to the Locule and Become a Constituent of the Pollen Exine1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L.; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small secretory proteins in plants with defined lipid-binding structures for possible lipid exocytosis. Special groups of LTPs unique to the anther tapetum are abundant, but their functions are unclear. We studied a special group of LTPs, type III LTPs, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Their transcripts were restricted to the anther tapetum, with levels peaking at the developmental stage of maximal pollen-wall exine synthesis. We constructed an LTP-Green Fluorescent Protein (LTP-GFP) plasmid, transformed it into wild-type plants, and monitored LTP-GFP in developing anthers with confocal laser scanning microscopy. LTP-GFP appeared in the tapetum and was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum-trans-Golgi network machinery into the locule. It then moved to the microspore surface and remained as a component of exine. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy of native LTP in anthers confirmed the LTP-GFP observations. The in vivo association of LTP-GFP and exine in anthers was not observed with non-type III or structurally modified type III LTPs or in transformed exine-defective mutant plants. RNA interference knockdown of individual type III LTPs produced no observable mutant phenotypes. RNA interference knockdown of two type III LTPs produced microscopy-observable morphologic changes in the intine underneath the exine (presumably as a consequence of changes in the exine not observed by transmission electron microscopy) and pollen susceptible to dehydration damage. Overall, we reveal a novel transfer pathway of LTPs in which LTPs bound or nonbound to exine precursors are secreted from the tapetum to become microspore exine constituents; this pathway explains the need for plentiful LTPs to incorporate into the abundant exine. PMID:24096413

  13. Abundant type III lipid transfer proteins in Arabidopsis tapetum are secreted to the locule and become a constituent of the pollen exine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-11-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small secretory proteins in plants with defined lipid-binding structures for possible lipid exocytosis. Special groups of LTPs unique to the anther tapetum are abundant, but their functions are unclear. We studied a special group of LTPs, type III LTPs, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Their transcripts were restricted to the anther tapetum, with levels peaking at the developmental stage of maximal pollen-wall exine synthesis. We constructed an LTP-Green Fluorescent Protein (LTP-GFP) plasmid, transformed it into wild-type plants, and monitored LTP-GFP in developing anthers with confocal laser scanning microscopy. LTP-GFP appeared in the tapetum and was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum-trans-Golgi network machinery into the locule. It then moved to the microspore surface and remained as a component of exine. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy of native LTP in anthers confirmed the LTP-GFP observations. The in vivo association of LTP-GFP and exine in anthers was not observed with non-type III or structurally modified type III LTPs or in transformed exine-defective mutant plants. RNA interference knockdown of individual type III LTPs produced no observable mutant phenotypes. RNA interference knockdown of two type III LTPs produced microscopy-observable morphologic changes in the intine underneath the exine (presumably as a consequence of changes in the exine not observed by transmission electron microscopy) and pollen susceptible to dehydration damage. Overall, we reveal a novel transfer pathway of LTPs in which LTPs bound or nonbound to exine precursors are secreted from the tapetum to become microspore exine constituents; this pathway explains the need for plentiful LTPs to incorporate into the abundant exine. PMID:24096413

  14. Seasonal changes in hepatocytic lipid droplets, glycogen deposits, and rough endoplasmic reticulum along the natural breeding cycle of female ohrid trout (Salmo letnica Kar.)-A semiquantitative ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Jordanova, Maja; Rebok, Katerina; Malhão, Fernanda; Rocha, Maria J; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    This study on wild female Ohrid trout was primarily designed to provide a general overview of the breeding cycle influence upon selected aspects of hepatocytes. According with a semiquantitatively evaluation, some of these cell's structural compartments change during the breeding cycle. Structural modifications were disclosed in the relative occurrence of lipid, glycogen, and RER content during breeding cycle. The relative amount of lipid deposits in the hepatocytes was much greater in previtellogenesis, and decreased postspawning. So, while the seasonal changes in RER were positively related with the ovary maturation status, those of the lipid droplets followed an opposite trend. The hepatocytic glycogen occurred rarely, mainly in late-vitellogenesis and spawning, suggesting that in this species such kind of energy storage is comparatively unimportant. Lipid accumulation and later usage is, probably, the relevant biochemical pathway for Ohrid trout in the wild. While glycogen and RER contents were positively correlated with the gonadosomatic index, lipids were negatively correlated. Additionally, glycogen inclusions were positively correlated with the plasma estradiol levels. When comparing seasonal patterns from wild Ohrid trout with those from well-studied rainbow and brown trout (specimens studied were from aquaculture), there are contradicting results as to lipid and glycogen reserves, and also as to RER loads. The differences among the mentioned trout can result from intrinsic interspecies differences or may be associated with natural feeding conditions versus feeding with commercially prepared diets, or other factors. This study offers new data useful as standard to access liver pathology in wild and aquacultured Ohrid trout. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:700-706, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223583

  15. BTG1 ameliorates liver steatosis by decreasing stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) abundance and altering hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Deng, Jiali; Guo, Yajie; Niu, Yuguo; Yuan, Feixiang; Yu, Junjie; Chen, Shanghai; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Liver steatosis, a condition in which lipid accumulates in liver cells, is a leading cause of many liver diseases. The livers of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, a cancer characterized by liver steatosis, have decreased abundance of the transcription cofactor BTG1 (B cell translocation gene 1). We showed that the livers of db/db mice, which are a genetic model of obesity, had decreased BTG1 mRNA and protein abundance. BTG1 overexpression ameliorated liver steatosis in db/db mice, whereas knockdown of BTG1 induced liver steatosis in wild-type mice. Consistent with these changes, we found that BTG1 decreased triglyceride accumulation in cultured hepatocytes. BTG1 overexpression inhibited the expression of the gene encoding stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), an enzyme involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, by suppressing the activity of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Knockdown of SCD1 prevented liver steatosis in wild-type mice induced by knockdown of BTG1. Conversely, the ability of BTG1 overexpression to ameliorate liver steatosis in db/db mice was negated by ATF4 overexpression. Moreover, BTG1 transgenic mice were resistant to liver steatosis induced by a high-carbohydrate diet. BTG1 abundance was decreased by this diet through a pathway that involved mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Together, our study identifies a role of BTG1 in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism and specifically in preventing ATF4 and SCD1 from inducing liver steatosis. PMID:27188441

  16. In Vivo Natural-Abundance 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Living Ectomycorrhizal Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis; Canet, Daniel; Marchal, Jean-Pierre; Brondeau, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study intact mycelia of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum graniforme (Ascomycetes) and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (Basidiomycetes). A number of sharp resonances are observed in living fungi. These signals primarily arise from fatty acyl chains and carbohydrate nuclei. The spectra are interpreted in terms of relative concentrations of the major fatty acids present in the fungal triglycerides. The small line width of fatty acids (mainly oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids) resonances and spin-lattice relaxation time are indicative of fast rotational reorientations and are consequently thought to arise from fatty acyl chains in fat droplets. We were able to locate the site of lipids accumulation within mycelia using light microscopy and histological staining. Many lipid droplets were observed in mycelia of both species. These results suggest that fatty acids droplets could be involved in carbon storage and metabolism from ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:16663561

  17. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-01-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  18. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-11-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  19. Droplet Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  20. Droplet microactuator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Eckhardt, Allen E. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a droplet microactuator system. According to one embodiment, the droplet microactuator system includes: (a) a droplet microactuator configured to conduct droplet operations; (b) a magnetic field source arranged to immobilize magnetically responsive beads in a droplet during droplet operations; (c) a sensor configured in a sensing relationship with the droplet microactuator, such that the sensor is capable of sensing a signal from and/or a property of one or more droplets on the droplet microactuator; and (d) one or more processors electronically coupled to the droplet microactuator and programmed to control electrowetting-mediated droplet operations on the droplet actuator and process electronic signals from the sensor.

  1. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations. PMID:25578408

  2. Yeast Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Baochi; Upadhyaya, Arpita; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Brenner, Michael

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that the Young's law and surface tension govern the shape of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Here we address through experiments and theory the shape of growing aggregates of yeast on agar substrates, and assess whether these ideas still hold. Experiments are carried out on Baker's yeast, with different levels of expressions of an adhesive protein governing cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Changing either the agar concentration or the expression of this protein modifies the local contact angle of a yeast droplet. When the colony is small, the shape is a spherical cap with the contact angle obeying Young's law. However, above a critical volume this structure is unstable, and the droplet becomes nonspherical. We present a theoretical model where this instability is caused by bulk elastic effects. The model predicts that the transition depends on both volume and contact angle, in a manner quantitatively consistent with our experiments.

  3. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  4. Expression of type I and type II bovine scavenger receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells: Lipid droplet accumulation and nonreciprocal cross competition by acetylated and oxidized low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston ); Ekkel, Y.; Rohrer, L.; Penman, M.; Freedman, N.J.; Krieger, M. ); Chisolm, G.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Type I and type II scavenger receptors, which have been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis and other macrophage-associated functions, differ only by the presence in the type I receptor of an extracellular cysteine-rich C-terminal domain. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transfectants expressing high levels of either the type I or type II bovine scavenger receptors have been generated. Type I and type II receptors in these cells mediated high-affinity saturable endocytosis of both {sup 125}I-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and {sup 125}I-labeled oxidized LDL with the distinctive broad ligand specificity characteristic of scavenger receptors. After incubation for 2 days with acetylated LDL, the transfected cells accumulated oil red O-staining lipid droplets reminiscent of those in macrophage foam cells, whereas untransfected CHO cells did not. Thus, macrophage-specific gene products other than the scavenger receptor are not required for modified-LDL-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. In transfected cells, acetylated LDL efficiently competed for both its own endocytosis and that of oxidized LDL. This nonreciprocal cross competition suggests that these ligands may bind to nonidentical but interacting sites on a single receptor. Results were similar for transfectants expressing either type I or type II scavenger receptors. The nonreciprocal cross competition seen in the transfected CHO cells differs from that previously observed with cultured macrophages.

  5. Acidophilic green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 accumulates high amount of lipid droplets under a nitrogen-depleted condition at a low-pH.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Shunsuke; Higuchi, Sumio; Uzuka, Akihiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    Microalgal storage lipids are considered to be a promising source for next-generation biofuel feedstock. However, microalgal biodiesel is not yet economically feasible due to the high cost of production. One of the reasons for this is that the use of a low-cost open pond system is currently limited because of the unavoidable contamination with undesirable organisms. Extremophiles have an advantage in culturing in an open pond system because they grow in extreme environments toxic to other organisms. In this study, we isolated the acidophilic green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 from sulfuric acid mine drainage in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. The vegetative cells of YKT1 display the morphological characteristics of Trebouxiophyceae and molecular phylogenetic analyses indicated it to be most closely related to Pseudochlorella pringsheimii. The optimal pH and temperature for the growth of YKT1 are pH 3.0-5.0 and a temperature 20-25°C, respectively. Further, YKT1 is able to grow at pH 2.0 and at 32°C, which corresponds to the usual water temperature in the outdoors in summer in many countries. YKT1 accumulates a large amount of storage lipids (∼30% of dry weigh) under a nitrogen-depleted condition at low-pH (pH 3.0). These results show that acidophilic green algae will be useful for industrial applications by acidic open culture systems. PMID:25221913

  6. Avian sebokeratocytes and marine mammal lipokeratinocytes: structural, lipid biochemical, and functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Elias, P M; Menon, G K; Grayson, S; Brown, B E; Rehfeld, S J

    1987-10-01

    fledglings; ordinarily, however, the internal lamellae and limiting membranes deteriorate, generating intracellular neutral lipid droplets. The sphingolipid composition of avian stratum corneum is intermediate between terrestrials and cetaceans (approximately equal to 50% glycolipids), with triglycerides present in abundance. In the midstratum corneum of avians, neutral lipid droplets are released into the interstices, forming a large extracellular, lipid-enriched compartment, surrounding wafer-thin corneocytes, with a paucity of both lipid and keratin ("plates-and-mortar" rather than the "bricks-and-mortar" of mammals).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2445192

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus lowers zebrafish lipid content by changing gut microbiota and host transcription of genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Silvia; Picchietti, Simona; Rodiles, Ana; Cossignani, Lina; Merrifield, Daniel L; Taddei, Anna Rita; Maradonna, Francesca; Olivotto, Ike; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Carnevali, Oliana

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome plays an important role in lipid metabolism but how the introduction of probiotic communities affects host lipid metabolism is poorly understood. Using a multidisciplinary approach we addressed this knowledge gap using the zebrafish model by coupling high-throughput sequencing with biochemical, molecular and morphological analysis to evaluate the changes in the intestine. Analysis of bacterial 16S libraries revealed that Lactobacillus rhamnosus was able to modulate the gut microbiome of zebrafish larvae, elevating the abundance of Firmicutes sequences and reducing the abundance of Actinobacteria. The gut microbiome changes modulated host lipid processing by inducing transcriptional down-regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and triglycerides metabolism (fit2, agpat4, dgat2, mgll, hnf4α, scap, and cck) concomitantly decreasing total body cholesterol and triglyceride content and increasing fatty acid levels. L. rhamnosus treatment also increased microvilli and enterocyte lengths and decreased lipid droplet size in the intestinal epithelium. These changes resulted in elevated zebrafish larval growth. This integrated system investigation demonstrates probiotic modulation of the gut microbiome, highlights a novel gene network involved in lipid metabolism, provides an insight into how the microbiome regulates molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and reveals a new potential role for L. rhamnosus in the treatment of lipid disorders. PMID:25822072

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus lowers zebrafish lipid content by changing gut microbiota and host transcription of genes involved in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falcinelli, Silvia; Picchietti, Simona; Rodiles, Ana; Cossignani, Lina; Merrifield, Daniel L.; Taddei, Anna Rita; Maradonna, Francesca; Olivotto, Ike; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Carnevali, Oliana

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome plays an important role in lipid metabolism but how the introduction of probiotic communities affects host lipid metabolism is poorly understood. Using a multidisciplinary approach we addressed this knowledge gap using the zebrafish model by coupling high-throughput sequencing with biochemical, molecular and morphological analysis to evaluate the changes in the intestine. Analysis of bacterial 16S libraries revealed that Lactobacillus rhamnosus was able to modulate the gut microbiome of zebrafish larvae, elevating the abundance of Firmicutes sequences and reducing the abundance of Actinobacteria. The gut microbiome changes modulated host lipid processing by inducing transcriptional down-regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and triglycerides metabolism (fit2, agpat4, dgat2, mgll, hnf4α, scap, and cck) concomitantly decreasing total body cholesterol and triglyceride content and increasing fatty acid levels. L. rhamnosus treatment also increased microvilli and enterocyte lengths and decreased lipid droplet size in the intestinal epithelium. These changes resulted in elevated zebrafish larval growth. This integrated system investigation demonstrates probiotic modulation of the gut microbiome, highlights a novel gene network involved in lipid metabolism, provides an insight into how the microbiome regulates molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and reveals a new potential role for L. rhamnosus in the treatment of lipid disorders. PMID:25822072

  9. A Lys49 phospholipase A2, isolated from Bothrops asper snake venom, induces lipid droplet formation in macrophages which depends on distinct signaling pathways and the C-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Leiguez, Elbio; Moreira, Vanessa; Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Lopes de Melo, Robson; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs), key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115-129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38(MAPK) or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages. PMID:23509782

  10. Multifactorial resistance to aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug CHR2863 in myeloid leukemia cells: down-regulation of carboxylesterase 1, drug sequestration in lipid droplets and pro-survival activation ERK/Akt/mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Al, Marjon; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kammerer, Sarah; Chandrupatla, Durga M.S.H.; Honeywell, Richard; Musters, Rene P.J.; Giovannetti, Elisa; O'Toole, Tom; Scheffer, George L.; Krige, David; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Lems, Willem F.; Kramer, Pieternella A.; Scheper, Rik J.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Jansen, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors are receiving attention as combination chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia. However, the factors determining therapeutic efficacy remain elusive. Here we identified the molecular basis of acquired resistance to CHR2863, an orally available hydrophobic aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug with an esterase-sensitive motif, in myeloid leukemia cells. CHR2863 enters cells by diffusion and is retained therein upon esterase activity-mediated conversion to its hydrophilic active metabolite drug CHR6768, thereby exerting amino acid depletion. Carboxylesterases (CES) serve as candidate prodrug activating enzymes given CES1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia specimens. We established two novel myeloid leukemia sublines U937/CHR2863(200) and U937/CHR2863(5uM), with low (14-fold) and high level (270-fold) CHR2863 resistance. The latter drug resistant cells displayed: (i) complete loss of CES1-mediated drug activation associated with down-regulation of CES1 mRNA and protein, (ii) marked retention/sequestration of the prodrug, (iii) a substantial increase in intracellular lipid droplets, and (iv) a dominant activation of the pro-survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Remarkably, the latter feature coincided with a gain of sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. These finding delineate the molecular basis of CHR2863 resistance and offer a novel modality to overcome this drug resistance in myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26496029

  11. Distributions and Transformations of Natural Abundance 14C and 13C in Dissolved and Particulate Lipids in a Major Temperate Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Canuel, E. A.; McIntosh, H.; Barrett, A.; Ferer, E.; Hossler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Limited previous studies have shown major differences in the natural 14C and 13C isotopic signatures and radiocarbon ages of different biochemical classes (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipid, etc.) in river, estuarine and marine dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively). Of particular note are the much greater radiocarbon ages of lipophilic materials than other compound classes. Possible explanations for these findings include greater-than-expected inputs of fossil and highly aged lipid-containing organic matter to rivers and estuaries, extended sorptive-protection of lipophilic materials from degradation and/or lower overall reactivities of lipids vs. other major biochemical classes. We measured the Delta 14C and del 13C signatures and 14C ages of lipid classes in DOM and POM in a major temperate estuary, Delaware Bay (USA) over two years. Changes in DOM were also followed during large volume dark and light incubations to assess the microbial and photochemical reactivity and processing of DOM and lipids. Neutral lipids in DOM were among the most highly aged (> 30,000 yrs BP) of any materials measured in natural waters to date, and were significantly older than co-occurring polar lipids (~4,000-5,000 yrs BP). In general, DOM lipid ages were significantly greater than POM lipid ages across the river-estuary transect, arguing against sorptive protection as the major factor explaining greater ages of lipid than those of other compound classes. Both dark and light incubations of DOM resulted in losses of very highly aged material (30-50,000 y BP), with the remnant exported lipids being correspondingly younger. The microbial and photochemical alterations were most pronounced for lipids from freshwater reaches of the system (i.e., the Delaware River). These findings suggest that a) dissolved vs. particulate lipids have fundamentally different sources and/or physico-chemical partitioning, b) different lipid classes (e.g., neutral vs. polar

  12. Ultrastructural characterization of porcine oocytes and adjacent follicular cells during follicle development: lipid component evolution.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata C; Báo, Sônia N; Jivago, José Luiz P R; Lucci, Carolina M

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the morphometry and ultrastructure of porcine preantral and antral follicles, especially the lipid component evolution. Ovarian tissue was processed for light microscopy. Ovarian tissue and dissected antral follicles (< 2, 2-4, and 4-6 mm) were also processed for transmission electron microscopy using routine methods and using an osmium-imidazole method for lipid detection. Primordial follicles (34 ± 5 μm in diameter, mean ± SD) had one layer of flattened-cuboidal granulosa cells around the oocyte, primary follicles (40 ± 7 μm) had a single layer of cuboidal granulosa cells around the oocyte, and secondary follicles (102 ± 58 μm) had two or more layers of cuboidal granulosa cells around the oocyte. Preantral follicle oocytes had many round mitochondria and both rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. In oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, lipid droplets were abundant and were mostly located at the cell poles. In secondary and antral follicles, the zona pellucida completely surrounded the oocyte, whereas some microvilli and granulosa cells projected through it. Numerous electron-lucent vesicles and vacuoles were present in the oolemma of secondary and antral follicles. Based on osmium-imidazole staining, most of these structures were shown to be lipid droplets. As the follicle developed, the appearance of the lipid droplets changed from small and black to large and gray, dark or dark with light streaks, suggesting that their nature may change over time. In summary, although porcine follicles and oocytes had many similarities to those of other mammalian species, they were rich in lipids, with lipid droplets with varying morphological patterns as the follicle developed. PMID:21835450

  13. Biochemical, Transcriptional, and Bioinformatic Analysis of Lipid Droplets from Seeds of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) and Their Use as Potent Sequestration Agents against the Toxic Pollutant, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Rahman, Farzana; Blee, Elizabeth; Murphy, Denis J.

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of aquatic environments with dioxins, the most toxic group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), is a major ecological issue. Dioxins are highly lipophilic and bioaccumulate in fatty tissues of marine organisms used for seafood where they constitute a potential risk for human health. Lipid droplets (LDs) purified from date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, seeds were characterized and their capacity to extract dioxins from aquatic systems was assessed. The bioaffinity of date palm LDs toward 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener of dioxins was determined. Fractioned LDs were spheroidal with mean diameters of 2.5 µm, enclosing an oil-rich core of 392.5 mg mL-1. Isolated LDs did not aggregate and/or coalesce unless placed in acidic media and were strongly associated with three major groups of polypeptides of relative mass 32–37, 20–24, and 16–18 kDa. These masses correspond to the LD-associated proteins, oleosins, caleosins, and steroleosins, respectively. Efficient partitioning of TCDD into LDs occurred with a coefficient of log KLB/w,TCDD = 7.528 ± 0.024; it was optimal at neutral pH and was dependent on the presence of the oil-rich core, but was independent of the presence of LD-associated proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the date palm genome revealed nine oleosin-like, five caleosin-like, and five steroleosin-like sequences, with predicted structures having putative lipid-binding domains that match their LD stabilizing roles and use as bio-based encapsulation systems. Transcriptomic analysis of date palm seedlings exposed to TCDD showed strong up-regulation of several caleosin and steroleosin genes, consistent with increased LD formation. The results suggest that the plant LDs could be used in ecological remediation strategies to remove POPs from aquatic environments. Recent reports suggest that several fungal and algal species also use LDs to sequester both external and internally derived hydrophobic toxins

  14. Biochemical, Transcriptional, and Bioinformatic Analysis of Lipid Droplets from Seeds of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) and Their Use as Potent Sequestration Agents against the Toxic Pollutant, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxin.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Rahman, Farzana; Blee, Elizabeth; Murphy, Denis J

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of aquatic environments with dioxins, the most toxic group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), is a major ecological issue. Dioxins are highly lipophilic and bioaccumulate in fatty tissues of marine organisms used for seafood where they constitute a potential risk for human health. Lipid droplets (LDs) purified from date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, seeds were characterized and their capacity to extract dioxins from aquatic systems was assessed. The bioaffinity of date palm LDs toward 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener of dioxins was determined. Fractioned LDs were spheroidal with mean diameters of 2.5 µm, enclosing an oil-rich core of 392.5 mg mL(-1). Isolated LDs did not aggregate and/or coalesce unless placed in acidic media and were strongly associated with three major groups of polypeptides of relative mass 32-37, 20-24, and 16-18 kDa. These masses correspond to the LD-associated proteins, oleosins, caleosins, and steroleosins, respectively. Efficient partitioning of TCDD into LDs occurred with a coefficient of log K LB/w,TCDD = 7.528 ± 0.024; it was optimal at neutral pH and was dependent on the presence of the oil-rich core, but was independent of the presence of LD-associated proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the date palm genome revealed nine oleosin-like, five caleosin-like, and five steroleosin-like sequences, with predicted structures having putative lipid-binding domains that match their LD stabilizing roles and use as bio-based encapsulation systems. Transcriptomic analysis of date palm seedlings exposed to TCDD showed strong up-regulation of several caleosin and steroleosin genes, consistent with increased LD formation. The results suggest that the plant LDs could be used in ecological remediation strategies to remove POPs from aquatic environments. Recent reports suggest that several fungal and algal species also use LDs to sequester both external and internally derived hydrophobic toxins, which

  15. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J M; Bowick, M J

    2016-03-11

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional. PMID:27015513

  16. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J. M.; Bowick, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  17. Droplet-Based Production of Liposomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackley, Donald E.; Forster, Anita

    2009-01-01

    A process for making monodisperse liposomes having lipid bilayer membranes involves fewer, simpler process steps than do related prior methods. First, a microfluidic, cross junction droplet generator is used to produce vesicles comprising aqueous solution droplets contained in single layer lipid membranes. The vesicles are collected in a lipid-solvent mix that is at most partially soluble in water and is less dense than is water. A layer of water is dispensed on top of the solvent. By virtue of the difference in densities, the water sinks to the bottom and the solvent floats to the top. The vesicles, which have almost the same density as that of water, become exchanged into the water instead of floating to the top. As there are excess lipids in the solvent solution, in order for the vesicles to remain in the water, the addition of a second lipid layer to each vesicle is energetically favored. The resulting lipid bilayers present the hydrophilic ends of the lipid molecules to both the inner and outer membrane surfaces. If lipids of a second kind are dissolved in the solvent in sufficient excess before use, then asymmetric liposomes may be formed.

  18. A new droplet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  19. A new droplet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-03-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  20. Effect of gluten on soybean oil droplets in jet-cooked starch-oil composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jet cooked starch-lipid composites have been developed as a technology for suspending micron-size lipid droplets in an aqueous cooked starch dispersion. Normally oil droplets are independent and freely mobile in such liquid composites. When wheat flour was used as the starch source, unusual behavi...

  1. Mechanisms of droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physico-chemical mechanisms governing droplet vaporization and combustion are discussed. Specific topics include governing equations and simplifications, the classical d(2)-Law solution and its subsequent modification, finite-rate kinetics and the flame structure, droplet dynamics, near- and super-critical combustion, combustion of multicomponent fuel blends/emulsions/suspensions, and droplet interaction. Potential research topics are suggested.

  2. Patterning droplets with durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Style, Robert W.; Che, Yonglu; Park, Su Ji; Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho; Hyland, Callen; German, Guy K.; Power, Michael P.; Wilen, Larry A.; Wettlaufer, John S.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cell types have shown a remarkable ability to detect and move along gradients in stiffness of an underlying substrate—a process known as durotaxis. The mechanisms underlying durotaxis are still unresolved, but generally believed to involve active sensing and locomotion. Here, we show that simple liquid droplets also undergo durotaxis. By modulating substrate stiffness, we obtain fine control of droplet position on soft, flat substrates. Unlike other control mechanisms, droplet durotaxis works without imposing chemical, thermal, electrical, or topographical gradients. We show that droplet durotaxis can be used to create large-scale droplet patterns and is potentially useful for many applications, such as microfluidics, thermal control, and microfabrication. PMID:23798415

  3. The lipid droplet—a well-connected organelle

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Goodman, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of inter-organellar communication has grown exponentially in recent years. This review focuses on the interactions that cytoplasmic lipid droplets have with other organelles. Twenty-five years ago droplets were considered simply particles of coalesced fat. Ten years ago there were hints from proteomics studies that droplets might interact with other structures to share lipids and proteins. Now it is clear that the droplets interact with many if not most cellular structures to maintain cellular homeostasis and to buffer against insults such as starvation. The evidence for this statement, as well as probes to understand the nature and results of droplet interactions, are presented. PMID:26322308

  4. How coalescing droplets jump.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications. PMID:25171210

  5. Lipid Accumulation during the Establishment of Kleptoplasty in Elysia chlorotica

    PubMed Central

    Pelletreau, Karen N.; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Weber, Katrin L.; Rumpho, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of kleptoplasty (retention of “stolen plastids”) in the digestive tissue of the sacoglossan Elysia chlorotica Gould was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Cellular processes occurring during the initial exposure to plastids were observed in laboratory raised animals ranging from 1–14 days post metamorphosis (dpm). These observations revealed an abundance of lipid droplets (LDs) correlating to plastid abundance. Starvation of animals resulted in LD and plastid decay in animals <5 dpm that had not yet achieved permanent kleptoplasty. Animals allowed to feed on algal prey (Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh) for 7 d or greater retained stable plastids resistant to cellular breakdown. Lipid analysis of algal and animal samples supports that these accumulating LDs may be of plastid origin, as the often algal-derived 20∶5 eicosapentaenoic acid was found in high abundance in the animal tissue. Subsequent culturing of animals in dark conditions revealed a reduced ability to establish permanent kleptoplasty in the absence of photosynthetic processes, coupled with increased mortality. Together, these data support an important role of photosynthetic lipid production in establishing and stabilizing this unique animal kleptoplasty. PMID:24828251

  6. Droplet transport system and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments of droplet transport systems and methods are disclosed for levitating and transporting single or encapsulated droplets using thermocapillary convection. One method embodiment, among others comprises providing a droplet of a first liquid; and applying thermocapillary convection to the droplet to levitate and move the droplet.

  7. Water droplets also swim!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  8. Photopolymerization Of Levitated Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Experimental containerless process combines two established techniques to make variety of polymeric microspheres. In single step, electrostatically-levitated monomer droplets polymerized by ultraviolet light. Faster than multiple-step emulsion polymerization process used to make microspheres. Droplets suspended in cylindrical quadrupole electrostatic levitator. Alternating electrostatic field produces dynamic potential along axis. Process enables tailoring of microspheres for medical, scientific, and industrial applications.

  9. Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, John B., Jr.; Nayagan, Vedha; Dryer, Frederick L.; Williams, Forman A.

    1998-01-01

    The first space-based experiments were performed on the combustion of free, individual liquid fuel droplets in oxidizing atmospheres. The fuel was heptane, with initial droplet diameters ranging about from 1 mm to 4 mm. The atmospheres were mixtures of helium and oxygen, at pressures of 1.00, 0.50 and 0.25 bar, with oxygen mole fractions between 20% and 40%, as well as normal Spacelab cabin air. The temperatures of the atmospheres and of the initial liquid fuel were nominally 300 K. A total of 44 droplets were burned successfully on the two flights, 8 on the shortened STS-83 mission and 36 on STS-94. The results spanned the full range of heptane droplet combustion behavior, from radiative flame extinction at larger droplet diameters in the more dilute atmospheres to diffusive extinction in the less dilute atmospheres, with the droplet disappearing prior to flame extinction at the highest oxygen concentrations. Quasisteady histories of droplet diameters were observed along with unsteady histories of flame diameters. New and detailed information was obtained on burning rates, flame characteristics and soot behavior. The results have motivated new computational and theoretical investigations of droplet combustion, improving knowledge of the chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer processes involved in burning liquid fuels.

  10. Liquid droplet generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Orme, Melissa; Farnham, Tony; Vandiep, G. Pham; Huerre, P.

    1989-01-01

    A pre-prototype segment of a droplet sheet generator for a liquid droplet radiator was designed, constructed and tested. The ability to achieve a uniform, non-diverging droplet sheet is limited by manufacturing tolerances on nozzle parallelism. For an array of 100, 100 micrometer diameters nozzles spaced 5 stream diameters apart, typical standard deviations in stream alignment were plus or minus 10 mrad. The drop to drop fractional speed variations of the drops in typical streams were similar and independent of position in the array. The absolute value of the speed dispersion depended on the amplitude of the disturbance applied to the stream. A second generation preliminary design of a 5200 stream segment of a droplet sheet generator was completed. The design is based on information developed during testing of the pre-prototype segment, along with the results of an acoustical analysis for the stagnation cavity pressure fluctuations used to break-up the streams into droplets.

  11. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, E.R.; Perl, M.L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal inter-droplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications. 8 figs.

  12. Vaporization of Deforming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxing; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-11-01

    Droplet deformation is one of the most important factors influencing the evaporation rate. In the present study, high-fidelity numerical simulations of single evaporating droplets with deformation are carried out over a wide range of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The formulation is based on a complete set of conservation equations for both the liquid and surrounding gas phases. A modified volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique that takes into account heat and mass transfer is used to track the behavior of the liquid/gas interface. Special attention is given to the property conservation, which can be realized by using an iterative algorithm that enforces a divergence constraint in cells containing the interface. The effect of the ambient flow on droplet dynamics and evaporation are investigated systematically. Various underlying mechanisms dictating the droplet characteristics in different deformation regimes are identified. Correlations for the droplet evaporation rate are established in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers.

  13. Lipid synthesis in chick epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lavker, R M

    1975-07-01

    Lipid synthesis in newborn chick epidermis was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography after injection of tritiated palmitate. The labeled lipid product in the tissue was identified as mostly triglyceride. At the earliest time after injection (6 hr), the radioactive precursor was taken up by all viable cells of the epidermis. Grain density was heaviest over basal cells, moderate over spinous cells, and slight over granular cells; thus lipid incorporation is highest in the basal and spinous regions of the chick epidermis. As time after injection progressed, the increasing amounts of grains over the granular and horny cells and decreasing amounts over the basal and spinous cells reflected the continuous upward displacement of cells from one layer into the next. From the distribution of silver grains within the epidermal cells, it has been concluded that, with the passage of time, triglycerides synthesized by the epidermal cells were mainly located in lipid droplets. The numerous grains associated with the elements of the endoplasmic reticulum indicated that this organelle is involved in aggregating triglyceride molecules into lipid droplets. The fact that grains were seen within the horny cells indicated that part of the horny cell consists of lipid probably derived from the lipid droplets retained by the cells during keratinization. PMID:1151110

  14. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  15. METHANE GAS STABILIZES SUPERCOOLED ETHANE DROPLETS IN TITAN'S CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chia C.; Lang, E. Kathrin; Signorell, Ruth

    2010-03-20

    Strong evidence for ethane clouds in various regions of Titan's atmosphere has recently been found. Ethane is usually assumed to exist as ice particles in these clouds, although the possible role of liquid and supercooled liquid ethane droplets has been recognized. Here, we report on infrared spectroscopic measurements of ethane aerosols performed in the laboratory under conditions mimicking Titan's lower atmosphere. The results clearly show that liquid ethane droplets are significantly stabilized by methane gas which is ubiquitous in Titan's nitrogen atmosphere-a phenomenon that does not have a counterpart for water droplets in Earth's atmosphere. Our data imply that supercooled ethane droplets are much more abundant in Titan's clouds than previously anticipated. Possibly, these liquid droplets are even more important for cloud processes and the formation of lakes than ethane ice particles.

  16. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  17. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup. PMID:26555381

  18. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Eric R.; Perl, Martin L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

  19. Microscopic Rayleigh Droplet Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, R. B.

    2005-11-01

    A periodically triggered Rayleigh Droplet Beam (RDB) delivers a perfectly linear and periodic stream of identical, monoenergetic droplets that are phase-locked to the trigger signal. The droplet diameter and spacing are easily adjusted of choice of nozzle diameter and trigger frequency. Any liquid of low viscosity may be emloyed as the beam fluid. Although the field of nanofluidics is expanding rapidly, little effort has yet been devoted to ``external flows'' such as RDB's. At ASU we have generated RDB's of water and methanol down to 2 microns in droplet diameter. Nozzle clogging is the sole impediment to smaller droplets. Microscopic Rayleigh droplet beams offer tremendous potential for fundamental physical measurements, fluid dynamics research, and nanofabrication. This talk will describe the apparatus and techniques used at ASU to generate RDB's (surprisingly simple and inexpensive), discuss the triboelectric phenomena that play a role (surprisingly significant), present some initial experimental fluid dynamics measurements, and briefly survey RDB applications. Our particular interest in RDB's is as microscopic transport systems to deliver hydrated, undenatured proteins into vacuum for structure determination via serial diffraction of x-rays or electrons. This may offer the first general method for structure determination of non-crystallizable proteins.

  20. Functions of the Coacervate Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1982-12-01

    Functions of coacervate droplets as protocells are studied by using synthetic polymers. The coacervate droplets were made from PVA-A and PVA-S. When glycine or diglycine were in the surrounding medium, the coacervate droplets concentrated them. The concentration of glycine in the coacervate droplets was higher than that of diglycine. When this mixture was irradiated by UV light, the coacervate droplets protected them from the photochemical decomposition.

  1. Fuel Droplet Burning During Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 4 1997, MET:2/05:40 (approximate). The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.4MB, 13-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300168.html.

  2. On the acoustic properties of vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C; Williams, Ross; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N

    2014-06-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on clinically relevant time scales of hundreds of milliseconds after vaporization. It was found that the vaporized droplets oscillate non-linearly and exhibit a resonant bubble size shift and increased damping relative to uncoated gas bubbles due to the presence of coating material. Unlike the commercially available lipid-coated ultrasound contrast agents, which may exhibit compression-only behavior, vaporized droplets may exhibit expansion-dominated oscillations. It was further observed that the non-linearity of the acoustic response of the bubbles was comparable to that of SonoVue microbubbles. These results suggest that vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets possess the acoustic characteristics necessary for their potential use as ultrasound contrast agents in clinical practice. PMID:24462162

  3. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We have considered evolution of baryon-free droplets which have different initial temperatures and expansion rates. As a typical trend we observe an oscillating behavior of the droplet radius superimposed with a gradual shrinkage due to the hadron emission. The characteristic life time of droplets with radii 1.5-2 fm are about 9-16 fm/c.

  4. HIF-2α dependent lipid storage promotes endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bo; Ackerman, Daniel; Sanchez, Danielle J.; Li, Bo; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Grazioli, Alison; Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Diehl, J. Alan; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Two hallmarks of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) are constitutive hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling and abundant intracellular lipid droplets (LDs). However, regulation of lipid storage and its role in ccRCC are incompletely understood. Transcriptional profiling of primary ccRCC samples revealed that expression of the LD coat protein gene PLIN2 was elevated in tumors and correlated with HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, activation. HIF-2α dependent PLIN2 expression promoted lipid storage, proliferation, and viability in xenograft tumors. Mechanistically, lipid storage maintained integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is functionally and physically associated with LDs. Specifically, PLIN2 dependent lipid storage suppressed cytotoxic ER stress responses that otherwise result from elevated protein synthetic activity characteristic of ccRCC cells. Thus, in addition to promoting ccRCC proliferation and anabolic metabolism, HIF-2α modulates lipid storage to sustain ER homeostasis, particularly under conditions of nutrient and oxygen limitation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. PMID:25829424

  5. Droplet lasing spectroscopy applied to droplet stream flames

    SciTech Connect

    Santangelo, P.J.; Kennedy, I.M.

    1999-04-01

    Droplet lasing spectroscopy (DLS) has been applied to the measurement of droplet size and vaporization rates in both reacting and non-reacting rectilinear droplet streams. A Berglund-Liu droplet generator was used to generate a stream of droplets, approximately 63 microns in diameter and 6.5 droplet diameters apart. Ethanol, methanol, and a pentane/ethanol mixture were doped with Rhodamine 6G. Lasing spectra were examined in the steady-state combustion regime. In the pentane/ethanol case the measurements were carried out in a sooting region of the flame. In some cases, vaporization rates were high enough to measure the rate from consecutive droplets, yielding a quasi-instantaneous measurement. In all cases, the D{sup 2} law of droplet vaporization was evident. In addition, photographs of the flames yielded measurements of flame height and thickness.

  6. Droplet Combustion Experiment movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300164.html.

  7. The use of virtual ground to control transmembrane voltages and measure bilayer currents in serial arrays of droplet interface bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.

    2013-09-01

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a simple technique for constructing a stable lipid bilayer at the interface of two lipid-encased water droplets submerged in oil. Networks of DIBs formed by connecting more than two droplets constitute a new form of modular biomolecular smart material, where the transduction properties of a single lipid bilayer can affect the actions performed at other interface bilayers in the network via diffusion through the aqueous environments of shared droplet connections. The passive electrical properties of a lipid bilayer and the arrangement of droplets that determine the paths for transport in the network require specific electrical control to stimulate and interrogate each bilayer. Here, we explore the use of virtual ground for electrodes inserted into specific droplets in the network and employ a multichannel patch clamp amplifier to characterize bilayer formation and ion-channel activity in a serial DIB array. Analysis of serial connections of DIBs is discussed to understand how assigning electrode connections to the measurement device can be used to measure activity across all lipid membranes within a network. Serial arrays of DIBs are assembled using the regulated attachment method within a multi-compartment flexible substrate, and wire-type electrodes inserted into each droplet compartment of the substrate enable the application of voltage and measurement of current in each droplet in the array.

  8. Chip-based droplet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  9. Geoengineering with Charged Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water molecules in a droplet are held together by intermolecular forces generated by hydrogen bonding which has a bonding energy of only about 0.2 eV. One can create a more rugged droplet by using an ion as a condensation nucleus. In that case, water molecules are held together by the interaction between the ion and the dipole moments of the water molecules surrounding the ion, in addition to any hydrogen bonding. In this research, properties of such charged droplets were investigated using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. A molecule which exhibits positive electron affinity is a good candidate to serve as the ionic condensation nucleus, because addition of an electron to such a molecule creates an energetically more stable state than the neutral molecule. A good example is the oxygen molecule (O2) where energy of O2 negative (O2-) ion is lower than that of the neutral O2 by about 0.5 eV. Examples of other molecules which have positive electron affinity include ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur oxides (SOx, x=1-3). Atomic models used in the calculations consisted of a negative ion of one of the molecules mentioned above surrounded by water molecules. Calculations were performed using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Energy of interaction between O2- ion and the water molecule was found to be ~0.7 eV. This energy is an order of magnitude greater than the thermal energy of even the highest temperatures encountered in the atmosphere. Once created, charged rugged droplets can survive in hot and dry climates where they can be utilized to create humidity and precipitation. The ion which serves as the nucleus of the droplet can attract not only water molecules but also other dipolar gases in the atmosphere. Such dipolar gases include industrial pollutants, for example nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or sulfur dioxide (SO2). Energy of interaction between O2- ion and pollutant

  10. Role of intramyocelluar lipids in human health

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2016-01-01

    Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) is predominantly stored as intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) in lipid droplets and is utilized as metabolic fuel during physical exercise. IMTG is also implicated in muscle insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes. However, it has become apparent that lipid moieties such as ceramide and diacylglycerol are the likely culprits of IR. This article reviews current knowledge of IMCL-mediated IR and important areas of investigation, including myocellular lipid transport and lipid droplet proteins. Several crucial questions remain unanswered, such as the identity of specific ceramide and diacylglycerol species that mediate IR in human muscle and their subcellular location. Quantitative lipidomics and proteomics of targeted subcellular organelles will help to better define the mechanisms underlying pathological IMCL accumulation and IR. PMID:22721584

  11. Electric Field Mediated Droplet Centering

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Z.-M.; Jones, T.B.; Tucker-Schwartz, A.; Harding, D.R.

    2010-03-12

    Double emulsion droplets subjected to a uniform ac electric field self-assemble into highly concentric structures via the dipole/dipole force if the outer droplet has a higher dielectric constant than the suspending liquid. The dielectric constant of the inner droplet has no influence. To minimize field-induced droplet distortion, the liquids must be density matched to ~0.1%. Centering of ~3 to 6 mm diameter droplets is achieved within ~60 s for field strengths of ~10^4 V_rms /m in liquids of viscosity ~10 cP. Effective centering depends strongly on frequency if the outer shell is conductive.

  12. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  13. Tobacco NtLTP1, a glandular-specific lipid transfer protein, is required for lipid secretion from glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Eui; Lim, Soon; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Jung Yeon; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Ji-Ah; Kim, Yun-Soo

    2012-05-01

    Glandular trichomes are the phytochemical factories of plants, and they secrete a wide range of commercially important natural products such as lipids, terpenes and flavonoids. Herein, we report that the Nicotiana tabacum LTP1 (NtLTP1) gene, which is specifically expressed in long glandular trichomes, plays a role in lipid secretion from trichome heads. NtLTP1 mRNA is abundantly transcribed in trichomes, but NtLTP3, NtLTP4 and NtLTP5 are not. In situ hybridization revealed that NtLTP1 mRNAs accumulate specifically in long trichomes and not in short trichomes or epidermal cells. X-gluc staining of leaves from a transgenic plant expressing the NtLTP1 promoter fused to a GUS gene revealed that NtLTP1 protein accumulated preferentially on the tops of long glandular trichomes. GFP fluorescence from transgenic tobacco plants expressing an NtLTP1-GFP fusion protein was localized at the periphery of cells and in the excreted liquid droplets from the glandular trichome heads. In vitro assays using a fluorescent 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate probe indicated that recombinant NtLTP1 had lipid-binding activity. The overexpression of NtLTP1 in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in the increased secretion of trichome exudates, including epicuticular wax. In transgenic NtLTP1-RNAi lines, liquid secretion from trichomes was strongly reduced, but epicuticular wax secretion was not altered. Moreover, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing NtLTP1 showed increased protection against aphids. Taken together, these data suggest that NtLTP1 is abundantly expressed in long glandular trichomes, and may play a role in lipid secretion from long glandular trichomes. PMID:22171964

  14. Diffraction of walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2014-11-01

    We present results from our revisitation of the experiment of a walking droplet passing through a single slit, originally investigated by Couder & Fort (PRL, 2006). On each passage, the walker's trajectory is deviated as a result of the spatial confinement of its guiding wave. We explore the role of the droplet size and the bath's vibration amplitude on both the dynamics and statistics. We find the behavior to be remarkably sensitive to these control parameters. A complex physical picture emerges. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant CMMI-1333242, DMH through the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program, and GP through the Programma Operativo Regionale (POR) Calabria - FSE 2007/2013.

  15. Impurity Extraction by Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G.; Kincaid, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The goals are to model and to measure the phase equilibrium properties of a finely divided fluid containing a large number of chemically similar species. The objective is to develop an accurate, usable model for such phenomena as pollutant extraction of rain clouds, industrial separation in spray towers, and separation in emulsions. The project was designed as a hierarchy of complementary theoretical and experimental steps. A theory was developed to describe the segregation of complex impurities at the interface of a solvent. This phenomenon is important in phase behavior when a large fraction of molecules in a material are near an interface, the situation in a finely divided material. The theory will be modified to account for the effect of surface curvature on the surface tension. The study of mixtures differs from pure fluids not only because of the surface effects but also because composition differences between the droplet and the surrounding vapor can stabilize a droplet with respect to a bulk phase.

  16. Droplet monitoring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Thys, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    A droplet monitoring system is disclosed for analysis of mixed-phase fluid flow in development of gas turbines. The system uses a probe comprising two electrical wires spaced a known distance apart and connected at one end to means for establishing a dc potential between the wires. A drop in the fluid stream momentarily contacting both wires simultaneously causes and electrical signal which is amplified, detected and counted.

  17. Monodisperse Micro-Oil Droplets Stabilized by Polymerizable Phospholipid Coatings as Potential Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonjee; Pham, Tuan A; Beigie, Carl; Cabodi, Mario; Cleveland, Robin O; Nagy, Jon O; Wong, Joyce Y

    2015-09-15

    There is a critical need to formulate stable micron-sized oil droplets as hydrophobic drug carriers for efficient drug encapsulation, long-term storage, and sustained drug release. Microfluidic methods were developed to maximize the stability of micron-sized, oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions for potential use in drug delivery, using doxorubicin-loaded triacetin oil as a model hydrophobic drug formulation. Initial experiments examined multiple flow conditions for the dispersed (oil) and continuous (liposome aqueous) phases in a microfluidic device to establish the parameters that influenced droplet size. These data were fit to a mathematical model from the literature and indicate that the droplet sizes formed are controlled by the ratio of flow rates and the height of the device channel, rather than the orifice size. Next, we investigated effects of o/w emulsion production methods on the stability of the droplets. The stability of o/w emulsion produced by microfluidic flow-focusing techniques was found to be much greater (5 h vs 1 h) than for emulsions produced by mechanical agitation (vortexing). The increased droplet stability was attributed to the uniform size and lipid distribution of droplets generated by flow-focusing. In contrast, vortexed populations consisted of a wide size distribution that resulted in a higher prevalence of Ostwald ripening. Finally, the effects of shell polymerization on stability were investigated by comparing oil droplets encapsulated by a photopolymerizable diacetylene lipid shell to those with a nonpolymerizable lipid shell. Shell polymerization was found to significantly enhance stability against dissolution for flow-focused oil droplets but did not significantly affect the stability of vortexed droplets. Overall, results of these experiments show that flow-focusing is a promising technique for generating tunable, stable, monodisperse oil droplet emulsions, with potential applications for controlled delivery of hydrophobic drug

  18. Droplet Combustion Experiment Operates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 12, 1997, MET:11/07:00 (approximate). DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (119KB JPEG, 658 x 982 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300171.html.

  19. High-Voltage Droplet Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus that is extremely effective in dispensing a wide range of droplets has been developed. This droplet dispenser is unique in that it utilizes a droplet bias voltage, as well as an ionization pulse, to release a droplet. Apparatuses that deploy individual droplets have been used in many applications, including, notably, study of combustion of liquid fuels. Experiments on isolated droplets are useful in that they enable the study of droplet phenomena under well-controlled and simplified conditions. In this apparatus, a syringe dispenses a known value of liquid, which emerges from, and hangs onto, the outer end of a flat-tipped, stainless steel needle. Somewhat below the needle tip and droplet is a ring electrode. A bias high voltage, followed by a high-voltage pulse, is applied so as to attract the droplet sufficiently to pull it off the needle. The voltages are such that the droplet and needle are negatively charged and the ring electrode is positively charged.

  20. Interdroplet bilayer arrays in millifluidic droplet traps from 3D-printed moulds.

    PubMed

    King, Philip H; Jones, Gareth; Morgan, Hywel; de Planque, Maurits R R; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2014-02-21

    In droplet microfluidics, aqueous droplets are typically separated by an oil phase to ensure containment of molecules in individual droplets of nano-to-picoliter volume. An interesting variation of this method involves bringing two phospholipid-coated droplets into contact to form a lipid bilayer in-between the droplets. These interdroplet bilayers, created by manual pipetting of microliter droplets, have proved advantageous for the study of membrane transport phenomena, including ion channel electrophysiology. In this study, we adapted the droplet microfluidics methodology to achieve automated formation of interdroplet lipid bilayer arrays. We developed a 'millifluidic' chip for microliter droplet generation and droplet packing, which is cast from a 3D-printed mould. Droplets of 0.7-6.0 μL volume were packed as homogeneous or heterogeneous linear arrays of 2-9 droplets that were stable for at least six hours. The interdroplet bilayers had an area of up to 0.56 mm(2), or an equivalent diameter of up to 850 μm, as determined from capacitance measurements. We observed osmotic water transfer over the bilayers as well as sequential bilayer lysis by the pore-forming toxin melittin. These millifluidic interdroplet bilayer arrays combine the ease of electrical and optical access of manually pipetted microdroplets with the automation and reproducibility of microfluidic technologies. Moreover, the 3D-printing based fabrication strategy enables the rapid implementation of alternative channel geometries, e.g. branched arrays, with a design-to-device time of just 24-48 hours. PMID:24336841

  1. Maze Solving by Chemotactic Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J.; Browne, Kevin P.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-11

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze’s exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  2. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  3. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  4. Lipid-rich carcinoma of the breast that is strongly positive for estrogen receptor: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oba, Takaaki; Ono, Mayu; Iesato, Asumi; Hanamura, Toru; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tokiko; Kanai, Toshiharu; Maeno, Kazuma; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Tateishi, Ayako; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Takayama, Fumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-rich carcinoma (LRC) of the breast is a rare breast cancer variant that accounts for <1% of all breast malignancies. It has been reported that LRCs are negative for estrogen receptor. Here, we report a case of LRC of the breast that was strongly positive for estrogen receptor and treated with endocrine adjuvant therapy. A 52-year-old postmenopausal female noticed a lump in her right breast by self-examination and presented to our hospital. Physical examination revealed an elastic 30 mm ×20 mm hard mass in the upper medial part of her right breast. The findings obtained using ultrasonography, mammography, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested breast cancer. Core needle biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of invasive carcinoma. The patient underwent mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Histopathologically, the tumor cells were abundant in foamy cytoplasm. Because the presence of marked cytoplasmic lipid droplets was confirmed by Sudan IV staining and electron microscopic examination of the tumor and the lipid droplets were negative for periodic acid-Schiff staining, the tumor was diagnosed as an LRC. Immunohistochemically, estrogen and progesterone receptors of the tumor were strongly positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 was negative, and the ratio of Ki-67-positive cells was ~30%. After surgery, the patient underwent combination chemotherapy with anthracycline, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil, followed by docetaxel. Thereafter, the pateint was treated with letrozole and has remained well for 24 months with no signs of recurrence. PMID:27051299

  5. Lipid-rich carcinoma of the breast that is strongly positive for estrogen receptor: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Takaaki; Ono, Mayu; Iesato, Asumi; Hanamura, Toru; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tokiko; Kanai, Toshiharu; Maeno, Kazuma; Ito, Ken-ichi; Tateishi, Ayako; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Takayama, Fumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-rich carcinoma (LRC) of the breast is a rare breast cancer variant that accounts for <1% of all breast malignancies. It has been reported that LRCs are negative for estrogen receptor. Here, we report a case of LRC of the breast that was strongly positive for estrogen receptor and treated with endocrine adjuvant therapy. A 52-year-old postmenopausal female noticed a lump in her right breast by self-examination and presented to our hospital. Physical examination revealed an elastic 30 mm ×20 mm hard mass in the upper medial part of her right breast. The findings obtained using ultrasonography, mammography, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested breast cancer. Core needle biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of invasive carcinoma. The patient underwent mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Histopathologically, the tumor cells were abundant in foamy cytoplasm. Because the presence of marked cytoplasmic lipid droplets was confirmed by Sudan IV staining and electron microscopic examination of the tumor and the lipid droplets were negative for periodic acid–Schiff staining, the tumor was diagnosed as an LRC. Immunohistochemically, estrogen and progesterone receptors of the tumor were strongly positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 was negative, and the ratio of Ki-67-positive cells was ~30%. After surgery, the patient underwent combination chemotherapy with anthracycline, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil, followed by docetaxel. Thereafter, the pateint was treated with letrozole and has remained well for 24 months with no signs of recurrence. PMID:27051299

  6. Chemistry and Biology in Femtoliter and Picoliter Volume Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Daniel T.; Lorenz, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus The basic unit of any biological system is the cell, and malfunctions at the single-cell level can result in devastating diseases; in cancer metastasis, for example, a single cell seeds the formation of a distant tumor. Although tiny, a cell is a highly heterogeneous and compartmentalized structure: proteins, lipids, RNA, and small-molecule metabolites constantly traffic among intracellular organelles. Gaining detailed information about the spatiotemporal distribution of these biomolecules is crucial to our understanding of cellular function and dysfunction. To access this information, we need sensitive tools that are capable of extracting comprehensive biochemical information from single cells and subcellular organelles. In this Account, we outline our approach and highlight our progress towards mapping the spatiotemporal organization of information flow in single cells. Our technique is centered on the use of femtoliter- and picoliter-sized droplets as nanolabs for manipulating single cells and subcellular compartments. We have developed a single-cell nanosurgical technique for isolating select subcellular structures from live cells, a capability that is needed for the high-resolution manipulation and chemical analysis of single cells. Our microfluidic approaches for generating single femtoliter-sized droplets on demand include both pressure and electric field methods; we have also explored a design for the on-demand generation of multiple aqueous droplets to increase throughput. Droplet formation is only the first step in a sequence that requires manipulation, fusion, transport, and analysis. Optical approaches provide the most convenient and precise control over the formed droplets with our technology platform; we describe aqueous droplet manipulation with optical vortex traps, which enable the remarkable ability to dynamically “tune” the concentration of the contents. Integration of thermoelectric manipulations with these techniques affords

  7. Chemistry and biology in femtoliter and picoliter volume droplets.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Daniel T; Lorenz, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    The basic unit of any biological system is the cell, and malfunctions at the single-cell level can result in devastating diseases; in cancer metastasis, for example, a single cell seeds the formation of a distant tumor. Although tiny, a cell is a highly heterogeneous and compartmentalized structure: proteins, lipids, RNA, and small-molecule metabolites constantly traffic among intracellular organelles. Gaining detailed information about the spatiotemporal distribution of these biomolecules is crucial to our understanding of cellular function and dysfunction. To access this information, we need sensitive tools that are capable of extracting comprehensive biochemical information from single cells and subcellular organelles. In this Account, we outline our approach and highlight our progress toward mapping the spatiotemporal organization of information flow in single cells. Our technique is centered on the use of femtoliter- and picoliter-sized droplets as nanolabs for manipulating single cells and subcellular compartments. We have developed a single-cell nanosurgical technique for isolating select subcellular structures from live cells, a capability that is needed for the high-resolution manipulation and chemical analysis of single cells. Our microfluidic approaches for generating single femtoliter-sized droplets on demand include both pressure and electric field methods; we have also explored a design for the on-demand generation of multiple aqueous droplets to increase throughput. Droplet formation is only the first step in a sequence that requires manipulation, fusion, transport, and analysis. Optical approaches provide the most convenient and precise control over the formed droplets with our technology platform; we describe aqueous droplet manipulation with optical vortex traps, which enable the remarkable ability to dynamically "tune" the concentration of the contents. Integration of thermoelectric manipulations with these techniques affords further control. The

  8. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, Rebecca; Boreyko, Jonathan; Briggs, Dayrl; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of Leidenfrost droplets on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems using boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant way to direct droplet motion in a variety of emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling. This suggests that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon droplet impact onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. Asymmetric wettability and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing this to be the mechanism for the droplet directionality. This work was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Lab by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, US Dept. of Energy.

  9. A microfluidic platform for size-dependent generation of droplet interface bilayer networks on rails

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, P.; Elani, Y.; Law, R. V.; Brooks, N. J.; Seddon, J. M.; Ces, O.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are emerging as a cornerstone technology for the bottom up construction of cell-like and tissue-like structures and bio-devices. They are an exciting and versatile model-membrane platform, seeing increasing use in the disciplines of synthetic biology, chemical biology, and membrane biophysics. DIBs are formed when lipid-coated water-in-oil droplets are brought together—oil is excluded from the interface, resulting in a bilayer. Perhaps the greatest feature of the DIB platform is the ability to generate bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together, which can in turn be used in applications ranging from tissue mimics, multicellular models, and bio-devices. For such applications, the construction and release of DIB networks of defined size and composition on-demand is crucial. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized DIB networks (300–1500 pl droplets) on-chip. We do this by employing a droplet-on-rails strategy where droplets are guided down designated paths of a chip with the aid of microfabricated grooves or “rails,” and droplets of set sizes are selectively directed to specific rails using auxiliary flows. In this way we can uniquely produce parallel bilayer networks of defined sizes. By trapping several droplets in a rail, extended DIB networks containing up to 20 sequential bilayers could be constructed. The trapped DIB arrays can be composed of different lipid types and can be released on-demand and regenerated within seconds. We show that chemical signals can be propagated across the bio-network by transplanting enzymatic reaction cascades for inter-droplet communication. PMID:26759638

  10. A microfluidic platform for size-dependent generation of droplet interface bilayer networks on rails.

    PubMed

    Carreras, P; Elani, Y; Law, R V; Brooks, N J; Seddon, J M; Ces, O

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are emerging as a cornerstone technology for the bottom up construction of cell-like and tissue-like structures and bio-devices. They are an exciting and versatile model-membrane platform, seeing increasing use in the disciplines of synthetic biology, chemical biology, and membrane biophysics. DIBs are formed when lipid-coated water-in-oil droplets are brought together-oil is excluded from the interface, resulting in a bilayer. Perhaps the greatest feature of the DIB platform is the ability to generate bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together, which can in turn be used in applications ranging from tissue mimics, multicellular models, and bio-devices. For such applications, the construction and release of DIB networks of defined size and composition on-demand is crucial. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized DIB networks (300-1500 pl droplets) on-chip. We do this by employing a droplet-on-rails strategy where droplets are guided down designated paths of a chip with the aid of microfabricated grooves or "rails," and droplets of set sizes are selectively directed to specific rails using auxiliary flows. In this way we can uniquely produce parallel bilayer networks of defined sizes. By trapping several droplets in a rail, extended DIB networks containing up to 20 sequential bilayers could be constructed. The trapped DIB arrays can be composed of different lipid types and can be released on-demand and regenerated within seconds. We show that chemical signals can be propagated across the bio-network by transplanting enzymatic reaction cascades for inter-droplet communication. PMID:26759638

  11. Involvement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hydrolase Ldh1p in lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Thoms, Sven; Connerth, Melanie; Daum, Günther; Erdmann, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report the functional characterization of the newly identified lipid droplet hydrolase Ldh1p. Recombinant Ldh1p exhibits esterase and triacylglycerol lipase activities. Mutation of the serine in the hydrolase/lipase motif GXSXG completely abolished esterase activity. Ldh1p is required for the maintenance of a steady-state level of the nonpolar and polar lipids of lipid droplets. A characteristic feature of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δldh1 strain is the appearance of giant lipid droplets and an excessive accumulation of nonpolar lipids and phospholipids upon growth on medium containing oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Ldh1p is thought to play a role in maintaining the lipid homeostasis in yeast by regulating both phospholipid and nonpolar lipid levels. PMID:21478434

  12. Experiments examining drag in linear droplet packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. V.; Dunn-Rankin, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of vertically traveling droplet packets, where the droplets in each packet are aligned linearly, one behind another. The paper describes in detail, an experimental apparatus that produces repeatable, linearly aligned, and isolated droplet packets containing 1 6 droplets per packet. The apparatus is suitable for examining aerodynamic interactions between droplets within each packet. This paper demonstrates the performance of the apparatus by examining the drag reduction and collision of droplets traveling in the wake of a lead droplet. Comparison of a calculated single droplet trajectory with the detailed droplet position versus time data for a droplet packet provides the average drag reduction experienced by the trailing droplets due to the aerodynamic wake of the lead droplet. For the conditions of our experiment (4 droplet packet, 145 μm methanol droplets, 10 m/s initial velocity, initial droplet spacing of 5.2 droplet diameters, Reynolds number approx. 80) the average drag on the first trailing droplet was found to be 75% of the drag on the lead droplet.

  13. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26211746

  14. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. PMID:26211746

  15. Droplet Burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A fuel droplet burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) Experiment on STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:02/19:20 (approximate). This experiment, performed in the Middeck Glovebox, allows us to study the burning of fuels such as n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, ethanol, methanol/water mixtures, and heptane/hexadecane mixtures in droplets as large as 6 mm (nearly 1/4 inch). In this sequence, you see the burn of a 5mm droplet of n-heptane, in a 30% O2/He environment at 1 atmosphere pressure. The droplet (looking bright pink because of reflected light) hangs suspended from the supporting fiber. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (279KB JPEG, 1350 x 2026 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300175.html.

  16. Lepidopteran defence droplets - a composite physical and chemical weapon against potential predators

    PubMed Central

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Khakimov, Bekzod; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Clausen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Borch, Jonas; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Insects often release noxious substances for their defence. Larvae of Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera) secrete viscous and cyanogenic glucoside-containing droplets, whose effectiveness was associated with their physical and chemical properties. The droplets glued mandibles and legs of potential predators together and immobilised them. Droplets were characterised by a matrix of an aqueous solution of glycine-rich peptides (H-WG11-NH2) with significant amounts of proteins and glucose. Among the proteins, defensive proteins such as protease inhibitors, proteases and oxidases were abundant. The neurotoxin β-cyanoalanine was also found in the droplets. Despite the presence of cyanogenic glucosides, which release toxic hydrogen cyanide after hydrolysis by a specific β-glucosidase, the only β-glucosidase identified in the droplets (ZfBGD1) was inactive against cyanogenic glucosides. Accordingly, droplets did not release hydrogen cyanide, unless they were mixed with specific β-glucosidases present in the Zygaena haemolymph. Droplets secreted onto the cuticle hardened and formed sharp crystalline-like precipitates that may act as mandible abrasives to chewing predators. Hardening followed water evaporation and formation of antiparallel β-sheets of the peptide oligomers. Consequently, after mild irritation, Zygaena larvae deter predators by viscous and hardening droplets that contain defence proteins and β-cyanoalanine. After severe injury, droplets may mix with exuding haemolymph to release hydrogen cyanide. PMID:26940001

  17. Lepidopteran defence droplets - a composite physical and chemical weapon against potential predators.

    PubMed

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Khakimov, Bekzod; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Clausen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Borch, Jonas; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Insects often release noxious substances for their defence. Larvae of Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera) secrete viscous and cyanogenic glucoside-containing droplets, whose effectiveness was associated with their physical and chemical properties. The droplets glued mandibles and legs of potential predators together and immobilised them. Droplets were characterised by a matrix of an aqueous solution of glycine-rich peptides (H-WG11-NH2) with significant amounts of proteins and glucose. Among the proteins, defensive proteins such as protease inhibitors, proteases and oxidases were abundant. The neurotoxin β-cyanoalanine was also found in the droplets. Despite the presence of cyanogenic glucosides, which release toxic hydrogen cyanide after hydrolysis by a specific β-glucosidase, the only β-glucosidase identified in the droplets (ZfBGD1) was inactive against cyanogenic glucosides. Accordingly, droplets did not release hydrogen cyanide, unless they were mixed with specific β-glucosidases present in the Zygaena haemolymph. Droplets secreted onto the cuticle hardened and formed sharp crystalline-like precipitates that may act as mandible abrasives to chewing predators. Hardening followed water evaporation and formation of antiparallel β-sheets of the peptide oligomers. Consequently, after mild irritation, Zygaena larvae deter predators by viscous and hardening droplets that contain defence proteins and β-cyanoalanine. After severe injury, droplets may mix with exuding haemolymph to release hydrogen cyanide. PMID:26940001

  18. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  19. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A.; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E.; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect – a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface – we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces. PMID:23150770

  20. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Smith, Richard D

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  1. Levitation of liquid sodium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.S.; Cramb, A.W.; Hoburg, J.F.; Lally, B.

    1995-12-01

    Droplets of liquid sodium ranging from 1.2 to 2.1 g, immersed in mineral oil, were levitated in an electromagnetic field. The experimental setup was designed and constructed to levitate small metal droplets at audio frequencies. The levitated droplet was found to be very stable inside the inductor, and the equilibrium shape attained by the droplet in the electromagnetic field was measured during the experiment. A surface coupled mathematical model was used to calculate the self-consistent equilibrium droplet shape of liquid sodium under the influence of an electromagnetic field. The predicted shapes of the metal droplet and the position of the droplet inside the inductor compare well with the experimental data. The idea of casting metals and alloys without any physical contact has generated a lot of interest in the metals industry, especially in the production of metals/alloys that are highly reactive and have a very high melting point. Containerless casting can be achieved by levitating or pushing the liquid metal from the surface of the container.

  2. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  3. Droplet resonator based optofluidic microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraz, Alper; Jonáš, Alexandr; Aas, Mehdi; Karadag, Yasin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Zemánek, Pavel; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David

    2014-03-01

    We introduce tunable optofluidic microlasers based on active optical resonant cavities formed by optically stretched, dye-doped emulsion droplets confined in a dual-beam optical trap. To achieve tunable dye lasing, optically pumped droplets of oil dispersed in water are stretched by light in the dual-beam trap. Subsequently, resonant path lengths of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) propagating in the droplet are modified, leading to shifts in the microlaser emission wavelengths. We also report lasing in airborne, Rhodamine B-doped glycerolwater droplets which were localized using optical tweezers. While being trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets were pumped with a Q-switched green laser. Furthermore, biological lasing in droplets supported by a superhydrophobic surface is demonstrated using a solution of Venus variant of the yellow fluorescent protein or E. Coli bacterial cells expressing stably the Venus protein. Our results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  4. Genetics of Lipid-Storage Management in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos.

    PubMed

    Schmökel, Verena; Memar, Nadin; Wiekenberg, Anne; Trotzmüller, Martin; Schnabel, Ralf; Döring, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Lipids play a pivotal role in embryogenesis as structural components of cellular membranes, as a source of energy, and as signaling molecules. On the basis of a collection of temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal mutants, a systematic database search, and a subsequent microscopic analysis of >300 interference RNA (RNAi)-treated/mutant worms, we identified a couple of evolutionary conserved genes associated with lipid storage in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The genes include cpl-1 (cathepsin L-like cysteine protease), ccz-1 (guanine nucleotide exchange factor subunit), and asm-3 (acid sphingomyelinase), which is closely related to the human Niemann-Pick disease-causing gene SMPD1. The respective mutant embryos accumulate enlarged droplets of neutral lipids (cpl-1) and yolk-containing lipid droplets (ccz-1) or have larger genuine lipid droplets (asm-3). The asm-3 mutant embryos additionally showed an enhanced resistance against C band ultraviolet (UV-C) light. Herein we propose that cpl-1, ccz-1, and asm-3 are genes required for the processing of lipid-containing droplets in C. elegans embryos. Owing to the high levels of conservation, the identified genes are also useful in studies of embryonic lipid storage in other organisms. PMID:26773047

  5. TPD52 expression increases neutral lipid storage within cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kamili, Alvin; Roslan, Nuruliza; Frost, Sarah; Cantrill, Laurence C; Wang, Dongwei; Della-Franca, Austin; Bright, Robert K; Groblewski, Guy E; Straub, Beate K; Hoy, Andrew J; Chen, Yuyan; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2015-09-01

    Tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is amplified and/or overexpressed in cancers of diverse cellular origins. Altered cellular metabolism (including lipogenesis) is a hallmark of cancer development, and protein-protein associations between TPD52 and known regulators of lipid storage, and differential TPD52 expression in obese versus non-obese adipose tissue, suggest that TPD52 might regulate cellular lipid metabolism. We found increased lipid droplet numbers in BALB/c 3T3 cell lines stably expressing TPD52, compared with control and TPD52L1-expressing cell lines. TPD52-expressing 3T3 cells showed increased fatty acid storage in triglyceride (from both de novo synthesis and uptake) and formed greater numbers of lipid droplets upon oleic acid supplementation than control cells. TPD52 colocalised with Golgi, but not endoplasmic reticulum (ER), markers and also showed partial colocalisation with lipid droplets coated with ADRP (also known as PLIN2), with a proportion of TPD52 being detected in the lipid droplet fraction. Direct interactions between ADRP and TPD52, but not TPD52L1, were demonstrated using the yeast two-hybrid system, with ADRP-TPD52 interactions confirmed using GST pulldown assays. Our findings uncover a new isoform-specific role for TPD52 in promoting intracellular lipid storage, which might be relevant to TPD52 overexpression in cancer. PMID:26183179

  6. Arrayed water-in-oil droplet bilayers for membrane transport analysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, R; Soga, N; Hara, M; Noji, H

    2016-08-01

    The water-in-oil droplet bilayer is a simple and useful lipid bilayer system for membrane transport analysis. The droplet interface bilayer is readily formed by the contact of two water-in-oil droplets enwrapped by a phospholipid monolayer. However, the size of individual droplets with femtoliter volumes in a high-throughput manner is difficult to control, resulting in low sensitivity and throughput of membrane transport analysis. To overcome this drawback, in this study, we developed a novel micro-device in which a large number of droplet interface bilayers (>500) are formed at a time by using femtoliter-sized droplet arrays immobilized on a hydrophobic/hydrophilic substrate. The droplet volume was controllable from 3.5 to 350 fL by changing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic pattern on the device, allowing high-throughput analysis of membrane transport mechanisms including membrane permeability to solutes (e.g., ions or small molecules) with or without the aid of transport proteins. Thus, this novel platform broadens the versatility of water-in-oil droplet bilayers and will pave the way for novel analytical and pharmacological applications such as drug screening. PMID:27080052

  7. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  8. Orbiting pairs of walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Emmanuel; Bush, John W. M.; Oza, Anand

    2015-11-01

    Droplets may self-propel on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, pushed forward by their own Faraday pilot-wave field. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of pairs of such droplets. Particular attention is given to characterizing the system's dependence on the vibrational forcing of the bath and the impact parameter of the walking droplets. Observed criteria for the capture and stability of orbital pairs are rationalized by accompanying theoretical developments. Thanks to the NSF.

  9. Neutral lipid stores and lipase PNPLA5 contribute to autophagosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Nicolas; Chauhan, Santosh; Arko-Mensah, John; Castillo, Eliseo F.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Robenek, Horst; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Deretic, Vojo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Autophagy is a fundamental cell biological process whereby eukaryotic cells form membranes in the cytoplasm to sequester diverse intracellular targets. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the origins of autophagosomal organelles, the source of lipids that support autophagic membrane formation remain an important open question. Results Here we show that lipid droplets as cellular stores of neutral lipids including triglycerides contribute to autophagic initiation. Lipid droplets, as previously shown, were consumed upon induction of autophagy by starvation. However, inhibition of autophagic maturation by blocking acidification or using dominant negative Atg4C74A that prohibits autophagosomal closure, did not prevent disappearance of lipid droplets. Thus, lipid droplets continued to be utilized upon induction of autophagy but not as autophagic substrates in a process referred to as lipophagy. We considered an alternative model whereby lipid droplets were consumed not as a part of lipophagy but as a potential contributing source to the biogenesis of lipid precursors for nascent autophagosomes. We carried out a screen for a potential link between triglyceride mobilization and autophagy, and identified a neutral lipase, PNPLA5, as being required for efficient autophagy. PNPLA5, which localized to lipid droplets, was needed for optimal initiation of autophagy. PNPLA5 was required for autophagy of diverse substrates including degradation of autophagic adaptors, bulk proteolysis, mitochondrial quantity control, and microbial clearance. Conclusions Lipid droplets contribute to autophagic capacity by enhancing it in a process dependent on PNPLA5. Thus, neutral lipid stores are mobilized during autophagy to support autophagic membrane formation. PMID:24613307

  10. Droplet spectral broadening in marine stratus

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.; Yum, Seong Soo

    1997-11-15

    Broadening of the cloud droplet (diameter < 50 {mu}m) spectrum with increased droplet size was found to depend on the vertical profiles of cloud water. Clouds with liquid water profiles resembling adiabatic conditions displayed constant spectral widths. Other clouds displayed broader droplet spectra and increasing broadness with mean droplet sizes. Less than adiabatic cloud liquid water profiles may be accounted for by conversion to drops (diameter > 50 {mu}m, i.e., drizzle). Broad droplet spectra were most closely associated with drizzle drops. Both the concentration, C and slope, k, of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra were theoretically found to affect droplet spectral width. For individual cloud parcels a higher C and lower k each contributed to broader droplet spectra. When mixing among cloud parcels with different updrafts was considered, the predictions deviated especially at larger mean droplet diameters. Variations in updraft velocity result in differences in droplet concentrations and mean droplet sizes. The predictions for this internal mixing process showed greater droplet spectral widths for CCN spectra with higher k, especially at the larger mean droplet diameters. Instead of the individual parcel predictions of narrower droplet spectra at larger mean droplet sizes, internal mixing predicted increasing droplet spectral width with increasing mean droplet size. These predictions are consistent with the observations. First, when only cloud parcels with small mean droplet diameters (< 1 {mu}m) were considered, the polluted clouds that formed on CCN with higher C and lower k displayed broader droplet spectra than clean clouds. Cloud parcels with large mean droplet diameters (>12 {mu}m) and large {sigma} were observed only in clean conditions where k was high. Increasing droplet spectral width with mean droplet diameter (especially > 12 {mu}m) is typical of many observations here and elsewhere.

  11. Droplet combustion at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, F. L.; Williams, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    The current work involves theoretical analyses of the effects identified, experiments in the NASA Lewis drop towers performed in the middeck areas of the Space Shuttle. In addition, there is laboratory work associated with the design of the flight apparatus. Calculations have shown that some of the test-matrix data can be obtained in drop towers, and some are achievable only in the space experiments. The apparatus consists of a droplet dispensing device (syringes), a droplet positioning device (opposing, retractable, hollow needles), a droplet ignition device (two matched pairs of retractable spark electrodes), gas and liquid handling systems, a data acquisition system (mainly giving motion-picture records of the combustion in two orthogonal views, one with backlighting for droplet resolution), and associated electronics.

  12. Obesogens beyond Vertebrates: Lipid Perturbation by Tributyltin in the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Jordão, Rita; Casas, Josefina; Fabrias, Gemma; Campos, Bruno; Piña, Benjamín; Lemos, Marco F.L.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Tauler, Romà

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of obesogenic effects in invertebrates is limited by our poor knowledge of the regulatory pathways of lipid metabolism. Recent data from the crustacean Daphnia magna points to three signaling hormonal pathways related to the molting and reproductive cycles [retinoic X receptor (RXR), juvenile hormone (JH), and ecdysone] as putative targets for exogenous obesogens. Objective The present study addresses the disruptive effects of the model obesogen tributyltin (TBT) on the lipid homeostasis in Daphnia during the molting and reproductive cycle, its genetic control, and health consequences of its disruption. Methods D. magna individuals were exposed to low and high levels of TBT. Reproductive effects were assessed by Life History analysis methods. Quantitative and qualitative changes in lipid droplets during molting and the reproductive cycle were studied using Nile red staining. Lipid composition and dynamics were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Relative abundances of mRNA from different genes related to RXR, ecdysone, and JH signaling pathways were studied by qRT-PCR. Results and Conclusions TBT disrupted the dynamics of neutral lipids, impairing the transfer of triacylglycerols to eggs and hence promoting their accumulation in adult individuals. TBT’s disruptive effects translated into a lower fitness for offspring and adults. Co-regulation of gene transcripts suggests that TBT activates the ecdysone, JH, and RXR receptor signaling pathways, presumably through the already proposed interaction with RXR. These findings indicate the presence of obesogenic effects in a nonvertebrate species. Citation Jordão R, Casas J, Fabrias G, Campos B, Piña B, Lemos MF, Soares AM, Tauler R, Barata C. 2015. Obesogens beyond vertebrates: lipid perturbation by tributyltin in the crustacean Daphnia magna. Environ Health Perspect 123:813–819; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409163 PMID

  13. Reversible, voltage-activated formation of biomimetic membranes between triblock copolymer-coated aqueous droplets in good solvents.

    PubMed

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Taylor, Graham; Hepburn, Trevor; Michael Kilbey, S; Sarles, Stephen A

    2016-06-21

    Biomimetic membranes assembled from block copolymers attract considerable interest because they exhibit greater stability and longetivity compared to lipid bilayers, and some enable the reconstitution of functional transmembrane biomolecules. Yet to-date, block copolymer membranes have not been achieved using the droplet interface bilayer (DIB) method, which uniquely allows assembling single- and multi-membrane networks between water droplets in oil. Herein, we investigate the formation of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(dimethyl siloxane)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer-stabilized interfaces (CSIs) between polymer-coated aqueous droplets in solutions comprising combinations of decane, hexadecane and AR20 silicone oil. We demonstrate that triblock-coated droplets do not spontaneously adhere in these oils because all are thermodynamically good solvents for the hydrophobic PDMS middle block. However, thinned planar membranes are reversibly formed at the interface between droplets upon the application of a sufficient transmembrane voltage, which removes excess solvent from between droplets through electrocompression. At applied voltages above the threshold required to initiate membrane thinning, electrowetting causes the area of the CSI between droplets to increase while thickness remains constant; the CSI electrowetting response is similar to that encountered with lipid-based DIBs. In combination, these results reveal that stable membranes can be assembled in a manner that is completely reversible when an external pressure is used to overcome a barrier to adhesion caused by solvent-chain interactions, and they demonstrate new capability for connecting and disconnecting aqueous droplets via polymer-stabilized membranes. PMID:27174295

  14. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  15. The emerging role of autophagy in peroxisome dynamics and lipid metabolism of phyllosphere microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Takano, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms resident in the phyllosphere (above-ground, plant-surface environments) undergo dynamic changes in nutrient conditions and adapt their metabolic pathways during proliferation or in the course of infection of host plants. Some of these metabolic switches are accomplished by regulation of organelle abundance. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a major role in reducing the organelle quantity, thereby contributing to the metabolic switch required for survival or virulence of the microorganisms in the phyllosphere. In this mini review the metabolic pathways in several phytopathogenic fungi and the non-infectious asporogenous yeast Candida boidinii, which involve lipid droplets and peroxisomes, are summarized. The physiological functions of Atg (Autophagy-related) proteins in these organisms are discussed in relation to the dynamics of these two important organelles. PMID:24653730

  16. Cyanogenic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Selmar, Dirk; Grocholewski, Sabine; Seigler, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  17. Lipid metabolism and signaling in cardiac lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Kenneth; Nzirorera, Carine; Kienesberger, Petra C

    2016-10-01

    The heart balances uptake, metabolism and oxidation of fatty acids (FAs) to maintain ATP production, membrane biosynthesis and lipid signaling. Under conditions where FA uptake outpaces FA oxidation and FA sequestration as triacylglycerols in lipid droplets, toxic FA metabolites such as ceramides, diacylglycerols, long-chain acyl-CoAs, and acylcarnitines can accumulate in cardiomyocytes and cause cardiomyopathy. Moreover, studies using mutant mice have shown that dysregulation of enzymes involved in triacylglycerol, phospholipid, and sphingolipid metabolism in the heart can lead to the excess deposition of toxic lipid species that adversely affect cardiomyocyte function. This review summarizes our current understanding of lipid uptake, metabolism and signaling pathways that have been implicated in the development of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy under conditions including obesity, diabetes, aging, and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26924249

  18. On-demand droplet release for droplet-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Chun; Liu, YingShuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-03-01

    On-demand droplet release from microwell was successfully implemented and well combined with droplet trapping/fusion functions to make an ideal and integrated droplet based microfluidic system. PMID:20162230

  19. Chronic ethanol consumption in mice alters hepatocyte lipid droplet properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Hepatosteatosis is a common pathological feature of impaired hepatic metabolism following chronic alcohol consumption. Although often benign and reversible, it is widely believed that steatosis is a risk factor for development of advanced liver pathologies, including steatohepatitis and ...

  20. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Ando, T.

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  1. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  2. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research. PMID:26979408

  3. From Leaf Synthesis to Senescence: n-Alkyl Lipid Abundance and D/H Composition Among Plant Species in a Temperate Deciduous Forest at Brown's Lake Bog, Ohio, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, E. J.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Lowell, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotope composition (D/H, δD) of terrestrial plant leaf waxes is a promising paleohydrology proxy because meteoric water (e.g., precipitation) is the primary hydrogen source for wax synthesis. However, secondary environmental and biological factors modify the net apparent fractionation between precipitation δD and leaf wax δD, limiting quantitative reconstruction of paleohydrology. These secondary factors include soil evaporation, leaf transpiration, biosynthetic fractionation, and the seasonal timing of lipid synthesis. Here, we investigate the influence of each of these factors on n-alkyl lipid δD in five dominant deciduous angiosperm tree species as well as shrubs, ferns and grasses in the watershed surrounding Brown's Lake Bog, Ohio, USA. We quantified n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid concentrations and δD in replicate individuals of each species at weekly to monthly intervals from March to October 2014 to assess inter- and intraspecific isotope variability throughout the growing season. We present soil, xylem and leaf water δD from each individual, and precipitation and atmospheric water vapor δD throughout the season to directly examine the relationship between source water and lipid isotope composition. These data allow us to assess the relative influence of soil evaporation and leaf transpiration among plant types, within species, and along a soil moisture gradient throughout the catchment. We use leaf water δD to approximate biosynthetic fractionation for each individual and test whether this is a species-specific and seasonal constant, and to evaluate variation among plant types with identical growth conditions. Our high frequency sampling approach provides new insights into the seasonal timing of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid synthesis and subsequent fluctuations in concentration and δD in a temperate deciduous forest. These results will advance understanding of the magnitude and timing of secondary influences on the modern leaf wax

  4. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Amber J.; Broman, Aimee T.; Zarnowski, Robert; Dwyer, Teigan G.; Bond, Laura M.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Fontaine, Joël; Ntambi, James M.; Keleş, Sündüz; Kendziorski, Christina; Gauthier, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s) underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ) fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0–48 hours), gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C) and during the phase transition to mold (22°C). This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition. PMID:26114571

  5. Dry Zones Around Frozen Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    The saturation pressure of water vapor above supercooled water exceeds that above ice at the same temperature. A frozen droplet will therefore grow by harvesting water vapor from neighboring supercooled condensate, which has recently been demonstrated to be a primary mechanism of in-plane frost growth on hydrophobic surfaces. The underlying physics of this source-sink interaction is still poorly understood. In this work, a deposited water droplet is frozen on a dry hydrophobic surface initially held above the dew point. We demonstrate that when the surface is then cooled beneath the dew point, the frozen droplet harvests nearby water vapor in the air. This results in an annular dry zone that forms between the frozen droplet and the forming supercooled condensation. For a given ambient temperature and humidity, the length of the dry zone varied strongly with surface temperature and weakly with droplet volume. The dependence of the dry zone on surface temperature is due to the fact that the vapor pressure gradients between the ambient and the surface and between the liquid and frozen water are both functions of temperature.

  6. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  7. Droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Praveen Priyaranjan; Kar, Durga Prasanna; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan

    2016-01-01

    A new technique of droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation has been proposed and experimentally investigated in this work. The proposed method is based on the principle of resonant inductive coupling and piezoelectric resonance. When a mechanical vibration is excited in a piezoelectric plate, the ultrasonic vibration transmitted to the droplets placed on its surface and induces merging. It has been observed that the merging rate of water droplets depends on the operating frequency, mechanical vibration of piezoelectric plate, separation distance between the droplets, and volume of droplets. The investigated technique of droplets merging through piezoelectric actuation is quite useful for microfluidics, chemical and biomedical engineering applications. PMID:26299402

  8. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans contribute to intracellular lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilsie, Larissa C; Chanchani, Shree; Navaratna, Deepti; Orlando, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Background Transport of fatty acids within the cytosol of adipocytes and their subsequent assimilation into lipid droplets has been thoroughly investigated; however, the mechanism by which fatty acids are transported across the plasma membrane from the extracellular environment remains unclear. Since triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins represent an abundant source of fatty acids for adipocyte utilization, we have investigated the expression levels of cell surface lipoprotein receptors and their functional contributions toward intracellular lipid accumulation; these include very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-R), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Results We found that expression of these three lipoprotein receptors increased 5-fold, 2-fold, and 2.5-fold, respectively, during adipocyte differentiation. The major proteoglycans expressed by mature adipocytes are of high molecular weight (>500 kD) and contain both heparan and chondroitin sulfate moieties. Using ligand binding antagonists, we observed that HSPG, rather than VLDL-R or LRP, play a primary role in the uptake of DiI-lableled apoE-VLDL by mature adipocytes. In addition, inhibitors of HSPG maturation resulted in a significant reduction (>85%) in intracellular lipid accumulation. Conclusions These results suggest that cell surface HSPG is required for fatty acid transport across the plasma membrane of adipocytes. PMID:15636641

  9. Droplet burning at zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Questions of the importance and feasibility of performing experiments on droplet burning at zero gravity in Spacelab were studied. Information on the physics and chemistry of droplet combustion, with attention directed specifically to the chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics of the phenomena involved, are presented. The work was divided into three phases, the justification, the feasibility, and the conceptual development of a preliminary design. Results from the experiments performed revealed a few new facts concerning droplet burning, notably burning rates in excess of theoretical prediction and a phenomenon of flash extinction, both likely traceable to accumulation of carbon produced by gas-phase pyrolysis in the fuel-rich zone enclosed by the reaction surface. These experiments also showed that they were primarily due to timing difficulties.

  10. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  11. The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was par