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Sample records for abundant microbial growth

  1. Global distribution of microbial abundance and biomass in subseafloor sediment

    PubMed Central

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Pockalny, Robert; Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Smith, David C.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The global geographic distribution of subseafloor sedimentary microbes and the cause(s) of that distribution are largely unexplored. Here, we show that total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. This variation is strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance from land. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9⋅1029 cells [corresponding to 4.1 petagram (Pg) C and ∼0.6% of Earth’s total living biomass]. This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate Earth’s total number of microbes and total living biomass to be, respectively, 50–78% and 10–45% lower than previous estimates. PMID:22927371

  2. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  3. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our findings therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions. PMID:26658882

  4. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.

  5. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra,more » and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.« less

  6. Teaching Microbial Growth by Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, A. Fernandez; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a simulation program for Apple II computer which assays the effects of a series of variables on bacterial growth and interactions between microbial populations. Results of evaluation of the program with students are summarized. (CW)

  7. Modeling microbial growth and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling has become an important tool for widening our understanding of microbial growth in the context of applied microbiology and related to such processes as safe food production, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, or microbe-mediated mining. Various modeling techniques, such as primary, secondary and tertiary mathematical models, phenomenological models, mechanistic or kinetic models, reactive transport models, Bayesian network models, artificial neural networks, as well as agent-, individual-, and particle-based models have been applied to model microbial growth and activity in many applied fields. In this mini-review, we summarize the basic concepts of these models using examples and applications from food safety and wastewater treatment systems. We further review recent developments in other applied fields focusing on models that explicitly include spatial relationships. Using these examples, we point out the conceptual similarities across fields of application and encourage the combined use of different modeling techniques in hybrid models as well as their cross-disciplinary exchange. For instance, pattern-oriented modeling has its origin in ecology but may be employed to parameterize microbial growth models when experimental data are scarce. Models could also be used as virtual laboratories to optimize experimental design analogous to the virtual ecologist approach. Future microbial growth models will likely become more complex to benefit from the rich toolbox that is now available to microbial growth modelers.

  8. Modeling microbial growth and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling has become an important tool for widening our understanding of microbial growth in the context of applied microbiology and related to such processes as safe food production, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, or microbe-mediated mining. Various modeling techniques, such as primary, secondary and tertiary mathematical models, phenomenological models, mechanistic or kinetic models, reactive transport models, Bayesian network models, artificial neural networks, as well as agent-, individual-, and particle-based models have been applied to model microbial growth and activity in many applied fields. In this mini-review, we summarize the basic concepts of these models using examples and applications from food safety and wastewater treatment systems. We further review recent developments in other applied fields focusing on models that explicitly include spatial relationships. Using these examples, we point out the conceptual similarities across fields of application and encourage the combined use of different modeling techniques in hybrid models as well as their cross-disciplinary exchange. For instance, pattern-oriented modeling has its origin in ecology but may be employed to parameterize microbial growth models when experimental data are scarce. Models could also be used as virtual laboratories to optimize experimental design analogous to the virtual ecologist approach. Future microbial growth models will likely become more complex to benefit from the rich toolbox that is now available to microbial growth modelers. PMID:26298697

  9. Global Distribution of Microbial Abundance and Biomass in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Pockalny, R. A.; Adhikari, R. R.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previously published cell counts were mostly from ocean margins and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Cell counts from these environments are generally similar from site to site and decrease logarithmically with sediment depth, although there can be sharp peaks of high cell densities in zones of anaerobic methane-oxidation. Recent counts from the South Pacific Gyre and the North Pacific Gyre are several orders of magnitude lower and show a more rapid decrease with depth than all previously published datasets. With these new data available, total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. The differences between cell counts from ocean margins and upwelling areas and cell counts from oceanic gyres raise three questions. First, how does the abundance of microbes in subseafloor sediment vary throughout the world ocean? Second, what property or properties are likely to control that variation? Third, how does this variation affect estimates of total subseafloor sedimentary biomass and Earth's total biomass? To address these questions, we compiled our cell counts from the South Pacific Gyre, the North Pacific Gyre and the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with previously published counts and parameterized the cell distribution at each site and determined two parameters, (i) cell concentration at 1 mbsf and (ii) rate of decrease in cell counts with depth. Both parameters are strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance to shore. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9*1029 cells (corresponding to 4.1 Pg C and ~0.6% of Earth's total living biomass). This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate

  10. Resolving microbial membership using Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy ('AVIT ).

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Siddharth, Jay; Lauber, Christian L; Membrez, Mathieu; Betrisey, Bertrand; Loyer, Carole; Chou, Chieh Jason; Pataky, Zoltan; Golay, Alain; Parkinson, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Development of NGS has revolutionized the analysis in microbial ecology contributing to our deeper understanding of microbiota in health and disease. However, the quality, quantity and confidence of summarized taxonomic abundances are in need of further scrutiny due to sample dependent and independent effects. In this article we introduce 'AVIT (Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy), an unbiased method to enrich for assigned members of microbial communities. As opposed to using a priori thresholds, 'AVIT uses inherent abundance and variability of taxa in a dataset to determine the inclusion or rejection of each taxa for further downstream analysis. Using in-vitro and in-vivo studies, we benchmarked performance and parameterized 'AVIT to establish a framework for investigating the dynamic range of microbial community membership in clinically relevant scenarios. PMID:27530237

  11. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Stibal, Marek; Gözdereliler, Erkin; Cameron, Karen A.; Box, Jason E.; Stevens, Ian T.; Gokul, Jarishma K.; Schostag, Morten; Zarsky, Jakub D.; Edwards, Arwyn; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM), flow cytometry (FCM), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (102–107 cells ml−1) and mineral particle (0.1–100 mg ml−1) concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ~ 2 × 103 to ~ 2 × 106 cells ml−1 while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg ml−1. The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the GrIS. PMID:25852678

  12. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Gözdereliler, Erkin; Cameron, Karen A; Box, Jason E; Stevens, Ian T; Gokul, Jarishma K; Schostag, Morten; Zarsky, Jakub D; Edwards, Arwyn; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D L; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2015-01-01

    Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM), flow cytometry (FCM), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (10(2)-10(7) cells ml(-1)) and mineral particle (0.1-100 mg ml(-1)) concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ~ 2 × 10(3) to ~ 2 × 10(6) cells ml(-1) while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg ml(-1). The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the GrIS. PMID

  13. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  14. Rapid detection of microbial cell abundance in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andrea M; Yuan, Quan; Close, Dan M; O'Dell, Kaela B; Fortney, Julian L; Wu, Jayne; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-15

    The detection and quantification of naturally occurring microbial cellular densities is an essential component of environmental systems monitoring. While there are a number of commonly utilized approaches for monitoring microbial abundance, capacitance-based biosensors represent a promising approach because of their low-cost and label-free detection of microbial cells, but are not as well characterized as more traditional methods. Here, we investigate the applicability of enhanced alternating current electrokinetics (ACEK) capacitive sensing as a new application for rapidly detecting and quantifying microbial cellular densities in cultured and environmentally sourced aquatic samples. ACEK capacitive sensor performance was evaluated using two distinct and dynamic systems - the Great Australian Bight and groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. Results demonstrate that ACEK capacitance-based sensing can accurately determine microbial cell counts throughout cellular concentrations typically encountered in naturally occurring microbial communities (10(3)-10(6) cells/mL). A linear relationship was observed between cellular density and capacitance change correlations, allowing a simple linear curve fitting equation to be used for determining microbial abundances in unknown samples. This work provides a foundation for understanding the limits of capacitance-based sensing in natural environmental samples and supports future efforts focusing on evaluating the robustness ACEK capacitance-based within aquatic environments. PMID:27315516

  15. Relationships between sedimentary subseafloor microbial abundance and sedimentation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cell count data for estimates of global subseafloor microbial abundance need to be simplified in order to be used for model calculations All models rely on regressions of cell counts vs. depth. Different strategies are being used for simplifying the data, e.g. averaging over highly variable data from different oceanic provinces or excluding individual datasets that cannot be described by a single regression. While providing global estimates, these models fail to identify the finer details of the controls on subseafloor microbial abundance. Most subseafloor microbes are heterotrophic and gain energy by degrading buried organic matter. Because sedimentation rate is usually positively correlated with primary productivity and organic matter flux to the seafloor, it determines how much organic matter is deposited on the sea floor and how fast it is buried and reaches greater depths. At the same depth, in environments with low sed. rates the organic matter is older, more degraded and supports less metabolic activity than in those with high sed. rates. As a result, sed. rates control penetration depth of oxygen and other electron acceptors. Oxygen penetration remains in the mm to cm range over most sed. rates and it only penetrates significantly deeper at very low rates of ca. 1 mm/kyr or less. However, microbial abundance correlates with sed. rate over a wider range. In order to take a more detailed look at the influence of sed. rate and therefore sediment age on cell abundance, ages and additional geochemical information were assigned to individual cell counts. The new dataset shows the strong influence of sed. rates or rather sediment age on microbial abundance, while oxygen concentrations seem to have only a minor influence. Using data from IODP drill sites that have moved from high to low productivity zones or vice versa helps to differentiate between different factors that control microbial cell abundance.

  16. Microbial communities within saltmarsh sediments: Composition, abundance and pollution constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Ana; Magalhães, Catarina; Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of the saltmarsh plant Halimione portucaloides and the level of sediment metal contamination on the distribution of microbial communities were investigated in two Portuguese estuarine systems with different degrees of metal contamination: the Cavado (41.5 N; 8.7 W) and Sado estuaries. In the Sado, two saltmarshes were studied: Lisnave (38.4 N; 8.7 W) and Comporta (38.4 N; 8.8 W). A PCR rDNA-DGGE approach and direct microscopic counts of DAPI-stained cells were applied to study the biodiversity and abundance of prokaryotic communities. Sediment characteristics and metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni and Zn) were also evaluated to identify possible environmental pollution constraints on spatial and temporal microbial dynamics. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that the Lisnave saltmarsh microbial community was usually associated with a higher degree of metal contamination, especially the metal Pb. In clear contrast, the Cavado estuary microbial assemblage composition was associated with low metal concentrations but higher organic matter content. The Comporta saltmarsh bacterial community clustered in a separate branch, and was associated with higher levels of different metals, such as Ni, Cr and Zn. Additionally, the microbial community structure of the Lisnave and Cavado showed a seasonal pattern. Moreover, microbial abundance correlated negatively with metal concentrations, being higher at the Cavado estuarine site and with general higher counts in the rhizosediment. These findings suggest that increased metal concentrations negatively affect the abundance of prokaryotic cells and that saltmarsh plants may have a pivotal role in shaping the microbial community structure.

  17. Microbial abundance and community in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms: role of plant presence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xie, Huijun; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Yang, Zhongchen; Zhao, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    In this research, the role of plants in improving microorganism growth conditions in subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) microcosms was determined. In particular, microbial abundance and community were investigated during summer and winter in Phragmites australis-planted CW microcosms (PA) and unplanted CW microcosms (control, CT). Results revealed that the removal efficiencies of pollutants and microbial community structure varied in winter with variable microbial abundance. During summer, PA comprised more dominant phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), whereas CT contained more Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria. During winter, the abundance of Proteobacteria was >40 % in PA but dramatically decreased in CT. Moreover, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacterial dominance in CT decreased. In both seasons, bacteria were more abundant in root surfaces than in sand. Plant presence positively affected microbial abundance and community. The potential removal ability of CT, in which Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria were abundant during summer, was more significantly affected by temperature reduction than that of PA with plant presence. PMID:25772872

  18. Soil microbial abundance and diversity along a low precipitation gradient.

    PubMed

    Bachar, Ami; Al-Ashhab, Ashraf; Soares, M Ines M; Sklarz, Menachem Y; Angel, Roey; Ungar, Eugene D; Gillor, Osnat

    2010-08-01

    The exploration of spatial patterns of abundance and diversity patterns along precipitation gradients has focused for centuries on plants and animals; microbial profiles along such gradients are largely unknown. We studied the effects of soil pH, nutrient concentration, salinity, and water content on bacterial abundance and diversity in soils collected from Mediterranean, semi-arid, and arid sites receiving approximately 400, 300, and 100 mm annual precipitation, respectively. Bacterial diversity was evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analyses and the patterns obtained varied with the climatic regions. Over 75% of the sequenced clones were unique to their environment, while ∼2% were shared by all sites, yet, the Mediterranean and semi-arid sites had more common clones (∼9%) than either had with the arid site (4.7% and 6%, respectively). The microbial abundance, estimated by phospholipid fatty acids and real-time quantitative PCR assays, was significantly lower in the arid region. Our results indicate that although soil bacterial abundance decreases with precipitation, bacterial diversity is independent of precipitation gradient. Furthermore, community composition was found to be unique to each ecosystem.

  19. Soil microbial abundance and diversity along a low precipitation gradient.

    PubMed

    Bachar, Ami; Al-Ashhab, Ashraf; Soares, M Ines M; Sklarz, Menachem Y; Angel, Roey; Ungar, Eugene D; Gillor, Osnat

    2010-08-01

    The exploration of spatial patterns of abundance and diversity patterns along precipitation gradients has focused for centuries on plants and animals; microbial profiles along such gradients are largely unknown. We studied the effects of soil pH, nutrient concentration, salinity, and water content on bacterial abundance and diversity in soils collected from Mediterranean, semi-arid, and arid sites receiving approximately 400, 300, and 100 mm annual precipitation, respectively. Bacterial diversity was evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analyses and the patterns obtained varied with the climatic regions. Over 75% of the sequenced clones were unique to their environment, while ∼2% were shared by all sites, yet, the Mediterranean and semi-arid sites had more common clones (∼9%) than either had with the arid site (4.7% and 6%, respectively). The microbial abundance, estimated by phospholipid fatty acids and real-time quantitative PCR assays, was significantly lower in the arid region. Our results indicate that although soil bacterial abundance decreases with precipitation, bacterial diversity is independent of precipitation gradient. Furthermore, community composition was found to be unique to each ecosystem. PMID:20683588

  20. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods.

    PubMed

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands.

  1. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods.

    PubMed

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands. PMID:27140199

  2. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods

    PubMed Central

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands. PMID:27140199

  3. Microbial abundance and community structure in a melting alpine snowpack.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Anna; Wismer, Andrea; Schneebeli, Martin; Erny, Isolde; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Snowmelt is a crucial period for alpine soil ecosystems, as it is related to inputs of nutrients, particulate matter and microorganisms to the underlying soil. Although snow-inhabiting microbial communities represent an important inoculum for soils, they have thus far received little attention. The distribution and structure of these microorganisms in the snowpack may be linked to the physical properties of the snowpack at snowmelt. Snow samples were taken from snow profiles at four sites (1930-2519 m a.s.l.) in the catchment of the Tiefengletscher, Canton Uri, Switzerland. Microbial (Archaea, Bacteria and Fungi) communities were investigated through T-RFLP profiling of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes, respectively. In parallel, we assessed physical and chemical parameters relevant to the understanding of melting processes. Along the snow profiles, density increased with depth due to compaction, while other physico-chemical parameters, such as temperature and concentrations of DOC and soluble ions, remained in the same range (e.g. <2 mg DOC L(-1), 5-30 μg NH4 (+)-N L(-1)) in all samples at all sites. Along the snow profiles, no major change was observed either in cell abundance or in bacterial and fungal diversity. No Archaea could be detected in the snow. Microbial communities, however, differed significantly between sites. Our results show that meltwater rearranges soluble ions and microbial communities in the snowpack.

  4. GeoChip-based insights into the microbial functional gene repertoire of marine sponges (high microbial abundance, low microbial abundance) and seawater.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Kristina; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Brümmer, Franz; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-12-01

    The GeoChip 4.2 gene array was employed to interrogate the microbial functional gene repertoire of sponges and seawater collected from the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. Complementary amplicon sequencing confirmed the microbial community composition characteristic of high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges. By use of GeoChip, altogether 20,273 probes encoding for 627 functional genes and representing 16 gene categories were identified. Minimum curvilinear embedding analyses revealed a clear separation between the samples. The HMA/LMA dichotomy was stronger than any possible geographic pattern, which is shown here for the first time on the level of functional genes. However, upon inspection of individual genes, very few specific differences were discernible. Differences were related to microbial ammonia oxidation, ammonification, and archaeal autotrophic carbon fixation (higher gene abundance in sponges over seawater) as well as denitrification and radiation-stress-related genes (lower gene abundance in sponges over seawater). Except for few documented specific differences the functional gene repertoire between the different sources appeared largely similar. This study expands previous reports in that functional gene convergence is not only reported between HMA and LMA sponges but also between sponges and seawater.

  5. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  6. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  7. Temperature affects microbial abundance, activity and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Temperature is a major factor determining the performance of the anaerobic digestion process. The microbial abundance, activity and interactional networks were investigated under a temperature gradient from 25°C to 55°C through amplicon sequencing, using 16S ribosomal RNA and 16S rRNA gene-based approaches. Comparative analysis of past accumulative elements presented by 16S rRNA gene-based analysis, and the in-situ conditions presented by 16S rRNA-based analysis, provided new insights concerning the identification of microbial functional roles and interactions. The daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. Increased methanogenesis and hydrolysis at 50°C were main factors causing higher methane production which was also closely related with more well-defined methanogenic and/or related modules with comprehensive interactions and increased functional orderliness referred to more microorganisms participating in interactions. This research demonstrated the importance of evaluating functional roles and interactions of microbial community. PMID:26970926

  8. A thermodynamic theory of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-08-01

    Our ability to model the growth of microbes only relies on empirical laws, fundamentally restricting our understanding and predictive capacity in many environmental systems. In particular, the link between energy balances and growth dynamics is still not understood. Here we demonstrate a microbial growth equation relying on an explicit theoretical ground sustained by Boltzmann statistics, thus establishing a relationship between microbial growth rate and available energy. The validity of our equation was then questioned by analyzing the microbial isotopic fractionation phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kinetic consequence of the differences in energy contents of isotopic isomers used for growth. We illustrate how the associated theoretical predictions are actually consistent with recent experimental evidences. Our work links microbial population dynamics to the thermodynamic driving forces of the ecosystem, which opens the door to many biotechnological and ecological developments. PMID:24522260

  9. A thermodynamic theory of microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to model the growth of microbes only relies on empirical laws, fundamentally restricting our understanding and predictive capacity in many environmental systems. In particular, the link between energy balances and growth dynamics is still not understood. Here we demonstrate a microbial growth equation relying on an explicit theoretical ground sustained by Boltzmann statistics, thus establishing a relationship between microbial growth rate and available energy. The validity of our equation was then questioned by analyzing the microbial isotopic fractionation phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kinetic consequence of the differences in energy contents of isotopic isomers used for growth. We illustrate how the associated theoretical predictions are actually consistent with recent experimental evidences. Our work links microbial population dynamics to the thermodynamic driving forces of the ecosystem, which opens the door to many biotechnological and ecological developments. PMID:24522260

  10. Microbial Diversity and Putative Diazotrophy in High- and Low-Microbial-Abundance Mediterranean Sponges.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Marta; Dziallas, Claudia; Coma, Rafel; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-09-01

    Microbial communities associated with marine sponges carry out nutrient transformations essential for benthic-pelagic coupling; however, knowledge about their composition and function is still sparse. We evaluated the richness and diversity of prokaryotic assemblages associated with three high-microbial-abundance (HMA) and three low-microbial-abundance (LMA) sympatric Mediterranean sponges to address their stability and uniqueness. Moreover, to examine functionality and because an imbalance between nitrogen ingestion and excretion has been observed for some of these species, we sequenced nitrogenase genes (nifH) and measured N2 fixation. The prokaryotic communities in the two sponge types did not differ in terms of richness, but the highest diversity was found in HMA sponges. Moreover, the discrete composition of the communities in the two sponge types relative to that in the surrounding seawater indicated that horizontal transmission and vertical transmission affect the microbiomes associated with the two sponge categories. nifH genes were found in all LMA species and sporadically in one HMA species, and about half of the nifH gene sequences were common between the different sponge species and were also found in the surrounding water, suggesting horizontal transmission. (15)N2-enriched incubations showed that N2 fixation was measurable in the water but was not associated with the sponges. Also, the analysis of the isotopic ratio of (15)N to (14)N in sponge tissue indicated that N2 fixation is not an important source of nitrogen in these Mediterranean sponges. Overall, our results suggest that compositional and functional features differ between the prokaryotic communities associated with HMA and LMA sponges, which may affect sponge ecology.

  11. Microbial Diversity and Putative Diazotrophy in High- and Low-Microbial-Abundance Mediterranean Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Coma, Rafel; Riemann, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities associated with marine sponges carry out nutrient transformations essential for benthic-pelagic coupling; however, knowledge about their composition and function is still sparse. We evaluated the richness and diversity of prokaryotic assemblages associated with three high-microbial-abundance (HMA) and three low-microbial-abundance (LMA) sympatric Mediterranean sponges to address their stability and uniqueness. Moreover, to examine functionality and because an imbalance between nitrogen ingestion and excretion has been observed for some of these species, we sequenced nitrogenase genes (nifH) and measured N2 fixation. The prokaryotic communities in the two sponge types did not differ in terms of richness, but the highest diversity was found in HMA sponges. Moreover, the discrete composition of the communities in the two sponge types relative to that in the surrounding seawater indicated that horizontal transmission and vertical transmission affect the microbiomes associated with the two sponge categories. nifH genes were found in all LMA species and sporadically in one HMA species, and about half of the nifH gene sequences were common between the different sponge species and were also found in the surrounding water, suggesting horizontal transmission. 15N2-enriched incubations showed that N2 fixation was measurable in the water but was not associated with the sponges. Also, the analysis of the isotopic ratio of 15N to 14N in sponge tissue indicated that N2 fixation is not an important source of nitrogen in these Mediterranean sponges. Overall, our results suggest that compositional and functional features differ between the prokaryotic communities associated with HMA and LMA sponges, which may affect sponge ecology. PMID:26070678

  12. Microbial carbonate abundance compared with fluctuations in metazoan diversity over geological time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riding, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Secular variation in microbial carbonate abundance may be reflected by stromatolite morphotype diversity and reefal microbial carbonate abundance. These datasets reveal long-term changes over the past 3000 Myr that include a peak of abundance 1250 Myr ago, Late Proterozoic decline, Cambrian resurgence, and fluctuating decline during the remainder of the Phanerozoic. It is conceivable that Proterozoic metazoan diversification coincided with inception of stromatolite decline ˜1250 Myr ago, but microbial carbonate increase during Cambrian metazoan radiation together with failure of microbial carbonates to increase in the aftermaths of the End-Ordovician, End-Triassic and End-Cretaceous Mass Extinctions suggest that factors in addition to metazoan competition significantly influenced long-term changes in microbial carbonate abundance.

  13. Differential Abundance of Microbial Functional Groups along the Elevation Gradient from the Coast to the Luquillo Mountains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial communities respond to multiple abiotic and biotic factors that change along elevation gradients. We compare changes in microbial community composition in soil and review previous research on differential abundance of microbial functional groups along an elevation gradi...

  14. Microbial growth responses upon rewetting dry soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Annelein; Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Increased rainfall and drought periods are expected to occur with current climate change, leading to fluctuations in soil moisture. Changes in soil moisture are known to affect carbon cycling. A pulse of carbon dioxide release (respiration) is often observed after rewetting a dry soil and a drying threshold is observed before this pulse emerges. Increased microbial activity is often assumed to be the cause for the pulse in respiration. Yet, the microbial growth responses that underlie this pulse are often not studied. The following questions will be addressed in this presentation. 1) Do fungal and bacterial growth explain the pulse in respiration upon rewetting a dry soil? 2) How does microbial growth respond to different drying intensities before rewetting? To answer the research questions, soils from Sweden, U.K. and Greenland were put in microcosms, air-dried for four days, a prolonged period or to different moisture content before rewetting. We measured soil respiration, fungal growth rates and/or bacterial growth rates at high temporal resolution during one week after rewetting. Our results suggest that the respiration pulse upon rewetting dry soil is not due to high microbial growth rates. During the first hours after rewetting, bacterial and fungal growth rates were low whereas the respiration rates were high. As such, there was a decoupling between the pulse in respiration and microbial growth rates. Two patterns of bacterial growth were observed upon rewetting the three different soils. In "pattern 1", bacteria started growing immediately in a linear pattern up to values similar as the moist control. In "pattern 2", bacteria started growing exponentially after a lag period of no growth with a second pulse of respiration occurring at the start of bacterial growth. Manipulating the drying intensity changed the patterns. Soils with "pattern 1" were changed to "pattern 2" when subjected to more extensive drying periods whereas soils with "pattern 2" were

  15. A Metastable Equilibrium Model for the Relative Abundances of Microbial Phyla in a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies link the compositions of microbial communities to their environments, but the energetics of organism-specific biomass synthesis as a function of geochemical variables have rarely been assessed. We describe a thermodynamic model that integrates geochemical and metagenomic data for biofilms sampled at five sites along a thermal and chemical gradient in the outflow channel of the hot spring known as “Bison Pool” in Yellowstone National Park. The relative abundances of major phyla in individual communities sampled along the outflow channel are modeled by computing metastable equilibrium among model proteins with amino acid compositions derived from metagenomic sequences. Geochemical conditions are represented by temperature and activities of basis species, including pH and oxidation-reduction potential quantified as the activity of dissolved hydrogen. By adjusting the activity of hydrogen, the model can be tuned to closely approximate the relative abundances of the phyla observed in the community profiles generated from BLAST assignments. The findings reveal an inverse relationship between the energy demand to form the proteins at equal thermodynamic activities and the abundance of phyla in the community. The distance from metastable equilibrium of the communities, assessed using an equation derived from energetic considerations that is also consistent with the information-theoretic entropy change, decreases along the outflow channel. Specific divergences from metastable equilibrium, such as an underprediction of the relative abundances of phototrophic organisms at lower temperatures, can be explained by considering additional sources of energy and/or differences in growth efficiency. Although the metabolisms used by many members of these communities are driven by chemical disequilibria, the results support the possibility that higher-level patterns of chemotrophic microbial ecosystems are shaped by metastable equilibrium states that depend on both the

  16. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales.

  17. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales. PMID:27572161

  18. Microbial abundance in lacustrine sediments: a case study from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Kitte, J. A.; Grewe, S.; Glombitza, C.

    2015-12-01

    The ICDP "PaleoVan" drilling campaign at Lake Van, Turkey, provided a long (>100 m) record of lacustrine subsurface sedimentary microbial cell abundance. After the ICDP campaign at Potrok Aike, Argentina, this is only the second time that deep lacustrine cell counts have been documented. The lacustrine cell count data are significantly different from published marine records, the most probable cause being differences in sedimentary organic matter composition, with marine sediments containing a higher fraction of labile organic matter. Previous studies showed that microbial activity and abundance increase within centimetres to meters around geologic interfaces. The finely laminated Lake Van sediment allowed studying this phenomenon on the microscale. We sampled at the scale of individual laminae (0.5 to 1 mm thick) and in some depth intervals we found differences in microbial abundance of up to two orders of magnitude between the different laminae. This small-scale heterogeneity is normally overlooked due to much larger sampling intervals that integrate over several centimetres. However, not all laminated intervals exhibit such large differences in microbial abundance, and some non-laminated horizons show large variability on the millimetre-scale as well. The reasons for such contrasting observations remain elusive, but indicate that heterogeneity of microbial abundance in subsurface sediments has not been taken into account sufficiently. These findings have implications not just for microbiological studies but for geochemistry as well, as the large differences in microbial abundance clearly show that there are distinct microhabitats that deviate considerably from the surrounding layers.

  19. Microbial growth in small-volume pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Whyte, W; Niven, L; Bell, N D

    1989-01-01

    The ability of aseptically filled pharmaceuticals to support microbial growth was tested on 43 small-volume products (mainly parenterals). These were inoculated with a variety of microorganisms which were known to be associated with contamination of pharmaceutical products. In general, Gram-negative bacteria were found to be much more likely to grow than Gram-positive. It was possible for an inoculum of a few cells to multiply to levels up to 10(7)/mL. The presence of preservatives also influenced the likelihood of growth, 12 out of 19 (63%) of the pharmaceuticals without preservatives supporting growth of one or more microorganisms; only 3 out of 24 (12%) of those with preservatives supported growth. The importance of these observations is discussed with reference to formulation of aseptically filled products, environmental sampling and the quality of cleanroom conditions necessary for production. It is suggested that those pharmaceuticals which are designed to be sterile but not to be terminally sterilized, should be tested before production begins, for their ability to support microbial growth. In this way, the risks involved in aseptically filling can be ascertained. A test is proposed in which "indicator" microorganisms would predict the likelihood of pharmaceutical formulations supporting growth.

  20. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  1. Impact of warm winters on microbial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgander, Johanna; Rousk, Johannes; Axel Olsson, Pål

    2014-05-01

    Growth of soil bacteria has an asymmetrical response to higher temperature with a gradual increase with increasing temperatures until an optimum after which a steep decline occurs. In laboratory studies it has been shown that by exposing a soil bacterial community to a temperature above the community's optimum temperature for two months, the bacterial community grows warm-adapted, and the optimum temperature of bacterial growth shifts towards higher temperatures. This result suggests a change in the intrinsic temperature dependence of bacterial growth, as temperature influenced the bacterial growth even though all other factors were kept constant. An intrinsic temperature dependence could be explained by either a change in the bacterial community composition, exchanging less tolerant bacteria towards more tolerant ones, or it could be due to adaptation within the bacteria present. No matter what the shift in temperature tolerance is due to, the shift could have ecosystem scale implications, as winters in northern Europe are getting warmer. To address the question of how microbes and plants are affected by warmer winters, a winter-warming experiment was established in a South Swedish grassland. Results suggest a positive response in microbial growth rate in plots where winter soil temperatures were around 6 °C above ambient. Both bacterial and fungal growth (leucine incorporation, and acetate into ergosterol incorporation, respectively) appeared stimulated, and there are two candidate explanations for these results. Either (i) warming directly influence microbial communities by modulating their temperature adaptation, or (ii) warming indirectly affected the microbial communities via temperature induced changes in bacterial growth conditions. The first explanation is in accordance with what has been shown in laboratory conditions (explained above), where the differences in the intrinsic temperature relationships were examined. To test this explanation the

  2. Microbial abundance in lacustrine sediments: a case study from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Grewe, Sina; Glombitza, Clemens; Kitte, J. Axel

    2015-09-01

    The ICDP "PaleoVan" drilling campaign at Lake Van, Turkey, provided a long (>100 m) record of lacustrine subsurface sedimentary microbial cell abundance. After the ICDP campaign at Potrok Aike, Argentina, this is only the second time deep lacustrine cell counts have been documented. Two sites were cored and revealed a strikingly similar cell distribution despite differences in organic matter content and microbial activity. Although shifted towards higher values, cell counts from Lake Potrok Aike, Argentina, reveal very similar distribution patterns with depth. The lacustrine cell count data are significantly different from published marine records; the most probable cause is differences in sedimentary organic matter composition with marine sediments containing a higher fraction of labile organic matter. Previous studies showed that microbial activity and abundance increase centimetres to metres around geologic interfaces. The finely laminated Lake Van sediment allowed studying this phenomenon on the microscale. We sampled at the scale of individual laminae, and in some depth intervals, we found large differences in microbial abundance between the different laminae. This small-scale heterogeneity is normally overlooked due to much larger sampling intervals that integrate over several centimetres. However, not all laminated intervals exhibit such large differences in microbial abundance, and some non-laminated horizons show large variability on the millimetre scale as well. The reasons for such contrasting observations remain elusive, but indicate that heterogeneity of microbial abundance in subsurface sediments has not been taken into account sufficiently. These findings have implications not just for microbiological studies but for geochemistry as well, as the large differences in microbial abundance clearly show that there are distinct microhabitats that deviate considerably from the surrounding layers.

  3. Effect of altitude and season on microbial activity, abundance and community structure in Alpine forest soils.

    PubMed

    Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Minerbi, Stefano; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of climate change, the study of microbial communities along altitudinal gradients is especially useful. Only few studies considered altitude and season at the same time. We characterized four forest sites located in the Italian Alps, along an altitude gradient (545-2000 m a.s.l.), to evaluate the effect of altitude in spring and autumn on soil microbial properties. Each site in each season was characterized with regard to soil temperature, physicochemical properties, microbial activities (respiration, enzymes), community level physiological profiles (CLPP), microbial abundance and community structure (PLFA). Increased levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients were found at higher altitudes and in autumn, resulting in a significant increase of (soil dry-mass related) microbial activities and abundance at higher altitudes. Significant site- and season-specific effects were found for enzyme production. The significant interaction of the factors site and incubation temperature for soil microbial activities indicated differences in microbial communities and their responses to temperature among sites. CLPP revealed site-specific effects. Microbial community structure was influenced by altitudinal, seasonal and/or site-specific effects. Correlations demonstrated that altitude, and not season, was the main factor determining the changes in abiotic and biotic characteristics at the sites investigated.

  4. Evidence of nitrification and denitrification in high and low microbial abundance sponges.

    PubMed

    Schläppy, Marie-Lise; Schöttner, Sandra I; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M; de Beer, Dirk; Hoffmann, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic microbial key processes were quantified and compared to microbial numbers and morphological structure in Mediterranean sponges. Direct counts on histological sections stained with DAPI showed that sponges with high microbial abundances (HMA sponges) have a denser morphological structure with a reduced aquiferous system compared to low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges. In Dysidea avara, the LMA sponge, rates of nitrification and denitrification were higher than in the HMA sponge Chondrosia reniformis, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation and sulfate reduction were below detection in both species. This study shows that LMA sponges may host physiologically similar microbes with comparable or even higher metabolic rates than HMA sponges, and that anaerobic processes such as denitrification can be found both in HMA and LMA sponges. A higher concentration of microorganisms in the mesohyl of HMA compared to LMA sponges may indicate a stronger retention of and, hence, a possible benefit from associated microbes.

  5. Resolving microbial membership using Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy (‘AVIT )

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Siddharth, Jay; Lauber, Christian L.; Membrez, Mathieu; Betrisey, Bertrand; Loyer, Carole; Chou, Chieh Jason; Pataky, Zoltan; Golay, Alain; Parkinson, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of NGS has revolutionized the analysis in microbial ecology contributing to our deeper understanding of microbiota in health and disease. However, the quality, quantity and confidence of summarized taxonomic abundances are in need of further scrutiny due to sample dependent and independent effects. In this article we introduce ‘AVIT (Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy), an unbiased method to enrich for assigned members of microbial communities. As opposed to using a priori thresholds, ‘AVIT uses inherent abundance and variability of taxa in a dataset to determine the inclusion or rejection of each taxa for further downstream analysis. Using in-vitro and in-vivo studies, we benchmarked performance and parameterized ‘AVIT to establish a framework for investigating the dynamic range of microbial community membership in clinically relevant scenarios. PMID:27530237

  6. Microbial abundance and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.K.; Rao, P.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of highly lipophilic chemicals that are generally formed during combustion, pyrolysis and pyrosynthesis of organic matter and are present ubiquitously in the urban environment as pollutants in very small quantities. The objective of the present study was to determine the activity of indigenous microbial populations of hazardous waste sites, their degree of adaptation, their ability to degrade toxic PAHs, and to study the potentials of different indigenous microbes to degrade the following selected PAHs from the polluted soil environment. PAHs selected for the study were anthracene, phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene and fluoranthene. In this study, the indigenous contaminated soil populations were effective in removing the hydrocarbons and returning the soil to productivity. The biodegradation of PAHs in the selected soil was due to PAH degrader present in the bacterial as well as fungal communities. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization. PMID:25764538

  8. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization.

  9. Putative Effect of Aquifer Recharge on the Abundance and Taxonomic Composition of Endemic Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Cally A.; Hutson, John L.; Mitchell, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Drought events and the overexploitation of freshwater resources have led to the increased need to manage groundwater reserves. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), whereby artificial water is injected into aquifers for storage, is one of the proposed methods by which freshwater supplies can be increased. Microbial clogging following injection, however, is a major issue. Here, during laboratory simulations of ASR, we used flow cytometry and bar-coded pyrosequencing to investigate changes in microbial abundance and community dynamics. Bacterial abundance ranged from 5.0 × 104 to 1.4 × 107 cells ml-1 before the addition of synthetic wastewater. Following wastewater addition, a 25-fold decrease in abundance was observed, coinciding with a 12-fold increase in viral abundance. Taxa shifted from an overrepresentation of Sphingomonadales, Sphingobacteriales, Rhodospirillales, Caulobacterales, Legionellales, Bacillales, Fusobacteriales and Verrucomicrobiales prior to the addition of synthetic wastewater to Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales, Pseudomonadales, Xanthomonadales, Rhodobacterales, Thizobiales and Thiotrichales following the addition of synthetic wastewater. Furthermore, a significant difference in overall taxonomic composition between the groundwater samples before and after the addition of synthetic wastewater was observed, with water samples exhibiting more similarity to sediment samples after wastewater was added. Collectively, these results suggest that ASR may alter the taxonomic composition of endemic microbial communities and that complete profiles of groundwater properties, including microbial community abundance and composition need to be taken into consideration when selecting aquifers for ASR practices. PMID:26083532

  10. Biodiversity at the plant-soil interface: microbial abundance and community structure respond to litter mixing.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Samantha K; Newman, Gregory S

    2010-03-01

    The interactive effects of diversity in plants and microbial communities at the litter interface are not well understood. Mixtures of plant litter from different species often decompose differently than when individual species decompose alone. Previously, we found that litter mixtures of multiple conifers decomposed more rapidly than expected, but litter mixtures that included conifer and aspen litter did not. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these diversity effects may help explain existing anomalous decay dynamics and provide a glimpse into the elusive linkage between plant diversity and the fungi and bacteria that carry out decomposition. We examined the microbial communities on litter from individual plant species decomposing both in mixture and alone. We assessed two main hypotheses to explain how the decomposer community could stimulate mixed-litter decomposition above predicted rates: either by being more abundant, or having a different or more diverse community structure than when microbes decompose a single species of litter. Fungal, bacterial and total phospholipid fatty acid microbial biomass increased by over 40% on both conifer and aspen litter types in mixture, and microbial community composition changed significantly when plant litter types were mixed. Microbial diversity also increased with increasing plant litter diversity. While our data provide support for both the increased abundance hypothesis and the altered microbial community hypothesis, microbial changes do not translate to predictably altered litter decomposition and may only produce synergisms when mixed litters are functionally similar.

  11. Plant Kin Recognition Enhances Abundance of Symbiotic Microbial Partner

    PubMed Central

    File, Amanda L.; Klironomos, John; Maherali, Hafiz; Dudley, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The stability of cooperative interactions among different species can be compromised by cheating. In the plant-mycorrhizal fungi symbiosis, a single mycorrhizal network may interact with many plants, providing the opportunity for individual plants to cheat by obtaining nutrients from the fungi without donating carbon. Here we determine whether kin selection may favour plant investment in the mycorrhizal network, reducing the incentive to cheat when relatives interact with a single network. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that mycorrhizal network size and root colonization were greater when Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. was grown with siblings compared to strangers. Soil fungal abundance was positively correlated with group leaf nitrogen, and increased root colonization was associated with a reduced number of pathogen-induced root lesions, indicating greater benefit to plants grown with siblings. Conclusions/Significance Plants can benefit their relatives through investment in mycorrhizal fungi, and kin selection in plants could promote the persistence of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:23029158

  12. Microbial Abundances in Salt Marsh Soils: A Molecular Approach for Small Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granse, Dirk; Mueller, Peter; Weingartner, Magdalena; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The rate of biological decomposition greatly determines the carbon sequestration capacity of salt marshes. Microorganisms are involved in the decomposition of biomass and the rate of decomposition is supposed to be related to microbial abundance. Recent studies quantified microbial abundance by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), a method that also allows determining the microbial community structure by applying specific primers. The main microbial community structure can be determined by using primers specific for 16S rRNA (Bacteria) and 18S rRNA (Fungi) of the microbial DNA. However, the investigation of microbial abundance pattern at small spatial scales, such as locally varying abiotic conditions within a salt-marsh system, requires high accuracy in DNA extraction and QPCR methods. Furthermore, there is evidence that a single extraction may not be sufficient to reliably quantify rRNA gene copies. The aim of this study was to establish a suitable DNA extraction method and stable QPCR conditions for the measurement of microbial abundances in semi-terrestrial environments. DNA was extracted from two soil samples (top WE{5}{cm}) by using the PowerSoil DNA Extraction Kit (Mo Bio Laboratories, Inc., Carlsbad, CA) and applying a modified extraction protocol. The DNA extraction was conducted in four consecutive DNA extraction loops from three biological replicates per soil sample by reusing the PowerSoil bead tube. The number of Fungi and Bacteria rRNA gene copies of each DNA extraction loop and a pooled DNA solution (extraction loop 1 - 4) was measured by using the QPCR method with taxa specific primer pairs (Bacteria: B341F, B805R; Fungi: FR1, FF390). The DNA yield of the replicates varied at DNA extraction loop 1 between WE{25 and 85}{ng

  13. [Microbial community abundance and diversity in typical karst ecosystem to indicate soil carbon cycle].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Jiang; Tang, Hua-Feng; Li, Min; Huang, Bing-Fu; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Li, Gui-Wen

    2014-11-01

    The soil microbial characteristics were detected to clarify their indications in organic carbon cycle in karst system. Soil samples from three karst types (saddle, depression and slop) at 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm layers were collected in the Yaji Karst Experimental Site, a typical karst ecosystem. The microbial diversity and abundance were assayed using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and fluorescence quantitative PCR. The data showed that the highest abundance of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA were in depression with 1.32 x 10(11) copies x g(-1) and in saddle with 1.12 x 10(10) copies x g(-1), respectively. The abundance of 16S rRNA in saddle and depression decreased from top to bottom, while that of 18S rRNA in three karst forms decreased, which showed that the abundance changed consistently with soil organic carbon (SOC). The 3 diversity indices of 16S rRNA and 6 diversity indices of 18S rRNA increased from top to bottom in soil profiles of three karst forms. These results showed that microbial diversity changed conversely with the abundance and SOC in soil profile. It can be concluded that the abundance was more important than the diversity index for soil carbon cycle in karst system.

  14. The pinyon rhizosphere, plant stress, and herbivory affect the abundance of microbial decomposers in soils.

    PubMed

    Kuske, C R; Ticknor, L O; Busch, J D; Gehring, C A; Whitham, T G

    2003-05-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, changes in environmental conditions that affect plant performance cause a cascade of effects through many trophic levels. In a 2-year field study, seasonal abundance measurements were conducted for fast-growing bacterial heterotrophs, humate-degrading actinomycetes, fungal heterotrophs, and fluorescent pseudomonads that represent the decomposers in soil. Links between plant health and soil microbiota abundance in pinyon rhizospheres were documented across two soil types: a dry, nutrient-poor volcanic cinder field and a sandy-loam soil. On the stressful cinder fields, we identified relationships between soil decomposer abundance, pinyon age, and stress due to insect herbivory. Across seasonal variation, consistent differences in microbial decomposer abundance were identified between the cinders and sandy-loam soil. Abundance of bacterial heterotrophs and humate-degrading actinomycetes was affected by both soil nutritional status and the pinyon rhizosphere. In contrast, abundance of the fungal heterotrophs and fluorescent pseudomonads was affected primarily by the pinyon rhizosphere. On the cinder field, the three bacterial groups were more abundant on 150-year-old trees than on 60-year-old trees, whereas fungal heterotrophs were unaffected by tree age. Fungal heterotrophs and actinomycetes were more abundant on insect-resistant trees than on susceptible trees, but the opposite was true for the fluorescent pseudomonads. Although all four groups were present in all the environments, the four microbial groups were affected differently by the pinyon rhizosphere, by tree age, and by tree stress caused by the cinder soil and insect herbivory.

  15. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate

  16. Methods for determining the abundance, diversity and activity of soil microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg, Lily

    2014-05-01

    The diversity and abundance of soil microbial communities play important roles in determining soil structure, quality and productivity. The past decade has seen an increase in the number and efficiency of methods for determining microbial diversity, abundance and function. Recognising that only a very small proportion of the soil microbial community can be cultured, most current studies use molecular techniques based on the 16S and 18S rRNA encoding sequences (DGGE, TRFLP, OFRG, ARISA, SSCP) as well as techniques based on the cellular composition of the microbes (PLFA composition). Recent developments include high-throughput sequencing and microarrays, representing major advances in microbial community analysis. While the diversity of microbes can be determined using DNA-based techniques, microbial activity changes under various conditions. Therefore, the analysis of soil function at any given time requires the analysis of gene expression using RNA-based techniques. Molecular techniques have tremendously advanced our knowledge in the field of soil microbiology, however, the limitations should not be underestimated. This presentation will critically review both the advantages and the limitations of techniques used in soil microbial analysis.

  17. Microbial growth and transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, Pavel; Jost, Daniel; Bastian, Peter; Ippisch, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    There is a considerable ongoing effort aimed at understanding the behavior of microorganisms in porous media. Microbial activity is of significant interest in various environmental applications such as in situ bioremediation, protection of drinking water supplies and for subsurface geochemistry in general. The main limiting factors for bacterial growth are the availability of electron acceptors, nutrients and bio-available water. The capillary fringe, defined - in a wider sense than usual - as the region of the subsurface above the groundwater table, but still dominated by capillary rise, is a region where all these factors are abundantly available. It is thus a region where high microbial activity is to be expected. In a research unit 'Dynamic Capillary Fringes - A Multidisciplinary Approach (DyCap)' founded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the growth of microorganisms in the capillary fringe was studied experimentally and with numerical simulations. Processes like component transport and diffusion, exchange between the liquid phase and the gas phase, microbial growth and cell attachment and detachment were incorporated into a numerical simulator. The growth of the facultative anaerobic Escherichia coli as a function of nutrient availability and oxygen concentration in the liquid phase is modeled with modified Monod-type models and modifications for the switch between aerobic and anaerobic growth. Laboratory batch experiments with aqueous solutions of bacteria have been carried out under various combinations of oxygen concentrations in the gas phase and added amounts of dissolved organic carbon to determine the growth model parameters by solution of a parameter estimation problem. For the transport of bacteria the adhesion to phase boundaries is also very important. As microorganisms are transported through porous media, they are removed from the pore fluid by physicochemical filtration (attachment to sediment grain surfaces) or are adhering to gas

  18. Linking soil microbial communities to vascular plant abundance along a climate gradient.

    PubMed

    Bragazza, Luca; Bardgett, Richard D; Mitchell, Edward A D; Buttler, Alexandre

    2015-02-01

    The ongoing expansion of shrub cover in response to climate change represents a unique opportunity to explore the link between soil microbial communities and vegetation changes. This link is particularly important in peatlands where shrub expansion is expected to feed back negatively on the carbon sink capacity of these ecosystems. Microbial community structure and function were measured seasonally in four peatlands located along an altitude gradient representing a natural gradient of climate and associated vascular plant abundance. We show that increased soil temperature and reduced water content are associated with greater vascular plant biomass, in particular that of ericoids, and that this, in turn, is correlated with greater microbial biomass. More specifically, microbial community structure is characterized by an increasing dominance of fungi over bacteria with improved soil oxygenation. We also found that the carbon and nitrogen stoichiometry of microbial biomass differs in relation to soil microbial community structure and that this is ultimately associated with a different investment in extracellular enzymatic activity. Our findings highlight the fact that the determination of the structural identity of microbial communities can help to explain the biogeochemical dynamics of organic matter and provide a better understanding of ecosystem response to environmental changes.

  19. Soil degradation and amendment effects on soil properties, microbial communities, and plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, M.; Fehmi, J. S.; Rasmussen, C.; Gallery, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities that disrupt soil properties are fundamentally changing ecosystems. Soil degradation, caused by anthropogenic disturbance can decrease microbial abundance and activity, leading to changes in nutrient availability, soil organic matter, and plant establishment. The addition of amendments to disturbed soils have the potential ameliorate these negative consequences. We studied the effects of soil degradation, via an autoclave heat shock method, and the addition of amendments (biochar and woodchips) on microbial activity, soil carbon and nitrogen availability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and plant growth of ten plant species native to the semi-arid southwestern US. Relative to non-degraded soils, microbial activity, measured via extracellular enzyme assays, was significantly lower for all seven substrates assayed. These soils also had significantly lower amounts of carbon assimilated into microbial biomass but no change in microbial biomass nitrogen. Soil degradation had no effect on plant biomass. Amendments caused changes in microbial activity: biochar-amended soils had significant increases in potential activity with five of the seven substrates measured; woodchip amended soils had significant increases with two. Soil carbon increased with both amendments but this was not reflected in a significant change in microbial biomass carbon. Biochar-amended soils had increases in soil nitrogen availability but neither amendment caused changes in microbial biomass nitrogen. Biochar amendments had no significant effect on above- or belowground plant biomass while woodchips significantly decreased aboveground plant biomass. Results show that soil degradation decreases microbial activity and changes nutrient dynamics, but these are not reflected in changes in plant growth. Amendments provide nutrient sources and change soil pore space, which cause microbial activities to fluctuate and may, in the case of woodchips, increase plant drought

  20. Benthic microbial abundance and activities in an intensively trawled ecosystem (Thermaikos Gulf, Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Pusceddu, Antonio; Tselepides, Anastasios; Polychronaki, Thalia; Giannakourou, Antonia; Fiordelmondo, Carla; Hatziyanni, Eleni; Danovaro, Roberto

    2005-12-01

    Abundance of benthic bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates, extracellular enzymatic activities, bacterial C production, C mineralisation and sediment community oxygen consumption rates were measured in the Thermaikos Gulf (Northeastern Mediterranean), before (September 2001), and during intense trawling activities (October 2001 and February 2002). The biochemical composition of sedimentary organic matter has revealed that bottom trawling had an effect on the trophic state of Thermaikos Gulf. Changes on the benthic microbial food web were also recorded, during the three sampling seasons. Even though trawling-induced sediment resuspension did not alter significantly the abundance of the microbial components, with the exception of the most impacted station, it determined changes regarding their relative importance. Thus, the ratios of bacterium to nanoflagellates and ciliate to nanoflagellates abundance increased in the trawled stations, causing a sudden increase in bacterial C production, in comparison to the non-trawled station. Four months later, the effects of trawling on the microbial food web were less evident, masked possibly by the drastic decrease in the water temperature. The results of the present work suggest that bottom trawling induces alteration of the sedimentological variables and can be considered as a factor affecting the function of the microbial food web in marine coastal ecosystems. These alterations cause faster mobilisation of organic C buried in the sediment and increase nutrient concentrations and availability in the system, thus inducing an effect that could lead to coastal eutrophication.

  1. Bioflumology: Microbial mat growth in flumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airo, A.; Weigert, S.; Beck, C.

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in a transformational change of Earth's geochemical cycles and the subsequent evolution of life. However, it remains vigorously debated when this metabolic ability had evolved in cyanobacteria. This is largely because studies of Archean microfossil morphology, molecular biomarkers, and isotopic characteristics are frequently ambiguous. However, the high degree of morphological similarities between modern photosynthetic and Archean fossil mats has been interpreted to indicate phototactic microbial behavior or oxygenic photosynthesis. In order to better evaluate the relationship between mat morphology and metabolism, we here present a laboratory set-up for conducting month-long experiments in several sterilizable circular flumes designed to allow single-species cyanobacterial growth under adjustable fluid-flow conditions and protected from contamination.

  2. When should we expect microbial phenotypic traits to predict microbial abundances?

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy W

    2012-01-01

    Species' phenotypic traits may predict their relative abundances. Intuitively, this is because locally abundant species have traits making them well-adapted to local abiotic and biotic conditions, while locally rare species are not as well-adapted. But this intuition may not be valid. If competing species vary in how well-adapted they are to local conditions, why doesn't the best-adapted species simply exclude the others entirely? But conversely, if species exhibit niche differences that allow them to coexist, then by definition there is no single best adapted species. Rather, demographic rates depend on species' relative abundances, so that phenotypic traits conferring high adaptedness do not necessarily confer high abundance. I illustrate these points using a simple theoretical model incorporating adjustable levels of "adaptedness" and "niche differences." Even very small niche differences can weaken or even reverse the expected correlation between adaptive traits and abundance. Conversely, adaptive traits confer high abundance when niche differences are very strong. Future work should be directed toward understanding the link between phenotypic traits and frequency-dependence of demographic rates. PMID:22876239

  3. Microbial Diversity and Lipid Abundance in Microbial Mats from a Sulfidic, Saline, Warm Spring in Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Edwardson, C.; Mackey, T. J.; Dzaugis, M.; Ibarra, Y.; Course 2012, G.; Frantz, C. M.; Osburn, M. R.; Hirst, M.; Williamson, C.; Hanselmann, K.; Caporaso, J.; Sessions, A. L.; Spear, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The microbial diversity of Stinking Springs, a sulfidic, saline, warm spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake was investigated. The measured pH, temperature, salinity, and sulfide concentration along the flow path ranged from 6.64-7.77, 40-28° C, 2.9-2.2%, and 250 μM to negligible, respectively. Five sites were selected along the flow path and within each site microbial mats were dissected into depth profiles based on the color and texture of the mat layers. Genomic DNA was extracted from each layer, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced on the Roche 454 Titanium platform. Fatty acids were also extracted from the mat layers and analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The mats at Stinking Springs were classified into roughly two morphologies with respect to their spatial distribution: loose, sometimes floating mats proximal to the spring source; and thicker, well-laminated mats distal to the spring source. Loosely-laminated mats were found in turbulent stream flow environments, whereas well-laminated mats were common in less turbulent sheet flows. Phototrophs, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers, methanogens, other bacteria and archaea were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences. Diatoms, identified by microscopy and lipid analysis were found to increase in abundance with distance from the source. Methanogens were generally more abundant in deeper mat laminae. Photoheterotrophs were found in all mat layers. Microbial diversity increased significantly with depth at most sites. In addition, two distinct microbial streamers were identified and characterized at the two fast flowing sites. These two streamer varieties were dominated by either cyanobacteria or flavobacteria. Overall, our genomic and lipid analysis suggest that the physical and chemical environment is more predictive of the community composition than mat morphology. Site Map

  4. Abundance and diversity of microbial inhabitants in European spacecraft-associated clean rooms.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Pukall, Rüdiger; Wirth, Reinhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-06-01

    The determination of the microbial load of a spacecraft en route to interesting extraterrestrial environments is mandatory and currently based on the culturable, heat-shock-surviving portion of microbial contaminants. Our study compared these classical bioburden measurements as required by NASA's and ESA's guidelines for the microbial examination of flight hardware, with molecular analysis methods (16S rRNA gene cloning and quantitative PCR) to further develop our understanding of the diversity and abundance of the microbial communities of spacecraft-associated clean rooms. Three samplings of the Herschel Space Observatory and its surrounding clean rooms were performed in two different European facilities. Molecular analyses detected a broad diversity of microbes typically found in the human microbiome with three bacterial genera (Staphylococcus, Propionibacterium, and Brevundimonas) common to all three locations. Bioburden measurements revealed a low, but heterogeneous, abundance of spore-forming and other heat-resistant microorganisms. Total cell numbers estimated by quantitative real-time PCR were typically 3 orders of magnitude greater than those determined by viable counts, which indicates a tendency for traditional methods to underestimate the extent of clean room bioburden. Furthermore, the molecular methods allowed the detection of a much broader diversity than traditional culture-based methods.

  5. Microbiome interplay: plants alter microbial abundance and diversity within the built environment

    PubMed Central

    Mahnert, Alexander; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The built indoor microbiome has importance for human health. Residents leave their microbial fingerprint but nothing is known about the transfer from plants. Our hypothesis that indoor plants contribute substantially to the microbial abundance and diversity in the built environment was experimentally confirmed as proof of principle by analyzing the microbiome of the spider plant Chlorophytum comosum in relation to their surroundings. The abundance of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota (fungi) increased on surrounding floor and wall surfaces within 6 months of plant isolation in a cleaned indoor environment, whereas the microbial abundance on plant leaves and indoor air remained stable. We observed a microbiome shift: the bacterial diversity on surfaces increased significantly but fungal diversity decreased. The majority of cells were intact at the time of samplings and thus most probably alive including diverse Archaea as yet unknown phyllosphere inhabitants. LEfSe and network analysis showed that most microbes were dispersed from plant leaves to the surrounding surfaces. This led to an increase of specific taxa including spore-forming fungi with potential allergic potential but also beneficial plant-associated bacteria, e.g., Paenibacillus. This study demonstrates for the first time that plants can alter the microbiome of a built environment, which supports the significance of plants and provides insights into the complex interplay of plants, microbiomes and human beings. PMID:26379656

  6. Organic amendments enhance microbial diversity and abundance of functional genes in Australian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldorri, Sind; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Food and cash crops play important roles in Australia's economy with black, grey and red clay soil, widely use for growing cotton, wheat, corn and other crops in rotation. While the majority of cotton growers use nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers only in the form of agrochemicals, a few experiment with the addition of manure or composted plant material before planting. We hypothesized that the use of such organic amendments would enhance the soil microbial function through increased microbial diversity and abundance, thus contribute to improved soil sustainability. To test the hypothesis we collected soil samples from two cotton-growing farms in close geographical proximity and with mostly similar production practices other than one grower has been using composted plants as organic amendment and the second farmer uses only agrochemicals. We applied the Biolog Ecoplate system to study the metabolic signature of microbial communities and used qPCR to estimate the abundance of functional genes in the soil. The soil treated with organic amendments clearly showed higher metabolic activity of a more diverse range of carbon sources as well as higher abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen and phosphorous cycles. Since microbes undertake a large number of soil functions, the use of organic amendments can contribute to the sustainability of agricultural soils.

  7. Microbial abundance and composition influence litter decomposition response to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Allison, Steven D; Lu, Ying; Weihe, Claudia; Goulden, Michael L; Martiny, Adam C; Treseder, Kathleen K; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2013-03-01

    Rates of ecosystem processes such as decomposition are likely to change as a result of human impacts on the environment. In southern California, climate change and nitrogen (N) deposition in particular may alter biological communities and ecosystem processes. These drivers may affect decomposition directly, through changes in abiotic conditions, and indirectly through changes in plant and decomposer communities. To assess indirect effects on litter decomposition, we reciprocally transplanted microbial communities and plant litter among control and treatment plots (either drought or N addition) in a grassland ecosystem. We hypothesized that drought would reduce decomposition rates through moisture limitation of decomposers and reductions in plant litter quality before and during decomposition. In contrast, we predicted that N deposition would stimulate decomposition by relieving N limitation of decomposers and improving plant litter quality. We also hypothesized that adaptive mechanisms would allow microbes to decompose litter more effectively in their native plot and litter environments. Consistent with our first hypothesis, we found that drought treatment reduced litter mass loss from 20.9% to 15.3% after six months. There was a similar decline in mass loss of litter inoculated with microbes transplanted from the drought treatment, suggesting a legacy effect of drought driven by declines in microbial abundance and possible changes in microbial community composition. Bacterial cell densities were up to 86% lower in drought plots and at least 50% lower on litter derived from the drought treatment, whereas fungal hyphal lengths increased by 13-14% in the drought treatment. Nitrogen effects on decomposition rates and microbial abundances were weaker than drought effects, although N addition significantly altered initial plant litter chemistry and litter chemistry during decomposition. However, we did find support for microbial adaptation to N addition with N

  8. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest.

  9. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bézy, Vanessa S; Valverde, Roldán A; Plante, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1) nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) g(-1) nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  10. Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Hatching Success as a Function of the Microbial Abundance in Nest Sand at Ostional, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Bézy, Vanessa S.; Valverde, Roldán A.; Plante, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas). However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g-1 nest sand). Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g-1 g-1 nest sand). Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest. PMID:25714355

  11. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Smithwick, Erica A H; Naithani, Kusum J; Balser, Teri C; Romme, William H; Turner, Monica G

    2012-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2) determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa) forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m). Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R²<0.29). Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21(st) Century. PMID:23226324

  12. Post-Fire Spatial Patterns of Soil Nitrogen Mineralization and Microbial Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Smithwick, Erica A. H.; Naithani, Kusum J.; Balser, Teri C.; Romme, William H.; Turner, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2) determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa) forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m). Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R2<0.29). Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21st Century. PMID:23226324

  13. 21 CFR 866.2560 - Microbial growth monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbial growth monitor. 866.2560 Section 866.2560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2560 Microbial...

  14. 21 CFR 866.2560 - Microbial growth monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbial growth monitor. 866.2560 Section 866.2560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2560 Microbial...

  15. 21 CFR 866.2560 - Microbial growth monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbial growth monitor. 866.2560 Section 866.2560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2560 Microbial...

  16. 21 CFR 866.2560 - Microbial growth monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbial growth monitor. 866.2560 Section 866.2560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2560 Microbial...

  17. 21 CFR 866.2560 - Microbial growth monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbial growth monitor. 866.2560 Section 866.2560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2560 Microbial...

  18. Linking potential denitrification rates to microbial gene abundances in multiple boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D. G.; Blazewicz, S.; Herman, D. J.; Firestone, M. K.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and functioning of boreal ecosystems are vulnerable to changes in climate, leading to changes in season length, fire regimes, and soil moisture status. To investigate the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on microbial nitrogen cycling several disparate boreal ecosystems was studied. The two primary objectives were to: (1) determine whether process rates could be predicted solely from soil physical and chemical characteristics and (2) determine if the abundance of functional genes could be an additional explanatory variable. Surface soils were sampled along an elevation-driven hydrologic gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER that corresponds with five plant communities typical of interior Alaska. The plant communities included a black spruce stand, a deciduous stand, a tussock grassland, an emergent fen, and a rich fen. We examined the chemical composition of the surface organic moss and soil, measured gross N-mineralization, potential rates of nitrification and denitrification (DEA), and abundances of several functional groups of microorganisms from soil cores collected in mid summer. We used quantitative PCR to assess the gene abundances of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers based on a functional gene approach. Here, we focus on potential denitrification rates (PDR), and abundance of denitrifyers carrying NirS and NirK genes (nitrate reductase) and NosZ genes (nitrous oxide reductase). PDR increased dramatically with increasing soil moisture along the gradient, from 1 mg N/m2/h at the dry black spruce site to 300 mg N/m2/h in the rich fen, which is very high compared to other poorly drained soil environments. PDR were linearly related to the abundance of functional genes from the microorganisms responsible for this process. Abundances of NirS, NirK and NosZ genes correlated significantly to PDR (r2 = 0.61 p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.45 p < 0.0003, r2 = 0.81 p < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, PDR were better explained by functional gene abundances

  19. Herbivory: effects on plant abundance, distribution and population growth

    PubMed Central

    Maron, John L; Crone, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Plants are attacked by many different consumers. A critical question is how often, and under what conditions, common reductions in growth, fecundity or even survival that occur due to herbivory translate to meaningful impacts on abundance, distribution or dynamics of plant populations. Here, we review population-level studies of the effects of consumers on plant dynamics and evaluate: (i) whether particular consumers have predictably more or less influence on plant abundance, (ii) whether particular plant life-history types are predictably more vulnerable to herbivory at the population level, (iii) whether the strength of plant–consumer interactions shifts predictably across environmental gradients and (iv) the role of consumers in influencing plant distributional limits. Existing studies demonstrate numerous examples of consumers limiting local plant abundance and distribution. We found larger effects of consumers on grassland than woodland forbs, stronger effects of herbivory in areas with high versus low disturbance, but no systematic or unambiguous differences in the impact of consumers based on plant life-history or herbivore feeding mode. However, our ability to evaluate these and other patterns is limited by the small (but growing) number of studies in this area. As an impetus for further study, we review strengths and challenges of population-level studies, such as interpreting net impacts of consumers in the presence of density dependence and seed bank dynamics. PMID:17002942

  20. Microbial diversity and abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang long-term water-flooding petroleum reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Tian, Huimei; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Hongwen; Ma, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Microbial populations associated with microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and their abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang water-flooding petroleum reservoir were investigated using 16S rRNA, nitrate reductases, dissimilatory sulfate reductase, and methyl coenzyme-M reductase-encoded genes to provide ecological information for the potential application of MEOR. 16S rRNA gene miseq sequencing revealed that this reservoir harbored large amounts of taxa, including 155 bacterial and 7 archeal genera. Among them, Arcobacter, Halomonas, Marinobacterium, Marinobacter, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Ochrobactrum, Hyphomonas, Acinetobacter, and Shewanella were dominant, and have the potential to grow using hydrocarbons as carbon sources. Metabolic gene clone libraries indicated that the nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) mainly belonged to Pseudomonas, Azospirillum, Bradyrhizobium, Thauera, Magnetospirillum, Sinorhizobium, Azoarcus, and Rhodobacter; the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were Desulfarculus, Desulfomonile, Desulfosarcina, Desulfotignum, Desulfacinum, Desulfatibacillum, Desulfatibacillum, Desulfomicrobium, and Desulfovibrio; while the methanogens were archaea and belonged to Methanomethylovorans, Methanosaeta, Methanococcus, Methanolobus, and Methanobacterium. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the number of bacterial 16S rRNA reached 106 copies/mL, while the metabolic genes of NRB, SRB, and methanogens reached 104 copies/mL. These results show that the Luliang reservoir has abundant microbial populations associated with oil recovery, suggesting that the reservoir has potential for MEOR. PMID:25641701

  1. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand...

  2. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  3. Effects of biochar and elevated soil temperature on soil microbial activity and abundance in an agricultural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2014-05-01

    As a consequence of Global Warming, rising surface temperatures will likely cause increased soil temperatures. Soil warming has already been shown to, at least temporarily, increase microbial activity and, therefore, the emissions of greenhouse gases like CO2 and N2O. This underlines the need for methods to stabilize soil organic matter and to prevent further boost of the greenhouse gas effect. Plant-derived biochar as a soil amendment could be a valuable tool to capture CO2 from the atmosphere and sequestrate it in soil on the long-term. During the process of pyrolysis, plant biomass is heated in an oxygen-low atmosphere producing the highly stable solid matter biochar. Biochar is generally stable against microbial degradation due to its chemical structure and it, therefore, persists in soil for long periods. Previous experiments indicated that biochar improves or changes several physical or chemical soil traits such as water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity or soil structure, but also biotic properties like microbial activity/abundance, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth. Changes in the soil microbial abundance and community composition alter their metabolism, but likely also affect plant productivity. The interaction of biochar addition and soil temperature increase on soil microbial properties and plant growth was yet not investigated on the field scale. To investigate whether warming could change biochar effects in soil, we conducted a field experiment attached to a soil warming experiment on an agricultural experimental site near the University of Hohenheim, already running since July 2008. The biochar field experiment was set up as two-factorial randomized block design (n=4) with the factors biochar amendment (0, 30 t ha-1) and soil temperature (ambient, elevated=ambient +2.5° C) starting from August 2013. Each plot has a dimension of 1x1m and is equipped with combined soil temperature and moisture sensors. Slow pyrolysis biochar from the C

  4. Increasing aridity reduces soil microbial diversity and abundance in global drylands.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Fernando T; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C; Eldridge, David J; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Quero, José Luis; García-Gómez, Miguel; Gallardo, Antonio; Ulrich, Werner; Bowker, Matthew A; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Gutiérrez, Julio R; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L; Miriti, Maria; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Stavi, Ilan; Wang, Deli; Woods, Natasha N; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-12-22

    Soil bacteria and fungi play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of their responses to climate change lags significantly behind that of other organisms. This gap in our understanding is particularly true for drylands, which occupy ∼41% of Earth´s surface, because no global, systematic assessments of the joint diversity of soil bacteria and fungi have been conducted in these environments to date. Here we present results from a study conducted across 80 dryland sites from all continents, except Antarctica, to assess how changes in aridity affect the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil bacteria and fungi. The diversity and abundance of soil bacteria and fungi was reduced as aridity increased. These results were largely driven by the negative impacts of aridity on soil organic carbon content, which positively affected the abundance and diversity of both bacteria and fungi. Aridity promoted shifts in the composition of soil bacteria, with increases in the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and α-Proteobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Contrary to what has been reported by previous continental and global-scale studies, soil pH was not a major driver of bacterial diversity, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota. Our results fill a critical gap in our understanding of soil microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They suggest that changes in aridity, such as those predicted by climate-change models, may reduce microbial abundance and diversity, a response that will likely impact the provision of key ecosystem services by global drylands.

  5. Increasing aridity reduces soil microbial diversity and abundance in global drylands.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Fernando T; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C; Eldridge, David J; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Quero, José Luis; García-Gómez, Miguel; Gallardo, Antonio; Ulrich, Werner; Bowker, Matthew A; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Gutiérrez, Julio R; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L; Miriti, Maria; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Stavi, Ilan; Wang, Deli; Woods, Natasha N; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-12-22

    Soil bacteria and fungi play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of their responses to climate change lags significantly behind that of other organisms. This gap in our understanding is particularly true for drylands, which occupy ∼41% of Earth´s surface, because no global, systematic assessments of the joint diversity of soil bacteria and fungi have been conducted in these environments to date. Here we present results from a study conducted across 80 dryland sites from all continents, except Antarctica, to assess how changes in aridity affect the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil bacteria and fungi. The diversity and abundance of soil bacteria and fungi was reduced as aridity increased. These results were largely driven by the negative impacts of aridity on soil organic carbon content, which positively affected the abundance and diversity of both bacteria and fungi. Aridity promoted shifts in the composition of soil bacteria, with increases in the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and α-Proteobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Contrary to what has been reported by previous continental and global-scale studies, soil pH was not a major driver of bacterial diversity, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota. Our results fill a critical gap in our understanding of soil microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They suggest that changes in aridity, such as those predicted by climate-change models, may reduce microbial abundance and diversity, a response that will likely impact the provision of key ecosystem services by global drylands. PMID:26647180

  6. Increasing aridity reduces soil microbial diversity and abundance in global drylands

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Jeffries, Thomas C.; Eldridge, David J.; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Quero, José Luis; García-Gómez, Miguel; Gallardo, Antonio; Ulrich, Werner; Bowker, Matthew A.; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Gutiérrez, Julio R.; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L.; Miriti, Maria; Naseri, Kamal; Ospina, Abelardo; Stavi, Ilan; Wang, Deli; Woods, Natasha N.; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria and fungi play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of their responses to climate change lags significantly behind that of other organisms. This gap in our understanding is particularly true for drylands, which occupy ∼41% of Earth´s surface, because no global, systematic assessments of the joint diversity of soil bacteria and fungi have been conducted in these environments to date. Here we present results from a study conducted across 80 dryland sites from all continents, except Antarctica, to assess how changes in aridity affect the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil bacteria and fungi. The diversity and abundance of soil bacteria and fungi was reduced as aridity increased. These results were largely driven by the negative impacts of aridity on soil organic carbon content, which positively affected the abundance and diversity of both bacteria and fungi. Aridity promoted shifts in the composition of soil bacteria, with increases in the relative abundance of Chloroflexi and α-Proteobacteria and decreases in Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Contrary to what has been reported by previous continental and global-scale studies, soil pH was not a major driver of bacterial diversity, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota. Our results fill a critical gap in our understanding of soil microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They suggest that changes in aridity, such as those predicted by climate-change models, may reduce microbial abundance and diversity, a response that will likely impact the provision of key ecosystem services by global drylands. PMID:26647180

  7. Growth and element flux at fine taxonomic resolution in natural microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungate, Bruce; Mau, Rebecca; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cindy M.; McHugh, Theresa; Marks, Jane C.; Morrissey, Ember; Price, Lance B.

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms are the engines of global biogeochemical cycles, driving half of all photosynthesis and nearly all decomposition. Yet, quantifying the rates at which uncultured microbial taxa grow and transform elements in intact and highly diverse natural communities in the environment remains among the most pressing challenges in microbial ecology today. Here, we show how shifts in the density of DNA caused by stable isotope incorporation can be used to estimate the growth rates of individual bacterial taxa in intact soil communities. We found that the distribution of growth rates followed the familiar lognormal distribution observed for the abundances, biomasses, and traits of many organisms. Growth rates of most bacterial taxa increased in response to glucose amendment, though the increase in growth observed for many taxa was larger than could be explained by direct utilization of the added glucose for growth, illustrating that glucose addition indirectly stimulated the utilization of other substrates. Variation in growth rates and phylogenetic distances were quantitatively related, connecting evolutionary history and biogeochemical function in intact soil microbial communities. Our approach has the potential to identify biogeochemically significant taxa in the microbial community and quantify their contributions to element transformations and ecosystem processes.

  8. The Abundance and Activity of Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Populations in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estuaries are productive ecosystems that ameliorate nutrient and metal contaminants from surficial water supplies. At the intersection of terrestrial and aquatic environments, estuarine sediments host major microbially-mediated geochemical transformations. These include denitrification (the conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide and/or dinitrogen) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Denitrification has historically been seen as the predominant nitrate attenuation process and functions as an effective sink for nitrate. DNRA has previously been believed to be a minor nitrate reduction process and transforms nitrate within the ecosystem to ammonium, a more biologically available N species. Recent studies have compared the two processes in coastal environments and determined fluctuating environmental conditions may suppress denitrification, supporting an increased role for DNRA in the N cycle. Nitrate availability and salinity are factors thought to influence the membership of the microbial communities present, and the nitrate reduction process that predominates. The aim of this study is to investigate how nitrate concentration and salinity alter the transcript abundances of N cycling functional gene markers for denitrification (nirK, nirS) and DNRA (nrfA) in estuarine sediments at the mouth of the hypernutrified Old Salinas River, CA. Short-term whole core incubations amended with artificial freshwater/artificial seawater (2 psu, 35 psu) and with varying NO3- concentrations (200mM, 2000mM) were conducted to assess the activity as well as the abundance of the nitrate-reducing microbial populations present. Gene expression of nirK, nirS, and nrfA at the conclusion of the incubations was quantified using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). High abundances of nirK, nirS, and nrfA under particular conditions coupled with the resulting geochemical data ultimately provides insight onto how the aforementioned factors

  9. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  10. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S.; Crump, Byron C.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  11. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  12. Cell abundance and microbial community composition along a complete oil sand mining and reclamation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappé, M.; Schneider, B.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbons constitute an important energy source for microbes but can also be of environmental concern. Microbial activity causes hydrocarbon degradation and thereby loss of economical value, but also helps to remove hydrocarbons from the environment. The present study characterizes the abundance of microbes along the oil sand mining process in Alberta, Canada, as a first approach to assess the impact of mining and oil extraction on the microbial population. After mining the oil is extracted from the sediment by a hot-water extraction (50-60°C), resulting in three major fractions: crude oil, tailings sand and fine tailings. The tailings sand is used as substratum for newly developing soils on the reclamation areas. The very liquid fine tailings still have a TOC content of about 4.3% and are pumped into tailings ponds, where they need up to three decades to settle and solidify. After deposition, these mature fine tailings (MFTs) are enriched in organics (TOC content between 9.6 and 16.8%) and dredged out of the ponds and put on dumps for several years for dewatering. Finally they are brought out onto the reclamation sites and deposited below the sand layer. Cells were extracted from oily sediments according to the protocol of Lappé and Kallmeyer (2011), stained with SYBR Green I and counted by fluorescence microscopy. Cell abundance in the unprocessed oil sand is around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. After processing the fresh fine tailings still contain around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. Cell counts in the processed MFTs are 5.8 x 107 cells cm-3, whereas in the sand used as substratum for newly developing soils, they are twice as high (1.4 x 108). In root-bearing horizons, cell counts reach 1.1 x 109 cell cm-3. Cell numbers calculated from cultivation experiments are in the same range. Higher cell counts in the tailings sand are probably due to a higher nitrogen supply through the addition of a 35 cm top layer of a peat-mineral mix. In the sand nitrate concentrations are high

  13. Microbial mat controls on infaunal abundance and diversity in modern marine microbialites.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, L G; Planavsky, N J; Laumer, C E; Stolz, J F; Reid, R P

    2013-09-01

    Microbialites are the most abundant macrofossils of the Precambrian. Decline in microbialite abundance and diversity during the terminal Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic has historically been attributed to the concurrent radiation of complex metazoans. Similarly, the apparent resurgence of microbialites in the wake of Paleozoic and Mesozoic mass extinctions is frequently linked to drastic declines in metazoan diversity and abundance. However, it has become increasing clear that microbialites are relatively common in certain modern shallow, normal marine carbonate environments-foremost the Bahamas. For the first time, we present data, collected from the Exuma Cays, the Bahamas, systematically characterizing the relationship between framework-building cyanobacteria, microbialite fabrics, and microbialite-associated metazoan abundance and diversity. We document the coexistence of diverse microbialite and infaunal metazoan communities and demonstrate that the predominant control upon both microbialite fabric and metazoan community structure is microbial mat type. These findings necessitate that we rethink prevalent interpretations of microbialite-metazoan interactions and imply that microbialites are not passive recipients of metazoan-mediated alteration. Additionally, this work provides support for the theory that certain Precambrian microbialites may have been havens of early complex metazoan life, rather than bereft of metazoans, as has been traditionally envisaged. PMID:23889904

  14. Microbial mat controls on infaunal abundance and diversity in modern marine microbialites.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, L G; Planavsky, N J; Laumer, C E; Stolz, J F; Reid, R P

    2013-09-01

    Microbialites are the most abundant macrofossils of the Precambrian. Decline in microbialite abundance and diversity during the terminal Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic has historically been attributed to the concurrent radiation of complex metazoans. Similarly, the apparent resurgence of microbialites in the wake of Paleozoic and Mesozoic mass extinctions is frequently linked to drastic declines in metazoan diversity and abundance. However, it has become increasing clear that microbialites are relatively common in certain modern shallow, normal marine carbonate environments-foremost the Bahamas. For the first time, we present data, collected from the Exuma Cays, the Bahamas, systematically characterizing the relationship between framework-building cyanobacteria, microbialite fabrics, and microbialite-associated metazoan abundance and diversity. We document the coexistence of diverse microbialite and infaunal metazoan communities and demonstrate that the predominant control upon both microbialite fabric and metazoan community structure is microbial mat type. These findings necessitate that we rethink prevalent interpretations of microbialite-metazoan interactions and imply that microbialites are not passive recipients of metazoan-mediated alteration. Additionally, this work provides support for the theory that certain Precambrian microbialites may have been havens of early complex metazoan life, rather than bereft of metazoans, as has been traditionally envisaged.

  15. T lymphocytes control microbial composition by regulating the abundance of Vibrio in the zebrafish gut.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Witte, Merlijn; Klein, Mark R; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Boes, Marianne L; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-01-01

    Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbial community is considered a risk factor for development of chronic intestinal inflammation as well as other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and even cancer. Study of the innate and adaptive immune pathways controlling bacterial colonization has however proven difficult in rodents, considering the extensive cross-talk between bacteria and innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we used the zebrafish to study innate and adaptive immune processes controlling the microbial community. Zebrafish lack a functional adaptive immune system in the first weeks of life, enabling study of the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity. We show that in wild type zebrafish, the initial lack of adaptive immunity associates with overgrowth of Vibrio species (a group encompassing fish and human pathogens), which is overcome upon adaptive immune development. In Rag1-deficient zebrafish (lacking adaptive immunity) Vibrio abundance remains high, suggesting that adaptive immune processes indeed control Vibrio species. Using cell transfer experiments, we confirm that adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes, but not B lymphocytes into Rag1-deficient recipients suppresses outgrowth of Vibrio. In addition, ex vivo exposure of intestinal T lymphocytes to Rag1-deficient microbiota results in increased interferon-gamma expression by these T lymphocytes, compared to exposure to wild type microbiota. In conclusion, we show that T lymphocytes control microbial composition by effectively suppressing the outgrowth of Vibrio species in the zebrafish intestine. PMID:25536157

  16. Microbial growth on respirator filters from improper storage.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, A L; Keinänen, J; Kalliokoski, P; Martikainen, P I; Ruuskanen, J

    1993-12-01

    Microbiological contamination and particle penetration were studied in two respirator filters with high efficiency. Microbial growth in filter materials during storage under conditions and the passing of microorganisms through the filters were particularly examined. Filters with different fiberglass and cellulose proportions were loaded in environments containing high microbial levels and incubated at a relative humidity of 98%. Particle penetration through loaded and incubated filters and carbon, nitrogen and microbial content were measured. After incubation, considerable particle penetration and the passing of fungal spores were observed for filters composed mainly of cellulose, probably because of humid conditions, which stimulated fungi to grow and extend mycelia and spores through the filter. Microbial activity, microorganism concentrations, and the chemical properties of the filter materials also supported this hypothesis. Storing used respirators in humid environments may result in heavy microbial contamination of the filters, especially if the filter material is biodegradable by microorganisms. PMID:8153595

  17. Do associated microbial abundances impact marine demosponge pumping rates and tissue densities?

    PubMed

    Weisz, Jeremy B; Lindquist, Niels; Martens, Christopher S

    2008-03-01

    The evolution of marine demosponges has led to two basic life strategies: one involving close associations with large and diverse communities of microorganisms, termed high microbial abundance (HMA) species, and one that is essentially devoid of associated microorganisms, termed low microbial abundance (LMA) species. This dichotomy has previously been suggested to correlate with morphological differences, with HMA species having a denser mesohyl and a more complex aquiferous systems composed of longer and narrower water canals that should necessitate slower seawater filtration rates. We measured mesohyl density for a variety of HMA and LMA sponges in the Florida Keys, and seawater pumping rates for a select group of these sponges using an in situ dye technique. HMA sponges were substantially denser than LMA species, and had per unit volume pumping rates 52-94% slower than the LMA sponges. These density and pumping rate differences suggest that evolutionary differences between HMA and LMA species may have resulted in profound morphological and physiological differences between the two groups. The LMA sponge body plan moves large quantities of water through their porous tissues allowing them to rapidly acquire the small particulate organic matter (POM) that supplies the majority of their nutritional needs. In contrast, the HMA sponge body plan is suited to host large and tightly packed communities of microorganisms and has an aquiferous system that increases contact time between seawater and the sponge/microbial consortium that feeds on POM, dissolved organic matter and the raw inorganic materials for chemolithotrophic sponge symbionts. The two evolutionary patterns represent different, but equally successful patterns and illustrate how associated microorganisms can potentially have substantial effects on host evolution.

  18. Environmental controls on microbial abundance and activity on the greenland ice sheet: a multivariate analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon; Cook, Joe; Mak, Ka Man; Hodson, Andy; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2012-01-01

    Microbes in supraglacial ecosystems have been proposed to be significant contributors to regional and possibly global carbon cycling, and quantifying the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in glacial ecosystems is of great significance for global carbon flow estimations. Here we present data on microbial abundance and productivity, collected along a transect across the ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) in summer 2010. We analyse the relationships between the physical, chemical and biological variables using multivariate statistical analysis. Concentrations of debris-bound nutrients increased with distance from the ice sheet margin, as did both cell numbers and activity rates before reaching a peak (photosynthesis) or a plateau (respiration, abundance) between 10 and 20 km from the margin. The results of productivity measurements suggest an overall net autotrophy on the GrIS and support the proposed role of ice sheet ecosystems in carbon cycling as regional sinks of CO(2) and places of production of organic matter that can be a potential source of nutrients for downstream ecosystems. Principal component analysis based on chemical and biological data revealed three clusters of sites, corresponding to three 'glacier ecological zones', confirmed by a redundancy analysis (RDA) using physical data as predictors. RDA using data from the largest 'bare ice zone' showed that glacier surface slope, a proxy for melt water flow, accounted for most of the variation in the data. Variation in the chemical data was fully explainable by the determined physical variables. Abundance of phototrophic microbes and their proportion in the community were identified as significant controls of the carbon cycling-related microbial processes.

  19. Microbial growth and physiology in space - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cioletti, Louis A.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of microbial behavior in closed environments is given with attention to data related to simulated microgravity and actual space flight. Microbes are described in terms of antibiotic sensitivity, subcellular structure, and physiology, and the combined effects are considered of weightlessness and cosmic radiation on human immunity to such microorganisms. Space flight results report such effects as increased phage induction, accelerated microbial growth rates, and the increased risk of disease communication and microbial exchange aboard confining spacecraft. Ultrastructural changes are also noted in the nuclei, cell membranes, and cytoplasmic streaming, and it appears that antibiotic sensitivity is reduced under both actual and simulated conditions of spaceflight.

  20. Estimating phosphorus availability for microbial growth in an emerging landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, S.K.; Cleveland, C.C.; Nemergut, D.R.; Reed, S.C.; King, A.J.; Sowell, P.

    2011-01-01

    Estimating phosphorus (P) availability is difficult—particularly in infertile soils such as those exposed after glacial recession—because standard P extraction methods may not mimic biological acquisition pathways. We developed an approach, based on microbial CO2 production kinetics and conserved carbon:phosphorus (C:P) ratios, to estimate the amount of P available for microbial growth in soils and compared this method to traditional, operationally-defined indicators of P availability. Along a primary succession gradient in the High Andes of Perú, P additions stimulated the growth-related (logistic) kinetics of glutamate mineralization in soils that had been deglaciated from 0 to 5 years suggesting that microbial growth was limited by soil P availability. We then used a logistic model to estimate the amount of C incorporated into biomass in P-limited soils, allowing us to estimate total microbial P uptake based on a conservative C:P ratio of 28:1 (mass:mass). Using this approach, we estimated that there was < 1 μg/g of microbial-available P in recently de-glaciated soils in both years of this study. These estimates fell well below estimates of available soil P obtained using traditional extraction procedures. Our results give both theoretical and practical insights into the kinetics of C and P utilization in young soils, as well as show changes in microbial P availability during early stages of soil development.

  1. Inherited microbial symbionts increase herbivore abundances and alter arthropod diversity on a native grass.

    PubMed

    Faeth, Stanley H; Shochat, Eyal

    2010-05-01

    Some microbial symbionts of plants are maternally inherited and thus functionally increase genetic and phenotypic variation within plant populations. This variation, coupled with that of the host plant and environment, may alter abundances, diversity, and trophic structure of associated plant and animal communities. Fungal endophytes in the genus Neotyphodium are vertically transmitted, asexual microbial symbionts of grasses that remain asymptomatic and rely upon their hosts for resources and transmission via seeds, often providing benefits to their hosts, including protection against herbivores. Endophyte infections may influence associated arthropod communities in agronomic grasses, but the long-term effects of endophytes and variation in host genotype and resource availability on arthropod communities in native grass populations are unknown. We conducted a long-term field experiment with four maternal genotypes of an infected (E+) native grass (Festuca arizonica) from whence the endophyte was experimentally removed (E-) and water availability was controlled, to test the effects of infection, plant genotype, and resources on abundances, biomass, diversity (richness and evenness), and trophic structure of the arthropod community. Generally, E+ grasses harbored more arthropods, including more herbivores, predators, and detritivores, suggesting that the effects of endophytes cascaded upward through trophic levels in terms of abundances, at least in early ontogeny of the host. That E+ plants harbored more herbivorous insects than E- plants suggests that infection does not increase but instead decreases resistance to herbivores, contrary to prevailing concepts of endophytes as defensive mutualists. Infection did not alter overall species richness of the arthropod community or richness of herbivores but reduced natural enemy richness, especially that of parasites, and increased richness of detritivores. Reduced richness and shifts in evenness of natural enemies on E

  2. Linking TFT-LCD wastewater treatment performance to microbial population abundance of Hyphomicrobium and Thiobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Toshikazu; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chen, Po-Chun; Putri, Dyah Wulandari; Chang, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ya-Ching

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the linkage between performance of two full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems treating thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) wastewater and the population dynamics of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)/dimethylsulfide (DMS) degrading bacteria. High DMSO degradation efficiencies were achieved in both MBRs, while the levels of nitrification inhibition due to DMS production from DMSO degradation were different in the two MBRs. The results of real-time PCR targeting on DMSO/DMS degrading populations, including Hyphomicrobium and Thiobacillus spp., indicated that a higher DMSO oxidation efficiency occurred at a higher Hyphomicrobium spp. abundance in the systems, suggesting that Hyphomicrobium spp. may be more important for complete DMSO oxidation to sulfate compared with Thiobacillus spp. Furthermore, Thiobacillus spp. was more abundant during poor nitrification, while Hyphomicrobium spp. was more abundant during good nitrification. It is suggested that microbial population of DMSO/DMS degrading bacteria is closely linking to both DMSO/DMS degradation efficiency and nitrification performance. PMID:23628318

  3. The use of microbial gene abundance in the development of fuel remediation guidelines in polar soils.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Elizabeth L; King, Catherine K; Powell, Shane M

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial fuel spills in Antarctica commonly occur on ice-free land around research stations as the result of human activities. Successful spill clean-ups require appropriate targets that confirm contaminated sites are no longer likely to pose environmental risk following remediation. These targets are based on knowledge of the impacts of contaminants on the soil ecosystem and on the response of native biota to contamination. Our work examined the response of soil microbial communities to fuel contamination by measuring the abundance of genes involved in critical soil processes, and assessed the use of this approach as an indicator of soil health in the presence of weathered and fresh fuels. Uncontaminated and contaminated soils were collected from the site of remediation treatment of an aged diesel spill at Casey Station, East Antarctica in December 2012. Uncontaminated soil was spiked with fresh Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel to determine the response of the genes to fresh fuel. Partly remediated soil containing weathered SAB diesel was diluted with uncontaminated soil to simulate a range of concentrations of weathered fuel and used to determine the response of the genes to aged fuel. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to measure the abundance of rpoB, alkB, cat23, and nosZ in soils containing SAB diesel. Differences were observed between the abundance of genes in control soils versus soils containing weathered and fresh fuels. Typical dose-response curves were generated for genes in response to the presence of fresh fuel. In contrast, the response of these genes to the range of weathered fuel appeared to be due to dilution, rather than to the effect of the fuel on the microbial community. Changes in microbial genes in response to fresh contamination have potential as a sensitive measure of soil health and for assessments of the effect of fuel spills in polar soils. This will contribute to the development of remediation guidelines to assist in management

  4. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term.

  5. Optimization of biomass composition explains microbial growth-stoichiometry relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, O.; Hall, E.K.; Kaiser, C.; Battin, T.J.; Richter, A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrating microbial physiology and biomass stoichiometry opens far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to ecosystem processes. For example, the growth-rate hypothesis (GRH) predicts positive correlations among growth rate, RNA content, and biomass phosphorus (P) content. Such relationships have been used to infer patterns of microbial activity, resource availability, and nutrient recycling in ecosystems. However, for microorganisms it is unclear under which resource conditions the GRH applies. We developed a model to test whether the response of microbial biomass stoichiometry to variable resource stoichiometry can be explained by a trade-off among cellular components that maximizes growth. The results show mechanistically why the GRH is valid under P limitation but not under N limitation. We also show why variability of growth rate-biomass stoichiometry relationships is lower under P limitation than under N or C limitation. These theoretical results are supported by experimental data on macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, and protein) and biomass stoichiometry from two different bacteria. In addition, compared to a model with strictly homeostatic biomass, the optimization mechanism we suggest results in increased microbial N and P mineralization during organic-matter decomposition. Therefore, this mechanism may also have important implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in ecosystems.

  6. Obesity-Dependent Increases in Oocyte mRNAs Are Associated With Increases in Proinflammatory Signaling and Gut Microbial Abundance of Lachnospiraceae in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Anderson, Christopher L; Timme, Kelsey R; Kurz, Scott G; Fernando, Samodha C; Wood, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    RNAs stored in the metaphase II-arrested oocyte play important roles in successful embryonic development. Their abundance is defined by transcriptional activity during oocyte growth and selective degradation of transcripts during LH-induced oocyte maturation. Our previous studies demonstrated that mRNA abundance is increased in mature ovulated oocytes collected from obese humans and mice and therefore may contribute to reduced oocyte developmental competence associated with metabolic dysfunction. In the current study mouse models of diet-induced obesity were used to determine whether obesity-dependent increases in proinflammatory signaling regulate ovarian abundance of oocyte-specific mRNAs. The abundance of oocyte-specific Bnc1, Dppa3, and Pou5f1 mRNAs as well as markers of proinflammatory signaling were significantly increased in ovaries of obese compared with lean mice which were depleted of fully grown preovulatory follicles. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses also demonstrated increased association of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 with the Pou5f1 promoter in ovaries of obese mice suggesting that proinflammatory signaling regulates transcription of this gene in the oocyte. The cecum microbial content of lean and obese female mice was subsequently examined to identify potential relationships between microbial composition and proinflammatory signaling in the ovary. Multivariate Association with Linear Models identified significant positive correlations between cecum abundance of the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae and ovarian abundance of Tnfa as well as Dppa3, Bnc1, and Pou5f1 mRNAs. Together, these data suggest that diet-induced changes in gut microbial composition may be contributing to ovarian inflammation which in turn alters ovarian gene expression and ultimately contributes to obesity-dependent reduction in oocyte quality and development of infertility in obese patients.

  7. Obesity-Dependent Increases in Oocyte mRNAs Are Associated With Increases in Proinflammatory Signaling and Gut Microbial Abundance of Lachnospiraceae in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Anderson, Christopher L; Timme, Kelsey R; Kurz, Scott G; Fernando, Samodha C; Wood, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    RNAs stored in the metaphase II-arrested oocyte play important roles in successful embryonic development. Their abundance is defined by transcriptional activity during oocyte growth and selective degradation of transcripts during LH-induced oocyte maturation. Our previous studies demonstrated that mRNA abundance is increased in mature ovulated oocytes collected from obese humans and mice and therefore may contribute to reduced oocyte developmental competence associated with metabolic dysfunction. In the current study mouse models of diet-induced obesity were used to determine whether obesity-dependent increases in proinflammatory signaling regulate ovarian abundance of oocyte-specific mRNAs. The abundance of oocyte-specific Bnc1, Dppa3, and Pou5f1 mRNAs as well as markers of proinflammatory signaling were significantly increased in ovaries of obese compared with lean mice which were depleted of fully grown preovulatory follicles. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses also demonstrated increased association of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 with the Pou5f1 promoter in ovaries of obese mice suggesting that proinflammatory signaling regulates transcription of this gene in the oocyte. The cecum microbial content of lean and obese female mice was subsequently examined to identify potential relationships between microbial composition and proinflammatory signaling in the ovary. Multivariate Association with Linear Models identified significant positive correlations between cecum abundance of the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae and ovarian abundance of Tnfa as well as Dppa3, Bnc1, and Pou5f1 mRNAs. Together, these data suggest that diet-induced changes in gut microbial composition may be contributing to ovarian inflammation which in turn alters ovarian gene expression and ultimately contributes to obesity-dependent reduction in oocyte quality and development of infertility in obese patients. PMID:26881311

  8. [Effects of Slope Position and Soil Horizon on Soil Microbial Biomass and Abundance in Karst Primary Forest of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-zhen; Su, Yi-rong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effects of slope position and soil horizon on soil microbial biomass and abundance, chloroform fumigation extraction methods and real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) were adopted to quantify the changes of soil microbial biomass C, N and abundance of bacteria and fungi, respectively. Soil samples were harvested from three horizons along profile, i. e., leaching horizon (A, 0-10 cm), transitional horizon (AB, 30-50 cm) and alluvial horizon (B, 70-100 cm), which were collected from the upper, middle and lower slope positions of a karst primary forest ecosystem. The results showed that slope position, soil horizon and their interaction significantly influenced the soil microbial biomass and abundance (P < 0.05). Different from A horizon, where SMBC was greater in lower than in upper slope position (P < 0.05), SMBC in AB and B horizons were highest in middle slope position. Similarly, SMBN was greater in lower than in upper slope position for A, AB and B horizons. Besides soil bacterial abundance in B horizon and fungal abundance in AB layer, the middle slope position had the highest value for all the three soil horizons (P < 0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that soil organic carbon, available nitrogen and pH were the key factors responsible for SMBC and SMBN variation, respectively, while the important factors responsible for the variation of bacteria abundance were available nitrogen and available phosphorus, and that for fungi abundance variation were available potassium.

  9. Solid and Aqueous Geochemical Controls on Phylogenetic Diversity and Abundance of Microbial Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the subsurface, the vast majority of microorganisms are found in biofilms attached to mineral surfaces. The fickle nature of these environments (chemically and physically) likely causes dynamic ecological shifts in these microbial communities. We used laboratory biofilm reactors (inoculated with a diverse subsurface community) to explore the role of mineralogy as part of a microbe-mineral-water ecosystem under variable pressures (mineralogy, pH, carbon, phosphate). Following multivariate analyses, pH was identified as the key physicochemical property associated with variation in both phylogenetic and taxonomic diversity as well as overall community structure (P<0.05). In particular, the ability of minerals, media, or a combination of the two to buffer metabolically generated acidity impacted community structure under oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions. Additionally, we found that media phosphate limitations were significantly correlated to greater biofilm accumulation (P<0.002), but lower species richness (P<0.001) and Shannon diversity (P<0.001); while mineral-bound phosphate limitations were significantly correlated to lesser biofilm accumulation (P<0.05) but not to species richness or diversity. Carbon (as acetate, lactate, or formate) added to the media was correlated with a significant increase in biofilm accumulation (P<0.04), and overall Shannon diversity (P<0.006), but not significantly correlated with overall species richness. Although variable in magnitude, the effect of surface chemistry on microbial diversity (both phylogenetic and taxonomic) was statistically significant, in all reactors, regardless of environmental pressures. Phylogenetically, surface type (carbonate, silicate, or Al-silicate) controlled ~70-90%, meaning that organisms attached to similar surfaces were significantly more genetically similar. Taxonomy and proportional abundance was significantly sensitive to variations in media chemistry with consistent patterns emerging among

  10. High Ozone (O3) Affects the Fitness Associated with the Microbial Composition and Abundance of Q Biotype Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanyun; Yi, Tuyong; Tan, Xiaoling; Zhao, Zihua; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) affects the fitness of an insect, such as its development, reproduction and protection against fungal pathogens, but the mechanism by which it does so remains unclear. Here, we compared the fitness (i.e., the growth and development time, reproduction and protection against Beauveria bassiana (B. bassiana) of Q biotype whiteflies fumigated under hO3 (280 ± 20 ppb) and control O3 (50 ± 10 ppb) concentrations. Moreover, we determined that gene expression was related to development, reproduction and immunity to B. bassiana and examined the abundance and composition of bacteria and fungi inside of the body and on the surface of the Q biotype whitefly. We observed a significantly enhanced number of eggs that were laid by a female, shortened developmental time, prolonged adult lifespan, decreased weight of one eclosion, and reduced immunity to B. bassiana in whiteflies under hO3, but hO3 did not significantly affect the expression of genes related to development, reproduction and immunity. However, hO3 obviously changed the composition of the bacterial communities inside of the body and on the surface of the whiteflies, significantly reducing Rickettsia and enhancing Candidatus_Cardinium. Similarly, hO3 significantly enhanced Thysanophora penicillioides from the Trichocomaceae family and reduced Dothideomycetes (at the class level) inside of the body. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between the abundance of Candidatus_Cardinium and the female whitefly ratio and the fecundity of a single female, and positive correlations were found between the abundance of Rickettsia and the weight of adult whiteflies just after eclosion and immunity to B. bassiana. We conclude that hO3 enhances whitefly development and reproduction but impairs immunity to B. bassiana, and our results also suggest that the changes to the microbial environments inside of the body and on the surface could be crucial factors that alter whitefly fitness under hO3. PMID:27799921

  11. Microbial communities on glacier surfaces in Svalbard: impact of physical and chemical properties on abundance and structure of cyanobacteria and algae.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2006-11-01

    Microbial communities occurring in three types of supraglacial habitats--cryoconite holes, medial moraines, and supraglacial kames--at several glaciers in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard were investigated. Abundance, biovolume, and community structure were evaluated by using epifluorescence microscopy and culturing methods. Particular emphasis was laid on distinctions in the chemical and physical properties of the supraglacial habitats and their relation to the microbial communities, and quantitative multivariate analyses were used to assess potential relationships. Varying pH (4.8 in cryoconite; 8.5 in a moraine) and texture (the proportion of coarse fraction 2% of dry weight in cryoconite; 99% dw in a kame) were found, and rather low concentrations of organic matter (0.3% of dry weight in a kame; 22% dw in cryoconite) and nutrients (nitrogen up to 0.4% dw, phosphorus up to 0.8% dw) were determined in the samples. In cryoconite sediment, the highest numbers of bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae were found, whereas relatively low microbial abundances were recorded in moraines and kames. Cyanobacterial cells were significantly more abundant than microalgal ones in cryoconite and supraglacial kames. Different species of the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya were by far the most represented in all samples, and cyanobacteria of the genera Phormidium and Nostoc prevailed in cultures isolated from cryoconite samples. These species are considered opportunistic organisms with wide ecological valency and strong colonizing potential rather than glacial specialists. Statistical analyses suggest that fine sediment with higher water content is the most suitable condition for bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae. Also, a positive impact of lower pH on microbial growth was found. The fate of a microbial cell deposited on the glacier surface seems therefore predetermined by the physical and chemical factors such as texture of sediment and water content rather than spatial factors

  12. Microbial communities on glacier surfaces in Svalbard: impact of physical and chemical properties on abundance and structure of cyanobacteria and algae.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2006-11-01

    Microbial communities occurring in three types of supraglacial habitats--cryoconite holes, medial moraines, and supraglacial kames--at several glaciers in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard were investigated. Abundance, biovolume, and community structure were evaluated by using epifluorescence microscopy and culturing methods. Particular emphasis was laid on distinctions in the chemical and physical properties of the supraglacial habitats and their relation to the microbial communities, and quantitative multivariate analyses were used to assess potential relationships. Varying pH (4.8 in cryoconite; 8.5 in a moraine) and texture (the proportion of coarse fraction 2% of dry weight in cryoconite; 99% dw in a kame) were found, and rather low concentrations of organic matter (0.3% of dry weight in a kame; 22% dw in cryoconite) and nutrients (nitrogen up to 0.4% dw, phosphorus up to 0.8% dw) were determined in the samples. In cryoconite sediment, the highest numbers of bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae were found, whereas relatively low microbial abundances were recorded in moraines and kames. Cyanobacterial cells were significantly more abundant than microalgal ones in cryoconite and supraglacial kames. Different species of the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya were by far the most represented in all samples, and cyanobacteria of the genera Phormidium and Nostoc prevailed in cultures isolated from cryoconite samples. These species are considered opportunistic organisms with wide ecological valency and strong colonizing potential rather than glacial specialists. Statistical analyses suggest that fine sediment with higher water content is the most suitable condition for bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae. Also, a positive impact of lower pH on microbial growth was found. The fate of a microbial cell deposited on the glacier surface seems therefore predetermined by the physical and chemical factors such as texture of sediment and water content rather than spatial factors

  13. Long-term changes in heterotrophic prokaryotes abundance and growth characteristics in the northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivančić, Ingrid; Fuks, Dragica; Najdek, Mirjana; Blažina, Maria; Devescovi, Massimo; Šilović, Tina; Paliaga, Paolo; Orlić, Sandi

    2010-09-01

    During the 1990-2008 period heterotrophic prokaryotes abundance (HP) in the northern Adriatic showed a substantial decrease after 2003. Before 2003 the HP annual cycle was characterized by minimal values during winter (100-134 · 10 7 cell l - 1 , on average) and a gradual increase toward summer (up to 212 · 10 7 cell l - 1 , on average). After 2003 HP was low during the most part of the year (27-63 · 10 7 cell l - 1 , on average), with somewhat higher values only at the end of summer and in April (up to 80 · 10 7 cell l - 1 in average). The overall higher Leu/TdR ratio after 2003 showed that prokaryotes were increasing their cellular biomass but more slowly dividing than before. There were indications that changed hydrographic conditions, reduced substrate supply and quality changes might be the most responsible factors for the observed HP decrease and change in their growth characteristics. As a consequence of lower HP heterotrophic flagellates abundance (HF) after 2003 (average 0.57 · 10 6 cell l - 1 ) generally decreased by about three times. Weakened coupling between HP and HF confirmed the minor role of grazing pressure in controlling HP after 2003. This study shows the direct response of the microbial community to meteorological and subsequent hydrographical condition changes that occurred in the northern Adriatic.

  14. Susceptibility of green and conventional building materials to microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Mensah-Attipoe, J; Reponen, T; Salmela, A; Veijalainen, A-M; Pasanen, P

    2015-06-01

    Green building materials are becoming more popular. However, little is known about their ability to support or limit microbial growth. The growth of fungi was evaluated on five building materials. Two green, two conventional building materials and wood as a positive control were selected. The materials were inoculated with Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium brevicompactum, in the absence and presence of house dust. Microbial growth was assessed at four different time points by cultivation and determining fungal biomass using the N-acetylhexosaminidase (NAHA) enzyme assay. No clear differences were seen between green and conventional building materials in their susceptibility to support microbial growth. The presence of dust, an external source of nutrients, promoted growth of all the fungal species similarly on green and conventional materials. The results also showed a correlation coefficient ranging from 0.81 to 0.88 between NAHA activity and culturable counts. The results suggest that the growth of microbes on a material surface depends on the availability of organic matter rather than the classification of the material as green or conventional. NAHA activity and culturability correlated well indicating that the two methods used in the experiments gave similar trends for the growth of fungi on material surfaces.

  15. Solutes determine the temperature windows for microbial survival and growth

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jason P.; Megaw, Julianne; Magill, Caroline L.; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Williams, Jim P.; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Linton, Mark; Patterson, Margaret F.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Mswaka, Allen Y.; Hallsworth, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial cells, and ultimately the Earth's biosphere, function within a narrow range of physicochemical conditions. For the majority of ecosystems, productivity is cold-limited, and it is microbes that represent the failure point. This study was carried out to determine if naturally occurring solutes can extend the temperature windows for activity of microorganisms. We found that substances known to disorder cellular macromolecules (chaotropes) did expand microbial growth windows, fungi preferentially accumulated chaotropic metabolites at low temperature, and chemical activities of solutes determined microbial survival at extremes of temperature as well as pressure. This information can enhance the precision of models used to predict if extraterrestrial and other hostile environments are able to support life; furthermore, chaotropes may be used to extend the growth windows for key microbes, such as saprotrophs, in cold ecosystems and manmade biomes. PMID:20404182

  16. Microbial Distribution and Abundance in the Digestive System of Five Shipworm Species (Bivalvia: Teredinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Betcher, Meghan A.; Fung, Jennifer M.; Han, Andrew W.; O’Connor, Roberta; Seronay, Romell; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Distel, Daniel L.; Haygood, Margo G.

    2012-01-01

    Marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms) are voracious consumers of wood in marine environments. In several shipworm species, dense communities of intracellular bacterial endosymbionts have been observed within specialized cells (bacteriocytes) of the gills (ctenidia). These bacteria are proposed to contribute to digestion of wood by the host. While the microbes of shipworm gills have been studied extensively in several species, the abundance and distribution of microbes in the digestive system have not been adequately addressed. Here we use Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and laser scanning confocal microscopy with 16S rRNA directed oligonucleotide probes targeting all domains, domains Bacteria and Archaea, and other taxonomic groups to examine the digestive microbiota of 17 specimens from 5 shipworm species (Bankia setacea, Lyrodus pedicellatus, Lyrodus massa, Lyrodus sp. and Teredo aff. triangularis). These data reveal that the caecum, a large sac-like appendage of the stomach that typically contains large quantities of wood particles and is considered the primary site of wood digestion, harbors only very sparse microbial populations. However, a significant number of bacterial cells were observed in fecal pellets within the intestines. These results suggest that due to low abundance, bacteria in the caecum may contribute little to lignocellulose degradation. In contrast, the comparatively high population density of bacteria in the intestine suggests a possible role for intestinal bacteria in the degradation of lignocellulose. PMID:23028923

  17. Dynamic speckle study of microbial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincitorio, F. M.; Mulone, C.; Marcuzzi, P. A.; Budini, N.; Freyre, C.; Lopez, A. J.; Ramil, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this work we present a characterization of yeast dynamic speckle activity during growth in an isolated agar culture medium. We found that it is possible to detect the growth of the microorganisms even before they turn out to be visible. By observing the time evolution of the speckle activity at different regions of the culture medium we could extract a map of the growth process, which served to analyze how the yeast develops and spreads over the agar's medium. An interesting point of this study concerns with the influence of the laser light on the yeast growth rate. We have found that yeast finds hard to develop at regions with higher laser light illumination, although we used a synchronous system to capture the speckle pattern. The results obtained in this work would serve us as a starting point to fabricate a detector of growing microorganism colonies, with obvious interesting applications in diverse areas.

  18. Shifts in Campylobacter species abundance may reflect general microbial community shifts in periodontitis progression

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Karsten; Fuchs, Felix; Kruth, Sebastian; Horz, Hans-Peter; Conrads, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral Campylobacter species have been found to be associated with periodontitis progression. While the etiological significance of Campylobacter rectus is quite established, the association of C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus with health or disease remains contradictory. Objectives This study hypothesizes that the proportion of species within the Campylobacter genus rather than the absolute abundance of a single species is a suitable indicator for periodontitis progression. Design Subgingival plaque from 90 periodontitis patients and gingival sulcus fluid of 32 healthy individuals were subjected to a newly developed nested PCR approach, in which all Campylobacter spp. were amplified simultaneously. The resulting mixture of 16S-rRNA-gene-amplicons were separated by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) gel electrophoresis, followed by sequencing and identification of excised bands and relative quantification of band intensities. In all samples, the abundance of selected periodontitis marker species was determined based on DNA hybridization on a microarray. Results The highly prevalent Campylobacter community was composed of varying proportions of C. rectus, C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus. Cluster analysis based on SSCP-banding pattern resulted in distinct groups which in turn coincided with significant differences in abundance of established periodontitis marker species (Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum) and progression. Conclusions The shift in the Campylobacter community composition seems to display the general microbial community shift during clinical progression in a simplified manner. The focus on members of the Campylobacter in this study suggests that this genus can be an indicator of ecological changes in the subgingival oral microflora. PMID:25412608

  19. Diversity, abundance, and consistency of microbial oxygenase expression and biodegradation in a shallow contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, J.M.; Madsen, E.L.

    2009-10-15

    The diversity of Rieske dioxygenase genes and short-term temporal variability in the abundance of two selected dioxygenase gene sequences were examined in a naphthalene-rich, coal tar waste-contaminated subsurface study site. Using a previously published PCR-based approach (S. M. Ni Chadhain, R. S. Norman, K. V. Pesce, J. J. Kukor, and G. J. Zylstra, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72: 4078-4087, 2006) a broad suite of genes was detected, ranging from dioxygenase sequences associated with Rhodococcus and Sphingomonas to 32 previously uncharacterized Rieske gene sequence clone groups. The nag genes appeared frequently (20% of the total) in two groundwater monitoring wells characterized by low (similar to 10{sup 2} ppb; similar to 1 {mu} M) ambient concentrations of naphthalene. A quantitative competitive PCR assay was used to show that abundances of nag genes (and archetypal nah genes) fluctuated substantially over a 9-month period. To contrast short-term variation with long-term community stability, in situ community gene expression (dioxygenase mRNA) and biodegradation potential (community metabolism of naphthalene in microcosms) were compared to measurements from 6 years earlier. cDNA sequences amplified from total RNA extracts revealed that nah- and nag-type genes were expressed in situ, corresponding well with structural gene abundances. Despite evidence for short-term (9-month) shifts in dioxygenase gene copy number, agreement in field gene expression (dioxygenase mRNA) and biodegradation potential was observed in comparisons to equivalent assays performed 6 years earlier. Thus, stability in community biodegradation characteristics at the hemidecadal time frame has been documented for these subsurface microbial communities.

  20. Heavy metal pollution decreases microbial abundance, diversity and activity within particle-size fractions of a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhui; He, Feng; Zhang, Xuhui; Sun, Xuan; Zheng, Jufeng; Zheng, Jinwei

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and microbial characterisations of particle-size fractions (PSFs) from a rice paddy soil subjected to long-term heavy metal pollution (P) and nonpolluted (NP) soil were performed to investigate whether the distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) regulates microbial community activity, abundance and diversity at the microenvironment scale. The soils were physically fractionated into coarse sand, fine sand, silt and clay fractions. Long-term heavy metal pollution notably decreased soil basal respiration (a measurement of the total activity of the soil microbial community) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) across the fractions by 3-45% and 21-53%, respectively. The coarse sand fraction was more affected by pollution than the clay fraction and displayed a significantly lower MBC content and respiration and dehydrogenase activity compared with the nonpolluted soils. The abundances and diversities of bacteria were less affected within the PSFs under pollution. However, significant decreases in the abundances and diversities of fungi were noted, which may have strongly contributed to the decrease in MBC. Sequencing of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands revealed that the groups Acidobacteria, Ascomycota and Chytridiomycota were clearly inhibited under pollution. Our findings suggest that long-term heavy metal pollution decreased the microbial biomass, activity and diversity in PSFs, particularly in the large-size fractions.

  1. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  2. Microbial physiology and ecology of slow growth.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A L

    1997-01-01

    The uptake capabilities of the cell have evolved to permit growth at very low external nutrient concentrations. How are these capabilities controlled when the substrate concentrations are not extremely low and the uptake systems could import substrate much more rapidly than the metabolic capabilities of the cell might be able to handle? To answer this question, earlier theories for the kinetics of uptake through the cell envelope and steady-state systems of metabolic enzymes are discussed and a computer simulation is presented. The problems to the cell of fluctuating levels of nutrient and too much substrate during continuous culture are discussed. Too much substrate can lead to oligotrophy, substrate-accelerated death, entry into the viable but not culturable state, and lactose killing. The relationship between uptake and growth is considered. Finally, too little substrate may lead to catastrophic attempts at mounting molecular syntheses that cannot be completed. PMID:9293184

  3. Soil Microbial 15N-Natural Abundance is Enriched Relative to Other Soil N Pools and Indicates Microbial C-Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Doucett, R.; Hart, S. C.; Boring, L. L.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Soil microbial biomass is responsible for many of the nitrogen (N) transformations that occur between different soil organic matter pools, plants and atmosphere. For this reason, it is important to learn more about the 15N natural abundance of these organisms. The microbial biomass takes up organic carbon (C) and N and inorganic N for assimilation and respiration. Under C-limited conditions, organic N compounds are mainly utilized as C-source, and excess N leaves the cell (mineralization). The processes of N assimilation, N dissimilation, and export discriminate against the heavier 15N isotope. This leaves the cells 15N enriched compared to their supposed substrates, or total soil N. Selective uptake of enriched ammonium (as a result of nitrification) may contribute to the higher \\delta15N of the micro-organisms. We measured 15N natural abundances of the microbial biomass, using the chloroform-fumigation-extraction method, in grassland soils along an elevation gradient, a fire-disturbance gradient in Florida, a ponderosa forest restoration study, and a dung-gradient near a water source in desert grassland and found 0-12\\permil difference between the soil extractable N and the microbial biomass. We also found that the enrichment is quantitatively dependent on C availability. We speculate that, in addition to an indicator for C availability to the microbes, microbial transformations may explain the 15N-enrichment of soil organic matter with depth.

  4. Partitioning Respiration Between Plant and Microbial Sources Using Natural Abundance Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, T. E.; Tu, K. P.

    2009-12-01

    Partitioning plant and microbial respiration is important for understanding the mechanistic basis of ecosystem respiration, as each can respond to changes in environmental conditions in different ways and at different timescales. In theory, natural abundance stable C isotopes can allow source partitioning when the isotopic difference between the sources can be resolved. The longstanding notion is that such differences do not exist, yet field measurements to support this conclusion are rare. The question remains as to how much isotopic difference exists between the plant and microbial respiration and whether or not this difference is sufficient for partitioning. We addressed this question by measuring the C isotope ratios (13C/12C) of plant, microbial, and whole ecosystem respiration from three contrasting ecosystems in California. We found significant variation in the 13C/12C ratios between plant and microbial sources. However, isotopic mass balance was not observed in more than half the cases. When isotopic mass balance was observed, the largest isotopic differences were always between CO2 evolved during leaf respiration and SOC decomposition, with leaf respiration more depleted by 1-8 per mil. Within plants, the leaf respiration was more depleted than rhizosphere respiration by 2-6 per mil. Among microbial sources, litter decomposition was more depleted than SOC decomposition by 1-5 per mil. The 13C/12C ratio of bulk C and respired CO2 exhibited similar trends, but bulk C values were clearly not a good surrogate for the 13C/12C ratios of respired CO2. Based on the 13C/12C ratios of respired CO2, belowground respiration accounted for 25% in the redwood forest, 37% in the grassland and 84% in the pine forest. Belowground respiration was further partitioned between rhizosphere, litter and SOC decomposition. Each contributed nearly equal amounts in the redwood forest (30/40/30) whereas litter respiration dominated in the grassland (20/70/10) and pine forest (15

  5. Alteration of extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance by biochar addition: Implication for carbon sequestration in subtropical mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has attracted more and more attention due to its essential role in adsorbing pollutants, improving soil fertility, and modifying greenhouse gas emission. However, the influences of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance are still lack and debatable. Currently, there is no information about the impact of biochar on the function of mangrove ecosystems. Therefore, we explored the effects of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance in subtropical mangrove sediment, and further estimated the contribution of biochar to C sequestration. In this study, sediments were amended with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% of biochar and incubated at 25 °C for 90 days. After incubation, enzyme activities, microbial abundance and the increased percentage of sediment organic C content were determined. Both increase (phenol oxidase and β-glucosidase) and decrease (peroxidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) of enzyme activities were observed in biochar treatments, but only peroxidase activity showed statistical significance (at least p < 0.01) compared to the control. Moreover, the activities of all enzymes tested were significantly related to the content of biochar addition (at least p < 0.05). On the other hand, bacterial and fungal abundance in biochar treatments were remarkably lower than control (p < 0.001), and the significantly negative relationship (p < 0.05) between bacterial abundance and the content of biochar was found. Additionally, the increased percentage of organic C gradually increased with biochar addition rate, which provided evidence for applying biochar to mitigate climate change. Given the importance of microorganisms and enzyme activities in sediment organic matter decomposition, the increased C sequestration might be explained by the large decrease of microbial abundance and enzyme activity after biochar intervention. PMID:27454094

  6. Alteration of extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance by biochar addition: Implication for carbon sequestration in subtropical mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has attracted more and more attention due to its essential role in adsorbing pollutants, improving soil fertility, and modifying greenhouse gas emission. However, the influences of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance are still lack and debatable. Currently, there is no information about the impact of biochar on the function of mangrove ecosystems. Therefore, we explored the effects of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance in subtropical mangrove sediment, and further estimated the contribution of biochar to C sequestration. In this study, sediments were amended with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% of biochar and incubated at 25 °C for 90 days. After incubation, enzyme activities, microbial abundance and the increased percentage of sediment organic C content were determined. Both increase (phenol oxidase and β-glucosidase) and decrease (peroxidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) of enzyme activities were observed in biochar treatments, but only peroxidase activity showed statistical significance (at least p < 0.01) compared to the control. Moreover, the activities of all enzymes tested were significantly related to the content of biochar addition (at least p < 0.05). On the other hand, bacterial and fungal abundance in biochar treatments were remarkably lower than control (p < 0.001), and the significantly negative relationship (p < 0.05) between bacterial abundance and the content of biochar was found. Additionally, the increased percentage of organic C gradually increased with biochar addition rate, which provided evidence for applying biochar to mitigate climate change. Given the importance of microorganisms and enzyme activities in sediment organic matter decomposition, the increased C sequestration might be explained by the large decrease of microbial abundance and enzyme activity after biochar intervention.

  7. Abundances and potential activities of nitrogen cycling microbial communities along a chronosequence of a glacier forefield

    PubMed Central

    Brankatschk, Robert; Töwe, Stefanie; Kleineidam, Kristina; Schloter, Michael; Zeyer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Glacier forefields are ideal ecosystems to study the development of nutrient cycles as well as single turnover processes during soil development. In this study, we examined the ecology of the microbial nitrogen (N) cycle in bulk soil samples from a chronosequence of the Damma glacier, Switzerland. Major processes of the N cycle were reconstructed on the genetic as well as the potential enzyme activity level at sites of the chronosequence that have been ice-free for 10, 50, 70, 120 and 2000 years. In our study, we focused on N fixation, mineralization (chitinolysis and proteolysis), nitrification and denitrification. Our results suggest that mineralization, mainly the decomposition of deposited organic material, was the main driver for N turnover in initial soils, that is, ice-free for 10 years. Transient soils being ice-free for 50 and 70 years were characterized by a high abundance of N fixing microorganisms. In developed soils, ice-free for 120 and 2000 years, significant rates of nitrification and denitrification were measured. Surprisingly, copy numbers of the respective functional genes encoding the corresponding enzymes were already high in the initial phase of soil development. This clearly indicates that the genetic potential is not the driver for certain functional traits in the initial phase of soil formation but rather a well-balanced expression of the respective genes coding for selected functions. PMID:21124490

  8. Targeted Access to the Genomes of Low Abundance Organisms in Complex Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Podar, Mircea; Abulencia, Carl; Walcher, Marion; Hutchinson, Don; Zengler, Karsten; Garcia, Joseph; Holland, Trevin; Cotton, Dave; Hauser, Loren John; Keller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Current metagenomic approaches to the study of complex microbial consortia provide a glimpse into the community metabolism, and occasionally allow genomic assemblies for the most abundant organisms. However, little information is gained for the members of the community present at low frequency, especially those representing yet uncultured taxa-which includes the bulk of the diversity present in most environments. Here we used phylogenetically directed cell separation by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, followed by amplification and sequencing of a fraction of the genomic DNA of several bacterial cells that belong to the TM7 phylum. Partial genomic assembly allowed, for the first time, a look into the evolution and potential metabolism of a soil representative from this group of organisms for which there are no species in stable laboratory cultures. Genomic reconstruction from targeted cells of uncultured organisms directly isolated from the environment represents a powerful approach to access any specific members of a community and an alternative way to assess the community metabolic potential.

  9. Microplastic is an abundant and distinct microbial habitat in an urban river.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Amanda; Hoellein, Timothy J; Mason, Sherri A; Schluep, Joseph; Kelly, John J

    2014-10-21

    Recent research has documented microplastic particles (< 5 mm in diameter) in ocean habitats worldwide and in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Microplastic interacts with biota, including microorganisms, in these habitats, raising concerns about its ecological effects. Rivers may transport microplastic to marine habitats and the Great Lakes, but data on microplastic in rivers is limited. In a highly urbanized river in Chicago, Illinois, USA, we measured concentrations of microplastic that met or exceeded those measured in oceans and the Great Lakes, and we demonstrated that wastewater treatment plant effluent was a point source of microplastic. Results from high-throughput sequencing showed that bacterial assemblages colonizing microplastic within the river were less diverse and were significantly different in taxonomic composition compared to those from the water column and suspended organic matter. Several taxa that include plastic decomposing organisms and pathogens were more abundant on microplastic. These results demonstrate that microplastic in rivers are a distinct microbial habitat and may be a novel vector for the downstream transport of unique bacterial assemblages. In addition, this study suggests that urban rivers are an overlooked and potentially significant component of the global microplastic life cycle.

  10. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Kristina; Kamke, Janine; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-09-01

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy.

  11. Spatial and temporal variation in enterococcal abundance and its relationship to the microbial community in Hawaii beach sand and water.

    PubMed

    Cui, Henglin; Yang, Kun; Pagaling, Eulyn; Yan, Tao

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have reported high levels of fecal indicator enterococci in marine beach sand. This study aimed to determine the spatial and temporal variation of enterococcal abundance and to evaluate its relationships with microbial community parameters in Hawaii beach sand and water. Sampling at 23 beaches on the Island of Oahu detected higher levels of enterococci in beach foreshore sand than in beach water on a mass unit basis. Subsequent 8-week consecutive samplings at two selected beaches (Waialae and Kualoa) consistently detected significantly higher levels of enterococci in backshore sand than in foreshore/nearshore sand and beach water. Comparison between the abundance of enterococci and the microbial communities showed that enterococci correlated significantly with total Vibrio in all beach zones but less significantly with total bacterial density and Escherichia coli. Samples from the different zones of Waialae beach were sequenced by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to determine the microbial community structure and diversity. The backshore sand had a significantly more diverse community and contained different major bacterial populations than the other beach zones, which corresponded to the spatial distribution pattern of enterococcal abundance. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence support the possibility of enterococci as autochthonous members of the microbial community in Hawaii beach sand. PMID:23563940

  12. Factors Limiting Microbial Growth and Activity at a Proposed High-Level Nuclear Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, T. L.; Kovacik, W. P.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Haldeman, D. L.; Amy, P. S.; Hersman, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste, volcanic tuff was analyzed for microbial abundance and activity. Tuff was collected aseptically from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally low: direct microscopic cell counts were near detection limits at all sites (3.2 x 10(sup4) to 2.0 x 10(sup5) cells g(sup-1) [dry weight]); plate counts of aerobic heterotrophs ranged from 1.0 x 10(sup1) to 3.2 x 10(sup3) CFU g(sup-1) (dry weight). Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations (0.1 to 3.7 pmol g(sup-1)) also indicated low microbial biomasses; diglyceride fatty acid concentrations, indicative of dead cells, were in a similar range (0.2 to 2.3 pmol g(sup-1)). Potential microbial activity was quantified as (sup14)CO(inf2) production in microcosms containing radiolabeled substrates (glucose, acetate, and glutamic acid); amendments with water and nutrient solutions (N and P) were used to test factors potentially limiting this activity. Similarly, the potential for microbial growth and the factors limiting growth were determined by performing plate counts before and after incubating volcanic tuff samples for 24 h under various conditions: ambient moisture, water-amended, and amended with various nutrient solutions (N, P, and organic C). A high potential for microbial activity was demonstrated by high rates of substrate mineralization (as much as 70% of added organic C in 3 weeks). Water was the major limiting factor to growth and microbial activity, while amendments with N and P resulted in little further stimulation. Organic C amendments stimulated growth more than water alone. PMID:16535670

  13. Pan-Arctic patterns of planktonic heterotrophic microbial abundance and processes: Controlling factors and potential impacts of warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranger, Roxane; Vaqué, Dolors; Nguyen, Dan; Hébert, Marie-Pier; Lara, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing where increasing water temperatures and rapid loss of summer sea-ice will likely influence the structure and functioning of the entire ecosystem. The aim of this study was to synthesize the current state of knowledge on microbial abundances and processes from a regional Pan-Arctic perspective, characterize regulating factors and attempt to predict how patterns may change under a warming scenario. Here we identify some generalized patterns of different microbial variables between the Pacific-fed and the Atlantic-fed sectors of the Arctic Ocean. Bacterial production (BP), abundance and grazing rates by protists (GT) were all higher in the Atlantic-fed region. Bacterial loss by viral lyses (VL) was proportionally more important in the Pacific-fed sector, suggesting a reduced C transfer efficiency within the microbial loop of that region. Using a cross-comparative approach and all available data to build Arrhenius plots, we found a differential response to warming temperatures among various microbial processes. BP and GT responded similarly and more strongly to increases in temperature than VL did, suggesting a shift in the overall influence of viral mortality under a warming scenario. However, together with temperature, resource-related factors also exerted an influence in regulating these rates. We identified large information gaps for more classically studied microbial variable from several Arctic seas. Furthermore, there is limited information on less conventional pathways such as grazing by mixotrophic species, which may be playing a significant role in Arctic microbial trophodynamics. Although generalized patterns could be elucidated, more information is needed to predict and understand how a changing Arctic will alter microbial C pathways and major biogeochemical cycles on regional and seasonal scales.

  14. Season mediates herbivore effects on litter and soil microbial abundance and activity in a semi-arid woodland

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, Aimee T; Overby, Stephen; Hart, Stephen C; Koch, George W; Whitham, Thomas G

    2007-01-01

    Herbivores can directly impact ecosystem function by altering litter quality entering an ecosystem or indirectly by affecting a shift in the microbial community that mediate nutrient processes. We examine herbivore susceptibility and resistance effects on litter microarthropod and soil microbial communities to test the general hypothesis that herbivore driven changes in litter inputs will feedback to the microbial community. Our study population consisted of individual trees that are susceptible or resistant to the stem-boring moth (Dioryctria albovittella) and trees that herbivores have been manually removed since 1982. Moth herbivory increased pi on litter nitrogen concentrations (16%) and canopy precipitation infiltration (28%), both significant factors influencing litter and soil microbial populations. Our research resulted in three major conclusions: 1) In spite of an increase in litter quality, herbivory does not change litter microarthropod abundance or species richness. 2) Herbivore susceptibility alters bulk soil microbial communities, but not soil properties. 3) Season has a strong influence on microbial communities, and their response to herbivore inputs, in this semi-arid ecosystem.

  15. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    clear distinction in the T2-distribution and D-T2 plots between live and dead cell pellets was also observed. These results will provide a basis for understanding the effect of microbes within geologic media on SIP and low-field NMR measurements. This research suggests that both SIP and NMR have the potential to monitor microbial growth and activities in the subsurface and could provide spatiotemporal variations in bacterial abundance in porous media.

  16. Microbial Communities: Tracing Growth Processes from Antarctic Lakes to Early Earth to Other Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Life in the Universe is dominated by microbes: they are numerically the most abundant cells in our bodies and in Earth's biosphere, and they are the only life that might be present elsewhere in our solar system. Life beyond our solar system could include macroscopic organisms, but everything we understand about the origin of life suggests it must start with microbes. Thus, understanding microbial ecosystems, in the absence of macroscopic organisms, is critical to understanding early life on Earth and life elsewhere in the Universe - if it exists. But what are the general principles of microbial ecology in the absence of predation? What happens when each cell is a chemical factory that can swap among metabolic processes in response to environmental and emergent cues? Geobiologists and astrobiologists are addressing these questions in diverse ways using both Earth's modern biosphere and its fossil record. Modern microbial communities in shallow, ice-covered lakes, Antarctica (Fig.), provide a model for high productivity microbial ecosystems with no to low predation. In these lakes, photosynthetic communities create macroscopic pinnacles and domes, sometime lithified into stromatolites. They provide an ecological, geochemical and morphological model for Precambrian microbial communities in low sedimentation, low current environments. Insights from these communities include new growth processes for ancient mats, especially some that grew prior to the oxidation of Earth's atmosphere. The diversity of biosignatures created in these communities also provides context for models of life under ice elsewhere in our solar system such as paleolakes on Mars and on icy moons. Results from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team document formerly habitable fluvial and lacustrine environments. Lacustrine environments, in particular, are favorable for preserving biosignatures, and continued investigations by MSL will provide a deeper understanding of the duration of habitable

  17. Nanomechanical sensors for single microbial cell growth monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Niall; Lukacs, Gyongyi; Jensen, Jason; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    A nanomechanical technique for rapid real time detection and monitoring of microorganism growth will significantly reduce costs and diagnosis times in industrial and clinical settings. Owing to their label free detection mechanism and unprecedented sensitivity to the mass and elastic modulus of biological structures, dynamically operated cantilever arrays provide an opportunity to rapidly detect and track the evolution of microbial growth. Here we report the monitoring of the growth of single Aspergillus niger spores via the multimode response of microcantilevers. The fungal hyphal structure affects the cantilevers' nanomechanical properties as it propagates along the sensor. We demonstrate, for the first time, the mapping of cellular events with great accuracy using a cantilever frequency response. Imaging of growth conditions on the cantilever, which is performed in parallel, allows for verification of these results. Theoretical comparison and finite element modelling confirm experimental findings and allow for determination of the hyphal elastic modulus.A nanomechanical technique for rapid real time detection and monitoring of microorganism growth will significantly reduce costs and diagnosis times in industrial and clinical settings. Owing to their label free detection mechanism and unprecedented sensitivity to the mass and elastic modulus of biological structures, dynamically operated cantilever arrays provide an opportunity to rapidly detect and track the evolution of microbial growth. Here we report the monitoring of the growth of single Aspergillus niger spores via the multimode response of microcantilevers. The fungal hyphal structure affects the cantilevers' nanomechanical properties as it propagates along the sensor. We demonstrate, for the first time, the mapping of cellular events with great accuracy using a cantilever frequency response. Imaging of growth conditions on the cantilever, which is performed in parallel, allows for verification of these

  18. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period. PMID:24066551

  19. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period.

  20. Microbial abundance in the deep subsurface of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater: relationship to lithology and impact processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cockell, Charles S.; Gronstal, Aaron L.; Voytek, Mary A.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Finster, Kai; Sanford, Ward E.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Gohn, Gregroy S.; Powars, David S.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    Asteroid and comet impact events are known to cause profound disruption to surface ecosystems. The aseptic collection of samples throughout a 1.76-km-deep set of cores recovered from the deep subsurface of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure has allowed the study of the subsurface biosphere in a region disrupted by an impactor. Microbiological enumerations suggest the presence of three major microbiological zones. The upper zone (127–867 m) is characterized by a logarithmic decline in microbial abundance from the surface through the postimpact section of Miocene to Upper Eocene marine sediments and across the transition into the upper layers of the impact tsunami resurge sediments and sediment megablocks. In the middle zone (867–1397 m) microbial abundances are below detection. This zone is predominantly quartz sand, primarily composed of boulders and blocks, and it may have been mostly sterilized by the thermal pulse delivered during impact. No samples were collected from the large granite block (1096–1371 m). The lowest zone (below 1397 m) of increasing microbial abundance coincides with a region of heavily impact-fractured, hydraulically conductive suevite and fractured schist. These zones correspond to lithologies influenced by impact processes. Our results yield insights into the influence of impacts on the deep subsurface biosphere.

  1. Microbial growth and biofilm formation in geologic media is detected with complex conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Caroline A.; Atekwana, Estella; Atekwana, Eliot; Slater, Lee D.; Rossbach, Silvia; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2006-09-01

    Complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) were obtained from biostimulated sand-packed columns to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on the electrical properties of porous media. Microbial growth was verified by direct microbial counts, pH measurements, and environmental scanning electron microscope imaging. Peaks in imaginary (interfacial) conductivity in the biostimulated columns were coincident with peaks in the microbial cell concentrations extracted from sands. However, the real conductivity component showed no discernible relationship to microbial cell concentration. We suggest that the observed dynamic changes in the imaginary conductivity (σ″) arise from the growth and attachment of microbial cells and biofilms to sand surfaces. We conclude that complex conductivity techniques, specifically imaginary conductivity measurements are a proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. Our results have implications for microbial enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, bioremediation, and astrobiology studies.

  2. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF MICROBIAL GROWTH AND BIOFILM FORMATION ON SEISMIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated that the seismic methods are sensitive to microbially-induced changes in porous media through the generation of biogenic gases and biomineralization. The seismic signatures associated with microbial growth and biofilm formation...

  3. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Haugen, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand columns. A control column (non-biostimulated) and a biostimulated column were studied in a 2D acoustic scanning apparatus, and a second set of columns were constructed with Ag-AgCl electrodes for complex conductivity measurements. At the completion of the 29-day experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times for the control column were observed to be relatively uniform over the scanned 2D region. However, the biostimulated sample exhibited a high degree of spatial variability within the column for both the amplitude and arrival times. Furthermore, portions of the sample exhibited increased attenuation (~ 80%) concurrent with an increase in the arrival times, while other portions exhibited decreased attenuation (~ 45%) and decreased arrival time. The acoustic amplitude and arrival times changed significantly in the biostimulated column between Days 5 and 7 of the experiment and are consistent with a peak in the imaginary conductivity (σ”) values. The σ” response corresponds to different stages of biofilm development. That is, we interpret the peak σ” with the maximum biofilm thickness and decreasing σ” due to cell death or detachment. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) imaging confirmed microbial cell attachment to sand surfaces in the biostimulated columns, showed apparent differences in the morphology of attached biomass between regions of increased and decreased attenuation, and indicated no mineral precipitation or biomineralization. The heterogeneity in the elastic properties arises from the differences in the morphology and structure of attached biofilms. These results suggest that combining acoustic imaging and complex conductivity techniques

  4. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Our results clearly showed that the functional characteristics of the soil microbial community (i.e. specific growth rates and enzymes activity) rather than total microbial biomass amount are sensitive to increased atmospheric CO2. We conclude that the more abundant available organics released by roots at elevated CO2 altered the ecological strategy of the soil microbial community specifically a shift to a higher contribution of fast-growing r-selected species was observed. These changes in functional structure of the soil microbial community may counterbalance higher C input into the soil under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  5. Perspectives for microbial community composition in anaerobic digestion: from abundance and activity to connectivity.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Verstraete, Willy

    2016-09-01

    Microbial management in anaerobic digestion is mainly focused on physically present and metabolically active species. Because of its complexity and operation near the thermodynamic equilibria, it is equally important to address functional regulation, based on spatial organisation and interspecies communication. Further establishment of the knowledge on microbial communication in anaerobic digestion through quorum sensing and nanowires is needed. Methods to detect centres of concentrated activity, related to the presence of highly active and well-connected species that take a central role in the anaerobic digestion process, have to be optimized. Bioaugmentation could serve as a crucial tool to introduce keystone species that may create or sustain such centres. Functional stability can be maintained by keeping the microbial community active. This results in a clear trade-off between functionally active and redundant microorganisms as primary basis for microbial community organization. Finally, a microbial community based prediction strategy for advanced process control is formulated. PMID:27376701

  6. Minimal models of growth and decline of microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Juška, Alfonsas

    2011-01-21

    Dynamics of growth and decline of microbial populations were analysed and respective models were developed in this investigation. Analysis of the dynamics was based on general considerations concerning the main properties of microorganisms and their interactions with the environment which was supposed to be affected by the activity of the population. Those considerations were expressed mathematically by differential equations or systems of the equations containing minimal sets of parameters characterizing those properties. It has been found that: (1) the factors leading to the decline of the population have to be considered separately, namely, accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium and the exhaustion of resources; the latter have to be separated again into renewable ('building materials') and non-renewable (sources of energy); (2) decline of the population is caused by the exhaustion of sources of energy but no decline is predicted by the model because of the exhaustion of renewable resources; (3) the model determined by the accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium does not suggest the existence of a separate 'stationary phase'; (4) in the model determined by the exhaustion of energy resources the 'stationary' and 'decline' phases are quite discernible; and (5) there is no symmetry in microbial population dynamics, the decline being slower than the rise. Mathematical models are expected to be useful in getting insight into the process of control of the dynamics of microbial populations. The models are in agreement with the experimental data. PMID:21036180

  7. Arsenic as an energy source for microbial growth. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Arsenic, although known for millenia to be a potent poison, can also constitute the basis for energy metabolism by a number of Bacteria and Archaea. Hence, the oxyanion arsenate [As(V)] can serve as a respiratory electron acceptor for the growth of anaerobes, resulting in the accumulation of arsenite [As(III)]. Conversely, As(III) can serve as an electron donor for the growth of aerobic and anaerobic (e.g., nitrate-respiring) chemoautotrophs, as well as photoautotrophs that grow via anoxygenic photosynthesis. Collectively, these microbes carry out these redox reactions between the +3 and +5 oxidation states that have profound importance for the mobility of As in the environment, and perhaps for the pattern of microbial evolution on Earth. I will focus upon the occurrence of these microbes in extreme environments that are rich in naturally-occurring arsenic.

  8. Microbial growth and macromolecular synthesis in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Cuhel, R.L.; Jannasch, H.W.; Taylor, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous time-course measurements of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, /sup 32/PO/sup 43 -/, /sup 15/NH/sub 4//sup +/, and (/sup 14/C)acetate, glucose, and glutamate uptake were made at three stations in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, using water samples taken from well below the euphotic zone. Marked deviations from linearity were observed in 14 of the 15 cases. At the two most inshore stations uptake of /sup 15/NH/sub 4//sup +/ or incorporation of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into protein was undetectable for 16-30 h, followed by very rapid increases in the rates of activity. The sudden burst of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/and NH/sub 4//sup +/ uptake was accompanied by a major increase in the incorporation of /sup 32/P into RNA and lipid fractions of the microbial population at a continental slope station. At a station in Sargasso Sea, all substrates were taken up without lag. Extended incubations led to a growth plateau which may be a measure of the total biologically labile organic nutrient supply. In all cases tested, chloramphenicol severely restricted uptake. One of the inshore stations was revisited a year later with similar results. The combined data demonstrate the utility of using inorganic nutrient uptake and subcellular incorporation patterns to measure microbial growth and metabolism and stress the necessity of time-course rather than end-point incubations.

  9. Biogeochemistry of Stinking Springs, Utah. Part II: Microbial Diversity and Photo- and Chemo-Autotrophic Growth Rates in a Layered Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteverde, D.; Metzger, J. G.; Bournod, C.; Kelly, H.; Johnson, H.; Sessions, A. L.; Osburn, M.; Shapiro, R. S.; Rideout, J.; Johnston, D. T.; Stevenson, B.; Stamps, B. W.; Vuono, D.; Hanselmann, K.; Spear, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Layered microbial mats have garnered attention for their high phylogenetic diversity and exploitation of geochemical gradients often on the mm scale. However, despite their novelty and implications for early life diversification, little is known about layered microbial mat growth rates or the interdependence of the microbial communities within the system. Stinking Springs, a warm, sulfidic, saline spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake, serves as our test-site to investigate some of these questions. Stinking Springs undergoes downstream changes in pH (6.59-8.14), sulfide (527μM - below detection), sulfate (13-600μM), TCO2 (7.77-3.71mM), and temperature (40-21°C) along its ~150m flow path. The first 10m of discharge is channelized, beyond that, the spring supports a 10 to 40mm-thick layered microbial mat covering ~40% of the total spring runoff area. The mat was divided into four texturally-distinct layers which were each analyzed for 16S rRNA, lipid abundance, and bicarbonate and acetate uptake rates in addition to standard microscopy analyses. 16S rRNA analyses confirmed high taxa diversity within each layer, which varied significantly in taxa makeup such that no single phylum dominated the abundance (>33%) in more than one mat layer. The taxonomic diversity tended to increase with mat depth, a similar finding to other studies on layered microbial mats. A mat sampling transect across 16 meters showed that layer taxonomic diversity was conserved horizontally for all four mat layers, which implies mat depth has a larger control on diversity than physical or chemical parameters. Microscopy indicated the presence of diatoms in all layers which was confirmed by lipid abundance of sterols and long-branch fatty acid methyl esters. Incubation experiments were conducted in light and dark conditions over 24 hours with separate 13C-tagged bicarbonate and acetate additions. Heterotrophic growth rates (acetate uptake; 0.03-0.65%/day) were higher than autotrophic growth

  10. Determining the Diversity and Species Abundance Patterns in Arctic Soils using Rational Methods for Exploring Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovreas, L.; Quince, C.; Sloan, W.; Lanzen, A.; Davenport, R.; Green, J.; Coulson, S.; Curtis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic microbial soil communities are intrinsically interesting and poorly characterised. We have inferred the diversity and species abundance distribution of 6 Arctic soils: new and mature soil at the foot of a receding glacier, Arctic Semi Desert, the foot of bird cliffs and soil underlying Arctic Tundra Heath: all near Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen. Diversity, distribution and sample sizes were estimated using the rational method of Quince et al., (Isme Journal 2 2008:997-1006) to determine the most plausible underlying species abundance distribution. A log-normal species abundance curve was found to give a slightly better fit than an inverse Gaussian curve if, and only if, sequencing error was removed. The median estimates of diversity of operational taxonomic units (at the 3% level) were 3600-5600 (lognormal assumed) and 2825-4100 (inverse Gaussian assumed). The nature and origins of species abundance distributions are poorly understood but may yet be grasped by observing and analysing such distributions in the microbial world. The sample size required to observe the distribution (by sequencing 90% of the taxa) varied between ~ 106 and ~105 for the lognormal and inverse Gaussian respectively. We infer that between 5 and 50 GB of sequencing would be required to capture 90% or the metagenome. Though a principle components analysis clearly divided the sites into three groups there was a high (20-45%) degree of overlap in between locations irrespective of geographical proximity. Interestingly, the nearest relatives of the most abundant taxa at a number of most sites were of alpine or polar origin. Samples plotted on first two principal components together with arbitrary discriminatory OTUs

  11. Removing environmental sources of variation to gain insight on symbionts vs. transient microbes in high and low microbial abundance sponges.

    PubMed

    Blanquer, Andrea; Uriz, Maria J; Galand, Pierre E

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we pursue unravelling the bacterial communities of 26 sponges, belonging to several taxonomical orders, and comprising low microbial abundance (LMA) and high microbial abundance (HMA) representatives. Particularly, we searched for species-specific bacteria, which could be considered as symbionts. To reduce temporal and spatial environmentally caused differences between host species, we sampled all the sponge species present in an isolated small rocky area in a single dive. The bacterial communities identified by pyrosequencing the 16S rRNA gene showed that all HMA species clustered separated from LMA sponges and seawater. HMA sponges often had highest diversity, but some LMA sponges had also very diverse bacterial communities. Network analyses indicated that no core bacterial community seemed to exist for the studied sponges, not even for such a space and time-restricted sampling. Most sequences, particularly the most abundant ones in each species, were species-specific for both HMA and LMA sponges. The bacterial sequences retrieved from LMA sponges, despite being phylogenetically more similar to seawater, did not represent transient seawater bacteria. We conclude that sponge bacterial communities depend more on the host affiliation to the HMA or LMA groups than on host phylogeny.

  12. Temporal trends in microbial abundance and biodegradation in Louisiana salt marshes following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Fulthorpe, R. R.; Zimmerman, A. R.; Silliman, B. R.; Slater, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill that began in April 2010 released approximately 4.9 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico waters. Coastal salt marshes experienced moderate to heavy oiling as spilled oils washed ashore and threatened economically important habitats. In situ biodegradation of petroleum by microbes is one of the most effective methods used to remediate oil spills. However, demonstrating biodegradation can be challenging due to heterogeneous distributions of contaminants and dynamic conditions of coastal ecosystems. Salt marshes provide a unique opportunity in which variations in the natural abundance of δ13C can be used to confirm in situ biodegradation of petroleum. Marsh grasses, specifically Spartina sp., have δ13C values of -12 to -14‰ whereas the BP crude oil has a δ13C signature of -27‰. Thus, the 13C content of microbial membrane lipids (which reflects their carbon source) can be used to detect incorporation of petroleum-derived carbon. We investigated biodegradation in marsh sediments in oiled and non-oiled portions of Barataria Bay, Louisiana which experienced some of the most extensive oil contamination. Samples were collected 3, 9 and 15 months following Deepwater Horizon oil intrusion to assess biodegradation over time. Total alkane and PAH analyses confirmed that by Oct 2011 (15 months), concentrations had been significantly reduced (by up to 50,000 ug/kg at some sites). Microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis revealed that cell densities decreased over the 1 year sampling period across both oil-impacted and non-impacted sites indicating that, rather than petroleum presence, seasonal variability was likely the primary control on microbial abundance. The ranges of δ13C PLFA values in oil-impacted (-26.7 to -30.5‰ ± 1.0) and non-impacted sediments (-24.5 to -33.3‰ ± 0.7) in Oct 2010 overlap, thereby reducing confidence in confirmation of biodegradation at this time point. However, in Oct 2011, PLFA

  13. SELECTIVE REVERSIBLE INHIBITION OF MICROBIAL GROWTH WITH PYRITHIAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, D. W.; White, A. G. C.

    1943-01-01

    Growth of many microbial species was inhibited by pyrithiamine, the pyridine analog of thiamine. Growth of many other species was not influenced. In a series of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, it was found that inhibition of growth occurred only in those in which growth was stimulated by thiamine or its component pyrimidine and thiazole portions. The amount of pyrithiamine required for inhibition was correlated with the type of thiamine requirements of various species. The least amount was needed to inhibit organisms which required intact thiamine. Those which could use the pyrimidine and thiazole portions were not so readily inhibited. In the case of the former organisms, half maximal inhibition was produced by as little as 0.03 γ per cc. In all instances, the inhibition was overcome by sufficient amounts of thiamine. The synthesis of thiamine by insusceptible species was studied, and it was concluded that formation of thiamine or other antagonistic substance did not provide an adequate explanation of the resistance of these species to the action of pyrithiamine. PMID:19871344

  14. Carbon nanotubes as plant growth regulators: effects on tomato growth, reproductive system, and soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya V; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kim, Jong Nam; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Mustafa, Thikra; Cernigla, Carl E

    2013-01-14

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can affect plant phenotype and the composition of soil microbiota. Tomato plants grown in soil supplemented with CNTs produce two times more flowers and fruit compared to plants grown in control soil. The effect of carbon nanotubes on microbial community of CNT-treated soil is determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing analysis. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes are the most dominant groups in the microbial community of soil. The relative abundances of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes are found to increase, whereas Proteobacteria and Verrucomicorbia decrease with increasing concentration of CNTs. The results of comparing diversity indices and species level phylotypes (OTUs) between samples showed that there is not a significant affect on bacterial diversity.

  15. Weed seed persistence and microbial abundance in long-term organic and conventional cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed seed persistence in soil can be influenced by many factors, including crop management. This research was conducted to determine whether organic management systems with higher organic amendments and soil microbial biomass could reduce weed seed persistence compared to conventional management sy...

  16. Detecting Microbial Growth and Metabolism in Geologic Media with Complex Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Bottrell, P. M.; Chasten, L. E.; Heidenreich, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Complex conductivity measurements between 0.1-1000 Hz were obtained from biostimulated sand-packed (coarse and mixed fine and medium grain) columns to investigate microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbial metabolism on the electrical properties of porous media. Microbial growth and metabolism was verified by direct microbial counts, pH changes, and environmental scanning electron microscope imaging. Peaks in imaginary (interfacial) conductivity in the coarse grain columns occurred concurrently with peaks in the microbial cell concentrations. The magnitude of the imaginary conductivity response in the mixed fine and medium grain columns, however, was low compared to the coarse grain sand columns, consistent with lower microbial cell concentrations. It is possible that the pore size in the mixed fine and medium grain sand restricted bacteria cell division, inhibiting microbial growth, and thus the smaller magnitude imaginary conductivity response. The biostimulated columns for both grain sizes displayed similar trends and showed an increase in the real (electrolytic) conductivity and decrease in pH over time. Dynamic changes in the imaginary conductivity arises from the growth and attachment of microbial cells and biofilms to surfaces, whereas, changes in the real conductivity arises from the release of byproducts (ionic species) of microbial metabolism. We conclude that complex conductivity techniques are feasible sensors for detecting microbial growth (imaginary conductivity measurements) and metabolism (real conductivity measurements) with implications for bioremediation and astrobiology studies.

  17. Evaluating microbial carbon sources in Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds using natural abundance stable and radiocarbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, J. M.; Pakdel, H.

    2013-12-01

    Natural abundance stable (δ13C) and radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopes of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to evaluate the carbon sources utilized by the active microbial populations in surface sediments from Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds. The absence of algal-specific PLFAs at three of the four sites investigated, in conjunction with δ13C signatures for PLFAs that were generally within ~3‰ of that reported for oil sands bitumen (~ -30‰), indicated that the microbial communities growing on petroleum constituents were dominated by aerobic heterotrophs. The Δ14C values of PLFAs ranged from -906 to -586‰ and pointed to a significant uptake of fossil carbon (up to ~90% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum), particularly in PLFAs (e.g., cy17:0 and cy19:0) often associated with petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The comparatively higher levels of 14C in other, less specific PLFAs (e.g., 16:0) indicated the preferential uptake of younger organic matter by the general microbial population (~50-80% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum). Since the main carbon pools in tailings sediment were essentially 'radiocarbon dead' (i.e., no detectable 14C), the principal source for this modern carbon is considered to be the Athabasca River, which provides the bulk of the water used in the bitumen extraction process. The preferential uptake of the minor amount of young and presumably more biodegradable material present in systems otherwise dominated by recalcitrant petroleum constituents has important implications for remediation strategies. On the one hand, it implies that mining-related organic contaminants could persist in the environment long after tailings pond reclamation has begun. Alternatively, it may be that the young, labile organic matter provided by the Athabasca River plays an important role in stimulating or supporting the microbial utilization of petroleum carbon in oil sands tailings ponds via co-metabolism or priming processes

  18. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  19. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs.

  20. Stabilising metal(loid)s in soil with iron and aluminium-based products: microbial, biochemical and plant growth impact.

    PubMed

    Garau, Giovanni; Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola; Mele, Elena; Deiana, Pietrino; Deiana, Salvatore

    2014-06-15

    Four iron and aluminium-based products, including red mud (RM), hematite (Fe2O3), an iron-rich water treatment residual (Fe-WTR) and amorphous Al hydroxide (Al-OH), were evaluated for their effectiveness at stabilising As and heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) in a circumneutral contaminated soil [As (2105 mg kg(-1)), Cd (18 mg kg(-1)), Cu (264 mg kg(-1)), Pb (710 mg kg(-1)), Zn (522 mg kg(-1))]. Treatment impacts on soil microbial and biochemical features (i.e. microbial biomass-C, microbial counts, 16S rRNA PCR-TTGE of culturable bacteria, dehydrogenase, urease and β-glucosidase activity, Biolog derived parameters-AWCD and richness) as well as bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth were also assessed. After 6 months equilibration, all the amendments (application rate 3% w/w) but RM reduced labile As while only Al-OH reduced the concentration of water-soluble heavy metals. Despite the highest bioavailability of contaminants, most of the soil microbial and biochemical features monitored (i.e. microbial biomass-C, total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity and AWCD) were significantly higher in the RM-soil. Bean germination was completely inhibited in RM-soil while wheat growth was similar to that of the control. The Al-OH treatment was best overall, promoting microbial abundance, diversity and activity while increasing bean and wheat growth and reducing As accumulated in plant shoots. Results suggest that Al-OH is a suitable candidate for field evaluations while the use of RM in the remediation of circumneutral or subalkaline contaminated soils should be reconsidered. PMID:24685456

  1. Linkages between Alaskan sockeye salmon abundance, growth at sea, and climate, 1955 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggerone, G. T.; Nielsen, J. L.; Bumgarner, J.

    2007-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased growth of salmon during early marine life contributed to greater survival and abundance of salmon following the 1976/1977 climate regime shift and that this, in turn, led to density-dependent reductions in growth during late marine stages. Annual measurements of Bristol Bay (Bering Sea) and Chignik (Gulf of Alaska) sockeye salmon scale growth from 1955 to 2002 were used as indices of body growth. During the first and second years at sea, growth of both stocks tended to be higher after the 1976-1977 climate shift, whereas growth during the third year and homeward migration was often below average. Multiple regression models indicated that return per spawner of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon and adult abundance of western and central Alaska sockeye salmon were positively correlated with growth during the first 2 years at sea and negatively correlated with growth during later life stages. After accounting for competition between Bristol Bay sockeye and Asian pink salmon, age-specific adult length of Bristol Bay salmon increased after the 1976-1977 regime shift, then decreased after the 1989 climate shift. Late marine growth and age-specific adult length of Bristol Bay salmon was exceptionally low after 1989, possibly reducing their reproductive potential. These findings support the hypothesis that greater marine growth during the first 2 years at sea contributed to greater salmon survival and abundance, which in turn led to density-dependent growth during later life stages when size-related mortality was likely lower. Our findings provide new evidence supporting the importance of bottom-up control in marine ecosystems and highlight the complex dynamics of species interactions that continually change as salmon grow and mature in the ocean.

  2. Linkages between Alaskan sockeye salmon abundance, growth at sea, and climate, 1955-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Nielsen, J.L.; Bumgarner, J.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased growth of salmon during early marine life contributed to greater survival and abundance of salmon following the 1976/1977 climate regime shift and that this, in turn, led to density-dependent reductions in growth during late marine stages. Annual measurements of Bristol Bay (Bering Sea) and Chignik (Gulf of Alaska) sockeye salmon scale growth from 1955 to 2002 were used as indices of body growth. During the first and second years at sea, growth of both stocks tended to be higher after the 1976-1977 climate shift, whereas growth during the third year and homeward migration was often below average. Multiple regression models indicated that return per spawner of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon and adult abundance of western and central Alaska sockeye salmon were positively correlated with growth during the first 2 years at sea and negatively correlated with growth during later life stages. After accounting for competition between Bristol Bay sockeye and Asian pink salmon, age-specific adult length of Bristol Bay salmon increased after the 1976-1977 regime shift, then decreased after the 1989 climate shift. Late marine growth and age-specific adult length of Bristol Bay salmon was exceptionally low after 1989, possibly reducing their reproductive potential. These findings support the hypothesis that greater marine growth during the first 2 years at sea contributed to greater salmon survival and abundance, which in turn led to density-dependent growth during later life stages when size-related mortality was likely lower. Our findings provide new evidence supporting the importance of bottom-up control in marine ecosystems and highlight the complex dynamics of species interactions that continually change as salmon grow and mature in the ocean. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of microbial signals in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Contreras-Cornejo, Hexon Angel; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; López-Bucio, José

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth and development involves a tight coordination of the spatial and temporal organization of cell division, cell expansion and cell differentiation. Orchestration of these events requires the exchange of signaling molecules between the root and shoot, which can be affected by both biotic and abiotic factors. The interactions that occur between plants and their associated microorganisms have long been of interest, as knowledge of these processes could lead to the development of novel agricultural applications. Plants produce a wide range of organic compounds including sugars, organic acids and vitamins, which can be used as nutrients or signals by microbial populations. On the other hand, microorganisms release phytohormones, small molecules or volatile compounds, which may act directly or indirectly to activate plant immunity or regulate plant growth and morphogenesis. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the identification of signals from free-living bacteria and fungi that interact with plants in a beneficial way. Evidence has accumulated indicating that classic plant signals such as auxins and cytokinins can be produced by microorganisms to efficiently colonize the root and modulate root system architecture. Other classes of signals, including N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, which are used by bacteria for cell-to-cell communication, can be perceived by plants to modulate gene expression, metabolism and growth. Finally, we discuss the role played by volatile organic compounds released by certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in plant immunity and developmental processes. The picture that emerges is one in which plants and microbes communicate themselves through transkingdom signaling systems involving classic and novel signals.

  4. The role of microbial signals in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Contreras-Cornejo, Hexon Angel; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Plant growth and development involves a tight coordination of the spatial and temporal organization of cell division, cell expansion and cell differentiation. Orchestration of these events requires the exchange of signaling molecules between the root and shoot, which can be affected by both biotic and abiotic factors. The interactions that occur between plants and their associated microorganisms have long been of interest, as knowledge of these processes could lead to the development of novel agricultural applications. Plants produce a wide range of organic compounds including sugars, organic acids and vitamins, which can be used as nutrients or signals by microbial populations. On the other hand, microorganisms release phytohormones, small molecules or volatile compounds, which may act directly or indirectly to activate plant immunity or regulate plant growth and morphogenesis. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the identification of signals from free-living bacteria and fungi that interact with plants in a beneficial way. Evidence has accumulated indicating that classic plant signals such as auxins and cytokinins can be produced by microorganisms to efficiently colonize the root and modulate root system architecture. Other classes of signals, including N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, which are used by bacteria for cell-to-cell communication, can be perceived by plants to modulate gene expression, metabolism and growth. Finally, we discuss the role played by volatile organic compounds released by certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in plant immunity and developmental processes. The picture that emerges is one in which plants and microbes communicate themselves through transkingdom signaling systems involving classic and novel signals. PMID:19820333

  5. Diversity, Abundance, and Potential Activity of Nitrifying and Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Assemblages in a Subglacial Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, M. L.; Boyd, E. S.; Lange, R. K.; Mitchell, A. C.; Havig, J. R.; Hamilton, T. L.; Lafreniere, M. J.; Shock, E.; Peters, J.

    2011-12-01

    Ice currently covers 11% of the terrestrial landmass and has covered significantly greater portions of the planet during Earth's history. Significant microbial populations have been documented in all subglacial settings sampled to date. Recent research has demonstrated sizable volumes of subglacial sediment beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet that are greater than 1km thick in places and where sampled active microbial populations have been documented. Collectively this suggests subglacial microbial populations may impact global biogeochemical cycles on glacial-interglacial timescales, however, nitrogen cycling in subglacial systems is poorly understood. Subglacial sediments sampled from beneath Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada harbor a diverse assemblage of potential nitrifiers, nitrate reducers, and diazotrophs, as assessed by amoA, narG, and nifH gene biomarker diversity. Archaeal amoA genes were less abundant and less diverse than bacterial amoA. Nitrification and nitrate reduction were measured in microcosms incubated at 4 degrees Celsius indicating the potential for these processes to occur in situ. Subglacial sediment porewaters and bulk meltwaters have low concentrations of dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds and a high C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter in sediment porewaters, indicating that the sediment communities are N limited. This may reflect the combined biological activities of organic N mineralization, nitrification, and nitrate reduction. Despite evidence for N limitation and detection of nifH, biological nitrogen fixation was not detected in subglacial sediment microcosm experiments at 4 degrees Celsius. Collectively, our results suggest a role for nitrification and nitrate reduction in sustaining microbial communities in subglacial environments.

  6. Effect of disodium fumarate on microbial abundance, ruminal fermentation and methane emission in goats under different forage: concentrate ratios.

    PubMed

    Yang, C J; Mao, S Y; Long, L M; Zhu, W Y

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of disodium fumarate (DF) on methane emission, ruminal fermentation and microbial abundance in goats under different forage (F) : concentrate (C) ratios and fed according to maintenance requirements. Four ruminally fistulated, castrated male goats were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and the main factors being the F : C ratios (41 : 59 or 58 : 42) and DF supplementation (0 or 10 g/day). DF reduced methane production (P < 0.05) on average by 11.9%, irrespective of the F : C ratio. The concentrations of total volatile fatty acids, acetate and propionate were greater in the rumen of goats supplemented with DF (P < 0.05), whereas the abundance of methanogens was lower (P < 0.05). In high-forage diets, the abundance of Selenomonas ruminantium, a fumarate-reducing bacterium, was greater in the rumen of goats supplemented with DF. The abundance of fungi, protozoa, Ruminococus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes were not affected by the addition of DF. Variable F : C ratios affected the abundance of methanogens, fungi and R. flavefaciens (P < 0.05), but did not affect methane emission. The result implied that DF had a beneficial effect on the in vivo rumen fermentation of the goats fed diets with different F : C ratios and that this effect were not a direct action on anaerobic fungi, protozoa and fibrolytic bacteria, the generally recognized fiber-degrading and hydrogen-producing microorganisms, but due to the stimulation of fumarate-reducing bacteria and the depression of methanogens.

  7. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    PubMed

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species.

  8. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    PubMed

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species. PMID:26444564

  9. Abundance and biomass responses of microbial food web components to hydrology and environmental gradients within a floodplain of the River Danube.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Goran

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the relationships of time-dependent hydrological variability and selected microbial food web components. Samples were collected monthly from the Kopački Rit floodplain in Croatia, over a period of 19 months, for analysis of bacterioplankton abundance, cell size and biomass; abundance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates and nanophytoplankton; and concentration of chlorophyll a. Similar hydrological variability at different times of the year enabled partition of seasonal effects from hydrological changes on microbial community properties. The results suggested that, unlike some other studies investigating sites with different connectivity, bacterioplankton abundance, and phytoplankton abundance and biomass increased during lentic conditions. At increasing water level, nanophytoplankton showed lower sensitivity to disturbance in comparison with total phytoplankton biomass: this could prolong autotrophic conditions within the floodplain. Bacterioplankton biomass, unlike phytoplankton, was not impacted by hydrology. The bacterial biomass less affected by hydrological changes can be an important additional food component for the floodplain food web. The results also suggested a mechanism controlling bacterial cell size independent of hydrology, as bacterial cell size was significantly decreased as nanoflagellate abundance increased. Hydrology, regardless of seasonal sucession, has the potential to structure microbial food webs, supporting microbial development during lentic conditions. Conversely, other components appear unaffected by hydrology or may be more strongly controlled by biotic interactions. This research, therefore, adds to understanding on microbial food web interactions in the context of flood and flow pulses in river-floodplain ecosystems.

  10. Evaluation of the ecotoxicological impact of the organochlorine chlordecone on soil microbial community structure, abundance, and function.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Chloé; Devers, Marion; Béguet, Jérémie; Boggio, Baptiste; Rouard, Nadine; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    The insecticide chlordecone applied for decades in banana plantations currently contaminates 20,000 ha of arable land in the French West Indies. Although the impact of various pesticides on soil microorganisms has been studied, chlordecone toxicity to the soil microbial community has never been assessed. We investigated in two different soils (sandy loam and silty loam) exposed to different concentrations of CLD (D0, control; D1 and D10, 1 and 10 times the agronomical dose) over different periods of time (3, 7, and 32 days): (i) the fate of chlordecone by measuring (14)C-chlordecone mass balance and (ii) the impact of chlordecone on microbial community structure, abundance, and function, using standardized methods (-A-RISA, taxon-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR), and (14)C-compounds mineralizing activity). Mineralization of (14)C-chlordecone was inferior below 1 % of initial (14)C-activity. Less than 2 % of (14)C-activity was retrieved from the water-soluble fraction, while most of it remained in the organic-solvent-extractable fraction (75 % of initial (14)C-activity). Only 23 % of the remaining (14)C-activity was measured in nonextractable fraction. The fate of chlordecone significantly differed between the two soils. The soluble and nonextractable fractions were significantly higher in sandy loam soil than in silty loam soil. All the measured microbiological parameters allowed discriminating statistically the two soils and showed a variation over time. The genetic structure of the bacterial community remained insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. In response to chlordecone exposure, the abundance of Gram-negative bacterial groups (β-, γ-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes) was significantly modified only in sandy loam soil. The mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate and (14)C-2,4-D was insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. However, mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate was significantly reduced in soil

  11. [Effects of vegetable cultivation years on microbial biodiversity and abundance of nitrogen cycling in greenhouse soils].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Zeng, Xi-Bai; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Bai, Ling-Yu; Su, Shi-Ming; Wu, Cui-Xia; Li, Lian-Fang; Duan, Ran

    2014-04-01

    The effects of facility vegetable cultivation years (three, nine, fourteen or seventeen years) on biodiversity and abundance of soil microorganisms, such as bacteria, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirK type denitrifying bacteria, in the greenhouse soils in Wuwei of Gansu Province, China were determined by the combined analyses of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that the dominant population structure and abundance of bacteria, AOB, nirK type denitrifying bacteria in the soils were significantly different from those in the farmland fields. The dominant population also changed with the cultivation years. With the increase of vegetable cultivation years, the abundance of 16S rRNA and nirK gene in the 0-20 cm soil layer first increased and then decreased, with the maximum values of 9.67 x 10(9) and 2.30 x 10(7) copies x g(-1) soil at year 14 and year 9, being as 1.51 and 1.52 times of that of the 3-year, respectively. However, the abundance of amoA gene showed an opposite trend. The amoA gene copy number in the 14-year sample was 3.28 x 10(7) copies x g(-1) soil, which was only 45.7% of that of the 3-year. These results illustrated that the ecological adaptation mechanisms of the different functional microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycling had significant differences in the facility vegetable soils, and provided a base for further researches on exploring and explaining the characteristics and adaptation mechanisms of microorganisms in greenhouse soil.

  12. [Effects of vegetable cultivation years on microbial biodiversity and abundance of nitrogen cycling in greenhouse soils].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Zeng, Xi-Bai; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Bai, Ling-Yu; Su, Shi-Ming; Wu, Cui-Xia; Li, Lian-Fang; Duan, Ran

    2014-04-01

    The effects of facility vegetable cultivation years (three, nine, fourteen or seventeen years) on biodiversity and abundance of soil microorganisms, such as bacteria, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirK type denitrifying bacteria, in the greenhouse soils in Wuwei of Gansu Province, China were determined by the combined analyses of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that the dominant population structure and abundance of bacteria, AOB, nirK type denitrifying bacteria in the soils were significantly different from those in the farmland fields. The dominant population also changed with the cultivation years. With the increase of vegetable cultivation years, the abundance of 16S rRNA and nirK gene in the 0-20 cm soil layer first increased and then decreased, with the maximum values of 9.67 x 10(9) and 2.30 x 10(7) copies x g(-1) soil at year 14 and year 9, being as 1.51 and 1.52 times of that of the 3-year, respectively. However, the abundance of amoA gene showed an opposite trend. The amoA gene copy number in the 14-year sample was 3.28 x 10(7) copies x g(-1) soil, which was only 45.7% of that of the 3-year. These results illustrated that the ecological adaptation mechanisms of the different functional microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycling had significant differences in the facility vegetable soils, and provided a base for further researches on exploring and explaining the characteristics and adaptation mechanisms of microorganisms in greenhouse soil. PMID:25011307

  13. 454 pyrosequencing to describe microbial eukaryotic community composition, diversity and relative abundance: a test for marine haptophytes.

    PubMed

    Egge, Elianne; Bittner, Lucie; Andersen, Tom; Audic, Stéphane; de Vargas, Colomban; Edvardsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of ribosomal DNA is increasingly used to assess the diversity and structure of microbial communities. Here we test the ability of 454 pyrosequencing to detect the number of species present, and assess the relative abundance in terms of cell numbers and biomass of protists in the phylum Haptophyta. We used a mock community consisting of equal number of cells of 11 haptophyte species and compared targeting DNA and RNA/cDNA, and two different V4 SSU rDNA haptophyte-biased primer pairs. Further, we tested four different bioinformatic filtering methods to reduce errors in the resulting sequence dataset. With sequencing depth of 11000-20000 reads and targeting cDNA with Haptophyta specific primers Hap454 we detected all 11 species. A rarefaction analysis of expected number of species recovered as a function of sampling depth suggested that minimum 1400 reads were required here to recover all species in the mock community. Relative read abundance did not correlate to relative cell numbers. Although the species represented with the largest biomass was also proportionally most abundant among the reads, there was generally a weak correlation between proportional read abundance and proportional biomass of the different species, both with DNA and cDNA as template. The 454 sequencing generated considerable spurious diversity, and more with cDNA than DNA as template. With initial filtering based only on match with barcode and primer we observed 100-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 99% similarity than the number of species present in the mock community. Filtering based on quality scores, or denoising with PyroNoise resulted in ten times more OTU99% than the number of species. Denoising with AmpliconNoise reduced the number of OTU99% to match the number of species present in the mock community. Based on our analyses, we propose a strategy to more accurately depict haptophyte diversity using 454 pyrosequencing. PMID:24069303

  14. 454 pyrosequencing to describe microbial eukaryotic community composition, diversity and relative abundance: a test for marine haptophytes.

    PubMed

    Egge, Elianne; Bittner, Lucie; Andersen, Tom; Audic, Stéphane; de Vargas, Colomban; Edvardsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of ribosomal DNA is increasingly used to assess the diversity and structure of microbial communities. Here we test the ability of 454 pyrosequencing to detect the number of species present, and assess the relative abundance in terms of cell numbers and biomass of protists in the phylum Haptophyta. We used a mock community consisting of equal number of cells of 11 haptophyte species and compared targeting DNA and RNA/cDNA, and two different V4 SSU rDNA haptophyte-biased primer pairs. Further, we tested four different bioinformatic filtering methods to reduce errors in the resulting sequence dataset. With sequencing depth of 11000-20000 reads and targeting cDNA with Haptophyta specific primers Hap454 we detected all 11 species. A rarefaction analysis of expected number of species recovered as a function of sampling depth suggested that minimum 1400 reads were required here to recover all species in the mock community. Relative read abundance did not correlate to relative cell numbers. Although the species represented with the largest biomass was also proportionally most abundant among the reads, there was generally a weak correlation between proportional read abundance and proportional biomass of the different species, both with DNA and cDNA as template. The 454 sequencing generated considerable spurious diversity, and more with cDNA than DNA as template. With initial filtering based only on match with barcode and primer we observed 100-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 99% similarity than the number of species present in the mock community. Filtering based on quality scores, or denoising with PyroNoise resulted in ten times more OTU99% than the number of species. Denoising with AmpliconNoise reduced the number of OTU99% to match the number of species present in the mock community. Based on our analyses, we propose a strategy to more accurately depict haptophyte diversity using 454 pyrosequencing.

  15. Environmental variability in a transitional Mediterranean system (Oliveri-Tindari, Italy): Focusing on the response of microbial activities and prokaryotic abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Gabriella; Azzaro, Filippo; Azzaro, Maurizio; Decembrini, Franco; La Ferla, Rosabruna; Maimone, Giovanna; De Pasquale, Francesca; Monticelli, Luis Salvador; Zaccone, Renata; Zappalà, Giuseppe; Leonardi, Marcella

    2013-12-01

    The response of both microbial activities and prokaryotic abundances to environmental variability was studied in a transitional Mediterranean system (Oliveri-Tindari, Italy) during two yearly surveys (1997-'98 and 2005-'06). The total enzymatic (leucine aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase) and respiratory activity rates as well as of the abundances of total prokaryotes, culturable heterotrophic bacteria, faecal coliforms and enterococci were measured in surface waters of four brackish ponds, together with temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll-a and particulate organic carbon and particulate nitrogen determinations. The seasonal and interannual patterns of microbial parameters were investigated in relation to environmental variations.

  16. Abundance and structure of microbial loop components (bacteria and protists) in lakes of different trophic status.

    PubMed

    Ryszard, Chrost J; Tomasz, Adamczewski; Kalinowska, Krystyna; Skowronska, Agnieszka

    2009-09-01

    The abundance, biomass, size distribution, and taxonomic composition of bacterial and protistan (heterotrophic and autotrophic nanoflagellates and ciliates) communities were investigated in six lakes of Masurian Lake District (north-eastern Poland) differing in trophic state. Samples were taken from the trophogenic water layer during summer stratification periods in the years of 2004 and 2006. Image analysis techniques with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as [3H]-methyl-thymidine incorporation methods were applied to analyze differences in the composition and activity of bacterial communities. The greatest differences in trophic parameters were found between the humic lake and remaining non-humic ones. The same bacterial and heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) cell size classes dominated in all the studied lakes. However, distinct increases in the contributions of large bacterial (>1.0 microm) and HNF (>10 microm) cells were observed in eutrophic lakes. The bacterial community was dominated by the beta-Proteobacteria group, which accounted for 27% of total DAPI counts. Ciliate communities were largely composed of Oligotrichida. Positive correlations between bacteria and protists, as well as between nanoflagellates (both heterotrophic and autotrophic) and ciliates, suggest that concentrations of food sources may be important in determining the abundance of protists in the studied lakes.

  17. Microbial growth and carbon use efficiency in the rhizosphere and root-free soil.

    PubMed

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    Plant-microbial interactions alter C and N balance in the rhizosphere and affect the microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE)-the fundamental characteristic of microbial metabolism. Estimation of CUE in microbial hotspots with high dynamics of activity and changes of microbial physiological state from dormancy to activity is a challenge in soil microbiology. We analyzed respiratory activity, microbial DNA content and CUE by manipulation the C and nutrients availability in the soil under Beta vulgaris. All measurements were done in root-free and rhizosphere soil under steady-state conditions and during microbial growth induced by addition of glucose. Microorganisms in the rhizosphere and root-free soil differed in their CUE dynamics due to varying time delays between respiration burst and DNA increase. Constant CUE in an exponentially-growing microbial community in rhizosphere demonstrated the balanced growth. In contrast, the CUE in the root-free soil increased more than three times at the end of exponential growth and was 1.5 times higher than in the rhizosphere. Plants alter the dynamics of microbial CUE by balancing the catabolic and anabolic processes, which were decoupled in the root-free soil. The effects of N and C availability on CUE in rhizosphere and root-free soil are discussed. PMID:24722409

  18. Diversity, abundance, and spatial distribution of riverine microbial communities response to effluents from swine farm versus farmhouse restaurant.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen

    2014-09-01

    The 454 pyrosequencing technique was applied to evaluate microbial community composition in sediment and water samples collected from the river receiving effluents from a swine farm and a farmhouse restaurant, respectively. For each sample, 4,600 effective sequences were selected and used to do the bacterial diversity and abundance analysis, respectively. Bacterial phylotype richness in the river sediment sample without effluent input was higher than the other samples, and the river water sample with addition of effluent from the swine farm had the least richness. Effluents from both the swine farm and the farmhouse restaurant have the potential to decrease the bacterial diversity and abundance in the river sediment and water, especially it is more significant in the river sediment. Effect of effluent from the swine farm on riverine bacterial communities was more significant than that from the farmhouse restaurant. Characterization of bacterial community composition in sediments from two tributaries of the downstream river showed that various effluents from the swine farm and the farmhouse restaurant have the similar potential to reduce the natural variability in riverine ecosystems, and contribute to the biotic homogenization in the river sediment. PMID:24818690

  19. Distribution of Prokaryotic Abundance and Microbial Nutrient Cycling Across a High-Alpine Altitudinal Gradient in the Austrian Central Alps is Affected by Vegetation, Temperature, and Soil Nutrients.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Katrin; Lamprecht, Andrea; Pauli, Harald; Illmer, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Studies of the altitudinal distributions of soil microorganisms are rare or have led to contradictory results. Therefore, we studied archaeal and bacterial abundance and microbial-mediated activities across an altitudinal gradient (2700 to 3500 m) on the southwestern slope of Mt. Schrankogel (Central Alps, Austria). Sampling sites distributed over the alpine (2700 to 2900 m), the alpine-nival (3000 to 3100 m), and the nival altitudinal belts (3200 to 3500 m), which are populated by characteristic plant assemblages. Bacterial and archaeal abundances were measured via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Moreover, microbial biomass C, microbial activity (dehydrogenase), and enzymes involved in carbon (CM-cellulase), nitrogen (protease), phosphorus (alkaline phosphatase), and sulfur (arylsulfatase) cycling were determined. Abundances, microbial biomass C, and activities almost linearly decreased along the gradient. Archaeal abundance experienced a sharper decrease, thus pointing to pronounced sensitivity toward environmental harshness. Additionally, abundance and activities were significantly higher in soils of the alpine belt compared with those of the nival belt, whereas the alpine-nival ecotone represented a transitional area with intermediate values, thus highlighting the importance of vegetation. Archaeal abundance along the gradient was significantly related to soil temperature only, whereas bacterial abundance was significantly related to temperature and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations explained most of the variance in enzyme activities involved in the cycling of C, N, P, and S. Increasing temperature could therefore increase the abundances and activities of microorganisms either directly or indirectly via expansion of alpine vegetation to higher altitudes and increased plant cover. PMID:27401822

  20. Inconsistent Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Abundance with Biochar Amendment in Rice Paddy Soils from South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Qu, J.; Liu, X.; Zheng, J.; Li, L.; Pan, G.

    2012-04-01

    Effects of biochar amendment on soil microbiota had not yet been well understood. We conducted a cross site field study on biochar amendment to rice paddies from south China in 2010. The experiment was performed with four treatments including N fertilization only (C0N), N fertilization plus biochar at 20t/ha (C1N) and at 40t/ha (C2N) as well as a control without N fertilization and biochar (C0N0) consistently with three sites. Biochar was spread at soil surface and incorporated into soil and thoroughly mixed to depth of about 12cm before padding for rice seedling transplantation. Rice production was conducted with conventional water and nutrient management practices adapting to local climate and cultivar conditions. Topsoil samples were collected from each treatment plot across sites for chemical properties and molecular analysis after rice harvest in autumn of 2010. Contents of organic carbon, total N as well as soil microbial biomass carbon were determined with recommended methods. Quantitative real-time PCR coupled with 16S rRNA gene and 18S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were respectively employed to trace changes in abundance and structure of bacteria and fungi community with biochar amendment. Increase in microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) was not observed in one site but by 10-20% in other two sites while SOC contents were increased by 25-45% in all sites under biochar treatments. Copy numbers of bacterial genes were different between the sites but no changes with biochar treatment in a single site. However, cluster analysis revealed a more or less decreased similarity of bacterial community to the control (ranging from 75% to 85%) by biochar treatment in a single site. Nevertheless, a number of special bands appeared both in bacterial and fungal DGGE patterns under biochar treatments, though varying with site also. While the fungi copy numbers markedly varied both with sites and with biochar treatments, lower similarity and greater

  1. Field population abundance of leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadelidae) and planthopper (Homoptera: Delphacidae) as affected by rice growth stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizal, M. M.; Idris, A. B.

    2013-11-01

    The leafhopper (Homoptera: Delphacidae) and planthopper (Homoptera: Cicadelidae) are considered as important rice pest in Asia including Malaysia. As phloem-feeders, they can cause loss to rice growth development and their population abundance is thought to be influenced by rice growth stages. This study was conducted to examine the population of Delphacidae and Cicadelidae between different rice growth stages, i.e. before and after rice planting periods. Monthly sampling was conducted in three sites in Kuala Selangor at before planting, vegetative, reproductive, maturing stages and post-harvest period using sweeping net and light traps. Population abundance of Delphacidae and Cicadelidae were found to be significantly different and positively correlated with different rice growth stages (p<0.05). Delphacidae was most abundance during maturing stages, while the abundance of Cicadelidae peaked during reproductive stage of rice growth. Differences in temporal abundance of the population of these two homopterans indicated adaptive feeding strategy to reduce food competition.

  2. Effect of temperature and zooplankton abundance on growth and survival of larval threadfin shad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Betsill, R.K.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    As a test of the match-mismatch hypothesis, we examined the effects of prey availability and water temperature on growth and survival of weekly cohorts of larval threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense in J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir, Georgia-South Carolina. Hatching dates were estimated from otolith increments, and availability of prey was estimated from the abundance of zooplankton size-classes commonly eaten by larval threadfin shad. Growth rates of 31 cohorts ranged from 0.39 to 0.78 mm/d, demonstrating the potential for stage-duration effects on cohort survival. Daily growth rate was related to water temperature and prey availability for larvae up to 21 d old. Growth increased linearly with water temperature up to 28??C, but the relation between growth and prey availability was more complex. Growth rate increased with prey density up to 160-290 organisms/L; at higher densities, growth rate decreased or was unchanged. Cohort survival ranged from 0.65 to 0.96 (per millimeter increase in length) and was significantly correlated with water temperature and growth rate but not with prey availability.

  3. Abundance, diversity, and activity of microbial assemblages associated with coral reef fish guts and feces.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Steven; Sandin, Stuart A; Azam, Farooq

    2010-07-01

    Feces and distal gut contents were collected from three coral reef fish species. Bacteria cell abundances, as determined via epifluorescence microscopy, ranged two orders of magnitude among the fishes. Mass-specific and apparent cell-specific hydrolytic enzyme activities in feces from Chlorurus sordidus were very high, suggesting that endogenous fish enzymes were egested into feces. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of 16S rRNA genes were more similar among multiple individuals of the surgeonfish Acanthurus nigricans than among individuals of the parrotfish C. sordidus or the snapper Lutjanus bohar. Analyses of feces-derived 16S rRNA gene clones revealed that at least five bacterial phyla were present in A. nigricans and that Vibrionaceae comprised 10% of the clones. Meanwhile, C. sordidus contained at least five phyla and L. bohar three, but Vibrionaceae comprised 71% and 76% of the clones, respectively. Many sequences clustered phylogenetically to cultured Vibrio spp. and Photobacterium spp. including Vibrio ponticus and Photobacterium damselae. Other Vibrionaceae-like sequences comprised a distinct phylogenetic group that may represent the presence of 'feces-specific' bacteria. The observed differences among fishes may reflect native gut microbiota and/or bacterial assemblages associated with ingested prey.

  4. Specific microbial gene abundances and soil parameters contribute to C, N, and greenhouse gas process rates after land use change in Southern Amazonian Soils.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Daniel R; Feigl, Brigitte J; Cerri, Carlos C; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Ecological processes regulating soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are still poorly understood, especially in the world's largest agricultural frontier in Southern Amazonia. We analyzed soil parameters in samples from pristine rainforest and after land use change to pasture and crop fields, and correlated them with abundance of functional and phylogenetic marker genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, norB, nosZ, nifH, mcrA, pmoA, and 16S/18S rRNA). Additionally, we integrated these parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions. Following forest removal, concentrations of soil C and N declined, and pH and nutrient levels increased, which influenced microbial abundances and biogeochemical processes. A seasonal trend was observed, suggesting that abundances of microbial groups were restored to near native levels after the dry winter fallow. Integration of the marker gene abundances with soil parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions provided good predictions of biogeochemical processes, such as the fluxes of NO3, N2O, CO2, and CH4. In the wet season, agricultural soil showed the highest abundance of nitrifiers (amoA) and Archaea, however, forest soils showed the highest abundances of denitrifiers (nirK, nosZ) and high N, which correlated with increased N2O emissions. Methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) were more abundant in forest soil, but methane flux was highest in pasture sites, which was related to soil compaction. Rather than analyzing direct correlations, the data integration using multivariate tools provided a better overview of biogeochemical processes. Overall, in the wet season, land use change from forest to agriculture reduced the abundance of different functional microbial groups related to the soil C and N cycles; integrating the gene abundance data and soil parameters provided a comprehensive overview of these interactions. Path analysis and multiple regressions addressed the need for more comprehensive approaches to improve our

  5. Impact of short-term storage temperature on determination of microbial community composition and abundance in aerated forest soil and anoxic pond sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Franziska B; Breidenbach, Björn; Brenzinger, Kristof; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    Sampling strategy is important for unbiased analysis of the characteristics of microbial communities in the environment. During field work it is not always possible to analyze fresh samples immediately or store them frozen. Therefore, the effect of short-term storage temperature was investigated on the abundance and composition of bacterial, archaeal and denitrifying communities in environmental samples from two different sampling sites. Oxic forest soil and anoxic pond sediment were investigated by measuring microbial abundance (DNA) and transcriptional activity (RNA). Prior to investigating the effect of storage temperature, samples were immediately analyzed, in order to represent the original situation in the habitat. The effect of storage temperature was then determined after 11 days at different low temperatures (room temperature, 4 °C, −22 °C and −80 °C). Community profiling using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) showed no significant differences between the immediately analyzed reference sample and the samples stored at different incubation temperatures, both for DNA and RNA extracts. The abundance of microbial communities was determined using quantitative PCR and it also revealed a stable community size at all temperatures tested. By contrast, incubation at an elevated temperature (37 °C) resulted in changed bacterial community composition. In conclusion, short-term storage, even at room temperature, did not affect microbial community composition, abundance and transcriptional activity in aerated forest soil and anoxic pond sediment.

  6. Abundances, Identity, and Growth State of Actinobacteria in Mountain Lakes of Different UV Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, Falk; Sommaruga, Ruben; Sekar, Raju; Hofer, Julia S.; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence, identity, and activity of microbes from the class Actinobacteria was studied in the surface waters of 10 oligo- to mesotrophic mountain lakes located between 913 m and 2,799 m above sea level. Oligonucleotide probes were designed to distinguish between individual lineages within this group by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Bacteria of a single phylogenetic lineage (acI) represented >90% of all Actinobacteria in the studied lakes, and they constituted up to 70% of the total bacterial abundances. In the subset of eight lakes situated above the treeline, the community contribution of bacteria from the acI lineage was significantly correlated with the ambient levels of solar UV radiation (UV transparency, r2 = 0.72; P < 0.01). Three distinct genotypic subpopulations were distinguished within acI that constituted varying fractions of all Actinobacteria in the different lakes. The abundance of growing actinobacterial cells was estimated by FISH and immunocytochemical detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into de novo-synthesized DNA. The percentages of Actinobacteria with visible DNA synthesis approximately corresponded to the average percentages of BrdU-positive cells in the total assemblages. Actinobacteria from different subclades of the acI lineage, therefore, constituted an important autochthonous element of the aquatic microbial communities in many of the studied lakes, potentially also due to their higher UV resistance. PMID:16151148

  7. Reconstruction of Pacific salmon abundance from riparian tree-ring growth.

    PubMed

    Drake, D C; Naiman, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    We use relationships between modern Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) escapement (migrating adults counted at weirs or dams) and riparian tree-ring growth to reconstruct the abundance of stream-spawning salmon over 150-350 years. After examining nine sites, we produced reconstructions for five mid-order rivers and four salmon species over a large geographic range in the Pacific Northwest: chinook (O. tschwatcha) in the Umpqua River, Oregon, USA; sockeye (O. nerka) in Drinkwater Creek, British Columbia, Canada; pink (O. gorbuscha) in Sashin Creek, southeastern Alaska, USA; chum (O. keta) in Disappearance Creek, southeastern Alaska, USA; and pink and chum in the Kadashan River, southeastern Alaska, USA. We first derived stand-level, non-climatic growth chronologies from riparian trees using standard dendroecology methods and differencing. When the chronologies were compared to 18-55 years of adult salmon escapement we detected positive, significant correlations at five of the nine sites. Regression models relating escapement to tree-ring growth at the five sites were applied to the differenced chronologies to reconstruct salmon abundance. Each reconstruction contains unique patterns characteristic of the site and salmon species. Reconstructions were validated by comparison to local histories (e.g., construction of dams and salmon canneries) and regional fisheries data such as salmon landings and aerial surveys and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation climate index. The reconstructions capture lower-frequency cycles better than extremes and are most useful for determination and comparison of relative abundance, cycles, and the effects of interventions. Reconstructions show lower population cycle maxima in both Umpqua River chinook and Sashin Creek pink salmon in recent decades. The Drinkwater Creek reconstruction suggests that sockeye abundance since the mid-1990s has been 15-25% higher than at any time since 1850, while no long-term deviations from natural cycles are

  8. Seasonal Abundance, Spatial Distribution, Spawning and Growth of Astropecten irregularis (Echinodermata: Asteroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S. M.; Richardson, C. A.; Seed, R.

    2001-07-01

    Seasonal trends in the abundance, spatial distribution, spawning and growth of a population of Astropecten irregularis inhabiting the coastal waters of North Wales are described. Population densities of A. irregularis varied seasonally with starfish attaining their maximum and minimum abundances in summer and winter respectively. Changes in their spatial distribution strongly suggests that A. irregularis migrates offshore into deeper waters during the winter months probably to avoid strong onshore wave surges. High population densities of starfish which occur during the summer months may be associated with spawning aggregations or the availability of suitable prey species; a smaller peak in starfish abundance occurred during autumn 1997 coinciding with the settlement of the bivalve Spisula subtruncata and the cumacean Diastylis rugosa , prey species which are readily consumed by A. irregularis. Astropecten irregularis spawned during late spring-early summer, but thereafter the gonad somatic index remained at a low level until late autumn; the index increased throughout winter and starfish attained peak reproductive condition by late spring. Small starfish (arm length <24 mm), showed little evidence of reproductive development. Limited recruitment of A. irregularis (<8 mm) occurred during October-November 1996, and the integration of this small cohort into the main population occurred within one year. Locomotory activity and burrowing depth of starfish maintained in laboratory aquaria correlated with changes in seawater temperature; activity was largely inhibited and burrowing depth significantly increased at temperatures <8 °C. Seawater temperature is probably an important factor regulating the abundance and distribution of A. irregularis in coastal waters.

  9. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    PubMed

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C; Watson, Mick; Wallace, R John

    2016-02-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  10. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J.; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A.; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W.; Hyslop, Jimmy J.; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C.

    2016-01-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  11. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    PubMed

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C; Watson, Mick; Wallace, R John

    2016-02-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  12. Effects of coconut and fish oils on ruminal methanogenesis, fermentation, and abundance and diversity of microbial populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K; Yu, Z

    2013-03-01

    Coconut (CO) and fish (FO) oils were previously shown to inhibit rumen methanogenesis and biohydrogenation, which mitigates methane emission and helps improve beneficial fatty acids in meat and milk. This study aimed at investigating the comparative effects of CO and FO on the methanogenesis, fermentation, and microbial abundances and diversity in vitro rumen cultures containing different doses (0, 3.1, and 6.2 mL/L) of each oil and 400mg feed substrate using rumen fluid from lactating dairy cows as inocula. Increasing doses of CO and FO quadratically decreased concentrations of methane, but hydrogen concentrations were only increased quadratically by CO. Both oils linearly decreased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility of feeds but did not affect the concentration of total volatile fatty acids. However, CO reduced acetate percentage and acetate to propionate ratio and increased the percentages of propionate and butyrate to a greater extent than FO. Ammonia concentration was greater for CO than FO. As determined by quantitative real-time PCR, FO had greater inhibition to methanogens than CO, but the opposite was true for protozoal, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Fibrobacter succinogenes. Ruminococcus albus was not affected by either oil. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that bacterial and archaeal community composition were changed differently by oil type. Based on Pareto-Lorenz evenness curve analysis of the DGGE profiles, CO noticeably changed the functional organization of archaea compared with FO. In conclusion, although both CO and FO decreased methane concentrations to a similar extent, the mode of reduction and the effect on abundances and diversity of archaeal and bacterial populations differed between the oils. Thus, the use of combination of CO and FO at a low dose may additively lower methanogenesis in the rumen while having little adverse effect on rumen fermentation. PMID:23332846

  13. Growth of lake trout in Lake Superior before the maximum abundance of sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahrer, Jerold F.

    1967-01-01

    The growth in length of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the inshore water of Lake Superior in 1953 increased with age from the 3rd to 9th year, and was nearly constant from the 9th to the 12th year. Growth was greatest in the 1st year (4.0 inches) and least in the 2nd and 3rd years (2.3 inches). Between the 4th and 9th years the increments increased from 2.6 to 3.5 inches. Growth was calculated from a curvilinear body-scale relation. Intraseasonal growth in length extended from late April until well after October; most growth was in late summer and fall. The younger fish started growth earlier, and some mature fish did not increase in length until after the October spawning. Lake trout reached the minimum legal weight (1.5 pounds) in the 7th year of life and the average size taken in the commercial fishery (about 3 pounds) in the 8th year. The annual increase in weight in the 8th year of life was over 64%. Fish used in this study grew more slowly than those from Lakes Michigan and Huron taken during the period when sea lamprey abundance was increasing, but at about the same rate as lake trout of Lake Michigan before the sea lamprey appeared.

  14. Age, growth, mortality, and abundance of lake sturgeon in the Grasse River, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trested, D.G.; Isely, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    An increased understanding of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) population dynamics is a key requirement for successful management efforts. Little is known regarding the Grasse River population of lake sturgeon except that it is one of a few populations in New York State where spawning has been documented. Thus our purpose was to assess the current status of lake sturgeon in the Grasse River system, including age, growth, mortality, and abundance. Age was determined for 196 of 211 lake sturgeon by examination of sectioned pectoral fin rays. Ages ranged from 0 to 32 years and the annual mortality rate for fish between ages 7 and 14 was 16.8%. The weight (W, g) to total length (TL, mm) relationship was W = 1.281 x 10-6TL3.202. The von Bertalanffy growth equation was TL = 1913(1-e-0.0294(t+9.5691)). While the range of observed ages was similar to that of nearby St. Lawrence River populations, mean weight at age for an individual at 1000 mm TL was lower than that observed for lake sturgeon within Lake St. Francis of the St. Lawrence River. Predicted growth based on von Bertalanffy parameters was similar to that observed for the nearby Lake St. Francis. An open population estimator using the POPAN sub-module in the Program MARK produced an abundance estimate of 793 lake sturgeon (95% CI = 337-1249).

  15. Effects of fertilization on microbial abundance and emissions of greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) in rice paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xianfang; Yu, Haiyang; Wu, Qinyan; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Yang, Jinghui; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2016-02-01

    This study is to explore effects of nitrogen application and straw incorporation on abundance of relevant microbes and CH 4 and N2O fluxes in a midseason aerated rice paddy field. Fluxes of CH 4 and N2O were recorded, and abundance of relevant soil microbial functional genes was determined during rice-growing season in a 6-year-long fertilization experiment field in China. Results indicate that application of urea significantly changed the functional microbial composition, while the influence of straw incorporation was not significant. Application of urea significantly decreased the gene abundances of archaeal amoA and mcrA, but it significantly increased the gene abundances of bacterial amoA. CH 4 emission was significantly increased by fresh straw incorporation. Incorporation of burnt straw tended to increase CH 4 emission, while the urea application had no obvious effect on CH 4 emission. N2O emission was significantly increased by urea application, while fresh or burnt straw incorporation tended to decrease N2O emission. The functional microbial composition did not change significantly over time, although the abundances of pmoA, archaeal amoA, nirS, and nosZ genes changed significantly. The change of CH 4 emission showed an inverse trend with the one of the N2O emissions over time. To some extent, the abundance of some functional genes in this study can explain CH 4 and N2O emissions. However, the correlation between CH 4 and N2O emissions and the abundance of related functional genes was not significant. Environmental factors, such as soil Eh, may be more related to CH 4 and N2O emissions.

  16. Microbial Biofilm Growth on Irradiated, Spent Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Frank

    2009-02-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 × 103 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments.

  17. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods.

    PubMed

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r(2) > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model. PMID:26539483

  18. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r2 > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model. PMID:26539483

  19. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods.

    PubMed

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r(2) > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model.

  20. Comparison of the Microbial Diversity and Abundance Between the Freshwater Land-Locked Lakes of Schirmacher Oasis and the Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Untersee in East Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jonathan; Hoover, Richard B.; Swain, Ashit; Murdock, Chris; Bej, Asim K.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme conditions such as low temperature, dryness, and constant UV-radiation in terrestrial Antarctica are limiting factors of the survival of microbial populations. The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial diversity and enumeration between the open water lakes of Schirmacher Oasis and the permanently ice-covered Lake Untersee. The lakes in Schirmacher Oasis possessed abundant and diverse group of microorganisms compared to the Lake Untersee. Furthermore, the microbial diversity between two lakes in Schirmacher Oasis (Lake L27C and L47) was compared by culture-based molecular approach. It was determined that L27Chad a richer microbial diversity representing 5 different phyla and 7 different genera. In contrast L47 consisted of 4 different phyla and 6 different genera. The difference in microbial community could be due to the wide range of pH between L27C (pH 9.1) and L47 (pH 5.7). Most of the microbes isolated from these lakes consisted of adaptive biological pigmentation. Characterization of the microbial community found in the freshwater lakes of East Antarctica is important because it gives a further glimpse into the adaptation and survival strategies found in extreme conditions.

  1. Rumen microbial abundance and fermentation profile during severe subacute ruminal acidosis and its modulation by plant derived alkaloids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mickdam, Elsayed; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Chizzola, Remigius; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-06-01

    Rumen microbiota have important metabolic functions for the host animal. This study aimed at characterizing changes in rumen microbial abundances and fermentation profiles using a severe subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in vitro model, and to evaluate a potential modulatory role of plant derived alkaloids (PDA), containing quaternary benzophenanthridine and protopine alkaloids, of which sanguinarine and chelerythrine were the major bioactive compounds. Induction of severe SARA strongly affected the rumen microbial composition and fermentation variables without suppressing the abundance of total bacteria. Protozoa and fungi were more sensitive to the low ruminal pH condition than bacteria. Induction of severe SARA clearly depressed degradation of fiber (P < 0.001), which came along with a decreased relative abundance of fibrolytic Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes (P < 0.001). Under severe SARA conditions, the genus Prevotella, Lactobacillus group, Megasphaera elsdenii, and Entodinium spp. (P < 0.001) were more abundant, whereas Ruminobacter amylophilus was less abundant. SARA largely suppressed methane formation (-70%, P < 0.001), although total methanogenic 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected. According to principal component analysis, Methanobrevibacter spp. correlated to methane concentration. Addition of PDA modulated ruminal fermentation under normal conditions such as enhanced (P < 0.05) concentration of total SCFA, propionate and valerate, and increased (P < 0.05) degradation of crude protein compared with the unsupplemented control diet. Our results indicate strong shifts in the microbial community during severe SARA compared to normal conditions. Supplementation of PDA positively modulates ruminal fermentation under normal ruminal pH conditions. PMID:26868619

  2. Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Kakarla, Ramesh; Moon, Jung Mi; Min, Booki

    2015-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/g- COD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation.

  3. Using PLFA Biomarkers and Natural Abundance Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes to Characterize the Microbial Ecology and Metabolism of Methane Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, C. T.; Mandernack, K. W.; Slater, G. F.; Dias, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Methane generated in the subsurface is a major source of atmospheric CH4, but its release is mitigated by CH4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Therefore, it is important to understand the ecology of methanotroph communities in various environments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses are a particularly useful method for characterizing these communities for two reasons: (1) Many type I and II methanotrophs produce specific PLFA biomarkers that can be used to estimate their populations, and (2) because CH4 is often very depleted in 13C and sometimes 14C, natural abundance δ13CPLFA and Δ14CPLFA values can be used to trace the flow of CH4- derived carbon through microbial ecosystems. We used these tools to evaluate the role of methanotrophs in carbon flow in three different environments: (1) a soil column overlying a coal bed methane (CBM) seep in southwest CO, and pristine, oligotrophic groundwaters within (2) sedimentary and (3) granitic host rocks in Japan. In the soil column impacted by CBM seepage, concentrations of the biomarker PLFAs for type I (16:1ω8cis) and type II (18:1ω8cis) methanotrophs were as high as 13 and 18 nmoles (g dry soil)-1, respectively. Depth profiles of methanotroph PLFA concentrations varied over different sampling dates indicating dynamic populations. δ13CPLFA values of the CBM soils (-25.1 to - 66.9‰) were substantially more negative than those for the control soil (-14.5 to -32.5‰) indicating that CBM is an important carbon source for the CBM-impacted soil microbial community. Δ14CPLFA values (-351 to -936‰) indicate the importance of 14C-dead CBM as a carbon source to the microbial communities, contributing 32 to 66% of total carbon in PLFA structures isolated from shallow soils and 67 to 97% for those isolated from deeper soils. The biomarker for type II methanotrophs, comprised 3 and 18% of total PLFAs in sedimentary and granitic groundwaters, respectively. The Δ14C values determined for type II methanotroph PLFAs

  4. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials. PMID:24975413

  5. Modeling Microbial Growth Dynamics, Patterns, and Coexistence on Partially Saturated Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, T.; Or, D.

    2005-12-01

    A new modeling tool was developed to study the impact of variations in matric potential on aquatic pathways and substrate diffusion, and on microbial growth and movement on unsaturated rough surfaces. The modeling domain is composed of prescribed distributions of conical pits (sites) connected by prismatic channels (bonds) representing rough surfaces of soils or rocks. The well-defined geometry facilitates exact description of aqueous phase distribution within the roughness for a given matric potential. Microbial growth within the resulting highly variable diffusion network architectures (vary with matric potential) and interactions with nutrient diffusion patterns are simulated by coupling Reaction-Diffusion Method (RDM) and the Active Walker Method (AWM). Simulation results show direct impact of wetness conditions (matric potential values) on microbial growth rates and expansion patters for the same surface roughness. In addition to modification of mean diffusion rates for drier or wetter conditions, the network connectivity may induce significant changes in spatial patters of microbial growth. Impact of these changes on coexistence of two competing microbial species will be discussed.

  6. Abundance, biomass and growth rates of Synechococcus sp. in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Philippines, South China Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agawin, N. S. R.; Duarte, C. M.; Agustí, S.; McManus, L.

    2003-03-01

    The abundance, biomass and growth rates of Synechococcus sp. were estimated in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Philippines, South China Sea). The patterns of change of these parameters were further examined in relation to human-derived disturbance such as siltation, and by short-term episodic disturbances such as the typhoons, which are frequent in the region. The average abundance and biomass of Synechococcus sp. in the coastal ecosystem ranged from 0.13 to 21×10 6 cells l -1, and from 0.01 to l.6 mg C m -3, respectively, with higher biomass occurring near river sources rich in inorganic nutrients. There was, however, a significant decline of specific growth rates and maximum frequency of cells in division with increasing siltation, which suggests a deterioration of the environmental conditions to support picocyanobacterial populations. The low biomass of Synechococcus sp. in more pristine sites, in spite of relatively high growth rates there suggests that loss factors (i.e. grazing) are important in controlling the biomass in the area. The temporal pattern of picocyanobacterial abundance in the tropical ecosystem studied was tightly coupled with their temporal patterns of growth indicating that changes in abundance may result from changes in growth rate. There was not, however, a clear annual pattern of Synechococcus sp. abundance in the study site but there was some evidence for effects of storms on Synechococcus sp. abundance.

  7. Specific microbial gene abundances and soil parameters contribute to C, N, and greenhouse gas process rates after land use change in Southern Amazonian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lammel, Daniel R.; Feigl, Brigitte J.; Cerri, Carlos C.; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Ecological processes regulating soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are still poorly understood, especially in the world’s largest agricultural frontier in Southern Amazonia. We analyzed soil parameters in samples from pristine rainforest and after land use change to pasture and crop fields, and correlated them with abundance of functional and phylogenetic marker genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, norB, nosZ, nifH, mcrA, pmoA, and 16S/18S rRNA). Additionally, we integrated these parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions. Following forest removal, concentrations of soil C and N declined, and pH and nutrient levels increased, which influenced microbial abundances and biogeochemical processes. A seasonal trend was observed, suggesting that abundances of microbial groups were restored to near native levels after the dry winter fallow. Integration of the marker gene abundances with soil parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions provided good predictions of biogeochemical processes, such as the fluxes of NO3, N2O, CO2, and CH4. In the wet season, agricultural soil showed the highest abundance of nitrifiers (amoA) and Archaea, however, forest soils showed the highest abundances of denitrifiers (nirK, nosZ) and high N, which correlated with increased N2O emissions. Methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) were more abundant in forest soil, but methane flux was highest in pasture sites, which was related to soil compaction. Rather than analyzing direct correlations, the data integration using multivariate tools provided a better overview of biogeochemical processes. Overall, in the wet season, land use change from forest to agriculture reduced the abundance of different functional microbial groups related to the soil C and N cycles; integrating the gene abundance data and soil parameters provided a comprehensive overview of these interactions. Path analysis and multiple regressions addressed the need for more comprehensive approaches to improve

  8. Specific microbial gene abundances and soil parameters contribute to C, N, and greenhouse gas process rates after land use change in Southern Amazonian Soils.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Daniel R; Feigl, Brigitte J; Cerri, Carlos C; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Ecological processes regulating soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are still poorly understood, especially in the world's largest agricultural frontier in Southern Amazonia. We analyzed soil parameters in samples from pristine rainforest and after land use change to pasture and crop fields, and correlated them with abundance of functional and phylogenetic marker genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, norB, nosZ, nifH, mcrA, pmoA, and 16S/18S rRNA). Additionally, we integrated these parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions. Following forest removal, concentrations of soil C and N declined, and pH and nutrient levels increased, which influenced microbial abundances and biogeochemical processes. A seasonal trend was observed, suggesting that abundances of microbial groups were restored to near native levels after the dry winter fallow. Integration of the marker gene abundances with soil parameters using path analysis and multiple regressions provided good predictions of biogeochemical processes, such as the fluxes of NO3, N2O, CO2, and CH4. In the wet season, agricultural soil showed the highest abundance of nitrifiers (amoA) and Archaea, however, forest soils showed the highest abundances of denitrifiers (nirK, nosZ) and high N, which correlated with increased N2O emissions. Methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) were more abundant in forest soil, but methane flux was highest in pasture sites, which was related to soil compaction. Rather than analyzing direct correlations, the data integration using multivariate tools provided a better overview of biogeochemical processes. Overall, in the wet season, land use change from forest to agriculture reduced the abundance of different functional microbial groups related to the soil C and N cycles; integrating the gene abundance data and soil parameters provided a comprehensive overview of these interactions. Path analysis and multiple regressions addressed the need for more comprehensive approaches to improve our

  9. Optimising Microbial Growth with a Bench-Top Bioreactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. M. R.; Borin, S. L.; Chooi, K. P.; Huang, S. S.; Newgas, A. J. S.; Sodagar, D.; Ziegler, C. A.; Chan, G. H. T.; Walsh, K. A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of impeller size, agitation and aeration on the rate of yeast growth were investigated using bench-top bioreactors. This exercise, carried out over a six-month period, served as an effective demonstration of the importance of different operating parameters on cell growth and provided a means of determining the optimisation conditions…

  10. Calorimetric versus Growth Microbial Analysis of Cellulase Enzymes Acting on Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Lovrien, Rex E.; Williams, Karl K.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Ammend, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Assay of cellulase enzymology on cellulose was investigated by two methods: (i) plate colony counting to determine microbial growth and (ii) microbial calorimetry. These methods were chosen because they accept raw samples and have the potential to be far more specific than spectrophotometric reducing sugar assays. Microbial calorimetry requires ca. 0.5 to 1 h and 10 to 100 μM concentrations of cellulolytic lower sugars (glucose and cellobiose). Growth assay (liquid culture, plating, colony counting) requires 15 to 20 h and ca. 0.5 mM sugars. Microbial calorimetry requires simply aerobic metabolism, whereas growth assay requires completion of the cell cycle. A stripping technique is described for use in conjunction with the calorimetric method to enable separate analysis of the two sugars. Mixtures of glucose and cellobiose are equilibrated with Escherichia coli and spun out to remove glucose. The supernatant is calorimetrically combusted with Klebsiella sp. to quantitate cellobiose, and the same organism combusting the nonstripped mixture gives heat proportional to the sum of the two sugars. Calorimetry of cellulolysis products from individual exo- and endocellulases, and from their reconstituted mixture, was carried out to develop a microbial calorimetric means for demonstrating enzyme synergism. PMID:16347508

  11. Dynamics of Microbial Communities on Marine Snow Aggregates: Colonization, Growth, Detachment, and Grazing Mortality of Attached Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Ploug, Helle

    2003-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of microbial communities attached to model aggregates (4-mm-diameter agar spheres) and the component processes of colonization, detachment, growth, and grazing mortality. Agar spheres incubated in raw seawater were rapidly colonized by bacteria, followed by flagellates and ciliates. Colonization can be described as a diffusion process, and encounter volume rates were estimated at about 0.01 and 0.1 cm3 h−1 for bacteria and flagellates, respectively. After initial colonization, the abundances of flagellates and ciliates remained approximately constant at 103 to 104 and ∼102 cells sphere−1, respectively, whereas bacterial populations increased at a declining rate to >107 cells sphere−1. Attached microorganisms initially detached at high specific rates of ∼10−2 min−1, but the bacteria gradually became irreversibly attached to the spheres. Bacterial growth (0 to 2 day−1) was density dependent and declined hyperbolically when cell density exceeded a threshold. Bacterivorous flagellates grazed on the sphere surface at an average saturated rate of 15 bacteria flagellate−1 h−1. At low bacterial densities, the flagellate surface clearance rate was ∼5 × 10−7 cm2 min−1, but it declined hyperbolically with increasing bacterial density. Using the experimentally estimated process rates and integrating the component processes in a simple model reproduces the main features of the observed microbial population dynamics. Differences between observed and predicted population dynamics suggest, however, that other factors, e.g., antagonistic interactions between bacteria, are of importance in shaping marine snow microbial communities. PMID:12788697

  12. Thermodynamics of Microbial Growth Coupled to Metabolism of Glucose, Ethanol, Short-Chain Organic Acids, and Hydrogen ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Eric E.; Jin, Qusheng

    2011-01-01

    A literature compilation demonstrated a linear relationship between microbial growth yield and the free energy of aerobic and anaerobic (respiratory and/or fermentative) metabolism of glucose, ethanol, formate, acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, and H2. This relationship provides a means to estimate growth yields for modeling microbial redox metabolism in soil and sedimentary environments. PMID:21216913

  13. Connection between stochastic and deterministic modelling of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Kutalik, Zoltán; Razaz, Moe; Baranyi, József

    2005-01-21

    We present in this paper various links between individual and population cell growth. Deterministic models of the lag and subsequent growth of a bacterial population and their connection with stochastic models for the lag and subsequent generation times of individual cells are analysed. We derived the individual lag time distribution inherent in population growth models, which shows that the Baranyi model allows a wide range of shapes for individual lag time distribution. We demonstrate that individual cell lag time distributions cannot be retrieved from population growth data. We also present the results of our investigation on the effect of the mean and variance of the individual lag time and the initial cell number on the mean and variance of the population lag time. These relationships are analysed theoretically, and their consequence for predictive microbiology research is discussed.

  14. Evaluation of the microbial growth response to inorganic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Darryl N; Ehrman, Sheryl H; Pulliam Holoman, Tracey R

    2006-01-01

    In order to enhance the utilization of inorganic nanoparticles in biological systems, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of the influence they have on cellular health and function. Experiments were conducted to test silica, silica/iron oxide, and gold nanoparticles for their effects on the growth and activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to characterize the morphology and quantify size distribution of the nanoparticles, respectively. TEM was also used to verify the interactions between composite iron oxide nanoparticles and E. coli. The results from DLS indicated that the inorganic nanoparticles formed small aggregates in the growth media. Growth studies measured the influence of the nanoparticles on cell proliferation at various concentrations, showing that the growth of E. coli in media containing the nanoparticles indicated no overt signs of toxicity. PMID:16507102

  15. Rapid Determination of Bacterial Abundance, Biovolume, Morphology, and Growth by Neural Network-Based Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Nicholas; Hagström, Åke; Wikner, Johan; Cuadros-Hansson, Rocio; Bjørnsen, Peter Koefoed

    1998-01-01

    Annual bacterial plankton dynamics at several depths and locations in the Baltic Sea were studied by image analysis. Individual bacteria were classified by using an artificial neural network which also effectively identified nonbacterial objects. Cell counts and frequencies of dividing cells were determined, and the data obtained agreed well with visual observations and previously published values. Cell volumes were measured accurately by comparison with bead standards. The survey included 690 images from a total of 138 samples. Each image contained approximately 200 bacteria. The images were analyzed automatically at a rate of 100 images per h. Bacterial abundance exhibited coherent patterns with time and depth, and there were distinct subsurface peaks in the summer months. Four distinct morphological classes were resolved by the image analyzer, and the dynamics of each could be visualized. The bacterial growth rates estimated from frequencies of dividing cells were different from the bacterial growth rates estimated by the thymidine incorporation method. With minor modifications, the image analysis technique described here can be used to analyze other planktonic classes. PMID:9726867

  16. Biodegradation during contaminant transport in porous media: 4. Impact of microbial lag and bacterial cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrin, Susannah K.; Jordan, Fiona L.; Maier, Raina M.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2001-08-01

    Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to examine the impact of microbial lag and bacterial cell growth on the transport of salicylate, a model hydrocarbon compound. The impacts of these processes were examined separately, as well as jointly, to determine their relative effects on biodegradation dynamics. For each experiment, a column was packed with porous medium that was first inoculated with bacteria that contained the NAH plasmid encoding genes for the degradation of naphthalene and salicylate, and then subjected to a step input of salicylate solution. The transport behavior of salicylate was non-steady for all cases examined, and was clearly influenced by a delay (lag) in the onset of biodegradation. This microbial lag, which was consistent with the results of batch experiments, is attributed to the induction and synthesis of the enzymes required for biodegradation of salicylate. The effect of microbial lag on salicylate transport was eliminated by exposing the column to two successive pulses of salicylate, thereby allowing the cells to acclimate to the carbon source during the first pulse. Elimination of microbial lag effects allowed the impact of bacterial growth on salicylate transport to be quantified, which was accomplished by determining a cell mass balance. Conversely, the impact of microbial lag was further investigated by performing a similar double-pulse experiment under no-growth conditions. Significant cell elution was observed and quantified for all conditions/systems. The results of these experiments allowed us to differentiate the effects associated with microbial lag and growth, two coupled processes whose impacts on the biodegradation and transport of contaminants can be difficult to distinguish.

  17. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2016-03-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment.

  18. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment. PMID:26958858

  19. Effect of temperature on microbial growth rate - thermodynamic analysis, the arrhenius and eyring-polanyi connection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work is to develop a new thermodynamic mathematical model for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of microbial growth. The new mathematical model is derived by combining the Arrhenius equation and the Eyring-Polanyi transition theory. The new model, suitable for ...

  20. Influence of different buffers (HEPES/MOPS) on keratinocyte cell viability and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Dias, Kássia de Carvalho; Barbugli, Paula Aboud; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of the buffers 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) and 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) on keratinocyte cell viability and microbial growth. It was observed that RPMI buffered with HEPES, supplemented with l-glutamine and sodium bicarbonate, can be used as a more suitable medium to promote co-culture. PMID:27060444

  1. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  2. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: Growth on soil carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa L.; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment. The modeling framework can represent porous media such as soil. The individual based biological model can explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and cell metabolism is regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences may suggest different functional roles for these two classes of microbes in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20 {micro}m size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111 {micro}m size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Trends in dynamic properties were very similar at these two scales, implying that micro-scale studies can be useful approximations to aggregate scale studies when local effects on microbial dynamics are studied.

  3. Influence of Land Use, Nutrients, and Geography on Microbial Communities and Fecal Indicator Abundance at Lake Michigan Beaches.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Danielle D; Alm, Elizabeth W; McLellan, Sandra L

    2015-08-01

    Microbial communities within beach sand play a key role in nutrient cycling and are important to the nearshore ecosystem function. Escherichia coli and enterococci, two common indicators of fecal pollution, have been shown to persist in the beach sand, but little is known about how microbial community assemblages are related to these fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) reservoirs. We examined eight beaches across a geographic gradient and range of land use types and characterized the indigenous community structure in the water and the backshore, berm, and submerged sands. FIB were found at similar levels in sand at beaches adjacent to urban, forested, and agricultural land and in both the berm and backshore. However, there were striking differences in the berm and backshore microbial communities, even within the same beach, reflecting the very different environmental conditions in these beach zones in which FIB can survive. In contrast, the microbial communities in a particular beach zone were similar among beaches, including at beaches on opposite shores of Lake Michigan. The differences in the microbial communities that did exist within a beach zone correlated to nutrient levels, which varied among geographic locations. Total organic carbon and total phosphorus were higher in Wisconsin beach sand than in beach sand from Michigan. Within predominate genera, fine-scale sequence differences could be found that distinguished the populations from the two states, suggesting a biogeographic effect. This work demonstrates that microbial communities are reflective of environmental conditions at freshwater beaches and are able to provide useful information regarding long-term anthropogenic stress.

  4. Response of the abundance of key soil microbial nitrogen-cycling genes to multi-factorial global changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ximei; Liu, Wei; Schloter, Michael; Zhang, Guangming; Chen, Quansheng; Huang, Jianhui; Li, Linghao; Elser, James J; Han, Xingguo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple co-occurring environmental changes are affecting soil nitrogen cycling processes, which are mainly mediated by microbes. While it is likely that various nitrogen-cycling functional groups will respond differently to such environmental changes, very little is known about their relative responsiveness. Here we conducted four long-term experiments in a steppe ecosystem by removing plant functional groups, mowing, adding nitrogen, adding phosphorus, watering, warming, and manipulating some of their combinations. We quantified the abundance of seven nitrogen-cycling genes, including those for fixation (nifH), mineralization (chiA), nitrification (amoA of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea (AOA)), and denitrification (nirS, nirK and nosZ). First, for each gene, we compared its sensitivities to different environmental changes and found that the abundances of various genes were sensitive to distinct and different factors. Overall, the abundances of nearly all genes were sensitive to nitrogen enrichment. In addition, the abundances of the chiA and nosZ genes were sensitive to plant functional group removal, the AOB-amoA gene abundance to phosphorus enrichment when nitrogen was added simultaneously, and the nirS and nirK gene abundances responded to watering. Second, for each single- or multi-factorial environmental change, we compared the sensitivities of the abundances of different genes and found that different environmental changes primarily affected different gene abundances. Overall, AOB-amoA gene abundance was most responsive, followed by the two denitrifying genes nosZ and nirS, while the other genes were less sensitive. These results provide, for the first time, systematic insights into how the abundance of each type of nitrogen-cycling gene and the equilibrium state of all these nitrogen-cycling gene abundances would shift under each single- or multi-factorial global change.

  5. Microbial contamination associated with consumption and the growth in plastic bottled beverage.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takahiro; Goto, Keiichi; Kanda, Takashi; Kanazawa, Yuji; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Sugiyama, Kanji; Watanabe, Maiko; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    Plastic bottles enable the storage of unfinished beverages, and most of microbial contamination has occurred in the unfinished beverage that was left. Therefore, we investigated microorganisms in various beverages contaminated by pouring and drinking directly by mouth from the bottle, and analyzed the growth of microorganisms in the beverages at room temperature. In the pouring test, microbial growth was detected in 60 of 320 samples, and 13 bacterial strains, 49 mold strains, and 8 yeast strains were isolated. Molds including Cladosporium spp., Tramets spp., Bjerkandera spp., and Penicillium spp. accounted for the majority of isolated microorganisms. In the drinking test, microbial growth was detected in 181 of 352 samples, and 225 bacterial strains, 27 mold strains and 77 yeast strains were isolated. Bacteria including Streptococcus spp. such as S. salivarius and Staphylococcus spp. such as S. aureus accounted for the majority of isolated microorganisms. Enterotoxin-producing S. aureus and Bacillus cereus were also isolated. The pH of the beverage influenced the growth of bacteria. The Brix values of the beverage did not correlate with the growth of microorganisms. These results revealed that various microorganisms including foodborne pathogens were able to grow in numerous types of beverages and that the storage of unfinished beverage in inappropriate condition, such as the storage at room temperature led microorganism to grow easily in beverage. Therefore, it is necessary to consume beverages as soon as possible after opening the bottle.

  6. Biological management of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in pea using plant growth promoting microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial plant-microbe interactions play crucial roles in protection against large number of plant pathogens causing disease. The present study aims to investigate the growth promoting traits induced by beneficial microbes namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27, and Bacillus subtilis BHHU100 treated singly and in combinations under greenhouse and field conditions to control Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Plants treated with three microbe consortium enhanced plant growth maximally both in the presence and absence of the pathogen. Increase in plant length, total biomass, number of leaves, nodules and secondary roots, total chlorophyll and carotenoid content, and yield were recorded in plants treated with microbial consortia. Also, a decrease in plant mortality was observed in plants treated with microbial consortia in comparison to untreated control plants challenged with S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, the decrease in disease of all the treatments can be associated with differential improvement of growth induced in pea. PMID:25727183

  7. Biological management of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in pea using plant growth promoting microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial plant-microbe interactions play crucial roles in protection against large number of plant pathogens causing disease. The present study aims to investigate the growth promoting traits induced by beneficial microbes namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27, and Bacillus subtilis BHHU100 treated singly and in combinations under greenhouse and field conditions to control Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Plants treated with three microbe consortium enhanced plant growth maximally both in the presence and absence of the pathogen. Increase in plant length, total biomass, number of leaves, nodules and secondary roots, total chlorophyll and carotenoid content, and yield were recorded in plants treated with microbial consortia. Also, a decrease in plant mortality was observed in plants treated with microbial consortia in comparison to untreated control plants challenged with S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, the decrease in disease of all the treatments can be associated with differential improvement of growth induced in pea.

  8. Numerical solution of a microbial growth model applied to dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Si; Chen, Guibing

    2015-05-01

    The Baranyi and Roberts model is one of the most frequently used microbial growth models. It has been successfully applied to numerous studies of various microorganisms in different food products. Under dynamic conditions, the model is implicitly formulated as a set of two coupled differential equations which could be numerically solved using the Runge-Kutta method. In this study, a simplified numerical solution of the coupled differential equations was derived and used to simulate microbial growth under dynamic conditions in Microsoft Excel. As expected, the results obtained were the same as those from solving the coupled differential equations using a MATLAB Solver. In addition, model parameters were accurately identified by fitting the numerical solution to simulated growth curves under dynamic (time-varying) temperature conditions using the Microsoft Excel Solver.

  9. Growth dynamic of Naegleria fowleri in a microbial freshwater biofilm.

    PubMed

    Goudot, Sébastien; Herbelin, Pascaline; Mathieu, Laurence; Soreau, Sylvie; Banas, Sandrine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The presence of pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) such as Naegleria fowleri in freshwater environments is a potential public health risk. Although its occurrence in various water sources has been well reported, its presence and associated factors in biofilm remain unknown. In this study, the density of N. fowleri in biofilms spontaneously growing on glass slides fed by raw freshwater were followed at 32 °C and 42 °C for 45 days. The biofilms were collected with their substrata and characterized for their structure, numbered for their bacterial density, thermophilic free-living amoebae, and pathogenic N. fowleri. The cell density of N. fowleri within the biofilms was significantly affected both by the temperature and the nutrient level (bacteria/amoeba ratio). At 32 °C, the density remained constantly low (1-10 N. fowleri/cm(2)) indicating that the amoebae were in a survival state, whereas at 42 °C the density reached 30-900 N. fowleri/cm(2) indicating an active growth phase. The nutrient level, as well, strongly affected the apparent specific growth rate (μ) of N. fowleri in the range of 0.03-0.23 h(-1). At 42 °C a hyperbolic relationship was found between μ and the bacteria/amoeba ratio. A ratio of 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria/amoeba was needed to approach the apparent μ(max) value (0.23 h(-1)). Data analysis also showed that a threshold for the nutrient level of close to 10(4) bacteria/amoeba is needed to detect the growth of N. fowleri in freshwater biofilm. This study emphasizes the important role of the temperature and bacteria as prey to promote not only the growth of N. fowleri, but also its survival.

  10. Environmental Filtering of Microbial Communities in Agricultural Soil Shifts with Crop Growth.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Sarah K; Williams, Ryan J; Hofmockel, Kirsten S

    2015-01-01

    Plant and soil properties cooperatively structure soil microbial communities, with implications for ecosystem functioning. However, the extent to which each factor contributes to community structuring is not fully understood. To quantify the influence of plants and soil properties on microbial diversity and composition in an agricultural context, we conducted an experiment within a corn-based annual cropping system and a perennial switchgrass cropping system across three topographic positions. We sequenced barcoded 16S ribosomal RNA genes from whole soil three times throughout a single growing season and across two years in July. To target the belowground effects of plants, we also sampled rhizosphere soil in July. We hypothesized that microbial community α-diversity and composition (β-diversity) would be more sensitive to cropping system effects (annual vs. perennial inputs) than edaphic differences among topographic positions, with greater differences occurring in the rhizosphere compared to whole soil. We found that microbial community composition consistently varied with topographic position, and cropping system and the rhizosphere influenced α-diversity. In July, cropping system and rhizosphere structured a small but specific group of microbes implying a subset of microbial taxa, rather than broad shifts in community composition, may explain previously observed differences in resource cycling between treatments. Using rank abundance analysis, we detected enrichment of Saprospirales and Actinomycetales, including cellulose and chitin degraders, in the rhizosphere soil and enrichment of Nitrospirales, Syntrophobacterales, and MND1 in the whole soil. Overall, these findings support environmental filtering for the soil microbial community first by soil and second by the rhizosphere. Across cropping systems, plants selected for a general rhizosphere community with evidence for plant-specific effects related to time of sampling.

  11. Impacts of Microbial Growth on the Air Quality of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.; Bruce, Rebekah J.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the various sources of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is one facet to ensuring the habitability of crewed spacecraft. Even though the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere is relatively well characterized in terms of what is in the atmosphere and approximately how much, linking the majority of these trace contaminants detected to their source is virtually impossible. Albeit a few of can be associated to a single source, the majority of these trace contaminants have their origins from multiple sources. On crewed spacecraft such as ISS, trace contaminants are broadly categorized as either coming from equipment, which includes systems and payloads, or from the metabolic processes of the crew members. Such widely encompassing categories clearly illustrate the difficulty in linking air contaminants to their source(s). It is well known that microbial growth in ISS can flourish if left unchecked. Although processes are in place to limit microbial growth, in reality, microbial growth has pervaded the habitable environment of ISS. This is simply a consequence of having crewed spacecraft, as humans are the largest contributor to the bioload. As with crew members, microbes also have metabolic processes which, in many ways, are comparable to human metabolism. As such, it can be expected that microbial growth can lead to the release of volatile organic compounds into the ISS atmosphere. Given a large enough microbial population, the impact to the air quality of ISS can be potentially large. A survey of the microbiology found in ISS will be presented as well as the possible types of volatile organic compounds that can result from such organisms. This will be correlated to the observations provided by ground-based analysis of ISS atmosphere samples

  12. Impacts of Microbial Growth on the Air Quality of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.; Bruce, Rebekah J.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the various sources of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is one facet to ensuring the habitability of crewed spacecraft. Even though the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere is relatively well characterized in terms of what is in the atmosphere and approximately how much, linking the majority of these trace contaminants detected to their source is virtually impossible. Albeit a few of can be associated to a single source, the majority of these trace contaminants have their origins from multiple sources. On crewed spacecraft such as ISS, trace contaminants are broadly categorized as either coming from equipment, which includes systems and payloads, or from the metabolic processes of the crew members. Such widely encompassing categories clearly illustrate the difficulty in linking air contaminants to their source(s). It is well known that microbial growth in ISS can flourish if left unchecked. Although processes are in place to limit microbial growth, in reality, microbial growth has pervaded the habitable environment of ISS. This is simply a consequence of having crewed spacecraft, as humans are the largest contributor to the bioload. As with crew members, microbes also have metabolic processes which, in many ways, are comparable to human metabolism. As such, it can be expected that microbial growth can lead to the release of volatile organic compounds into the ISS atmosphere. Given a large enough microbial population, the impact to the air quality of ISS can be potentially large. A survey of the microbiology found in ISS will be presented as well as the possible types of volatile organic compounds that can result from such organisms. This will be correlated to the observations provided by ground-based analysis of ISS atmosphere samples.

  13. Settlement, abundance, growth and mortality of juvenile flatfish in a subtropical tidal estuary (Georgia, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Marcel J. M.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    The population dynamics of juveniles of some flatfish species were studied in the Duplin River, a tidal creek in a subtropical salt-marsh area in Georgia, U.S.A. from April until September 1990. Seven species were found. Paralichthys dentatus, Paralichthys lethostigma, Paralichthys oblongus and Trinectus maculatus were relatively rare. Etropus crossotus, Citharichthys spilopterus and Symphurus plagiusa were abundant and settled during the period studied. E. crossotus was the most abundant species with a mean abundance of 18 ind·10 -2 m -2 (max. 287). Demersal settlement of E. crossotus took place in shallow areas and over sandy bottoms from mid-May to August. Prolonged settlement hampered the calculation of growth rate and instantaneous mortality rate. However, laboratory growth experiments indicated a mean growth of about 0.50 mm·d -1 at 24-28°C. Juveniles of C. spilopterus were already present in the Duplin River in March. Settling continued until the end of April with a mean abundance of 3.5 ind·10 -2 m -2 (max. 183). With increasing size the juveniles of this species tended to migrate to deeper waters and to the mouth of the river, possibly as a reaction to increasing water temperatures. Maximum growth rate was 1.4 mm·d -1 at about 26°C. The mean instantaneous mortality rate (z) was estimated at 0.03·d -1. Settling of S. plagiusa occurred from mid-May onwards. The mean abundance was 10.3 ind·10 -2 m -2 (max. 98.3). Newly settled juveniles were most abundant on muddy sediments in the shallow river areas. The maximum growth rate was 1.3 mm·d -1 at about 28°C. The mean instantaneous mortality rate (Z) decreased from 0.04·d -1 in April to 0.01·d -1 in August. At all sites the abundance of juveniles of this species decreased with increasing water depth. Predation experiments indicated that blue crabs ( Callinectes similis and C. sapidus) and sea robins ( Prionotus sp.) are potential predators on juvenile flatfish. The high abundances of juvenile flatfish

  14. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    DOE PAGES

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; et al

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on:more » inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.« less

  15. mRNA Transcript abundance during plant growth and the influence of Li(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Duff, M C; Kuhne, W W; Halverson, N V; Chang, C-S; Kitamura, E; Hawthorn, L; Martinez, N E; Stafford, C; Milliken, C E; Caldwell, E F; Stieve-Caldwell, E

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li(+) concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li(+) focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li(+) exposure in Arabidopsis with Li(+) uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li(+)-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li(+) resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li(+) exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li(+) exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li(+)-sensitive genes and a gene-based "response plan" for acute and chronic Li(+) exposure are delineated.

  16. Immune indexes of larks from desert and temperate regions show weak associations with life history but stronger links to environmental variation in microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Nicholas P C; Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Hine, Kathryn; Jaquier, Sophie; Shobrak, Mohammed; Williams, Joseph B; Tinbergen, Joost M; Tieleman, B Irene

    2012-01-01

    Immune defense may vary as a result of trade-offs with other life-history traits or in parallel with variation in antigen levels in the environment. We studied lark species (Alaudidae) in the Arabian Desert and temperate Netherlands to test opposing predictions from these two hypotheses. Based on their slower pace of life, the trade-off hypothesis predicts relatively stronger immune defenses in desert larks compared with temperate larks. However, as predicted by the antigen exposure hypothesis, reduced microbial abundances in deserts should result in desert-living larks having relatively weaker immune defenses. We quantified host-independent and host-dependent microbial abundances of culturable microbes in ambient air and from the surfaces of birds. We measured components of immunity by quantifying concentrations of the acute-phase protein haptoglobin, natural antibody-mediated agglutination titers, complement-mediated lysis titers, and the microbicidal ability of whole blood. Desert-living larks were exposed to significantly lower concentrations of airborne microbes than temperate larks, and densities of some bird-associated microbes were also lower in desert species. Haptoglobin concentrations and lysis titers were also significantly lower in desert-living larks, but other immune indexes did not differ. Thus, contrary to the trade-off hypothesis, we found little evidence that a slow pace of life predicted increased immunological investment. In contrast, and in support of the antigen exposure hypothesis, associations between microbial exposure and some immune indexes were apparent. Measures of antigen exposure, including assessment of host-independent and host-dependent microbial assemblages, can provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying immunological variation.

  17. Effect of refrigeration on microbial growth in the Blairex Water Purifier.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Meng, K E; Frank, L J; Mamalis, G

    1987-05-01

    The Blairex Water Purifier is designed to make tap water into purified water that can be used to make saline solution for soft contact lens disinfection and rinsing. The micropore filters of eight Purifiers were perforated to allow a controlled contamination by either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. The bacterial growth was evaluated in these altered Blairex Water Purifiers under refrigerated and unrefrigerated conditions. Those Purifiers that were refrigerated showed significantly less bacterial growth than those Purifiers that were kept at room temperature between samplings. Our findings imply that soft contact lens wearers may reduce the level of microbial growth in undamaged Purifiers by refrigerating the Purifiers between uses. PMID:3111265

  18. A novel nutritional predictor links microbial fastidiousness with lowered ubiquity, growth rate, and cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Reshef, Leah; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-07-01

    Understanding microbial nutritional requirements is a key challenge in microbiology. Here we leverage the recent availability of thousands of automatically generated genome-scale metabolic models to develop a predictor of microbial minimal medium requirements, which we apply to thousands of species to study the relationship between their nutritional requirements and their ecological and genomic traits. We first show that nutritional requirements are more similar among species that co-habit many ecological niches. We then reveal three fundamental characteristics of microbial fastidiousness (i.e., complex and specific nutritional requirements): (1) more fastidious microorganisms tend to be more ecologically limited; (2) fastidiousness is positively associated with smaller genomes and smaller metabolic networks; and (3) more fastidious species grow more slowly and have less ability to cooperate with other species than more metabolically versatile organisms. These associations reflect the adaptation of fastidious microorganisms to unique niches with few cohabitating species. They also explain how non-fastidious species inhabit many ecological niches with high abundance rates. Taken together, these results advance our understanding microbial nutrition on a large scale, by presenting new nutrition-related associations that govern the distribution of microorganisms in nature. PMID:25033033

  19. Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, F. D. Mace, R. L.

    2014-04-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ω{sub j}{sup ∗}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ω{sub j}{sup ∗} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

  20. Influence of Land Use, Nutrients, and Geography on Microbial Communities and Fecal Indicator Abundance at Lake Michigan Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Danielle D.; Alm, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities within beach sand play a key role in nutrient cycling and are important to the nearshore ecosystem function. Escherichia coli and enterococci, two common indicators of fecal pollution, have been shown to persist in the beach sand, but little is known about how microbial community assemblages are related to these fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) reservoirs. We examined eight beaches across a geographic gradient and range of land use types and characterized the indigenous community structure in the water and the backshore, berm, and submerged sands. FIB were found at similar levels in sand at beaches adjacent to urban, forested, and agricultural land and in both the berm and backshore. However, there were striking differences in the berm and backshore microbial communities, even within the same beach, reflecting the very different environmental conditions in these beach zones in which FIB can survive. In contrast, the microbial communities in a particular beach zone were similar among beaches, including at beaches on opposite shores of Lake Michigan. The differences in the microbial communities that did exist within a beach zone correlated to nutrient levels, which varied among geographic locations. Total organic carbon and total phosphorus were higher in Wisconsin beach sand than in beach sand from Michigan. Within predominate genera, fine-scale sequence differences could be found that distinguished the populations from the two states, suggesting a biogeographic effect. This work demonstrates that microbial communities are reflective of environmental conditions at freshwater beaches and are able to provide useful information regarding long-term anthropogenic stress. PMID:25979888

  1. Green tea yogurt: major phenolic compounds and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Amirdivani, Shabboo; Baba, Ahmad Salihin Hj

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fermentation of milk in the presence of green tea (Camellia sinensis) with respect to changes in antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Pasteurized full fat cow's milk and starter culture were incubated at 41 °C in the presence of two different types of green tea extracts. The yogurts formed were refrigerated (4 °C) for further analysis. The total phenolic content was highest (p < 0.05) in air-dried green tea-yogurt (MGT) followed by steam-treated green tea (JGT) and plain yogurts. Four major compounds in MGTY and JGTY were detected. The highest concentration of major phenolic compounds in both samples was related to quercetin-rhamnosylgalactoside and quercetin-3-O-galactosyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside for MGTY and JGTY respectively during first 7 day of storage. Diphenyl picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power methods showed highest antioxidant capacity in MGTY, JGTY and PY. Streptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus spp. were highest in MGTY followed by JGTY and PY. This paper evaluates the implementation of green tea yogurt as a new product with functional properties and valuable component to promote the growth of beneficial yogurt bacteria and prevention of oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant activity of yogurt. PMID:26139940

  2. Comparative analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2006-09-21

    Mixed-substrate microbial growth is of fundamental interest in microbiology and bioengineering. Several mathematical models have been developed to account for the genetic regulation of such systems, especially those resulting in diauxic growth. In this work, we compare the dynamics of three such models (Narang, 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121; Thattai and Shraiman, 2003. Metabolic switching in the sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli. Biophys. J. 85(2), 744-754; Brandt et al., 2004. Modelling microbial adaptation to changing availability of substrates. Water Res. 38, 1004-1013). We show that these models are dynamically similar--the initial motion of the inducible enzymes in all the models is described by the Lotka-Volterra equations for competing species. In particular, the prediction of diauxic growth corresponds to "extinction" of one of the enzymes during the first few hours of growth. The dynamic similarity occurs because in all the models, the inducible enzymes possess properties characteristic of competing species: they are required for their own synthesis, and they inhibit each other. Despite this dynamic similarity, the models vary with respect to the range of dynamics captured. The Brandt et al. model always predicts the diauxic growth pattern, whereas the remaining two models exhibit both diauxic and non-diauxic growth patterns. The models also differ with respect to the mechanisms that generate the mutual inhibition between the enzymes. In the Narang model, mutual inhibition occurs because the enzymes for each substrate enhance the dilution of the enzymes for the other substrate. The Brandt et al. model superimposes upon this dilution effect an additional mechanism of mutual inhibition. In the Thattai and Shraiman model, the mutual inhibition is entirely due to competition for the phosphoryl groups. For quantitative

  3. What's on the menu? Assessing microbial carbon sources and cycling in soils using natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Burns, L.; Mancini, S.; Fulthorpe, R.; Slater, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Organic matter in soils is composed of diverse materials in various stages of decomposition. Soil organic matter is not in a single pool but rather in multiple carbon pools with different intrinsic turnover times that can be on annual to decadal and even millennial timescales. Microorganisms can influence the total amount of carbon stored in soils and the turnover rates of these different pools. However, the links between microbes and their ability to utilize these various carbon pools are not well understood. Moreover, microbes have been shown to co-utilize a number of available carbon sources rather than a single carbon source under soil conditions which creates difficulties in identifying microbial carbon sources in the natural environment. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) has become a useful tool in elucidating microbial carbon sources in complex environments with multiple carbon sources. We investigated microbial carbon cycling at an industrial site in Ontario which included a variety of carbon sources including vegetation, PAHs and natural organic matter (NOM). Using this approach, the 14C content of microbial membrane lipids (which reflects their carbon source) can be compared to surrounding carbon sources in order to assess which carbon source they are metabolizing and incorporating into their lipids. In addition, we assessed microbial community structure and diversity by analyzing amplified bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal rDNA fragments with denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The Δ14C value for PLFAs ranged from +54 to -697% which indicates that microbial carbon sources across soils differ. The Δ14CPLFA for some soils is consistent with modern carbon sources while Δ14CPLFA for other soils is consistent with natural organic matter including older pools of carbon. The microbial communities at this site are not metabolizing PAHs but rather they are utilizing various pools of natural organic

  4. Adapting isostatic microbial growth parameters into non-isostatic models for use in dynamic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, J.; Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling microbial respiration and growth is an important tool for understanding many geochemical systems. The estimation of growth parameters relies on fitting experimental data to a selected model, such as the Monod equation or some variation, most often under batch or continuous culture conditions. While continuous culture conditions can be analogous to some natural environments, it often isn’t the case. More often, microorganisms are subject to fluctuating temperature, substrate concentrations, pH, water activity, and inhibitory compounds, to name a few. Microbial growth estimation under non-isothermal conditions has been possible through use of numerical solutions and has seen use in the field of food microbiology. In this study, numerical solutions were used to extend growth models under more non-isostatic conditions using momentary growth rate estimates. Using a model organism common in wastewater (Paracoccus denitrificans), growth and respiration rate parameters were estimated under varying static conditions (temperature, pH, electron donor/acceptor concentrations) and used to construct a non-isostatic growth model. After construction of the model, additional experiments were conducted to validate the model. These non-isostatic models hold the potential for allowing the prediction of cell biomass and respiration rates under a diverse array of conditions. By not restricting models to constant environmental conditions, the general applicability of the model can be greatly improved.

  5. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm’s Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order

    PubMed Central

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm’s owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl’s main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species. PMID:26444564

  6. Bifunctional silver nanoparticle cathode in microbial fuel cells for microbial growth inhibition with comparable oxygen reduction reaction activity.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Jeon, Hongrae; Lee, Jaeyoung; Chang, In Seop

    2011-06-15

    Organic contamination of water bodies in which benthic microbial fuel cells (benthic MFCs) are installed, and organic crossover from the anode to the cathode of membraneless MFCs, is a factor causing oxygen depletion and substrate loss in the cathode due to the growth of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria. This study examines the possible use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a cathodic catalyst for MFCs suffering from organic contamination and oxygen depletion. Four treated cathodes (AgNPs-coated, Pt/C-coated, Pt/C+AgNPs-coated, and plain graphite cathodes) were prepared and tested under high levels of organics loading. During operation (fed with 50 mM acetate), the AgNPs-coated system showed the highest DO concentration (0.8 mg/L) in the cathode area as well as the highest current (ranging from 0.04 to 0.12 mA). Based on these results, we concluded that (1) the growth of oxygen-consuming heterotrophic microbes could be inhibited by AgNPs, (2) the function of AgNPs as a bacterial growth inhibitor resulted in a greater increase of DO concentration in the cathode than the other tested cathode systems, (3) AgNPs could be applied as a cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction, and as a result (4) the MFC with the AgNPs-coated cathode led to the highest current generation among the tested MFCs. PMID:21585217

  7. Macroalgae Decrease Growth and Alter Microbial Community Structure of the Reef-Building Coral, Porites astreoides

    PubMed Central

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca; Burkepile, Deron E.; Correa, Adrienne M. S.; Thurber, Andrew R.; Shantz, Andrew A.; Welsh, Rory; Pritchard, Catharine; Rosales, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    With the continued and unprecedented decline of coral reefs worldwide, evaluating the factors that contribute to coral demise is of critical importance. As coral cover declines, macroalgae are becoming more common on tropical reefs. Interactions between these macroalgae and corals may alter the coral microbiome, which is thought to play an important role in colony health and survival. Together, such changes in benthic macroalgae and in the coral microbiome may result in a feedback mechanism that contributes to additional coral cover loss. To determine if macroalgae alter the coral microbiome, we conducted a field-based experiment in which the coral Porites astreoides was placed in competition with five species of macroalgae. Macroalgal contact increased variance in the coral-associated microbial community, and two algal species significantly altered microbial community composition. All macroalgae caused the disappearance of a γ-proteobacterium previously hypothesized to be an important mutualist of P. astreoides. Macroalgal contact also triggered: 1) increases or 2) decreases in microbial taxa already present in corals, 3) establishment of new taxa to the coral microbiome, and 4) vectoring and growth of microbial taxa from the macroalgae to the coral. Furthermore, macroalgal competition decreased coral growth rates by an average of 36.8%. Overall, this study found that competition between corals and certain species of macroalgae leads to an altered coral microbiome, providing a potential mechanism by which macroalgae-coral interactions reduce coral health and lead to coral loss on impacted reefs. PMID:22957055

  8. Macroalgae decrease growth and alter microbial community structure of the reef-building coral, Porites astreoides.

    PubMed

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca; Burkepile, Deron E; Correa, Adrienne M S; Thurber, Andrew R; Shantz, Andrew A; Welsh, Rory; Pritchard, Catharine; Rosales, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    With the continued and unprecedented decline of coral reefs worldwide, evaluating the factors that contribute to coral demise is of critical importance. As coral cover declines, macroalgae are becoming more common on tropical reefs. Interactions between these macroalgae and corals may alter the coral microbiome, which is thought to play an important role in colony health and survival. Together, such changes in benthic macroalgae and in the coral microbiome may result in a feedback mechanism that contributes to additional coral cover loss. To determine if macroalgae alter the coral microbiome, we conducted a field-based experiment in which the coral Porites astreoides was placed in competition with five species of macroalgae. Macroalgal contact increased variance in the coral-associated microbial community, and two algal species significantly altered microbial community composition. All macroalgae caused the disappearance of a γ-proteobacterium previously hypothesized to be an important mutualist of P. astreoides. Macroalgal contact also triggered: 1) increases or 2) decreases in microbial taxa already present in corals, 3) establishment of new taxa to the coral microbiome, and 4) vectoring and growth of microbial taxa from the macroalgae to the coral. Furthermore, macroalgal competition decreased coral growth rates by an average of 36.8%. Overall, this study found that competition between corals and certain species of macroalgae leads to an altered coral microbiome, providing a potential mechanism by which macroalgae-coral interactions reduce coral health and lead to coral loss on impacted reefs. PMID:22957055

  9. Waste water derived electroactive microbial biofilms: growth, maintenance, and basic characterization.

    PubMed

    Gimkiewicz, Carla; Harnisch, Falk

    2013-12-29

    The growth of anodic electroactive microbial biofilms from waste water inocula in a fed-batch reactor is demonstrated using a three-electrode setup controlled by a potentiostat. Thereby the use of potentiostats allows an exact adjustment of the electrode potential and ensures reproducible microbial culturing conditions. During growth the current production is monitored using chronoamperometry (CA). Based on these data the maximum current density (jmax) and the coulombic efficiency (CE) are discussed as measures for characterization of the bioelectrocatalytic performance. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), a nondestructive, i.e. noninvasive, method, is used to study the extracellular electron transfer (EET) of electroactive bacteria. CV measurements are performed on anodic biofilm electrodes in the presence of the microbial substrate, i.e. turnover conditions, and in the absence of the substrate, i.e. nonturnover conditions, using different scan rates. Subsequently, data analysis is exemplified and fundamental thermodynamic parameters of the microbial EET are derived and explained: peak potential (Ep), peak current density (jp), formal potential (E(f)) and peak separation (ΔEp). Additionally the limits of the method and the state-of the art data analysis are addressed. Thereby this video-article shall provide a guide for the basic experimental steps and the fundamental data analysis.

  10. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  11. Microbial community structure and abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil of a tomato cropping system that includes cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this report we use Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (TRFLP) in a tomato production system to “finger printing” the soil microbial community structure with Phylum specific primer sets. Factors influencing the soil microbes are a cover crop of Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) or Rye (...

  12. The perils and promises of microbial abundance: novel natures and model ecosystems, from artisanal cheese to alien seas.

    PubMed

    Paxson, Heather; Helmreich, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Microbial life has been much in the news. From outbreaks of Escherichia coli to discussions of the benefits of raw and fermented foods to recent reports of life forms capable of living in extreme environments, the modest microbe has become a figure for thinking through the presents and possible futures of nature, writ large as well as small. Noting that dominant representations of microbial life have shifted from an idiom of peril to one of promise, we argue that microbes--especially when thriving as microbial communities--are being upheld as model ecosystems in a prescriptive sense, as tokens of how organisms and human ecological relations with them could, should, or might be. We do so in reference to two case studies: the regulatory politics of artisanal cheese and the speculative research of astrobiology. To think of and with microbial communities as model ecosystems offers a corrective to the scientific determinisms we detect in some recent calls to attend to the materiality of scientific objects.

  13. Using coagulation to restrict microbial re-growth in tap water by phosphate limitation in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Ma, Jun; Huang, Ting-Lin; Egli, Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Extensive microbial re-growth in a drinking water distribution system can deteriorate water quality. The limiting factor for microbial re-growth in a tap water produced by a conventional drinking water treatment plant in China was identified by determining the microbial re-growth potential (MRP) by adding different nutrients to stimulate growth of a natural microbial consortium as inoculum and flow-cytometric enumeration. No obvious change of MRP was found in tap water after addition of carbon, whereas, a 1- to 2-fold increase of MRP was observed after addition of phosphate (P). This clearly demonstrated that microbial re-growth in this tap water was limited by P. Most of the re-grown microbial flora (>85%) consisted of high nucleic acid content cells. A subsequent investigation of the MRP in the actual water treatment plant demonstrated that coagulation was the crucial step for decreasing MRP and producing P-limited water. Therefore, a comparison concerning the control of MRP by three different coagulants was conducted. It showed that all the three coagulants efficiently reduced the MRP and shifted the limitation regime from C to P, but the required dose was different. The study shows that it is feasible to restrict microbial re-growth by P limitation using coagulation in water treatment.

  14. Response of microbial growth to orthophosphate and organic carbon influx in copper and plastic based plumbing water systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Keun; Kim, Yeong-Kwan; Choi, Sung-Chan

    2008-07-01

    Consequences of orthophosphate addition for corrosion control in water distribution pipes with respect to microbial growth were investigated using batch and dynamic tests. Batch tests showed that the release of copper in either low or high organic carbon content water was decreased by 69% and 56% with addition 206 microg PO(4)-P, respectively. Dosing of orthophosphate against corrosion did not increase microbial growth potential in the water and in the biofilm in both corroded and uncorroded systems receiving tap water with a low content of organic carbon and of biodegradable organic fraction. However, in tap water having a high concentration of organic carbon from acetate addition, orthophosphate addition promoted the growth of bacteria, allowed more bacteria to assemble on corroded and uncorroded surfaces, and increased the consumption of organic carbon. Orthophosphate consumption did not exceed 1% of the amount of easily biodegradable organic carbon required for microbial growth, and the orthophosphate demand for corrosion control greatly exceeded the nutritional requirement of microbial growth. The results of the dynamic tests demonstrated that there was a significant effect of interaction between biodegradable organic carbon and orthophosphate on biofilm growth, whereby the effect of orthophosphate flux on microbial growth was dependent on the levels of biodegradable organic carbon. Controlling an easily biodegradable organic carbon would be therefore necessary to minimize the microbial growth potential induced by orthophosphate-based anticorrosion treatment.

  15. Response of microbial growth to orthophosphate and organic carbon influx in copper and plastic based plumbing water systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Keun; Kim, Yeong-Kwan; Choi, Sung-Chan

    2008-07-01

    Consequences of orthophosphate addition for corrosion control in water distribution pipes with respect to microbial growth were investigated using batch and dynamic tests. Batch tests showed that the release of copper in either low or high organic carbon content water was decreased by 69% and 56% with addition 206 microg PO(4)-P, respectively. Dosing of orthophosphate against corrosion did not increase microbial growth potential in the water and in the biofilm in both corroded and uncorroded systems receiving tap water with a low content of organic carbon and of biodegradable organic fraction. However, in tap water having a high concentration of organic carbon from acetate addition, orthophosphate addition promoted the growth of bacteria, allowed more bacteria to assemble on corroded and uncorroded surfaces, and increased the consumption of organic carbon. Orthophosphate consumption did not exceed 1% of the amount of easily biodegradable organic carbon required for microbial growth, and the orthophosphate demand for corrosion control greatly exceeded the nutritional requirement of microbial growth. The results of the dynamic tests demonstrated that there was a significant effect of interaction between biodegradable organic carbon and orthophosphate on biofilm growth, whereby the effect of orthophosphate flux on microbial growth was dependent on the levels of biodegradable organic carbon. Controlling an easily biodegradable organic carbon would be therefore necessary to minimize the microbial growth potential induced by orthophosphate-based anticorrosion treatment. PMID:18495203

  16. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  17. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  18. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  19. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  20. Scaling and optimal synergy: Two principles determining microbial growth in complex media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Guimerà, Roger; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Sales-Pardo, Marta

    2015-06-01

    High-throughput experimental techniques and bioinformatics tools make it possible to obtain reconstructions of the metabolism of microbial species. Combined with mathematical frameworks such as flux balance analysis, which assumes that nutrients are used so as to maximize growth, these reconstructions enable us to predict microbial growth. Although such predictions are generally accurate, these approaches do not give insights on how different nutrients are used to produce growth, and thus are difficult to generalize to new media or to different organisms. Here, we propose a systems-level phenomenological model of metabolism inspired by the virial expansion. Our model predicts biomass production given the nutrient uptakes and a reduced set of parameters, which can be easily determined experimentally. To validate our model, we test it against in silico simulations and experimental measurements of growth, and find good agreement. From a biological point of view, our model uncovers the impact that individual nutrients and the synergistic interaction between nutrient pairs have on growth, and suggests that we can understand the growth maximization principle as the optimization of nutrient synergies.

  1. Phenolic-rich leaf carbon fractions differentially influence microbial respiration and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Meier, Courtney L; Bowman, William D

    2008-11-01

    Phenolics can reduce soil nutrient availability, either indirectly by stimulating microbial nitrogen (N) immobilization or directly by enhancing physical protection within soil. Phenolic-rich plants may therefore negatively affect neighboring plant growth by restricting the N supply. We used a slow-growing, phenolic-rich alpine forb, Acomastylis rossii, to test the hypothesis that phenolic-rich carbon (C) fractions stimulate microbial population growth and reduce plant growth. We generated low-molecular-weight (LMW) fractions, tannin fractions, and total soluble C fractions from A. rossii and measured their effects on soil respiration and growth of Deschampsia caespitosa, a fast-growing, co-dominant grass. Fraction effects fell into two distinct categories: (1) fractions did not increase soil respiration and killed D. caespitosa plants, or (2) fractions stimulated soil respiration and reduced plant growth and plant N concentration while simultaneously inhibiting root growth. The LMW phenolic-rich fractions increased soil respiration and reduced plant growth more than tannins. These results suggest that phenolic compounds can inhibit root growth directly as well as indirectly affect growth by reducing pools of plant available N by stimulating soil microbes. Both mechanisms illustrate how below-ground phenolic effects may influence the growth of neighboring plants. We also examined patterns of foliar phenolic concentrations among populations of A. rossii across a natural productivity gradient (productivity was used as a proxy for competition intensity). Concentrations of some LMW phenolics increased significantly in more productive sites where A. rossii is a competitive equal with the faster growing D. caespitosa. Taken together, our results contribute important information to the growing body of evidence indicating that the quality of C moving from plants to soils can have significant effects on neighboring plant performance, potentially associated with phytoxic

  2. Growth-inhibitory activity of natural and synthetic isothiocyanates against representative human microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kurepina, Natalia; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to test the growth inhibition activity of isothiocyanates (ITC), defense compounds of plants, against common human microbial pathogens. Methods and Results In this study we have tested the growth inhibitory activity of a diverse collection of new and previously known representative ITC of various structural classes against pathogenic bacteria, fungi and molds by a serial dilution method. Generally, the compounds were more active against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi exhibiting species-specific bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. The most active compounds inhibited the growth of both drug-susceptible and multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens at micromolar concentrations. In the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis some compounds were more active against MDR, rather than against susceptible strains. The average anti-microbial activity for some of new derivatives was significantly higher than previously reported for the most active ITC compounds. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) established for various classes of ITC with Bacillus cereus (model organism for B. anthracis) followed a distinct pattern, thereby enabling prediction of new more efficient inhibitors. Remarkably, tested bacteria failed to develop resistance to ITC. While effectively inhibiting microbial growth, ITCs displayed moderate toxicity towards eukaryotic cells. Conclusions High antimicrobial activity coupled with moderate toxicity grants further thorough studies of the ITC compounds aimed at elucidation of their cellular targets and inhibitory mechanism. Significance and impact of the study This systematic study identified new ITC compounds highly active against common human microbial pathogens at the concentrations comparable with those for currently used antimicrobial drugs (e.g. rifampicin, fluconazole). Tested representative pathogens do not develop resistance to the inhibitors. These properties justify further evaluation of ITC compounds as potential

  3. Marine microbial ecology off East Antarctica (30 - 80°E): Rates of bacterial and phytoplankton growth and grazing by heterotrophic protists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Thomson, Paul G.; Wright, Simon; van den Enden, Rick

    2010-05-01

    Marine microbes (<200 μm) contribute most of the living matter and carbon flow in the Southern Ocean, yet the factors that control the composition and function of these microbial communities are not well understood. To determine the importance of microbial grazers in controlling microbial abundance, we determined microbial standing stocks and rates of herbivory and bacterivory in relation to the physical environment off East Antarctica during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment: West (BROKE-West) survey, which covered waters from the Polar Front to the coast between 30 and 80°E. Concentrations of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) (˜2 to 20 μm), microzooplankton (˜20 to 200 μm), bacteria, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) were determined and the growth and grazing mortality of phytoplankton and bacteria were estimated using the grazing dilution technique at 22 sites along the survey. Results showed that microzooplankton and HNF consumed on average 52% of bacterial production d -1 and 62% primary production d -1 but consumed >100% d -1 at the western ice-edge sites. Rates of bacterivory ranged from 0.4 - 2.6 d -1 and were correlated with bacterial concentrations, bacterial growth rates and longitude. Rates were highest in the eastern-most part of the survey, which was sampled last, reflecting the transition along the successional continuum toward a respiration-based, senescent, microbial community. Rates of herbivory ranged from 0.3 to 2.4 d -1 and were correlated with concentrations of microzooplankton and HNF combined, rates of phytoplankton growth, and latitude. Rates were highest at southern ice edge sites where concentrations of prey (as represented by Chl a) and microzooplankton were also highest. Cluster analysis of the concentrations of marine microbes and their rates of growth and grazing mortality identified 5 groups of sample sites that conveniently summarised the variability in the composition and function of the microbial

  4. Extraction of solubles from plant biomass for use as microbial growth stimulant and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Ming Woei

    2015-12-08

    A method for producing a microbial growth stimulant (MGS) from a plant biomass is described. In one embodiment, an ammonium hydroxide solution is used to extract a solution of proteins and ammonia from the biomass. Some of the proteins and ammonia are separated from the extracted solution to provide the MGS solution. The removed ammonia can be recycled and the proteins are useful as animal feeds. In one embodiment, the method comprises extracting solubles from pretreated lignocellulosic biomass with a cellulase enzyme-producing growth medium (such T. reesei) in the presence of water and an aqueous extract.

  5. Assessment of Heterotrophic Growth Supported by Soluble Microbial Products in Anammox Biofilm using Multidimensional Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Sun, Jing; Peng, Lai; Wang, Dongbo; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is known to autotrophically convert ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, but little is known about their released microbial products and how these are relative to heterotrophic growth in anammox system. In this work, we applied a mathematical model to assess the heterotrophic growth supported by three key microbial products produced by bacteria in anammox biofilm (utilization associated products (UAP), biomass associated products (BAP), and decay released substrate). Both One-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical biofilm models were developed to describe the development of anammox biofilm as a function of the multiple bacteria–substrate interactions. Model simulations show that UAP of anammox is the main organic carbon source for heterotrophs. Heterotrophs are mainly dominant at the surface of the anammox biofilm with small fraction inside the biofilm. 1-D model is sufficient to describe the main substrate concentrations/fluxes within the anammox biofilm, while the 2-D model can give a more detailed biomass distribution. The heterotrophic growth on UAP is mainly present at the outside of anammox biofilm, their growth on BAP (HetB) are present throughout the biofilm, while the growth on decay released substrate (HetD) is mainly located in the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:27273460

  6. Assessment of Heterotrophic Growth Supported by Soluble Microbial Products in Anammox Biofilm using Multidimensional Modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Sun, Jing; Peng, Lai; Wang, Dongbo; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is known to autotrophically convert ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, but little is known about their released microbial products and how these are relative to heterotrophic growth in anammox system. In this work, we applied a mathematical model to assess the heterotrophic growth supported by three key microbial products produced by bacteria in anammox biofilm (utilization associated products (UAP), biomass associated products (BAP), and decay released substrate). Both One-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical biofilm models were developed to describe the development of anammox biofilm as a function of the multiple bacteria-substrate interactions. Model simulations show that UAP of anammox is the main organic carbon source for heterotrophs. Heterotrophs are mainly dominant at the surface of the anammox biofilm with small fraction inside the biofilm. 1-D model is sufficient to describe the main substrate concentrations/fluxes within the anammox biofilm, while the 2-D model can give a more detailed biomass distribution. The heterotrophic growth on UAP is mainly present at the outside of anammox biofilm, their growth on BAP (HetB) are present throughout the biofilm, while the growth on decay released substrate (HetD) is mainly located in the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:27273460

  7. Effects of Adaptation of In vitro Rumen Culture to Garlic Oil, Nitrate, and Saponin and Their Combinations on Methanogenesis, Fermentation, and Abundances and Diversity of Microbial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Amlan K.; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of garlic oil (0.25 g/L), nitrate (5 mM), and quillaja saponin (0.6 g/L), alone and in binary or ternary combinations, on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation, and abundances of select microbial populations using in vitro rumen cultures. Potential adaptation to these compounds was also examined by repeated transfers of the cultures on alternate days until day 18. All treatments except saponin alone significantly decreased methanogenesis. Ternary combinations of garlic oil, nitrate, and saponin additively/synergistically suppressed methane production by 65% at day 2 and by 40% at day 18. Feed digestion was not adversely affected by any of the treatments at day 2, but was decreased by the combinations (binary and ternary) of garlic oil with the other inhibitors at days 10 and 18. Saponin, alone or in combinations, and garlic oil alone lowered ammonia concentration at day 2, while nitrate increased ammonia concentration at days 10 and 18. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was decreased by garlic oil alone or garlic oil-saponin combination. Molar proportions of acetate and propionate were affected to different extents by the different treatments. The abundances of methanogens were similar among treatments at day 2; however, garlic oil and its combination with saponin and/or nitrate at day 10 and all treatments except saponin at day 18 significantly decreased the abundances of methanogens. All the inhibitors, either alone or in combinations, did not adversely affect the abundances of total bacteria or Ruminococcus flavefaciens. However, at day 18 the abundances of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus albus were lowered in the presence of garlic oil and saponin, respectively. The results suggest that garlic oil-nitrate-saponin combination (at the doses used in this study) can effectively decreases methanogenesis in the rumen, but its efficacy may decrease while inhibition to feed digestion can increase over time. PMID:26733975

  8. Bacterial abundance and aerobic microbial activity across natural and oyster aquaculture habitats during summer conditions in a northeastern Pacific estuary.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured sediment properties and the abundance and functional diversity of microbes in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA, to test the response of sediment microbes to oyster aquaculture. Sites spanned the estuary gradient (salinity 24-30) and six different habitat types: eelgrass (Zostera marina), uns...

  9. Plant growth in Arabidopsis is assisted by compost soil-derived microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Lilia C; Muzzi, Frederico; Tan, Chin-Hong; Hsien-Choo, Jin; Schenk, Peer M

    2013-01-01

    Plants in natural and agricultural environments are continuously exposed to a plethora of diverse microorganisms resulting in microbial colonization of roots and the rhizosphere. This process is believed to be accompanied by an intricate network of ongoing simultaneous interactions. In this study, we examined Arabidopsis thaliana roots and shoots in the presence or absence of whole microbial communities extracted from compost soil. The results show a clear growth promoting effect on Arabidopsis shoots in the presence of soil microbes compared to plants grown in microbe-free soil under otherwise identical conditions. Element analyses showed that iron uptake was facilitated by these mixed microbial communities which also led to transcriptional downregulation of genes required for iron transport. In addition, soil microbial communities suppressed the expression of marker genes involved in nitrogen uptake, oxidative stress/redox signaling, and salicylic acid (SA)-mediated plant defense while upregulating jasmonate (JA) signaling, cell wall organization/biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Multi-species analyses such as simultaneous transcriptional profiling of plants and their interacting microorganisms (metatranscriptomics) coupled to metagenomics may further increase our understanding of the intricate networks underlying plant-microbe interactions.

  10. Plant growth in Arabidopsis is assisted by compost soil-derived microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhais, Lilia C.; Muzzi, Frederico; Tan, Chin-Hong; Hsien-Choo, Jin; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants in natural and agricultural environments are continuously exposed to a plethora of diverse microorganisms resulting in microbial colonization of roots and the rhizosphere. This process is believed to be accompanied by an intricate network of ongoing simultaneous interactions. In this study, we examined Arabidopsis thaliana roots and shoots in the presence or absence of whole microbial communities extracted from compost soil. The results show a clear growth promoting effect on Arabidopsis shoots in the presence of soil microbes compared to plants grown in microbe-free soil under otherwise identical conditions. Element analyses showed that iron uptake was facilitated by these mixed microbial communities which also led to transcriptional downregulation of genes required for iron transport. In addition, soil microbial communities suppressed the expression of marker genes involved in nitrogen uptake, oxidative stress/redox signaling, and salicylic acid (SA)-mediated plant defense while upregulating jasmonate (JA) signaling, cell wall organization/biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Multi-species analyses such as simultaneous transcriptional profiling of plants and their interacting microorganisms (metatranscriptomics) coupled to metagenomics may further increase our understanding of the intricate networks underlying plant-microbe interactions. PMID:23847639

  11. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: growth on soil carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a new kinetic model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment and by different strategies for hydrolysis of polymeric carbon. The hybrid model represented the dynamics of substrates and enzymes using a continuum representation and the dynamics of the cells were modeled individually. Individual-based biological model allowed us to explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and to model cell physiology as regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions in heterogeneous media such as soil and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20-μm size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111-μm size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences suggested different functional niches for these two microbe types in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence of membrane-associated hydrolase and extracellular hydrolases releasing organisms led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Our analysis indicated that their co-existence mutually benefits these organisms, where basal cellulose degradation activity by membrane-associated hydrolase-expressing cells shortened the soluble hydrolase buildup time and, when enzyme buildup allowed for cellulose degradation to be fast enough to sustain exponential growth, all the

  12. [Abundance, population structure and growth of the Atrina maura (Bivalvia: Pinnidae) in a tropical lagoon of the Mexican Pacific coast ].

    PubMed

    Ahumada-Sempoal, Miguel Angel; Serrano-Guzmán, Saúl Jaime; Ruiz-García, Noe

    2002-01-01

    The abundance, population structure, and growth of the Pen-shell Atrina maura in the Corralero-Alotengo tropical lagoon system in Oaxaca, Mexico, were studied from February to September of 1997. An abundance analysis showed significant temporal and spatial differences (Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.001). Two spatial groups of abundance were found in the area, one from the mouth of the lagoon system to the middle of the Pen-shell bank, and the other between the middle of the Pen-shell bank and the head of the system. Three temporal periods of abundance were found (February-April-May; July-August; March-June-September). The distribution of population size showed that benthic recruitment of A. maura occurred from February to July. Length frequency of A. maura is commonly wide-ranging; nevertheless, in this study Pen-shell organisms with a valve length of 15 cm were frequently found. The growth rate length was 3.7 cm/month during the dry season (February to May), and 3.5 cm/month during the rainy season (June to September). Sex ratio was maintained at 1:1 from February to May, but males were dominant from June to August, and the minimum length for reproduction was registered at 10 cm valve length.

  13. Biohydrogen production in the suspended and attached microbial growth systems from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Li, Feifei; Tang, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    Waste pastry was hydrolyzed by glucoamylase and protease which were obtained from solid state fermentation of Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae to produce waste pastry hydrolysate. Then, the effects of hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (4-12h) on hydrogen production rate (HPR) in the suspended microbial growth system (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and attached microbial growth system (continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor, CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate were investigated. The maximum HPRs of CSTR (201.8mL/(h·L)) and CMISR (255.3mL/(h·L)) were obtained at HRT of 6h and 4h, respectively. The first-order reaction could be used to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of waste pastry. The carbon content of the waste pastry remained 22.8% in the undigested waste pastry and consumed 77.2% for carbon dioxide and soluble microbial products. To our knowledge, this is the first study which reports biohydrogen production from waste pastry. PMID:27416509

  14. Biohydrogen production in the suspended and attached microbial growth systems from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Li, Feifei; Tang, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    Waste pastry was hydrolyzed by glucoamylase and protease which were obtained from solid state fermentation of Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae to produce waste pastry hydrolysate. Then, the effects of hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (4-12h) on hydrogen production rate (HPR) in the suspended microbial growth system (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and attached microbial growth system (continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor, CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate were investigated. The maximum HPRs of CSTR (201.8mL/(h·L)) and CMISR (255.3mL/(h·L)) were obtained at HRT of 6h and 4h, respectively. The first-order reaction could be used to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of waste pastry. The carbon content of the waste pastry remained 22.8% in the undigested waste pastry and consumed 77.2% for carbon dioxide and soluble microbial products. To our knowledge, this is the first study which reports biohydrogen production from waste pastry.

  15. Enough is enough: the effects of symbiotic ant abundance on herbivory, growth, and reproduction in an African acacia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Todd M; Brody, Alison K

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how cooperative interactions evolve and persist remains a central challenge in biology. Many mutualisms are thought to be maintained by "partner fidelity feedback," in which each partner bases their investment on the benefits they receive. Yet, we know little about how benefits change as mutualists vary their investment, which is critical to understanding the balance between mutualism and antagonism in any given partnership. Using an obligate ant-plant mutualism, we manipulated the density of symbiotic acacia ants (Crematogaster mimosae) and examined how the costs and benefits to Acacia drepanolobium trees scaled with ant abundance. Benefits of ants to plants saturated with increasing ant abundance for protection from branch browsing by elephants and attack by branch galling midges, while varying linearly for protection from cerambycid beetles. In addition, the risk of catastrophic whole-tree herbivory by elephants was highest for trees with very low ant abundance. However, there was no relationship between ant abundance and herbivory by leaf-feeding invertebrates, nor by vertebrate browsers such as giraffe, steinbuck, and Grant's gazelle. Ant abundance did not significantly influence rates of branch growth on acacias, but there was a significant negative relationship between ant abundance and the number of fruits produced by host plants, suggesting that maintaining high-density ant colonies is costly. Because benefits to plants largely saturated with increasing colony size, while costs to plant reproduction increased, we suggest that ant colonies may achieve abundances that are higher than optimal for host plants. Our results highlight the conflicts of interest inherent in many mutualisms, and demonstrate the value of examining the shape of curves relating costs and benefits within these globally important interactions.

  16. Enough is enough: the effects of symbiotic ant abundance on herbivory, growth, and reproduction in an African acacia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Todd M; Brody, Alison K

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how cooperative interactions evolve and persist remains a central challenge in biology. Many mutualisms are thought to be maintained by "partner fidelity feedback," in which each partner bases their investment on the benefits they receive. Yet, we know little about how benefits change as mutualists vary their investment, which is critical to understanding the balance between mutualism and antagonism in any given partnership. Using an obligate ant-plant mutualism, we manipulated the density of symbiotic acacia ants (Crematogaster mimosae) and examined how the costs and benefits to Acacia drepanolobium trees scaled with ant abundance. Benefits of ants to plants saturated with increasing ant abundance for protection from branch browsing by elephants and attack by branch galling midges, while varying linearly for protection from cerambycid beetles. In addition, the risk of catastrophic whole-tree herbivory by elephants was highest for trees with very low ant abundance. However, there was no relationship between ant abundance and herbivory by leaf-feeding invertebrates, nor by vertebrate browsers such as giraffe, steinbuck, and Grant's gazelle. Ant abundance did not significantly influence rates of branch growth on acacias, but there was a significant negative relationship between ant abundance and the number of fruits produced by host plants, suggesting that maintaining high-density ant colonies is costly. Because benefits to plants largely saturated with increasing colony size, while costs to plant reproduction increased, we suggest that ant colonies may achieve abundances that are higher than optimal for host plants. Our results highlight the conflicts of interest inherent in many mutualisms, and demonstrate the value of examining the shape of curves relating costs and benefits within these globally important interactions. PMID:23687894

  17. Measurement of Microbial Activity and Growth in the Ocean by Rates of Stable Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Karl, David M.

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple and extremely sensitive technique for measuring rates of stable ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was devised and applied to bacterial cultures and seawater samples. The procedure is based upon the uptake and incorporation of exogenous radiolabeled adenine into cellular RNA. To calculate absolute rates of synthesis, measurements of the specific radioactivity of the intracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate pools (precursor to RNA) and of the total amount of radioactivity incorporated into stable cellular RNA per unit time are required. Since the rate of RNA synthesis is positively correlated with growth rate, measurements of RNA synthesis should be extremely useful for estimating and comparing the productivities of microbial assemblages in nature. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate, adenylate energy charge, and rates of stable RNA synthesis have been measured at a station located in the Columbian Basin of the Caribbean Sea. A subsurface peak in RNA synthesis (and therefore growth) was located within the dissolved oxygen minimum zone (450 m), suggesting in situ microbiological utilization of dissolved molecular oxygen. Calculations of the specific rates of RNA synthesis (i.e., RNA synthesis per unit of biomass) revealed that the middepth maximum corresponded to the highest specific rate of growth (420 pmol of adenine incorporated into RNA·day−1) of all depths sampled, including the euphotic zone. The existence of an intermediate depth zone of active microbial growth may be an important site for nutrient regeneration and may serve as a source of reduced carbon for mesopelagic and deep sea environments. PMID:16345461

  18. Quantum dots conjugated zinc oxide nanosheets: Impeder of microbial growth and biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Rajendra; Gholap, Haribhau; Warule, Sambhaji; Banpurkar, Arun; Kulkarni, Gauri; Gade, Wasudeo

    2015-01-01

    The grieving problem of the 21st century has been the antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic microorganisms to conventional antibiotics. Therefore, developments of novel antibacterial materials which effectively inhibit or kill such resistant microorganisms have become the need of the hour. In the present study, we communicate the synthesis of quantum dots conjugated zinc oxide nanostructures (ZnO/CdTe) as an impeder of microbial growth and biofilm. The as-synthesized nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The growth impedance property of ZnO and ZnO/CdTe on Gram positive organism, Bacillus subtilis NCIM 2063 and Gram negative, Escherichia coli NCIM 2931 and biofilm impedance activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa O1 was found to occur due to photocatalytical action on the cell biofilm surfaces. The impedance in microbial growth and biofilm formation was further supported by ruptured appearances of cells and dettrered biofilm under field emission scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscope. The ZnO/CdTe nanostructures array synthesized by hydrothermal method has an advantage of low growth temperature, and opportunity to fabricate inexpensive material for nano-biotechnological applications.

  19. Chemical diversity of microbial volatiles and their potential for plant growth and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Malnoy, Mickael; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) are produced by a wide array of microorganisms ranging from bacteria to fungi. A growing body of evidence indicates that MVOCs are ecofriendly and can be exploited as a cost-effective sustainable strategy for use in agricultural practice as agents that enhance plant growth, productivity, and disease resistance. As naturally occurring chemicals, MVOCs have potential as possible alternatives to harmful pesticides, fungicides, and bactericides as well as genetic modification. Recent studies performed under open field conditions demonstrate that efficiently adopting MVOCs may contribute to sustainable crop protection and production. We review here the chemical diversity of MVOCs by describing microbial–plants and microbial–microbial interactions. Furthermore, we discuss MVOCs role in inducing phenotypic plant responses and their potential physiological effects on crops. Finally, we analyze potential and actual limitations for MVOC use and deployment in field conditions as a sustainable strategy for improving productivity and reducing pesticide use. PMID:25821453

  20. Rumen degradable protein supply affects microbial efficiency in continuous culture and growth in steers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, M A; Harvey, R M; Johnson, N F; Kerley, M S

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that microbial efficiency and output from fermentation in the rumen would be optimized when peptide supply was balanced with peptide requirement of ruminal microflora. This study was conducted to measure response of varying rumen degradable peptide (RDPep) supply on ruminal fermentation characteristics and steer growth. A continuous culture experiment was conducted with diets formulated to achieve a predicted RDPep balance (RDPep supplied above RDPep required) of -0.30 to 1.45% CP with rumen degradable N (RDN) balance (RDN supplied above RDN required) above dietary ammonia-N requirement of microbes. Two additional treatments had RDPep balances of -0.30 and 0.78% CP with insufficient ammonia-N supply to meet microbial requirements. Single-flow fermenters (N = 24; n = 6) were inoculated with rumen fluid and maintained anaerobically at 39°C with a 0.06 h(-1) dilution rate. Inadequate RDN decreased OM digestion and microbial N flow, and increased rumen undegradable N (P < 0.01). Microbial efficiency decreased in RDN-deficient diets and was greatest when RDPep balance did not excessively exceed microbial requirement of RDPep predicted (P < 0.01). A growth study was conducted with 49 yearling, crossbred, Angus steers (initial BW 370 ± 34 kg). Animals were assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups by BW and further divided into 3 pens with 4 steers per pen to achieve similar initial pen weights. Treatments consisted of 4 isonitrogenous diets balanced for RDN but varying in predicted RDPep balance (0.55%, -0.02%, -0.25%, and -0.65% CP). Animals were maintained on treatment for 70 d with individual BW taken on d 0, 1, 21, 42, 70, and 71. Final BW decreased linearly with decreasing RDPep (P = 0.05). Average daily gain and G:F displayed a quadratic effect with greater ADG and G:F at greater and lesser RDPep levels (P = 0.02). We concluded that balancing RDPep supply to predicted requirement improved fermentation efficiency and microbial output, which in turn

  1. Biomechanical ordering and buckling due to microbial growth confined at oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that often exist as densely populated, surface-associated communities. Bacteria are also environmental colloids and spontaneously attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present results on the growth dynamics of individual rod-shaped bacteria confined to finite oil-water interfaces of varying curvature. Through experiments using microfluidic chambers and time-lapse microscopy, we study the formation of macroscopic structures observed as adsorbed bacteria grow, divide, and self-assemble in a nematic phase due to biomechanical interactions. The continued growth at the interface leads to a jammed monolayer of cells, which then causes the interface to buckle and undergo large deformations including wrinkling and tubulation. These observations highlight the interplay between physical environment, such as confinement and interface curvature, and active biological processes, such as growth, at the scale of individual agents and shape our understanding of macroscale processes such as microbial degradation of oil in the ocean.

  2. Experimental Manipulation of Soil Moisture Regime Impacts Soil Microbial Community Abundance, Diversity, and Function in a Semi-Arid Sagebrush Steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, P. O.; Feris, K. P.; Germino, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Rising global temperatures are predicted to alter regional climate regimes, including the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. In water-limited (e.g. arid and semi-arid) ecosystems annual precipitation is low and shows a high degree of variability. In these environments, soil microbes occupy a pivotal seat coupling the effects of water availability and plant productivity to biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem function. Using a long running ecological field experiment (>15 years) sited in Idaho’s sagebrush steppe, effects of experimentally manipulated precipitation regime on microbial diversity, abundance, and terrestrial carbon cycling are being explored. Soils were sampled in January (winter) of 2009. Replicate cores collected at 15-20cm and 95-100cm, were taken from field plots planted with native vegetation under three different precipitation amendments; Ambient, Summer (+200mm in June), or Fall/Spring (+200mm in April or October). Bacterial and Fungal community structure was analyzed by high-resolution 454 pyrosequencing. Edaphic properties (soil moisture, pH, total C, total N, organic C, inorganic N, ortho P) were measured and used as factors for general linear modeling of Bacterial and Fungal community structure against field treatments. Labile soil carbon pools were measured as C mineralization rates by gas chromatography using long term soil incubations. Pyrosequencing analysis of soil Bacterial communities has revealed greater Bacterial community abundance and diversity across all treatments relative to Archaeal and Fungal communities. General linear modeling of sequences obtained from 454 pyrosequencing showed significant interactions of phyla-level Bacterial and Fungal abundance with experimental precipitation regime and depth of sampling. Edaphic properties such as soil moisture and pH also showed significant interactions with phyla-level Bacterial and Fungal abundance. Long-term soil incubation studies revealed treatment effects on

  3. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition.

  4. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition. PMID:24975409

  5. El Niño, host plant growth, and migratory butterfly abundance in a changing climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the wet forests of Panama, El Niño typically brings a more prolonged and severe dry season. Interestingly, many trees and lianas that comprise the wet forests increase their productivity as a response to El Niño. Here we quantify the abundance of migrating Marpesia chiron butterflies over 17 yea...

  6. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate. PMID:22792053

  7. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  8. Microbial abundance and activities in relation to water potential in the vadose zones of arid and semiarid sites.

    PubMed

    Kieft, T L; Amy, P S; Brockman, F J; Fredrickson, J K; Bjornstad, B N; Rosacker, L L

    1993-07-01

    Numbers and activities of microorganisms were measured in the vadose zones of three arid and semiarid areas of the western United States, and the influence of water availability was determined. These low-moisture environments have vadose zones that are commonly hundreds of meters thick. The specific sampling locations chosen were on or near U.S. Department of Energy facilities: the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and the Hanford Site (HS) in southcentral Washington State. Most of the sampling locations were uncontaminated, but geologically representative of nearby locations with storage and/or leakage of waste compounds in the vadose zone. Lithologies of samples included volcanic tuff, basalt, glaciofluvial and fluvial sediments, and paleosols (buried soils). Samples were collected aseptically, either by drilling bore-holes (INEL and HS), or by excavation within tunnels (NTS) and outcrop faces (paleosols near the HS). Total numbers of microorganisms were counted using direct microscopy, and numbers of culturable microorganisms were determined using plate-count methods. Desiccation-tolerant microorganisms were quantified by plate counts performed after 24 h desiccation of the samples. Mineralization of (14)C-labeled glucose and acetate was quantified in samples at their ambient moisture contents, in dried samples, and in moistened samples, to test the hypothesis that water limits microbial activities in vadose zones. Total numbers of microorganisms ranged from log 4.5 to 7.1 cells g(-1) dry wt. Culturable counts ranged from log <2 to 6.7 CFU g(-1) dry wt, with the highest densities occurring in paleosol (buried soil) samples. Culturable cells appeared to be desiccation-tolerant in nearly all samples that had detectable viable heterotrophs. Water limited mineralization in some, but not all samples, suggesting that an inorganic nutrient or other factor may limit microbial activities in some vadose zone environments.

  9. Long-term tracking of microbial survivability and growth in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutandar, Andiyanto; Abdiel Foo, Jong Yong; Lim, Chu Sing; Hsu, Li-Yang

    2008-04-01

    The ecological and histological study of a microbial population in a given environment provides important information leading to its survivability and growth. Current standard laboratory practices adopt culture on a medium housed in an incubated environment. However, large numbers of cultures are usually required to investigate the effects of variations in parametric conditions on the microbes. This can result in a high use of resources such as consumables and man-hours. Automated systems that are able to replenish fresh nutrients and extract metabolic waste for long-term monitoring are also limited. In this study, a system capable of real-time monitoring of microbe survival and providing a suitable environment for their growth is presented. Housed within its structure is a customized chamber with temperature control, pH regulation, nutrient providence and metabolic waste removal functions. To assess the reliability of the system, five sets of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 strains are cultured and monitored continuously for 96 consecutive hours. The survival and growth of the pathogens are verified by standard laboratory techniques such as viable plate count after each successive 24 h of monitoring. The findings herein suggest that the system is able to monitor the microbial population with minimal human intervention and can be a valuable long-term tracking tool.

  10. Impact of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, John S.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2006-10-05

    A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in porous media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a seven day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant impact on the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with maximum population densities that would occupy about 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.

  11. Growth Kinetics of Suspended Microbial Cells: From Single-Substrate-Controlled Growth to Mixed-Substrate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová-Kovar, Karin; Egli, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Growth kinetics, i.e., the relationship between specific growth rate and the concentration of a substrate, is one of the basic tools in microbiology. However, despite more than half a century of research, many fundamental questions about the validity and application of growth kinetics as observed in the laboratory to environmental growth conditions are still unanswered. For pure cultures growing with single substrates, enormous inconsistencies exist in the growth kinetic data reported. The low quality of experimental data has so far hampered the comparison and validation of the different growth models proposed, and only recently have data collected from nutrient-controlled chemostat cultures allowed us to compare different kinetic models on a statistical basis. The problems are mainly due to (i) the analytical difficulty in measuring substrates at growth-controlling concentrations and (ii) the fact that during a kinetic experiment, particularly in batch systems, microorganisms alter their kinetic properties because of adaptation to the changing environment. For example, for Escherichia coli growing with glucose, a physiological long-term adaptation results in a change in KS for glucose from some 5 mg liter−1 to ca. 30 μg liter−1. The data suggest that a dilemma exists, namely, that either “intrinsic” KS (under substrate-controlled conditions in chemostat culture) or μmax (under substrate-excess conditions in batch culture) can be measured but both cannot be determined at the same time. The above-described conventional growth kinetics derived from single-substrate-controlled laboratory experiments have invariably been used for describing both growth and substrate utilization in ecosystems. However, in nature, microbial cells are exposed to a wide spectrum of potential substrates, many of which they utilize simultaneously (in particular carbon sources). The kinetic data available to date for growth of pure cultures in carbon-controlled continuous culture

  12. Soil microbial biomass and root growth in Bt and non-Bt cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D. K. Y.; Broughton, K.; Knox, O. G.; Hulugalle, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has had a substantial impact on pest management in the cotton industry. While there has been substantial research done on the impact of Bt on the above-ground parts of the cotton plant, less is known about the effect of Bt genes on below ground growth of cotton and soil microbial biomass. The aim of this research was to test the hypothesis that Bt [Sicot 80 BRF (Bollgard II Roundup Ready Flex®)] and non-Bt [Sicot 80 RRF (Roundup Ready Flex®)] transgenic cotton varieties differ in root growth and root turnover, carbon indices and microbial biomass. A field experiment was conducted in Narrabri, north-western NSW. The experimental layout was a randomised block design and used minirhizotron and core break and root washing methods to measure cotton root growth and turnover during the 2008/09 season. Root growth in the surface 0-0.1 m of the soil was measured using the core break and root washing methods, and that in the 0.1 to 1 m depth was measured with a minirhizotron and an I-CAP image capture system. These measurements were used to calculate root length per unit area, root carbon added to the soil through intra-seasonal root death, carbon in roots remaining at the end of the season and root carbon potentially added to the soil. Microbial biomass was also measured using the ninhydrin reactive N method. Root length densities and length per unit area of non-Bt cotton were greater than Bt cotton. There were no differences in root turnover between Bt and non-Bt cotton at 0-1 m soil depth, indicating that soil organic carbon stocks may not be affected by cotton variety. Cotton variety did not have an effect on soil microbial biomass. The results indicate that while there are differences in root morphology between Bt and non-Bt cotton, these do not change the carbon turnover dynamics in the soil.

  13. A Bayesian approach to analyzing phenotype microarray data enables estimation of microbial growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Gerstgrasser, Matthias; Nicholls, Sarah; Stout, Michael; Smart, Katherine; Powell, Chris; Kypraios, Theodore; Stekel, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Biolog phenotype microarrays (PMs) enable simultaneous, high throughput analysis of cell cultures in different environments. The output is high-density time-course data showing redox curves (approximating growth) for each experimental condition. The software provided with the Omnilog incubator/reader summarizes each time-course as a single datum, so most of the information is not used. However, the time courses can be extremely varied and often contain detailed qualitative (shape of curve) and quantitative (values of parameters) information. We present a novel, Bayesian approach to estimating parameters from Phenotype Microarray data, fitting growth models using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to enable high throughput estimation of important information, including length of lag phase, maximal "growth" rate and maximum output. We find that the Baranyi model for microbial growth is useful for fitting Biolog data. Moreover, we introduce a new growth model that allows for diauxic growth with a lag phase, which is particularly useful where Phenotype Microarrays have been applied to cells grown in complex mixtures of substrates, for example in industrial or biotechnological applications, such as worts in brewing. Our approach provides more useful information from Biolog data than existing, competing methods, and allows for valuable comparisons between data series and across different models. PMID:26762475

  14. A thermodynamically-based model for predicting microbial growth and community composition coupled to system geochemistry: Application to uranium bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Istok, Jonathan D.; Park, Melora M.; Michalsen, Mandy M.; Spain, A. M.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.; Roden, Eric E.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Baldwin, Brett R.

    2010-04-01

    ‘Bioimmobilization’ of redox-sensitive heavy metals and radionuclides is being investigated as a way to remediate contaminated groundwater and sediments. In one approach, growth-limiting substrates are added to the subsurface to stimulate the activity of targeted groups of indigenous microorganisms and create conditions favorable for the microbially-mediated reductive precipitation (‘bioreduction’) of targeted contaminants. We present a theoretical framework for modeling this process that modifies conventional geochemical reaction path modeling to include thermodynamic descriptions for microbial growth and may be called biogeochemical reaction path modeling. In this approach, the actual microbial community is represented by a synthetic microbial community consisting of a collection of microbial groups; each with a unique growth equation that couples a specific pair of energy yielding redox reactions. The growth equations and their computed standard-state free energy yields are appended to the thermodynamic databasse used in conventional geochemical reaction path modeling, providing a direct coupling between chemical species participating in both microbial growth and geochemical reactions. To compute the biogeochemical reaction paths, growth substrates are added incrementally to a defined geochemical environment and the coupled equations are solved simultaneously to predict microbial biomass, community composition (i.e. the fraction of total biomass in each microbial group), and the aqueous and mineral composition of the system, including aqueous speciation and oxidation state of the targeted contaminants. The approach, with growth equations derived from the literature using well known bioenergetics principles, was used to predict the results of a laboratory microcosm experiment and an in situ field experiment that investigated the bioreduction of uranium. Predicted effects of ethanol or acetate addition on uranium concentration and speciation, major ion

  15. Complex conductivity response to microbial growth and biofilm formation on phenanthrene spiked medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Simonnot, Marie-Odile; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    Several laboratory studies have recently demonstrated the utility of geophysical methods for the investigation of microbial-induced changes over contaminated sites. However, it remains difficult to distinguish the effects due to the new physical properties imparted by microbial processes, to bacterial growth, or to the development of bacterial biofilm. We chose to study the influence of biofilm formation on geophysical response using complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) in phenanthrene-contaminated media. Biotic assays were conducted with two phenanthrene (PHE) degrading bacterial strains: Burkholderia sp (NAH1), which produced biofilm and Stenophomonas maltophilia (MATE10), which did not, and an abiotic control. Results showed that bacterial densities for NAH1 and MATE10 strains continuously increased at the same rate during the experiment. However, the complex conductivity signature showed noticeable differences between the two bacteria, with a phase shift of 50 mrad at 4 Hz for NAH1, which produced biofilm. Biofilm volume was quantified by Scanning Confocal Laser Microscopy (SCLM). Significant correlations were established between phase shift decrease and biofilm volume for NAH1 assays. Results suggest that complex conductivity measurements, specifically phase shift, can be a useful indicator of biofilm formation inside the overall signal of microbial activity on contaminated sites.

  16. Activity and growth of microbial populations in pressurized deep-sea sediment and animal gut samples.

    PubMed

    Tabor, P S; Deming, J W; Ohwada, K; Colwell, R R

    1982-08-01

    Benthic animals and sediment samples were collected at deep-sea stations in the northwest (3,600-m depth) and southeast (4,300- and 5200-m depths) Atlantic Ocean. Utilization rates of [14C]glutamate (0.67 to 0.74 nmol) in sediment suspensions incubated at in situ temperatures and pressures (3 to 5 degrees C and 360, 430, or 520 atmospheres) were relatively slow, ranging from 0.09 to 0.39 nmol g-1 day-1, whereas rates for pressurized samples of gut suspensions varied widely, ranging from no detectable activity to a rapid rate of 986 nmol g-1 day-1. Gut flora from a holothurian specimen and a fish demonstrated rapid, barophilic substrate utilization, based on relative rates calculated for pressurized samples and samples held at 1 atm (101.325 kPa). Substrate utilization by microbial populations in several sediment samples was not inhibited by in situ pressure. Deep-sea pressures did not restrict growth, measured as doubling time, of culturable bacteria present in a northwest Atlantic sediment sample and in a gut suspension prepared from an abyssal scavenging amphipod. From the results of this study, it was concluded that microbial populations in benthic environments can demonstrate significant metabolic activity under deep-ocean conditions of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, rates of microbial activity in the guts of benthic macrofauna are potentially more rapid than in surrounding deep-sea sediments. PMID:6127054

  17. Marine microbial ecology in the sub-Antarctic Zone: Rates of bacterial and phytoplankton growth and grazing by heterotrophic protists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Thomson, Paul G.; Wright, Simon; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-11-01

    The sub-Antarctic zone (SAZ) of the Southern Ocean is considered one of the largest sinks for atmospheric CO 2 and as such is an important region for climate change research. To determine the importance of micro- and nano-heterotrophs in controlling microbial abundance within this region, we determined microbial standing stocks and rates of herbivory and bacterivory in relation to changes in the water masses south of Tasmania. The SAZ-Sense ('Sensitivity of the sub-Antarctic zone to environmental change') cruise traversed the SAZ during mid-late austral summer and focussed on process stations to the southeast (45°S, 153°E) and southwest (46°S, 140°E) of Tasmania and at the Polar Front (54°S, 147°E). Growth and grazing mortality of phytoplankton and bacteria were estimated by the grazing dilution technique using seawater from 10 m depth at 15 sites along the survey, along with concentrations of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), microzooplankton, bacteria, cyanobacteria and size fractionated (pico-, nano- and micro-sized) chlorophyll a (Chl a). Rates of herbivory ranged from 0.12 to 1.39 d -1 and were highest in the north-eastern SAZ (NE-SAZ) where concentrations of prey (as indicated by Chl a) and microzooplankton were also highest. Rates of herbivory were correlated with total rates of phytoplankton growth, bacterial growth and concentrations of microzooplankton. On average 82%, 67% and 42% primary production d -1 was consumed by microzooplankton and HNF at process stations in the north-western SAZ (NW-SAZ), NE-SAZ and polar frontal zone (PFZ), respectively. In the NW-SAZ, grazing pressure was highest on the pico-sized Chl a fraction, whereas in the NE-SAZ, grazing pressure was more evenly distributed across all three size fractions of Chl a. Bacterivory removed 77%, 93% and 39% of bacterial production d -1 in the NW-SAZ, NE-SAZ and PFZ, respectively, and rates of bacterivory ranged from 0.12 to 1.03 d -1. Rates of bacterivory were highest in the NE

  18. Effects of river discharge on abundance and instantaneous growth of age-0 carpsuckers in the Oconee River, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Ronald C.; Jennings, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Oconee River in middle Georgia, U.S.A., has been regulated by the Sinclair Dam since 1953. Since then, the habitat of the lower Oconee River has been altered and the river has become more incised. The altered environmental conditions of the Oconee River may limit the success of various fish populations. Some obligate riverine fishes may be good indicator species for assessing river system integrity because they are intolerant to unfavourable conditions. For example, many sucker species require clean gravel for feeding and reproduction. Further, age-0 fishes are more vulnerable than adults to flow alterations because of their limited ability to react to such conditions. In this study, we investigated the relationship between abundance and growth of age-0 carpsuckers to river discharge in the Oconee River. A beach seine was used to collect age-0 carpsuckers (Carpiodes spp.) from littoral zones of the lower Oconee River from May through July of 1995 to 2001. Regression models were used to assess whether 12 river discharge categories (e.g. peak, low, seasonal flows) influenced age-0 carpsucker abundance or instantaneous growth. Our analysis indicated that abundance of age-0 carpsuckers was significantly negatively related to number of days river discharge was >85 m3 s-1(r2=0.61, p=0.04). Estimates of instantaneous growth ranged from 0.10 to 0.90. Instantaneous growth rates were significantly positively related to summer river discharge (r2=0.95, p<0.01). These results suggest that (1) moderate flows during spawning and rearing are important for producing strong-year classes of carpsuckers, and (2) river discharge is variable among years, with suitable flows for strong year-classes of carpsuckers occurring every few years. River management should attempt to regulate river discharge to simulate historic flows typical for the region when possible. Such an approach is best achieved when regional climatic conditions are considered.

  19. Arsenic methylation in soils and its relationship with microbial arsM abundance and diversity, and as speciation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Harris, Eleanor; Yan, Jia; Ma, Jincai; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Wenju; McGrath, Steve P; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-07-01

    Methylation of arsenic in soil influences its environmental behavior and accumulation by plants, but little is known about the factors affecting As methylation. As speciation was determined in the pore waters of six soils from diverse geographical locations over 54 days of incubation under flooded conditions. The concentration of methylated As (monomethylarsonic acid, MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid, DMA) varied from 0 to 85 μg L(-1) (0 - 69% of the total As in pore water). Two Bangladeshi paddy soils contaminated by irrigation of As-laden groundwater produced large concentrations of inorganic As but relatively little methylated As. Two contaminated paddy soils from China produced a transient peak of DMA during the early phase of incubation. Methylated As represented considerable proportions of the total soluble As in the two uncontaminated soils from the UK and U.S. The copy number of the microbial arsenite methyltransferase gene (arsM) correlated positively with soil pH. However, pore-water methylated As correlated negatively with pH or arsM copy number, and positively with dissolved organic C. GeoChip assay revealed considerable arsM diversity among the six soils, with 27-35 out of 66 sequences in the microarray being detected. As speciation in rice plants grown in the soils generally mirrored that in the pore water. The results suggest that methylated As species in plants originated from the soil and As methylation in soil was influenced strongly by the soil conditions. PMID:23750559

  20. Turnover of microbial lipids in the deep biosphere and growth of benthic archaeal populations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sitan; Lipp, Julius S; Wegener, Gunter; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments host a microbial biosphere with unknown impact on global biogeochemical cycles. This study tests previous evidence based on microbial intact polar lipids (IPLs) as proxies of live biomass, suggesting that Archaea dominate the marine sedimentary biosphere. We devised a sensitive radiotracer assay to measure the decay rate of ([(14)C]glucosyl)-diphytanylglyceroldiether (GlcDGD) as an analog of archaeal IPLs in continental margin sediments. The degradation kinetics were incorporated in model simulations that constrained the fossil fraction of subseafloor IPLs and rates of archaeal turnover. Simulating the top 1 km in a generic continental margin sediment column, we estimated degradation rate constants of GlcDGD being one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of bacterial IPLs, with half-lives of GlcDGD increasing with depth to 310 ky. Given estimated microbial community turnover times of 1.6-73 ky in sediments deeper than 1 m, 50-96% of archaeal IPLs represent fossil signals. Consequently, previous lipid-based estimates of global subseafloor biomass probably are too high, and the widely observed dominance of archaeal IPLs does not rule out a deep biosphere dominated by Bacteria. Reverse modeling of existing concentration profiles suggest that archaeal IPL synthesis rates decline from around 1,000 pg⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1) at the surface to 0.2 pg⋅mL(-1)⋅y(-1) at 1 km depth, equivalent to production of 7 × 10(5) to 140 archaeal cells⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1), respectively. These constraints on microbial growth are an important step toward understanding the relationship between the deep biosphere and the carbon cycle.

  1. Carbon stabilization and microbial growth in acidic mine soils after addition of different amendments for soil reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, Jose; Ángeles Muñoz, María; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Faz, Ángel; Bååth, Erland

    2016-04-01

    The extreme soil conditions in metalliferous mine soils have a negative influence on soil biological activity and therefore on soil carbon estabilization. Therefore, amendments are used to increase organic carbon content and activate microbial communities. In order to elucidate some of the factors controlling soil organic carbon stabilization in reclaimed acidic mine soils and its interrelationship with microbial growth and community structure, we performed an incubation experiment with four amendments: pig slurry (PS), pig manure (PM) and biochar (BC), applied with and without marble waste (MW; CaCO3). Results showed that PM and BC (alone or together with MW) contributed to an important increment in recalcitrant organic C, C/N ratio and aggregate stability. Bacterial and fungal growths were highly dependent on pH and labile organic C. PS supported the highest microbial growth; applied alone it stimulated fungal growth, and applied with MW it stimulated bacterial growth. BC promoted the lowest microbial growth, especially for fungi, with no significant increase in fungal biomass. MW+BC increased bacterial growth up to values similar to PM and MW+PM, suggesting that part of the biochar was degraded, at least in short-term mainly by bacteria rather than fungi. PM, MW+PS and MW+PM supported the highest microbial biomass and a similar community structure, related with the presence of high organic C and high pH, with immobilization of metals and increased soil quality. BC contributed to improved soil structure, increased recalcitrant organic C, and decreased metal mobility, with low stimulation of microbial growth.

  2. Spatio-temporal distribution of organic and inorganic pollutants from Lake Geneva (Switzerland) reveals strong interacting effects of sewage treatment plant and eutrophication on microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Herbez, Aline; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-07-01

    Variation with depth and time of organic matter (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus), inorganic pollutant (mercury), as well as bacterial abundance and activity, were investigated for the first time in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) over the last decades. The highest organic contents (about 32%), mercury concentration (27 mg kg(-1)), bacterial abundance (in order of 9×10(9) cell g(-1) dry sediment), and bacterial activity (1299 Relative Light Units (RLU)) were found in the highly polluted sediments contaminated by the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) discharge, which deposited during the period of cultural eutrophication. Such data, which contrast with the other sampled sites from deeper and more remote parts of the lake, prove that the organic matter and nutrients released from the municipal WWTP have considerable effects on bacterial abundance and activities in freshwater sediments. In fact, the relatively unpolluted deepwater sites and the coastal polluted site show large synchronous increases in bacterial densities linked to the anoxic conditions in the 1970s (lake eutrophication caused by external nutrient input) that subsequently increased the nutrient loading fluxes. These results show that the microbial activities response to natural or human-induced changing limnological conditions (e.g., nutrient supply, oxygen availability, redox conditions) constitutes a threat to the security of water resources, which in turn poses concerns for the world's freshwater resources in the context of global warming and the degradation of water quality (oxygen depletion in the bottom water due to reduced deep waters mixing). Moreover, the accumulation of inorganic pollutants such as high mercury (methyl-mercury) concentration may represent a significant source of toxicity for sediment dwelling organisms.

  3. Effect of temperature on microbial growth rate-mathematical analysis: the Arrhenius and Eyring-Polanyi connections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan; Hwang, Andy; Phillips, John

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a mathematical model for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of microbial growth. The new mathematical model is derived by combination and modification of the Arrhenius equation and the Eyring-Polanyi transition theory. The new model, suitable for both suboptimal and the entire growth temperature ranges, was validated using a collection of 23 selected temperature-growth rate curves belonging to 5 groups of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Clostridium perfringens, and Escherichia coli, from the published literature. The curve fitting is accomplished by nonlinear regression using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The resulting estimated growth rate (μ) values are highly correlated to the data collected from the literature (R(2) = 0.985, slope = 1.0, intercept = 0.0). The bias factor (B(f) ) of the new model is very close to 1.0, while the accuracy factor (A(f) ) ranges from 1.0 to 1.22 for most data sets. The new model is compared favorably with the Ratkowsky square root model and the Eyring equation. Even with more parameters, the Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and mean square errors of the new model are not statistically different from the square root model and the Eyring equation, suggesting that the model can be used to describe the inherent relationship between temperature and microbial growth rates. The results of this work show that the new growth rate model is suitable for describing the effect of temperature on microbial growth rate. Practical Application:  Temperature is one of the most significant factors affecting the growth of microorganisms in foods. This study attempts to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe the temperature dependence of microbial growth rate. The findings show that the new model is accurate and can be used to describe the effect of temperature on microbial growth rate in foods.

  4. Microbial changes and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during chilled storage of brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis).

    PubMed

    Mejlholm, Ole; Kjeldgaard, Jette; Modberg, Anne; Vest, Mette Bohn; Bøknaes, Niels; Koort, Joanna; Björkroth, Johanna; Dalgaard, Paw

    2008-06-10

    Thirteen storage trials and ten challenge tests were carried out to examine microbial changes, spoilage and the potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis). Shrimp in brine as well as brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were produced and studied. Different recipes were used to study the effect of preserving parameters (organic acids, pH and NaCl) on growth of microorganisms and shelf life at 7-8 degrees C or 12 degrees C. Particularly, brines with different concentrations of (i) benzoic, citric and sorbic acids or (ii) acetic, citric and lactic acids were studied. Furthermore, the effect of adding diacetate to brined shrimp was evaluated. A single batch of cooked and peeled shrimp was used to study both industrially and manually processed brined shrimp with respect to the effect of process hygiene on microbial changes and the shelf life of products. Concentrations of microorganisms on newly produced brined shrimp from an industrial scale processing line were 1.0-2.3 log (CFU g(-1)) higher than comparable concentrations in manually processed samples. This resulted in a substantially shorter shelf life and a more diverse spoilage microflora of the industrially processed brined shrimp. In addition, shelf life of brined shrimp was affected by the types and concentrations of organic acids and by the storage temperature as expected. The effect of MAP was less pronounced. Eighty-two isolates from the spoilage microflora of brined shrimp were identified and they included 53 lactic acid bacteria, 6 coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp., 18 Pseudomonas fluorescens and 5 yeast isolates. After storage at 7 degrees C, P. fluorescens, Enterococcus-like isolates, E. malodoratus, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. and Lactobacillus sakei constituted the dominating microflora of shrimp in brines that contained benzoic, citric and sorbic acids as preservatives. L. sakei dominated the

  5. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-09

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­-type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  6. MediaDB: a database of microbial growth conditions in defined media.

    PubMed

    Richards, Matthew A; Cassen, Victor; Heavner, Benjamin D; Ajami, Nassim E; Herrmann, Andrea; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2014-01-01

    Isolating pure microbial cultures and cultivating them in the laboratory on defined media is used to more fully characterize the metabolism and physiology of organisms. However, identifying an appropriate growth medium for a novel isolate remains a challenging task. Even organisms with sequenced and annotated genomes can be difficult to grow, despite our ability to build genome-scale metabolic networks that connect genomic data with metabolic function. The scientific literature is scattered with information about defined growth media used successfully for cultivating a wide variety of organisms, but to date there exists no centralized repository to inform efforts to cultivate less characterized organisms by bridging the gap between genomic data and compound composition for growth media. Here we present MediaDB, a manually curated database of defined media that have been used for cultivating organisms with sequenced genomes, with an emphasis on organisms with metabolic network models. The database is accessible online, can be queried by keyword searches or downloaded in its entirety, and can generate exportable individual media formulation files. The data assembled in MediaDB facilitate comparative studies of organism growth media, serve as a starting point for formulating novel growth media, and contribute to formulating media for in silico investigation of metabolic networks. MediaDB is freely available for public use at https://mediadb.systemsbiology.net. PMID:25098325

  7. The inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles, silver ions, and silver chloride colloids on microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyoung; Deng, Kathy Kanjun; Kim, Nam-Jung; Ross, Louis; Surampalli, Rao Y; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2008-06-01

    Emerging nanomaterials are of great concern to wastewater treatment utilities and the environment. The inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and other important Ag species on microbial growth were evaluated using extant respirometry and an automatic microtiter fluorescence assay. Using autotrophic nitrifying organisms from a well-controlled continuously operated bioreactor, Ag NPs (average size=14+/-6 nm), Ag(+) ions (AgNO(3)), and AgCl colloids (average size=0.25 microm), all at 1mg/L Ag, inhibited respiration by 86+/-3%, 42+/-7%, and 46+/-4%, respectively. Based on a prolonged microtiter assay, at about 0.5mg/L Ag, the inhibitions on the growth of Escherichia coli PHL628-gfp by Ag NPs, Ag(+) ions, and AgCl colloids were 55+/-8%, 100%, and 66+/-6%, respectively. Cell membrane integrity was not compromised under the treatment of test Ag species by using a LIVE/DEAD Baclight bacterial viability assay. However, electron micrographs demonstrated that Ag NPs attached to the microbial cells, probably causing cell wall pitting. The results suggest that nitrifying bacteria are especially susceptible to inhibition by Ag NPs, and the accumulation of Ag NPs could have detrimental effects on the microorganisms in wastewater treatment.

  8. Impact of mycorrhization on the abundance, growth and leaf nutrient status of ferns along a tropical elevational gradient.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Michael; Güdel, Ramona; Salazar, Laura; Homeier, Jürgen; Kluge, Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are crucial for the ecological success of land plants, providing their hosts with nutrients in exchange for organic C. However, not all plants are mycorrhizal, especially ferns, of which about one-third of the species lack this symbiosis. Because the mycorrhizal status is evolutionarily ancestral, this lack of mycorrhizae must have ecological advantages, but what these advantages are and how they affect the competitive ability of non-mycorrhizal plants under natural conditions is currently unknown. To address this uncertainty, we studied terrestrial fern assemblages and species abundances as well as their mycorrhization status, leaf nutrient concentration and relative annual growth along an elevational gradient in the Ecuadorian Andes (500-4,000 m). We surveyed the mycorrhizal status of 375 root samples belonging to 85 species, and found mycorrhizae in 89% of the samples. The degree of mycorrhization decreased with elevation but was unrelated to soil nutrients. Species with mycorrhizae were significantly more abundant than non-mycorrhizal species, but non-mycorrhizal species had significantly higher relative growth and concentrations of leaf N, P, Mg, and Ca. Our study thus shows that despite lower abundances, non-mycorrhizal fern species did not appear to be limited in their growth or nutrient supply relative to mycorrhizal ones. As a basis for future studies, we hypothesize that non-mycorrhizal fern species may be favoured in special microhabitats of the forest understory with high soil nutrient or water availability, or that the ecological benefit of mycorrhizae is not related to nutrient uptake but rather to, for example, pathogen resistance.

  9. Inhibition of microbial growth, study of solution stability, growth and characterization of potassium fluoride mixed ?-arginine phosphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Ravi, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2001-07-01

    In order to alleviate the major problem of microbial growth and colouration in L-arginine phosphate (LAP), the use of potassium fluoride (KF), a new additive having higher dipole moment, has been proposed. The stabilities of the pure and KF mixed LAP solution at different temperatures have been determined. Pure and KF mixed LAP crystals were grown by the temperature lowering technique. The presence of potassium in the crystal was identified by inductively coupled plasma analysis (ICP). The lattice parameters for the grown crystals were determined from X-ray powder diffraction. The molecular vibration and thermal behaviour of KF mixed LAP were found from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermal analysis (DTA &TGA) respectively.

  10. Microbial growth on pall rings: a problem when upgrading biogas with the water-wash absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tynell, Asa; Börjesson, Gunnar; Persson, Margareta

    2007-01-01

    Biogas is upgraded using an absorption with water-wash technique by 11 of a total of 14 upgrading plants in Sweden. However, problems with microbial growth on the pall rings in the absorption column, and in one case in the desorption column, have a negative impact on the upgrading of raw gas to vehicle gas. Five of the nine biogas plants studied here have experienced problems with microbial growth. The objectives of this study were to identify such microbial growth and to determine possible factors for its control, in order to provide recommendations for process management. A questionnaire was sent out and visits were made to the upgrading plants to collect information about the upgrading process. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was performed to determine microbial biomass and community structure in samples from four upgrading plants. In samples from two of the plants, methane-oxidizing bacteria (type I methanotrophs) were indicated, while samples from one of the other plants showed biomarkers indicating actinomycetes. Factors affecting development of microbial growth were found to be water quality and the pH and temperature of the process water. Plants that used wastewater in the upgrading process experienced far more problems than those using clean water of drinking quality.

  11. The influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and growth of seedlings under impact of zinc salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, L. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The life support systems (LSS) for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including biological recycling. Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food. They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS. Studies of influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on growth of seedlings under impact of heavy metals are necessary because of migration of heavy metals in LSS. Microbial associations are able to stimulate growth of plants, to protect them from pathogenic organisms and from toxicity of heavy metal salts. The goal of this work was to investigate effect of microbial associations on the germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of different concentrations of ZnSO4. The results of investigations showed that:Zinc salt had an adverse effect on germination of wheat seeds, beginning with concentrations of 8 MPC (Maximum Permissible Concentration) and higher.Microbial associations (concentrations -104 to 107 cells/ml) were able to decrease (partly or completely) the adverse effect of ZnSO4 on germination of wheat seeds.Concentrations (104-107 cells/ml) of microbial associations were able to decrease partly the adverse effect of zinc salts (intervals: from 1 to 32 MP?) on the growth and development of wheat plantlets during heterotrophic phase.The root system of plants was more sensitive to the adverse effect of ZnSO4 than shoots of plants.

  12. Abundance, breeding and growth of the ocypodid crab Dotilla myctiroides (Milne-Edwards) on a West Malaysian beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hails, A. J.; Yaziz, S.

    1982-08-01

    The ocypodid crab, Dotilla myctiroides, was studied on the south-west coast of peninsular Malaysia. The mean numbers and biomass over a year along a transect from high to low water ranged from 37·5 to 579 crabs m -2 and from 2·22 to 50·79 g m -2 (wet weight) respectively. Berried females were found in all months of the year but two peaks of activity were apparent, from November to February and May to July. It is suggested that this may be related to changes in food abundance associated with the effects of monsoon winds on sea currents. Laboratory growth studies indicated that maximum life span was approximately 13 months (from first crab stage) for males and 10 months for females. Growth rate decreased with increasing size of crab. Egg number increased with size of female.

  13. Long-term effect of municipal solid waste amendment on microbial abundance and humus-associated enzyme activities under semiarid conditions.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Felipe; Kandeler, Ellen; Hernández, Teresa; García, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    Microbial ecology is the key to understanding the function of soil biota for organic matter cycling after a single amendment of organic waste in semiarid soils. Therefore, in this paper, the long-term effect (17 years) of adding different doses of a solid municipal waste to an arid soil on humus-enzyme complexes, a very stable and long-lasting fraction of soil enzymes, as well as on microbial and plant abundance, was studied. Humic substances were extracted by 0.1 M pH 7 sodium pyrophosphate from soil samples collected in experimental plots amended with different doses of a solid municipal waste (0, 65, 130, 195, and 260 t/ha) 17 years before. The activity of different hydrolases related with the C (beta-glucosidase), N (urease), and P (alkaline phosphatase) cycles and with the formation of humic substances (o-diphenol oxidase) were determined in this extract. The density and diversity of plant cover in the plots, as well as the fungal and bacterial biomass (by analyzing phopholipid fatty acids) were also determined. In general, the amended plots showed greater humic substance-related enzymatic activity than the unamended plots. This activity increased with the dose but only up to a certain level, above which it leveled off or even diminished. Plant diversity and cover density followed the same trend. Fungal and bacterial biomass also benefited in a dose-dependent manner. Different signature molecules representing gram+ and gram- bacteria, and those corresponding to monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids showed a similar behavior. The results demonstrate that organic amendment had a noticeable long-term effect on the vegetal development, humic substances-related enzyme activity and on the development of bacteria and fungi in semiarid conditions.

  14. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −149 and −264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −217 and −275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  15. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between -149 and -264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between -217 and -275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  16. Maximising electricity production by controlling the biofilm specific growth rate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Pablo; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the relationship between growth rate and electricity production in perfusion-electrode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), across a wide range of flow rates by co-measurement of electrical output and changes in population numbers by viable counts and optical density. The experiments hereby presented demonstrate, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, that the anodic biofilm specific growth rate can be determined and controlled in common with other loose matrix perfusion systems. Feeding with nutrient-limiting conditions at a critical flow rate (50.8 mL h(-1)) resulted in the first experimental determination of maximum specific growth rate μ(max) (19.8 day(-1)) for Shewanella spp. MFC biofilms, which is considerably higher than those predicted or assumed via mathematical modelling. It is also shown that, under carbon-energy limiting conditions there is a strong direct relationship between growth rate and electrical power output, with μ(max) coinciding with maximum electrical power production.

  17. Invading rainbow trout usurp a terrestrial prey subsidy from native charr and reduce their growth and abundance.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Colden V; Fausch, Kurt D; Murakami, Masashi; Chapman, Phillip L

    2007-08-01

    Movements of prey organisms across ecosystem boundaries often subsidize consumer populations in adjacent habitats. Human disturbances such as habitat degradation or non-native species invasions may alter the characteristics or fate of these prey subsidies, but few studies have measured the direct effects of this disruption on the growth and local abundance of predators in recipient habitats. Here we present evidence, obtained from a combined experimental and comparative study in northern Japan, that an invading stream fish usurped the flux of allochthonous prey to a native fish, consequently altering the diet and reducing the growth and abundance of the native species. A large-scale field experiment showed that excluding terrestrial invertebrates that fell into the stream with a mesh greenhouse reduced terrestrial prey in diets of native Dolly Varden charr (Salvelinus malma) by 46-70%, and reduced their growth by 25% over six weeks. However, when nonnative rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were introduced, they monopolized these prey and caused an even greater reduction of terrestrial prey in charr diets of 82-93%, and reduced charr growth by 31% over the same period. Adding both greenhouse and rainbow trout treatments together produced similar results to adding either alone. Results from a comparative field study of six other stream sites in the region corroborated the experimental findings, showing that at invaded sites rainbow trout usurped the terrestrial prey subsidy, causing a more than 75% decrease in the biomass of terrestrial invertebrates in Dolly Varden diets and forcing them to shift their foraging to insects on the stream bottom. Moreover, at sites with even low densities of rainbow trout, biomass of Dolly Varden was more than 75% lower than at sites without rainbow trout. Disruption of resource fluxes between habitats may be a common, but unidentified, consequence of invasions, and an additional mechanism contributing to the loss of native species

  18. Goldeye, Hiodon alosoides, in Lake Oahe: abundance, age, growth, maturity, food, and the fishery, 1963-69

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Grant L.; Nelson, William R.

    1974-01-01

    Reproductive success was relatively consistent, and adequate to maintain species abundance at a nearly constant level, during 1963-69. Both abundance and growth in length increased from the lower to the upper portion of the reservoir. In most characteristics -- growth in length, length-weight relation, age at maturity, and food -- goldeye in Lake Oahe were similar to those from other Missouri River impoundments. Experimental gill nets samples all lengths (range 80-460 mm; median, 320 mm) of goldeye, bottom trawls sampled mostly small fish, (median, 215 mm) and trap nets large ones (median, 345 mm). Commercial gill nets were highly size selective (median, 375 mm); fish of ages IV-VII made up 90% of the catch. Survival rates were 57 to 52% for ages II-X. Estimated survival rates for ages V-IX declined from 44 to 35% after the inception of the commercial fishery in 1966. The peak commercial catch was 151,432 kg (1.2 kg/hectare) in 1969. Unless recruitment declines, the population can support a fishery of that magnitude.

  19. Understanding the performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based packed bed reactor by growth kinetics study and microbial profiling.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2016-07-15

    A novel marine waste extract (MWE) as alternative nitrogen source was explored for the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Variation of sulfate and nitrogen (MWE) showed that SRB growth follows an uncompetitive inhibition model. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of 0.085 and 0.124 h(-1) and inhibition constants (Ki) of 56 and 4.6 g/L were observed under optimized sulfate and MWE concentrations, respectively. The kinetic data shows that MWE improves the microbial growth by 27%. The packed bed bioreactor (PBR) under optimized sulfate and MWE regime showed sulfate removal efficiency of 62-66% and metals removal efficiency of 66-75% on using mine wastewater. The microbial community analysis using DGGE showed dominance of SRB (87-89%). The study indicated the optimum dosing of sulfate and cheap organic nitrogen to promote the growth of SRB over other bacteria.

  20. Understanding the performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based packed bed reactor by growth kinetics study and microbial profiling.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2016-07-15

    A novel marine waste extract (MWE) as alternative nitrogen source was explored for the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Variation of sulfate and nitrogen (MWE) showed that SRB growth follows an uncompetitive inhibition model. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of 0.085 and 0.124 h(-1) and inhibition constants (Ki) of 56 and 4.6 g/L were observed under optimized sulfate and MWE concentrations, respectively. The kinetic data shows that MWE improves the microbial growth by 27%. The packed bed bioreactor (PBR) under optimized sulfate and MWE regime showed sulfate removal efficiency of 62-66% and metals removal efficiency of 66-75% on using mine wastewater. The microbial community analysis using DGGE showed dominance of SRB (87-89%). The study indicated the optimum dosing of sulfate and cheap organic nitrogen to promote the growth of SRB over other bacteria. PMID:27085153

  1. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management. PMID:25784647

  2. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-03-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management.

  3. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO₂.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Pendall, Elise

    2015-03-18

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO₂, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO₂ (eCO₂) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with (13)C and (15)N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO₂. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO₂ effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO₂. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management.

  4. Elemental Economy: microbial strategies for optimizing growth in the face of nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Helmann, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms play a dominant role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. They are rightly praised for their facility at fixing both carbon and nitrogen into organic matter, and microbial driven processes have tangibly altered the chemical composition of the biosphere and its surrounding atmosphere. Despite their prodigious capacity for molecular transformations, microorganisms are powerless in the face of the immutability of the elements. Limitations for specific elements, either fleeting or persisting over eons, have left an indelible trace on microbial genomes, physiology, and their very atomic composition. We here review the impact of elemental limitation on microbes, with a focus on selected genetic model systems and representative microbes from the ocean ecosystem. Evolutionary adaptations that enhance growth in the face of persistent or recurrent elemental limitations are evident from genome and proteome analyses. These range from the extreme (such as dispensing with a requirement for a hard to obtain element) to the extremely subtle (changes in protein amino acid sequences that slightly, but significantly, reduce cellular carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur demand). One near universal adaptation is the development of sophisticated acclimation programs by which cells adjust their chemical composition in response to a changing environment. When specific elements become limiting, acclimation typically begins with an increased commitment to acquisition and a concomitant mobilization of stored resources. If elemental limitation persists, the cell implements austerity measures including elemental-sparing and elemental-recycling. Insights into these fundamental cellular properties have emerged from studies at many different levels; including ecology, biological oceanography, biogeochemistry, molecular genetics, genomics, and microbial physiology. Here, we present a synthesis of these diverse studies and attempt to discern some overarching themes. PMID:22633059

  5. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Tisza A. S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an

  6. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tisza A S; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D; Fields, Matthew W; Peyton, Brent M

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal "crop." In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an open

  7. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgarismore » and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass

  8. Changing patterns of soiling and microbial growth on building stone in Oxford, England after implementation of a major traffic scheme.

    PubMed

    Thornbush, M; Viles, H

    2006-08-15

    Surfaces of freshly cut Bath limestone exposed along various roadsides before and after the reduction of traffic in the historical city centre of Oxford, England (following the Oxford Transport Strategy or OTS), presented an opportunity to investigate changes in soiling and fungal growth in relation to changing traffic pollution. Spectrophotometric data using an X-Rite SP68 sphere spectrophotometer provided quantitative information on soiling before and after the OTS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided a means to view and quantify the microbial inhabitants in detail, using a technique which registered and counted branching beaded structures. Results indicated that at Longwall Street soiling became more pronounced and microbial cover lower, with the reverse occurring at High Street where the greatest improvements in surface lightness were found. Other sites showed less clearcut responses in soiling and microbial growth. Overall, microbial growth was pronounced within hollows on stone surfaces before the OTS, with some signs of spreading of growths away from hollows after the OTS. A complex relationship between air pollution, soiling, and microfloral growths is revealed by the study which needs to be taken into account in soiling management strategies.

  9. Growth performance and intestinal microbial populations of growing pigs fed diets containing sucrose thermal oligosaccharide caramel.

    PubMed

    Orban, J I; Patterson, J A; Adeola, O; Sutton, A L; Richards, G N

    1997-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine growth performance and changes in intestinal microbial populations of growing pigs fed diets containing sucrose thermal oligosaccharide caramel (STOC). Ninety-six barrows and 96 gilts were group-fed experimental nursery diets for 32 d after weaning in both Exp. 1 and 2. For each experiment, pigs were divided into four groups of 48 pigs and were fed either control, antibiotic (Apramycin sulfate, 34 mg/kg), 1% STOC, or 2% STOC diets for 32 d after weaning. Each diet was replicated six times with eight pigs per replication. Pigs were either orally gavaged (Exp 1) with water of STOC (2 g per pig) or pigs were creep-fed (Exp 2) either a control diet or a 2% STOC diet for 5 d before weaning (33 d). At the end of Exp 1 and 2, cecal material was collected for enumeration of total aerobes, total anaerobes, coliforms, lactobacilli, and bifidobacteria. Gilts (96 per experiment) used in Exp. 3 and 4 were weaned at 26 d and fed experimental nursery diets for 32 d. They were fed either a control or 1% STOC diet and were otherwise treated as previously described. There were no significant effects of STOC or antibiotic on ADG, ADFI, feed efficiency, or cecal microbial populations in pigs in this study. Feeding diets containing either antibiotic of STOC did not improve animal performance or change intestinal bacterial populations in the present study. PMID:9027562

  10. Well constructions with inhibited microbial growth and methods of antimicrobial treatment in wells

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2004-11-02

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  11. Coupling Microbial Growth with Nanoparticles: A Universal Strategy To Produce Functional Fungal Hyphae Macrospheres.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Kun; Cong, Huai-Ping; Guan, Qing-Fang; Yao, Wei-Tang; Liang, Hai-Wei; Wang, Wei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-25

    Macroscale assembly of nanoscale building blocks is an intriguing way to translate the unique characteristics of individual nanoparticles into macroscopic materials. However, the lack of the efficient universal assembly strategy seriously hinders the possibility of macroscale architectures in practical applications. Herein, we develop a general, environment-friendly, and scalable microbial growth method for the construction of macroscopic composite assemblies with excellent mechanical strength by in situ integrating various types of nanoparticles into fungal hyphae (FH) macrospheres. Notably, the size of the FH-based composite spheres and the loading amount of the nanoparticles with different dimensions can be well tuned by controlling the cultivation time and the dosage of nanoparticles, respectively. Interestingly, bifunctional FH-based core-shell macrospheres can also be achieved by programmed assembling two different kinds of nanoparticles in the cultivation process. The produced multifunctional FH-based composite spheres exhibit wide potential applications in magnetic actuation, photothermal therapy, and contaminant adsorption, etc.

  12. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Price, P. Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, μg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, μm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, μs(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of ≈110 kJ and that scale as μg(T):μm(T):μs(T) ≈ 106:103:1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40°C in ice corresponds to ≈10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate μs(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage. PMID:15070769

  13. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival.

    PubMed

    Price, P Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-03-30

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, microg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, microm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, micros(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of approximately 110 kJ and that scale as microg(T):microm(T):micros(T) approximately 10(6):10(3):1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40 degrees C in ice corresponds to approximately 10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate micros(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage.

  14. Adenoma-linked barrier defects and microbial products drive IL-23/IL-17-mediated tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Wang, Kepeng; Mucida, Daniel; Stewart, C. Andrew; Schnabl, Bernd; Jauch, Dominik; Taniguchi, Koji; Yu, Guann-Yi; Osterreicher, Christoph H.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Datz, Christian; Feng, Ying; Fearon, Eric R.; Oukka, Mohamed; Tessarollo, Lino; Coppola, Vincenzo; Yarovinsky, Felix; Cheroutre, Hilde; Eckmann, Lars; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 2% of colorectal cancer is linked to pre-existing inflammation known as colitis-associated cancer, but most develops in patients without underlying inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal cancer often follows a genetic pathway whereby loss of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor and activation of β-catenin are followed by mutations in K-Ras, PIK3CA and TP53, as the tumour emerges and progresses1,2. Curiously, however, ‘inflammatory signature’ genes characteristic of colitis-associated cancer are also upregulated in colorectal cancer3,4. Further, like most solid tumours, colorectal cancer exhibits immune/inflammatory infiltrates5, referred to as ‘tumour elicited inflammation’6. Although infiltrating CD4+ TH1 cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells constitute a positive prognostic sign in colorectal cancer7,8, myeloid cells and T-helper interleukin (IL)-17-producing (TH17) cells promote tumorigenesis5,6, and a ‘TH17 expression signature’ in stage I/II colorectal cancer is associated with a drastic decrease in disease-free survival9. Despite its pathogenic importance, the mechanisms responsible for the appearance of tumour-elicited inflammation are poorly understood. Many epithelial cancers develop proximally to microbial communities, which are physically separated from immune cells by an epithelial barrier10. We investigated mechanisms responsible for tumour-elicited inflammation in a mouse model of colorectal tumorigenesis, which, like human colorectal cancer, exhibits upregulation of IL-23 and IL-17. Here we show that IL-23 signalling promotes tumour growth and progression, and development of a tumoural IL-17 response. IL-23 is mainly produced by tumour-associated myeloid cells that are likely to be activated by microbial products, which penetrate the tumours but not adjacent tissue. Both early and late colorectal neoplasms exhibit defective expression of several barrier proteins. We propose that barrier deterioration induced by

  15. BIODEGRADATION DURING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA. 4. IMPACT OF MICROBIAL LAG AND BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH. (R825415)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to examine the impact of microbial lag and bacterial cell growth on the transport of salicylate, a model hydrocarbon compound. The impacts of these processes were examined separately, as well as jointly, to dete...

  16. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC. PMID:27572833

  17. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-25

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC.

  18. Feedbacks between flow, sediment motion and microbial growth on sand bars initiate and shape elongated stromatolite mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Perron, J. T.; Bosak, T.

    2014-07-01

    Elongated stromatolites are often used as indicators of current direction and shoreline orientation, especially in paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, mechanisms that create shore-parallel, m-scale elongated stromatolite mounds in carbonate sand are not well understood. We propose that this geometry is initiated by microbial growth on the parts of sand bars that experience low wave-induced bed shear stresses. We test this idea by growing microbial mats on carbonate sand bars in a laboratory wave tank. Cyanobacterial mats grow on the bar runnels, where sediment motion is negligible, but are absent from the bar ridges, where the waves generate migrating ripples. When microbially-promoted lithification reinforces and preserves this initial pattern, elongated stromatolites should initiate in the runnels of sand bars, with long wavelengths (5-100 m) and small width-to-wavelength ratios (∼0.3). These dimensions are consistent with modern shore-parallel stromatolites in Hamelin Pool, Western Australia, and with patterns of microbial colonization in other sandy sediments. This model of elongated stromatolite mounds can inform paleoenvironmental reconstructions by clarifying and quantifying feedbacks among waves, sediment transport and microbial growth.

  19. Real-time optical monitoring of microbial growth using optimal combination of light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Takeshi; Hiraishi, Akira; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    We developed a real-time optical monitoring system consisting of a monochrome complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) camera and two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a constant temperature incubator for the rapid detection of microbial growth on solid media. As a target organism, we used Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, which is an acidophilic thermophilic endospore-forming bacterium able to survive in pasteurization processes and grow in acidic drink products such as apple juice. This bacterium was cultured on agar medium with a redox dye applied to improve detection sensitivity. On the basis of spectroscopic properties of the colony, medium, and LEDs, an optimal combination of two LED illuminations was selected to maximize the contrast between the colony and medium areas. We measured A. acidocaldarius and Escherichia coli at two different dilution levels using these two LEDs. From the results of time-course changes in the number of detected pixels in the detection images, a similar growth rate was estimated amongst the same species of microbes, regardless of the dilution level. This system has the ability to detect a colony of approximately 26 μm in diameter in a detection image, and it can be interpreted that the size corresponds to less than 20 μm diameter in visual inspection.

  20. Dietary Nisin Modulates the Gastrointestinal Microbial Ecology and Enhances Growth Performance of the Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Józefiak, Damian; Kierończyk, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Rawski, Mateusz; Długosz, Jakub; Sip, Anna; Højberg, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Due to antimicrobial properties, nisin is one of the most commonly used and investigated bacteriocins for food preservation. Surprisingly, nisin has had limited use in animal feed as well as there are only few reports on its influence on microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The present study therefore aimed at investigating effects of dietary nisin on broiler chicken GIT microbial ecology and performance in comparison to salinomycin, the widely used ionophore coccidiostat. In total, 720 one-day-old male Ross 308 chicks were randomly distributed to six experimental groups. The positive control (PC) diet was supplemented with salinomycin (60 mg/kg). The nisin (NI) diets were supplemented with increasing levels (100, 300, 900 and 2700 IU nisin/g, respectively) of the bacteriocin. The negative control (NC) diet contained no additives. At slaughter (35 days of age), activity of specific bacterial enzymes (α- and β-glucosidases, α-galactosidases and β-glucuronidase) in crop, ileum and caeca were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the NC group, and nisin supplementation decreased the enzyme activities to levels observed for the PC group. A similar inhibitory influence on bacterial activity was reflected in the levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and putrefactive SCFA (PSCFA) in digesta from crop and ileum; no effect was observed in caeca. Counts of Bacteroides and Enterobacteriacae in ileum digesta were significantly (P<0.001) decreased by nisin and salinomycin, but no effects were observed on the counts of Clostridium perfringens, Lactobacillus/Enterococcus and total bacteria. Like salinomycin, nisin supplementation improved broiler growth performance in a dose-dependent manner; compared to the NC group, the body weight gain of the NI900 and NI2700 groups was improved by 4.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Our findings suggest that dietary nisin exerts a mode of action similar to salinomycin and could be considered as a dietary supplement for broiler

  1. Dietary nisin modulates the gastrointestinal microbial ecology and enhances growth performance of the broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Józefiak, Damian; Kierończyk, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Rawski, Mateusz; Długosz, Jakub; Sip, Anna; Højberg, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Due to antimicrobial properties, nisin is one of the most commonly used and investigated bacteriocins for food preservation. Surprisingly, nisin has had limited use in animal feed as well as there are only few reports on its influence on microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The present study therefore aimed at investigating effects of dietary nisin on broiler chicken GIT microbial ecology and performance in comparison to salinomycin, the widely used ionophore coccidiostat. In total, 720 one-day-old male Ross 308 chicks were randomly distributed to six experimental groups. The positive control (PC) diet was supplemented with salinomycin (60 mg/kg). The nisin (NI) diets were supplemented with increasing levels (100, 300, 900 and 2700 IU nisin/g, respectively) of the bacteriocin. The negative control (NC) diet contained no additives. At slaughter (35 days of age), activity of specific bacterial enzymes (α- and β-glucosidases, α-galactosidases and β-glucuronidase) in crop, ileum and caeca were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the NC group, and nisin supplementation decreased the enzyme activities to levels observed for the PC group. A similar inhibitory influence on bacterial activity was reflected in the levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and putrefactive SCFA (PSCFA) in digesta from crop and ileum; no effect was observed in caeca. Counts of Bacteroides and Enterobacteriacae in ileum digesta were significantly (P<0.001) decreased by nisin and salinomycin, but no effects were observed on the counts of Clostridium perfringens, Lactobacillus/Enterococcus and total bacteria. Like salinomycin, nisin supplementation improved broiler growth performance in a dose-dependent manner; compared to the NC group, the body weight gain of the NI₉₀₀ and NI₂₇₀₀ groups was improved by 4.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Our findings suggest that dietary nisin exerts a mode of action similar to salinomycin and could be considered as a dietary supplement

  2. Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR as a Tool for Exploring Calcium Biomineralization: Renal Stone Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2011-12-07

    Renal stone diseases are a global health issue with little effective therapeutic recourse aside from surgery and shock-wave lithotripsy, primarily because the fundamental chemical mechanisms behind calcium biomineralization are poorly understood. In this work, we show that natural abundance 43Ca NMR at 21.1 T is an effective means to probe the molecular-level Ca2+ structure in oxalate-based kidney stones. We find that the 43Ca NMR resonance of an authentic oxalate-based kidney stone cannot be explained by a single pure phase of any common Ca2+-bearing stone mineral. Combined with XRD results, our findings suggest an altered calcium oxalate monohydrate-like Ca2+ coordination environment for some fraction of Ca2+ in our sample. The evidence is consistent with existing literature hypothesizing that nonoxalate organic material interacts directly with Ca2+ at stone surfaces and is the primary driver of renal stone aggregation and growth. Our findings show that 43Ca NMR spectroscopy may provide unique and crucial insight into the fundamental chemistry of kidney stone formation, growth, and the role organic molecules play in these processes.

  3. Main factors controlling microbial community structure, growth and activity after reclamation of a tailing pond with aided phytostabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Faz, Ángel; Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Reclamation on bare tailing ponds has the potential to represent soil genesis in Technosols favoring the understanding of the changes of microbial communities and function. In this study we used phytostabilization aided with calcium carbonate and pig slurry/manure to reclaim an acidic bare tailing pond with the aim of investigating the effect of amending and different species on microbial community structure and function. We sampled after two years of amending and planting: unamended tailing soil (UTS), non-rhizospheric amended tailing soil (ATS), rhizospheric soil from four species, and non-rhizospheric native forest soil (NS), which acted as reference. The application of amendments increased pH up to neutrality, organic carbon (Corg), C/N and aggregate stability, while decreased salinity and heavy metals availability. No effect of rhizosphere was observed on physicochemical properties, metals immobilization and microbial community structure and function. To account for confounding effects due to soil organic matter, microbial properties were expressed per Corg. The high increments in pH and Corg have been the main factors driving changes in microbial community structure and function. Bacterial biomass was higher in UTS, without significant differences among the rest of soils. Fungal biomass followed the trend UTS < ATS = rhizospheric soils < NS. Bacterial growth increased and fungal growth decreased with increasing pH, despite the high availability of metals at low pH. Enzyme activities were lower in UTS, being β-glucosidase and β-glucosaminidase activities highly correlated with bacterial growth. Microbial activities were not correlated with the exchangeable fraction of heavy metals, indicating that microbial function is not strongly affected by these metals, likely due to the efficiency of the reclamation procedure to reduce metals toxicity. Changes in microbial community composition were largely explained by changes in pH, heavy metals availability and Corg

  4. An Economic Framework of Microbial Trade.

    PubMed

    Tasoff, Joshua; Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of microbial life on earth exists in complex communities where metabolic exchange is vital. Microbes trade essential resources to promote their own growth in an analogous way to countries that exchange goods in modern economic markets. Inspired by these similarities, we developed a framework based on general equilibrium theory (GET) from economics to predict the population dynamics of trading microbial communities. Our biotic GET (BGET) model provides an a priori theory of the growth benefits of microbial trade, yielding several novel insights relevant to understanding microbial ecology and engineering synthetic communities. We find that the economic concept of comparative advantage is a necessary condition for mutualistic trade. Our model suggests that microbial communities can grow faster when species are unable to produce essential resources that are obtained through trade, thereby promoting metabolic specialization and increased intercellular exchange. Furthermore, we find that species engaged in trade exhibit a fundamental tradeoff between growth rate and relative population abundance, and that different environments that put greater pressure on group selection versus individual selection will promote varying strategies along this growth-abundance spectrum. We experimentally tested this tradeoff using a synthetic consortium of Escherichia coli cells and found the results match the predictions of the model. This framework provides a foundation to study natural and engineered microbial communities through a new lens based on economic theories developed over the past century.

  5. An Economic Framework of Microbial Trade

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of microbial life on earth exists in complex communities where metabolic exchange is vital. Microbes trade essential resources to promote their own growth in an analogous way to countries that exchange goods in modern economic markets. Inspired by these similarities, we developed a framework based on general equilibrium theory (GET) from economics to predict the population dynamics of trading microbial communities. Our biotic GET (BGET) model provides an a priori theory of the growth benefits of microbial trade, yielding several novel insights relevant to understanding microbial ecology and engineering synthetic communities. We find that the economic concept of comparative advantage is a necessary condition for mutualistic trade. Our model suggests that microbial communities can grow faster when species are unable to produce essential resources that are obtained through trade, thereby promoting metabolic specialization and increased intercellular exchange. Furthermore, we find that species engaged in trade exhibit a fundamental tradeoff between growth rate and relative population abundance, and that different environments that put greater pressure on group selection versus individual selection will promote varying strategies along this growth-abundance spectrum. We experimentally tested this tradeoff using a synthetic consortium of Escherichia coli cells and found the results match the predictions of the model. This framework provides a foundation to study natural and engineered microbial communities through a new lens based on economic theories developed over the past century. PMID:26222307

  6. An Economic Framework of Microbial Trade.

    PubMed

    Tasoff, Joshua; Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of microbial life on earth exists in complex communities where metabolic exchange is vital. Microbes trade essential resources to promote their own growth in an analogous way to countries that exchange goods in modern economic markets. Inspired by these similarities, we developed a framework based on general equilibrium theory (GET) from economics to predict the population dynamics of trading microbial communities. Our biotic GET (BGET) model provides an a priori theory of the growth benefits of microbial trade, yielding several novel insights relevant to understanding microbial ecology and engineering synthetic communities. We find that the economic concept of comparative advantage is a necessary condition for mutualistic trade. Our model suggests that microbial communities can grow faster when species are unable to produce essential resources that are obtained through trade, thereby promoting metabolic specialization and increased intercellular exchange. Furthermore, we find that species engaged in trade exhibit a fundamental tradeoff between growth rate and relative population abundance, and that different environments that put greater pressure on group selection versus individual selection will promote varying strategies along this growth-abundance spectrum. We experimentally tested this tradeoff using a synthetic consortium of Escherichia coli cells and found the results match the predictions of the model. This framework provides a foundation to study natural and engineered microbial communities through a new lens based on economic theories developed over the past century. PMID:26222307

  7. An investigation of the sensitivity of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance to microbial growth and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Keating, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes and microbial processes play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in applications ranging from microbially enhanced oil recovery to soil and groundwater contaminant remediation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface; however, due to the complexity of subsurface systems,it is difficult to monitor the growth of microbes and microbial activity in porous media. The focus of this research is to determine if low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a method used in well logging to characterize fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs or water in aquifers, can be used to directly detect the presence and the growth of microbes in geologic media. In this laboratory study, low-field NMR (2 MHz) relaxation measurements were collected on microbial suspensions with measured densities (i.e. biomasses), microbial pellets (live and dead), and inoculated silica. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the NMR signals in the absence of biomineralization. Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1), a facultative metal reducer known to play an important role in subsurface environments, were used as a model organism and were inoculated under aerobic condition. Data were collected using a CPMG pulse sequence, which was to determine the T2-distribution, and using a gradient spin-echo (PGSE) plus CPMG pulse sequence, which was used to encode diffusion properties and determine the effective diffusion-spin-spin relaxation correlation (D-T2) plot. Our data show no obvious change in the T2-distribution as S. oneidensis density varied in suspension, but show a clear distinction in the T2-distribution and D-T2 plots between live and dead cell pellets. A decrease in the T2-distribution is observed in the inoculated sand column. These results will provide a basis for understanding the effect of microbes within geologic media on low-field NMR measurements. This

  8. Bacterial Growth, Necromass Turnover, And Endospore Abundance In The Deep Subseafloor Sediments Of The Greenland Shelf Using D:L Amino Acid Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhatre, S. S.; Braun, S.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface realm is colonized by a large number of microorganisms- about 3 × 1029. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize at a much slower rate than model organisms in nutrient rich cultures. The aim of this work was to use recently developed D:L-amino acid racemization model for studying the turnover times of microbial biomass and microbial necromass in a ~12,000 years old Greenland shelf marine sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers of aspartic acid. The percentage amino acid carbon content (%TAAC) and the percentage amino acid nitrogen content (%TAAN) were used for determining the degradation state of the organic matter. Endospores quantified using DPA quantification method were found to be as abundant as vegetative cells. The microbial necromass turnover times were thousand years, and biomass turnover times were in the range of tens to hundred years. Studies with deeper sediment cores will further improve our understanding of the energetic limits of life in the deep biosphere.

  9. Deep-water microbialites of the Mesoproterozoic Dismal Lakes Group: microbial growth, lithification, and implications for coniform stromatolites.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J K; Kah, L C; Frank, T D; Lyons, T W

    2015-01-01

    Offshore facies of the Mesoproterozoic Sulky Formation, Dismal Lakes Group, arctic Canada, preserve microbialites with unusual morphology. These microbialites grew in water depths greater than several tens of meters and correlate with high-relief conical stromatolites of the more proximal September Lake reef complex. The gross morphology of these microbial facies consists of ridge-like vertical supports draped by concave-upward, subhorizontal elements, resulting in tent-shaped cuspate microbialites with substantial primary void space. Morphological and petrographic analyses suggest a model wherein penecontemporaneous upward growth of ridge elements and development of subhorizontal draping elements initially resulted in a buoyantly supported, unlithified microbial form. Lithification began via precipitation within organic elements during microbialite growth. Mineralization either stabilized or facilitated collapse of initially neutrally buoyant microbialite forms. Microbial structures and breccias were then further stabilized by precipitation of marine herringbone cement. During late-stage diagenesis, remaining void space was occluded by ferroan dolomite cement. Cuspate microbialites are most similar to those found in offshore facies of Neoarchean carbonate platforms and to unlithified, buoyantly supported microbial mats in modern ice-covered Antarctic lakes. We suggest that such unusual microbialite morphologies are a product of the interaction between motile and non-motile communities under nutrient-limiting conditions, followed by early lithification, which served to preserve the resultant microbial form. The presence of marine herringbone cement, commonly associated with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low O2 conditions, also suggests growth in association with reducing environments at or near the seafloor or in conjunction with a geochemical interface. Predominance of coniform stromatolite forms in the Proterozoic--across a variety of depositional

  10. Deep-water microbialites of the Mesoproterozoic Dismal Lakes Group: microbial growth, lithification, and implications for coniform stromatolites.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J K; Kah, L C; Frank, T D; Lyons, T W

    2015-01-01

    Offshore facies of the Mesoproterozoic Sulky Formation, Dismal Lakes Group, arctic Canada, preserve microbialites with unusual morphology. These microbialites grew in water depths greater than several tens of meters and correlate with high-relief conical stromatolites of the more proximal September Lake reef complex. The gross morphology of these microbial facies consists of ridge-like vertical supports draped by concave-upward, subhorizontal elements, resulting in tent-shaped cuspate microbialites with substantial primary void space. Morphological and petrographic analyses suggest a model wherein penecontemporaneous upward growth of ridge elements and development of subhorizontal draping elements initially resulted in a buoyantly supported, unlithified microbial form. Lithification began via precipitation within organic elements during microbialite growth. Mineralization either stabilized or facilitated collapse of initially neutrally buoyant microbialite forms. Microbial structures and breccias were then further stabilized by precipitation of marine herringbone cement. During late-stage diagenesis, remaining void space was occluded by ferroan dolomite cement. Cuspate microbialites are most similar to those found in offshore facies of Neoarchean carbonate platforms and to unlithified, buoyantly supported microbial mats in modern ice-covered Antarctic lakes. We suggest that such unusual microbialite morphologies are a product of the interaction between motile and non-motile communities under nutrient-limiting conditions, followed by early lithification, which served to preserve the resultant microbial form. The presence of marine herringbone cement, commonly associated with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low O2 conditions, also suggests growth in association with reducing environments at or near the seafloor or in conjunction with a geochemical interface. Predominance of coniform stromatolite forms in the Proterozoic--across a variety of depositional

  11. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  12. Microbial Patterns Signaling via Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 5 Contribute to Epithelial Repair, Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Behr, Jürgen; Bals, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) continuously interact with microorganisms and detect their presence via different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Ligation of epithelial TLRs by pathogens is usually associated with the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial factors. In this study, using human airway ECs as a model, we found that detection of microbial patterns via epithelial TLRs directly regulates tissue homeostasis. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and microbial patterns signaling via TLR2 and TLR5 induce a set of non-immune epithelial responses including cell migration, wound repair, proliferation, and survival of primary and cancerous ECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) gene targeting, receptor-tyrosine kinase microarray and inhibition studies, we determined that TLR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediate the stimulating effect of microbial patterns on epithelial repair. Microbial patterns signaling via Toll-like receptors 2 and 5 contribute to epithelial repair, growth and survival. This effect is independent of hematopoietic and other cells as well as inflammatory cytokines suggesting that epithelia are able to regulate their integrity in an autonomous non-inflammatory manner by sensing microbes directly via TLRs. PMID:18167552

  13. Microbial growth and the effects of mild acidification and preservatives in refrigerated sweet potato puree.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Truong, Van-Den; Webber, Ashlee; McFeeters, Roger F

    2008-03-01

    Refrigerated sweet potato puree is a convenient form of sweet potato that can be used as an ingredient in formulated foods. The microbiology of refrigerated sweet potato puree during storage for up to 5 weeks was evaluated. Because the puree was made by comminuting steam-cooked sweet potatoes before refrigeration, no naturally occurring vegetative bacterial cells were detected during a 4-week period of refrigerated storage at 4 degrees C. However, if postprocessing microbial contamination of the puree were to occur, contaminating microorganisms such as Listeria monocytogenes could grow during refrigerated storage. The effects of acidification or the addition of potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate on a population of L. monocytogenes inoculated into refrigerated (4 degrees C) sweet potato puree were determined. Inoculation of the refrigerated puree with L. monocytogenes at 10(6) CFU/ml resulted in a 3-log increase after 3 weeks storage of nonsupplemented puree. Supplementation of the sweet potato puree with 0.06% (wt/vol) sorbic acid or benzoic acid plus mild acidification of the sweet potato puree with citric acid to pH 4.2 prevented growth of L. monocytogenes during storage at 4 degrees C.

  14. ATP monitoring technology for microbial growth control in potable water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Patrick A.; Whalen, Philip J.; Cairns, James E.

    2006-05-01

    ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is the primary energy transfer molecule present in all living biological cells on Earth. ATP cannot be produced or maintained by anything but a living organism, and as such, its measurement is a direct indication of biological activity. The main advantage of ATP as a biological indicator is the speed of the analysis - from collecting the sample to obtaining the result, only minutes are required. The technology to measure ATP is already widely utilized to verify disinfection efficacy in the food industry and is also commonly applied in industrial water processes such as cooling water systems to monitor microbial growth and biocide applications. Research has indicated that ATP measurement technology can also play a key role in such important industries as potable water distribution and biological wastewater treatment. As will be detailed in this paper, LuminUltra Technologies has developed and applied ATP measurement technologies designed for any water type, and as such can provide a method to rapidly and accurately determine the level of biological activity in drinking water supplies. Because of its speed and specificity to biological activity, ATP measurement can play a key role in defending against failing drinking water quality, including those encountered during routine operation and also bioterrorism.

  15. Structural effects of ionic liquids on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Cho, Chul-Woong; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated structural effects of various ionic liquids (ILs) on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial biodegradability. For this, we tested pyridinium- and pyrrolidinium-based ILs with various alkyl chain lengths and bromide anion, and compared the toxicological effects with log EC50 values of imidazolium-based IL with the same alkyl chains and anion from literature. Comparing determined EC50 values of cationic moieties with the same alkyl chain length, pyridinium-based ILs were found to be slightly more toxic towards the freshwater green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, than a series of pyrrolidinium and imidazolium except to 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. Concerning the biodegradation study of 12 ILs using the activated sludge microorganisms, the results showed that the pyridinium derivatives except to 1-propyl-3-methylpyridinium cation were degraded. Whereas in case of imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based compounds, only n-hexyl and n-octyl substituted cations were fully degraded but no significant biodegradation was observed for the short chains (three and four alkyl chains).

  16. By passing microbial resistance: xylitol controls microorganisms growth by means of its anti-adherence property.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline S; Silva-Paes-Leme, Annelisa F; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Sílvio S

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is an important polyalcohol suitable for use in odontological, medical and pharmaceutical products and as an additive in food. The first studies on the efficacy of xylitol in the control and treatment of infections started in the late 1970s and it is still applied for this purpose, with safety and very little contribution to resistance. Xylitol seems to act against microorganisms exerting an anti-adherence effect. Some research studies have demonstrated its action against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. However, a clear explanation of how xylitol is effective has not been completely established yet. Some evidence shows that xylitol acts on gene expression, down-regulating the ones which are involved in the microorganisms' virulence, such as capsule formation. Another possible clarification is that xylitol blocks lectin-like receptors. The most important aspect is that, over time, xylitol bypasses microbial resistance and succeeds in controlling infection, either alone or combined with another compound. In this review, the effect of xylitol in inhibiting the growth of a different microorganism is described, focusing on studies in which such an anti-adherent property was highlighted. This is the first mini-review to describe xylitol as an anti-adherent compound and take into consideration how it exerts such action.

  17. Evaluation of americium-241 toxicity influence on the microbial growth of organic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Takehiro Marumo, Julio; Padua Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de; Keiko Isiki, Vera Lucia; Miyamoto, Hissae; Sayuri Takara, Aline; Kazumi Sakata, Solange; Bellini, Maria Helena; Cardoso Pedroso de Lima, Luis Filipe

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since the licenses for using radioactive sources in radioactive lightning rods were lifted by the Brazilian national nuclear authority, in 1989, the radioactive devices have been replaced by Franklin type and collected as radioactive waste. However, only 20 percent of the estimated total number of installed rods was delivered to Brazilian Nuclear Commission. This situation causes concern, due to, first, the possibility of the rods being disposed as domestic waste, and second, the americium, the most commonly employed radionuclide, is classified as a high-toxicity element. In the present study, Am-241 migration experiments were performed by a lysimeter system, in order to evaluate the risk of contamination caused by radioactive lightning rods disposed as a common solid waste. Besides the risk evaluation, it is important to know the mechanism of the Am-241 release or retention in waste as well as its influence in the waste decomposition processes. Many factors are involved, but microorganisms present in the waste play an important role in its degradation, which control the physical and chemical processes. The objective of this work was to evaluate the Am-241 influence on the microbial population by counting number of cells in lysimeters leachate. Preliminary results suggest that americium may influence significantly the bacteria growth in organic waste, evidenced by culture under aerobiosis and an-aerobiosis and the antimicrobial resistance test. (authors)

  18. Biofilm feeding: Microbial colonization of food promotes the growth of a detritivorous arthropod

    PubMed Central

    Horváthová, Terézia; Babik, Wiesław; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Feeding on plant material is common among animals, but how different animals overcome the dietary deficiencies imposed by this feeding strategy is not well understood. Microorganisms are generally considered to play a vital role in the nutritional ecology of plant feeding animals. Commonly microbes living inside animal bodies are considered more important, but recent studies suggest external microbes significantly shape plant-feeding strategies in invertebrates. Here we investigate how external microbes that typically form biofilm on primary plant material affect growth rates in a terrestrial isopod species Porcellio scaber. We experimentally manipulated the amount of biofilm on three different primary diet sources and quantified growth and survival of individuals that fed on food with either a small or large amount of biofilm. In addition, we tested how dietary manipulation shapes the composition of bacterial communities in the gut. The presence of visible biofilm significantly affected the growth of isopods: individuals that fed on the primary diet source with a large amount of biofilm gained more mass than individuals feeding on a diet with marginal biofilm. Diet also significantly affected the bacterial gut community. The primary diet source mainly determined the taxonomic composition of the bacterial community in the isopod gut, whereas the amount of biofilm affected the relative abundance of bacterial taxa. Our study suggests that terrestrial isopods may cope with low-quality plant matter by feeding on biofilm, with decomposition of plant material by organisms outside of the feeding organism (here a terrestrial isopod) probably playing a major role. Future investigations may be directed towards the primary diet source, plant matter, and the secondary diet source, biofilm, and should assess if both components are indeed uptaken in detritivorous species. PMID:27110187

  19. Microbial enrichment of a novel growing substrate and its effect on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Trifonova, R; Postma, J; Schilder, M T; van Elsas, J D

    2009-10-01

    The quality of torrefied grass fibers (TGF) as a new potting soil ingredient was tested in a greenhouse experiment. TGF was colonized with previously selected microorganisms. Four colonization treatments were compared: (1) no inoculants, (2) the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15 alone, (3) the fungus followed by inoculation with two selected bacteria, and (4) the fungus with seven selected bacteria. Cultivation-based and DNA-based methods, i.e., PCR-DGGE and BOX-PCR, were applied to assess the bacterial and fungal communities established in the TGF. Although colonization was not performed under sterile conditions, all inoculated strains were recovered from TGF up to 26 days incubation. Stable fungal and bacterial populations of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/g TGF, respectively, were reached. As a side effect of the torrefaction process that aimed at the chemical stabilization of grass fibers, potentially phytotoxic compounds were generated. These phytotoxic compounds were cold-extracted from the fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Four of 15 target compounds that had previously been found in the extract of TGF were encountered, namely phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, benzopyran-2-one, and tetrahydro-5,6,7,7a-benzofuranone. The concentration of these compounds decreased significantly during incubation. The colonized TGF was mixed with peat (P) in a range of 100%:0%, 50%:50%, 20%:80%, and 0%:100% TGF/P (w/w), respectively, to assess suitability for plant growth. Germination of tomato seeds was assessed three times, i.e., with inoculated TGF that had been incubated for 12, 21, and 26 days. In these tests, 90-100% of the seeds germinated in 50%:50% and 20%:80% TGF/P, whereas on average only 50% of the seeds germinated in pure TGF. Germination was not improved by the microbial inoculants. However, plant fresh weight as well as leaf area of 28-day-old tomato plants were significantly increased in all treatments where C. ligniaria F/TGF15 was inoculated compared

  20. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. PMID:26992294

  1. Circular RNA profiling reveals an abundant circHIPK3 that regulates cell growth by sponging multiple miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiupeng; Bao, Chunyang; Guo, Weijie; Li, Shuyi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bing; Luo, Yanting; Lyu, Dongbin; Li, Yan; Shi, Guohai; Liang, Linhui; Gu, Jianren; He, Xianghuo; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a class of widespread and diverse endogenous RNAs that may regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. However, the regulation and function of human circRNAs remain largely unknown. Here we generate ribosomal-depleted RNA sequencing data from six normal tissues and seven cancers, and detect at least 27,000 circRNA candidates. Many of these circRNAs are differently expressed between the normal and cancerous tissues. We further characterize one abundant circRNA derived from Exon2 of the HIPK3 gene, termed circHIPK3. The silencing of circHIPK3 but not HIPK3 mRNA significantly inhibits human cell growth. Via a luciferase screening assay, circHIPK3 is observed to sponge to 9 miRNAs with 18 potential binding sites. Specifically, we show that circHIPK3 directly binds to miR-124 and inhibits miR-124 activity. Our results provide evidence that circular RNA produced from precursor mRNA may have a regulatory role in human cells. PMID:27050392

  2. Evaluation of nitrogenous substrates such as peptones from fish:a new method based on Gompertz modeling of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Dufossé, L; De La Broise, D; Guerard, F

    2001-01-01

    Fish peptones from tuna, cod, salmon, and unspecified fish were compared with a casein one by using a new method based on Gompertz modeling of microbial growth. Cumulative results obtained from six species of bacteria, yeasts, and fungi showed that, in most cases, these fish peptones are very effective. Nevertheless, this study raised some questions about the standardization of fish raw material, the enzymatic hydrolysis of fish proteins, and the composition of the culture medium used for testing the peptones.

  3. Measurement of microbial growth in the low nutrient conditions of a simulated subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, V. L.; Boult, S.; Vaughan, D. J.; Beadle, I. R.; Humphreys, P.; Wogelius, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    The growth of bacteria in natural porous media may alter porosity and permeability, and therefore hydraulic conductivity. Changes are due both to pore clogging caused by the production of bacterial extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and the formation of secondary mineral precipitates. Pore clogging has implications not only for fluid flow, but also for contaminant transport. Most biofilm research has been conducted under nutrient rich conditions, quite different from the actual subsurface environment. There is therefore a general need for studies under environmentally relevant conditions. The main objectives were to determine growth under environmental conditions and to produce reproducible homogeneously coated columns of porous media for further experiments on metal transport. Six short columns (length 25mm; diameter 20mm) instrumented with pressure, pH and dissolved oxygen sensors were used. Growth and reproducibility of the biofilm are related to the flow rate, the concentration of the nutrients and the grain size of the porous medium substrate. Two types of porous media were used; a single mineral quartz media with a constant grain size and a natural mixed mineral assemblage of non-uniform grain size. Nutrient used was a landfill derived carbon source present in synthetic trench leachate (STL) diluted with synthetic groundwater (SGW) by a factor of 100. The STL was pumped through each column at a constant, environmentally relevant flow rate of 0.109 ml/min. Experiments were performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions contained in a temperature-controlled room at 10^oC. Measurement of the pressure increase within the column apparatus was made, as an increase in pressure is relative to the resistance of the media to flow and indicates biofilm formation and pore clogging within the column. Monitoring of dissolved oxygen shows the metabolic conditions of the bacteria and also the biological oxygen demand. Column effluent was analysed for changes in

  4. The effect of salt reduction on sensory quality and microbial growth in hotdog sausages, bacon, ham and salami.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, Margit Dall; Vestergaard, Christian; Koch, Anette Granly

    2014-01-01

    Sodium chloride (NaCl) is a multi-functional ingredient used to inhibit microbial growth and to ensure good texture and taste in processed meat. This study showed how moderately (22-25%) and greatly (43-50%) reduction of NaCl affected yield, sensory quality and microbial growth in hotdog sausages, bacon, cooked cured ham and salami. In greatly reduced products, the yield was reduced by 8% in sausages and 6% in ham, whereas the yield in bacon and salami remained unaffected. The microbial growth was generally not affected by reducing the content of NaCl to 2.0% in sausages, 2.3% in bacon, 1.7% in ham and 6.3% in salami (aqueous phase). Salt taste, juiciness and texture were the sensory parameters most affected by the NaCl reduction. In sausages and ham, reduction from 2.2% to 1.7% and from 2.3% to 1.3% (w/w), respectively, did not alter the sensory properties. In contrast, the sensory properties of bacon and salami were significantly affected already after a moderately reduction.

  5. Effect of zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuxin; Lei, Zhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Yang, Ying; Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Bingkun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of supplemental zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and the cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella typhimurium, 180, 1-day-old male Cobb 500 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 3 treatments with ten replicates for a 42 day experiment. The 3 treatments were: unchallenged, S. typhimurium-challenged, and S. typhimurium-challenged with 120 mg/kg of zinc supplementation in the diet. Salmonella infection caused a reduction in body-weight gain and feed intake, disrupted the intestinal structure by decreasing the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum and increasing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells. Moreover, the cecal microbial community was altered by Salmonella infection, as demonstrated by a reduced number of Lactobacillus and total bacteria. Dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance by increasing the body-weight gain and feed intake in the challenged broilers. In addition, zinc repaired intestinal injury by reducing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells, enhancing villus height and the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum, and the proliferation index of ileal epithelial cells. Finally, zinc regulated the cecal microbial community by increasing the number of total bacteria and beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria, and reducing the number of Salmonella. The results indicated that dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance, intestinal morphology, and intestinal microbiota in S. typhimurium-challenged broilers. PMID:25467118

  6. Correlations of Gut Microbial Community Shift with Hepatic Damage and Growth Inhibition of Carassius auratus Induced by Pentachlorophenol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Kan, Haifeng; Zhao, Fuzheng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ren, Hongqiang; Gao, Shixiang

    2015-10-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) were exposed to 0-100 μg/L pentachlorophenol (PCP) for 28 days to investigate the correlations of fish gut microbial community shift with the induced toxicological effects. PCP exposure caused accumulation of PCP in the fish intestinal tract in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while hepatic PCP reached the maximal level after a 21 day exposure. Under the relatively higher PCP stress, the fish body weight and liver weight were reduced and hepatic CAT and SOD activities were inhibited, demonstrating negative correlations with the PCP levels in liver and gut content (R < -0.5 and P < 0.05 each). Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that PCP exposure increased the abundance of Bacteroidetes in the fish gut. Within the Bacteroidetes phylum, the Bacteroides genus had the highest abundance, which was significantly correlated with PCP exposure dosage and duration (R > 0.5 and P < 0.05 each). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Bacteroides showed quantitatively negative correlations with Chryseobacterium, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, and Legionella in the fish gut, and the Bacteroidetes abundance, Bacteroides abundance, and Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio played crucial roles in the reduction of body weight and liver weight under PCP stress. The results may extend our knowledge regarding the roles of gut microbiota in ecotoxicology. PMID:26378342

  7. Bioenergetic Limitations on Slow Microbial Growth in the Subsurface: What is the Burden of Maintenance on the Overall Energy Budget?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeaton, C. M.; Bajracharya, B. M.; Ridenour, C.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    In low energy environments such as the subsurface, the minimum energy required to maintain cellular integrity and function (maintenance energy) may represent a significant fraction of the total energy available to microbial communities. However, traditional kinetic and thermodynamic models incorporating key microbial processes are often developed using data collected in nutrient rich growth media. In this study, slow microbial growth in the subsurface was simulated using a flow through bioreactor system in experiments designed to determine the maintenance energy requirement of the model subsurface bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. An existing bioreactor system (Applikon EZ-control®, 2.4 L) was modified to include a biomass retention filtration unit (retentostat) resulting in biomass accumulation over time. An artificial low-nutrient groundwater medium was optimized for slow S. oneidensis growth and was supplied and removed from the reactor at flow rates on the order of 1 mL min-1 with a dilution rate of 0.025 h-1. The retentostat was run under electron donor limited conditions with nitrate, a common groundwater contaminant, supplied at 0.025 mM h-1 and lactate supplied in excess at 0.125 mM h-1. Respiratory ammonification of nitrate by S. oneidensis and cell growth was monitored over time (40 days) and compared to parallel incubations in batch reactors. Initial rates of ammonification were similar in the bioreactor and batch reactors, however, optical density and ATP measurements showed slow yet increasing microbial growth over time (generation time = 17 days) in the retentostat. In contrast, cells in the batch reactors did not grow significantly and died within 2 weeks of inoculation. A maintenance energy demand was estimated (2.5 kJ C-mol biomass h-1) by fitting the biomass production rates to the van Verseveld equation. The low maintenance energy demand of S. oneidensis as compared to typical maintenance energies reported in the literature (>10 kJ C-mol biomass

  8. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; Stieve-Caldwell, E.

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.

  9. Effects of feeding corn silage inoculated with microbial additives on the ruminal fermentation, microbial protein yield, and growth performance of lambs.

    PubMed

    Basso, F C; Adesogan, A T; Lara, E C; Rabelo, C H S; Berchielli, T T; Teixeira, I A M A; Siqueira, G R; Reis, R A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of feeding corn silage inoculated without or with either Lactobacillus buchneri (LB) alone or a combination of LB and Lactobacillus plantarum (LBLP) on the apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, and growth performance of lambs. Thirty Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred intact males lambs weighing 20.4±3.8 kg were blocked by weight into 10 groups. Lambs in each group were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 dietary treatments: untreated (Control), LB, and LBLP silage. Lambs were fed experimental diets for 61 d. The apparent digestibility was indirectly estimated from indigestible NDF measured on d 57 to 59. Spot urine samples were collected from all animals on d 59 to estimate microbial protein synthesis. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation on d 61 when they weighed 32.4±5.2 kg. Six additional ruminally cannulated Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred wethers weighing 40.5±1.8 kg were used to examine dietary effects on ruminal fermentation. Average daily gain was increased when lambs were fed LBLP silage (P<0.05) but not LB silage. The LBLP silage had the highest (P<0.05) lactic acid concentration and both inoculated silages had greater acetic acid concentrations than the Control silage (P<0.05). Inoculation of corn silage increased intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, total carbohydrate (CHO), and GE by the lambs but decreased digestibility of DM, OM, CP, total and nonstructural carbohydrates, and concentration of GE and ME. (P<0.05). Nevertheless, lambs fed inoculated silages had greater microbial N supply than those on the Control treatment (P<0.05). The acetate to propionate ratio was lower in ruminal fluid of wethers in LBLP treatment than LB and Control treatment (P<0.05) and ruminal pH tended to be greater in LB lambs than in LBLP and Control wethers (P<0.10). Finally, the inoculation with both bacteria combined enhanced the silage fermentation. The intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and GE

  10. Validation of a predictive model coupling gas transfer and microbial growth in fresh food packed under modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Guillard, V; Couvert, O; Stahl, V; Hanin, A; Denis, C; Huchet, V; Chaix, E; Loriot, C; Vincelot, T; Thuault, D

    2016-09-01

    Predicting microbial safety of fresh products in modified atmosphere packaging implies to take into account the dynamic of O2, CO2 and N2 exchanges in the system and its effect on microbial growth. In this paper a mechanistic model coupling gas transfer and predictive microbiology was validated using dedicated challenge-tests performed on poultry meat, fresh salmon and processed cheese, inoculated with either Listeria monocytogenes or Pseudomonas fluorescens and packed in commercially used packaging materials (tray + lid films). The model succeeded in predicting the relative variation of O2, CO2 and N2 partial pressure in headspace and the growth of the studied microorganisms without any parameter identification. This work highlighted that the respiration of the targeted microorganism itself and/or that of the naturally present microflora could not be neglected in most of the cases, and could, in the particular case of aerobic microbes contribute to limit the growth by removing all residual O2 in the package. This work also confirmed the low sensitivity of L. monocytogenes toward CO2 while that of P. fluorescens permitted to efficiently prevent its growth by choosing the right combination of packaging gas permeability value and initial % of CO2 initially flushed in the pack. PMID:27217358

  11. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in oceanic basalts, Pb isotope evolution and growth of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; White, W. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Hofmann, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that the mantle Pb isotope ratios reflect continued extraction of Pb into the earth's core over geologic time is evaluated by studying the depeletion of chalcophile and siderophile elements in the mantle. Oceanic basalt samples are analyzed in order to determine the Pb, Sr, and Nd isotropic compositions and the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements and incompatible lithophile elements. The data reveal that there is no systematic variation of siderophile or chalcophile element abundances relative to abundances of lithophile elements and the Pb/Ce ratio of the mantle is constant. It is suggested that the crust formation involves nonmagmatic and magmatic processes.

  12. Spring thaw ionic pulses boost nutrient availability and microbial growth in entombed Antarctic Dry Valley cryoconite holes.

    PubMed

    Telling, Jon; Anesio, Alexandre M; Tranter, Martyn; Fountain, Andrew G; Nylen, Thomas; Hawkings, Jon; Singh, Virendra B; Kaur, Preeti; Musilova, Michaela; Wadham, Jemma L

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal melting of ice entombed cryoconite holes on McMurdo Dry Valley glaciers provides oases for life in the harsh environmental conditions of the polar desert where surface air temperatures only occasionally exceed 0°C during the Austral summer. Here we follow temporal changes in cryoconite hole biogeochemistry on Canada Glacier from fully frozen conditions through the initial stages of spring thaw toward fully melted holes. The cryoconite holes had a mean isolation age from the glacial drainage system of 3.4 years, with an increasing mass of aqueous nutrients (dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus) with longer isolation age. During the initial melt there was a mean nine times enrichment in dissolved chloride relative to mean concentrations of the initial frozen holes indicative of an ionic pulse, with similar mean nine times enrichments in nitrite, ammonium, and dissolved organic matter. Nitrate was enriched twelve times and dissolved organic nitrogen six times, suggesting net nitrification, while lower enrichments for dissolved organic phosphorus and phosphate were consistent with net microbial phosphorus uptake. Rates of bacterial production were significantly elevated during the ionic pulse, likely due to the increased nutrient availability. There was no concomitant increase in photosynthesis rates, with a net depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon suggesting inorganic carbon limitation. Potential nitrogen fixation was detected in fully melted holes where it could be an important source of nitrogen to support microbial growth, but not during the ionic pulse where nitrogen availability was higher. This study demonstrates that ionic pulses significantly alter the timing and magnitude of microbial activity within entombed cryoconite holes, and adds credence to hypotheses that ionic enrichments during freeze-thaw can elevate rates of microbial growth and activity in other icy habitats, such as ice veins and subglacial regelation zones

  13. Effect of different film packaging on microbial growth in minimally processed cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica).

    PubMed

    Palma, A; Mangia, N P; Fadda, A; Barberis, A; Schirra, M; D'Aquino, S

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are natural contaminants of fresh produce and minimally processed products, and contamination arises from a number of sources, including the environment, postharvest handling and processing. Fresh-cut products are particularly susceptible to microbial contaminations because of the changes occurring in the tissues during processing. In package gas composition of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in combination with low storage temperatures besides reducing physiological activity of packaged produce, can also delay pathogen growth. Present study investigated on the effect of MAPs, achieved with different plastic films, on microbial growth of minimally processed cactus pear (Opuntio ficus-indica) fruit. Five different plastic materials were used for packaging the manually peeled fruit. That is: a) polypropylene film (Termoplast MY 40 micron thickness, O2 transmission rate 300 cc/m2/24h); b) polyethylene film (Bolphane BHE, 11 micron thickness, O2 transmission rate 19000 cc/m2/24h); c) polypropylene laser-perforated films (Mach Packaging) with 8, 16 or 32 100-micron holes. Total aerobic psychrophilic, mesophilic microorganisms, Enterobacteriaceae, yeast, mould populations and in-package CO2, O2 and C2H4 were determined at each storage time. Different final gas compositions, ranging from 7.8 KPa to 17.1 KPa O2, and 12.7 KPa to 2.6 KPa CO2, were achieved with MY and micro perforated films, respectively. Differences were detected in the mesophilic, Enterobacteriaceae and yeast loads, while no difference was detected in psychrophilic microorganisms. At the end of storage, microbial load in fruits sealed with MY film was significantly lower than in those sealed with BHE and micro perforated films. Furthermore, fruits packed with micro-perforated films showed the highest microbial load. This occurrence may in part be related to in-package gas composition and in part to a continuous contamination of microorganisms through micro-holes.

  14. Spring thaw ionic pulses boost nutrient availability and microbial growth in entombed Antarctic Dry Valley cryoconite holes

    PubMed Central

    Telling, Jon; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Tranter, Martyn; Fountain, Andrew G.; Nylen, Thomas; Hawkings, Jon; Singh, Virendra B.; Kaur, Preeti; Musilova, Michaela; Wadham, Jemma L.

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal melting of ice entombed cryoconite holes on McMurdo Dry Valley glaciers provides oases for life in the harsh environmental conditions of the polar desert where surface air temperatures only occasionally exceed 0°C during the Austral summer. Here we follow temporal changes in cryoconite hole biogeochemistry on Canada Glacier from fully frozen conditions through the initial stages of spring thaw toward fully melted holes. The cryoconite holes had a mean isolation age from the glacial drainage system of 3.4 years, with an increasing mass of aqueous nutrients (dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus) with longer isolation age. During the initial melt there was a mean nine times enrichment in dissolved chloride relative to mean concentrations of the initial frozen holes indicative of an ionic pulse, with similar mean nine times enrichments in nitrite, ammonium, and dissolved organic matter. Nitrate was enriched twelve times and dissolved organic nitrogen six times, suggesting net nitrification, while lower enrichments for dissolved organic phosphorus and phosphate were consistent with net microbial phosphorus uptake. Rates of bacterial production were significantly elevated during the ionic pulse, likely due to the increased nutrient availability. There was no concomitant increase in photosynthesis rates, with a net depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon suggesting inorganic carbon limitation. Potential nitrogen fixation was detected in fully melted holes where it could be an important source of nitrogen to support microbial growth, but not during the ionic pulse where nitrogen availability was higher. This study demonstrates that ionic pulses significantly alter the timing and magnitude of microbial activity within entombed cryoconite holes, and adds credence to hypotheses that ionic enrichments during freeze-thaw can elevate rates of microbial growth and activity in other icy habitats, such as ice veins and subglacial regelation zones

  15. Methods for Facilitating Microbial Growth on Pulp Mill Waste Streams and Characterization of the Biodegradation Potential of Cultured Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Stephanie L.; Ayoub, Ali S.; Pawlak, Joel; Grunden, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    The kraft process is applied to wood chips for separation of lignin from the polysaccharides within lignocellulose for pulp that will produce a high quality paper. Black liquor is a pulping waste generated by the kraft process that has potential for downstream bioconversion. However, the recalcitrant nature of the lignocellulose resources, its chemical derivatives that constitute the majority of available organic carbon within black liquor, and its basic pH present challenges to microbial biodegradation of this waste material. Methods for the collection and modification of black liquor for microbial growth are aimed at utilization of this pulp waste to convert the lignin, organic acids, and polysaccharide degradation byproducts into valuable chemicals. The lignocellulose extraction techniques presented provide a reproducible method for preparation of lignocellulose growth substrates for understanding metabolic capacities of cultured microorganisms. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry enables the identification and quantification of the fermentation products resulting from the growth of microorganisms on pulping waste. These methods when used together can facilitate the determination of the metabolic activity of microorganisms with potential to produce fermentation products that would provide greater value to the pulping system and reduce effluent waste, thereby increasing potential paper milling profits and offering additional uses for black liquor. PMID:24378616

  16. Microbial growth and sensory quality of dried potato slices irradiated by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation was applied to secure the microbial safety of dried purple sweet potato. After purple sweet potato slices had been dehydrated with 20% (w/w) maltodextrin solution, the samples were irradiated at doses 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and then stored at 20 °C for 60 days. Microbiological data indicated that the populations of total aerobic bacteria and of yeast and molds significantly decreased with increase in irradiation dosage. Specifically, microbial load was reduced by about three log cycles at 6 kGy compared to those of the control. Based on the color measurement of the potato slices, electron beam irradiation treatment did not affect the color quality. Sensory evaluation results also showed that electron beam irradiation did not affect overall sensory scores during storage. These results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be useful for improving microbial safety without impairing the quality of the potato slices during storage.

  17. Impact of Reed Canary Grass Cultivation and Mineral Fertilisation on the Microbial Abundance and Genetic Potential for Methane Production in Residual Peat of an Abandoned Peat Extraction Area

    PubMed Central

    Espenberg, Mikk; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Nõlvak, Hiie; Järveoja, Järvi; Mander, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined physiochemical conditions and prokaryotic community structure (the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA gene abundances and proportions), and evaluated the effect of reed canary grass cultivation and mineral fertilisation on these factors, in the 60 cm thick residual peat layer of experimental plots located on an abandoned peat extraction area. The archaeal proportion was 0.67–39.56% in the prokaryotic community and the methanogens proportion was 0.01–1.77% in the archaeal community. When bacterial abundance was higher in the top 20 cm of peat, the archaea were more abundant in the 20–60 cm layer and methanogens in the 40–60 cm layer of the residual peat. The bacterial abundance was significantly increased, but archaeal abundance was not affected by cultivation. The fertiliser application had a slight effect on peat properties and on archaeal and methanogen abundances in the deeper layer of cultivated peat. The CH4 emission was positively related to mcrA abundance in the 20–60 cm of the bare peat, while in case of reed canary grass cultivation these two parameters were not correlated. Reed canary grass cultivation mitigated CH4 emission, although methanogen abundance remained approximately the same or even increased in different layers of residual peat under cultivated sites over time. This study supports the outlook of using abandoned peat extraction areas to produce reed canary grass for energy purposes as an advisable land-use practice from the perspective of atmospheric impact in peatland-rich Northern Europe. PMID:27684377

  18. Effects of Monotypic and Binary Mixtures of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Microbial Growth in Sandy Soil Collected from Artificial Recharge Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Ha, Kyoochul; Kong, In Chul

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of monotypic and binary metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs, ZnO, NiO, Co3O4 and TiO2) on microbial growth were evaluated in sandy soil collected from artificial recharge sites. Microbial growth was assessed based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and viable cell counts (VCC). Microbial growth based on ATP content and VCC showed considerable differences depending on NP type and concentration, whereas DHA did not significantly change. In general, ZnO NPs showed the strongest effect on microbial growth in all measurements, showing an EC50 value of 10.9 mg/L for ATP content. The ranking (EC50) of NPs based on their effect on microbial growth assessed by ATP content and VCC was ZnO > Co3O4 > NiO > TiO2. Upon exposure to binary NP mixtures, synergistic and additive modes of action were observed for ATP content and VCC, respectively. The ranges of observed (P(O)) and expected (P(E)) activity were 83%–92% and 78%–82% of the control (p-value 0.0010) based on ATP content and 78%–95% and 72%–94% of the control (p-value 0.8813) based on VCC under the tested conditions, respectively. The results indicate that the effects of NP mixtures on microbial growth in the sandy soil matrix were as great, or greater, than those of single NPs. Therefore, understanding the effects of single NPs and NP mixtures is essential for proper ecological risk assessment. Additionally, these findings demonstrate that the evaluation of NP effects may be profoundly influenced by the method of microbial growth measurement. PMID:26610489

  19. Effects of Monotypic and Binary Mixtures of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Microbial Growth in Sandy Soil Collected from Artificial Recharge Sites.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Ha, Kyoochul; Kong, In Chul

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of monotypic and binary metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs, ZnO, NiO, Co₃O₄ and TiO₂) on microbial growth were evaluated in sandy soil collected from artificial recharge sites. Microbial growth was assessed based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and viable cell counts (VCC). Microbial growth based on ATP content and VCC showed considerable differences depending on NP type and concentration, whereas DHA did not significantly change. In general, ZnO NPs showed the strongest effect on microbial growth in all measurements, showing an EC50 value of 10.9 mg/L for ATP content. The ranking (EC50) of NPs based on their effect on microbial growth assessed by ATP content and VCC was ZnO > Co₃O₄ > NiO > TiO₂. Upon exposure to binary NP mixtures, synergistic and additive modes of action were observed for ATP content and VCC, respectively. The ranges of observed (P(O)) and expected (P(E)) activity were 83%-92% and 78%-82% of the control (p-value 0.0010) based on ATP content and 78%-95% and 72%-94% of the control (p-value 0.8813) based on VCC under the tested conditions, respectively. The results indicate that the effects of NP mixtures on microbial growth in the sandy soil matrix were as great, or greater, than those of single NPs. Therefore, understanding the effects of single NPs and NP mixtures is essential for proper ecological risk assessment. Additionally, these findings demonstrate that the evaluation of NP effects may be profoundly influenced by the method of microbial growth measurement. PMID:26610489

  20. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics for the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis Reveal Distinct Abundance Patterns upon Growth on Cellobiose, Crystalline Cellulose, and Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Lochner, Adriane; Keller, Martin; Antranikian, Garabed; Graham, David E; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures grown on four different carbon sources identified 65% of the cells predicted proteins in cell lysates and supernatants. Biological and technical replication together with sophisticated statistical analysis were used to reliably quantify protein abundances and their changes as a function of carbon source. Extracellular, multifunctional glycosidases were significantly more abundant on cellobiose than on the crystalline cellulose substrates Avicel and filter paper, indicating either disaccharide induction or constitutive protein expression. Highly abundant flagellar, chemotaxis, and pilus proteins were detected during growth on insoluble substrates, suggesting motility or specific substrate attachment. The highly abundant extracellular binding protein COB47-0549 together with the COB47-1616 ATPase might comprise the primary ABC-transport system for cellooligosaccharides, while COB47-0096 and COB47-0097 could facilitate monosaccharide uptake. Oligosaccharide degradation can occur either via extracellular hydrolysis by a GH1 {beta}-glycosidase or by intracellular phosphorolysis using two GH94 enzymes. When C. obsidiansis was grown on switchgrass, the abundance of hemicellulases (including GH3, GH5, GH51, and GH67 enzymes) and certain sugar transporters increased significantly. Cultivation on biomass also caused a concerted increase in cytosolic enzymes for xylose and arabinose fermentation.

  1. Label-free quantitative proteomics for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis reveal distinct abundance patterns upon growth on cellobiose, crystalline cellulose, and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Adriane; Giannone, Richard J; Keller, Martin; Antranikian, Garabed; Graham, David E; Hettich, Robert L

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures grown on four different carbon sources identified 65% of the cells' predicted proteins in cell lysates and supernatants. Biological and technical replication together with sophisticated statistical analysis were used to reliably quantify protein abundances and their changes as a function of carbon source. Extracellular, multifunctional glycosidases were significantly more abundant on cellobiose than on the crystalline cellulose substrates Avicel and filter paper, indicating either disaccharide induction or constitutive protein expression. Highly abundant flagellar, chemotaxis, and pilus proteins were detected during growth on insoluble substrates, suggesting motility or specific substrate attachment. The highly abundant extracellular binding protein COB47_0549 together with the COB47_1616 ATPase might comprise the primary ABC-transport system for cellooligosaccharides, while COB47_0096 and COB47_0097 could facilitate monosaccharide uptake. Oligosaccharide degradation can occur either via extracellular hydrolysis by a GH1 β-glycosidase or by intracellular phosphorolysis using two GH94 enzymes. When C. obsidiansis was grown on switchgrass, the abundance of hemicellulases (including GH3, GH5, GH51, and GH67 enzymes) and certain sugar transporters increased significantly. Cultivation on biomass also caused a concerted increase in cytosolic enzymes for xylose and arabinose fermentation.

  2. Characterization of microbial growth on processing equipment by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial activity that leads to the formation of biofilms on process equipment can accelerate corrosion, reduce heat transfer rates, and generally decrease process efficiencies. Additional concerns arise in the food and pharma industries where product quality and safety are a high priority. Followi...

  3. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Resistance to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress at the Last Stages of Growth and Development of Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Revealed by Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María C.; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiological agents of the neglected, stigmatizing disease termed american cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). ACL is a zoonosis and rodents are the main reservoirs. Most cases of ACL are reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. The biological cycle of the parasite is digenetic because sand fly vectors transmit the motile promastigote stage to the mammalian host dermis during blood meal intakes. The amastigote stage survives within phagocytes of the mammalian host. The purpose of this study is detection and identification of changes in protein abundance by 2DE/MALDI-TOF/TOF at the main growth phases of L. amazonensis promastigotes in axenic culture and the differentiation process that takes place simultaneously. The average number of proteins detected per gel is 202 and the non-redundant cumulative number is 339. Of those, 63 are differentially abundant throughout growth and simultaneous differentiation of L. amazonensis promastigotes. The main finding is that certain proteins involved in resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stress are more abundant at the last stages of growth and differentiation of cultured L. amazonensis promastigotes. These proteins are the arginase, a light variant of the tryparedoxin peroxidase, the iron superoxide dismutase, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A and a light HSP70 variant. These data taken together with the decrease of the stress-inducible protein 1 levels are additional evidence supporting the previously described pre-adaptative hypothesis, which consists of preparation in advance towards the amastigote stage. PMID:27776144

  4. Growth of Deinococcus Radiodurans in Oils as Sole Source of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmaso, G. Z. L.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Leite, S. G. F.; Leitão, A. C.; Lage, C.

    2010-04-01

    Growth of deinococcus radiodurans was analysed in (i) gasoline, diesel oil with (ii) or without (iii) additives, (iv) sergipano oil and (v) arabic light oil. High microbial abundance was confirmed for many of them.

  5. Nanoporous microscale microbial incubators.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhifei; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals abundant microbial diversity that has not been cultured in the laboratory. Many attribute this so-called 'great plate count anomaly' to traditional microbial cultivation techniques, which largely facilitate the growth of a single species. Yet, it is widely recognized that bacteria in nature exist in complex communities. One technique to increase the pool of cultivated bacterial species is to co-culture multiple species in a simulated natural environment. Here, we present nanoporous microscale microbial incubators (NMMI) that enable high-throughput screening and real-time observation of multi-species co-culture. The key innovation in NMMI is that they facilitate inter-species communication while maintaining physical isolation between species, which is ideal for genomic analysis. Co-culture of a quorum sensing pair demonstrates that the NMMI can be used to culture multiple species in chemical communication while monitoring the growth dynamics of individual species. PMID:26584739

  6. Microbial maximal specific growth rate as a square-root function of biomass yield and two kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wilson W; Liao, James C

    2009-11-01

    Understanding how growth rates changes under different perturbations is fundamental to many aspect of microbial physiology. In this work, we experimentally showed that maximal specific growth rate is a square-root function of the biomass yield, the substrate turnover number, and the maximum synthesis rate of the substrate transporter under that condition. We used Escherichia coli cultures in lactose minimal medium as a model system by introducing genetic modifications, in vitro evolution, and ethanol stress to the cell. Deletion of crr affected all three parameters in different directions while deletion of ptsG decreased only the biomass yield. Ethanol stress negatively impacted all three parameters, while anaerobicity decreased biomass yield and transporter synthesis rate. In addition, laboratory evolution increased the growth rate in lactose mostly through enhancing the expression rate of the lac operon. Despite all these changes, the growth rate of the perturbed strain was successfully related to the three parameters by the square-root equation. Thus, this square-root relationship provides insight into how growth rate is altered by different physiological parameters. PMID:19712746

  7. Range expansions transition from pulled to pushed waves as growth becomes more cooperative in an experimental microbial population

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Korolev, Kirill S.; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Range expansions are becoming more frequent due to environmental changes and rare long-distance dispersal, often facilitated by anthropogenic activities. Simple models in theoretical ecology explain many emergent properties of range expansions, such as a constant expansion velocity, in terms of organism-level properties such as growth and dispersal rates. Testing these quantitative predictions in natural populations is difficult because of large environmental variability. Here, we used a controlled microbial model system to study range expansions of populations with and without intraspecific cooperativity. For noncooperative growth, the expansion dynamics were dominated by population growth at the low-density front, which pulled the expansion forward. We found these expansions to be in close quantitative agreement with the classical theory of pulled waves by Fisher [Fisher RA (1937) Ann Eugen 7(4):355–369] and Skellam [Skellam JG (1951) Biometrika 38(1-2):196–218], suitably adapted to our experimental system. However, as cooperativity increased, the expansions transitioned to being pushed, that is, controlled by growth and dispersal in the bulk as well as in the front. Given the prevalence of cooperative growth in nature, understanding the effects of cooperativity is essential to managing invading species and understanding their evolution. PMID:27185918

  8. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  9. Development of a fast and reliable method for the assessment of microbial colonization and growth on textiles by DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Linda; Schuster, K Christian; Merschak, Petra; Bechtold, Thomas; Redl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    There is a lack of relevant methods to assess the colonization of textiles by skin bacteria because present methods are mainly culture-based procedures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a fast and sensitive culture-independent procedure for the quantification of microbial colonization and growth on textiles. We have established a suitable protocol to use DNA quantification as a reliable method for in vitroand in vivoinvestigations of textiles. For DNA extraction, a two-step procedure comprising treatment of the textile with a solution containing Triton X-100 and lysozyme for 1 h and a successive treatment by SDS and proteinase K for 2 h turned out to be most efficient. DNA extracted from textiles and fabrics was than quantified with the highly sensitive PicoGreen fluorescent dye. In vitrochallenge tests demonstrated a strong correlation between numbers of bacteria on textiles and amount of DNA extracted from textiles. Therefore, this method was used to compare different materials after in vivotrials for assessment of their susceptibility for microbial colonization and growth.

  10. Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite and Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Preventing Browning and Microbial Growth on Fresh-Cut Produce

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  11. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables.

  12. Dimensionless parameters to summarize the influence of microbial growth and inhibition on the bioremediation of groundwater contaminants.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M; Hatfield, K

    2011-09-01

    Monod expressions are preferred over zero- and first-order decay expressions in modeling contaminants biotransformation in groundwater because they better represent complex conditions. However, the wide-range of values reported for Monod parameters suggests each case-study is unique. Such uniqueness restricts the usefulness of modeling, complicates an interpretation of natural attenuation and limits the utility of a bioattenuation assessment to a small number of similar cases. In this paper, four Monod-based dimensionless parameters are developed that summarize the effects of microbial growth and inhibition on groundwater contaminants. The four parameters represent the normalized effective microbial growth rate (η), the normalized critical contaminant/substrate concentration (S*), the critical contaminant/substrate inhibition factor (N), and the bioremediation efficacy (η*). These parameters enable contaminated site managers to assess natural attenuation or augmented bioremediation at multiple sites and then draw comparisons between disparate remediation activities, sites and target contaminants. Simulations results are presented that reveal the sensitivity of these dimensionless parameters to Monod parameters and varying electron donor/acceptor loads. These simulations also show the efficacy of attenuation (η*) varying over space and time. Results suggest electron donor/acceptor amendments maintained at relative concentrations S* between 0.5 and 1.5 produce the highest remediation efficiencies. Implementation of the developed parameters in a case study proves their usefulness.

  13. Microbial biodiversity in cheese consortia and comparative Listeria growth on surfaces of uncooked pressed cheeses.

    PubMed

    Callon, Cécile; Retureau, Emilie; Didienne, Robert; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2014-03-17

    The study set out to determine how changes in the microbial diversity of a complex antilisterial consortium from the surface of St-Nectaire cheese modify its antilisterial activities. On the basis of the microbial composition of a natural complex consortium named TR15 (Truefood consortium 15), three new consortia of different species and strain compositions were defined: TR15-SC (58 isolates from TR15 collection), TR15-M (pools of isolates from selective counting media) and TR15-BHI (pools of isolates from BHI medium). Their antilisterial activities on the surfaces of uncooked pressed cheese made with pasteurised milk were compared with the activity of complex consortium TR15 and a control cheese inoculated only with starter culture (Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii). The natural consortium TR15 was the most inhibitory, followed by reconstituted consortium TR15-BHI. The dynamics of the cheese rind microbial flora were monitored by counting on media and by isolate identification using 16S rDNA sequencing and direct 16S rDNA Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis. The combination of these methods showed that rind with natural consortium TR15 had greater microbial diversity and different microbial dynamics than cheese rinds with reconstituted consortia. Cheese rind with the natural consortium showed higher citrate consumption and the highest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids, connected with high levels of lactic acid bacteria such as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Vagococcus fluvialis, Enterococcus gilvus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactococcus lactis, ripening bacteria such as Arthrobacter nicotianae/arilaitensis, and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas psychrophila and Enterobacter spp.). The highest L. monocytogenes count was on rind with TR15-M and was positively associated with the highest pH value, high succinic and citric acid contents, and the highest levels of Marinilactibacillus

  14. Changes in Microbial Plankton Assemblages Induced by Mesoscale Oceanographic Features in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alicia K.; McInnes, Allison S.; Rooker, Jay R.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale circulation generated by the Loop Current in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) delivers growth-limiting nutrients to the microbial plankton of the euphotic zone. Consequences of physicochemically driven community shifts on higher order consumers and subsequent impacts on the biological carbon pump remain poorly understood. This study evaluates microbial plankton <10 μm abundance and community structure across both cyclonic and anti-cyclonic circulation features in the NGOM using flow cytometry (SYBR Green I and autofluorescence parameters). Non-parametric multivariate hierarchical cluster analyses indicated that significant spatial variability in community structure exists such that stations that clustered together were defined as having a specific ‘microbial signature’ (i.e. statistically homogeneous community structure profiles based on relative abundance of microbial groups). Salinity and a combination of sea surface height anomaly and sea surface temperature were determined by distance based linear modeling to be abiotic predictor variables significantly correlated to changes in microbial signatures. Correlations between increased microbial abundance and availability of nitrogen suggest nitrogen-limitation of microbial plankton in this open ocean area. Regions of combined coastal water entrainment and mesoscale convergence corresponded to increased heterotrophic prokaryote abundance relative to autotrophic plankton. The results provide an initial assessment of how mesoscale circulation potentially influences microbial plankton abundance and community structure in the NGOM. PMID:26375709

  15. Changes in Microbial Plankton Assemblages Induced by Mesoscale Oceanographic Features in the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alicia K; McInnes, Allison S; Rooker, Jay R; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale circulation generated by the Loop Current in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) delivers growth-limiting nutrients to the microbial plankton of the euphotic zone. Consequences of physicochemically driven community shifts on higher order consumers and subsequent impacts on the biological carbon pump remain poorly understood. This study evaluates microbial plankton <10 μm abundance and community structure across both cyclonic and anti-cyclonic circulation features in the NGOM using flow cytometry (SYBR Green I and autofluorescence parameters). Non-parametric multivariate hierarchical cluster analyses indicated that significant spatial variability in community structure exists such that stations that clustered together were defined as having a specific 'microbial signature' (i.e. statistically homogeneous community structure profiles based on relative abundance of microbial groups). Salinity and a combination of sea surface height anomaly and sea surface temperature were determined by distance based linear modeling to be abiotic predictor variables significantly correlated to changes in microbial signatures. Correlations between increased microbial abundance and availability of nitrogen suggest nitrogen-limitation of microbial plankton in this open ocean area. Regions of combined coastal water entrainment and mesoscale convergence corresponded to increased heterotrophic prokaryote abundance relative to autotrophic plankton. The results provide an initial assessment of how mesoscale circulation potentially influences microbial plankton abundance and community structure in the NGOM.

  16. Controls and dynamics of biochar decay and soil microbial abundance, carbon use efficiency during long-term biochar-amended soil incubations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar addition to soil has been proposed as a management strategy to sequester a recalcitrant form of carbon (C). However, there is growing evidence that biochar can be degraded by soil microbes and modify their abundance, community composition and activity. Yet we lack an understanding of how mic...

  17. The influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of Zink salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, L. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.; Mikheeva, G. A.

    The life support systems LSS for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems including biological recycling Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS Development and studies of influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on growth of seedlings under impact of heavy metals has good prospects and necessity because of migration of heavy metals in LSS Microbial associations are able to stimulate plants growth to protect them from pathogenic organisms and from toxicity of heavy metals salts The goal of this work was to investigate microbial associations action on the germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of different concentrations of ZnSO 4 The results of investigations showed 1 Zink salt had negative action on germination of wheat seeds beginning with concentrations - 8 MPC Maximum Permissible Concentration and higher 2 Microbial associations concentrations -10 4 -- 10 6 cells ml were able to decrease partly or completely the negative action of ZnSO 4 on germination of wheat seeds 3 Concentrations 10 4 -- 10 5 cells ml of microbial associations were able to decrease the negative action of Zink salts intervals from 2 to 32 MPA on the growth and development of wheat plantlets during heterotrophic phase 4 Root system of plants was more sensible to the negative action of ZnSO 4 than shoots of plants

  18. rRNA Gene Expression of Abundant and Rare Activated-Sludge Microorganisms and Growth Rate Induced Micropollutant Removal.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Regnery, Julia; Li, Dong; Jones, Zackary L; Holloway, Ryan W; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-06-21

    The role of abundant and rare taxa in modulating the performance of wastewater-treatment systems is a critical component of making better predictions for enhanced functions such as micropollutant biotransformation. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) and rRNA gene expression of taxa in an activated-sludge-treatment plant (sequencing batch membrane bioreactor) at two solids retention times (SRTs): 20 and 5 days. These two SRTs were used to influence the rates of micropollutant biotransformation and nutrient removal. Our results show that rare taxa (<1%) have disproportionally high ratios of rRNA to rDNA, an indication of higher protein synthesis, compared to abundant taxa (≥1%) and suggests that rare taxa likely play an unrecognized role in bioreactor performance. There were also significant differences in community-wide rRNA expression signatures at 20-day SRT: anaerobic-oxic-anoxic periods were the primary driver of rRNA similarity. These results indicate differential expression of rRNA at high SRTs, which may further explain why high SRTs promote higher rates of micropollutant biotransformation. An analysis of micropollutant-associated degradation genes via metagenomics and direct measurements of a suite of micropollutants and nutrients further corroborates the loss of enhanced functions at 5-day SRT operation. This work advances our knowledge of the underlying ecosystem properties and dynamics of abundant and rare organisms associated with enhanced functions in engineered systems. PMID:27196630

  19. Influence of Growth Phase, pH, and Temperature on the Abundance and Composition of Tetraether Lipids in the Thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Chen, Yufei; Jia, Chengling; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and composition of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) and glycerol tribiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GTGT) lipids were determined as a function of growth phase as a proxy for nutrient availability, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature in cultures of the thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus. Regardless of the cultivation condition, the abundance of GDGTs and GTGTs was greater in the polar than core fraction, with a marked decrease in core GDGTs in cultures harvested during log phase growth. These data are consistent with previous suggestions indicating that core GDGTs are re-functionalized during polar lipid synthesis. Under all conditions examined, polar lipids were enriched in a GDGT with 2 cyclopentyl rings (GDGT-2), indicating GDGT-2 is the preferred lipid in this taxon. However, lag or stationary phase grown cells or cells subjected to pH or thermal stress were enriched in GDGTs with 4, 5, or 6 rings and depleted in GDGTs with 1, 2, 3, rings relative to log phase cells grown under optimal conditions. Variation in the composition of polar GDGT lipids in cells harvested during various growth phases tended to be greater than in cells cultivated over a pH range of 0.3-1.1 and a temperature range of 53-63°C. These results suggest that the growth phase, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature are all important factors that shape the composition of tetraether lipids in Picrophilus. The similarity in enrichment of GDGTs with more rings in cultures undergoing nutrient, pH, and thermal stress points to GDGT cyclization as a generalized physiological response to stress in this taxon. PMID:27625636

  20. Influence of Growth Phase, pH, and Temperature on the Abundance and Composition of Tetraether Lipids in the Thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus

    PubMed Central

    Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Chen, Yufei; Jia, Chengling; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and composition of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) and glycerol tribiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GTGT) lipids were determined as a function of growth phase as a proxy for nutrient availability, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature in cultures of the thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus. Regardless of the cultivation condition, the abundance of GDGTs and GTGTs was greater in the polar than core fraction, with a marked decrease in core GDGTs in cultures harvested during log phase growth. These data are consistent with previous suggestions indicating that core GDGTs are re-functionalized during polar lipid synthesis. Under all conditions examined, polar lipids were enriched in a GDGT with 2 cyclopentyl rings (GDGT-2), indicating GDGT-2 is the preferred lipid in this taxon. However, lag or stationary phase grown cells or cells subjected to pH or thermal stress were enriched in GDGTs with 4, 5, or 6 rings and depleted in GDGTs with 1, 2, 3, rings relative to log phase cells grown under optimal conditions. Variation in the composition of polar GDGT lipids in cells harvested during various growth phases tended to be greater than in cells cultivated over a pH range of 0.3–1.1 and a temperature range of 53–63°C. These results suggest that the growth phase, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature are all important factors that shape the composition of tetraether lipids in Picrophilus. The similarity in enrichment of GDGTs with more rings in cultures undergoing nutrient, pH, and thermal stress points to GDGT cyclization as a generalized physiological response to stress in this taxon.

  1. Influence of Growth Phase, pH, and Temperature on the Abundance and Composition of Tetraether Lipids in the Thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus

    PubMed Central

    Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Chen, Yufei; Jia, Chengling; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and composition of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) and glycerol tribiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GTGT) lipids were determined as a function of growth phase as a proxy for nutrient availability, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature in cultures of the thermoacidophile Picrophilus torridus. Regardless of the cultivation condition, the abundance of GDGTs and GTGTs was greater in the polar than core fraction, with a marked decrease in core GDGTs in cultures harvested during log phase growth. These data are consistent with previous suggestions indicating that core GDGTs are re-functionalized during polar lipid synthesis. Under all conditions examined, polar lipids were enriched in a GDGT with 2 cyclopentyl rings (GDGT-2), indicating GDGT-2 is the preferred lipid in this taxon. However, lag or stationary phase grown cells or cells subjected to pH or thermal stress were enriched in GDGTs with 4, 5, or 6 rings and depleted in GDGTs with 1, 2, 3, rings relative to log phase cells grown under optimal conditions. Variation in the composition of polar GDGT lipids in cells harvested during various growth phases tended to be greater than in cells cultivated over a pH range of 0.3–1.1 and a temperature range of 53–63°C. These results suggest that the growth phase, the pH of growth medium, and incubation temperature are all important factors that shape the composition of tetraether lipids in Picrophilus. The similarity in enrichment of GDGTs with more rings in cultures undergoing nutrient, pH, and thermal stress points to GDGT cyclization as a generalized physiological response to stress in this taxon. PMID:27625636

  2. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard R; Richter, Michael; Diez, María Suárez; Solano, Jennifer; Bargiela, Rafael; Golyshina, Olga V; Manteca, Ángel; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallego, José R; Llorente, Irene; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Jensen, Ole N; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic growths at geographically separated acid mine drainages (AMDs) exhibit distinct populations. Yet, local heterogeneities are poorly understood. To gain novel mechanistic insights into this, we used OMICs tools to profile microbial populations coexisting in a single pyrite gallery AMD (pH ∼2) in three distinct compartments: two from a stratified streamer (uppermost oxic and lowermost anoxic sediment-attached strata) and one from a submerged anoxic non-stratified mat biofilm. The communities colonising pyrite and those in the mature formations appear to be populated by the greatest diversity of bacteria and archaea (including 'ARMAN' (archaeal Richmond Mine acidophilic nano-organisms)-related), as compared with the known AMD, with ∼44.9% unclassified sequences. We propose that the thick polymeric matrix may provide a safety shield against the prevailing extreme condition and also a massive carbon source, enabling non-typical acidophiles to develop more easily. Only 1 of 39 species were shared, suggesting a high metabolic heterogeneity in local microenvironments, defined by the O2 concentration, spatial location and biofilm architecture. The suboxic mats, compositionally most similar to each other, are more diverse and active for S, CO2, CH4, fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide metabolism. The oxic stratum of the streamer, displaying a higher diversity of the so-called 'ARMAN'-related Euryarchaeota, shows a higher expression level of proteins involved in signal transduction, cell growth and N, H2, Fe, aromatic amino acids, sphingolipid and peptidoglycan metabolism. Our study is the first to highlight profound taxonomic and functional shifts in single AMD formations, as well as new microbial species and the importance of H2 in acidic suboxic macroscopic growths. PMID:24430486

  3. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard R; Richter, Michael; Diez, María Suárez; Solano, Jennifer; Bargiela, Rafael; Golyshina, Olga V; Manteca, Ángel; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallego, José R; Llorente, Irene; Martins dos Santos, Vitor AP; Jensen, Ole N; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic growths at geographically separated acid mine drainages (AMDs) exhibit distinct populations. Yet, local heterogeneities are poorly understood. To gain novel mechanistic insights into this, we used OMICs tools to profile microbial populations coexisting in a single pyrite gallery AMD (pH ∼2) in three distinct compartments: two from a stratified streamer (uppermost oxic and lowermost anoxic sediment-attached strata) and one from a submerged anoxic non-stratified mat biofilm. The communities colonising pyrite and those in the mature formations appear to be populated by the greatest diversity of bacteria and archaea (including ‘ARMAN' (archaeal Richmond Mine acidophilic nano-organisms)-related), as compared with the known AMD, with ∼44.9% unclassified sequences. We propose that the thick polymeric matrix may provide a safety shield against the prevailing extreme condition and also a massive carbon source, enabling non-typical acidophiles to develop more easily. Only 1 of 39 species were shared, suggesting a high metabolic heterogeneity in local microenvironments, defined by the O2 concentration, spatial location and biofilm architecture. The suboxic mats, compositionally most similar to each other, are more diverse and active for S, CO2, CH4, fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide metabolism. The oxic stratum of the streamer, displaying a higher diversity of the so-called ‘ARMAN'-related Euryarchaeota, shows a higher expression level of proteins involved in signal transduction, cell growth and N, H2, Fe, aromatic amino acids, sphingolipid and peptidoglycan metabolism. Our study is the first to highlight profound taxonomic and functional shifts in single AMD formations, as well as new microbial species and the importance of H2 in acidic suboxic macroscopic growths. PMID:24430486

  4. Effects of abundance and water temperature on recruitment and growth of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) near South Bay, Lake Huron, 1954-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, Bryan A.; Brown, Edward H.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of catches in pound nets provided indices of population size (ages 2–6) and of recruitment (ages 4–6) for alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) spawning in South Bay (1954–82). Four hypotheses concerning the effects of stock size and water temperature on growth and recruitment were tested statistically. The number of recruits per spawner was not a function of parental stock size, but was dependent on surface-water temperatures in June and July. Although the size of both males and females at age 3 yr was positively related to surface-water temperatures in the three preceding summers, growth rates were only a function of water temperatures during the second year of growth (age 1). However, growth rates during the first, second, and third years of growth were all related to year-class strength. Thus, population abundance, through recruitment, was determined by an abiotic factor (water temperature), but growth was mostly affected by intraspecific competition for, presumably, food.

  5. Dietary microbial phytase exerts mixed effects on the gut health of tilapia: a possible reason for the null effect on growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Ran, Chao; He, Suxu; Cao, Yanan; Yao, Bin; Ye, Yuantu; Zhang, Xuezhen; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of dietary microbial phytase on the growth and gut health of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus ♀×Oreochromis aureus ♂), focusing on the effect on intestinal histology, adhesive microbiota and expression of immune-related cytokine genes. Tilapia were fed either control diet or diet supplemented with microbial phytase (1000 U/kg). Each diet was randomly assigned to four groups of fish reared in cages (3×3×2 m). After 12 weeks of feeding, weight gain and feed conversion ratio of tilapia were not significantly improved by dietary microbial phytase supplementation. However, significantly higher level of P content in the scales, tighter and more regular intestinal mucosa folds were observed in the microbial phytase group and the microvilli density was significantly increased. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered by microbial phytase supplementation (0·41microbial phytase, as indicated by the up-regulated intestinal expressions of the cytokine genes (tnf-α and tgf-β) and hsp70. In addition, the gut microvilli height was significantly decreased in the phytase group. These results indicate that dietary microbial phytase may exert mixed effects on hybrid tilapia, and can guide our future selection of phytases as aquafeed additives - that is, eliminating those that can stimulate intestinal inflammation. PMID:27080419

  6. TatC-dependent translocation of pyoverdine is responsible for the microbial growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeji; Kim, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Yu, Hyung Eun; Lee, Kiho; Jin, Shouguang; Ha, Un-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Infections are often not caused by a colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alone but by a consortium of other bacteria. Little is known about the impact of P. aeruginosa on the growth of other bacteria upon coinfection. Here, cell-ree culture supernatants obtained from P. aeruginosa suppressed the growth of a number of bacterial strains such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but had little effect on the growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. The growth suppression effect was obvious when P. aeruginosa was cultivated in M9 minimal media, and the suppression was not due to pyocyanin, a well-known antimicrobial toxin secreted by P. aeruginosa. By performing transposon mutagenesis, PA5070 encoding TatC was identified, and the culture supernatant of its mutant did not suppress the growth. HPLC analysis of supernatants showed that pyoverdine was a secondary metabolite present in culture supernatants of the wild-type strain, but not in those of the PA5070 mutant. Supplementation of FeCl2 as a source of iron compromised the growth suppression effect of supernatants and also recovered biofilm formation of S. aureus, indicating that pyoverdine-mediated iron acquisition is responsible for the growth suppression. Thus, this study provides the action of TatC-dependent pyoverdine translocation for the growth suppression of other bacteria, and it might aid understanding of the impact of P. aeruginosa in the complex community of bacterial species upon coinfection. PMID:26832668

  7. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity.

  8. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the microbial growth and quality of beef jerky during storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chun, Ho-Hyun; Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2010-11-01

    Electron beam irradiation was applied to improve the microbial safety of beef jerky during storage. Beef jerky samples were irradiated at doses of 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and stored at 20 °C for 60 d. Microbiological data indicated that the populations of total aerobic bacteria significantly decreased with increasing irradiation dosage. In particular, the populations of total aerobic bacteria were significantly decreased by 1.76 log CFU/g at 10 kJ/m 2, compared to the control. Color measurements showed reduced Hunter L and a values of beef jerky for all the treatments during storage, and the Hunter L, a, and b values of beef jerky were not significantly different among the treatments. Sensory evaluation results also showed that electron beam irradiation did not affect sensory scores in overall during storage. Therefore, the results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be useful in improving the microbial safety without impairing the quality of beef jerky during storage.

  9. Relative abundance, age, growth, and fecundity of grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus in Niantic River and Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Edward F.; Tomichek, Christine A.; Maynard, Tracy; Burton, Jennifer A.

    2005-04-01

    Grubby ( Myoxocephalus aenaeus, Cottidae) is a common benthic fish of inshore waters and estuaries of eastern Long Island Sound; however, little information exists on their life history or population demographics. This study utilised a long-term data series (1976-2002) to assess grubby life history and population demographics and explores trends in the Niantic River and Niantic Bay populations. In addition, we examined the age, size, and fecundity of adult grubby in 2001-02 to determine the population characteristics in the region. Mean grubby catch per unit effort (CPUE) in Niantic Bay ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1976 to 2.9 per trawl in 1984 while river CPUE ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1977 to 7.6 per trawl in 1989. Catch of grubby in bottom trawls varied seasonally with highest CPUE occurring in winter. Highest entrainment of grubby larvae occurred in 2001 while the lowest entrainment observed was in 1991. Four age classes, 0+ through III+, were derived from otolith analysis (N = 51) although length frequency analysis suggested the possibility of older fish in the population. The total number of eggs in ovaries ranged from 286 to 16 451 for grubby (N = 64) between 52 mm and 155 mm TL. Results of this study indicated a decline in abundance of adult grubby over the 26-year period, possibly related to concurrent declines in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) abundance and/or increased water temperature.

  10. Relative abundance, age, growth, and fecundity of grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus in Niantic River and Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, E.F.; Tomichek, C.A.; Maynard, T.; Burton, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Grubby (Myoxocephalus aenaeus, Cottidae) is a common benthic fish of inshore waters and estuaries of eastern Long Island Sound; however, little information exists on their life history or population demographics. This study utilised a long-term data series (1976-2002) to assess grubby life history and population demographics and explores trends in the Niantic River and Niantic Bay populations. In addition, we examined the age, size, and fecundity of adult grubby in 2001-02 to determine the population characteristics in the region. Mean grubby catch per unit effort (CPUE) in Niantic Bay ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1976 to 2.9 per trawl in 1984 while river CPUE ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1977 to 7.6 per trawl in 1989. Catch of grubby in bottom trawls varied seasonally with highest CPUE occurring in winter. Highest entrainment of grubby larvae occurred in 2001 while the lowest entrainment observed was in 1991. Four age classes, 0+ through III+, were derived from otolith analysis (N = 51) although length frequency analysis suggested the possibility of older fish in the population. The total number of eggs in ovaries ranged from 286 to 16 451 for grubby (N = 64) between 52 mm and 155 mm TL. Results of this study indicated a decline in abundance of adult grubby over the 26-year period, possibly related to concurrent declines in eelgrass (Zostera marina) abundance and/or increased water temperature. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems.

  12. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems. PMID:27347796

  13. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  14. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    DOE PAGES

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-08-15

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions inmore » a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Lastly, simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.« less

  15. An evaluation of microbial growth and corrosion of 316L SS in glycol/seawater mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason S.; Ray, Richard I.; Lowe, Kristine L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J.

    2003-01-01

    Glycol/seawater mixtures containing > 50% glycol inhibit corrosion of 316L stainless steel and do not support bacterial growth. The results indicate bacteria are able to use low concentrations of glycol (10%) as a growth medium, but bacterial growth decreased with increasing glycol concentration. Pitting potential, determined by anodic polarization, was used to evaluate susceptibility of 316L SS to corrosion in seawater-contaminated glycol. Mixture containing a minimum concentration of 50% propylene glycol-based coolant inhibited pitting corrosion. A slightly higher minimum concentration (55%) was needed for corrosion protection in ethylene glycol mixtures.

  16. Influence of pulsed magnetic field on soybean (Glycine max L.) seed germination, seedling growth and soil microbial population.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kumari, Bollipo Dyana Ranjitha

    2013-08-01

    The effects of pulsed magnetic field (PMF) treatment of soybean (Glycine max L. cv CO3) seeds were investigated on rate of seed germination, seedling growth, physico-chemical properties of seed leachates and soil microbial population under laboratory conditions. Seeds were exposed to PMF of 1500 nT at 0.1, 1.0 10.0 and 100.0 Hz for 5 h per day for 20 days, induced by enclosure coil systems. Non-treated seeds were considered as controls. All PMF treatments significantly increased the rate of seed germination, while 10 and 100 Hz PMFs showed the most effective response. The 1.0 and 10 Hz PMFs remarkably improved the fresh weight of shoots and roots, leaf area and plant height from seedlings from magnetically-exposed seeds compared to the control, while 10 Hz PMF increased the total soluble sugar, total protein and phenol contents. The leaf chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll were higher in PMF (10 and 100 Hz) pretreated plants, as compared to other treatments. In addition, activities of alpha-amylase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase were increased, while beta-amylase and protease activities were declined in PMF (10 Hz)-exposed soybean plants. Similarly, the capacity of absorbance of water by seeds and electrical conductivity of seed leachates were significantly enhanced by 10 Hz PMF exposure, whereas PMF (10 Hz) pretreated plants did not affect the microbial population in rhizosphere soil. The results suggested the potential of 10 Hz PMF treatment to enhance the germination and seedling growth of soybean.

  17. Effects of mild heat treatment on microbial growth and product quality of packaged fresh-cut table grapes.

    PubMed

    Kou, L; Luo, Y; Wu, D; Liu, X

    2007-10-01

    The changes in packaged fresh-cut grape quality and microbial growth as affected by mild heat treatments and the retention of grape cap stems during 5 degrees C storage were evaluated. Each individual grape was either manually pulled off (stemless) from the stems, or cut (cut stem) to allow for a 1- to 2-mm cap stem remaining on the berry. The samples were sanitized in 100 mg/L chlorine solution for 1 min, followed by a mild heat treatment in a water bath (45 degrees C, 8 min) or an oven (55 degrees C, 5 min). After cooling, the berries were packaged in rigid trays sealed with a gas permeable film and stored at 5 degrees C. Product quality and decay rate were evaluated periodically during storage. The results indicate that in the package headspace for hot water treatment of stemless grapes, partial pressures of O(2) declined significantly (P < 0.05) less and C(2)H(4) increased significantly (P < 0.001) less than for the control and hot air treatment. Stem removal and heat treatment had significant (P < 0.05) effects on the decay rate of grapes during storage. Hot water treatment maintained a significantly lower decay rate than the control and hot air treatment throughout the entire storage. Color and texture were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by either heat treatment or stem removal. Grapes that retained the cap stems and received hot water treatment had the lowest decay rate and lowest microbial growth with the absence of any negative impact on grape color, texture, and flavor.

  18. Influence of pulsed magnetic field on soybean (Glycine max L.) seed germination, seedling growth and soil microbial population.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kumari, Bollipo Dyana Ranjitha

    2013-08-01

    The effects of pulsed magnetic field (PMF) treatment of soybean (Glycine max L. cv CO3) seeds were investigated on rate of seed germination, seedling growth, physico-chemical properties of seed leachates and soil microbial population under laboratory conditions. Seeds were exposed to PMF of 1500 nT at 0.1, 1.0 10.0 and 100.0 Hz for 5 h per day for 20 days, induced by enclosure coil systems. Non-treated seeds were considered as controls. All PMF treatments significantly increased the rate of seed germination, while 10 and 100 Hz PMFs showed the most effective response. The 1.0 and 10 Hz PMFs remarkably improved the fresh weight of shoots and roots, leaf area and plant height from seedlings from magnetically-exposed seeds compared to the control, while 10 Hz PMF increased the total soluble sugar, total protein and phenol contents. The leaf chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll were higher in PMF (10 and 100 Hz) pretreated plants, as compared to other treatments. In addition, activities of alpha-amylase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase were increased, while beta-amylase and protease activities were declined in PMF (10 Hz)-exposed soybean plants. Similarly, the capacity of absorbance of water by seeds and electrical conductivity of seed leachates were significantly enhanced by 10 Hz PMF exposure, whereas PMF (10 Hz) pretreated plants did not affect the microbial population in rhizosphere soil. The results suggested the potential of 10 Hz PMF treatment to enhance the germination and seedling growth of soybean. PMID:24772951

  19. Effects of mild heat treatment on microbial growth and product quality of packaged fresh-cut table grapes.

    PubMed

    Kou, L; Luo, Y; Wu, D; Liu, X

    2007-10-01

    The changes in packaged fresh-cut grape quality and microbial growth as affected by mild heat treatments and the retention of grape cap stems during 5 degrees C storage were evaluated. Each individual grape was either manually pulled off (stemless) from the stems, or cut (cut stem) to allow for a 1- to 2-mm cap stem remaining on the berry. The samples were sanitized in 100 mg/L chlorine solution for 1 min, followed by a mild heat treatment in a water bath (45 degrees C, 8 min) or an oven (55 degrees C, 5 min). After cooling, the berries were packaged in rigid trays sealed with a gas permeable film and stored at 5 degrees C. Product quality and decay rate were evaluated periodically during storage. The results indicate that in the package headspace for hot water treatment of stemless grapes, partial pressures of O(2) declined significantly (P < 0.05) less and C(2)H(4) increased significantly (P < 0.001) less than for the control and hot air treatment. Stem removal and heat treatment had significant (P < 0.05) effects on the decay rate of grapes during storage. Hot water treatment maintained a significantly lower decay rate than the control and hot air treatment throughout the entire storage. Color and texture were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by either heat treatment or stem removal. Grapes that retained the cap stems and received hot water treatment had the lowest decay rate and lowest microbial growth with the absence of any negative impact on grape color, texture, and flavor. PMID:17995622

  20. Effect of high oxygen modified atmosphere packaging on microbial growth and sensorial qualities of fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Jacxsens, L; Devlieghere, F; Van der Steen, C; Debevere, J

    2001-12-30

    The application of High Oxygen Atmospheres (HOA) (i.e. > 70% O2) for packaging ready-to-eat vegetables was evaluated as an alternative technique for low O2 Equilibrium Modified Atmosphere (EMA) packaging (3% O2-5% CO2-balance N2) for respiring products. Comparative experiments between both techniques were performed in-vitro and in-vivo. Typical spoilage causing microorganisms (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Candida lambica), the moulds Botrytis cinerea, Aspergillus flavus and the opportunistic psychrotrophic human pathogenic microorganism associated with refrigerated minimally processed vegetables. Aeromonas caviae (HG4), showed a retarded growth during the conducted in-vitro studies at 4 degrees C in 70%, 80% and 95% O2 as examples of HOA compared to the in-vitro experiments in 5% O2 (as example of EMA packaging) and the effect was more pronounced in 95% O2. The effect of the high O2-concentrations on the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes resulted in an extended lag phase (95% O2). The plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora was increasingly stimulated by increasing high O2-concentrations. During a storage experiment of three types of ready-to-eat vegetables (mushroom slices, grated celeriac and shredded chicory endive), which are sensitive to enzymatic browning and microbial spoilage, the effect of EMA and HOA (95% O2-5% N2) on their quality and shelf life was compared. High O2 atmospheres were found to be particularly effective in inhibiting enzymatic browning of the tested vegetables. Also, the microbial quality was better as a reduction in yeast growth was observed. The HOA can be applied as an alternative for low O2 modified atmospheres for some specific types of ready-to-eat vegetables, sensitive to enzymatic browning and spoilage by yeasts.

  1. Effects of Resveratrol and Essential Oils on Growth Performance, Immunity, Digestibility and Fecal Microbial Shedding in Challenged Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S. T.; Hossain, M. E.; Kim, G. M.; Hwang, J. A.; Ji, H.; Yang, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of resveratrol and essential oils from medicinal plants on the growth performance, immunity, digestibility, and fecal microbial shedding of weaned piglets. A total of 48 weaned piglets (8 kg initial weight, 28-d-old) were randomly allotted to four dietary treatments with 3 replications of 4 piglets each. The dietary treatments were NC (negative control; basal diet), PC (positive control; basal diet+0.002% apramycin), T1 (basal diet+0.2% resveratrol), and T2 (basal diet+0.0125% essential oil blend). All piglets were orally challenged with 5 ml culture fluid containing 2.3×108 cfu/ml of Escherichia coli KCTC 2571 and 5.9×108 cfu/ml Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium. The PC group (p<0.05) showed the highest average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) throughout the experimental period, although feed conversion ratio (FCR) was improved in the T1 group (p>0.05). Serum IgG level was increased in the T1 group, whereas TNF-α levels was reduced in the supplemented groups compared to control (p<0.05). The PC diet improved the dry matter (DM) digestibility, whereas PC and T2 diets improved nitrogen (N) digestibility compared to NC and T1 diets (p<0.05). Fecal Salmonella and E. coli counts were reduced in all treatment groups compared to control (p<0.05). Fecal Lactobacillus spp. count was increased in the T2 group compared to others (p<0.05). Dietary treatments had no significant effect on fecal Bacillus spp. count throughout the entire experimental period. Based on these results, resveratrol showed strong potential as antibiotic alternatives for reversing the adverse effects of weaning stress on growth performance, immunity and microbial environment in E. coli and Salmonella-challenged piglets. PMID:25049839

  2. Microbial Growth and Air Pollutants in the Corrosion of Carbonate Rocks: Results from Laboratory and Outdoor Experimental Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, B.; Poli, G.; Pitzurra, L.

    2003-04-01

    Microorganisms and atmospheric pollution are primary causes of deterioration of materials exposed to open air. Due to the variety of chemical-mineralogical compositions and textures, stone represents a variegated substrate that interacts with environmental fluids and particulate, and is a selective environment for biological proliferation. Carbonate rocks, in particular, are highly exposed to environmental decay and extremely susceptible to acid attack caused by atmospheric pollutants and metabolic acid production. The aim of this work is to study the combined effect of microbial contamination and atmospheric pollutants in the weathering of carbonate rocks by means of laboratory and outdoor exposure tests. Laboratory experiments performed on carbonate rocks allowed evaluation of the influence of the gas mixture in the chemical modifications of the lithic substrate, and formulation of a kinetic model of sulphation. The obtained results suggest that nucleation alternates with growth as leading processes in the development of sulphation. In particular, nucleation of the reaction products is the leading process in the initial period of sulphation, which is characterized by a marked slowdown of the reaction progress, whereas growth of the products is the leading process in the subsequent period of resumption of sulphation. In situ experiments performed by exposing limestone specimens at two air monitoring stations in Perugia with different degrees of urban air pollution showed high levels of fungal colonization at early times and the presence of weathering products (i.e. gypsum) in the longer term. Results point to a combined effect of microbial colonization and atmospheric pollutants in promoting the weathering of stone through acid attack within the film of water present on the surface of the exposed material, and through the oxidation of metal sulphide particulate pollutant to sulphate. Laboratory tests assaying the extent of fungal colonization and/or chemical

  3. Effects of 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) on microbial growth in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Noftsger, S M; St-Pierre, N R; Karnati, S K R; Firkins, J L

    2003-08-01

    2-Hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) positively affects milk composition and yield, potentially through ruminal actions. Four continuous culture fermenters were used to determine the optimal concentration of HMB for digestibility of organic matter (OM), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and hemicellulose and synthesis of microbial N. A highly degradable mix of hay and grain was used as a basal diet to simulate a typical lactation diet. Three concentrations of HMB (0, 0.055, and 0.110%) and one concentration of dl-Met (0.097%) were infused into the fermenters according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of the four 10-d experimental periods. Digestibility of OM, hemicellulose, and NDF was largely insensitive to treatment. Digestibility of ADF showed a quadratic effect to supplementation of HMB, with 0.055% having lower digestibility than 0 or 0.110%. Total production of VFA was not influenced by HMB supplementation, but differences in concentration and production of individual VFA were seen. Isobutyrate increased linearly with increasing HMB supplementation. Propionate concentration decreased linearly with increased HMB supplementation, but propionate production showed a quadratic trend (P = 0.13). A higher concentration of acetate was detected for dl-Met compared with the highest HMB concentration. There were trends (P < 0.15) for dl-Met to decrease the production of isobutyrate and to lower the concentration of butyrate when compared with HMB. Microbial efficiency was not different among treatments. The proportion of bacterial N produced from NH3-N decreased linearly with increasing HMB, and bacteria receiving dl-Met synthesized more N from NH3-N than those receiving HMB. These data suggest that supplementation of HMB may have a sparing effect on branched chain volatile fatty acids because the fatty acids are not needed to provide carbon for synthesis of valine, isoleucine and

  4. Microbial Growth Inferred from Nutrient Depletion in Deepwater Horizon Submerged Oil/Gas Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.; Joung, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident resulted in a substantial uncontrolled hydrocarbon release to the northern Gulf of Mexico, much of which was entrained in deep submerged plumes. While bio-degradation of the hydrocarbons has been inferred from microbial biomass and genetics, the amount of conversion of oil and gas carbon to biomass remains uncertain. Here we examine correlated depletions of nitrate, phosphate, and oxygen in the submerged plumes during May 2010. Combining these correlations with published estimates of overall oxygen consumption, we estimate that the substantial portion of hydrocarbons in these plumes was initially converted to biomass. This contrasts with nutrient-limited surface waters where other work has suggested respiration to carbon dioxide to be the dominant fate of the hydrocarbons.

  5. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns. PMID:25252643

  6. Better to light a candle than curse the darkness: illuminating spatial localization and temporal dynamics of rapid microbial growth in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Herron, Patrick M; Gage, Daniel J; Arango Pinedo, Catalina; Haider, Zane K; Cardon, Zoe G

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere is a hotbed of microbial activity in ecosystems, fueled by carbon compounds from plant roots. Basic questions about the location and dynamics of plant-spurred microbial growth in the rhizosphere are difficult to answer with standard, destructive soil assays mixing a multitude of microbe-scale microenvironments in a single, often sieved, sample. Soil microbial biosensors designed with the luxCDABE reporter genes fused to a promoter of interest enable continuous imaging of the microbial perception of (and response to) environmental conditions in soil. We used the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as host to plasmid pZKH2 containing a fusion between the strong constitutive promoter nptII and luxCDABE (coding for light-emitting proteins) from Vibrio fischeri. Experiments in liquid media demonstrated that high light production by KT2440/pZKH2 was associated with rapid microbial growth supported by high carbon availability. We applied the biosensors in microcosms filled with non-sterile soil in which corn (Zea mays L.), black poplar (Populus nigra L.), or tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) was growing. We detected minimal light production from microbiosensors in the bulk soil, but biosensors reported continuously from around roots for as long as six days. For corn, peaks of luminescence were detected 1-4 and 20-35 mm along the root axis behind growing root tips, with the location of maximum light production moving farther back from the tip as root growth rate increased. For poplar, luminescence around mature roots increased and decreased on a coordinated diel rhythm, but was not bright near root tips. For tomato, luminescence was dynamic, but did not exhibit a diel rhythm, appearing in acropetal waves along roots. KT2440/pZKH2 revealed that root tips are not always the only, or even the dominant, hotspots for rhizosphere microbial growth, and carbon availability is highly variable in space and time around roots. PMID:24032034

  7. Better to light a candle than curse the darkness: illuminating spatial localization and temporal dynamics of rapid microbial growth in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Patrick M.; Gage, Daniel J.; Arango Pinedo, Catalina; Haider, Zane K.; Cardon, Zoe G.

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere is a hotbed of microbial activity in ecosystems, fueled by carbon compounds from plant roots. Basic questions about the location and dynamics of plant-spurred microbial growth in the rhizosphere are difficult to answer with standard, destructive soil assays mixing a multitude of microbe-scale microenvironments in a single, often sieved, sample. Soil microbial biosensors designed with the luxCDABE reporter genes fused to a promoter of interest enable continuous imaging of the microbial perception of (and response to) environmental conditions in soil. We used the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as host to plasmid pZKH2 containing a fusion between the strong constitutive promoter nptII and luxCDABE (coding for light-emitting proteins) from Vibrio fischeri. Experiments in liquid media demonstrated that high light production by KT2440/pZKH2 was associated with rapid microbial growth supported by high carbon availability. We applied the biosensors in microcosms filled with non-sterile soil in which corn (Zea mays L.), black poplar (Populus nigra L.), or tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) was growing. We detected minimal light production from microbiosensors in the bulk soil, but biosensors reported continuously from around roots for as long as six days. For corn, peaks of luminescence were detected 1–4 and 20–35 mm along the root axis behind growing root tips, with the location of maximum light production moving farther back from the tip as root growth rate increased. For poplar, luminescence around mature roots increased and decreased on a coordinated diel rhythm, but was not bright near root tips. For tomato, luminescence was dynamic, but did not exhibit a diel rhythm, appearing in acropetal waves along roots. KT2440/pZKH2 revealed that root tips are not always the only, or even the dominant, hotspots for rhizosphere microbial growth, and carbon availability is highly variable in space and time around roots. PMID:24032034

  8. Assessing the use of delta(13)C natural abundance in separation of root and microbial respiration in a Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Ambus, Per

    2004-01-01

    Our understanding of forest biosphere-atmosphere interactions is fundamental for predicting forest ecosystem responses to climatic changes. Currently, however, our knowledge is incomplete partly due to inability to separate the major components of soil CO(2) effluxes, viz. root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil organic matter and microbial decomposition of litter material. In this study we examined whether the delta(13)C characteristics of solid organic matter and respired CO(2) from different soil-C components and root respiration in a Danish beech forest were useful to provide information on the root respiration contribution to total CO(2) effluxes. The delta(13)C isotopic analyses of CO(2) were performed using a FinniganMAT Delta(PLUS) isotope-ratio mass spectrometer coupled in continuous flow mode to a trace gas preparation-concentration unit (PreCon). Gas samples in 2-mL crimp seal vials were analysed in a fully automatic mode with an experimental standard error +/-0.11 per thousand. We observed that the CO(2) derived from root-free mineral soil horizons (A, B(W)) was more enriched in (13)C (delta(13)C range -21.6 to -21.2 per thousand ) compared with CO(2) derived from root-free humus layers (delta(13)C range -23.6 to -23.4 per thousand ). The CO(2) evolved from root respiration in isolated young beech plants revealed a value intermediate between those for the soil humus and mineral horizons, delta(13)C(root) = -22.2 per thousand, but was associated with great variability (SE +/- 1.0 per thousand ) due to plant-specific differences. delta(13)C of CO(2) from in situ below-ground respiration averaged -22.8 per thousand, intermediate between the values for the humus layer and root respiration, but variability was great (SE +/- 0.4 per thousand ) due to pronounced spatial patterns. Overall, we were unable to statistically separate the CO(2) of root respiration vs. soil organic matter decomposition based solely on delta(13)C signatures, yet the trend in

  9. Effect of gamma irradiation and storage time on microbial growth and physicochemical characteristics of pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata Duchesne ex Poiret) puree.

    PubMed

    Gliemmo, María F; Latorre, María E; Narvaiz, Patricia; Campos, Carmen A; Gerschenson, Lía N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation (0-2 kGy) and storage time (0-28 days) on microbial growth and physicochemical characteristics of a packed pumpkin puree was studied. For that purpose, a factorial design was applied. The puree contained potassium sorbate, glucose and vanillin was stored at 25°C . Gamma irradiation diminished and storage time increased microbial growth. A synergistic effect between both variables on microbial growth was observed. Storage time decreased pH and color of purees. Sorbate content decreased with storage time and gamma irradiation. Mathematical models of microbial growth generated by the factorial design allowed estimating that a puree absorbing 1.63 kGy would have a shelf-life of 4 days. In order to improve this time, some changes in the applied hurdles were assayed. These included a thermal treatment before irradiation, a reduction of irradiation dose to 0.75 kGy and a decrease in storage temperature at 20°C . As a result, the shelf-life of purees increased to 28 days. PMID:23733817

  10. Influence of mechanical disintegration on the microbial growth of aerobic sludge biomass: A comparative study of ultrasonic and shear gap homogenizers by oxygen uptake measurements.

    PubMed

    Divyalakshmi, P; Murugan, D; Sivarajan, M; Saravanan, P; Lajapathi Rai, C

    2015-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant incorporates physical, chemical and biological processes to treat and remove the contaminants. The main drawback of conventional activated sludge process is the huge production of excess sludge, which is an unavoidable byproduct. The treatment and disposal of excess sludge costs about 60% of the total operating cost. The ideal way to reduce excess sludge production during wastewater treatment is by preventing biomass formation within the aerobic treatment train rather than post treatment of the generated sludge. In the present investigation two different mechanical devices namely, Ultrasonic and Shear Gap homogenizers have been employed to disintegrate the aerobic biomass. This study is intended to restrict the multiplication of microbial biomass and at the same time degrade the organics present in wastewater by increasing the oxidative capacity of microorganisms. The disintegrability on biomass was determined by biochemical methods. Degree of inactivation provides the information on inability of microorganisms to consume oxygen upon disruption. The soluble COD quantifies the extent of release of intra cellular compounds. The participation of disintegrated microorganism in wastewater treatment process was carried out in two identical respirometeric reactors. The results show that Ultrasonic homogenizer is very effective in the disruption of microorganisms leading to a maximum microbial growth reduction of 27%. On the other hand, Shear gap homogenizer does not favor the sludge growth reduction rather it facilitates the growth. This study also shows that for better microbial growth reduction, floc size reduction alone is not sufficient but also microbial disruption is essential.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation and storage time on microbial growth and physicochemical characteristics of pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata Duchesne ex Poiret) puree.

    PubMed

    Gliemmo, María F; Latorre, María E; Narvaiz, Patricia; Campos, Carmen A; Gerschenson, Lía N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation (0-2 kGy) and storage time (0-28 days) on microbial growth and physicochemical characteristics of a packed pumpkin puree was studied. For that purpose, a factorial design was applied. The puree contained potassium sorbate, glucose and vanillin was stored at 25°C . Gamma irradiation diminished and storage time increased microbial growth. A synergistic effect between both variables on microbial growth was observed. Storage time decreased pH and color of purees. Sorbate content decreased with storage time and gamma irradiation. Mathematical models of microbial growth generated by the factorial design allowed estimating that a puree absorbing 1.63 kGy would have a shelf-life of 4 days. In order to improve this time, some changes in the applied hurdles were assayed. These included a thermal treatment before irradiation, a reduction of irradiation dose to 0.75 kGy and a decrease in storage temperature at 20°C . As a result, the shelf-life of purees increased to 28 days.

  12. The effect of heavy metal concentration and soil pH on the abundance of selected microbial groups within ArcelorMittal Poland steelworks in Cracow.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Anna; Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the effect of heavy metal concentration and soil pH on the abundance of the selected soil microorganisms within ArcelorMittal Poland steelworks, Cracow. The analysis included 20 soil samples, where the concentration of Fe, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, Mn, Cr and soil pH were evaluated together with the number of mesophilic bacteria, fungi, Actinomycetes and Azotobacter spp. In the majority of samples soil pH was alkaline. The limits of heavy metals exceeded in eight samples and in one sample, the concentration of Zn exceeded 31-fold. Chromium was the element which most significantly limited the number of bacteria and Actinomycetes.

  13. Microbial colonization and growth on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.; Sundquist, A. R.; Lawrence, J.; Doyle, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    To determine whether a bacterial film forms on sulfur minerals in situ, various sulfur containing and other minerals were incubated in Penitencia Creek. The rate of cell growth and attachment within the surface microenvironment of mineral surfaces was also determined. To determine whether surfaces enriched with soluble sulfur substrates (cysteine, glutathione, thioglycolate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) increased the rate of growth or attachment of natural communities, membrane enrichments were incubated. These rates were determined as described by Caldwell et al. (1981, 1983). The growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a heterotrophic sulfur oxidizer, was studied in batch cell suspensions and in continuous culture. In batch culture the cells were oxygen limited (growth rate 0.33 per hour under oxygen limitations and 0.52 per hour when vigorously aerated). Growth within the film was glucose limited. Several behavioral phenomena were observed for cells growing within the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Despite a flow of 10 cm per second in the environment, the bacteria were able to move freely in both directions within the hydrodynamic boundary layer.

  14. Interaction of unsaturated fat or coconut oil with monensin in lactating dairy cows fed 12 times daily. I. Protozoal abundance, nutrient digestibility, and microbial protein flow to the omasum.

    PubMed

    Reveneau, C; Karnati, S K R; Oelker, E R; Firkins, J L

    2012-04-01

    Monensin (tradename: Rumensin) should reduce the extent of amino acid deamination in the rumen, and supplemental fat should decrease protozoal abundance and intraruminal N recycling. Because animal-vegetable (AV) fat can be biohydrogenated in the rumen and decrease its effectiveness as an anti-protozoal agent, we included diets supplemented with coconut oil (CNO) to inhibit protozoa. In a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments, 6 rumen-cannulated cows were fed diets without or with Rumensin (12 g/909 kg) and either no fat (control), 5% AV fat, or 5% CNO. The log10 concentrations (cells/mL) of total protozoa were not different between control (5.97) and AV fat (5.95) but were decreased by CNO (4.79; main effect of fat source). Entodinium and Dasytricha decreased as a proportion of total cells from feeding CNO, whereas Epidinium was unchanged in total abundance and thus increased proportionately. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected by diet, but the acetate:propionate ratio decreased for CNO (1.85) versus control (2.95) or AV fat (2.58). Feeding CNO (23.8%) decreased ruminal neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with control (31.1%) and AV fat (30.5%). The total-tract digestibility of NDF was lower for CNO (45.8%) versus control (57.0%) and AV fat (54.6%), with no difference in apparent organic matter digestibility (averaging 69.8%). The omasal flows of microbial N and non-ammonia N were lower for CNO versus control and AV fat, but efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was not affected. The dry matter intake was 4.5 kg/d lower with CNO, which decreased milk production by 3.1 kg/d. Main effect means of dry matter intake and milk yield tended to decrease by 0.7 and 1.2 kg/d, respectively, when Rumensin was added. Both percentage and production of milk fat decreased for CNO (main effect of fat source). An interaction was observed such that AV decreased milk fat yield more when combined with Rumensin

  15. Microbial growth in dry grain food (Sunsik) beverages prepared with water, milk, soymilk, or honey-water.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin-Ho; Lee, Sun-Young

    2010-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the growth of microorganisms, including pathogenic bacteria such as Cronobacter sakazakii and Bacillus cereus, in Sunsik beverages made of water, milk, soymilk, or honey-water during storage at room temperature. Prepared Sunsik beverages were stored at room temperature and the growth of total aerobic counts, Escherichia coli/coliforms, and yeast and mold were measured. Also, samples inoculated with a cocktail of C. sakazakii or B. cereus spores were stored at room temperature and their growths were determined during storage. Populations of total aerobic counts and coliforms significantly increased with increasing storage time at room temperature, which resulted in higher than 8 log and 7 log after 24 h in all samples except for the honey-water sample, respectively. Levels of total aerobic counts and coliforms were significantly lower in the honey-water sample than in the other samples after 6 and 9 h of storage, respectively. Initial populations of C. sakazakii and B. cereus ranged from 0 to 1 log CFU/mL, respectively, and these populations significantly increased with increasing storage time at room temperature. Therefore, populations of C. sakazakii and B. cereus were approximately 7 to 8 log CFU/mL after 24 h of storage. However, after 12 and 9 h of storage, there were significant differences in levels of C. sakazakii and B. cereus between the honey-water sample and the other samples, respectively. Based on these results, the addition of honey can inhibit microbial growth in Sunsik beverages; however, the best way to avoid pathogen infection would be to consume Sunsik beverages as soon as possible after preparation.

  16. Mapping high-growth phenotypes in the flux space of microbial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Font-Clos, Francesc; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and empirical observations on cell metabolism cannot be understood as a whole without their integration into a consistent systematic framework. However, the characterization of metabolic flux phenotypes is typically reduced to the study of a single optimal state, such as maximum biomass yield that is by far the most common assumption. Here, we confront optimal growth solutions to the whole set of feasible flux phenotypes (FFPs), which provides a benchmark to assess the likelihood of optimal and high-growth states and their agreement with experimental results. In addition, FFP maps are able to uncover metabolic behaviours, such as aerobic fermentation accompanying exponential growth on sugars at nutrient excess conditions, that are unreachable using standard models based on optimality principles. The information content of the full FFP space provides us with a map to explore and evaluate metabolic behaviour and capabilities, and so it opens new avenues for biotechnological and biomedical applications. PMID:26289659

  17. Gibberellin Regulates PIN-FORMED Abundance and Is Required for Auxin Transport–Dependent Growth and Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Willige, Björn C.; Isono, Erika; Richter, René; Zourelidou, Melina; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Plants integrate different regulatory signals to control their growth and development. Although a number of physiological observations suggest that there is crosstalk between the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) and auxin, as well as with auxin transport, the molecular basis for this hormonal crosstalk remains largely unexplained. Here, we show that auxin transport is reduced in the inflorescences of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in GA biosynthesis and signaling. We further show that this reduced auxin transport correlates with a reduction in the abundance of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators in GA-deficient plants and that PIN protein levels recover to wild-type levels following GA treatment. We also demonstrate that the regulation of PIN protein levels cannot be explained by a transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes but that GA deficiency promotes, at least in the case of PIN2, the targeting of PIN proteins for vacuolar degradation. In genetic studies, we reveal that the reduced auxin transport of GA mutants correlates with an impairment