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Sample records for abundant myxoid stroma

  1. Claudin 6 expression is useful to distinguish myxofibrosarcomas from other myxoid soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Takizawa, Katsumi; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuichi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Harimaya, Katsumi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-06-01

    Myxofibrosarcoma (MFS) is characterized by abundant myxoid stroma, a wide spectrum of cytological atypia, and frequent local recurrence. Some soft tissue tumors with myxoid stroma can histologically mimic MFS, but have different biological behaviors. Here we sought to identify a useful diagnostic marker for MFS. After our analysis of the gene expression dataset from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we focused on claudin 6 (CLDN 6). The status of CLDN 6 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 61 samples of MFS and other (benign) myxoid soft tissue tumors (28 myxoma samples, 12 nodular fasciitis samples), 18 low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma, 30 myxoid liposarcoma, 29 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma and 27 dedifferentiated liposarcoma with myxoid feature samples. The correlation between the expression of CLDN 6 and clinicopathological findings in MFS was also investigated. Immunohistochemically, high expression of CLDN 6 was observed in approx. 65% of the MFSs, whereas the benign soft tissue tumors did not show a high expression of CLDN 6. The expression of CLDN 6 in the MFS was significantly higher than those of other tumor specimens. Among the MFSs, the high expression of CLDN 6 was correlated with high FNCLCC grades and high AJCC stages. CLDN 6 may be useful for the differential diagnosis from benign myxoid tumor and for predicting the aggressive biological behavior of MFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the masticator space in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Romañach, Mário-José; Carlos, Román; Nuyens, Michel; de Andrade, Bruno-Augusto-Benevenuto; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2017-06-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a malignant soft-tissue neoplasm rarely described in the head and neck region of children and adolescents. We describe a case of EMC affecting the masticator space and a literature review. A 13-year-old boy who presented a large painless, diffuse mass causing progressive midfacial asymmetry of 6 months duration. Histopathological evaluation revealed a multinodular lesion, containing scattered round vacuolated tumor cells dispersed in an abundant myxoid stroma, separated by fibrous septae. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positivity for vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, and chromogranin. The Ki-67 labelling index was 42%. The patient was treated surgically with tumor resection followed by adjuvant local radiotherapy. The patient died 1 year after initial diagnosis due to locoregional tumor dissemination. EMC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myxoid neoplasms in the head and neck region. Key words:Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, masticator space, parapharyngeal space, immunohistochemistry, children.

  3. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the masticator space in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Romañach, Mário-José; Carlos, Román; Nuyens, Michel; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2017-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a malignant soft-tissue neoplasm rarely described in the head and neck region of children and adolescents. We describe a case of EMC affecting the masticator space and a literature review. A 13-year-old boy who presented a large painless, diffuse mass causing progressive midfacial asymmetry of 6 months duration. Histopathological evaluation revealed a multinodular lesion, containing scattered round vacuolated tumor cells dispersed in an abundant myxoid stroma, separated by fibrous septae. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positivity for vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, and chromogranin. The Ki-67 labelling index was 42%. The patient was treated surgically with tumor resection followed by adjuvant local radiotherapy. The patient died 1 year after initial diagnosis due to locoregional tumor dissemination. EMC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myxoid neoplasms in the head and neck region. Key words:Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, masticator space, parapharyngeal space, immunohistochemistry, children. PMID:28638563

  4. Recurrent BCOR internal tandem duplication and BCOR or BCL6 expression distinguish primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy from congenital infantile fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Teresa; Clay, Michael R; Allen, Sariah J; Orr, Brent A

    2017-06-01

    Primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy is a rare sarcoma that preferentially affects infants. It can be locally aggressive and rarely metastasizes, but the long-term outcome of children with this tumor is mostly unknown. Histologically, it is characterized by primitive cells with abundant myxoid stroma. Internal tandem duplication of B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6)-interacting co-repressor (BCOR) exon 15 has recently been described in clear cell sarcoma of kidney, central nervous system high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration, and primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy. Herein, we report five cases of primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy: three girls and two boys with mean age of 6.5 months. The tumors were located in the paraspinal region (n=3), back (n=1), or foot (n=1) and ranged in size from 2.5 to 10.2 cm. BCOR internal tandem duplication was confirmed by PCR and sequencing in all five cases. The minimally duplicated region consisted of nine residues, which is shorter than was previously reported in other BCOR-associated tumors. To assess the clinical value and specificity of the BCOR internal tandem duplication, a group of 11 ETV6-rearranged congenital infantile fibrosarcomas were evaluated and no BCOR internal tandem duplication was identified in any case. Though not detected in congenital infantile fibrosarcomas, BCOR and BCL6 immunoreactivity was present in >90% of the nuclei of tumor cells in each of the five primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy. The presence of BCOR internal tandem duplication in all five primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumors of infancy provides evidence that it is a recurrent somatic abnormality and substantiates the concept that this tumor is a unique sarcoma of infancy. Our findings indicate that identification of BCOR internal tandem duplication and/or nuclear immunoreactivity for BCOR or BCL6 can aid in the diagnosis of primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy and help to differentiate

  5. Omental-mesenteric myxoid hamartomas. Infantile lesions simulating malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Crussi, F; deMello, D E; Sotelo-Avila, C

    1983-09-01

    Three infants presented with multiple nodular tumors of the omentum and mesentery characterized histologically by plump mesenchymal cells in a myxoid, well-vascularized stroma. Electron microscopy of one tumor revealed reticulated inclusions in dilated cisterna of endoplasmic reticulum. Diagnoses by the original pathologist, or by consultants from referral centers in the United States included liposarcoma, primitive sarcoma, possible leiomyosarcoma, and fibromatosis, but the subsequent evolution of the patients questions the validity of such diagnoses. Two patients received what was deemed ineffective therapy, yet survived with no evidence of disease for over a decade of close follow-up. Another patient received no therapy other than the initial surgery, and has been well for more than a year. Infantile lesions may show deceptive features of immaturity and high cellularity that are apt to be confused with a true malignancy. Omentalmesenteric "myxoid" lesions are probably hamartomatous in origin.

  6. Reticular schwannoma mimicking myxoid sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Afroz, Nishat; Sahoo, Biswajit; Naim, Mohammed

    2014-02-20

    Reticular/microcystic schwannoma is a recently described rare distinctive variant of schwannoma with a predilection for gastrointestinal tract. Its occurrence in soft tissue is extremely rare. We report a case of reticular/microcystic variant of schwannoma in a 55-year-old Indian woman who presented with a painless slow-growing swelling in the right forearm for the past 6 months. MRI findings suggested myxoid sarcoma. However, histological and immunohistochemical findings in the excised specimen were consistent with reticular/microcystic variant of schwannoma. This case report emphasises that the diagnosis of reticular/microcystic schwannoma should always be considered in cases where myxoid sarcomas are suspected as it can mimic malignant myxoid sarcomas, clinically and radiologically, thereby avoiding aggressive intervention and overtreatment.

  7. Primary myxoid melanoma with dermoscopic findings

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Zindanci, Ilkin; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Karadag, Ayse S.; Kuru, Burce C.; Akdeniz, Necmettin

    2017-01-01

    Myxoid melanoma is a rare variant of melanoma, which is characterized by atypical spindle cells and dense mucin deposition in dermis. This tumor is usually seen in elderly people with a similar progress in other variants of melanoma. A 28-year-old male presented to our outpatient clinic with a 6-month history of a slowly growing asymptomatic pink lesion on his arm. Dermoscopic examination revealed pink-white cristalline structures and blue-grayish ovoid globules. The lesion was totally excised with initial diagnosis of basosquamous carcinoma, amelanotic melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Histopathological examination was consistent with myxoid melanoma. We present this case due to the rarity of myxoid melanoma and occurrence at such a young age. PMID:28515997

  8. Pulmonary extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Balanzá, Ricardo; Arrangoiz, Rodrigo; Cordera, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel; Luque-de-León, Enrique; Moreno, Eduardo; Molinar, Lourdes; Somerville, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) accounts for the 3% of all soft tissue sarcomas and it's categorized as a tumour of uncertain differentiation. This entity has shown to have the recurrent balanced chromosomal translocation t(9;22) (q22;q12.2), which leads to the oncogenic fusion gene EWSR1-NR4A3. This sarcoma usually presents as a slow growing, palpable mass in the extremities. EMC arising from the lung is extremely infrequent. We report one case of pulmonary extraskeletal mixoid chondrosarcoma and a review of the world literature. A 69-year-old male patient presented with intermittent hemoptysis for the last 6 months. A PET/CT scan showed a hypermetabolic solid mass with lobulated borders of approximately 29×26mm in the inferior right lobe. We performed a right thoracotomy with inferior lobectomy and lymphadenectomy of levels VII, VIII, X, and XI levels. The neoplasm was constituted by cords of small cells with small round nucleus and scarce cytoplasm immerse in an abundant myxoid matrix. The immunophenotype was positive for MUM-1, CDK4, MDM2, and showed focal expression for S-100 protein and CD56. The final pathology report revealed a pulmonary extraskeletal mixoid chondrosarcoma. No further surgical interventions or adjuvant therapies were needed. EMC is an intermediate-grade neoplasm, characterized by a long clinical course with high potential for local recurrence and distant metastasis. Treatment for EMC is surgical and non-surgical treatment is reserved for recurrence or metastatic disease. Pulmonary extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare neoplasm with only isolated case reports found in the literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Farahat, A; Magdy, N; Elaffandi, A

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast chondrosarcoma has been rarely reported in the literature. Conservative breast surgery has never been part of the management of previously reported cases. Surgery remains the mainstay management of such a disease as it is resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this report, we present a case of rare primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast that was managed successfully with a conservative approach.

  10. Endometrial Endometrioid Carcinoma With Large Cystic Growth Configuration and Deceptive Pattern of Invasion Associated With Abundant Nodular Fasciitis-like Stroma: A Unique Hitherto Unreported Histology in Endometrioid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Švajdler, Marián; Michal, Michael; Dubinský, Pavol; Švajdler, Peter; Ondič, Ondrej; Michal, Michal

    2016-11-01

    We describe a case of an unusual endometrial endometrioid carcinoma occurring in a 67-year-old woman. The tumor involved uterine corpus as well as lower uterine segment and presented as polypoid tumor protruding through the cervical orifice. Microscopically, the tumor was characterized by broad zones of cytologically bland fibromyxoid stroma resembling nodular fasciitis, showing vaguely nodular architecture. Neoplastic glands were characterized by interconnected elongated slit-like and large cystic profiles, mostly lined by flattened epithelium with variable squamous differentiation, whereas typical columnar endometrioid cells were only focally present. Voluminous nodules of the stroma produced phyllodes-like appearance of the tumor. The tumor showed some resemblance to the microcystic, elongated, and fragmented (MELF) glands growth pattern, but in contrast with MELF pattern, where fibromyxoid change occurs focally, in the presented case abundant myofibroblastic proliferation was present throughout the tumor and the neoplastic glands showed anastomosing "large cystic" rather than "small cystic" profiles. Some of the neoplastic glands presented almost complete or complete squamous differentiation, with relatively bland-looking squamous cells and no hint of endometrioid differentiation, which resulted in initial misdiagnosis of Müllerian adenofibroma. We believe that nodular fasciitis-like pattern represents yet undescribed, and diagnostically challenging pattern of invasion in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma.

  11. Curious case of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushilkumar Satish; Khanna, Neha; Jacobi, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas (EMC) are a rare entity of soft tissue tumors that have slow growth with metastatic potential. We discuss here a case of EMC presenting with right upper extremity pain and hemoptysis. Computed tomography scans chest showed diffuse metastatic numerous lung nodules bilaterally. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of the tumor. Chemotherapy was a bigger challenge for our patient due to sparse research and data in the literature about the disease. PMID:28360467

  12. Primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, N; Elaffandi, A

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast chondrosarcoma has been rarely reported in the literature. Conservative breast surgery has never been part of the management of previously reported cases. Surgery remains the mainstay management of such a disease as it is resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this report, we present a case of rare primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast that was managed successfully with a conservative approach. PMID:24417859

  13. Pericardial myxoid liposarcoma in a common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Foster, A P; Johnston, P E; Duignan, P J; Schock, A

    2011-07-01

    A pericardial myxoid liposarcoma was diagnosed in a common eland (Taurotragus oryx) based on gross, microscopical and immunohistochemical findings. The pericardial and epicardial tissues were soft and uniformly thickened. Microscopically, the neoplastic mass consisted of stellate cells embedded in a myxoid matrix. These cells contained cytoplasmic vacuoles stained by oil red O. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the neoplastic cells to express vimentin and S-100.

  14. Axitinib Has Antiangiogenic and Antitumorigenic Activity in Myxoid Liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Jacqueline F.; Wilding, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma is a rare form of soft-tissue sarcoma. Although most patients initially respond well to treatment, approximately 21% relapse, highlighting the need for alternative treatments. To identify novel treatment regimens and gain a better understanding of myxoid liposarcoma tumor biology, we screened various candidate and approved targeted therapeutics and chemotherapeutics against myxoid liposarcoma cell lines. Therapeutics that target angiogenesis showed antitumor activity. The small molecule inhibitor axitinib, which targets angiogenesis by inhibiting the VEGFR and PDGFR families and c-Kit, inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in vitro, as well as having significant antitumor activity against MLS 1765 myxoid liposarcoma xenografts in mice. Axitinib also displayed synergistic antitumor activity in vitro when combined with the potassium channel ionophore salinomycin or the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Another angiogenesis-targeting therapeutic, 4EGI-1, which targets the oncoprotein eIF4E, significantly decreased angiogenic ligand expression by myxoid liposarcoma cells and reduced tumor cell growth. To verify this oncogenic addiction to angiogenic pathways, we utilized VEGFR-derived ligand traps and found that autocrine VEGFR signaling was crucial to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival. Overall, these findings suggest that autocrine angiogenic signaling through the VEGFR family is critical to myxoid liposarcoma cell survival and that further study of axitinib as a potential anticancer therapy is warranted. PMID:27822137

  15. Myxoid Leiomyosarcoma of Ovary-A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    V, Srinivasamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Primary pure myxoid leiomyosarcoma of the ovary is extremely rare, comprising of only 1% of the ovarian tumours. Patient presented with a mass in the right iliac fossa since three months. Radiological diagnosis of broad ligament fibroid was given. Right salphingo-oophorectomy with enucleation of ischial fossa and wedge biopsy of left ovary was carried out. Based on gross, microscopy and immunohistochemistry a diagnosis of primary myxoid leiomyosarcoma of ovary was made. We report a rare case of primary pure myxoid leiomyosarcoma of the ovary with metastasis to ischial fossa emphasising on reliable prognostic markers. Ovarian leiomyosarcomas are highly aggressive tumours with poor prognosis. PMID:25120990

  16. Myxoid Neurofibromas of the External Ear Canal: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Maryam, Y K; Mohd Khairi, M D; Asmah Hanim, H

    2015-04-01

    Myxoid neurofibroma is benign tumours of perineural cell origin that arise from elements in the peripheral nervous system. We report a case of a 60-year-old female patient presented with history of right ear mass which was slowly growing. Her primary complaint was cosmetic deformity but hearing loss was also present. The mass was excised and histologically revealed a myxoid neurofibroma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that a myxoid neurofibroma arising from external auditory canal is reported. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass originating from this location.

  17. Myxoid stroma and delicate vasculature of a superficial angiomyxoma give rise to the red planet sign.

    PubMed

    Green, Margaret; Logemann, Nichola; Sulit, Daryl J

    2014-09-16

    Superficial angiomyxomas are uncommon benign mesenchymal tumors. They often recur locally if partially removed. This case report demonstrates not only the characteristic pathological findings of a superficial angiomyxoma in a 33- year-old man, but also shows a unique dermatoscopic image, which in our estimation resembles a celestial red planet such as the blood moon seen during a lunar eclipse. We propose to call this the "red planet" sign for a superficial angiomyxoma on dermoscopic examination.

  18. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of metastatic malignant mesothelioma with myxoid change and signet ring cells: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manisha M.; Farver, Carol F.; Chute, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a rare neoplasm, which is most commonly encountered in cytology through effusion specimens. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of MM, particularly the epithelioid subtype, can be a source of diagnostic difficulty and may mimic sampling of an adenocarcinoma. This is the first case report to demonstrate abundant extracellular myxoid material and numerous intracellular vacuoles, including signet ring cells, in a fine needle aspirate of metastatic MM. A review of the literature for myxoid change and vacuoles in fine needle aspiration biopsies of MM discloses that vacuoles are found in up to 35% of aspirates of MM, but myxoid change is very rare, reported in <5% of the cases. Cytologists should be aware of this rare morphologic pattern of metastatic epithelioid MM. PMID:27014364

  19. Myxoid fibroadenomas differ from conventional fibroadenomas: a hypothesis-generating study.

    PubMed

    Lozada, John R; Burke, Kathleen A; Maguire, Aoife; Pareja, Fresia; Lim, Raymond S; Kim, Jisun; Gularte-Merida, Rodrigo; Murray, Melissa P; Brogi, Edi; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Geyer, Felipe C

    2017-10-01

    Breast myxoid fibroadenomas (MFAs) are characterized by a distinctive hypocellular myxoid stroma, and occur sporadically or in the context of Carney complex, an inheritable condition caused by PRKAR1A-inactivating germline mutations. Conventional fibroadenomas (FAs) are underpinned by recurrent MED12 mutations in the stromal components of the lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic landscape of MFAs and compare it with that of conventional FAs. Eleven MFAs from patients without clinical and/or genetic evidence of Carney complex were retrieved. DNA samples of tumour and matching normal tissue were subjected to massively parallel sequencing using the Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets (MSK-IMPACT) assay, an assay targeting 410 cancer genes. Genetic alterations detected by MSK-IMPACT were tested in samples in which the stromal and epithelial components were separately laser capture-microdissected. Sequencing revealed no germline PRKAR1A mutations and non-synonymous mutations in six MFAs. Interestingly, in three of the MFAs in which the stromal and epithelial components were separately microdissected, the mutations were found to be restricted to the epithelial rather than the stromal component. The sole exception was a lesion harbouring a somatic truncating PRKAR1A mutation. Upon histological re-review, this case was reclassified as a breast myxoma, consistent with the spectrum of tumous observed in Carney complex patients. In this case, the PRKAR1A somatic mutation was restricted to the stromal component. MFAs lack MED12 mutations, and their stromal components seem not to harbour mutations in the 410 cancer genes tested. Whole-exome and/or whole-genome analyses of MFAs are required to elucidate their genetic drivers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Polypeptides of the Maize Amyloplast Stroma1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; He Mu, Helen; Mu-Forster, Chen; Wasserman, Bruce P.

    1998-01-01

    In the developing endosperm of monocotyledonous plants, starch granules are synthesized and deposited within the amyloplast. A soluble stromal fraction was isolated from amyloplasts of immature maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm and analyzed for enzyme activities and polypeptide content. Specific activities of starch synthase and starch-branching enzyme (SBE), but not the cytosolic marker alcohol dehydrogenase, were strongly enhanced in soluble amyloplast stromal fractions relative to soluble extracts obtained from homogenized kernels or endosperms. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that starch synthase I, SBEIIb, and sugary1, the putative starch-debranching enzyme, were each highly enriched in the amyloplast stroma, providing direct evidence for the localization of starch-biosynthetic enzymes within this compartment. Analysis of maize mutants shows the deficiency of the 85-kD SBEIIb polypeptide in the stroma of amylose extender cultivars and that the dull mutant lacks a >220-kD stromal polypeptide. The stromal fraction is distinguished by differential enrichment of a characteristic group of previously undocumented polypeptides. N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that an abundant 81-kD stromal polypeptide is a member of the Hsp70 family of stress-related proteins. Moreover, the 81-kD stromal polypeptide is strongly recognized by antibodies specific for an Hsp70 of the chloroplast stroma. These findings are discussed in light of implications for the correct folding and assembly of soluble, partially soluble, and granule-bound starch-biosynthetic enzymes during import into the amyloplast. PMID:9536063

  1. NY-ESO-1 is a sensitive and specific immunohistochemical marker for myxoid and round cell liposarcomas among related mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica A; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2013-09-01

    Myxoid and round cell liposarcomas constitute approximately one-third of all liposarcomas, a relatively common group of fat-derived soft tissue sarcomas. The histomorphology is a continuum between highly differentiated myxoid and poorly differentiated round cell components. The gold standard of diagnosis is dependent on histomorphology and/or identification of t(12;16)(q13;p11) translocation by cytogenetics or demonstration of DDIT3 rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization. There are currently no diagnostic immunohistochemical stains available. The broad range of myxoid neoplasms in the differential diagnosis includes a variety of sarcomas. Given the notable differences in disease biology among myxoid neoplasms, which range from benign to aggressive, an accurate diagnosis is imperative for proper treatment and prognostication. Prompted by our recent study showing frequent expression of the cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 in myxoid and round cell liposarcomas, we sought to evaluate the utility of NY-ESO-1 as an immunohistochemical marker for myxoid and round cell liposarcoma among mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms within the differential diagnosis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks were obtained for the following mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms (n=138): myxoid and round cell liposarcoma (n=38); well-differentiated liposarcoma (n=12); lipoma (n=20; 4 with myxoid change); extra-cardiac soft tissue myxoma (n=39); extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (n=12); myxofibrosarcoma (n=10: 5 low grade, 2 intermediate grade, 3 high grade); and low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (n=7). Utilizing standard immunohistochemistry protocols, full sections were stained with NY-ESO-1 (clone E978), and staining was assessed for intensity (1-2+), percentage of tumor positivity, and location. In all, 36/38 (95%) of the myxoid and round cell liposarcomas demonstrated NY-ESO-1 immunoreactivity. The majority of the positive cases (34/36; 94%) showed strong, homogenous staining (>50% tumor

  2. Corneal Stroma Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Samuel D.; Behzad, Ali R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.; Burns, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Elastic tissue was first described well over a hundred years ago and has since been identified in nearly every part of the body. In this review, we examine elastic tissue in the corneal stroma with some mention of other ocular structures which have been more thoroughly described in the past. True elastic fibers consist of an elastin core surrounded by fibrillin microfibrils. However, the presence of elastin fibers is not a requirement and some elastic tissue is comprised of non-elastin-containing bundles of microfibrils. Fibers containing a higher relative amount of elastin are associated with greater elasticity and those without elastin, with structural support. Recently it has been shown that the microfibrils, not only serve mechanical roles, but are also involved in cell signaling through force transduction and the release of TGF-β. A well characterized example of elastin-free microfibril bundles (EFMBs) is found in the ciliary zonules which suspend the crystalline lens in the eye. Through contraction of the ciliary muscle they exert enough force to reshape the lens and thereby change its focal point. It is believed that the molecules comprising these fibers do not turn-over and yet retain their tensile strength for the life of the animal. The mechanical properties of the cornea (strength, elasticity, resiliency) would suggest that EFMBs are present there as well. However, many authors have reported that, although present during embryonic and early postnatal development, EFMBs are generally not present in adults. Serial-block-face imaging with a scanning electron microscope enabled 3D reconstruction of elements in murine corneas. Among these elements were found fibers that formed an extensive network throughout the cornea. In single sections these fibers appeared as electron dense patches. Transmission electron microscopy provided additional detail of these patches and showed them to be composed of fibrils (∼10nm diameter). Immunogold evidence clearly

  3. MRI characteristics associated with high-grade myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gimber, L H; Montgomery, E A; Morris, C D; Krupinski, E A; Fayad, L M

    2017-07-01

    To identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features differentiating high-grade (>5% round-cell component) from low-grade myxoid liposarcomas (LPS) (≤5% round-cell component). Informed consent was waived. Patients with myxoid LPS and MRI before biopsy, neoadjuvant therapy, and surgery were included retrospectively. High-grade components were recorded from histological specimens by a pathologist (24 years of experience). Images were evaluated by a senior radiologist (>12 years of experience) for tumour size, location, tissue layer, and MRI features (signal intensity, heterogeneity, margin, and perilesional characteristics). Descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact test to identify associations with a round-cell component, and multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors of high-grade tumours were used. Thirty-one patients (16 women [mean 51.1 years; range 19-79 years] and 15 men [mean 45.5 years; range 18-95 years]) with myxoid LPS (23 low-grade, eight high-grade) were included. All high-grade lesions had lipid signal, a peritumoural capsule and peritumoural contrast enhancement, and more commonly exhibited heterogeneous signal; however, the average size of ≥10 cm was the strongest independent indicator of high-grade status (odds ratio [OR], 14.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6, 131). Size ≥10 cm is most strongly associated with high-grade myxoid LPS (round-cell component >5%). Other features possibly differentiating high-grade from low-grade status include lesion margin, lipid signal, and perilesional characteristics. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic cancer: Stroma and its current and emerging targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Kota, Janaiah; Hancock, Julie; Kwon, Jason; Korc, Murray

    2017-04-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies with a 5-year survival rate of 8%. Dense, fibrotic stroma associated with pancreatic tumors is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the tumor bed and plays a crucial role in pancreatic cancer progression. Targeting stroma is considered as a potential therapeutic strategy to improve anti-cancer drug efficacy and patient survival. Although numerous stromal depletion therapies have reached the clinic, they add little to overall survival and are often associated with toxicity. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests the anti-tumor properties of stroma. Its complete ablation enhanced tumor progression and reduced survival. Consequently, efforts are now focused on developing stromal-targeted therapies that normalize the reactive stroma and avoid the extremes: stromal abundance vs. complete depletion. In this review, we summarized the state of current and emerging anti-stromal targeted therapies, with major emphasis on the role of miRNAs in PDAC stroma and their potential use as novel therapeutic agents to modulate PDAC tumor-stromal interactions.

  5. Myxoid calcified hamartoma and natal teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Michelle; León, Jorge Esquiche; Kellermann, Michele Gassen; Valiati, Renato; Graner, Edgard; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2008-12-01

    We report the case of a 4-month-old Caucasian male baby who presented an uncommon mass in the anterior mandibular ridge. The patient was born with two natal mandibular incisors, which exfoliated some weeks after birth, followed by a growth of nodular lesion in the same region. Based on the clinical and histopathological features, the diagnosis was of myxoid calcified hamartoma. Immunohistochemical and scanning electron microscopic analysis of the lesion were performed. Hamartomas in the mandibular ridges associated with natal teeth are rare, but they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of common lesions, such as congenital granular cell epulis.

  6. Validation of immature adipogenic status and identification of prognostic biomarkers in myxoid liposarcoma using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongwei; Dodge, Jim; Mehl, Erika; Liu, Shuzhen; Poulin, Neal; van de Rijn, Matt; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2009-09-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma displays variably aggressive behavior and responds poorly to available systemic therapies. Expression profiling followed by tissue microarray validation linked to patient outcome is a powerful approach for validating biological mechanisms and identifying prognostic biomarkers. We applied these techniques to independent series of primary myxoid liposarcomas in an effort to assess markers of adipose differentiation in myxoid liposarcoma and to identify prognostic markers that can be efficiently assessed by immunohistochemistry. Candidate genes were selected based on analysis of expression profiles from 9 primary myxoid/round liposarcomas and 45 other soft tissue tumors, and by reference to publicly available data sets. Protein products were validated on an adipose neoplasm tissue microarray, including 32 myxoid liposarcomas linked to patient outcome. Results were scored visually and correlated with clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. In the study, by examining expression patterns of several lipogenic regulatory gene products, an immature adipogenic status was verified in myxoid liposarcomas. We also found that expression levels of the ret proto-oncogene, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, and insulin-like growth factor 2 correlate with poor metastasis-free survival, supporting a role for ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways in clinically aggressive myxoid liposarcomas.

  7. Primary retroperitoneal myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a nonexisting disease: an immunohistochemical and molecular biological analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vreeze, Ronald S A; de Jong, Daphne; Tielen, Ivon H G; Ruijter, Henrique J; Nederlof, Petra M; Haas, Rick L; van Coevorden, Frits

    2009-02-01

    Almost all primary retroperitoneal liposarcomas can be classified as well-/dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Rarely, however, primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma is classified as myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, based on the presence of myxoid areas and vascular crow's feet pattern, which has resulted in a debate on the classification of liposarcoma in the retroperitoneum. Genetically, myxoid/round cell liposarcoma and well-/dedifferentiated liposarcoma are different diseases. Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is characterized by a translocation causing FUS-CHOP or EWSR1-CHOP fusion, whereas well-/dedifferentiated liposarcoma is characterized by an amplification of the 12q13-15 region, including MDM2 and CDK4 genes. As myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is highly radio- and chemosensitive, differentiation between subtypes is important to optimize treatment. We studied whether primary retroperitoneal liposarcomas diagnosed as myxoid/round cell liposarcoma represent molecularly true myxoid/round cell liposarcoma or are histopathological mimics and represent well-/dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Primary retroperitoneal myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (n=16) were compared to primary extremity myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (n=20). Histopathological and immunohistochemical features were studied. Amplification status of the 12q13-15 region was studied using a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis, and FUS-CHOP or EWS-CHOP translocations were studied using RT-PCR. In primary retroperitoneal myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, MDM2 and CDK4 staining was both positive in 12 of 15 cases. In primary extremity myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, MDM2 was negative in 18/20 and CDK4 was negative in all cases. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification showed the amplification of 12q13-15 region in 16/16 primary retroperitoneal myxoid/round cell liposarcomas and in 1/20 primary extremity myxoid/round cell liposarcomas. Translocation was present in all (18/18) primary extremity myxoid

  8. Digital cushions in horses comprise coarse connective tissue, myxoid tissue, and cartilage but only little unilocular fat tissue.

    PubMed

    Egerbacher, M; Helmreich, M; Probst, A; König, H; Böck, P

    2005-04-01

    Digital cushions were studied in horses with particular reference to vascularization, tissue constituents and matrix components. The cushions mainly resembled a network of coarse collagen bundles. The areas inbetween the bundles were replenished with loosely woven interstitial connective tissue, myxoid tissue, and fibrocartilage. Expected masses of fat lobules were missing: only solitary adipocytes or small groups of adipocytes were seen. Vascular supply to the cushions was remarkably poor. The mucinous myxoid matrix largely consisted of hyaluronan with little sulphated glycosaminoglycans. Myxoid cells were stellate or ramified in shape and showed a tendency to store glycogen and lipid droplets. Myxoid cells reacted for vimentin and stained for S-100 protein. Moreover, myxoid cells often reacted for neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Myxoid tissue continuously transformed into loosely organized interstitial connective tissue with fibroblasts, which remained unreactive when tested for neuroectodermal markers. Myxoid tissue also was not clearly demarcated against irregularly interspersed islets of fibrocartilage or hyaline cartilage. Chondrocytes did not stain for neuron specific enolase but reactivity for S-100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein was noted in peripheral regions of fibrocartilage. Single or grouped unilocular fat cells were rarely placed into myxoid areas. Unilocular fat cells stained for vimentin, S-100 protein, and occasionally for glial fibrillary acidic protein but not for neuron specific enolase. Continuous transformation of myxoid tissue into cartilage together with corresponding reactivity for neuroectodermal marker proteins of myxoid cells and peripherally located chondrocytes suggest close relationship between myxoid cells and chondrocytes. The same criteria indicate relationship between myxoid cells and adipocytes. Coarse connective tissue, myxoid tissue, fibrous cartilage, and fat cells are functionally

  9. High-Throughput Screening of Myxoid Liposarcoma Cell Lines: Survivin Is Essential for Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, Marieke A; Malu, Shruti; Guardiola, Irma; Kruisselbrink, Alwine B; de Jong, Yvonne; Corver, Willem E; Gelderblom, H; Hwu, Patrick; Nielsen, Torsten O; Lazar, Alexander J; Somaiah, Neeta; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2017-08-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) is a soft tissue sarcoma characterized by a recurrent t(12;16) translocation. Although tumors are initially radio- and chemosensitive, the management of inoperable or metastatic MLS can be challenging. Therefore, our aim was to identify novel targets for systemic therapy. We performed an in vitro high-throughput drug screen using three MLS cell lines (402091, 1765092, DL-221), which were treated with 273 different drugs at four different concentrations. Cell lines and tissue microarrays were used for validation. As expected, all cell lines revealed a strong growth inhibition to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines and taxanes. A good response was observed to compounds interfering with Src and the mTOR pathway, which are known to be affected in these tumors. Moreover, BIRC5 was important for MLS survival because a strong inhibitory effect was seen at low concentration using the survivin inhibitor YM155, and siRNA for BIRC5 decreased cell viability. Immunohistochemistry revealed abundant expression of survivin restricted to the nucleus in all 32 tested primary tumor specimens. Inhibition of survivin in 402-91 and 1765-92 by YM155 increased the percentage S-phase but did not induce apoptosis, which warrants further investigation before application in the treatment of metastatic MLS. Thus, using a 273-compound drug screen, we confirmed previously identified targets (mTOR, Src) in MLS and demonstrate survivin as essential for MLS survival. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stroma-directed molecular targeted therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Michiyo; Shinagawa, Kei

    2011-12-08

    Recent studies in molecular and cellular biology have shown that tumor growth and metastasis are not determined by cancer cells alone, but also by a variety of stromal cells. Tumor stroma contains abundant extracellular matrix and several types of cells, including carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), endothelial cells, pericytes and inflammatory cells including macrophages. In gastric cancer tissues, tumor cells express platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B. Stromal cells, including CAFs, pericytes and lymphatic endothelial cells, express PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β. Administration of PDGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly decreases stromal reaction, lymphatic vessel area and pericyte coverage of tumor microvessels. Administration of PDGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drug(s) impairs the progressive growth and metastasis of gastric cancer. Activated stroma might serve as a novel therapeutic target in cases of gastric cancer.

  11. Targeting stroma to treat cancers

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Boris; Rowley, Donald A.; Schreiber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    All cancers depend on stroma for support of growth. Leukemias, solid tumors, cancer cells causing effusions, metastases as well as micro-disseminated cancer cells release factors that stimulate stromal cells, which in turn produce ligands that stimulate cancer cells. Therefore, elimination of stromal support by destroying the stromal cells or by inhibiting feedback stimulation of cancer growth is in the focus of many evolving therapies. A stringent evaluation of the efficacy of stromal targeting requires testing in animal models. Most current studies emphasize the successes of stromal targeting rather than deciphering its limitations. Here we show that many of the stromal targeting approaches, while often reducing tumor growth rates, are rarely curative. Therefore, we will also discuss conditions where stromal targeting can eradicate large established tumors. Finally, we will examine still unanswered questions of this promising and exciting area of cancer research. PMID:22212863

  12. [Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: a clinicopathologic analysis of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Huang, Haijian; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    To study the clinicopathologic features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC). The clinical and pathologic features of 7 cases of EMC encountered in Fujian Provincal Hospital and Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command during the period of 2005 to 2015 were analyzed. Immunohistochemical study and PAS staining were carried out. Relevant literature was reviewed. The male-to-female ratio was 6 to 1. The age of patients ranged from 21 to 50 years (median = 36 years). The maximum tumor dimension ranged from 2.5 to 15.0 cm (mean = 8.4 cm). The sites of involvement included left neck, right shoulder, left thigh, right thigh, right upper arm and abdomen. Most patients presented with painless lumps. Histologically, all cases showed similar features. Low-power examination showed a nodular or lobulated architecture, with intervening fibrous septa and myxoid matrix in the background. The tumor cells were arranged in cords or tufted clusters. They were spindly to epithelioid / rhabdoid (plasmacytoid) in shape, with eosinophilic to sometimes vacuolated cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusion bodies and coagulative necrosis were focally seen. Mitotic figures were rare (less than 2 per 10 high-power fields). Immunohistochemical study showed that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin (7/7) and INI1 (7/7). They were focally positive for CKpan (2/7), p63 (3/7), CD99 (3/7), S-100 protein (1/7) and synaptophysin (2/7). Ki-67 proliferation index ranged from 10% to 40%. The tumor cells were negative for α-smooth muscle actin, desmin, myoD1, CD34 and CD117. The cytoplasm of the tumor cells was positive for PAS. EWSR1 gene signal was detected in 5 cases. EMC is a rare malignant mesenchymal tumor. Arrival at correct diagnosis relies on morphologic examination and immunohistochemistry. Molecular pathology is helpful when necessary. The primary treatment modality for EMC is complete surgical excision and the prognosis

  13. Stroma: fertile soil for inflammation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rikesh; Filer, Andrew; Barone, Francesca; Buckley, Christopher D

    2014-08-01

    Biological therapies for the management of immune mediated inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis have proven to be extremely successful in recent years. Despite these successes, even the most effective of therapies do not lead to cure. Why chronic inflammation persists indefinitely within the rheumatoid synovium despite an absence of continuous stimulation, and why some patients with early synovitis progress to persistent disease whilst others do not, has remained unexplained. In contrast to the paradigm that stromal cells are biochemically active but immunologically passive, there is now growing evidence that stromal components from the rheumatoid synovium play a crucial part in the immunopathology of rheumatoid arthritis. Stromal cells play a central role in the transformation of an acute, resolving to a chronic inflammatory process, and to the persistence of synovial inflammation and joint destruction through a variety of immune mechanisms. Therapeutic manipulation of the stroma is a largely unexplored, yet potentially vital area of research. Targeting pathogenic stromal cells has the potential to provide a cure for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stroma in Breast Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that normal and malignant breast tissues require complex local and systemic stromal interactions for development and progression. During development, mammary cell fate specification and differentiation require highly regulated contextual signals derived from the stroma. Likewise, during breast carcinoma development, the tissue stroma can provide tumor suppressing and tumor-promoting environments that serve to regulate neoplastic growth of the epithelium. This review focuses on the role of the stroma as a mediator of normal mammary development, as well as a critical regulator of malignant conversion and progression in breast cancer. Recognition of the important role of the stroma during the progression of breast cancers leads to the possibility of new targets for treatment of the initial breast cancer lesion as well as prevention of recurrence. PMID:19857593

  15. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the thigh in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zainal Abidin; Chan, Wai Hoong; Wong, Siong Lung; Ong, Eng Joe; Narihan, M Zulkarnaen A

    2014-12-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is aggressive in children. The condition in children differs to that in adults and to skeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. We report on a 9-year-old girl with EMC in her left thigh. She underwent above-knee amputation. Five months later, a small mass was noted at the right lower lobe of the lung. The patient underwent one course of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide chemotherapy, followed by resection of the mass and 8 more courses of chemotherapy. At the 2-year follow-up, she was in remission radiologically.

  16. FUS-DDIT3 fusion protein driven IGF-IR signaling is a therapeutic target in myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Marcel; Menzel, Jasmin; Bertling, Christian; Cyra, Magdalene; Isfort, Ilka; Steinestel, Konrad; Elges, Sandra; Grünewald, Inga; Altvater, Bianca; Rossig, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Hafner, Susanne; Simmet, Thomas; Åman, Pierre; Wardelmann, Eva; Huss, Sebastian; Hartmann, Wolfgang

    2017-06-21

    Myxoid liposarcoma is an aggressive disease with particular propensity to develop hematogenic metastases. Over 90% of myxoid liposarcoma are characterized by a reciprocal t(12;16)(q13;p11) translocation. The resulting chimeric FUS-DDIT3 fusion protein plays a crucial role in myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis; however, its specific impact on oncogenic signaling pathways remains to be substantiated. We here investigate the functional role of FUS‑DDIT3 in IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling driving myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical evaluation of key effectors of the IGF‑IR/PI3K/Akt signaling axis was performed in a comprehensive cohort of myxoid liposarcoma specimens. FUS-DDIT3 dependency and biological function of the IGF‑IR/PI3K/Akt signaling cascade were analyzed using a HT1080 fibrosarcoma‑based myxoid liposarcoma tumor model and multiple tumor-derived myxoid liposarcoma cell lines. An established myxoid liposarcoma avian chorioallantoic membrane model was employed for in vivo confirmation of the preclinical in vitro results. A comprehensive subset of myxoid liposarcoma specimens showed elevated expression and phosphorylation levels of various IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling effectors. In HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, overexpression of FUS-DDIT3 induced aberrant IGF‑IR/PI3K/Akt pathway activity, which was dependent on transcriptional induction of the IGF2 gene. Conversely, RNAi-mediated FUS-DDIT3 knockdown in myxoid liposarcoma cells led to an inactivation of IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling associated with diminished IGF2 mRNA expression. Treatment of myxoid liposarcoma cell lines with several IGF-IR inhibitors resulted in significant growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our preclinical study substantiates the fundamental role of the IGF‑IR/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis and provides a mechanism-based rationale for molecular targeted approaches in myxoid liposarcoma cancer therapy. Copyright ©2017, American Association for

  17. High-Dose Ifosfamide Chemotherapy in a Series of Patients Affected by Myxoid Liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Elena; Provenzano, Salvatore; Bertulli, Rossella; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Morosi, Carlo; Collini, Paola; Gronchi, Alessandro; Casali, Paolo G.; Sanfilippo, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Background To report on the activity of high-dose prolonged-infusion ifosfamide (HDIFX) chemotherapy in a retrospective series of patients affected by myxoid liposarcoma treated at Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori in Milan, Italy. Patients and Methods Patients with an advanced myxoid liposarcoma treated with HDIFX (14 g/sqm, i.v., prolonged infusion of 14 days every 28 days) as a single agent between May 2002 and April 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. All pathologic diagnoses were centrally reviewed and molecularly confirmed. Response was evaluated by RECIST, and survival functions were computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Eleven patients with advanced myxoid liposarcoma were treated with HDIFX (male/female = 9/2, median age 33 years, range 31–75). Among these, 1/11 received HDIFX in first line, 5/11 in second line, 3/11 in third line, and 2/11 in fourth line for a median course number of 3 (range 2–7). No RECIST objective responses were observed. Overall median progression-free survival was 1,9 months. Median overall survival was 37 months. At a median follow-up of 115 months, 1 patient is alive. Conclusions In this series of patients affected by advanced myxoid liposarcoma, chemotherapy with HDIFX was essentially inactive. PMID:28947876

  18. Unresectable Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Neck: Early Tumor Response to Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Laszewski, Pam; Robinette, Natasha; Saleh, Husain; Raza, Naweed; Sukari, Ammar; Kim, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) rarely occurs in the head and neck and is generally managed with primary surgery. To our knowledge, no cases of unresectable EMC of the neck have been reported. We present a case of an unresectable EMC treated with chemotherapy and radiation, and highlight the exceptional early response to therapy.  PMID:26848421

  19. Unresectable Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Neck: Early Tumor Response to Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mark; Laszewski, Pam; Robinette, Natasha; Saleh, Husain; Raza, Naweed; Sukari, Ammar; Kim, Harold

    2015-12-24

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) rarely occurs in the head and neck and is generally managed with primary surgery. To our knowledge, no cases of unresectable EMC of the neck have been reported. We present a case of an unresectable EMC treated with chemotherapy and radiation, and highlight the exceptional early response to therapy.

  20. A huge abdominal mass mimicking ovarian cancer: p53-negative but aneuploid myxoid leiomyosarcoma of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Kaleli, S; Calay, Z; Ceydeli, N; Aydýnlý, K; Kösebay, D

    2001-12-10

    Less than 20 myxoid leiomyosarcoma cases were reported in literature. Since, these tumors are very rare and may exhibit highly malignant behavior despite their low mitotic index, clinical course and optimum type of therapy of myxoid variant of leiomyosarcoma were not well understood. The goal of this report is to contribute the better understanding of this rare type of tumor. A 39-year-old woman presented with a huge abdominal cystic mass. Laparotomy was performed and frozen section diagnosis was low-grade uterine leiomyosarcoma. TAH-BSO, omentectomy, pelvic lymph node and peritoneal samplings were carried out. No chemotherapy was performed after surgical therapy. Final histopathological diagnosis was uterine myxoid leiomyosarcoma. The tumor was p53-negative and had aneuploid DNA content. The patient tolerated well the operation and she is alive and free of disease after 24 months of primary surgical treatment. Uterine myxoid leiomyosarcoma may present a huge abdominal cystic mass and can be treated successfully with surgery alone.

  1. Undifferentiated myxoid lipoblastoma with PLAG1-HAS2 fusion in an infant; morphologically mimicking primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy (PMMTI)--diagnostic importance of cytogenetic and molecular testing and literature review.

    PubMed

    Warren, Mikako; Turpin, Brian K; Mark, Melissa; Smolarek, Teresa A; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Lipoblastoma is a benign myxoid neoplasm arising in young children that typically demonstrates adipose differentiation. It is often morphologically indistinguishable from primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy (PMMTI), which is characterized by a well-circumscribed myxoid mass with a proliferation of primitive mesenchymal cells with mild cytologic atypia. PMMTI occurs in the first year of life and is known to have locally aggressive behavior. No specific genetic rearrangements have been reported to date. In contrast, the presence of PLAG1 (Pleomorphic Adenoma Gene 1) rearrangement is diagnostic for lipoblastoma. We hereby demonstrate the combined application of multiple approaches to tackle the diagnostic challenges of a rapidly growing neck tumor in a 3-month-old female. An incisional tumor biopsy had features of an undifferentiated, myxoid mesenchymal neoplasm mimicking PMMTI. However, tumor cells showed diffuse nuclear expression by immunohistochemical (IHC) stain. Conventional cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses as well as next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated evidence of PLAG1 rearrangement, confirming the diagnosis of lipoblastoma. This experience warrants that undifferentiated myxoid lipoblastoma can mimic PMMTI, and the combination of cytogenetic and molecular approaches is essential to distinguish these two myxoid neoplasms. Literature on lipoblastomas with relevant molecular and cytogenetic findings is summarized. Our case is the first lipoblastoma diagnosed with a PLAG1 fusion defined by NGS technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Global gene expression analysis of reactive stroma in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dakhova, Olga; Ozen, Mustafa; Creighton, Chad J; Li, Rile; Ayala, Gustavo; Rowley, David; Ittmann, Michael

    2009-06-15

    Marked reactive stroma formation, designated as grade 3 reactive stroma, is associated with poor outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer. To understand the biological processes and signaling mechanisms underlying the formation of such reactive stroma, we carried out microarray gene expression analysis of laser-captured reactive stroma and matched normal stroma. Seventeen cases of reactive stroma grade 3 cancer were used to laser-capture tumor and normal stroma. Expression analysis was carried out using Agilent 44K arrays. Up-regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Expression data was analyzed to identify significantly up- and down-regulated genes, and gene ontology analysis was used to define pathways altered in reactive stroma. A total of 544 unique genes were significantly higher in the reactive stroma and 606 unique genes were lower. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant alterations in a number of novel processes in prostate cancer reactive stroma, including neurogenesis, axonogenesis, and the DNA damage/repair pathways, as well as evidence of increases in stem cells in prostate cancer reactive stroma. Formation of reactive stroma in prostate cancer is a dynamic process characterized by significant alterations in growth factor and signal transduction pathways and formation of new structures, including nerves and axons.

  3. Diagnostic pitfalls associated with fine-needle aspiration biopsy in a patient with the myxoid variant of monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Simon; Brownlee, Noel A; Geisinger, Kim R; Ward, William G; Pettenati, Mark J; Koty, Patrick; Ellis, Ezra; Beaty, Michael W; Kilpatrick, Scott E

    2006-11-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is one of the most common soft tissue tumors that typically presents in the extremities of young adults, but may occur at any site and affect children during the first decade. Herein we discuss a 12-yr-old male who complained of left foot pain and plantar mass. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy of an 8 cm subcutaneous mass was performed revealing a myxoid spindle cell neoplasm. The cytologic differential diagnosis included a myxoid neurofibroma, neurothekeoma, and a myxoid sarcoma. Subsequent excision of the mass revealed a monophasic fibrous SS with myxoid features. Examination of the tissue by fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of characteristic SS SYT gene rearrangement at chromosome 18q11.2. This case underscores that the cytologic distinction of mxyoid spindle cell tumors may be challenging. We report the cytologic features of a myxoid monophasic fibrous SS, and discuss its distinction from other benign and malignant myxoid soft tissue neoplasms.

  4. Discal cyst associated with myxoid change and apoptosis of herniated disc materials: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kyoji; Saito, Hajime; Nishida, Jun; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Takahashi, Shu; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Norio; Chida, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Discal cyst is a lumbar intraspinal cyst communicating with intervertebral disc, and previously reported series described the wall of these cysts as consisting of dense fibrous connective tissue. We report a 29-year-old Japanese male with discal cyst showing unusual histological features. Clinical symptoms in the current case as well as imaging features including discography were similar to those previously reported.However, the wall of the cyst consisted of disc material with myxoid degeneration. In addition, apoptosis of chondrocytes was diffusely observed in the herniated disc material. The current case was considered a histological variant of discal cyst. Myxoid degeneration of herniated disc material with diffuse apoptotic change of chondrocytes was probably associated with the formation of discal cyst.

  5. Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of Maxilla in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nimonkar, Pranali; Bhola, Nitin; Jadhav, Anendd; Jain, Anuj; Borle, Rajiv; Ranka, Rajul; Chaudhary, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid variant of chondrosarcoma is an uncommon potentially lethal malignant tumor which is even rare in pediatric age group. In the present paper, we report one such case of intermediate grade myxoid chondrosarcoma of left side of maxilla in a 12-year-old girl. The present case had a firm, painless, and lobulated growth in premolar-molar region which was associated with bicortical expansion. Maxillofacial imaging showed ill-defined radiolucency with displaced maxillary molars. Osteolytic changes were evident with the alveolus and walls of maxillary sinus. Owing to the age of the patient, surgical excision was selected as the modality of management followed by postoperative radiotherapy. This report encompasses the entire gamut of clinicopathological, radiological, and treatment modalities employed for chondrosarcoma. PMID:26904332

  6. A novel type of EWS-CHOP fusion gene in myxoid liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Yoshito . E-mail: ymatsui@sb4.so-net.ne.jp; Ueda, Takafumi; Kubo, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Mina; Myoui, Akira; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Yasui, Natsuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-09-22

    The cytogenetic hallmark of myxoid type and round cell type liposarcoma consists of reciprocal translocation of t(12;16)(q13;p11) and t(12;22)(q13;q12), which results in fusion of TLS/FUS and CHOP, and EWS and CHOP, respectively. Nine structural variations of the TLS/FUS-CHOP chimeric transcript have been reported, however, only two types of EWS-CHOP have been described. We describe here a case of myxoid liposarcoma containing a novel EWS-CHOP chimeric transcript and identified the breakpoint occurring in intron 13 of EWS. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and direct sequence showed that exon 13 of EWS was in-frame fused to exon 2 of CHOP. Genomic analysis revealed that the breaks were located in intron 13 of EWS and intron 1 of CHOP.

  7. Mesenteric Primitive Myxoid Mesenchymal Tumor in a 7-Month-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Daniella; Correa, Catalina; Luengas, Juan P

    2017-08-30

    Mesenteric tumors are rare, especially in the pediatric population. We present a case of a 7-month-old boy with an incidental abdominal mass identified as a Primitive Myxoid Mesenchymal Tumor of Infancy derived from the small bowel mesentery. This neoplasm is part of a spectrum of myofibroblastic lesions, with distinct clinical, morphologic, IHQ reactivity, and an aggressive clinical course. There is a paucity of evidence for the management of these tumors, and surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment.

  8. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: a rare periungual location simulating myxoid cyst*

    PubMed Central

    Minotto, Renan; Rodrigues, Camila Britto; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Furian, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumor most frequent between the third and fifth decades of life. It can mimic and make differential diagnoses with several hand tumors. Definitive diagnosis and the treatment of choice are reached with complete resection and histopathological examination. Here we describe a case with clinical presentation similar to that of a myxoid cyst. PMID:28225971

  9. Deep stroma investigation by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Valente, Paola; Ardia, Roberta; Buzzonetti, Luca; Canovetti, Annalisa; Malandrini, Alex; Lenzetti, Ivo; Menabuoni, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Laser assisted keratoplasty is nowadays largely used to perform minimally invasive surgery and partial thickness keratoplasty [1-3]. The use of the femtosecond laser enables to perform a customized surgery, solving the specific problem of the single patient, designing new graft profiles and partial thickness keratoplasty (PTK). The common characteristics of the PTKs and that make them eligible respect to the standard penetrating keratoplasty, are: the preservation of eyeball integrity, a reduced risk of graft rejection, a controlled postoperative astigmatism. On the other hand, the optimal surgical results after these PTKs are related to a correct comprehension of the deep stroma layers morphology, which can help in the identification of the correct cleavage plane during surgeries. In the last years some studies were published, giving new insights about the posterior stroma morphology in adult subjects [4,5]. In this work we present a study performed on two groups of tissues: one group is from 20 adult subjects aged 59 +/- 18 y.o., and the other group is from 15 young subjects, aged 12+/-5 y.o.. The samples were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. Confocal microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) were used for the analysis of the deep stroma. The preliminary results of this analysis show the main differences in between young and adult tissues, enabling to improve the knowledge of the morphology and of the biomechanical properties of human cornea, in order to improve the surgical results in partial thickness keratoplasty.

  10. Corneal stroma PDGF blockade and myofibroblast development

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harmeet; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; de Medeiros, Fabricio W.; Agrawal, Vandana; Salomao, Marcella Q.; Singh, Nirbhai; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Myofibroblast development and haze generation in the corneal stroma is mediated by cytokines, including transforming growth factor beta (TGF β), and possibly other cytokines. This study examined the effects of stromal PDGF-β blockade on the development of myofibroblasts in response to -9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy in the rabbit. Rabbits that had haze generating photorefractive keratectomy (PRK, for 9 diopters of myopia) in one eye were divided into three different groups: stromal application of plasmid pCMV.PDGFRB.23KDEL expressing a subunit of PDGF receptor b (domains 2-3, which bind PDGF-B), stromal application of empty plasmid pCMV, or stromal application of balanced salt solution (BSS). The plasmids (at a concentration 1000 ng/μl) or BSS was applied to the exposed stroma immediately after surgery and every 24 hours for 4-5 days until the epithelium healed. The group treated with pCMV.PDGFRB.23KDEL showed lower αSMA+ myofibroblast density in the anterior stroma compared to either control group (P≤ 0.001). Although there was also lower corneal haze at the slit lamp at one month after surgery, the difference in haze after PDGF-B blockade was not statistically significant compared to either control group. Stromal PDGF-B blockade during the early postoperative period following PRK decreases stromal αSMA+ myofibroblast generation. PDGF is an important modulator of myofibroblast development in the cornea. PMID:19133260

  11. Cancer‐testis antigens PRAME and NY‐ESO‐1 correlate with tumour grade and poor prognosis in myxoid liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Iura, Kunio; Kohashi, Kenichi; Hotokebuchi, Yuka; Ishii, Takeaki; Maekawa, Akira; Yamada, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myxoid liposarcoma is the second most common liposarcoma. Although myxoid liposarcoma is relatively chemosensitive and thus a good candidate for chemotherapy, cases with relapsed or metastatic disease still have poor outcome. Here, we performed a gene microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles in six clinical myxoid liposarcoma samples and three normal adipose tissue samples, and to identify molecular biomarkers that would be useful as diagnostic markers or treatment targets in myxoid liposarcoma. This showed that the cancer‐testis antigen PRAME was up‐regulated in myxoid liposarcoma. We then performed immunohistochemical, western blotting and real‐time polymerase chain reaction analyses to quantify the expression of PRAME and another cancer‐testis antigen, NY‐ESO‐1, in clinical samples of myxoid liposarcoma (n = 93), dedifferentiated (n = 46), well‐differentiated (n = 32) and pleomorphic liposarcomas (n = 14). Immunohistochemically, positivity for PRAME and NY‐ESO‐1 was observed in 84/93 (90%) and 83/93 (89%) of the myxoid liposarcomas, and in 20/46 (43%) and 3/46 (7%) of the dedifferentiated, 3/32 (9%) and 1/32 (3%) of the well‐differentiated and 7/14 (50%) and 3/21 (21%) of the pleomorphic liposarcomas, respectively. High immunohistochemical expression of PRAME and/or NY‐ESO‐1 was significantly correlated with tumour diameter, the existence of tumour necrosis, a round‐cell component of >5%, higher histological grade and advanced clinical stage. High PRAME and NY‐ESO‐1 expression correlated significantly with poor prognosis in a univariate analysis. The myxoid liposarcomas showed significantly higher protein and mRNA expression levels of PRAME and NY‐ESO‐1 (CTAG1B) than the other liposarcomas. In conclusion, PRAME and NY‐ESO‐1 (CTAG1B) were expressed in the vast majority of myxoid liposarcomas, and their high‐level expression correlated with tumour grade and poor prognosis. Our

  12. Cancer-testis antigens PRAME and NY-ESO-1 correlate with tumour grade and poor prognosis in myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Iura, Kunio; Kohashi, Kenichi; Hotokebuchi, Yuka; Ishii, Takeaki; Maekawa, Akira; Yamada, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-07-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma is the second most common liposarcoma. Although myxoid liposarcoma is relatively chemosensitive and thus a good candidate for chemotherapy, cases with relapsed or metastatic disease still have poor outcome. Here, we performed a gene microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles in six clinical myxoid liposarcoma samples and three normal adipose tissue samples, and to identify molecular biomarkers that would be useful as diagnostic markers or treatment targets in myxoid liposarcoma. This showed that the cancer-testis antigen PRAME was up-regulated in myxoid liposarcoma. We then performed immunohistochemical, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses to quantify the expression of PRAME and another cancer-testis antigen, NY-ESO-1, in clinical samples of myxoid liposarcoma (n = 93), dedifferentiated (n = 46), well-differentiated (n = 32) and pleomorphic liposarcomas (n = 14). Immunohistochemically, positivity for PRAME and NY-ESO-1 was observed in 84/93 (90%) and 83/93 (89%) of the myxoid liposarcomas, and in 20/46 (43%) and 3/46 (7%) of the dedifferentiated, 3/32 (9%) and 1/32 (3%) of the well-differentiated and 7/14 (50%) and 3/21 (21%) of the pleomorphic liposarcomas, respectively. High immunohistochemical expression of PRAME and/or NY-ESO-1 was significantly correlated with tumour diameter, the existence of tumour necrosis, a round-cell component of >5%, higher histological grade and advanced clinical stage. High PRAME and NY-ESO-1 expression correlated significantly with poor prognosis in a univariate analysis. The myxoid liposarcomas showed significantly higher protein and mRNA expression levels of PRAME and NY-ESO-1 (CTAG1B) than the other liposarcomas. In conclusion, PRAME and NY-ESO-1 (CTAG1B) were expressed in the vast majority of myxoid liposarcomas, and their high-level expression correlated with tumour grade and poor prognosis. Our results support the potential use of PRAME and NY

  13. Myxoid Plexiform Fibrohistiocytic Tumor Masquerading as Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background. Plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumor is a distinctive mesenchymal neoplasm of low-grade malignancy, with the capacity for biphasic differentiation toward a fibroblastic or histiocyte-like morphology. Clinically, these lesions affect different areas of the body and appear as painless, slowly growing, dermal or subcutaneous masses. To date, only three cases of myxoid variant have been reported in the English literature. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old female patient presented with a subcutaneous nodule in the right popliteal fossa. The initial impression was a benign ganglion cyst. The soft tissue tumor has been treated by local excision. The histopathological and the immunohistochemical findings supported the diagnosis of myxoid plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumor. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient received regular follow-up examination. She is alive without any recurrence. Conclusions. This case demonstrates how to distinguish this distinctive plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumor from other problematic soft tissue tumors. It is also remarkable for its rarely reported extensive myxoid change. Currently, there is no clear-cut correlation between the clinicopathologic findings and the behavior of this unusual variant. PMID:28255491

  14. Combining conventional and stroma-derived tumour markers in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Oskar; Öhlund, Daniel; Lundin, Christina; Öman, Mikael; Naredi, Peter; Wang, Wanzhong; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-01

    A lack of disease-specific symptoms and good tumour markers makes early detection and diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) challenging. To analyse the tissue expression and circulating levels of four stroma-derived substances (type IV collagen, endostatin/type XVIII collagen, osteopontin and tenascin C) and four conventional tumour markers (CA 19-9, TPS, CEA and Ca 125) in a PDAC cohort. Tissue expression of markers in normal pancreas and PDAC tissue was analysed with immunofluorescence. Plasma concentrations of markers were measured before and after surgery. Patients with non-malignant disorders served as controls. The conventional and stromal substances were expressed in the cancer cell compartment and the stroma, respectively. Although most patients had increased levels of many markers before surgery, 2/12 (17%) of patients had normal levels of Ca 19-9 at this stage. High preoperative endostatin/type XVIII collagen, and postoperative type IV collagen was associated with short survival. Neither the pre- nor postoperative levels of TPS, Ca 125 or CA 19-9 were associated to survival. PDAC is characterized by an abundant stroma. These initial observations indicate that the stroma can be a source of PDAC tumour markers that are found in different compartments of the cancer, thus reflecting different aspects of tumour biology.

  15. Traumatic insertion of eyelashes into corneal stroma.

    PubMed

    Casswell, Edward J; Anikina, Evgenia V; Mearza, Ali A

    2014-10-01

    An unusual case of eyelashes being traumatically inserted into the corneal stroma is presented. A 75-year-old hit her right eye with her own fist, presenting with intra-corneal eyelashes. All remained entirely within the cornea, with no breach of the endothelium. They seemed to have tracked there first through the superior conjunctiva and then the superior limbus. The lashes were surgically removed, with good visual recovery. The authors present a short review of intra-ocular eyelash insertion. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Reactive Stroma in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0189 TITLE: Role of Reactive Stroma in Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David R...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 12 JAN 2004 - 11 JAN 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Reactive Stroma in Prostate Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT...the reactive stroma of experimental prostate cancer . Using a modified approach, we are placing an inducible Cre recombinase behind the FAP gene

  17. Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae-Min; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2012-01-01

    Malignant transformation of tumor accompanies profound changes in the normal neighboring tissue, called tumor stroma. The tumor stroma provides an environment favoring local tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spreading. Nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) measures biochemical and physiologic functions in the human body. In oncology, PET/SPECT is particularly useful for differentiating tumors from postsurgical changes or radiation necrosis, distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, identifying the optimal site for biopsy, staging cancers, and monitoring the response to therapy. Indeed, PET/SPECT is a powerful, proven diagnostic imaging modality that displays information unobtainable through other anatomical imaging, such as CT or MRI. When combined with coregistered CT data, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET is particularly useful. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. This paper will review the tumor microenvironment targeting oncologic imaging such as angiogenesis, invasion, hypoxia, growth, and homing, and also therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to provide a roadmap for additional applications of tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:22685650

  18. Mesenchymal stroma: Role in osteosarcoma progression.

    PubMed

    Cortini, Margherita; Avnet, Sofia; Baldini, Nicola

    2017-10-01

    The initiation and progression of malignant tumors are supported by their microenvironment: cancer cells per se cannot explain growth and formation of the primary or metastasis, and a combination of proliferating tumor cells, cancer stem cells, immune cells mesenchymal stromal cells and/or cancer-associated fibroblasts all contribute to the tumor bulk. The interaction between these multiple players, under different microenvironmental conditions of biochemical and physical stimuli (i.e. oxygen tension, pH, matrix mechanics), regulates the production and biological activity of several soluble factors, extracellular matrix components, and extracellular vesicles that are needed for growth, maintenance, chemoresistance and metastatization of cancer. In osteosarcoma, a very aggressive cancer of young adults characterized by the extensive need for more effective therapies, this aspect has been only recently explored. In this view, we will discuss the role of stroma, with a particular focus on the mesenchymal stroma, contributing to osteosarcoma progression through inherent features for homing, neovascularization, paracrine cross-feeding, microvesicle secretion, and immune modulation, and also by responding to the changes of the microenvironment that are induced by tumor cells. The most recent advances in the molecular cues triggered by cytokines, soluble factors, and metabolites that are partially beginning to unravel the axis between stromal elements of mesenchymal origin and osteosarcoma cells, will be reviewed providing insights likely to be used for novel therapeutic approaches against sarcomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100+/CD1a+ Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  20. Vascular Hyperpermeability, Angiogenesis, and Stroma Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Dvorak, Harold F.

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for more than half a century that the tumor microvasculature is hyperpermeable to plasma proteins. However, the identity of the leaky vessels and the consequences of vascular hyperpermeability have received little attention. This article places tumor vascular hyperpermeability in a broader context, relating it to (1) the low-level “basal” permeability of the normal vasculature; (2) the “acute,” short-term hyperpermeability induced by vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF-A) and other vascular permeabilizing agents; and (3) the “chronic” hyperpermeability associated with longer-term exposure to agents such as VPF/VEGF-A that accompanies many types of pathological angiogenesis. Leakage of plasma protein-rich fluids is important because it activates the clotting system, depositing an extravascular fibrin gel provisional matrix that serves as the first step in stroma generation. PMID:22355795

  1. The Reactive Stroma Microenvironment and Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barron, David A.; Rowley, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive stroma initiates during early prostate cancer development and co-evolves with prostate cancer progression. Previous studies have defined the key markers of reactive stroma and have established that reactive stroma biology influences prostate tumorigenesis and progression. The stem/progenitor cells of origin and the mechanisms that regulate their recruitment and activation to myofibroblasts or carcinoma-associated fibroblasts are essentially unknown. Key regulatory factors have been identified, including transforming growth factor beta, interleukin-8, fibroblast growth factors, connective tissue growth factor, wingless homologs-Wnts, and stromal cell-derived factor-1, among others. The biology of reactive stroma in cancer is similar to the more predictable biology of the stroma compartment during wound repair at sites where the epithelial barrier function is breached and a stromal response is generated. The co-evolution of reactive stroma and the biology of how reactive stroma - carcinoma interactions regulate cancer progression and metastasis are targets for new therapeutic approaches. Such approaches are strategically designed to inhibit cancer progression by uncoupling the reactive stroma niche. PMID:22930558

  2. Identification of a gene expression driven progression pathway in myxoid liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Brich, Silvia; Mauro, Valentina; Bozzi, Fabio; Dagrada, GianPaolo; Disciglio, Vittoria; Sanfilippo, Roberta; Gronchi, Alessandro; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Casali, Paolo G.; Canevari, Silvana; Pierotti, Marco A.; Pilotti, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to investigate the events involved in the progression of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS). Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemical/biochemical analyses were applied to specimens representative of the opposite ends of the MLS spectrum: pure myxoid (ML) and pure round cell (RC) liposarcomas. The analyses revealed the involvement of both coding and non coding RNAs (SNORDs located in DLK1-DIO3 region) and support a model of stepwise progression mainly driven by epigenetic changes involving tumour vascular supply and tumoral cellular component. In this model, a switch in the vascular landscape from a normal to a pro-angiogenic signature and the silencing of DLK1-DIO3 region mark the progression from ML to RC in concert with the acquisition by the latter of the over-expression of YY1/C-MYC/HDAC2, together with over-expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and stemness: MKNK2, MSX1 and TRIM71. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that to progress from ML to RC liposarcoma the cells have to overcome the epigenetic silencing restriction point in order to reset their new stem-like differentiation signature. Our findings provide a first attempt at identifying the missing links between ML and RC liposarcomas, that may also have broader applications in other clinico-pathological settings characterised by a spectrum of progression. PMID:25115389

  3. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma arising in the femoral vein: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oike, Naoki; Ogose, Akira; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Umezu, Hajime; Inagawa, Shoichi

    2014-10-01

    Soft tissue tumors arising in deep veins of the extremities are uncommon, although a few cases of synovial sarcoma or leiomyosarcoma arising in the femoral vein have been documented. However, to the best of our knowledge, an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) arising in the femoral vein has not been reported in the English literature. We report a case of EMC arising in the femoral vein of a 70-year-old man who presented with right leg edema and was diagnosed with a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the right proximal thigh that was diagnosed as myxomatous sarcoma by aspiration cytology, and anticoagulant therapy was initiated. The mass was surgically resected en bloc, including the femoral vein and surrounding soft tissue, and the femoral artery was preserved. The femoral vein was not reconstructed. The histologic diagnosis was an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. The patient received postoperative local radiation treatment, with a total dose of 60 Gy, and is currently doing well with no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis at 8 months after surgery. In summary, this case report shows that EMC can arise in the femoral vein, and that reconstruction of the femoral vein is not always necessary during surgery for soft tissue tumors.

  4. Myxoid chondrosarcoma of the mandible in a 22-year-old man: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a case of myxoid chondrosarcoma of the mandible in a 22-year-old male patient. A tumour in the buccal gingiva of the lower left premolar region had been identified 2 years earlier. Whole-jaw panoramic radiographs showed a hypodense shadow in the mesiodistal area near the roots of teeth 34 and 35. A maxillofacial computed tomography scan revealed a mass in the lower left premolar soft tissue, with a shadow indicating bone destruction, a clear boundary and uniform density. The preliminary diagnosis at the outpatient department was 34–35 epulis. The patient underwent surgery for 34–35 gingival tumour resection, 34 and 35 extraction, and 34 and 35 immediate implantation. The postoperative pathological examination revealed a cellular type extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the lower left mandible. Under general anaesthesia, the patient underwent lower left mandibular block and segmental resection, submandibular triangle dissection and vessel disassociation, and musculocutaneous flap repair in the oral and maxillofacial defect area. After 9 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaints of discomfort, and tumour recurrence was not observed on imaging examinations. PMID:27602220

  5. Tumor reactive stroma in cholangiocarcinoma: The fuel behind cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Simone; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Strazzabosco, Mario; Fabris, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly aggressive epithelial malignancy still carrying a dismal prognosis, owing to early lymph node metastatic dissemination and striking resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Although mechanisms underpinning CCA progression are still a conundrum, it is now increasingly recognized that the desmoplastic microenvironment developing in conjunction with biliary carcinogenesis, recently renamed tumor reactive stroma (TRS), behaves as a paramount tumor-promoting driver. Indeed, once being recruited, activated and dangerously co-opted by neoplastic cells, the cellular components of the TRS (myofibroblasts, macrophages, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) continuously rekindle malignancy by secreting a huge variety of soluble factors (cyto/chemokines, growth factors, morphogens and proteinases). Furthermore, these factors are long-term stored within an abnormally remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn can deleteriously mold cancer cell behavior. In this review, we will highlight evidence for the active role played by reactive stromal cells (as well as by the TRS-associated ECM) in CCA progression, including an overview of the most relevant TRS-derived signals possibly fueling CCA cell aggressiveness. Hopefully, a deeper knowledge of the paracrine communications reciprocally exchanged between cancer and stromal cells will steer the development of innovative, combinatorial therapies, which can finally hinder the progression of CCA, as well as of other cancer types with abundant TRS, such as pancreatic and breast carcinomas. PMID:28396716

  6. Excellent Local Control Rates and Distinctive Patterns of Failure in Myxoid Liposarcoma Treated With Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rates and patterns of metastatic relapse in patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: Between 1960 and 2003, 127 patients with non-metastatic myxoid liposarcoma were treated with conservation surgery and RT at our institution. The median patient age was 39 years (range, 14-79 years). Of the 127 patients, 46% underwent preoperative RT (median dose, 50 Gy) and 54% underwent postoperative RT (median dose, 60 Gy). Also, 28% received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy as a part of their treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 9.1 years. The overall survival rate at 5 and 10 years was 87% and 79%, respectively. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 81% and 73%. The local control rate at {>=}5 years was 97%. The actuarial rate of distant metastases at 5 and 10 years was 15% and 24%, respectively. Of the 27 patients who developed distant metastases, 48% did so in the retroperitoneum, 22% in other extrapulmonary soft tissues, 22% in the lung, 15% in bone, and 4% in the liver. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that RT and conservation surgery for localized myxoid liposarcoma provide excellent local control. Distant metastatic relapse tended to occur in the retroperitoneum and other nonpulmonary soft tissues. Therefore, staging and surveillance imaging should include the abdomen and pelvis, as well as the thorax, for patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma.

  7. Establishment and characterization of a new human myxoid liposarcoma cell line (DL-221) with the FUS-DDIT3 translocation

    PubMed Central

    de Graaff, Marieke A.; Yu, Jamie S.E.; Cheung, Hannah C.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Theresa; Liu, Jeffrey Juehui; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Szuhai, Károly; Åman, Pierre; Torres, Keila E.; Lev, Dina; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Somaiah, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma has the pathognomonic fusion oncogene FUS-DDIT3 encoding a chimeric transcription factor. Metastatic risk is higher with an increased round cell component and has been linked to aberrations involving the IGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway. These molecular insights have yet to translate to targeted therapies and the lack of experimental models is a major hindrance. We describe the initial in-depth characterization of a new cell line (DL-221) and establishment of a mouse xenograft model. The cell line DL-221 was derived from a metastatic pleural lesion showing myxoid and round cell histology. This newly established cell line was characterized for phenotypic properties and molecular cytogenetic profile, using PCR, COBRA-FISH and western blot. Next-generation whole exome sequencing was performed to further characterize the cell line and the parent tumor. NOD-SCID-IL2R gamma knockout mice were xenograft hosts. DL-221 cells grew an adhering monolayer and COBRA-FISH showed an aneuploid karyotype with t(12;16)(q13;p11) and several other rearrangements; RT-PCR demonstrated a FUS-DDIT3 fusion transcript type 1. Both the cell line and the original tumor harbored a TP53 compound heterozygous mutation in exon 4 and 7 and were wild type for PIK3CA. Moreover, among the 1254 variants called by whole exome sequencing, there was 77% concordance between the cell line and parent tumor. The recently described hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter region in myxoid liposarcomas was also found at C228T in DL-221. Xenografts suitable for additional pre-clinical studies were successfully established in mice after subcutaneous injection. The established DL-221 cell line is the only published available myxoid liposarcoma cell line that underwent spontaneous immortalization, without requiring SV40 transformation. The cell line and its xenograft model are unique and helpful tools to study the biology and novel potential targeted treatment approaches for myxoid liposarcoma. PMID:27270875

  8. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S.; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R.; Creighton, Chad J.; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde–derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  9. Stroma Breaking Theranostic Nanoparticles for Targeted Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    This project develops a dual-targeted and stroma breaking theranostic nanoparticle platform to address an unmet, clinical challenge of poor drug delivery efficiency in the application of nanomedicine to cancer therapy.

  10. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Stephanos; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Flomenberg, Neal; Frank, Philippe G; Casimiro, Mathew C; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Howell, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in the tumor fibroblast compartment is associated with early tumor recurrence, lymphnode metastasis and tamoxifen-resistance, resulting in poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we have used Cav-1 (−/−) null mice as a pre-clinical model for this “lethal tumor micro-environment”. Metabolic profiling of Cav-1 (−/−) mammary fat pads revealed the upregulation of numerous metabolites (nearly 100), indicative of a major catabolic phenotype. Our results are consistent with the induction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy/mitophagy. The two most prominent metabolites that emerged from this analysis were ADMA (asymmetric dimethyl arginine) and BHB (beta-hydroxybutyrate; a ketone body), which are markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, respectively. Transcriptional profiling of Cav-1 (−/−) stromal cells and human tumor stroma from breast cancer patients directly supported an association with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy/mitophagy, as well as ADMA and ketone production. MicroRNA profiling of Cav-1 (−/−) stromal cells revealed the upregulation of two key cancer-related miR's, namely miR-31 and miR-34c. Consistent with our metabolic findings, these miR's are associated with oxidative stress (miR-34c) or activation of the hypoxic response/HIF1α (miR-31), which is sufficient to drive authophagy/mitophagy. Thus, via an unbiased comprehensive analysis of a lethal tumor micro-environment, we have identified a number of candidate biomarkers (ADMA, ketones and miR-31/34c) that could be used to identify high-risk cancer patients at diagnosis, for treatment stratification and/or for evaluating therapeutic efficacy during anti-cancer therapy. We propose that the levels of these key biomarkers (ADMA, ketones/BHB, miR-31 and miR-34c) could be (1) assayed using serum or plasma from cancer patients or (2) performed directly on excised tumor

  11. Anterior and posterior corneal stroma elasticity assessed using nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal biomechanics is an essential parameter for developing diagnostic and treatment methods of corneal-related diseases. It is widely accepted that corneal mechanical strength stems from the stroma's collagenous composition. However, more comprehensive insight into the mechanical properties within the stroma is needed to improve current corneal diagnostic and treatment techniques. The purpose of this study was to perform elasticity characterization of anterior and posterior stromal regions of human corneas using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nine pairs of human whole globes were placed in 20% Dextran solution, cornea side down, to restore the corneal thickness to physiological levels (400-600μm). The epithelium and Bowman's membrane were removed from all eyes. Anterior stromal AFM elasticity testing was then performed on left (OS) eyes. Additional stroma was removed from right (OD) eyes to allow posterior stromal measurements at a depth of 50% of the original thickness. All experiments were performed with corneas submerged in 15% Dextran to maintain corneal hydration. The results of the study showed that the Young's modulus of elasticity of the anterior stroma (average: 281 ± 214kPa; range: 59-764kPa) was significantly higher than that of the posterior stroma (average: 89.5 ± 46.1kPa; range: 29-179kPa) (p=0.014). In addition, a linear relationship was found between the posterior stromal elasticity and anterior stromal elasticity (p=0.0428). On average, the elasticity of the posterior stroma is 39.3% of the anterior stroma. In summary, there appears to be an elasticity gradient within the corneal stroma, which should be considered in the design and development of corneal diagnostic and treatment methods to enhance efficacy. PMID:23800511

  12. Role of Reactive Stroma in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    prostate cancer. 5 Body: Task 1 will knock-in DNA encoding the Mifepristone (RU 486) inducible Cre recombinase (CrePR1) into the fibroblast activation... Mifepristone -regulated Cre recombinase (CrePR1) expression specifically to reactive stroma. The purpose of Task 1 is to generate this mouse. The use of an...inducible Cre recombinase ( Mifepristone ) was proposed in order to selectively regulate expression at sites of reactive stroma formation in adult

  13. Proteins of the corneal stroma: importance in visual function.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Meng; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Xin; He, Yuxi; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    The human cornea, consisting of five layers, is the transparent tissue that refracts and transmits light to the lens and retina, providing about two thirds of the refractive power of the eye. The stroma layer comprises nearly 90 % of the thickness of the cornea and thus plays a pivotal role in normal visual function. The bulk of this layer is constituted by proteins in the extracellular martrix secreted by the corneal epithelial, stroma, and endothelial cells. Clinical research has shown that corneal stroma diseases are common and involve conditions such as infections, injuries, and genetic defects, which cause severe visual disturbances or even blindness. To improve our understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in the physiological and pathological activities of the corneal stroma, its proteins have been brought into the limelight to determine their crucial and irreplaceable roles. The data presented in a previous study have demonstrated the presence of 1679 proteins in the stroma, and this data set has subsequently been perfected by utilizing a highly sensitive isobaric peptide-labeling approach. According to their manifestations, these proteins can be classified as a gel-like organic material composed of proteoglycans, enzymes, and hemocyanin-binding proteins and a network of filaments composed of collagen, elastin, keratin, vimentin, and interconnected filaments comprising fibronectin and laminin. The aim of this review is to describe some corneal stroma proteins by highlighting their major functions and valuable applications in ophthalmologic research toward the better characterization and treatment of eye diseases.

  14. [Reconstruction of rabbit corneal stroma with skin fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-qing; Zhang, Wen-jie; Liu, Wei; Hu, Xiao-jie; Zhou, Guang-dong; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yi-lin

    2009-09-01

    To explore whether skin fibroblasts could be used as a cell source for reconstruction of the corneal stroma. It was an experimental study. Skin fibroblast cells were isolated from newborn rabbits, cultured and expanded in vitro. Cells were labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene by retro-viral infection. Fibroblasts at passage 3 were seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) non-woven fibers to form a cell-scaffold construct. Constructs were then implanted into the adult rabbit corneal stroma layer after being cultured in vitro for 1 week. Engineered stroma were observed continuously and harvested after 8 weeks of transplantation for gross, histological evaluation and Keratocan examination. PGA alone was used as control. The engineered tissue in the cornea became transparent gradually over a period of 8 weeks. Histological analysis showed that engineered stromal lamellar was relatively regular and the orientation of fibers was parallel to the surface of cornea, which is similar to normal cornea. The implanted cells were confirmed by GFP expression under fluorescent microscope, which also express Keratocan. By transmission electron microscopy examination, no significant difference in the diameter of collagen fiber was observed between engineered stroma (33.08 + or - 2.47) nm and normal stroma (t = 1.80, P = 0.0771). Skin fibroblast cells could be used as seed cells for reconstruction of the corneal stroma.

  15. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor, and renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma relationship of 3 types of renal tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondrej; Compérat, Eva Maria; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor has been described in 2000, followed by description of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma in 2006. Discussions about possible relationship of both tumors were published since their description. The main differential diagnostic feature was considered presence/absence of fibroleiomyomatous stroma-relationship of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor in stroma-rich tumors. However, it was shown that stroma is reactive and nonneoplastic by its nature and that all other histologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular-genetic features of both entities are identical. In upcoming World Health Organization classification of renal tumors (2016), both lesions are considered as a single entity (clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma [CCPRCC]). Most published cases followed the benign/indolent clinical course. In addition, most tumors has normal status of VHL gene (methylation, LOH 3p, mutations); however, CCPRCC was referred in patients with VHL syndrome. Another issue covered by this review is possible relationship of CCPRCC and "renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma" (RCCLS). Renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma shows clear cell cytology and abundant leiomyomatous stroma. Some of RCCLS are positive for cytokeratin 7; some are negative. Similar situation exists for relation of RCCLS and VHL gene abnormalities. It is so far unclear whether any relation between CCPRCC and RCCLS exists. From all published studies, it seems that these tumors are less likely related to each other.

  16. Membrane-to-Nucleus Signals and Epigenetic Mechanisms for Myofibroblastic Activation and Desmoplastic Stroma: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Liver Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ningling; Shah, Vijay H.; Urrutia, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the most abundant cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), are a key source of extracellular matrix (ECM) that constitutes the desmoplastic stroma. Through remodeling of the reactive tumor stroma and paracrine actions, CAFs regulate cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis, as well as tumor resistance to therapies. The CAFs found in stroma-rich primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and liver metastases of primary cancers of other organs predominantly originate from hepatic stellate cells (HSTCs), which are pericytes associated with hepatic sinusoids. During tumor invasion, HSTCs transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts in response to paracrine signals emanating from either tumor cells or a heterogenous cell population within the hepatic tumor microenvironment. Mechanistically, HSTC-to-myofibroblast transdifferentiation, also known as, HSTC activation, requires cell surface receptor activation, intracellular signal transduction, gene transcription and epigenetic signals, which combined ultimately modulate distinct gene expression profiles that give rise to and maintain a new phenotype. The current review, defines a paradigm that explains how HSTCs are activated into CAFs to promote liver metastasis. Furthermore, focus on the most relevant intracellular signaling networks and epigenetic mechanisms that control HSTC activation is provided. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of targeting CAF/activated HSTCs, in isolation or in conjunction with targeting cancer cells, which constitutes a promising and viable therapeutic approach for the treatment of primary stroma-rich liver cancers and liver metastasis. PMID:25548101

  17. p14(ARF) methylation is a common event in the pathogenesis and progression of myxoid and pleomorphic liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Davidović, Radoslav; Sopta, Jelena; Mandušić, Vesna; Krajnović, Milena; Stanojević, Maja; Tulić, Goran; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2013-01-01

    Liposarcoma represents the most frequent group of soft tissue sarcomas. The group can be divided into three different classes: (1) differentiated/undifferentiated (WDLPS/DDLPS), (2) myxoid/round cell (MLPS/RCLPS) and (3) pleomorphic liposarcoma (PLS). It has become apparent that p53-p14 and Rb-p16 pathways play important roles in the pathogenesis of various sarcoma types. Molecular studies of the genes involved in these two pathways showed wide variations between the liposarcoma subtypes or even within the same subtype. We sought to examine mutational status of p53 and methylation status of p16 (INK4a) /p14 (ARF) genes in primary and recurrent liposarcoma tumors. There were twelve myxoid (12/18, 66.7 %) and six pleomorphic liposarcoma (6/18, 33.3 %) samples. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that p53 protein was overexpressed in 3/12 MLPS (25 %) and 6/6 PLS (100 %). Mutational analysis showed that 2/11 MLPS (18.2 %) and 2/6 PLS (33.3 %) contained mutated p53 gene. On the other hand, 3/18 samples (16.7 %) had methylated p16 promoter. However, the frequencies of the p14 (ARF) gene methylation were 83.3 % (10/12) and 50 % (3/6) in myxoid and pleomorphic group, respectively. Overall, 15 out of 18 (83.3 %) samples had either p53 gene mutation or methylated p14 (ARF) promoter. The results from the current study suggest significant impact of the p14 (ARF) gene methylation on the pathogenesis and progression of myxoid and to a lesser extent pleomorphic liposarcoma. Despite the limited number of samples, our study points to necessity of further investigation of p53-p14 and Rb-p16 pathways in liposarcoma.

  18. FGFR2 is overexpressed in myxoid liposarcoma and inhibition of FGFR signaling impairs tumor growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Künstlinger, Helen; Fassunke, Jana; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Brors, Benedikt; Heydt, Carina; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wardelmann, Eva; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas account for more than one third of liposarcomas and about 10% of all adult soft tissue sarcomas. The tumors are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations leading to the chimeric oncogenes FUS-DDIT3 or EWS1R-DDIT3. The encoded fusion proteins act as aberrant transcription factors. Therefore, we implemented comparative expression analyses using whole-genome microarrays in tumor and fat tissue samples. We aimed at identifying differentially expressed genes which may serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers or as therapeutic targets. Microarray analyses revealed overexpression of FGFR2 and other members of the FGF/FGFR family. Overexpression of FGFR2 was validated by qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in primary tumor samples. Treatment of the myxoid liposarcoma cell lines MLS 402 and MLS 1765 with the FGFR inhibitors PD173074, TKI258 (dovitinib) and BGJ398 as well as specific siRNAs reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and delayed cell migration. Combination of FGFR inhibitors with trabectedin further increased the effect. Our study demonstrates overexpression of FGFR2 and a functional role of FGFR signaling in myxoid liposarcoma. As FGFR inhibition showed effects on proliferation and cell migration and induced apoptosis in vitro, our data indicate the potential use of FGFR inhibitors as a targeted therapy for these tumors. PMID:26036639

  19. FGFR2 is overexpressed in myxoid liposarcoma and inhibition of FGFR signaling impairs tumor growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Künstlinger, Helen; Fassunke, Jana; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Brors, Benedikt; Heydt, Carina; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wardelmann, Eva; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-08-21

    Myxoid liposarcomas account for more than one third of liposarcomas and about 10% of all adult soft tissue sarcomas. The tumors are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations leading to the chimeric oncogenes FUS-DDIT3 or EWS1R-DDIT3. The encoded fusion proteins act as aberrant transcription factors. Therefore, we implemented comparative expression analyses using whole-genome microarrays in tumor and fat tissue samples. We aimed at identifying differentially expressed genes which may serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers or as therapeutic targets. Microarray analyses revealed overexpression of FGFR2 and other members of the FGF/FGFR family. Overexpression of FGFR2 was validated by qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in primary tumor samples. Treatment of the myxoid liposarcoma cell lines MLS 402 and MLS 1765 with the FGFR inhibitors PD173074, TKI258 (dovitinib) and BGJ398 as well as specific siRNAs reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and delayed cell migration. Combination of FGFR inhibitors with trabectedin further increased the effect. Our study demonstrates overexpression of FGFR2 and a functional role of FGFR signaling in myxoid liposarcoma. As FGFR inhibition showed effects on proliferation and cell migration and induced apoptosis in vitro, our data indicate the potential use of FGFR inhibitors as a targeted therapy for these tumors.

  20. Bioactive self-assembled peptide nanofibers for corneal stroma regeneration.

    PubMed

    Uzunalli, G; Soran, Z; Erkal, T S; Dagdas, Y S; Dinc, E; Hondur, A M; Bilgihan, K; Aydin, B; Guler, M O; Tekinay, A B

    2014-03-01

    Defects in the corneal stroma caused by trauma or diseases such as macular corneal dystrophy and keratoconus can be detrimental for vision. Development of therapeutic methods to enhance corneal regeneration is essential for treatment of these defects. This paper describes a bioactive peptide nanofiber scaffold system for corneal tissue regeneration. These nanofibers are formed by self-assembling peptide amphiphile molecules containing laminin and fibronectin inspired sequences. Human corneal keratocyte cells cultured on laminin-mimetic peptide nanofibers retained their characteristic morphology, and their proliferation was enhanced compared with cells cultured on fibronectin-mimetic nanofibers. When these nanofibers were used for damaged rabbit corneas, laminin-mimetic peptide nanofibers increased keratocyte migration and supported stroma regeneration. These results suggest that laminin-mimetic peptide nanofibers provide a promising injectable, synthetic scaffold system for cornea stroma regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Technique for the selective heating of corneal stroma

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, J.D.; Albillar, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    Conventional thermokeratoplasty, which relies upon thermal conduction from the epithelium into the stroma, does not generate a desirable temperature profile through the cornea. Previous reports show that temperature levels in the epithelium and in Bowman's membrane are excessive, often resulting in damage to these structures. In addition, this study shows that when corneal thickness exceeds approximately 300 microns, the central portion of the stroma probably will not reach critical shrinkage temperature. Shrinkage only in the superficial stroma may result in minimal and transitory alterations of corneal shape. Variation in treatment results may also occur due to the difficulty in precise control of treatment duration. An alternative corneal heating technique is discussed which appears to solve these three basic problems.

  2. Emerging concepts in pancreatic cancer medicine: targeting the tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Neesse, Albrecht; Krug, Sebastian; Gress, Thomas M; Tuveson, David A; Michl, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a stroma-rich and highly challenging cancer to treat. Over recent years, it has become increasingly evident that the complex network of soluble cytokines, growth factors, proteases, and components of the extracellular matrix collaboratively interact within the tumor microenvironment, sustaining and driving cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and early metastasis. More recently, the tumor microenvironment has also been appreciated to mediate therapeutic resistance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, thus opening numerous avenues for novel therapeutic explorations. Inert and soluble components of the tumor stroma have been targeted in order to break down the extracellular matrix scaffold, relieve vessel compression, and increase drug delivery to hypovascular tumors. Moreover, targeting of antiapoptotic, immunosuppressive, and pro-proliferative effects of the tumor stroma provides novel vantage points of attack. This review focuses on current and future developments in pancreatic cancer medicine, with a particular emphasis on biophysical and biochemical approaches that target the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24379681

  3. The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is highly expressed in myxoid and round cell subset of liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica A; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Kraybill, William G; Guttridge, Denis C; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2013-02-01

    Liposarcomas are a heterogenous group of fat-derived sarcomas, and surgery with or without chemoradiation therapy remains the main stay of treatment. NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen expressed in various cancers where it can induce both cellular and humoral immunity. Immunotherapy has shown promise in clinical trials involving NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors. Gene expression studies have shown upregulation of the gene for NY-ESO-1, CTAG1B, in myxoid and round cell liposarcomas. Herein, we evaluated the expression of NY-ESO-1 among liposarcoma subtypes by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Frozen tissue for quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis was obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=15): myxoid and round cell (n=8); well-differentiated (n=4), and dedifferentiated (n=3). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks were obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=44): myxoid and round cell (n=18); well-differentiated (n=10); dedifferentiated (n=10); and pleomorphic (n=6). Full sections were stained with monoclonal antibody NY-ESO-1, and staining was assessed for intensity (1-3+), percentage of tumor positivity, and location. In all, 7/8 (88%) and 16/18 (89%) myxoid and round cell expressed CTAG1B and NY-ESO-1 by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Western blot correlated with mRNA expression levels. By immunohistochemistry, 94% (15/16) of positive cases stained homogenously with 2-3+ intensity. Also, 3/6 (50%) pleomorphic liposarcomas demonstrated a range of staining: 1+ intensity in 50% of cells; 2+ intensity in 5% of cells; and 3+ intensity in 90% of cells. One case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma showed strong, diffuse staining (3+ intensity in 75% of cells). Our study shows that both CTAG1B mRNA and protein are overexpressed with high frequency in myxoid and round cell liposarcoma, enabling the potential use of targeted immunotherapy in the treatment of this

  4. Thymus organogenesis and development of the thymic stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Farley, Alison M; Blackburn, C Clare

    2007-01-01

    T-cell development occurs principally in the thymus. Here, immature progenitor cells are guided through the differentiation and selection steps required to generate a complex T-cell repertoire that is both self-tolerant and has propensity to bind self major histocompatibility complex. These processes depend on an array of functionally distinct epithelial cell types within the thymic stroma, which have a common developmental origin in the pharyngeal endoderm. Here, we describe the structural and phenotypic attributes of the thymic stroma, and review current cellular and molecular understanding of thymus organogenesis.

  5. Role of Reactive Stroma in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    cancers, as FAP is generally expressed in reactive stroma of many different carcinomas. Body: Task 1 will knock-in DNA encoding the Mifepristone (RU 486...regulatory elements to target a Mifepristone -regulated Cre recombinase (CrePR1) expression specifically to reactive stroma. Recent studies have shown that...the Mifepristone inducible system may be too leaky for our needs. Since FAP is expressed 3 Table of Contents Cover…………………………………………………………………………………… 1

  6. Anthracycline-based chemotherapy in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a rare subgroup within soft tissue sarcomas. Its sensitivity to chemotherapy is reported to be low. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a series of 11 EMC patients treated as from 2001 within the Italian Rare Cancer Network (RCN) with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Pathologic diagnosis was centrally reviewed in all cases and confirmed by the presence of the specific chromosomal rearrangements, involving the NR4A3 gene locus on chromosome 9. Results Eleven patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy were included (M/F: 9/2 – mean age: 52 years – site of primary: lower limb/other = 9/2 - metastatic = 11 – front line/ further line = 10/1 – anthracycline as single agent/ combined with ifosfamide = 1/10). Ten patients are evaluable for response. Overall, best response according to RECIST was: partial response (PR) = 4 (40 %), stable disease (SD) = 3, progressive disease (PD) = 3 cases. Median PFS was 8 (range 2–10) months. Conclusions By contrast to what reported so far, anthracycline-based chemotherapy is active in a distinct proportion of EMC patients. PMID:24345066

  7. Metastatic patterns of myxoid/round cell liposarcoma: a review of a 25-year experience.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naofumi; Susa, Michiro; Hosaka, Seiichi; Nakayama, Robert; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Takeuchi, Katsuhito; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Anazawa, Ukei; Mukai, Makio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Yabe, Hiroo; Morioka, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (MRCL), unlike other soft tissue sarcomas, has been associated with unusual pattern of metastasis to extrapulmonary sites. In an attempt to elucidate the clinical features of MRCL with metastatic lesions, 58 cases, from the medical database of Keio University Hospital were used for the evaluation. 47 patients (81%) had no metastases, whereas 11 patients (11%) had metastases during their clinical course. Among the 11 patients with metastatic lesions, 8 patients (73%) had extrapulmonary metastases and 3 patients (27%) had pulmonary metastases. Patients were further divided into three groups; without metastasis, with extrapulmonary metastasis, and with pulmonary metastasis. When the metastatic patterns were stratified according to tumor size, there was statistical significance between the three groups (P = 0.028). The 8 cases with extrapulmonary metastases were all larger than 10 cm. Similarly, histological grading had a significant impact on metastatic patterns (P = 0.027). 3 cases with pulmonary metastatic lesions were all diagnosed as high grade. In conclusion, large size and low histological grade were significantly associated with extrapulmonary metastasis.

  8. Normal and Functional TP53 in Genetically Stable Myxoid/Round Cell Liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Kåbjörn Gustafsson, Christina; Engtröm, Katarina; Thomsen, Christer; Dolatabadi, Soheila; Jonasson, Emma; Li, Chieh-Yuan; Ruff, David; Chen, Shiaw-Min; Åman, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round-cell liposarcoma (MLS/RCLS) is characterized by either the fusion gene FUS-DDIT3 or the less commonly occurring EWSR1-DDIT3 and most cases carry few or no additional cytogenetic changes. There are conflicting reports concerning the status and role of TP53 in MLS/RCLS. Here we analysed four MLS/RCLS derived cell lines for TP53 mutations, expression and function. Three SV40 transformed cell lines expressed normal TP53 proteins. Irradiation caused normal posttranslational modifications of TP53 and induced P21 expression in two of these cell lines. Transfection experiments showed that the FUS-DDIT3 fusion protein had no effects on irradiation induced TP53 responses. Ion Torrent AmpliSeq screening, using the Cancer Hotspot panel, showed no dysfunctional or disease associated alleles/mutations. In conclusion, our results suggest that most MLS/RCLS cases carry functional TP53 genes and this is consistent with the low numbers of secondary mutations observed in this tumor entity. PMID:25393000

  9. Trabectedin in myxoid liposarcomas (MLS): a long-term analysis of a single-institution series.

    PubMed

    Grosso, F; Sanfilippo, R; Virdis, E; Piovesan, C; Collini, P; Dileo, P; Morosi, C; Tercero, J C; Jimeno, J; D'Incalci, M; Gronchi, A; Pilotti, S; Casali, P G

    2009-08-01

    Trabectedin has been approved in Europe as second-line therapy for advanced soft tissue sarcomas. A previous analysis showed that myxoid liposarcomas (MLS) are particularly sensitive to the drug. We report on the long-term efficacy of trabectedin in a subgroup of that series. Since September 2002, 32 advanced pretreated MLS patients received trabectedin at our center. Data were reviewed focusing on their long-term outcome. Trabectedin was given as a 24-h continuous infusion every 21 days. A total of 376 and a median of 12 courses per patient (range 2-26; interquartiles range (IQR) 8-15) were delivered. Response rate per RECIST was 50% [95% confidence interval (CI) 32% to 68%], median progression-free survival (PFS) was 17 months (95% CI 13.5-30.1) and median overall survival is still not reached. In 10 patients, therapy was stopped in the absence of any evident disease, mostly after complete surgery of residual lesions. In these 10 patients, at a median follow-up of 25 months, PFS was 28.1 months (95% CI 25.6-36.4) from treatment start. These data indicate that the high response rate of MLS to trabectedin translates into prolonged PFS. Surgery of residual metastatic disease is already used quite extensively in metastatic MLS. Trabectedin may give further significance to this kind of surgery.

  10. Tumor stroma as targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is not only composed malignant epithelial component but also stromal components such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells, by which an appropriate tumor microenvironment (TME) is formed to promote tumorigenesis, progression, and metastasis. As the most abundant component in the TME, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are involved in multifaceted mechanistic details including remodeling the extracellular matrix, suppressing immune responses, and secreting growth factors and cytokines that mediate signaling pathways to extensively affect tumor cell growth and invasiveness, differentiation, angiogenesis, and chronic inflammatory milieu. Today, more and more therapeutic strategies are purposefully designed to target the TME as well as tumor cells. This review will focus on the role of CAFs in tumor development and the novel strategies to target this component to inhibit the tumor growth. PMID:23064233

  11. Reactivation of Breast Cancer Micrometastases by Senescent Bone Marrow Stroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    induced by adhesion molecule signaling activated by osteoblast ligation, but these data are yet to be determined. It will also be important to...secretion in progression to growing disease. Anti-inflammatory treatment of senescent stroma with aspirin and indomethacin are experiments ongoing

  12. Tumor Stroma, Tumor Blood Vessels, and Antiangiogenesis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Harold F

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumors generally require a vascularized connective tissue stroma if they are to grow beyond minimal size. They generate that stroma in part by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent vascular permeability and angiogenic factor. Increased vascular permeability leads to deposition of a provisional fibrin stroma, which supports tumor, connective tissue, and inflammatory cell migration and plays an active role in the formation of mature vascularized stroma. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced tumor blood vessels are heterogeneous, of at least 6 distinct types, and develop linearly over time. They include both angiogenic (mother vessels, glomeruloid microvascular proliferations, vascular malformations, capillaries) and arteriovenogenic (feeding arteries, draining veins) blood vessels. Attacking the tumor vasculature with drugs that target VEGF or its receptors (VEGFR) has come into vogue but has been less effective than had been hope for. One reason for this is that anti-VEGF/VEGFR therapy attacks only a subset of tumor blood vessels, the earliest to form. New targets on late-forming blood vessels such as feeding arteries would be useful in helping antivascular cancer therapy fulfill its promise.

  13. Structural and ultrastructural evidence for telocytes in prostate stroma.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Lara S; Jesus, Mariana M; Fochi, Ricardo A; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Justulin, Luis A; Góes, Rejane M; Felisbino, Sérgio L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2013-03-01

    The prostate comprises a glandular epithelium embedded within a fibromuscular stroma. The stroma is a complex arrangement of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components in addition to growth factors, regulatory molecules, remodelling enzymes, blood vessels, nerves and immune cells. The principal sources of ECM components are fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMC), which synthesize the structural and regulatory components of the ECM. Telocytes (TCs) were recently described as a novel stromal cell type that exhibited characteristic features. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of TCs in prostate stromal tissue of gerbils, as the stromal compartment of this gland is a dynamic microenvironment. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), light microscopy and immunohistochemistry methods to provide morphological evidence for the presence of TCs. Cells that resembled TCs were observed in gerbil prostatic stroma. These cells had small cellular bodies with very thin and extremely long cellular processes. They were found primarily in the subepithelial area and also at the periphery of SMC layers. TCs also exhibited moniliform processes, caveolae and nuclei surrounded by small amounts of cytoplasm. Close contacts between TC podomers were evident, particularly in the adjacent epithelial compartment. This morphological evidence supported the presence of TCs in the gerbil prostatic stroma, which we report for the first time. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Structural and ultrastructural evidence for telocytes in prostate stroma

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Lara S; Jesus, Mariana M; Fochi, Ricardo A; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Justulin-, Luis A; Góes, Rejane M; Felisbino, Sérgio L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2013-01-01

    The prostate comprises a glandular epithelium embedded within a fibromuscular stroma. The stroma is a complex arrangement of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components in addition to growth factors, regulatory molecules, remodelling enzymes, blood vessels, nerves and immune cells. The principal sources of ECM components are fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMC), which synthesize the structural and regulatory components of the ECM. Telocytes (TCs) were recently described as a novel stromal cell type that exhibited characteristic features. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of TCs in prostate stromal tissue of gerbils, as the stromal compartment of this gland is a dynamic microenvironment. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), light microscopy and immunohistochemistry methods to provide morphological evidence for the presence of TCs. Cells that resembled TCs were observed in gerbil prostatic stroma. These cells had small cellular bodies with very thin and extremely long cellular processes. They were found primarily in the subepithelial area and also at the periphery of SMC layers. TCs also exhibited moniliform processes, caveolae and nuclei surrounded by small amounts of cytoplasm. Close contacts between TC podomers were evident, particularly in the adjacent epithelial compartment. This morphological evidence supported the presence of TCs in the gerbil prostatic stroma, which we report for the first time. PMID:23388038

  15. Automated Classification of Breast Cancer Stroma Maturity From Histological Images.

    PubMed

    Reis, Sara; Gazinska, Patrycja; Hipwell, John H; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Naidoo, Kalnisha; Williams, Norman; Pinder, Sarah; Hawkes, David J

    2017-10-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in regulating tumor progression by a number of different mechanisms, in particular, the remodeling of collagen fibers in tumor-associated stroma, which has been reported to be related to patient survival. The underlying motivation of this work is that remodeling of collagen fibers gives rise to observable patterns in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides from clinical cases of invasive breast carcinoma that the pathologist can label as mature or immature stroma. The aim of this paper is to categorise and automatically classify stromal regions according to their maturity and show that this classification agrees with that of skilled observers, hence providing a repeatable and quantitative measure for prognostic studies. We use multiscale basic image features and local binary patterns, in combination with a random decision trees classifier for classification of breast cancer stroma regions-of-interest (ROI). We present results from a cohort of 55 patients with analysis of 169 ROI. Our multiscale approach achieved a classification accuracy of 84%. This work demonstrates the ability of texture-based image analysis to differentiate breast cancer stroma maturity in clinically acquired H&E-stained slides at least as well as skilled observers.

  16. Chondroitin sulfate synthase 1 expression is associated with malignant potential of soft tissue sarcomas with myxoid substance.

    PubMed

    Momose, Takashige; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Harumiya, Satoru; Isobe, Ken'ichi; Kito, Munehisa; Fukushima, Mana; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The glycosyltransferases chondroitin sulfate synthase 1 (CHSY1) and exostoses-like 3 (EXTL3) specifically function in biosynthesis of the glycans chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate, respectively. Although these glycans play important roles in pathogenesis of various tumors, their significance in soft tissue sarcoma remains unknown. Here, we asked whether CHSY1 or EXTL3 expression correlates with malignant potential of soft tissue sarcomas with myxoid substance. To do so, we examined 40 samples representing specific types, including 12 cases of myxoid liposarcoma, 14 of myxofibrosarcoma, 12 of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 2 of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. We performed immunohistochemistry with anti-CHSY1 and anti-EXTL3 antibodies and compared enzyme expression levels with tumor histologic grade as assessed by the Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer classification and with patient 5-year survival rate. CHSY1 and EXTL3 were expressed in 72.5% and 32.5% of all tumors, respectively. Notably, CHSY1 was strongly expressed in myxofibrosarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor compared with other tumors and significantly associated with higher- rather than lower-grade tumors (P < .01). High expression of CHSY1 was also significantly associated with poorer patient outcomes (P = .031) and higher stages assessed by American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P = .004). By contrast, EXTL3 expression was not correlated with histologic grade or patient prognosis. We conclude that CHSY1 expression is closely associated with malignant potential of soft tissue sarcomas with myxoid substance.

  17. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy in Myxoid Sarcomas Is Associated With a Dense Vascular Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeze, Ronald S.A. de Jong, Daphne de; Haas, Rick L.; Stewart, Fiona; Coevorden, Frits van

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) have long been the standard treatment for most deep-seated sarcomas; however, since the randomized trial from the National Cancer Institute of Canada, which described similar local control for pre- vs. postoperative RT, both modalities are now widely accepted. As a group, sarcomas are classified as radiation resistant. The subgroup of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS), a sarcoma with a typical vascular crow's feet pattern, is highly radiosensitive, but a mechanism for this phenomenon is unknown. Here we describe our results with preoperative RT and propose a mechanism explaining the high sensitivity based on the distinctive vascularization pattern of MLS. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2006, 31 sarcoma patients, including 10 with MLS, underwent preoperative RT at our institute. Resected specimens were histologically evaluated, focusing on classification, grade, and vascularization patterns. Results: Twenty sarcomas showed more than 80% pathologic response after preoperative RT. A pathologic complete response was found in all 'pure' MLS specimens after preoperative RT (n = 8). There were no pathologic complete responses in the remaining sarcoma patients (n = 23), although 12 showed 80% to 90% pathologic response. In contrast to the remaining RT-resistant sarcomas, the highly responding specimens contained branching vasculature, partial thrombus formation and inflammation of medium sized arterioles, similar to the vascular changes in MLS. Conclusions: Both MLS and sarcomas with MLS-like vasculature are highly radiosensitive. Radiation sensitivity may be explained by changes in medium-sized arterioles, obstructing the specific crow's feet vascularization and inducing hypoxia with secondary tumor cell death.

  18. Evolutionary Dynamics of Tumor-Stroma Interactions in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sartakhti, Javad Salimi; Manshaei, Mohammad Hossein; Bateni, Soroosh; Archetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells and stromal cells cooperate by exchanging diffusible factors that sustain tumor growth, a form of frequency-dependent selection that can be studied in the framework of evolutionary game theory. In the case of multiple myeloma, three types of cells (malignant plasma cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts) exchange growth factors with different effects, and tumor-stroma interactions have been analysed using a model of cooperation with pairwise interactions. Here we show that a model in which growth factors have autocrine and paracrine effects on multiple cells, a more realistic assumption for tumor-stroma interactions, leads to different results, with implications for disease progression and treatment. In particular, the model reveals that reducing the number of malignant plasma cells below a critical threshold can lead to their extinction and thus to restore a healthy balance between osteoclast and osteoblast, a result in line with current therapies against multiple myeloma. PMID:28030607

  19. Cancer-stroma evolutionary dynamics in stress-gradient microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Lambert, Guillaume; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto

    2012-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of drug resistance in cancer, it is important to mimic the tumor microenvironment, in which cells are exposed to not uniform concentrations but rather gradients of drugs, nutrients, and other factors Compared to traditional in-vitro methods, microfluidic structure enables better control of the temporal and spatial profile of gradients. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic Doxorubicin gradient environment with heterogeneous landscape, and culture multiple myeloma (8226-S, expressing RFP) and bone marrow stroma (HS-5, expressing GFP) cell lines together. The myeloma cells are not directly motile, but they are able to migrate via the adhesion to motile stroma cells. The indirect motility mechanism of the myeloma cells is crucial for the adaptation to stress environment. Finally, we will report the co-culture dynamics under the stress of doxorubicin gradients, observing for cellular migrations and growth

  20. The Functional Role of Reactive Stroma in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Isaiah G.; Rowley, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The human prostate gland is one of the only internal organs that continue to enlarge throughout adulthood. The specific mechanisms that regulate this growth, as well as the pathological changes leading to the phenotype observed in the disease benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), are essentially unknown. Recent studies and their associated findings have made clear that many complex alterations occur, involving persistent and chronic inflammation, circulating hormonal level deregulation, and aberrant wound repair processes. BPH has been etiologically characterized as a progressive, albeit discontinuous, hyperplasia of both the glandular epithelial and stromal cell compartments coordinately yielding an expansion of the prostate gland and clinical symptoms. Interestingly, the inflammatory and repair responses observed in BPH are also key components of general wound repair in post-natal tissues. These responses include altered expression of chemokines, cytokines, matrix remodeling factors, chronic inflammatory processes, altered immune surveillance and recognition, as well as the formation of a prototypical ‘reactive’ stroma which is similar to that observed across various fibroplasias and malignancies of a variety of tissue sites. Stromal tissue, both embryonic mesenchyme, and adult reactive stroma myofibroblasts, has been shown to exert potent and functional regulatory control over epithelial proliferation and differentiation as well as immunoresponsive modulation. Thus, the functional biology of a reactive stroma, within the context of an adult disease typified by epithelial and stromal aberrant hyperplasia, is critical to understand within the context of prostate disease and beyond. The mechanisms that regulate reactive stroma biology in BPH represent targets of opportunity for new therapeutic approaches that may extend to other tissue contexts. Accordingly, this review seeks to address the dissection of important factors, signaling pathways, genes, and other

  1. Tumour stroma-derived lipocalin-2 promotes breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ören, Bilge; Urosevic, Jelena; Mertens, Christina; Mora, Javier; Guiu, Marc; Gomis, Roger R; Weigert, Andreas; Schmid, Tobias; Grein, Stephan; Brüne, Bernhard; Jung, Michaela

    2016-07-01

    Tumour cell-secreted factors skew infiltrating immune cells towards a tumour-supporting phenotype, expressing pro-tumourigenic mediators. However, the influence of lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) on the metastatic cascade in the tumour micro-environment is still not clearly defined. Here, we explored the role of stroma-derived, especially macrophage-released, Lcn2 in breast cancer progression. Knockdown studies and neutralizing antibody approaches showed that Lcn2 contributes to the early events of metastasis in vitro. The release of Lcn2 from macrophages induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and enhanced local migration as well as invasion into the extracellular matrix, using a three-dimensioanl (3D) spheroid model. Moreover, a global Lcn2 deficiency attenuated breast cancer metastasis in both the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model and a xenograft model inoculating MCF-7 cells pretreated with supernatants from wild-type and Lcn2-knockdown macrophages. To dissect the role of stroma-derived Lcn2, we employed an orthotopic mammary tumour mouse model. Implantation of wild-type PyMT tumour cells into Lcn2-deficient mice left primary mammary tumour formation unaltered, but specifically reduced tumour cell dissemination into the lung. We conclude that stroma-secreted Lcn2 promotes metastasis in vitro and in vivo, thereby contributing to tumour progression. Our study highlights the tumourigenic potential of stroma-released Lcn2 and suggests Lcn2 as a putative therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ex vivo and in vivo modulatory effects of umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells on human oral mucosa stroma substitutes.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; González-Andrades, E; Jaimes-Parra, B D; Fernández-Valadés, R; Campos, A; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Alaminos, M; Garzón, I

    2015-11-01

    Novel oral mucosa substitutes have been developed in the laboratory using human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells -HWJSC- as an alternative cell source. In the present work, we have generated human oral mucosa substitutes with oral mucosa keratinocytes and HWJSC to determine the influence of these cell sources on stromal differentiation. First, acellular and cellular stroma substitutes and bilayered oral mucosa substitutes with an epithelial layer consisting of oral mucosa keratinocytes -OM samples- or HWJSC -hOM- were generated. Then, tissues were analyzed by light and electron microscopy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to quantify all major extracellular matrix components after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of ex vivo development, and OM and hOM were also analyzed after in vivo grafting. The results showed that bioengineered oral mucosa stromas displayed an adequate fibrillar mesh. Synthesis of abundant collagen fibers was detected in OM and hOM after 3 weeks, and in vivo grafting resulted in an increased collagen synthesis. No elastic or reticular fibers were found. Glycoprotein synthesis was found at the epithelial-stromal layer when samples were grafted in vivo. Finally, proteoglycans, decorin, versican and aggrecan were strongly dependent on the in vivo environment and the presence of a well-structured epithelium on top. The use of HWJSC was associated to an increased synthesis of versican. These results confirm the usefulness of fibrin-agarose biomaterials for the generation of an efficient human oral mucosa stroma substitute and the importance of the in vivo environment and the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction for the adequate differentiation of the bioengineered stroma.

  3. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: a conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease.

  4. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Toshiki; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2012-06-01

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. • Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen • There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor • ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  5. miR-135b, a key regulator of malignancy, is linked to poor prognosis in human myxoid liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nezu, Y; Hagiwara, K; Yamamoto, Y; Fujiwara, T; Matsuo, K; Yoshida, A; Kawai, A; Saito, T; Ochiya, T

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell (RC) liposarcomas (MLS) were originally classified into two distinct populations based on histological differences; a myxoid component and a RC component. It is notable that, depending on an increase of the RC component, the prognosis significantly differs. Hence, the RC component is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the malignancy of the RC component still remain largely unknown. Here, we report microRNA-135b (miR-135b), a key regulator of the malignancy, highly expressed in the RC component and promoting MLS cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo through the direct suppression of thrombospondin 2 (THBS2). Decreased THBS2 expression by miR-135b increases the total amount of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and influences cellular density and an extracellular matrix structure, thereby resulting in morphological change in tumor. The expression levels of miR-135b and THBS2 significantly correlated with a poor prognosis in MLS patients. Overall, our study reveals that the miR-135b/THBS2/MMP2 axis is tightly related to MLS pathophysiology and has an important clinical implication. This work provides noteworthy evidence for overcoming metastasis and improving patient outcomes, and sheds light on miR-135b and THBS2 as novel molecular targets for diagnosis and therapy in MLS. PMID:27157622

  6. The Immunological Properties of Stroma-free Polyhemolysate Containing Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase Activities Prepared by Polymerized Bovine Stroma-free Hemolysate

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongli; Du, Qianqian; Chen, Chao; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2012-01-01

    Crosslinking of ultrapure hemoglobin, crystalline catalase, and superoxide dismutase resulted in a soluble nanodimensional complex of polyhemoglobin-catalase-superoxide dismutase. A less expensive and more convenient way is to crosslink bovine stroma-free hemolysate (stroma-free hemolysate) that already contains hemoglobin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase into polyhemoglobin with catalase and superoxide dismutase activities (stroma-free polyhemolysate) [21]. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the immunological properties of this stroma-free polyhemolysate. Each of three groups of rats received weekly subcutaneous injections of one of the stroma-free polyhemolysate, stroma-free hemolysate, and saline for four weeks. One week after the four cycles of weekly immunization, serum and plasma were collected for C3a complement activation tests and Ouchterlony antibody-antigen precipitation tests, respectively. Results show that stroma-free polyhemolysate retained significant antioxidant enzyme activity. The C3a complement activation test and Ouchterlony test show that four weekly subcutaneous injections of bovine stroma-free polyhemolysate did not result in any immunological reaction in rats when tested this way. PMID:20205612

  7. The immunological properties of stroma-free polyhemolysate containing catalase and superoxide dismutase activities prepared by polymerized bovine stroma-free hemolysate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Du, Qianqian; Chen, Chao; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2010-04-01

    Crosslinking of ultrapure hemoglobin, crystalline catalase, and superoxide dismutase resulted in a soluble nanodimensional complex of polyhemoglobin-catalase-superoxide dismutase. A less expensive and more convenient way is to crosslink bovine stroma-free hemolysate (stroma-free hemolysate) that already contains hemoglobin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase into polyhemoglobin with catalase and superoxide dismutase activities (stroma-free polyhemolysate) [21]. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the immunological properties of this stroma-free polyhemolysate. Each of three groups of rats received weekly subcutaneous injections of one of the stroma-free polyhemolysate, stroma-free hemolysate, and saline for four weeks. One week after the four cycles of weekly immunization, serum and plasma were collected for C3a complement activation tests and Ouchterlony antibody-antigen precipitation tests, respectively. Results show that stroma-free polyhemolysate retained significant antioxidant enzyme activity. The C3a complement activation test and Ouchterlony test show that four weekly subcutaneous injections of bovine stroma-free polyhemolysate did not result in any immunological reaction in rats when tested this way.

  8. TERT promoter hotspot mutations are recurrent in myxoid liposarcomas but rare in other soft tissue sarcoma entities.

    PubMed

    Koelsche, Christian; Renner, Marcus; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Brandt, Regine; Lehner, Burkhard; Waldburger, Nina; Alldinger, Ingo; Schmitt, Thomas; Egerer, Gerlinde; Penzel, Roland; Wardelmann, Eva; Schirmacher, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild

    2014-04-11

    Recently, recurrent point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter region have been found in many human cancers, leading to a new transcription factor binding site, increased induction of TERT and subsequently to telomere maintenance. We determined the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in soft tissue sarcomas of 341 patients comprising 16 entities and in 16 sarcoma cell lines covering 7 different soft tissue sarcoma types. The sarcoma tissue samples were collected from the archives of the Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg and were composed of 39 myxoid liposarcomas (MLS), 61 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 15 pleomorphic liposarcomas, 27 leiomyosarcomas, 25 synovial sarcomas (SS), 35 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), 40 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas, 17 myxofibrosarcomas, 9 low grade fibromyxoid sarcomas, 10 cases of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, 31 solitary fibrous tumors (SFT), 8 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 9 angiosarcomas, 6 alveolar soft part sarcomas, 5 clear cell sarcomas and 4 epithelioid sarcomas. Sarcoma cell lines were obtained from the raising laboratories. A 193 bp fragment of the TERT promoter region covering the hot-spot mutations C228T and C250T was amplified, and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. TERT promoter mutations were detected in 36/341 sarcomas. They were highly recurrent in MLS (29/39; 74%) and were in the present MLS series not associated with the phenotype (myxoid vs. round cell variant), tumor grade, tumor site and patients' median age or gender. In the remaining cases, TERT promoter mutations were found only in 7/302 sarcoma samples and confined to SFTs (4/31; 13%), MPNSTs (2/35; 6%), and SSs (1/25; 4%). Within the collection of sarcoma cell lines examined, TERT promoter mutations were detected in two MLS and in one of three MPNST cell lines. TERT promoter mutations are frequent in MLSs including their round cell variants, representing

  9. TERT promoter hotspot mutations are recurrent in myxoid liposarcomas but rare in other soft tissue sarcoma entities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, recurrent point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter region have been found in many human cancers, leading to a new transcription factor binding site, increased induction of TERT and subsequently to telomere maintenance. We determined the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in soft tissue sarcomas of 341 patients comprising 16 entities and in 16 sarcoma cell lines covering 7 different soft tissue sarcoma types. Methods The sarcoma tissue samples were collected from the archives of the Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg and were composed of 39 myxoid liposarcomas (MLS), 61 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 15 pleomorphic liposarcomas, 27 leiomyosarcomas, 25 synovial sarcomas (SS), 35 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), 40 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas, 17 myxofibrosarcomas, 9 low grade fibromyxoid sarcomas, 10 cases of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, 31 solitary fibrous tumors (SFT), 8 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, 9 angiosarcomas, 6 alveolar soft part sarcomas, 5 clear cell sarcomas and 4 epithelioid sarcomas. Sarcoma cell lines were obtained from the raising laboratories. A 193 bp fragment of the TERT promoter region covering the hot-spot mutations C228T and C250T was amplified, and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results TERT promoter mutations were detected in 36/341 sarcomas. They were highly recurrent in MLS (29/39; 74%) and were in the present MLS series not associated with the phenotype (myxoid vs. round cell variant), tumor grade, tumor site and patients’ median age or gender. In the remaining cases, TERT promoter mutations were found only in 7/302 sarcoma samples and confined to SFTs (4/31; 13%), MPNSTs (2/35; 6%), and SSs (1/25; 4%). Within the collection of sarcoma cell lines examined, TERT promoter mutations were detected in two MLS and in one of three MPNST cell lines. Conclusions TERT promoter mutations are frequent in MLSs including

  10. STROMAS: A Series of Microgravity Experiments on Bone Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; Massimilano, Monticone; Federico, Tortelli; Matalija, Pujic; Alessandra, Ruggiu; Ranieri, Cancedda

    2008-06-01

    We developed a novel 3D in vitro culture system by seeding cells onto porous bioceramics, mimicking the physiological niche of bone turn-over and enhancing cellular differentiation respective to conventional 2D Petri Dish cultures. Having overcome several technological difficulties, in a series of STROMA spaceflight experiments 3D cultures of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) and co-cultures of osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors were maintained and conserved in automated bioreactors on orbit. Genechip analysis revealed an inhibition of cell proliferation in microgravity. Unexpectedly, genes related to various processes of neural development were significantly upregulated in microgravity, raising the question on the lineage restriction in BMSC.

  11. Diagnostic efficacy of bone scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography in bone metastases of myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Conill, Carlos; Setoain, Xavier; Colomo, Luis; Palacín, Antonio; Combalia-Aleu, Andreu; Pomés, Jaime; Marruecos, Jordi; Vargas, Mauricio; Maurel, Joan

    2008-03-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLS) have a tendency to metastasize to unusual sites. We report an unusual case of bone metastases not detected by bone scan and neither by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET-FDG) and successfully identified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with metachronic MLS. Histopathological examination of the primary tumor evidenced a tumor with unfavorable prognostic markers, and the biopsy of an iliac bone lesion confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic disease. On histological grounds, the tumor showed features of a more differentiated neoplasm without foci of round cells or necrosis in the latter. MRI allowed the identification of disseminated disease compared to computed tomography (CT) and PET scans. Thus, because of the heterogeneous histological features of MLS and the biological behavior of the disease, a combined approach of FDGPET-CT and MRI, may allow a more accurate staging of soft tissue sarcomas.

  12. NY-ESO-1 is a ubiquitous immunotherapeutic target antigen for patients with myxoid/round cell liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Jungbluth, Achim A; Hoch, Benjamin L; Farrar, Erik A; Bleakley, Marie; Schneider, David J; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Rodler, Eve; Eary, Janet F; Conrad, Ernest U; Jones, Robin L; Yee, Cassian

    2012-09-15

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (MRCL) is the second most common liposarcoma subtype, accounting for >33% of liposarcomas and approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Although MRCL is a chemosensitive subtype, patients with metastatic disease have a poor outcome. NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen (also known as cancer germ cell antigen) that has been successfully targeted in vaccine trials and in adoptive T-cell therapy trials for the treatment of several solid tumors. The authors investigated the feasibility of targeting NY-ESO-1 in patients with MRCL by evaluating the prevalence of NY-ESO-1 expression in tumors using immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. NY-ESO-1-specific tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific T-cells also was analyzed using a chromium release assay. A search of the University of Washington Sarcoma Tissue Bank identified paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 25 patients with MRCL. NY-ESO-1 expression was observed in every MRCL tumor assessed (100%); in 18 tumors (72%), staining was homogenous. In all but 2 tumors, staining was sufficiently robust (2+) that such patients would be eligible for clinical trials of NY-ESO-1-directed therapy. By using NY-ESO-1 specific, CD8-positive T-cells, the in vitro sensitivity of myxoid liposarcoma cell lines to antigen-specific lysis was demonstrated. The current results establish NY-ESO-1 as an important target antigen for the treatment of patients with MRCL. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  13. Tumor-stroma interactions a trademark for metastasis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Monica; Planet, Evarist; Arnal-Estape, Anna; Pavlovic, Milica; Tarragona, Maria; Gomis, Roger R

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to unravel genes that are significantly associated with metastasis in order to identify functions that support disseminated disease. We identify genes associated with metastasis and verify its clinical correlations using publicly available primary tumor expression profile data sets. We used facilities in R and Bioconductor (GSEA). Specific data structures and functions were imported. Our results show that genes associated with metastasis in primary tumor enriched for pathways associated with immune infiltration or cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. As an example, we focus on the enrichment of TGFBR2 and TGF|X A set of communication tools capital for tumor-stroma interactions that define metastasis to the lung and support bone colonization. We showed that tumor-stroma communication through cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway is selected in primary tumors with high risk of relapse. High levels of these factors support systemic instigation of the far metastatic nest as well as local metastatic-specific functions that provide solid ground for metastatic development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  15. An enzymatic technique to facilitate air separation of the stroma-Descemet's membrane junction.

    PubMed

    Espana, Edgar M; Huang, Bo; Fratkin, Jonathan; Henegar, Jeffrey

    2011-12-09

    To describe an enzymatic technique that facilitates air separation of Descemet's membrane from the corneal stroma. Fresh human corneoscleral tissue was mounted on an artificial anterior chamber. In a control group, air was injected into the stroma. A second group received a stromal injection of 2.5 mg/mL collagenase type 2 in balanced salt solution that was left in the stroma for 1 hour and 15 minutes. A third group received an injection of 2.5 mg/mL collagenase type 2 in balanced salt solution followed 1 hour and 15 minutes later by an injection of air into the stroma. All injections were performed with a 27-gauge needle into the deep stroma without penetrating Descemet's membrane. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), histologic examination, and electron microscopy of the junction between the stroma and Descemet's membrane were performed. The trypan blue exclusion and TUNEL assays were used to study endothelial cell viability after collagenase incubation. Injection of air or collagenase into the deep corneal stroma did not result in a reproducible separation of the stroma-Descemet's junction. In contrast, the stroma was easily and reproducibly separated from Descemet's membrane with a combination of intrastromal collagenase and air injection. The separation was confirmed by using light and electron microscopy. The cleavage plane seemed to be located between the junction of the posterior stroma and the anterior banded layer of Descemet's membrane. Trypan blue staining demonstrated the viability of endothelial cells after collagenase incubation. TUNEL assay confirmed excellent viability after collagenase+air separation. This technique facilitates the separation of Descemet's membrane from the stroma without affecting endothelial cell viability.

  16. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: cellular origin, signaling pathways and stroma contribution.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Skoudy, Anouchka; Real, Francisco X; Navarro, Pilar

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very poor prognosis, in part due to its diagnosis at late stages of the disease and to limited response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The vast majority of pancreatic cancers are classified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Despite advances in knowledge on the cellular origin of PDAC or the involvement of signal transduction pathways therein, many questions remain unanswered. In this review, we summarize recent findings and current hypotheses regarding these two questions. Since pancreatitis is a risk factor for human PDAC, and the latter proceeds with an intense fibrotic reaction, we also analyze the role of the stroma in PDAC progression. An improved understanding of these key aspects for PDAC ontogeny will open new avenues for tumor prevention, early detection, and improved therapy. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Classification of breast cancer stroma as a tool for prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Sara; Gazinska, Patrycja; Hipwell, John H.; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Naidoo, Kalnisha; Pinder, Sarah; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown that the tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in regulating tumour progression by a number of different mechanisms, including the remodeling of collagen fibres in tumour-associated stroma. It is still unclear, however, if these stromal changes are of benefit to the host or the tumour. We hypothesise that stromal maturity is an important reflection of tumour biology, and thus can be used to predict prognosis. The aim of this study is to develop a texture analysis methodology which will automatically classify stromal regions from images of hematoxylin and eosin-stained (H and E) sections into two categories: mature and immature. Subsequently we will investigate whether stromal maturity could be used as a predictor of survival and also as a means to better understand the relationship between the radiological imaging signal and the underlying tissue microstructure. We present initial results for 118 regions-of-interest from a dataset of 39 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

  18. Prognostic Significance of the Tumor-Stroma Ratio in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wenxin; Liu, Xiangyu

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-stroma ratio (TSR) has recently been identified as a promising prognostic parameter for several solid tumors. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic role of TSR in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and 838 EOC patients were enrolled in this study. TSR was estimated on hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained tissue sections from the most invasive part of the primary tumor. Patients were classified as stroma-rich or stroma-poor according to the proportion of stroma ≥50% or <50%. Chi-square test analysis revealed that TSR were significantly associated with FIGO stage, LN status, and recurrence or not (all of them P < 0.001). The higher stroma-rich proportions were found in EOC patients with advanced stage (36.13% versus 19.75%), LN metastasis (51.93% versus 27.25%), and recurrence (34.27% versus 6.82%). Stroma-rich EOC patients had obvious shorter median time of progression-free survival (29 versus 39 months) and overall survival (50 versus 58 months), respectively. TSR was an independent prognostic factor for the evaluation of PFS in EOC. Stroma-rich tumors had worse prognosis and higher risk of relapse compared with those in stroma-poor tumors in EOC patients. Considered easy to determine for routine pathological examination, TSR may serve as a new prognostic histological parameter in EOC. PMID:26609529

  19. Magnetic resonance-guided regional gene delivery strategy using a tumor stroma-permeable nanocarrier for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingbing; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a very promising technology for treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, its application has been limited by the abundant stromal response in the tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to prepare a dendrimer-based gene-free loading vector with high permeability in the tumor stroma and explore an imaging-guided local gene delivery strategy for PDAC to promote the efficiency of targeted gene delivery. The experimental protocol was approved by the animal ethics committee of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University. Third-generation dendrigraft poly-L-lysines was selected as the nanocarrier scaffold, which was modified by cell-penetrating peptides and gadolinium (Gd) chelates. DNA plasmids were loaded with these nanocarriers via electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake and loaded gene expression were examined in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines in vitro. Permeability of the nanoparticles in the tumor stroma and transfected gene distribution in vivo were studied using a magnetic resonance imaging-guided delivery strategy in an orthotopic nude mouse model of PDAC. The nanocarriers were synthesized with a dendrigraft poly-L-lysine to polyethylene glycol to DTPA ratio of 1:3.4:8.3 and a mean diameter of 110.9±7.7 nm. The luciferases were strictly expressed in the tumor, and the luminescence intensity in mice treated by Gd-DPT/plasmid luciferase (1.04×10(4)±9.75×10(2) p/s/cm(2)/sr) was significantly (P<0.05) higher than in those treated with Gd-DTPA (9.56×10(2)±6.15×10 p/s/cm(2)/sr) and Gd-DP (5.75×10(3)± 7.45×10(2) p/s/cm(2)/sr). Permeability of the nanoparticles modified by cell-penetrating peptides was superior to that of the unmodified counterpart, demonstrating the improved capability of nanoparticles for diffusion in tumor stroma on magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that an image-guided gene delivery system with a stroma-permeable gene vector could be a potential clinically translatable gene therapy

  20. Papillary carcinoma of thyroid with exuberant nodular fasciitis-like stroma. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Chan, J K; Carcangiu, M L; Rosai, J

    1991-03-01

    Three examples of an unusual morphologic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are reported. The presence of a prominent stromal component resulted in low-power microscopic appearances resembling fibroadenoma, phyllodes tumor, or fibrocystic disease of the breast in two cases. The carcinomatous component grew in the form of anastomosing narrow tubules, clustered glands, solid sheets with or without squamous differentiation, and/or papillae, and exhibited the typical nuclear features of PTC. The abundant stroma had a nodular fasciitis-like quality and was composed of short fascicles of spindle cells separated by varying amounts of mucoid matrix, collagen, and extravasated red blood cells; this was interpreted as an exuberant mesenchymal reaction to the carcinoma. The importance of recognizing this variant of PTC is that, when one encounters a fibroproliferative lesion of the thyroid, a diligent search should be made for papillary carcinoma. This variant also must be distinguished from the vastly more aggressive papillary carcinomas with anaplastic transformation and the so-called carcinosarcomas.

  1. Mapping the Extracellular and Membrane Proteome Associated with the Vasculature and the Stroma in the Embryo*

    PubMed Central

    Soulet, Fabienne; Kilarski, Witold W.; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Herbert, John M. J.; Sacewicz, Izabela; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bicknell, Roy; Lalor, Patricia; Monsarrat, Bernard; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In order to map the extracellular or membrane proteome associated with the vasculature and the stroma in an embryonic organism in vivo, we developed a biotinylation technique for chicken embryo and combined it with mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analysis. We also applied this procedure to implanted tumors growing on the chorioallantoic membrane or after the induction of granulation tissue. Membrane and extracellular matrix proteins were the most abundant components identified. Relative quantitative analysis revealed differential protein expression patterns in several tissues. Through a bioinformatic approach, we determined endothelial cell protein expression signatures, which allowed us to identify several proteins not yet reported to be associated with endothelial cells or the vasculature. This is the first study reported so far that applies in vivo biotinylation, in combination with robust label-free quantitative proteomics approaches and bioinformatic analysis, to an embryonic organism. It also provides the first description of the vascular and matrix proteome of the embryo that might constitute the starting point for further developments. PMID:23674615

  2. Distinct nuclear receptor expression in stroma adjacent to breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Knower, Kevin C; Chand, Ashwini L; Eriksson, Natalie; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Funder, John W; Fuller, Peter J; Simpson, Evan R; Tilley, Wayne D; Leedman, Peter J; Graham, J Dinny; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L; Clyne, Colin D

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between breast tumor epithelial and stromal cells is vital for initial and recurrent tumor growth. While breast cancer-associated stromal cells provide a favorable environment for proliferation and metastasis, the molecular mechanisms contributing to this process are not fully understood. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are intracellular transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. Little is known about the status of NRs in cancer-associated stroma. Nuclear Receptor Low-Density Taqman Arrays were used to compare the gene expression profiles of all 48 NR family members in a collection of primary cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) obtained from estrogen receptor (ER)α positive breast cancers (n = 9) and normal breast adipose fibroblasts (NAFs) (n = 7). Thirty-three of 48 NRs were expressed in both the groups, while 11 NRs were not detected in either. Three NRs (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (DAX-1); estrogen-related receptor beta (ERR-β); and RAR-related orphan receptor beta (ROR-β)) were only detected in NAFs, while one NR (liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1)) was unique to CAFs. Of the NRs co-expressed, four were significantly down-regulated in CAFs compared with NAFs (RAR-related orphan receptor-α (ROR-α); Thyroid hormone receptor-β (TR-β); vitamin D receptor (VDR); and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ)). Quantitative immunohistochemistry for LRH-1, TR-β, and PPAR-γ proteins in stromal fibroblasts from an independent panel of breast cancers (ER-positive (n = 15), ER-negative (n = 15), normal (n = 14)) positively correlated with mRNA expression profiles. The differentially expressed NRs identified in tumor stroma are key mediators in aromatase regulation and subsequent estrogen production. Our findings reveal a distinct pattern of NR expression that therefore fits with a sustained and increased local estrogen microenvironment in ER

  3. UV absorbance of a bioengineered corneal stroma substitute in the 240-400 nm range.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ana-Maria; de la Cruz Cardona, Juan; González-Andrades, Miguel; Alaminos, Miguel; Campos, Antonio; Hita, Enrique; del Mar Pérez, María

    2010-08-01

    To determine the UV absorbance of a bioengineered human corneal stroma construct based on fibrin and fibrin-agarose scaffolds in the 240-400 nm range. Three types of artificial substitutes of the human corneal stroma were developed by tissue engineering using fibrin and fibrin with 0.1% and 0.2% agarose scaffolds with human keratocytes immersed within. After 28 days of culture, the UV absorbance of each sample was determined using a spectrophotometer. The thickness of corneal stroma samples was determined by light microscope. For all the 3 types of corneal stroma substitutes studied, the range of the UV absorbance values was similar to that of the native human corneal stroma, although the fibrin with 0.1% agarose stroma substitute had the best UV filtering properties. The higher UV absorbance of the artificial substitute of the human corneal stroma was in the UV-B and -A ranges, suggesting that these artificial tissues could have potential clinical usefulness and proper UV light-absorption capabilities. Our data suggest that the bioengineered human corneal substitute of fibrin with 0.1% agarose is an effective absorber of harmful UV radiation and could therefore be potentially useful.

  4. Tissue engineering of corneal stroma with rabbit fibroblast precursors and gelatin hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Shiro; Yokoo, Seiichi; Uchida, Saiko; Yamagami, Satoru; Usui, Tomohiko; Kimura, Yu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To isolate fibroblast precursors from rabbit corneal stroma using a sphere-forming assay, to engineer corneal stroma with the precursors and gelatin, and to establish the therapeutic application of precursors in a rabbit corneal stroma. Methods In the in vitro study, a sphere-forming assay was performed to produce precursors from rabbit corneal stroma. Corneal stroma was engineered by cultivating precursors in porous gelatin for one week. In the in vivo study, the engineered corneal stromal sheet with precursors (precursor/gelatin group) or with fibroblasts (fibroblast /gelatin group) or without cells (gelatin group) was transplanted to a pocket of rabbit corneal stroma. Gene expression and extracellular matrix production were examined immunohistochemically in each group one week and four weeks after surgery. Results In the in vitro study, cells in the spheres were BrdU-positive, and their progeny were keratocan-positive. The study also showed that the corneas transplanted with a porous gelatin sheet did not show any opacity four weeks after transplantation in any group. In the gelatin sheet of the precursor/gelatin group, a more intense expression of type I collagen was observed relative to the other two groups four weeks after the surgery. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the transplantation of fibroblast precursors combined with gelatin hydrogel into the corneal stroma is a possible treatment strategy for corneal stromal regeneration. PMID:18852871

  5. Tissue engineering of corneal stroma with rabbit fibroblast precursors and gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tatsuya; Amano, Shiro; Yokoo, Seiichi; Uchida, Saiko; Yamagami, Satoru; Usui, Tomohiko; Kimura, Yu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    To isolate fibroblast precursors from rabbit corneal stroma using a sphere-forming assay, to engineer corneal stroma with the precursors and gelatin, and to establish the therapeutic application of precursors in a rabbit corneal stroma. In the in vitro study, a sphere-forming assay was performed to produce precursors from rabbit corneal stroma. Corneal stroma was engineered by cultivating precursors in porous gelatin for one week. In the in vivo study, the engineered corneal stromal sheet with precursors (precursor/gelatin group) or with fibroblasts (fibroblast /gelatin group) or without cells (gelatin group) was transplanted to a pocket of rabbit corneal stroma. Gene expression and extracellular matrix production were examined immunohistochemically in each group one week and four weeks after surgery. In the in vitro study, cells in the spheres were BrdU-positive, and their progeny were keratocan-positive. The study also showed that the corneas transplanted with a porous gelatin sheet did not show any opacity four weeks after transplantation in any group. In the gelatin sheet of the precursor/gelatin group, a more intense expression of type I collagen was observed relative to the other two groups four weeks after the surgery. Our findings demonstrate that the transplantation of fibroblast precursors combined with gelatin hydrogel into the corneal stroma is a possible treatment strategy for corneal stromal regeneration.

  6. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Saud A.; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I. A.; Khan, Adnan A.; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark. PMID:26167294

  7. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Saud A; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I A; Khan, Adnan A; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark.

  8. Limb-sparing surgery as an alternative for limb amputation in an invasive myxoid liposarcoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Adameșteanu, M O; Enache, V; Zamfirescu, D; Lascăr, I

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, plastic surgeons confront with patients with sarcomas of the extremities that require a radical surgical approach. Knowing when to attempt limb-sparing surgery and when to give in to limb amputation is one of the most difficult decisions a surgeon can take. The correct approach and management of such cases ensure surgical success and the patient survival. In this paper, the case of a 56-year-old man, admitted in our clinic with a crush injury of the right calf and subsequent haematoma is presented. During haematoma drainage, the surgeon noticed abnormal tissue and performed an incisional biopsy. The patient was diagnosed with myxoid liposarcoma of the external compartment of the right calf. Limb amputation was proposed, but the patient refused. After the clinical examination, blood tests and diagnostic imaging, which allowed the correct evaluation of the case-tumor sizes and neighboring tissue reports, and preoperatory radiotherapy, limb sparing surgery, respectively primary tumor excision was decided to be performed. Negative margins could not be obtained by 3 successive resections or by adjuvant chemotherapy. The presented case supports the idea that limb-sparing surgery is only applicable to carefully selected patients with soft tissue sarcoma. In some cases, radical excision involving even mutilating amputations may provide a better oncologic and functional result.

  9. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in tumour and stroma compartments in cervical cancer: clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandina, G; Lauriola, L; Zannoni, G F; Distefano, M G; Legge, F; Salutari, V; Gessi, M; Maggiano, N; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    2002-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the relationship between cyclooxygenase-2 expression in tumour vs stroma inflammatory compartment and its possible clinical role. The study included 99 stage IB-IV cervical cancer patients: immunostaining of tumour tissue sections was performed with rabbit antiserum against cyclooxygenase-2. CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, Mast Cell Tryptase monoclonal antibodies were used to characterise stroma inflammatory cells in nine cervical tumours. An inverse relation was found between cyclooxygenase-2 levels (cyclooxygenase-2 IDV) of tumour vs stroma compartment (r=−0.44, P<0.0001). The percentage of cases showing high tumour/stromal cyclooxygenase-2 IDV ratio was significantly higher in patients who did not respond to treatment (93.3%) with respect to patients with partial (60.5%), and complete (43.7%) response (P= 0.009). Cases with a high tumour/stroma cyclooxygenase-2 IDV ratio had a shorter overall survival rate than cases with a low tumour/stroma cyclooxygenase-2 IDV (P<0.0001). In the multivariate analysis advanced stage and the status of tumour/stroma cyclooxygenase-2 IDV ratio retained an independent negative prognostic role. The proportion of CD3+, CD4+, and CD25+ cells was significantly lower in tumours with high tumour/stroma cyclooxygenase-2 IDV ratio, while a higher percentage of mast cells was detected in tumours showing high tumour/stroma cyclooxygenase-2 IDV ratio. Our study showed the usefulness of assessing cyclooxygenase-2 status both in tumour and stroma compartment in order to identify cervical cancer patients endowed with a very poor chance of response to neoadjuvant therapy and unfavourable prognosis. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1145–1152. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600578 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12402155

  10. Characterization of stroma from Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy corneas.

    PubMed

    Calandra, A; Chwa, M; Kenney, M C

    1989-01-01

    Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy is commonly regarded as an endothelial cell disorder. In the present study we compared glycoconjugates of Fuchs' and normal corneas using FITC conjugated lectins [peanut agglutinin (PNA), castor bean agglutinin (RCA120), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)]. Our results showed increased staining with RCA120 and PNA in the posterior region of the Fuchs' corneas, indicating an accumulation of terminal beta-galactose and B-D-galactose (1-3)-D-N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The stromal and epithelial regions of normal and Fuchs' corneas exhibited similar staining patterns with all lectins tested. Our collagen studies showed an increased extractability and abnormal amino acid analyses of collagen from Fuchs' corneas as compared with normals. The purified collagens did have similar banding patterns by sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. However, further characterization by 125(1) two-dimensional peptide mapping revealed that Fuchs' alpha 1-sized chains contained fingerprints that were distinctly different from normal cornea stromal collagen. These data suggest that in addition to abnormal accumulation of RCA120- and PNA-specific glycoconjugates in the posterior cornea, Fuchs' corneas contained stromal collagens with altered biochemical properties. We postulate that the characteristic deterioration of endothelial function in Fuchs' dystrophy may compromise the microenvironment of the stroma and its keratocytes, and thereby lead to an altered collagenous extracellular matrix.

  11. Rag Defects and Thymic Stroma: Lessons from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Marrella, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele; Grassi, Fabio; Villa, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) cross-talk is essential to support T cell development and preserve thymic architecture and maturation of TECs and Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells. Accordingly, disruption of thymic lymphostromal cross-talk may have major implications on the thymic mechanisms that govern T cell tolerance. Several genetic defects have been described in humans that affect early stages of T cell development [leading to severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)] or late stages in thymocyte maturation (resulting in combined immunodeficiency). Hypomorphic mutations in SCID-causing genes may allow for generation of a limited pool of T lymphocytes with a restricted repertoire. These conditions are often associated with infiltration of peripheral tissues by activated T cells and immune dysregulation, as best exemplified by Omenn syndrome (OS). In this review, we will discuss our recent findings on abnormalities of thymic microenvironment in OS with a special focus of defective maturation of TECs, altered distribution of thymic dendritic cells and impairment of deletional and non-deletional mechanisms of central tolerance. Here, taking advantage of mouse models of OS and atypical SCID, we will discuss how modifications in stromal compartment impact and shape lymphocyte differentiation, and vice versa how inefficient T cell signaling results in defective stromal maturation. These findings are instrumental to understand the extent to which novel therapeutic strategies should act on thymic stroma to achieve full immune reconstitution. PMID:25076946

  12. Rag defects and thymic stroma: lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Marrella, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele; Grassi, Fabio; Villa, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) cross-talk is essential to support T cell development and preserve thymic architecture and maturation of TECs and Foxp3(+) natural regulatory T cells. Accordingly, disruption of thymic lymphostromal cross-talk may have major implications on the thymic mechanisms that govern T cell tolerance. Several genetic defects have been described in humans that affect early stages of T cell development [leading to severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)] or late stages in thymocyte maturation (resulting in combined immunodeficiency). Hypomorphic mutations in SCID-causing genes may allow for generation of a limited pool of T lymphocytes with a restricted repertoire. These conditions are often associated with infiltration of peripheral tissues by activated T cells and immune dysregulation, as best exemplified by Omenn syndrome (OS). In this review, we will discuss our recent findings on abnormalities of thymic microenvironment in OS with a special focus of defective maturation of TECs, altered distribution of thymic dendritic cells and impairment of deletional and non-deletional mechanisms of central tolerance. Here, taking advantage of mouse models of OS and atypical SCID, we will discuss how modifications in stromal compartment impact and shape lymphocyte differentiation, and vice versa how inefficient T cell signaling results in defective stromal maturation. These findings are instrumental to understand the extent to which novel therapeutic strategies should act on thymic stroma to achieve full immune reconstitution.

  13. Neutral Peptidases in the Stroma of Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Qin; Jagendorf, André T.

    1986-01-01

    One endopeptidase (EP1) and at least three aminopeptidases (AP1, AP2, and AP3) were discovered in the stroma of chloroplasts isolated from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.), and purified over 100-fold. EP1 requires added Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity, may have an additional tightly bound metal atom, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents but not by serine residue-directed inhibitors. It is reversibly inhibited by dithiothreitol. Its specificity is for the bond between two adjacent Ala or Gly residues. Its molecular mass is 93 kilodaltons, estimated on a gel filtration column. Aminopeptidase activities were detected with the aid of different amino acyl-β-naphthylamides as substrates. They were resolved into at least three individual proteins by gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography, having apparent molecular masses of 269,000 (AP1), 84,000 (AP2), and 42,000 (AP3) daltons, respectively. Each has a unique specificity for substrates, with AP1 hydrolyzing only the Prolyl-β-naphthylamide. None of the APs require added divalent cations for activity, but the possibility of a tightly bound metal function was suggested in AP2 and AP3 (not AP1) from effects of inhibitors. A probable sulfhydryl residue function was indicated for all three, from inhibition by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate and Zn2+. All these peptidases had pH optima at 7.7. PMID:16664864

  14. Ultrastructure of the corneal stroma: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, K M; Leonard, D W

    1993-01-01

    Using a high intensity synchrotron x-ray source, we have recorded diffraction over a range of angles from the corneas of a wide variety of species. The results show that the interfibrillar Bragg spacing varies from 39 nm to 67 nm, the fibril diameter varies from 24 nm to 43 nm, but in the species studied intermolecular Bragg spacing is constant (1.58 +/- 0.03 nm). Using these data, a number of other structural parameters were calculated including the interfibrillar volume, V, and the surface-to-surface fibril separation, S. Large variations were found, particularly between aquatic and terrestrial animals. We found that the parameter which appears to be most constant throughout the species was the volume fraction, that is, the proportion of the tissue occupied by the hydrated fibrils. Ignoring the volume of the stroma occupied by cells, the tissue fibril volume fraction was (28 +/- 3)% for both aquatic and land animals. The observation of a constant volume fraction led us to propose a simple model in which collagen molecules and interfibrillar glycosaminoglycans occur in a fixed ratio in all the species--thus species with narrow fibrils have fewer interfibrillar glycosaminoglycans and the fibrils are thus more closely spaced, and vice versa. This model agrees with many of the experimental data on corneal composition and on the physical properties of the tissue reported in the literature. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8431547

  15. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  16. Mesenchymal stroma cells in peritoneal dialysis effluents from patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Guan, Qiunong; Li, Jing; da Roza, Gerald; Wang, Hao; Du, Caigan

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) have potential as an emerging cell therapy for treating many different diseases, but discovery of the practical sources of MSCs is needed for the large-scale clinical application of this therapy. This study was to identify MSCs in peritoneal dialysis (PD) effluents that were discarded after PD. The effluents were collected from patients who were on the dialysis for less than 1 month. Adherent cells from the effluents were isolated by incubation in serum-containing medium in plastic culture dishes. Cell surface markers were determined by a flow cytometric analysis, and the in vitro differentiation to chondrocytes, osteocytes or adipocytes was confirmed by staining with a specific dye. After four passages, these isolated cells displayed the typical morphology of mesenchymal cells in traditional 2-D cultures, and were grown to form spherical colonies in 3-D collagen cultures. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the unsorted cells from all of seven patient samples showed robust expression of typical mesenchymal marker CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD166, and the absence of CD34, CD79a, CD105, CD271, SSEA-4, Stro-1 and HLA-DR. In differentiation assays, these cells were induced in vitro to chondrocytes, osteocytes or adipocytes. In conclusion, this preliminary study suggests the presence of MSCs in the "discarded" PD effluents. Further characterization of the phenotypes of these MSCs and evaluation of their therapeutic potential, particularly for the prevention of PD failure, are needed.

  17. Rapid determination of the tumour stroma ratio in squamous cell carcinomas with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS): a proof-of-concept demonstration.

    PubMed

    Woolman, Michael; Tata, Alessandra; Dara, Delaram; Meens, Jalna; D'Arcangelo, Elisa; Perez, Consuelo J; Saiyara Prova, Shamina; Bluemke, Emma; Ginsberg, Howard J; Ifa, Demian; McGuigan, Alison; Ailles, Laurie; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2017-08-21

    Squamous cell carcinomas constitute a major class of head & neck cancers, where the tumour stroma ratio (TSR) carries prognostic information. Patients affected by stroma-rich tumours exhibit a poor prognosis and a higher chance of relapse. As such, there is a need for a technology platform that allows rapid determination of the tumour stroma ratio. In this work, we provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) can be used to determine tumour stroma ratios. Slices from three independent mouse xenograft tumours from the human FaDu cell line were subjected to DESI-MS imaging, staining and detailed analysis using digital pathology methods. Using multivariate statistical methods we compared the MS profiles with those of isolated stromal cells. We found that m/z 773.53 [PG(18:1)(18:1) - H](-), m/z 835.53 [PI(34:1) - H](-) and m/z 863.56 [PI(18:1)(18:0) - H](-) are biomarker ions that can distinguish FaDu cancer from cancer associated fibroblast (CAF) cells. A comparison with DESI-MS analysis of controlled mixtures of the CAF and FaDu cells showed that the abundance of the biomarker ions above can be used to determine, with an error margin of close to 5% compared with quantitative pathology estimates, TSR values. This proof-of-principle demonstration is encouraging and must be further validated using human samples and a larger sample base. At maturity, DESI-MS thus may become a stand-alone molecular pathology tool providing an alternative rapid cancer assessment without the need for time-consuming staining and microscopy methods, potentially further conserving human resources.

  18. Prognostic significance of tumour stroma ratio in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Downey, Candice L; Thygesen, Helene H; Sharma, Nisha; Shaaban, Abeer M

    2015-01-01

    Tumour stroma ratio (TSR) is emerging as an important prognostic indicator in cancer. We have previously shown TSR to be prognostic in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Its role in inflammatory breast cancer, a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer, has not been identified. Here we aimed to determine the prognostic significance of TSR in a cohort of patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma. TSR was measured by point counting virtual H&E stained tissue sections in 45 inflammatory breast cancer cases. The whole tumour area was sampled. Optimum cut-offs to distinguish high and low TSR was determined by log-rank test. The relationship of TSR to overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed alongside multivariate analysis. The optimal cut-offs between high and low TSR were determined to be 31% for OS and 46% for DFS. There was no significant difference in OS (p = 0.53) nor DFS (p = 0.66) between high and low TSR groups. Multivariate analysis did not demonstrate any new trends, within the limits of a small data sample. A significant correlation was found between pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival (p = 0.008). There is no evidence that TSR has prognostic significance in inflammatory breast cancer. When compared with published data in non-inflammatory breast carcinoma, this supports the view that differences in stromal biology exist between tumour types and highlights the importance of considering this when interpreting the prognostic value of TSR. However, these findings must be interpreted in the light of the small sample size.

  19. Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0059 TITLE: Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...2008 - 6 Jan 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...Symposium on Stem Cells , Cancer, and Aging in Singapore RESEARCH EXPERIENCE 2001 Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary and Critical

  20. Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 .TITLE: Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...the compound (Figure 1 ). The inhibitor was slightly more effective in T-47D cells than in MCF-7 cells, but did not eradicate dormant clones much past

  1. Size-Dependent Diffusion of Dextrans in Excised Porcine Corneal Stroma.

    PubMed

    Rajapakshal, Ajith; Fink, Michael; Todd, Brian A

    2015-09-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the eye requires efficient transport through cellular and extracellular barriers. We evaluated the rate of diffusive transport in excised porcine corneal stroma using fluorescently labeled dextran molecules with hydrodynamic radii ranging from 1.3 to 34 nm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to measure diffusion coefficients of dextran molecules in the excised porcine corneal stroma. The preferential sensitivity of FCS to diffusion along two dimensions was used to differentially probe diffusion along the directions parallel to and perpendicular to the collagen lamellae of the corneal stroma. In order to develop an understanding of how size affects diffusion in cornea, diffusion coefficients in cornea were compared to diffusion coefficients measured in a simple buffer solution. Dextran molecules diffuse more slowly in cornea as compared to buffer solution. The reduction in diffusion coefficient is modest however (67% smaller), and is uniform over the range of sizes that we measured. This indicates that, for dextrans in the 1.3 to 34 nm range, the diffusion landscape of corneal stroma can be represented as a simple liquid with a viscosity approximately 1.5 times that of water. Diffusion coefficients measured parallel vs. perpendicular to the collagen lamellae were indistinguishable. This indicates that diffusion in the corneal stroma is not highly anisotropic. Our results support the notion that the corneal stroma is highly permeable and isotropic to transport of hydrophilic molecules and particles with hydrodynamic radii up to at least 34 nm.

  2. Key players in pancreatic cancer-stroma interaction: Cancer-associated fibroblasts, endothelial and inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive type of common cancers, and in 2014, nearly 40000 patients died from the disease in the United States. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which accounts for the majority of PC cases, is characterized by an intense stromal desmoplastic reaction surrounding the cancer cells. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the main effector cells in the desmoplastic reaction, and pancreatic stellate cells are the most important source of CAFs. However, other important components of the PC stroma are inflammatory cells and endothelial cells. The aim of this review is to describe the complex interplay between PC cells and the cellular and non-cellular components of the tumour stroma. Published data have indicated that the desmoplastic stroma protects PC cells against chemotherapy and radiation therapy and that it might promote the proliferation and migration of PC cells. However, in animal studies, experimental depletion of the desmoplastic stroma and CAFs has led to more aggressive cancers. Hence, the precise role of the tumour stroma in PC remains to be elucidated. However, it is likely that a context-dependent therapeutic modification, rather than pure depletion, of the PC stroma holds potential for the development of new treatment strategies for PC patients. PMID:26973408

  3. FGFR1-WNT-TGF-β signaling in prostate cancer mouse models recapitulates human reactive stroma

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Julienne L.; Shahi, Payam; Van Tsang, Susan; Smith, Billie; Creighton, Chad J.; Zhang, Yiqun; Seamans, Amber; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Vedula, Indira; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Rowley, David R.; Spencer, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The reactive stroma surrounding tumor lesions performs critical roles ranging from supporting tumor cell proliferation to inducing tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, it is critical to understand the cellular components and signaling control mechanisms that underlay the etiology of reactive stroma. Previous studies have individually implicated fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer progression and the initiation and maintenance of a reactive stroma; however, both pathways are frequently found co-activated in cancer tissue. Using autochthonous transgenic mouse models for inducible FGFR1 (JOCK1) and prostate-specific and ubiquitously expressed inducible β-catenin (Pro-Cat and Ubi-Cat, respectively) and bigenic crosses between these lines (Pro-Cat × JOCK1 and Ubi-Cat × JOCK1), we describe WNT-induced synergistic acceleration of FGFR1-driven adenocarcinoma, associated with a pronounced fibroblastic reactive stroma activation surrounding prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) lesions found both in situ and reconstitution assays. Both mouse and human reactive stroma exhibited increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling adjacent to pathologic lesions likely contributing to invasion. Furthermore, elevated stromal TGF-β signaling was associated with higher Gleason scores in archived human biopsies, mirroring murine patterns. Our findings establish the importance of the FGFR1-WNT-TGF-β signaling axes as driving forces behind reactive stroma in aggressive prostate adenocarcinomas, deepening their relevance as therapeutic targets. PMID:24305876

  4. The EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma activates the PPARG nuclear receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Filion, C; Motoi, T; Olshen, A B; Laé, M; Emnett, R J; Gutmann, D H; Perry, A; Ladanyi, M; Labelle, Y

    2009-01-01

    The NR4A3 nuclear receptor is implicated in the development of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC), primitive sarcoma unrelated to conventional chondrosarcomas, through a specific fusion with EWSR1 resulting in an aberrant fusion protein that is thought to disrupt the transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We performed an expression microarray analysis of EMC tumours expressing the EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein, comparing their expression profiles to those of other sarcoma types. We thereby identified a set of genes significantly overexpressed in EMC relative to other sarcomas, including PPARG and NDRG2. Western blot or immunohistochemical analyses confirm that PPARG and NDRG2 are expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3. Bioinformatic analysis identified a DNA response element for EWSR1/NR4A3 in the PPARG promoter, and band-shift experiments and transient transfections indicate that EWSR1/NR4A3 can activate transcription through this element. Western blots further show that an isoform of the native NR4A3 receptor lacking the C-terminal domain is very highly expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3, and co-transfections of this isoform along with EWSR1/NR4A3 indicate that it may negatively regulate the activity of the fusion protein on the PPARG promoter. These results suggest that the overall expression of PPARG in EMC may be regulated in part by the balance between EWSR1/NR4A3 and NR4A3, and that PPARG may play a crucial role in the development of these tumours. The specific up-regulation of PPARG by EWSR1/NR4A3 may also have potential therapeutic implications.

  5. Multiscale Investigation of the Depth-Dependent Mechanical Anisotropy of the Human Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Labate, Cristina; Lombardo, Marco; De Santo, Maria P.; Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noel M.; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the depth-dependent mechanical anisotropy of the human corneal stroma at the tissue (stroma) and molecular (collagen) level by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods. Eleven human donor corneas were dissected at different stromal depths by using a microkeratome. Mechanical measurements were performed in 15% dextran on the surface of the exposed stroma of each sample by using a custom-built AFM in force spectroscopy mode using both microspherical (38-μm diameter) and nanoconical (10-nm radius of curvature) indenters at 2-μm/s and 15-μm/s indentation rates. Young's modulus was determined by fitting force curve data using the Hertz and Hertz-Sneddon models for a spherical and a conical indenter, respectively. The depth-dependent anisotropy of stromal elasticity was correlated with images of the corneal stroma acquired by two-photon microscopy. Results. The force curves were obtained at stromal depths ranging from 59 to 218 μm. At the tissue level, Young's modulus (ES) showed a steep decrease at approximately 140-μm stromal depth (from 0.8 MPa to 0.3 MPa; P = 0.03) and then was stable in the posterior stroma. At the molecular level, Young's modulus (EC) was significantly greater than at the tissue level; EC decreased nonlinearly with increasing stromal depth from 3.9 to 2.6 MPa (P = 0.04). The variation of microstructure through the thickness correlated highly with a nonconstant profile of the mechanical properties in the stroma. Conclusions. The corneal stroma exhibits unique anisotropic elastic behavior at the tissue and molecular levels. This knowledge may benefit modeling of corneal behavior and help in the development of biomimetic materials. PMID:26098472

  6. Phase contrast microscopy analysis of breast tissue: differences in benign vs. malignant epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Wells, Wendy A; Wang, Xin; Daghlian, Charles P; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2009-08-01

    To assess how optical scatter properties in breast tissue, as measured by phase contrast microscopy and interpreted pathophysiologically, might be exploited as a diagnostic tool to differentiate cancer from benign tissue. We evaluated frozen human breast tissue sections of adipose tissue, normal breast parenchyma, benign fibroadenoma tumors and noninvasive and invasive malignant cancers by phase contrast microscopy through quantification of grayscale values, using multiple regions of interest (ROI). Student's t tests were performed on phase contrast measures across diagnostic categories testing data from individual cases; all ROI data were used as separate measures. Stroma demonstrated significantly higher scatter intensity than did epithelium, with lower scattering in tumor-associated stroma as compared with normal or benign-associated stroma. Measures were comparable for invasive and noninvasive malignant tumors but were higher than those found in benign tumors and were lowest in adipose tissue. Significant differences were found in scatter coefficient properties of epithelium and stroma across diagnostic categories of breast tissue, particularly between benign and malignant-associated stroma. Improved understanding of how scatter properties correlate with morphologic criteria used in routine pathologic diagnoses could have a significant clinical impact as developing optical technology allows macroscopic in situ phase contrast imaging.

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of expressions of RB1, CDK4, HSP90, cPLA2G4A, and CHMP2B is helpful in distinction between myxofibrosarcoma and myxoid liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Goodman, Mark A; McGough, Richard L; Weiss, Kurt R; Rao, Uma N M

    2014-10-01

    The role and diagnostic efficacy of gene and protein products RB1, CDK4, CHMP2B, HSP90, and cPLA2G4A, all previously shown to be involved in tumor genesis and cell proliferation, were examined by immunohistochemical techniques in 32 cases of myxofibrosarcomas and 29 myxoid liposarcomas (all diagnosis had been confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization). HSP90 demonstrated strong nuclear and cytoplasmic positivity in all myxoid liposarcoma cases, while only 4 myxofibrosarcomas showed scattered HSP90 positivity. All but 4 cases of myxofibrosarcoma displayed strong positivity for cPLA2G4A, while only 2 myxoid liposarcoma cases were cPLA2G4A positive and both were CHMP2B negative. Overexpression of both cPLA2G4A and CHMP2B also suggested higher tumor grade. In conclusion, HSP90 and cPLA2G4A immunohistochemical stains are useful markers to distinguish myxofibrosarcoma from myxoid liposarcoma. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Gene expression in local stroma reflects breast tumor states and predicts patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bainer, Russell; Frankenberger, Casey; Rabe, Daniel; An, Gary; Gilad, Yoav; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2016-01-01

    The surrounding microenvironment has been implicated in the progression of breast tumors to metastasis. However, the degree to which metastatic breast tumors locally reprogram stromal cells as they disrupt tissue boundaries is not well understood. We used species-specific RNA sequencing in a mouse xenograft model to determine how the metastasis suppressor RKIP influences transcription in a panel of paired tumor and stroma tissues. We find that gene expression in metastatic breast tumors is pervasively correlated with gene expression in local stroma of both mouse xenografts and human patients. Changes in stromal gene expression elicited by tumors better predicts subtype and patient survival than tumor gene expression, and genes with coordinated expression in both tissues predict metastasis-free survival. These observations support the use of stroma-based strategies for the diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:27982086

  9. Integrated Bioinformatics Approach Reveals Crosstalk Between Tumor Stroma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Lang; Wang, Dan; Wei, Na; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Cancer progression is driven not only by cancer cell intrinsic alterations and interactions with tumor microenvironment, but also by systemic effects. Integration of multiple profiling data may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of complex systemic processes. We performed a bioinformatic analysis of two public available microarray datasets for breast tumor stroma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, featuring integrated transcriptomics data, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and protein subcellular localization, to identify genes and biological pathways that contribute to dialogue between tumor stroma and the peripheral circulation. Genes of the integrin family as well as CXCR4 proved to be hub nodes of the crosstalk network and may play an important role in response to stroma-derived chemoattractants. This study pointed to potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target systemic signals travelling through the circulation and interdict tumor cell recruitment.

  10. Quantitative analysis of thermally-induced alterations of corneal stroma by second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, P.; Rossi, F.; Ratto, F.; Cicchi, R.; Kapsokalyvas, D.; Pavone, F. S.; Pini, R.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal modifications induced in the corneal stroma were investigated by means of second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Whole fresh cornea samples were heated in a water bath at temperatures in the 35-80 °C range for a 4-min time. SHG images of the structural modifications induced at each temperature were acquired from different areas of cross-sectioned corneal stroma by using an 880 nm linearly- and circularly-polarized excitation light emitted by a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser. The SHG images were then analyzed by means of both an empirical approach and a 2D-theoretical model. The proposed analyses provide a detailed description of the changes occurring in the structural architecture of the cornea during the thermal treatment. Our results allow us to depict a temperature-dependent biochemical model for the progressive destructuration occurring to collagen fibrils and nonfibrillar components of the stroma.

  11. Thylakoid direct photobioelectrocatalysis: utilizing stroma thylakoids to improve bio-solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michelle; Minteer, Shelley D

    2014-08-28

    Thylakoid membranes from spinach were separated into grana and stroma thylakoid fractions which were characterized by several methods (pigment content, protein gel electrophoresis, photosystem activities, and electron microscopy analysis) to confirm that the intact thylakoids were differentiated into the two domains. The results of photoelectrochemical experiments showed that stroma thylakoid electrodes generate photocurrents more than four times larger than grana thylakoids (51 ± 4 nA cm(-2) compared to 11 ± 1 nA cm(-2)). A similar trend was seen in a bio-solar cell configuration with stroma thylakoids giving almost twice the current (19 ± 3 μA cm(-2)) as grana thylakoids (11 ± 2 μA cm(-2)) with no change in open circuit voltage.

  12. Changes in the Refractive Index of the Stroma and Its Extrafibrillar Matrix When the Cornea Swells

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Keith M.; Dennis, Sally; Khan, Shukria

    2003-01-01

    The transparency of the corneal stroma is critically dependent on the hydration of the tissue; if the cornea swells, light scattering increases. Although this scattering has been ascribed to the disruption caused to the arrangement of the collagen fibrils, theory predicts that light scattering could increase if there is an increased mismatch in the refractive indices of the collagen fibrils and the material between them. The purpose of this article is to use Gladstone and Dale's law of mixtures to calculate volume fractions for a number of different constituents in the stroma, and use these to show how the refractive indices of the stroma and its constituent extrafibrillar material would be expected to change as more solvent enters the tissue. Our calculations predict that solvent entering the extrafibrillar space causes a reduction in its refractive index, and hence a reduction in the overall refractive index of the bovine stroma according to the equation n′s = 1.335 + 0.04/(0.22 + 0.24 H′), where n′s is the refractive index and H′ is the hydration of the swollen stroma. This expression is in reasonable agreement with our experimental measurements of refractive index versus hydration in bovine corneas. When the hydration of the stroma increases from H = 3.2 to H = 8.0, we predict that the ratio of the refractive index of the collagen fibrils to that of the material between them increases from 1.041 to 1.052. This change would be expected to make only a small contribution to the large increase in light scattering observed when the cornea swells to H = 8. PMID:14507686

  13. Second harmonic generation imaging of corneal stroma after infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Danielle M.; Rogers, Nathan A.; Petroll, W. Matthew; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic gram-negative organism that has the ability to cause blinding corneal infections following trauma and during contact lens wear. In this study, we investigated the directional movement and orientation of an invasive corneal isolate of P. aeruginosa in the corneal stroma during infection of ex vivo and in vivo rabbit corneas using multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Ex vivo, rabbit corneas were subject to three partial thickness wounds prior to inoculation. In vivo, New Zealand white rabbits were fit with P. aeruginosa laden contact lenses in the absence of a penetrating wound. At all time points tested, infiltration of the corneal stroma by P. aeruginosa revealed a high degree of alignment between the bacteria and collagen lamellae ex vivo (p < 0.001). In vivo, P. aeruginosa traveled throughout the stroma in discrete regions or bands. Within each region, the bacteria showed good alignment with collagen lamellae (P = 0.002). Interestingly, in both the in vitro and in vivo models, P. aeruginosa did not appear to cross the corneal limbus. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa exploits the precise spacing of collagen lamellae in the central cornea to facilitate spread throughout the stroma. PMID:28397809

  14. Inflammation as a Keystone of Bone Marrow Stroma Alterations in Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Desterke, Christophe; Martinaud, Christophe; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm where severity as well as treatment complexity is mainly attributed to a long lasting disease and presence of bone marrow stroma alterations as evidenced by myelofibrosis, neoangiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. While recent understanding of mutations role in hematopoietic cells provides an explanation for pathological myeloproliferation, functional involvement of stromal cells in the disease pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The current dogma is that stromal changes are secondary to the cytokine “storm” produced by the hematopoietic clone cells. However, despite therapies targeting the myeloproliferation-sustaining clones, PMF is still regarded as an incurable disease except for patients, who are successful recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Although the clinical benefits of these inhibitors have been correlated with a marked reduction in serum proinflammatory cytokines produced by the hematopoietic clones, further demonstrating the importance of inflammation in the pathological process, these treatments do not address the role of the altered bone marrow stroma in the pathological process. In this review, we propose hypotheses suggesting that the stroma is inflammatory-imprinted by clonal hematopoietic cells up to a point where it becomes “independent” of hematopoietic cell stimulation, resulting in an inflammatory vicious circle requiring combined stroma targeted therapies. PMID:26640324

  15. A tissue engineered human endometrial stroma that responds to cues for secretory differentiation, decidualization and menstruation

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Stacey C.; Taylor, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To show the responsiveness of a tissue engineered human endometrial stroma to combinations of hormones mimicking the secretory and menstrual phases of the cycle. Design In vitro experimental study Setting University uterine biology research laboratory Cells Telomerase immortalized human endometrial stromal cells Interventions The stromal cells were cultured in monolayers (2D) or encapsulated in a collagen I hydrogel (3D) to create a simplified tissue engineered stroma. The cells and tissues were exposed to hormone treatments mimicking early and late secretory phases, decidualization and steroid withdrawal conditions to recapitulate menstruation. Main Outcome Measure(s) Morphological and biochemical markers of decidualization and collagenase activity Result(s) The 3D tissue is capable of manifesting changes in morphology and biochemical markers of decidualization similar to 2D culture and characteristic of endometrial stroma in vivo. Unlike 2D culture, the 3D tissue responded to steroid withdrawal by increased collagenase activity and tissue breakdown. Conclusion(s) 3D tissue engineered endometrial stroma can mimic secretory and menstrual phases of the cycle and may be useful for studying uterine receptivity and menstruation in a physiological endocrine environment. PMID:22306710

  16. Understanding tumor-stroma interplays for targeted therapies by armed mesenchymal stromal progenitors: the Mesenkillers

    PubMed Central

    Grisendi, Giulia; Bussolari, Rita; Veronesi, Elena; Piccinno, Serena; Burns, Jorge S; De Santis, Giorgio; Loschi, Pietro; Pignatti, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Ballarin, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Guarneri, Valentina; Piccinini, Lino; Horwitz, Edwin M; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, PierFranco; Dominici, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A tumor represents a complex structure containing malignant cells strictly coupled with a large variety of surrounding cells constituting the tumor stroma (TS). In recent years, the importance of TS for cancer initiation, development, local invasion and metastases has become increasingly clear allowing the identification of TS as one of the possible ways to indirectly target tumors. Inside the heterogeneous stromal cell population, tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF) play a crucial role providing both functional and supportive environments. During both tumor and stroma development, several findings suggest that TAF could be recruited from different sources such as locally derived host fibroblasts, via epithelial/endothelial mesenchymal transitions or from circulating pools of fibroblasts deriving form mesenchymal progenitors, namely mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). These insights prompted scientists to identify multimodal approaches to target TS by biomolecules, monoclonal antibodies, and more recently via cell based strategies. These latter strategies appear extremely promising, although still associated with debated and unclear findings. This review discusses crosstalk between cancers and their stroma, dissecting specific tumor types, such as sarcoma, pancreatic and breast carcinoma, where stroma plays distinct paradigmatic roles. The recognition of these distinct stromal functions may help in planning effective and safer approaches aimed either to eradicate or to substitute TS by novel compounds and/or MSC having specific killing activities. PMID:22016827

  17. Tic40 is important for reinsertion of proteins from the chloroplast stroma into the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Chou; Li, Hsou-min

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast inner-membrane proteins Tic40 and Tic110 are first imported from the cytosol into the chloroplast stroma, and subsequently reinserted from the stroma into the inner membrane. However, the mechanism of reinsertion remains unclear. Here we show that Tic40 itself is involved in this reinsertion process. When precursors of either Tic40 or a Tic110 C-terminal truncate, tpTic110-Tic110N, were imported into chloroplasts isolated from a tic40-null mutant, soluble Tic40 and Tic110N intermediates accumulated in the stroma of tic40-mutant chloroplasts, due to a slower rate of reinsertion. We further show that a larger quantity of soluble Tic21 intermediates also accumulated in the stroma of tic40-mutant chloroplasts. In contrast, inner-membrane insertion of the triose-phosphate/phosphate translocator was not affected by the tic40 mutation. Our data suggest that multiple pathways exist for the insertion of chloroplast inner-membrane proteins. PMID:18657235

  18. Breast Cancer Cell Invasion into a Three Dimensional Tumor-Stroma Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Danh; Puleo, Julieann; Llave, Alison; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Kamm, Roger D.; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to model 3D chemotactic tumor-stroma invasion in vitro, we developed an innovative microfluidic chip allowing side-by-side positioning of 3D hydrogel-based matrices. We were able to (1) create a dual matrix architecture that extended in a continuous manner, thus allowing invasion from one 3D matrix to another, and (2) establish distinct regions of tumor and stroma cell/ECM compositions, with a clearly demarcated tumor invasion front, thus allowing us to quantitatively analyze progression of cancer cells into the stroma at a tissue or single-cell level. We showed significantly enhanced cancer cell invasion in response to a transient gradient of epidermal growth factor (EGF). 3D tracking at the single-cell level displayed increased migration speed and persistence. Subsequently, we analyzed changes in expression of EGF receptors, cell aspect ratio, and protrusive activity. These findings show the unique ability of our model to quantitatively analyze 3D chemotactic invasion, both globally by tracking the progression of the invasion front, and at the single-cell level by examining changes in cellular behavior and morphology using high-resolution imaging. Taken together, we have shown a novel model recapitulating 3D tumor-stroma interactions for studies of real-time cell invasion and morphological changes within a single platform. PMID:27678304

  19. Survival and integration of tissue-engineered corneal stroma in a model of corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Nie, Xin; Hu, Dan; Liu, Yuan; Deng, Zhihong; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Yan

    2007-08-01

    Tissue-engineered replacement of diseased or damaged tissue has become a reality for some types of tissue, such as skin and cartilage. Tissue-engineered corneal stroma represents a promising concept to overcome the limitations of cornea replacement with allograft. In this study, porcine cornea was decellularized by a series of extraction methods, and the in vivo biocompatibility of the scaffold was measured subcutaneously in rabbits (n = 8). These were not acutely rejected and no abscesses were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining at the 8th week, indicating that the scaffolds had good biocompatibility. To investigate the potential value of clinical applications, rabbit stromal keratocytes were implanted onto decellularized scaffolds to fabricate tissue-engineered corneal stroma. Allograft, tissue-engineered corneal stroma, or scaffolds were implanted into a model of corneal ulcer. The survival and reconstruction of corneal transplantation were morphologically evaluated by light and electron microscopy until the 32nd week after implantation. Experiments involving transplantation indicated that the epithelial and stromal defect healed quickly, with improvement in corneal clarity. The integration of the graft was accompanied by neurite ingrowth from the host tissue. By 16 weeks after transplantation, the cornea had gradually regained an intact state similar to that of normal cornea. Our results demonstrate that the tissue-engineered corneal stroma with allogenetic cells is a promising therapeutic method for corneal injury.

  20. Extensively Myxoid and Hyalinized Sinonasal Capillary Hemangiomas: A Clinicopathologic Study of 16 Cases of a Distinctive and Potentially Confusing Hemangioma Variant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruifeng; Folpe, Andrew L

    2015-11-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, the most common vascular tumors of the sinonasal region, are benign endothelial neoplasms, typically growing in an easily recognized lobular pattern. Some sinonasal capillary hemangiomas may show atypical features, such as high cellularity or mitotic activity, and represent more challenging diagnoses. Over the past several years we have seen in consultation a number of examples of sinonasal capillary hemangiomas displaying very striking stromal myxoid change and hyalinization, features that have received scant attention in the past. Available slides from 16 sinonasal capillary hemangiomas previously coded as showing such changes were retrieved from our archives. Submitting diagnoses included "query angiofibroma, rule out malignancy" (N=4), "vascular polyp, rule out malignancy" (N=3), "query malignant vascular tumor" (N=4), "sinonasal hemangiopericytoma" (N=1), and "benign vascular tumor" (N=1). Available radiographic studies often showed worrisome features. Grossly, the tumors ranged from 1.1 to 6.0 cm and appeared as ulcerated, vascular-appearing polyps. Microscopically, the tumors showed striking stromal myxoid change and/or hyalinization, which largely obscured the underlying lobular capillary arrangement. Within this myxohyaline matrix, a florid capillary proliferation was present, frequently with nonatypical mitotic activity. In some instances a branching, "hemangiopericytoma-like" vascular pattern was present in areas. The overall cellularity was low to moderate, and endothelial atypia or hyperchromatism was absent. Ulceration and thrombosis were frequently present. Immunostains to CD31, CD34, and SMA highlighted areas of lobular growth pattern inapparent on the routinely stained slides. Four tested cases were negative for androgen receptors and β-catenin. Follow-up from 12 patients revealed no local recurrences or metastases. Awareness of that sinonasal capillary hemangioma may show these unusual stromal changes, and the use of

  1. Activated Wnt Signaling in Stroma Contributes to Development of Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Makoto; Driscoll, David R.; De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E.; Klimstra, David S.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), a cystic tumor of the pancreas that develops most frequently in women, is a potential precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. MCNs develop primarily in the body and tail of the pancreas and are characterized by the presence of a mucinous epithelium and ovarian-like subepithelial stroma. We investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in KRAS-mediated pancreatic tumorigenesis and development of MCN in mice, and Wnt activation in human MCN samples. METHODS LSL-KrasG12D, Ptf1a-cre mice were crossed with elastase-tva mice to allow for introduction of genes encoded by the replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long-terminal repeat with splice acceptor viruses to pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors, postnatally and sporadically. Repeat with splice acceptor viruses that expressed Wnt1 were delivered to the pancreatic epithelium of these mice; pancreatic lesions were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses. We analyzed levels of factors in Wnt signaling pathways in 19 MCN samples from patients. RESULTS Expression of Wnt1 in the pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors of female mice led to development of unilocular or multilocular epithelial cysts in the pancreas body and tail, similar to MCN. The cystic lesions resembled the estrogen receptor– and progesterone receptor–positive ovarian-like stroma of MCN, but lacked the typical mucinous epithelium. Activated Wnt signaling, based on nuclear localization of β-catenin, was detected in the stroma but not cyst epithelium. Wnt signaling to β-catenin was found to be activated in MCN samples from patients, within the ovarian-like stroma, consistent with the findings in mice. CONCLUSIONS Based on studies of mice and pancreatic MCN samples from patients, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway becomes activated and promotes development of the ovarian-like stroma to contribute to formation of MCNs. PMID

  2. Elastic microfibril distribution in the cornea: Differences between normal and keratoconic stroma.

    PubMed

    White, Tomas L; Lewis, Philip N; Young, Robert D; Kitazawa, Koji; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Meek, Keith M

    2017-06-01

    The optical and biomechanical properties of the cornea are largely governed by the collagen-rich stroma, a layer that represents approximately 90% of the total thickness. Within the stroma, the specific arrangement of superimposed lamellae provides the tissue with tensile strength, whilst the spatial arrangement of individual collagen fibrils within the lamellae confers transparency. In keratoconus, this precise stromal arrangement is lost, resulting in ectasia and visual impairment. In the normal cornea, we previously characterised the three-dimensional arrangement of an elastic fiber network spanning the posterior stroma from limbus-to-limbus. In the peripheral cornea/limbus there are elastin-containing sheets or broad fibers, most of which become microfibril bundles (MBs) with little or no elastin component when reaching the central cornea. The purpose of the current study was to compare this network with the elastic fiber distribution in post-surgical keratoconic corneal buttons, using serial block face scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We have demonstrated that the MB distribution is very different in keratoconus. MBs are absent from a region of stroma anterior to Descemet's membrane, an area that is densely populated in normal cornea, whilst being concentrated below the epithelium, an area in which they are absent in normal cornea. We contend that these latter microfibrils are produced as a biomechanical response to provide additional strength to the anterior stroma in order to prevent tissue rupture at the apex of the cone. A lack of MBs anterior to Descemet's membrane in keratoconus would alter the biomechanical properties of the tissue, potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. In Silico cancer cell versus stroma cellularity index computed from species-specific human and mouse transcriptome of xenograft models: towards accurate stroma targeting therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current state of the art for measuring stromal response to targeted therapy requires burdensome and rate limiting quantitative histology. Transcriptome measures are increasingly affordable and provide an opportunity for developing a stromal versus cancer ratio in xenograft models. In these models, human cancer cells are transplanted into mouse host tissues (stroma) and together coevolve into a tumour microenvironment. However, profiling the mouse or human component separately remains problematic. Indeed, laser capture microdissection is labour intensive. Moreover, gene expression using commercial microarrays introduces significant and underreported cross-species hybridization errors that are commonly overlooked by biologists. Method We developed a customized dual-species array, H&M array, and performed cross-species and species-specific hybridization measurements. We validated a new methodology for establishing the stroma vs cancer ratio using transcriptomic data. Results In the biological validation of the H&M array, cross-species hybridization of human and mouse probes was significantly reduced (4.5 and 9.4 fold reduction, respectively; p < 2x10-16 for both, Mann-Whitney test). We confirmed the capability of the H&M array to determine the stromal to cancer cells ratio based on the estimation of cellularity index of mouse/human mRNA content in vitro. This new metrics enable to investigate more efficiently the stroma-cancer cell interactions (e.g. cellularity) bypassing labour intensive requirement and biases of laser capture microdissection. Conclusion These results provide the initial evidence of improved and cost-efficient analytics for the investigation of cancer cell microenvironment, using species-specificity arrays specifically designed for xenografts models. PMID:25079962

  4. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer or “battery-operated tumor growth”

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Chiavarina, Barbara; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Trimmer, Casey; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Balliet, Renee; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Lin, Zhao; Caro, Jaime; Pestell, Richard G

    2010-01-01

    The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial. Both autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine) and autophagy promoters (rapamycin) block tumorigenesis by unknown mechanism(s). This is called the “Autophagy Paradox.” We have recently reported a simple solution to this paradox. We demonstrated that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative stress to induce autophagy in the tumor microenvironment. As a consequence, the autophagic tumor stroma generates recycled nutrients that can then be used as chemical building blocks by anabolic epithelial cancer cells. This model results in a net energy transfer from the tumor stroma to epithelial cancer cells (an energy imbalance), thereby promoting tumor growth. This net energy transfer is both unilateral and vectorial, from the tumor stroma to the epithelial cancer cells, representing a true host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new paradigm “The Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Cell Metabolism” or “Battery-Operated Tumor Growth.” In this sense, autophagy in the tumor stroma serves as a “battery” to fuel tumor growth, progression and metastasis, independently of angiogenesis. Using this model, the systemic induction of autophagy will prevent epithelial cancer cells from using recycled nutrients, while the systemic inhibiton of autophagy will prevent stromal cells from producing recycled nutrients—both effectively “starving” cancer cells. We discuss the idea that tumor cells could become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy by the upregulation of natural, endogenous autophagy inhibitors in cancer cells. Alternatively, tumor cells could also become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy by the genetic silencing/deletion of pro-autophagic molecules, such as Beclin1. If autophagy resistance develops in cancer cells, then the systemic inhibition of autophagy would provide a therapeutic solution to this type of drug resistance, as it would still target autophagy in the tumor

  5. Proteomics of the human endometrial glandular epithelium and stroma from the proliferative and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian L; Liu, Baoquan; Alkhas, Addie; Shoji, Yutaka; Challa, Rusheeswar; Wang, Guisong; Ferguson, Susan; Oliver, Julie; Mitchell, Dave; Bateman, Nicholas W; Zahn, Christopher M; Hamilton, Chad A; Payson, Mark; Lessey, Bruce; Fazleabas, Asgerally T; Maxwell, G Larry; Conrads, Thomas P; Risinger, John I

    2015-04-01

    Despite its importance in reproductive biology and women's health, a detailed molecular-level understanding of the human endometrium is lacking. Indeed, no comprehensive studies have been undertaken to elucidate the important protein expression differences between the endometrial glandular epithelium and surrounding stroma during the proliferative and midsecretory phases of the menstrual cycle. We utilized laser microdissection to harvest epithelial cells and stromal compartments from proliferative and secretory premenopausal endometrial tissue and performed a global, quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis. This analysis identified 1224 total proteins from epithelial cells, among which 318 were differentially abundant between the proliferative and secretory phases (q < 0.05), and 1005 proteins from the stromal compartments, 19 of which were differentially abundant between the phases (q < 0.05). Several proteins were chosen for validation by immunohistochemistry in an independent set of uterine tissues, including carboxypeptidase M, tenascin C, neprilysin, and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase family member 3 (ENPP3). ENPP3, which was elevated in epithelial glandular cells in the secretory phase, was confirmed to be elevated in midsecretory-phase baboon uterine lavage samples and also observed to have an N-linked glycosylated form that was not observed in the proliferative phase. This study provides a detailed view into the global proteomic alterations of the epithelial cells and stromal compartments of the cycling premenopausal endometrium. These proteomic alterations during endometrial remodeling provide a basis for numerous follow-up investigations on the function of these differentially regulated proteins and their role in reproductive biology and endometrial pathologies.

  6. Tumour-microenvironment interactions: role of tumour stroma and proteins produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts in chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Hale, Matthew David; Hayden, Jeremy David; Grabsch, Heike Irmgard

    2013-04-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy improves survival for some, but not all, cancer patients. Non-responders may experience unnecessary toxicity and cancer progression, thus creating an urgent need for biomarkers that can predict the response to chemotherapy. So far, the search for such biomarkers has primarily been focused on the cancer cells and less on their surrounding stroma. This stroma is known to act as a key regulator of tumour progression and, in addition, has been associated with drug delivery and drug efficacy. Fibroblasts represent the major cell type in cancer-associated stroma and they secrete extracellular matrix proteins as well as growth factors. This Medline-based literature review summarises the results from studies on epithelial cancers and aimed at investigating relationships between the quantity and quality of the intra-tumoral stroma, the cancer-associated fibroblasts, the proteins they produce and the concomitant response to chemotherapy. Biomarkers were selected for review that are known to affect cancer-related characteristics and patient prognosis. The current literature supports the hypothesis that biomarkers derived from the tumour stroma may be useful to predict response to chemotherapy. This notion appears to be related to the overall quantity and cellularity of the intra-tumoural stroma and the predominant constituents of the extracellular matrix. Increasing evidence is emerging showing that tumour-stroma interactions may not only affect tumour progression and patient prognosis, but also the response to chemotherapy. The tumour stroma-derived biomarkers that appear to be most appropriate to determine the patient's response to chemotherapy vary by tumour origin and the availability of pre-treatment tissue. For patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy, the most promising biomarker appears to be the PLAU: SERPINE complex, whereas for patients scheduled for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy the tumour stroma quantity appears to be most relevant.

  7. Characterization of the Tumor Microenvironment and Tumor–Stroma Interaction by Non-invasive Preclinical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Tumors are often characterized by hypoxia, vascular abnormalities, low extracellular pH, increased interstitial fluid pressure, altered choline-phospholipid metabolism, and aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). The impact of these tumor characteristics has been investigated extensively in the context of tumor development, progression, and treatment response, resulting in a number of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. More recent evidence suggests that cancer cells undergo metabolic reprograming, beyond aerobic glycolysis, in the course of tumor development and progression. The resulting altered metabolic content in tumors has the ability to affect cell signaling and block cellular differentiation. Additional emerging evidence reveals that the interaction between tumor and stroma cells can alter tumor metabolism (leading to metabolic reprograming) as well as tumor growth and vascular features. This review will summarize previous and current preclinical, non-invasive, multimodal imaging efforts to characterize the tumor microenvironment, including its stromal components and understand tumor–stroma interaction in cancer development, progression, and treatment response. PMID:28197395

  8. Steroid hormones and the stroma-vascular cells of the adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Volat, Fanny; Bouloumié, Anne

    2013-09-01

    The stroma-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue (AT) is a heterogeneous cell fraction composed of progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and immune cells. SVF plays a key role in AT homeostasis and growth as well as in obesity-associated pathologies. The SVF cell composition and phenotype are distinct according to AT location and adiposity. Such discrepancies influence AT function and are involved in obesity-associated disorders such as chronic inflammation. Investigations performed in recent years in rodents and humans provided evidence that the stroma-vascular cells contribute to the conversion of steroid hormones in AT and are also steroid targets. This review describes the link between steroids and SVF depending on gender, adiposity, and AT location and highlights the potential role of sex and corticosteroid hormones in adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and their contributions in AT inflammation.

  9. The expression of FOXL2 in pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and renal tumors with ovarian-type stroma.

    PubMed

    Westerhoff, Maria; Tretiakova, Maria; Hart, John; Gwin, Katja; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Ming; Yeh, Matthew M; Antic, Tatjana

    2014-05-01

    FOXL2, a gene encoding a member of the fork-head-winged-helix family of transcription factors, is one of the earliest expressed genes during female gonadal development. It is expressed in normal ovarian stroma and ovarian neoplasms with granulosa cell lineage. Nonovarian tumors such as pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (PMCs), hepatobiliary cystadenomas (HBCs), and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) have ovarian-type stroma. Immunohistochemical staining with FOXL2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor was performed on 21 PMCs, 13 HBCs, and 10 MESTs and assessed for nuclear immunohistochemical positivity in the tumor stroma. All cases of PMC and HBC demonstrated nuclear reactivity for FOXL2 in the subepithelial stromal cells. Ninety percent of MEST demonstrated nuclear FOXL2 positivity. Estrogen receptor nuclear positivity was demonstrated in 57% of PMC, 77% of HBC, and 80% of MEST. Progesterone receptor nuclear positivity was present in 67% of PMC, 100% of HBC, and 90% of MEST. Clinical information was available for 37 patients. Seventy-eight percent of the patients had a history of obesity, heavy alcohol use, or hormone-related therapy. The 2 male patients had histories significant for morbid obesity and chronic alcoholism. FOXL2 is expressed from the early stages of ovarian development and has been shown to be mandatory for normal ovarian function. We have shown that it is also expressed in the aberrant ovarian-type stroma characteristic of PMC, HBC, and MEST. Most of such patients, including the rare male patients, have risk factors for hormonal abnormalities such as obesity and hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hic-5’s Regulatory Role in TGFB Signaling in Prostate Stroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    of cancer. Expert Opin Investig Drugs , 2005. 14(6): p. 629-43. 10. Ayala, G., et al., Reactive stroma as a predictor of biochemical-free recurrence...584-95. 37. Bauman, D.R., et al., Development of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug analogs and steroid carboxylates selective for human aldo-keto...reductase isoforms: potential antineoplastic agents that work independently of cyclooxygenase isozymes. Mol Pharmacol, 2005. 67(1): p. 60-8. 38

  11. Identification of tumor epithelium and stroma in tissue microarrays using texture analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess whether texture analysis is feasible for automated identification of epithelium and stroma in digitized tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Texture analysis based on local binary patterns (LBP) has previously been used successfully in applications such as face recognition and industrial machine vision. TMAs with tissue samples from 643 patients with colorectal cancer were digitized using a whole slide scanner and areas representing epithelium and stroma were annotated in the images. Well-defined images of epithelium (n = 41) and stroma (n = 39) were used for training a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with LBP texture features and a contrast measure C (LBP/C) as input. We optimized the classifier on a validation set (n = 576) and then assessed its performance on an independent test set of images (n = 720). Finally, the performance of the LBP/C classifier was evaluated against classifiers based on Haralick texture features and Gabor filtered images. Results The proposed approach using LPB/C texture features was able to correctly differentiate epithelium from stroma according to texture: the agreement between the classifier and the human observer was 97 per cent (kappa value = 0.934, P < 0.0001) and the accuracy (area under the ROC curve) of the LBP/C classifier was 0.995 (CI95% 0.991-0.998). The accuracy of the corresponding classifiers based on Haralick features and Gabor-filter images were 0.976 and 0.981 respectively. Conclusions The method illustrates the capability of automated segmentation of epithelial and stromal tissue in TMAs based on texture features and an SVM classifier. Applications include tissue specific assessment of gene and protein expression, as well as computerized analysis of the tumor microenvironment. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4123422336534537 PMID:22385523

  12. A novel method in preparation of acellularporcine corneal stroma tissue for lamellar keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi; Tang, Jing; Zhou, Yueping; Qu, Yangluowa; He, Hui; Liu, Qiuping; Tan, Gang; Li, Wei; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a novel lamellar cornealbiomaterial for corneal reconstruction.Theporcine acellular corneal stroma discs (ACSDs) were prepared from de-epithelized fresh porcine corneas (DFPCs) by incubation with 100% fresh human serum and additional electrophoresis at 4°C. Such manipulation removed theanterior corneal stromal cells without residual of DNA content and α-Galantigen. Human serum decellularizing activity on porcineanterior corneal stroma cells is through apoptosis, and associated with the presence of α-Gal epitopes in anterior stroma. ACSDs displayed similar optical, biomechanical properties and ultrastructure to DFPCs, and showed good histocompatibility in rabbit corneal stromal pockets and anterior chamber. Rabbit corneallamellar keratoplasty (LKP) using ACSDs showed no rejection and high transparency of cornea at 2 months after surgery. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunostaining analysis showed complete re-epithelization and stromal cell in growth of ACSDs without inflammatory cell infiltration, new blood vessel ingrowth and excessive wound healing. In conclusion, this novel decellularization method may be valuable for preparation of xenogenic corneal tissue for clinical application, ACSDs resulted from this method may be served as a matrix equivalent for LKP in corneal xenotransplantation. PMID:26885261

  13. Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Riina; Mai, Anja; Georgiadou, Maria; Saari, Markku; De Franceschi, Nicola; Betz, Timo; Sihto, Harri; Ventelä, Sami; Elo, Laura; Jokitalo, Eija; Westermarck, Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal—not cancer—stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression. PMID:27488962

  14. Lactoferrin at basal side of mouse mammary epithelium derives in part from stroma cells.

    PubMed

    Pecorini, Chiara; Delpal, Serge; Truchet, Sandrine; Le Provost, Fabienne; Baldi, Antonella; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2009-11-01

    Lactoferrin is synthesized by glandular epithelial cells and neutrophils and is also present on both sides of the mammary epithelium. We have studied the origin of lactoferrin detected in the various compartments of mouse mammary tissue. As revealed by immunogold electron microscopy, lactoferrin is present in mammary epithelial cells and in the basal region of the epithelium, associated with connective tissue and stroma cells at all physiological stages studied. A perturbation of protein synthesis or transport after in vitro treatment with cycloheximide or brefeldin A does not abrogate lactoferrin labelling in the basal region of the epithelium. The expression of lactoferrin has also been observed in the fat pads of mammary glands from mice surgically depleted of epithelial cells. The sealing of one teat for 24 h is accompanied by an increase in both the number of stroma cells and the labelling of myoepithelial cells. Thus, the lactoferrin present in the interstitial space of the mouse mammary epithelium originates in part from stroma cells. Possible roles of lactoferrin at the basal side of the mammary epithelium are discussed.

  15. Digital histologic analysis reveals morphometric patterns of age-related involution in breast epithelium and stroma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Chollet-Hinton, Lynn; Kirk, Erin L.; Midkiff, Bentley; Troester, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Complete age-related regression of mammary epithelium, often termed post-menopausal involution, is associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, most studies have qualitatively assessed involution. We quantitatively analyzed epithelium, stroma, and adipose tissue from histologically normal breast tissue of 454 patients in the Normal Breast Study (NBS). High-resolution digital images of normal breast Hematoxylin & Eosin stained slides were partitioned into epithelium, adipose tissue, and non-fatty stroma. Percentage area and nuclei per unit area (nuclear density) were calculated for each component. Quantitative data were evaluated in association with age using linear regression and cubic spline models Stromal area decreased (p=0.0002) and adipose tissue area increased (p<0.0001), with an approximate 0.7% change in area for each component, until age 55 when these area measures reached a steady state. While epithelial area did not show linear changes with age, epithelial nuclear density decreased linearly beginning in the third decade of life. No significant age-related trends were observed for stromal or adipose nuclear density. Digital image analysis offers a high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring tissue morphometry and for objectively assessing age-related changes in adipose tissue, stroma, and epithelium. Epithelial nuclear density is a quantitative measure of age-related breast involution that begins to decline in the early premenopausal period. PMID:26772400

  16. Galectin-1 drives pancreatic carcinogenesis through stroma remodeling and Hedgehog signaling activation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Fernández-Barrena, Maite G.; Moreno, Mireia; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Hwang, Rosa F.; Poirier, Françoise; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Iglesias, Mar; Navas, Carolina; Guerra, Carmen; Fernández-Zapico, Martin E.; Navarro, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most aggressive tumor, showing incidence and mortality values almost identical. Despite remarkable advances in PDA molecular characterization, this disease is still refractory to current treatments. Desmoplastic stroma, a constant hallmark of PDA, has recently emerged as the major responsible for PDA therapeutic resistance, therefore representing a promising target. Galectin-1 (Gal1), a glycan-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDA stroma but its role remains unknown. Here, we aim to understand in vivo Gal1 functions and the molecular pathways responsible for its oncogenic properties. Genetic ablation of Gal1 in Ela-myc mice dampens tumor progression through inhibition of proliferation, angiogenesis, desmoplasia and stimulation of tumor-associated immune response, resulting in a 20% increase on the animal life span. In vitro and in vivo studies unveil that these effects are mediated by modulation of the tumor microenvironment in a non-cell autonomous manner. Importantly, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a crucial step for PDA initiation, is also regulated by Gal1. Finally, high-throughput gene expression studies and molecular analysis aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism revealed that Gal1 promotes Hedgehog pathway both in PDA cells and stromal fibroblasts. In summary, our studies define a novel role of Gal1 in PDA tumor epithelium-stroma crosstalk and suggest this lectin as potential molecular target for therapy of neoplasms overexpressing Gal1. PMID:24812270

  17. Epithelium-stroma classification via convolutional neural networks and unsupervised domain adaptation in histopathological images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Zheng, Han; Liu, Chi; Ding, Xinghao; Rohde, Gustavo

    2017-04-06

    Epithelium-stroma classification is a necessary preprocessing step in histopathological image analysis. Current deep learning based recognition methods for histology data require collection of large volumes of labeled data in order to train a new neural network when there are changes to the image acquisition procedure. However, it is extremely expensive for pathologists to manually label sufficient volumes of data for each pathology study in a professional manner, which results in limitations in real-world applications. A very simple but effective deep learning method, that introduces the concept of unsupervised domain adaptation to a simple convolutional neural network (CNN), has been proposed in this paper. Inspired by transfer learning, our work assumes that the training data and testing data follow different distributions, and there is an adaptation operation to more accurately estimate the kernels in CNN in feature extraction, in order to enhance performance by transferring knowledge from labeled data in source domain to unlabeled data in target domain. The model has been evaluated using three independent public epithelium-stroma datasets by cross-dataset validations. The experimental results demonstrate that for epithelium-stroma classification, the proposed framework outperforms the state-of-the-art deep neural network model, and it also achieves better performance than other existing deep domain adaptation methods. The proposed model can be considered to be a better option for real-world applications in histopathological image analysis, since there is no longer a requirement for large-scale labeled data in each specified domain.

  18. The prognostic value of stroma in pancreatic cancer in patients receiving adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Bever, Katherine M; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Bigelow, Elaine; Sharma, Rajni; Laheru, Daniel; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Anders, Robert A; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Zheng, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is comprised of a prominent desmoplastic stromal compartment and only 10-40% of the tumour consists of PDA cells. However, how stromal components should be assessed and how the characteristics of the stromal compartment determine clinical outcomes in PDA patients remain unknown. A cohort of 66 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and were primarily followed at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1998 and 2004, and treated with adjuvant therapy, were included in a retrospective analysis. Resected PDA blocks with good tissue preservation were available for all patients. A new, computer-aided, quantitative method was developed to assess the density and activity of stroma in PDAs and the associations of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. High stromal density in resected PDA was found to be significantly associated with longer disease-free [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.39; P = 0.001] and overall (aHR 0.44; P = 0.004) survival after adjusting for the use of pancreatic cancer vaccine therapy, as well as gender and resection margin positivity. Stromal activity, representing activated pancreatic stellate cells in PDAs, was not significantly associated with the prognosis of resected PDAs. These results illustrate the complexity of the role of stroma in PDAs. Further exploration of the prognostic ability of the characteristics of stroma is warranted. © 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  19. Targeting Enox1 in tumor stroma increases the efficacy of fractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clayton A.; Mont, Stacey; Traver, Geri; Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Freeman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to clarify the question of whether targeting Enox1 in tumor stroma would synergistically enhance the survival of tumor-bearing mice treated with fractionated radiotherapy. Enox1, a NADH oxidase, is expressed in tumor vasculature and stroma. However, it is not expressed in many tumor types, including HT-29 colorectal carcinoma cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Enox1 in endothelial cells inhibited repair of DNA double strand breaks, as measured by γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation, as well as neutral comet assays. For 4 consecutive days athymic mice bearing HT-29 hindlimb xenografts were injected with a small molecule inhibitor of Enox1 or solvent control. Tumors were then administered 2 Gy of x-rays. On day 5 tumors were administered a single ‘top-up’ fraction of 30 Gy, the purpose of which was to amplify intrinsic differences in the radiation fractionation regimen produced by Enox1 targeting. Pharmacological targeting of Enox1 resulted in 80% of the tumor-bearing mice surviving at 90 days compared to only 40% of tumor-bearing mice treated with solvent control. The increase in survival was not a consequence of reoxygenation, as measured by pimonidazole immunostaining. These results are interpreted to indicate that targeting of Enox1 in tumor stroma significantly enhances the effectiveness of 2 Gy fractionated radiotherapy and identifies Enox1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27788492

  20. Periostin and tumor-stroma interactions in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Ulrich; Stangel, Daniela; Pan, Zheng; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Esposito, Irene; Regel, Ivonne; Raulefs, Susanne; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-associated mortality globally. Interactions of the cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment are essential carcinogenic features for the majority of solid tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. The present study investigated the role of stromal activation in NSCLC and analyzed the surgical specimens of 93 patients by immunohistochemistry with regard to periostin (an extracellular matrix protein), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; a marker of myofibroblasts) and cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31; a marker of endothelial cells), and the activated stroma index. There was a trend towards reduced overall survival for patients with high periostin expression (hazard ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.99–3.27; P=0.050). No significant correlations with overall survival were identified for α-SMA (P=0.930), CD31 (P=0.923), collagen (P=0.441) or the activated stroma index (P=0.706). In a multivariable analysis, the histological tumor subtype, tumor stage, lymph node involvement and resection status were independent prognostic factors in NSCLC, but none of the investigated immunohistochemical markers were prognostic factors. Thus, the tumor microenvironment and stroma activation did not prove to be of prognostic relevance for lung cancer, as it has been previously described for pancreatic cancer. Other markers of the microenvironment of NSCLC may be of higher prognostic value, pointing towards tumor-type specific effects. PMID:27895734

  1. Three-dimensional arrangement of elastic fibers in the human corneal stroma.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip N; White, Tomas L; Young, Robert D; Bell, James S; Winlove, C Peter; Meek, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    The cornea is the main refracting lens in the eye. As part of the outer tunic it has to be resilient, a property conferred by the organisation of the constituent collagen. It also has to be sufficiently elastic to regain its exact shape when deformed, in order not to distort the retinal image. The basis of this elasticity is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to characterise in three dimensions the arrangement and distribution of elastic fibers in the human corneal stroma, using serial block face scanning electron microscopy. We have demonstrated that there exists a complex network of elastic fibers that appear to originate in the sclera or limbus. These appear as elastic sheets in the limbus and peripheral cornea immediately above the trabecular meshwork which itself appears to extend above Descemet's membrane in the peripheral stroma. From these sheets, elastic fibers extend into the cornea; moving centrally they bifurcate and trifurcate into narrower fibers and are concentrated in the posterior stroma immediately above Descemet's membrane. We contend that elastic sheets will play an important role in the biomechanical deformation and recovery of the peripheral cornea. The network may also have practical implications for understanding the structural basis behind a number of corneal surgeries.

  2. Digital histologic analysis reveals morphometric patterns of age-related involution in breast epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Chollet-Hinton, Lynn; Kirk, Erin L; Midkiff, Bentley; Troester, Melissa A

    2016-02-01

    Complete age-related regression of mammary epithelium, often termed postmenopausal involution, is associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, most studies have qualitatively assessed involution. We quantitatively analyzed epithelium, stroma, and adipose tissue from histologically normal breast tissue of 454 patients in the Normal Breast Study. High-resolution digital images of normal breast hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were partitioned into epithelium, adipose tissue, and nonfatty stroma. Percentage area and nuclei per unit area (nuclear density) were calculated for each component. Quantitative data were evaluated in association with age using linear regression and cubic spline models. Stromal area decreased (P = 0.0002), and adipose tissue area increased (P < 0.0001), with an approximate 0.7% change in area for each component, until age 55 years when these area measures reached a steady state. Although epithelial area did not show linear changes with age, epithelial nuclear density decreased linearly beginning in the third decade of life. No significant age-related trends were observed for stromal or adipose nuclear density. Digital image analysis offers a high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring tissue morphometry and for objectively assessing age-related changes in adipose tissue, stroma, and epithelium. Epithelial nuclear density is a quantitative measure of age-related breast involution that begins to decline in the early premenopausal period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The specific architecture of the anterior stroma accounts for maintenance of corneal curvature

    PubMed Central

    Muller, L.; Pels, E.; Vrensen, G.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To analyse the human corneal stroma in extreme hydration to discover if its structure is responsible for corneal stability.
METHODS—Corneas in several hydration states were used: postmortem control corneas (PM; n=3), corneas left for 1 day in phosphate buffered saline (PBS; n=4), and corneas left for 1 day (n=4), 2 days (n=4), 3 days (n=2), and 4 days (n=4) in deionised water. All corneas were fixed under standardised conditions and processed for light and electron microscopy. In addition, two fresh corneas from the operating theatre were studied which were processed 6 months after storage in sodium cacodylate buffer.
RESULTS—After 1 day in deionised water maximal stromal swelling was reached which did not change up to 4 days. The stroma of deionised water corneas (1400 µm) was much thicker than that of PBS corneas (650 µm) and PM corneas (450 µm). Deionised water treatment led to disappearance of all keratocytes leaving only remnants of nuclei and large interlamellar spaces. In these specimens the distance between the collagen fibres had increased significantly, but the diameter of the collagen fibres did not seem to be affected. A remarkable observation was that the most anterior part of the stroma (100-120 µm) in all deionised water specimens and those stored for 6 months in buffer was not swollen, indicating that the tightly interwoven anterior lamellae are resistant to extreme non-physiological hydration states.
CONCLUSIONS—The rigidity of the most anterior part of the corneal stroma in extreme hydration states points to an important role in maintenance of corneal curvature. Since a large part of this rigid anterior part of the stroma is either removed (PRK) or intersected (LASIK), it is possible that in the long run patients who underwent refractive surgery may be confronted with optical problems.

 PMID:11264134

  4. Chlorophyll composition and photochemical activity of photosystems detached from chloroplast grana and stroma lamellae.

    PubMed

    Gasanov, R A; French, C S

    1973-07-01

    A stroma fraction that has photosystem 1 activity and grana lamellae fractions that have activities for both photosystems were isolated by differential centrifugation of a needle valve homogenate. Subsequent fractions, corresponding to photosystems 1 (F-1D) and 2 (F-2D) were isolated by digitonin treatment of the grana lamellae (P-10K) and compared with respect to their chlorophyll composition and electron transport activities.Fraction F-2D from grana lamellae having photosystem 2 activity is primarily active in photosystem 2 and contains only the four major forms of chlorophyll a with a predominance of chlorophyll a 677 nm. This fraction differs from the original grana membranes in the absence of the longwavelength form of chlorophyll a and in the widening of the absorption band of chlorophyll a 682 nm from 10.9 to 15.6 nm.Photosystem 1 particles from grana and stroma both have high photosystem 1 activity but differ from each other in the proportions of the four major forms of chlorophyll a. The short-wavelength forms of chlorophyll a and also chlorophyll b 650 nm in particles from grana lamellae comprise relatively more total area than these same forms in the particles from stroma. In addition, the fraction corresponding to photosystem 1 from grana lamellae is not shifted to the long-wavelength side of the main absorption maximum, as compared to the photosystem 2 particles from grana and the original grana membrane fraction; this is usually observed in fractions that have photosystem 1 activity. Furthermore, the longest wavelength form of chlorophyll a in the photosystem 1 particles from grana is at 700 nm, while in the same fraction from stroma, it is at 706 nm.The half-width of the four main forms of chlorophyll a and both forms of chlorophyll b in the photosystem 1 fraction from grana is narrower than that of the corresponding forms in the same fraction from stroma. This may indicate a different packing of pigment molecules that are aggregated on the surface

  5. Gangliosides of myelosupportive stroma cells are transferred to myeloid progenitors and are required for their survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ziulkoski, Ana L.; Andrade, Cláudia M. B.; Crespo, Pilar M.; Sisti, Elisa; Trindade, Vera M. T.; Daniotti, Jose L.; Guma, Fátima C. R.; Borojevic, Radovan

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the myelopoiesis dependent upon myelosupportive stroma required production of growth factors and heparan-sulphate proteoglycans, as well as generation of a negatively charged sialidase-sensitive intercellular environment between the stroma and the myeloid progenitors. In the present study, we have investigated the production, distribution and role of gangliosides in an experimental model of in vitro myelopoiesis dependent upon AFT-024 murine liver-derived stroma. We used the FDC-P1 cell line, which is dependent upon GM-CSF (granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor) for both survival and proliferation, as a reporter system to monitor bioavailability and local activity of GM-CSF. GM3 was the major ganglioside produced by stroma, but not by myeloid cells, and it was required for optimal stroma myelosupportive function. It was released into the supernatant and selectively incorporated into the myeloid progenitor cells, where it segregated into rafts in which it co-localized with the GM-CSF-receptor α chain. This ganglioside was also metabolized further by myeloid cells into gangliosides of the a and b series, similar to endogenous GM3. In these cells, GM1 was the major ganglioside and it was segregated at the interface by stroma and myeloid cells, partially co-localizing with the GM-CSF-receptor α chain. We conclude that myelosupportive stroma cells produce and secrete the required growth factors, the cofactors such as heparan sulphate proteoglycans, and also supply gangliosides that are transferred from stroma to target cells, generating on the latter ones specific membrane domains with molecular complexes that include growth factor receptors. PMID:16321139

  6. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 is Upregulated in Reactive Stroma of Primary Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotun; Wang, Wenbin; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert L.; Takayama, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer progression is partly facilitated by tumor-stroma interactions. We recently reported that protease-activated receptors (PAR-1 and PAR-2) are overexpressed in prostate cancer, and PAR-1 expression in peritumoral stroma is associated with biochemical recurrence. However, the nature of PAR expression in prostate tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We therefore evaluated PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in primary prostate cancer and bone metastasis. METHODS PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in normal, primary prostate cancer and the corresponding bone metastatic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry, and double-label immunohistochemistry with the use of additional markers. RESULTS PAR-1 was expressed in peritumoral stroma in the majority of primary cancer tissues (83%). Serial sections and double-label immunohistochemistry determined that these PAR-1 expressing stromal cells were predominantly myofibroblasts, the primary cell type in reactive stroma. Analysis of cancer glands revealed that PAR-1 expression was significantly increased in the reactive stroma around higher Gleason grade cancers. PAR-2 was predominantly expressed in the primary cancer cells as well as smooth muscle cells but not in reactive stroma. In bone metastasis, PAR-1 expression in cancer cells was elevated compared to the primary site from the same patient. In the bone reactive stroma, PAR-1 was present in vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts, while both PAR-1 and PAR-2 were expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts. CONCLUSIONS In primary prostate cancer and bone metastasis, PAR-1 is upregulated in reactive stroma and PAR-2 is uniformly overexpressed in carcinoma cells, suggesting these receptors may play potentially different roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. PMID:19170048

  7. Assessment of oestrogen and progestin effects on epithelium and stroma from pre- and postmenopausal endometria.

    PubMed

    King, R J; Lane, G; Siddle, N; Taylor, R W; Townsend, P T; Whitehead, M I

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of commercially available progestin preparations were investigated with a view toward determining the optimum type, dose, duration, and route of administration required to protect the endometrium. Biochemical indices of estrogen and progestin action in endometria from postmenopausal women receiving various hormone therapies were monitored. The premenopausal samples obtained during the proliferative and secretory phases of the cycle can be compared with physiologically normal activities. Estrogen effects were monitored by nuclear estradiol receptor (REN) and soluble progesterone receptor (RP) content and DNA synthesis by autoradiography after [3-H]-thymidine labelling. Progestin action was assayed by inhibition of estrogen-induced REN and DNA synthesis by induction of isocritic and estradiol dehydrogenases and by morphological criteria. Postmenopausal patients were attending the menopause clinics at King's College Hospital or the Chelsea Hospital for Women in London for symptoms associated with the climacteric. Premenopausal samples were obtained from women attending the above hospitals as well as St. Thomas Hospital in London. There are no differences in REN or estradiol receptor content (RET) between epithelium and stroma for any of the groups. Progestins, regardless of whether they are derived from exogenous (postmenopausal) or endogenous (premenopausal sources, decrease REN and RET in both fractions. Progestins also decreased DNA synthesis in both cell types and this suppression correlates with the fall in REN. The RP content of epithelium is greater than stroma, but the 2 enzymes are markedly stimulated by progestins in epithelium but not stroma. The lower RP content of the stromal fraction could be because of cellular heterogeneity, differential loss of receptor during processing, or to genuine differences between epithelium and stroma. Estrogen induced DNA synthesis is inhibited by progestins in both epithelium ans stroma but the induction of

  8. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Ware, Russell E; Burnette, Angela; Pendleton, Andrew L; Kitano, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Toshiyuki; Machii, Takashi; Kitani, Teruo; Smith, Clay A; Rosse, Wendell F

    2002-01-01

    Although paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is often associated with aplastic anemia (AA), the nature of the pathogenetic link between PNH and AA remains unclear. Moreover, the PIG-A mutation appears to be necessary but not sufficient for the development of PNH, suggesting other factors are involved. The ability of PNH marrow cells to form in vitro hematopoietic colonies and the ability of PNH marrow to generate stroma that could support hematopoiesis of normal or PNH marrow in cross culture were investigated. PNH marrow from both post-Ficoll and post-lineage depleted hematopoietic progenitor cells grew similarly significantly fewer colonies than normal marrow. Sorting of CD59(+) and CD59(-) CD34(+) CD38(-) cells from patients with PNH showed similarly impaired clonogenic efficiency, indicating that the hematopoietic defect in PNH does not directly relate to GPI-anchored protein expression. PNH marrow readily grew stroma similar to marrow from normal donors. Cross culture experiments revealed that PNH stroma appears to function normally in vitro; it can support growth of normal marrow cells as well as normal stroma does, but neither PNH nor normal stroma could support the growth of PNH marrow cells. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cell growth related to additional unknown factors.

  9. Tumour-site-dependent expression profile of angiogenic factors in tumour-associated stroma of primary colorectal cancer and metastases.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, C; Pecqueux, M; Halama, N; Dienemann, H; Muley, T; Pfannschmidt, J; Lasitschka, F; Klupp, F; Schmidt, T; Rahbari, N; Reissfelder, C; Kunz, C; Benner, A; Falk, C; Weitz, J; Koch, M

    2014-01-21

    Tumour-associated stroma has a critical role in tumour proliferation. Our aim was to determine a specific protein expression profile of stromal angiogenic cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to identify potential biomarkers or new therapy targets. Frozen tissue of primary colorectal cancer (n=25), liver (n=25) and lung metastases (n=23) was laser-microdissected to obtain tumour epithelial cells and adjacent tumour-associated stroma. Protein expression of nine angiogenic cytokines and eight MMPs was analysed using a multiplex-based protein assay. We found a differential expression of several MMPs and angiogenic cytokines in tumour cells compared with adjacent tumour stroma. Cluster analysis displayed a tumour-site-dependent stromal expression of MMPs and angiogenic cytokines. Univariate analysis identified stromal MMP-2 and MMP-3 in primary colorectal cancer, stromal MMP-1, -2, -3 and Angiopoietin-2 in lung metastases and stromal MMP-12 and VEGF in liver metastases as prognostic markers (P>0.05, respectively). Furthermore, stroma-derived Angiopoietin-2 proved to be an independent prognostic marker in colorectal lung metastases. Expression of MMPs and angiogenic cytokines in tumour cells and adjacent tumour stroma is dependent on the tumour site. Stroma-derived MMPs and angiogenic cytokines may be useful prognostic biomarkers. These data can be helpful to identify new agents for a targeted therapy in patients with colorectal cancer.

  10. Cosmic abundance of boron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Colgate, S. A.; Grossman, L.

    1973-01-01

    All abundances are expressed relative to a million atoms of Si. An average abundance of boron in ordinary chondrites is 6.2. The boron abundance in meteorites is highly variable. It has been found that the abundances in carbonaceous chondrites are very much higher than those in ordinary chondrites. The condensation of boron and beryllium from a cooling, low-pressure gas of solar composition is discussed together with the occurrence of boron in the interstellar medium, questions of element abundances in the sun, problems of boron production by cosmic rays, and boron production from supernovae.

  11. HSP90 inhibition blocks ERBB3 and RET phosphorylation in myxoid/round cell liposarcoma and causes massive cell death in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Setareh; Järnum, Sofia; Vannas, Christoffer; Udhane, Sameer; Jonasson, Emma; Tomic, Tajana Tesan; Grundevik, Pernilla; Fagman, Henrik; Hansson, Magnus; Kalender, Zeynep; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Dolatabadi, Soheila; Stratford, Eva Wessel; Myklebost, Ola; Eriksson, Mikael; Stenman, Göran; Stock, Regine Schneider; Ståhlberg, Anders; Åman, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid sarcoma (MLS) is one of the most common types of malignant soft tissue tumors. MLS is characterized by the FUS-DDIT3 or EWSR1-DDIT3 fusion oncogenes that encode abnormal transcription factors. The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) encoding RET was previously identified as a putative downstream target gene to FUS-DDIT3 and here we show that cultured MLS cells expressed phosphorylated RET together with its ligand Persephin. Treatment with RET specific kinase inhibitor Vandetanib failed to reduce RET phosphorylation and inhibit cell growth, suggesting that other RTKs may phosphorylate RET. A screening pointed out EGFR and ERBB3 as the strongest expressed phosphorylated RTKs in MLS cells. We show that ERBB3 formed nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes with RET and both RTKs were previously reported to form complexes with EGFR. The formation of RTK hetero complexes could explain the observed Vandetanib resistence in MLS. EGFR and ERBB3 are clients of HSP90 that help complex formation and RTK activation. Treatment of cultured MLS cells with HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, caused loss of RET and ERBB3 phosphorylation and lead to rapid cell death. Treatment of MLS xenograft carrying Nude mice resulted in massive necrosis, rupture of capillaries and hemorrhages in tumor tissues. We conclude that complex formation between RET and other RTKs may cause RTK inhibitor resistance. HSP90 inhibitors can overcome this resistance and are thus promising drugs for treatment of MLS/RCLS. PMID:26595521

  12. HSP90 inhibition blocks ERBB3 and RET phosphorylation in myxoid/round cell liposarcoma and causes massive cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Järnum, Sofia; Vannas, Christoffer; Udhane, Sameer; Jonasson, Emma; Tomic, Tajana Tesan; Grundevik, Pernilla; Fagman, Henrik; Hansson, Magnus; Kalender, Zeynep; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Dolatabadi, Soheila; Stratford, Eva Wessel; Myklebost, Ola; Eriksson, Mikael; Stenman, Göran; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Ståhlberg, Anders; Åman, Pierre

    2016-01-05

    Myxoid sarcoma (MLS) is one of the most common types of malignant soft tissue tumors. MLS is characterized by the FUS-DDIT3 or EWSR1-DDIT3 fusion oncogenes that encode abnormal transcription factors. The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) encoding RET was previously identified as a putative downstream target gene to FUS-DDIT3 and here we show that cultured MLS cells expressed phosphorylated RET together with its ligand Persephin. Treatment with RET specific kinase inhibitor Vandetanib failed to reduce RET phosphorylation and inhibit cell growth, suggesting that other RTKs may phosphorylate RET. A screening pointed out EGFR and ERBB3 as the strongest expressed phosphorylated RTKs in MLS cells. We show that ERBB3 formed nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes with RET and both RTKs were previously reported to form complexes with EGFR. The formation of RTK hetero complexes could explain the observed Vandetanib resistence in MLS. EGFR and ERBB3 are clients of HSP90 that help complex formation and RTK activation. Treatment of cultured MLS cells with HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, caused loss of RET and ERBB3 phosphorylation and lead to rapid cell death. Treatment of MLS xenograft carrying Nude mice resulted in massive necrosis, rupture of capillaries and hemorrhages in tumor tissues. We conclude that complex formation between RET and other RTKs may cause RTK inhibitor resistance. HSP90 inhibitors can overcome this resistance and are thus promising drugs for treatment of MLS/RCLS.

  13. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) masquerading as an ovarian mass

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giorgio; Beneduce, Pasquale

    2004-01-01

    Background Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are rare mesenchymal tumors originating in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Myogenic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a distinctive morphologic variant is characterized by an unusually prominent myxoid stromal background. Case presentation We report a case of myxoid variant of GIST in a 42 years old woman presenting as an epigastric mass associated to an ovarian cyst and elevated CA-125. Histologically, the lesions was composed of a proliferation of spindle cells in an abundant myxoid stroma, without evidence of atypia or anaplasia. Immunohistochemical stains showed strong positive staining with muscle actin, positive staining with CD34 and weak positive staining with CD117, while showed negative for S-100. Conclusion At surgery every effort should be made to identify the origin of the tumor. A complete surgical removal of the tumor should be obtained, as this is the only established treatment that offers long term survival. PMID:15142276

  14. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Charlotta J; Moreira, José; Lukanidin, Eugene M; Ambartsumian, Noona S

    2010-08-19

    Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s) and cancer cells (MCF7S1) in three-dimensional (3D) growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the initial presence of human fibroblasts.

  15. Roles of limbal microvascular net and limbal stroma in regulating maintenance of limbal epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minghai; Wang, Bowen; Wan, Pengxia; Liang, Xuanwei; Wang, Xiaoran; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the microenvironment (niche) of stem cells is helpful for stem-cell-based regenerative medicine. In the eye, limbal epithelial stem cells (corneal epithelial stem cells) provide the self-renewal capacity of the corneal epithelium and are essential for maintaining corneal transparency and vision. Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency results in significant visual deterioration. Successful treatment of this type of blinding disease requires studies of the limbal epithelial stem cells and their microenvironment. We investigate the function of the limbal microvascular net and the limbal stroma in the maintenace of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche in vivo and examine the regulation of limbal epithelial stem cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in vivo. We assess the temporal and spatial changes in the expression patterns of the following markers during a six-month follow-up of various rabbit limbal autograft transplantation models: vascular endothelial cell marker CD31, corneal epithelium differentiation marker K3, limbal epithelial stem-cell-associated markers P63 and ABCG2 and proliferating cell nuclear marker Ki67. Our results suggest that limbal epithelial stem cells cannot maintain their stemness or proliferation without the support of the limbal microvascular net microenvironment. Thus, both the limbal microvascular net and the limbal stroma play important roles as components of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche maintaining limbal epithelial stem cell survival and proliferation and the avoidance of differentiation. The limbal stroma constitutes the structural basis of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche and the limbal microvascular net is a requirement for this niche. These new insights should aid the eventual construction of tissue-engineered cornea for corneal blind patients in the future.

  16. Antagonizing the Hedgehog Pathway with Vismodegib Impairs Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Growth In Vivo by Affecting Stroma.

    PubMed

    Meerang, Mayura; Bérard, Karima; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Lauk, Olivia; Vrugt, Bart; Boss, Andreas; Kenkel, David; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Stahel, Rolf A; Arni, Stephan; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    An autocrine-driven upregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been described in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), in which the ligand, desert Hh (DHH), was produced from tumor cells. However, our investigation revealed that the Hh pathway is activated in both tumor and stroma of MPM tumor specimens and an orthotopic immunocompetent rat MPM model. This was demonstrated by positive immunohistochemical staining of Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) and Patched1 (PTCH1) in both tumor and stromal fractions. DHH was predominantly expressed in the tumor fractions. To further investigate the role of the Hh pathway in MPM stroma, we antagonized Hh signaling in the rat model of MPM using a Hh antagonist, vismodegib, (100 mg/kg orally). Daily treatment with vismodegib efficiently downregulated Hh target genes Gli1, Hedgehog Interacting Protein (Hhip), and Ptch1, and caused a significant reduction of tumor volume and tumor growth delay. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that vismodegib treatment primarily downregulated GLI1 and HHIP in the stromal compartment along with a reduced expression of previously described fibroblast Hh-responsive genes such as Fibronectin (Fn1) and Vegfa Primary cells isolated from the rat model cultured in 3% O2 continued to express Dhh but did not respond to vismodegib in vitro However, culture supernatant from these cells stimulated Gli1, Ptch1, and Fn1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which was suppressed by vismodegib. Our study provides new evidence regarding the role of Hh signaling in MPM stroma in the maintenance of tumor growth, emphasizing Hh signaling as a treatment target for MPM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1095-105. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and dysfunctional bone marrow stroma in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Westerweel, Peter E; Teraa, Martin; Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E; White, Ian A; Hooper, Andrea T; Doevendans, Pieter A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2013-01-01

    Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired -at least partly- due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1(+)Flk-1(+) EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell-endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients.

  18. Impaired Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Dysfunctional Bone Marrow Stroma in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E.; White, Ian A.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired –at least partly– due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Methods Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1+Flk-1+ EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell–endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. Results In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. Conclusion EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients. PMID:23555959

  19. Evaluation of Stroma-Free Hemoglobin Solutions as Resuscitative Fluids for the Injured Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    sri -~ S. i~ -~I *1*~-. - -~ ti- H -~ S - - +1-i-i ~ .--.- -~ ~ .4 ~’ ~ - -Cl -- - :4 - I; I :4 - :4 .44- :4 I :4 . - ~f1 :4 ti- H - H ...hemoglobin solutions have FWo .𔄁~i if !t 1V& lt-j: di aised the question of non-stroma related n:z i i, L𔃼 !, A i h ,7,, ! \\,ycr 4dm’, toxicity in the...animal, wecre anesthetized andsl_ that peratia all\\ prepared as prex.iou’ dcscrillci by- 1_71(2(_bi solta iW P x th px’ I U, \\kit h the modification th

  20. Altered Proteomic Polymorphisms in the Caterpillar Body and Stroma of Natural Cordyceps sinensis during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zi-Mei; Gao, Ling; Yao, Yi-Sang; Tan, Ning-Zhi; Wu, Jian-Yong; Ni, Luqun; Zhu, Jia-Shi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the maturational changes in proteomic polymorphisms resulting from differential expression by multiple intrinsic fungi in the caterpillar body and stroma of natural Cordyceps sinensis (Cs), an integrated micro-ecosystem. Methods The surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) biochip technique was used to profile the altered protein compositions in the caterpillar body and stroma of Cs during its maturation. The MS chromatograms were analyzed using density-weighted algorithms to examine the similarities and cluster relationships among the proteomic polymorphisms of the Cs compartments and the mycelial products Hirsutella sinensis (Hs) and Paecilomyces hepiali (Ph). Results: SELDI-TOF MS chromatograms displayed dynamic proteomic polymorphism alterations among samples from the different Cs compartments during maturation. More than 1,900 protein bands were analyzed using density-weighted ZUNIX similarity equations and clustering methods, revealing integral polymorphism similarities of 57.4% between the premature and mature stromata and 42.8% between the premature and mature caterpillar bodies. The across-compartment similarity was low, ranging from 10.0% to 18.4%. Consequently, each Cs compartment (i.e., the stroma and caterpillar body) formed a clustering clade, and the 2 clades formed a Cs cluster. The polymorphic similarities ranged from 0.51% to 1.04% between Hs and the Cs compartments and were 2.8- to 4.8-fold higher (1.92%–4.34%) between Ph and the Cs compartments. The Hs and Ph mycelial samples formed isolated clades outside of the Cs cluster. Conclusion Proteomic polymorphisms in the caterpillar body and stroma of Cs change dynamically during maturation. The proteomic polymorphisms in Hs and Ph differ from those in Cs, suggesting the presence of multiple Cs-associated fungi and multiple Ophiocordyceps sinensis genotypes with altered differential protein expression in the Cs compartments

  1. 3D is not enough: Building up a cell instructive microenvironment for tumoral stroma microtissues.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Virginia; Garziano, Alessandro; Gioiella, Filomena; Urciuolo, Francesco; Imparato, Giorgia; Panzetta, Valeria; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated three-dimensional microtissues with the aim to replicate in vitro the composition and the functionalities of the tumor microenvironment. By arranging either normal fibroblasts (NF) or cancer-activated fibroblasts (CAF) in two different three dimensional (3D) configurations, two kinds of micromodules were produced: spheroids and microtissues. Spheroids were obtained by means of the traditional cell aggregation technique resulting in a 3D model characterized by high cell density and low amount of extracellular proteins. The microtissues were obtained by culturing cells into porous gelatin microscaffolds. In this latter configuration, cells assembled an intricate network of collagen, fibronectin and hyaluronic acid. We investigated the biophysical properties of both 3D models in terms of cell growth, metabolic activity, texture and composition of the extracellular matrix (via histological analysis and multiphoton imaging) and cell mechanical properties (via Particle Tracking Microrheology). In the spheroid models such biophysical properties remained unchanged regardless to the cell type used. In contrast, normal-microtissues and cancer-activated-microtissues displayed marked differences. CAF-microtissues possessed higher proliferation rate, superior contraction capability, different micro-rheological properties and an extracellular matrix richer in collagen fibronectin and hyaluronic acid. At last, multiphoton investigation revealed differences in the collagen network architecture. Taken together, these results suggested that despite to cell spheroids, microtissues better recapitulate the important differences existing in vivo between normal and cancer-activated stroma representing a more suitable system to mimic in vitro the stromal element of the tumor tissues. This work concerns the engineering of tumor tissue in vitro. Tumor models serve as biological equivalent to study pathologic progression and to screen or validate the drugs efficacy. Tumor

  2. Targeting tumor-stroma crosstalk: the example of the NT157 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rampias, T; Favicchio, R; Stebbing, J; Giamas, G

    2016-05-19

    Recent clinical research has provided evidence that cancer progression and therapy resistance is driven not only by tumor's genetic profile but also by complex paracrine interactions within the tumor microenvironment (TME). The role of TME in modulating tumor drug sensitivity is increasingly recognized and targeting TME has been the focus of novel therapeutic approaches. Two recent reports show that a new anti-cancer drug, the inhibitor NT157 has the potential to inhibit IGF-1R and STAT3 signaling pathways in cancer cells and stroma cells of TME leading to a decrease in cancer cell survival.

  3. Abundances of the elements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urey, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    An elemental abundance table along the lines used by Suess and Urey (1956) is presented. Since this early work, other studies have been made, and improvement in the abundance tables has been made as more reliable data have become available. Some changes in the original tables have been made, but the original abundances and their variations with mass numbers remain remarkably similar. The solar abundance of iron for many years appeared to be very much less relative to silicon than would be indicated by the data from the meteorites.

  4. Intact corneal stroma visualization of GFP mouse revealed by multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen; Teng, Shu-Wen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Kim, Ki Hean; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chen, Yang-Fan; So, Peter T C; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy is a preferred technique to investigate intact cornea structure without slicing and staining. At the micron resolution, multiphoton imaging can provide both large morphological features and detailed structure of epithelium, corneal collagen fibril bundles and keratocytes. A large area multiphoton cross-section across an intact eye excised from a GFP mouse was obtained by a homebuilt multiphoton microscope. The broadband multiphoton fluorescence (435-700 nm) and second harmonic generation (SHG, 360-400 nm) signals were generated by the 760 nm output of a femtosecond titanium-sapphire laser. A water immersion objective (Fluor, 40X, NA 0.8; Nikon) was used to facilitate imaging the curve ocular surface. The multiphoton image over entire cornea provides morphological information of epithelial cells, keratocytes, and global collagen orientation. Specifically, our planar, large area multiphoton image reveals a concentric pattern of the stroma collagen, indicative of the laminar collagen organization throughout the stroma. In addition, the green fluorescence protein (GFP) labeling contributed to fluorescence contrast of cellular area and facilitated visualizing of inactive keratocytes. Our results show that multiphoton imaging of GFP labeled mouse cornea manifests both morphological significance and structural details. The second harmonic generation imaging reveals the collagen orientation, while the multiphoton fluorescence imaging indicates morphology and distribution of cells in cornea. Our results support that multiphoton microscopy is an appropriate technology for further in vivo investigation and diagnosis of cornea. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Microscopic analysis of structural changes in diode-laser-welded corneal stroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Pini, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    Diode laser welding of the cornea is a technique used to provide immediate sealing of corneal wounds: the cut is stained with a water solution of Indocyanine Green and is then irradiated with an 810 nm laser at low power densities (12-16 W/cm2), which induces a localized heating of the stroma in the range 55-66 °C range. In this study, we present a microscopic analysis aimed at evaluating the structural modifications induced in the stromal collagen of pig eyes during the laser welding of corneal wounds. Cornea samples obtained from twenty freshly-enucleated eyes were cut with a pre-calibrated knife and subjected to the laser welding procedure. Histological slices of the laser-welded stroma were examined by means of optical and transmission electron microscopy. These analyses indicated that bridges of lamellar structures crossed the wound edges with no presence of a coagulation effect. After laser welding, collagen fibrils appeared differently oriented among themselves in comparison with those of the control samples, but with similar mean fibril diameters. The laser-induced effect appeared to be confined to the ICG stained area of the cut walls, and no heat damage was observed at the operative power levels of laser corneal welding.

  6. FGFR4 promotes stroma-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Xie, Ke; Zhang, Tao; Lei, Yunlong; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Kai; Wang, Kui; Wu, Hong; Wu, Min; Nice, Edouard C; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-10-01

    Tumor cells evolve by interacting with the local microenvironment; however, the tumor-stroma interactions that govern tumor metastasis are poorly understood. In this study, proteomic analyses reveal that coculture with tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) induces significant overexpression of FGFR4, but not other FGFRs, in colorectal cancer cell lines. Mechanistic study shows that FGFR4 plays crucial roles in TAF-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in colorectal cancer cell lines. Accumulated FGFR4 in cell membrane phosphorylates β-catenin, leading to translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus. Further, TAF-derived CCL2 and its downstream transcription factor, Ets-1, are prerequisites for TAF-induced FGFR4 upregulation. Furthermore, FGFR4-associated pathways are shown to be preferentially activated in colorectal tumor samples, and direct tumor metastasis in a mouse metastasis model. Our study shows a pivotal role of FGFR4 in tumor-stroma interactions during colorectal cancer metastasis, and suggests novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  7. The footprint of the ageing stroma in older patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, Barbara; Fumagalli, Debora; Brohee, Sylvain; Hatse, Sigrid; Govaere, Olivier; Floris, Giuseppe; Van den Eynde, Kathleen; Bareche, Yacine; Schöffski, Patrick; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Lambrechts, Diether; Sotiriou, Christos; Wildiers, Hans

    2017-07-03

    Tumours are not only composed of malignant cells but also consist of a stromal micro-environment, which has been shown to influence cancer cell behaviour. Because the ageing process induces accumulation of senescent cells in the body, this micro-environment is thought to be different in cancers occurring in old patients compared with younger patients. More specifically, senescence-related fibroblastic features, such as the senescence-associated secretory profile (SASP) and the induction of autophagy, are suspected to stimulate tumour growth and progression. We compared gene expression profiles in stromal fields of breast carcinomas by performing laser capture microdissection of the cancer-associated stroma from eight old (aged ≥80 years at diagnosis) and nine young (aged <45 years at diagnosis) patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Gene expression data were obtained by microarray analysis (Affymetrix). Differential gene expression and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) were performed. Differential gene expression analysis showed changes reminiscent of increased growth, de-differentiation and migration in stromal samples of older versus younger patients. GSEA confirmed the presence of a SASP, as well as the presence of autophagy in the stroma of older patients. We provide the first evidence in humans that older age at diagnosis is associated with a different stromal micro-environment in breast cancers. The SASP and the presence of autophagy appear to be important age-induced stromal features.

  8. Parotid sialosis: morphometrical analysis of the glandular parenchyme and stroma among diabetic and alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Carolina; Bohl, Luciana; Carda, Carmen; Gómez de Ferraris, María Elsa; Carranza, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Among the agents that cause parotid sialosis, diabetes mellitus type 2 and chronic alcoholism are included. In this study, the morphometrical modifications in the diabetic parotid sialosis were determined to compare them with the histopathological characteristics of alcoholic parotid sialosis. Five parotid biopsy samples obtained from patients with diabetic sialosis, 12 samples from patients with alcoholic sialosis and seven from individuals without these pathologies (control group) were analyzed. A morphometrical study of parotid parenchyme and stroma, using a digital image analyzer attached to an optical microscope, was carried out. Dimensions of serous acini and striated ducts, the area occupied by the fatty tissue, and the number of ducts were recorded. Mean values were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test (P stroma and a significant development of ductal epithelium that contributed to increase the caliber of the striated ducts. These results indicate that the glandular hypertrophy in the diabetic parotid sialosis is not directly associated with the ductal and acinar size, amount of fatty tissue and ductal hyperplasy. Nevertheless, these findings show that the ductal dimensions and the proportion of adipose tissue are variables that allow us to establish histopathological differences between diabetic and alcoholic sialosis.

  9. Using genipin-crosslinked acellular porcine corneal stroma for cosmetic corneal lens implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhu, Jixiang; Xiao, Jianhui; Wan, Pengxia; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Qiang, Na; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Zheng; Quan, Daping; Wang, Zhichong

    2012-10-01

    Acellular porcine corneal stroma (APCS) has been proven to maintain the matrix microenvironment and is therefore an ideal biomaterial for the repair and reconstruction of corneal stroma. This study aims to develop a method to prepare cosmetic corneal lens implants for leukoma using genipin-crosslinked APCS (Gc-APCS). The Gc-APCS was prepared from APCS immersed in 1.0% genipin aqueous solution (pH 5.5) for 4 h at 37 °C, followed by lyophilization at -10 °C. The color of the Gc-APCS gradually deepened to dark-blue. The degree of crosslinking was 45.7 ± 4.6%, measured by the decrease of basic and hydroxy amino acids. The porous structure and ultrastructure of collagenous lamellae were maintained, and the porosity and BET SSA were 72.7 ± 4.6% and 23.01 ± 3.45 m(2)/g, respectively. The Gc-APCS rehydrated to the physiological water content within 5 min and was highly resistant to collagenase digestion. There were no significant differences in the areal modulus and curvature variation between Gc-APCS and nature porcine cornea. The dark-blue pigments were stable to pH, light and implantation in vivo. Gc-APCS extracts had no inhibitory effects on the proliferation of keratocytes. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation and corneal rejection were not observed within 6 months.

  10. Human Papillomavirus and the Stroma: Bidirectional Crosstalk during the Virus Life Cycle and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Lambert, Paul F

    2017-08-09

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) tumor viruses that are causally associated with human cancers of the anogenital tract, skin, and oral cavity. Despite the availability of prophylactic vaccines, HPVs remain a major global health issue due to inadequate vaccine availability and vaccination coverage. The HPV life cycle is established and completed in the terminally differentiating stratified epithelia, and decades of research using in vitro organotypic raft cultures and in vivo genetically engineered mouse models have contributed to our understanding of the interactions between HPVs and the epithelium. More recently, important and emerging roles for the underlying stroma, or microenvironment, during the HPV life cycle and HPV-induced disease have become clear. This review discusses the current understanding of the bidirectional communication and relationship between HPV-infected epithelia and the surrounding microenvironment. As is the case with other human cancers, evidence suggests that the stroma functions as a significant partner in tumorigenesis and helps facilitate the oncogenic potential of HPVs in the stratified epithelium.

  11. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C; Urrutia, Andres A; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Pfaff, Andrew S; Olauson, Hannes; Wernerson, Annika; Fogo, Agnes B; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-02

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2-/- renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2-/- mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation.

  12. Stroma as an Active Player in the Development of the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, L

    2015-12-01

    The stroma is a considerable part of the tumor microenvironment. Because of its complexity, it can influence both cancer and immune cells in their behavior and cross-talk. Aside from soluble products released by non-cancer and cancer cells, extracellular matrix components have been increasingly recognized as more than just minor players in the constitution, development and regulation of the tumor microenvironment. The variations in the connective scaffold architecture, induced by transforming growth factor beta, lysyl oxidase and metalloproteinase activity, create different conditions of ECM density and stiffness. They exert broad effects on immune cells (e.g. physical barriers, modulation by release of stored TGF-β1), mesenchymal cells (transition to myofibroblasts), epithelial cells (epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition), cancer cells (progression to metastatic phenotype) and stem cells (activation of differentiation addressed by the microenvironment characteristics). Physiological mechanisms of the wound healing process, as well as mechanisms of fibrosis in some chronic pathologies, closely recall aspects of cancer deregulated biology. Their elucidation can provide a better understanding of tumor microenvironment immunobiology. In the following short review, we will focus on some aspects of the fibrous stroma to highlight its active participation in the tumor microenvironment constitution, tumor progression and the local immunological network.

  13. Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingdu; Binns, Thomas C.; Davidoff, Olena; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P.; Pfaff, Andrew S.; Olauson, Hannes; Fogo, Agnes B.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2–/– renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2–/– mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation. PMID:27088801

  14. In vitro 3D corneal tissue model with epithelium, stroma, and innervation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siran; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Gomes, Rachel; Pollard, Rachel E; Funderburgh, James L; Kaplan, David L

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between corneal nerve, epithelium, and stroma are essential for maintaining a healthy cornea. Thus, corneal tissue models that more fully mimic the anatomy, mechanical properties and cellular components of corneal tissue would provide useful systems to study cellular interactions, corneal diseases and provide options for improved drug screening. Here a corneal tissue model was constructed to include the stroma, epithelium, and innervation. Thin silk protein film stacks served as the scaffolding to support the corneal epithelial and stromal layers, while a surrounding silk porous sponge supported neuronal growth. The neurons innervated the stromal and epithelial layers and improved function and viability of the tissues. An air-liquid interface environment of the corneal tissue was also mimicked in vitro, resulting in a positive impact on epithelial maturity. The inclusion of three cell types in co-culture at an air-liquid interface provides an important advance for the field of in vitro corneal tissue engineering, to permit improvements in the study of innervation and corneal tissue development, corneal disease, and tissue responses to environmental factors.

  15. Regulation of dendritic-cell differentiation by bone marrow stroma via different Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pingyan; Nefedova, Yulia; Corzo, Cesar A.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2007-01-01

    Notch is a major factor mediating interaction between hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and bone marrow stroma (BMS). However its contribution to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is controversial. We found that main Notch ligands Delta-1 and Jagged-1 had the opposite effect on DC differentiation. Delta-1 promoted generation of fully differentiated DCs, whereas Jagged-1 stimulated accumulation of DC precursors but prevented their transition to terminally differentiated DCs. BMS expressed a substantially higher level of Jagged-1 than Delta-1. Just the opposite expression pattern was observed in spleen stroma (SS). The BMS effect on DC differentiation was similar to that of Jagged-1, whereas the effect of SS was similar to the effect of Delta-1. Down-regulation of Jagged-1 in BMS substantially increased DC differentiation. Experiments in vivo with adoptive transfer of DC precursors further supported the different roles of BMS and SS in DC development. Jagged-1 and Delta-1 equally activated CBF-1/RBPJκ transcription factor, which is a major Notch target. However, they produced a different pattern of activation of Notch target gene Hes1. Overexpression of Hes1 resulted in increased DC differentiation from HPCs. Thus, this study not only revealed the different role of Notch ligands in DC differentiation but also may provide a new insight into regulation of DC differentiation by BMS. PMID:16973960

  16. Identification of Prognostic Molecular Features in the Reactive Stroma of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Provero, Paolo; Fusco, Carlo; Delorenzi, Mauro; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value. PMID:21611158

  17. Analysis of Differential miRNA Expression in Primary Tumor and Stroma of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Troncone, Giancarlo; Pepe, Stefano; De Placido, Sabino; D'Incalci, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technology was used to profile miRNA expression in primary tumor and stromal tissue from paraffin embedded material of 51 patients with colorectal cancer. 26 miRNAs resulted differentially expressed with at least 2-fold change in tumor tissue with respect to stroma (16 more expressed in the tumor and 10 more expressed in the stroma). 10/26 were confirmed as differentially expressed at qRTPCR: miR-200c-3p, miR-141-3p, miR-200b-3p, miR-200a-3p, miR-1246, miR-92a-3p, miR-194-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-3651-5p, and miR-574-3p. No significant association was found between miRNA expressions and stage at diagnosis, site of primary tumor, first site of metastasis, progression-free, or overall survival. PMID:25143946

  18. Analysis of differential miRNA expression in primary tumor and stroma of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Calura, Enrica; Di Marino, Mariacristina; Romualdi, Chiara; Beltrame, Luca; Malapelle, Umberto; Troncone, Giancarlo; De Stefano, Alfonso; Pepe, Stefano; De Placido, Sabino; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Marchini, Sergio; Carlomagno, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technology was used to profile miRNA expression in primary tumor and stromal tissue from paraffin embedded material of 51 patients with colorectal cancer. 26 miRNAs resulted differentially expressed with at least 2-fold change in tumor tissue with respect to stroma (16 more expressed in the tumor and 10 more expressed in the stroma). 10/26 were confirmed as differentially expressed at qRTPCR: miR-200c-3p, miR-141-3p, miR-200b-3p, miR-200a-3p, miR-1246, miR-92a-3p, miR-194-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-3651-5p, and miR-574-3p. No significant association was found between miRNA expressions and stage at diagnosis, site of primary tumor, first site of metastasis, progression-free, or overall survival.

  19. On Orbit Osteobiology Experiments: from "STROMA" to "MDS" -from in vitro to in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Cancedda, Ranieri

    Spaceflight causes profound changes in the skeleton, in particular, in the weight-loading bones. Uncoupling of bone remodeling equilibrium between bone formation and resorption is con-sidered responsible for the microgravity-induced bone loss. These changes result in weak-ened and brittle bones prone to fracture on re-entry and in accelerated osteoporosis, making bone deterioration a major problem obstructing the prospects of long-duration manned space flight. Osteoblasts (bone forming cells) and osteocytes (bone resorption cells) are known to be mechano-sensors. Short-exposure of osteoblasts to simulated microgravity ensnarled cell adhe-sion and cytoskeleton. Also osteoblast precursors such as bone marrow stroma cells (BMSC) were shown to be sensitive to mechanical loading. We performed a series of STROMA space-flight experiments by culturing BMSC or co-culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors in automated bioreactors on orbit. Genechip analysis revealed an inhibition of cell proliferation and an unexpected activation of nervous system development genes by spaceflight. To unravel effects of microgravity on genes governing bone mass, transgenic mice with a higher bone mass were flown to orbit inside the Mice Drawer System (MDS) payload. The MDS experiment was launched inside Shuttle Discovery in STS-128 on August 28 2009 at 23:58 EST, and returned to earth by Shuttle Atlantis in STS129 on November 27 2009 at 9:47 EST, marking it as the first long duration animal experiment on the International Space Station (ISS).

  20. Antitumor Effects of Chimeric Receptor Engineered Human T Cells Directed to Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunitha; Chow, Kevin KH; Mata, Melinda; Shaffer, Donald R; Song, Xiao-Tong; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Lisa L; Rowley, David R; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principle component of the tumor-associated stroma, form a highly protumorigenic and immunosuppressive microenvironment that mediates therapeutic resistance. Co-targeting CAFs in addition to cancer cells may therefore augment the antitumor response. Fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a type 2 dipeptidyl peptidase, is expressed on CAFs in a majority of solid tumors making it an attractive immunotherapeutic target. To target FAP-positive CAFs in the tumor-associated stroma, we genetically modified T cells to express a FAP-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The resulting FAP-specific T cells recognized and killed FAP-positive target cells as determined by proinflammatory cytokine release and target cell lysis. In an established A549 lung cancer model, adoptive transfer of FAP-specific T cells significantly reduced FAP-positive stromal cells, with a concomitant decrease in tumor growth. Combining these FAP-specific T cells with T cells that targeted the EphA2 antigen on the A549 cancer cells themselves significantly enhanced overall antitumor activity and conferred a survival advantage compared to either alone. Our study underscores the value of co-targeting both CAFs and cancer cells to increase the benefits of T-cell immunotherapy for solid tumors. PMID:23732988

  1. Abundances in Przybylski's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ryabchikova, T.; Kupka, F.; Bord, D. J.; Mathys, G.; Bidelman, W. P.

    2000-09-01

    We have derived abundances for 54 elements in the extreme roAp star HD101065. ESO spectra with a resolution of about 80000, and S/N of 200 or more were employed. The adopted model has Teff=6600K, and log(g)=4.2. Because of the increased line opacity and consequent low gas pressure, convection plays no significant role in the temperature structure. Lighter elemental abundances through the iron group scatter about standard abundance distribution (SAD) (solar) values. Iron and nickel are about one order of magnitude deficient while cobalt is enhanced by 1.5dex. Heavier elements, including the lanthanides, generally follow the solar pattern but enhanced by 3 to 4dex. Odd-Z elements are generally less abundant than their even-Z neighbours. With a few exceptions (e.g. Yb), the abundance pattern among the heavy elements is remarkably coherent, and resembles a displaced solar distribution.

  2. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in myxoid liposarcoma: A useful adjunct for the detection of extra-pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J D; Watson, J J; Cool, P; Cribb, G L; Jenkins, J P R; Leahy, M; Gregory, J J

    2016-04-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLS) are a subgroup of soft-tissue sarcomas which have a propensity for extra-pulmonary metastases. Conventional radiological staging of soft-tissue sarcomas consists of chest radiographs (CXR) and thoracic computed tomography (CT) for possible chest metastases, supplemented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local disease. The optimal radiological modality to detect extra-pulmonary metastases for systemic staging has not been proven. We reviewed the efficacy of Whole-Body MRI (WBMRI) for this purpose. 33 WBMRI and simultaneous CT scans were performed in 28 patients suffering from MLS between 2007 and 2015. 38 metastases were identified in seven patients via WBMRI. Osseous lesions predominated (spine, pelvis, chest-wall and long bones), followed by soft-tissue and abdominal lesions. Of the 29 soft-tissue or osseous metastases that were within the field-of-view of the simultaneous CT scans, five soft-tissue and zero osseous metastases were identified using CT. Metastatic disease was detected in three patients solely using WBMRI, which directly influenced their management. WBMRI is a useful adjunct in the detection of extra-pulmonary metastatic disease, which directly alters patient management. WBMRI has demonstrated an ability to identify more sites of metastatic disease compared to CT. WBMRI should be used in two situations. Firstly, at diagnosis where ablative treatment will be required e.g. amputation, when the diagnosis of occult metastasis would change treatment planning. Secondly, at diagnosis of relapse to confirm if it is a solitary site of relapse prior to consideration of metastectomy.

  3. Cancer-associated fibroblast-secreted CXCL16 attracts monocytes to promote stroma activation in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allaoui, Roni; Bergenfelz, Caroline; Mohlin, Sofie; Hagerling, Catharina; Salari, Kiarash; Werb, Zena; Anderson, Robin L.; Ethier, Stephen P.; Jirström, Karin; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel; Tahin, Balázs; Johansson, Martin E.; Larsson, Christer; Leandersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative (TN) breast cancers (ER−PR−HER2−) are highly metastatic and associated with poor prognosis. Within this subtype, invasive, stroma-rich tumours with infiltration of inflammatory cells are even more aggressive. The effect of myeloid cells on reactive stroma formation in TN breast cancer is largely unknown. Here, we show that primary human monocytes have a survival advantage, proliferate in vivo and develop into immunosuppressive myeloid cells expressing the myeloid-derived suppressor cell marker S100A9 only in a TN breast cancer environment. This results in activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts and expression of CXCL16, which we show to be a monocyte chemoattractant. We propose that this migratory feedback loop amplifies the formation of a reactive stroma, contributing to the aggressive phenotype of TN breast tumours. These insights could help select more suitable therapies targeting the stromal component of these tumours, and could aid prediction of drug resistance. PMID:27725631

  4. The identification of trans-associations between prostate cancer GWAS SNPs and RNA expression differences in tumor-adjacent stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; McClelland, Michael; Jia, Zhenyu; Rahmatpanah, Farah B.; Sawyers, Anne; Trent, Jeffrey; Duggan, David; Mercola, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Here we tested the hypothesis that SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk, might differentially affect RNA expression in prostate cancer stroma. The most significant 35 SNP loci were selected from Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies of ~40,000 patients. We also selected 4030 transcripts previously associated with prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. eQTL analysis was carried out by a modified BAYES method to analyze the associations between the risk variants and expressed transcripts jointly in a single model. We observed 47 significant associations between eight risk variants and the expression patterns of 46 genes. This is the first study to identify associations between multiple SNPs and multiple in trans gene expression differences in cancer stroma. Potentially, a combination of SNPs and associated expression differences in prostate stroma may increase the power of risk assessment for individuals, and for cancer progression. PMID:25638161

  5. Systems Analysis of a Mouse Xenograft Model Reveals Annexin A1 as a Regulator of Gene Expression in Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Annexin A1 is a multi functional molecule which is involved in inflammation, innate and adaptive immune systems, tumor progression and metastasis. We have previously showed the impaired tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and wound healing in annexin A1 knockout mice. While tumor is a piece of heterogeneous mass including not only malignant tumor cells but also the stroma, the importance of the tumor stroma for tumor progression and metastasis is becoming increasingly clear. The tumor stroma is comprised by various components including extracellular matrix and non-malignant cells in the tumor, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune cells, inflammatory cells. Based on our previous finding of pro-angiogenic functions for annexin A1 in vascular endothelial cell sprouting, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis, and the previously known properties for annexin A1 in immune cells and inflammation, this study hypothesized that annexin A1 is a key functional player in tumor development, linking the various components in tumor stroma by its actions in endothelial cells and immune cells. Using systems analysis programs commercially available, this paper further compared the gene expression between tumors from annexin A1 wild type mice and annexin A1 knockout mice and found a list of genes that significantly changed in the tumor stroma that lacked annexin A1. This revealed annexin A1 to be an effective regulator in tumor stroma and suggested a mechanism that annexin A1 affects tumor development and metastasis through interaction with the various components in the microenvironment surrounding the tumor cells. PMID:23077482

  6. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  7. A new species of Trichoderma hypoxylon harbours abundant secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingzu; Pei, Yunfei; Li, Erwei; Li, Wei; Hyde, Kevin D.; Yin, Wen-Bing; Liu, Xingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Some species of Trichoderma are fungicolous on fungi and have been extensively studied and commercialized as biocontrol agents. Multigene analyses coupled with morphology, resulted in the discovery of T. hypoxylon sp. nov., which was isolated from surface of the stroma of Hypoxylon anthochroum. The new taxon produces Trichoderma- to Verticillium-like conidiophores and hyaline conidia. Phylogenetic analyses based on combined ITS, TEF1-α and RPB2 sequence data indicated that T. hypoxylon is a well-distinguished species with strong bootstrap support in the polysporum group. Chemical assessment of this species reveals a richness of secondary metabolites with trichothecenes and epipolythiodiketopiperazines as the major compounds. The fungicolous life style of T. hypoxylon and the production of abundant metabolites are indicative of the important ecological roles of this species in nature. PMID:27869187

  8. Sclerotic fibroma (storiform collagenoma)-like stroma in a fibroadenoma of axillary accessory breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Val-Bernal, José Fernando; González-Vela, María Carmen; De Grado, Mauricio; Garijo, María Francisca

    2012-08-01

    Accessory breast tissue is a subcutaneous remnant persisting after normal embryological development of the breast. It occurs most frequently in the axilla. Fibroadenomas in axillary breast tissue are rare. We report the case of a 29-year-old female patient who presented a fibroadenoma arising in the accessory breast tissue of the right axillary fossa. The neoplasm showed foci of sclerotic fibroma-like stroma. The patient had no signs of Cowden's syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, a lesion of this kind has not been previously reported. This stromal change suggests an uncommon involutional phase of the fibroadenoma with production of sclerotic and hypocellular collagen. The lesion should be differentiated from extraneural perineuroma, from the changes in fibroadenomas in Cowden's syndrome, from sclerosing lobular hyperplasia (fibroadenomatoid mastopathy) and from pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia.

  9. [The radioprotective effect of hypoxia on clonogenic cells of rat bone marrow stroma (KOE-F)].

    PubMed

    Konopliannikov, A G; Waĭnson, A A; Kolesnikova, A I; Zaĭtsev, A V; Kal'sina, S Sh; Lepekhina, L A

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was made on the survival rate of cell-precursors of haemopoietic stroma, that form, in a rat bone marrow culture, colonies (clones) of fibroblasts (CFU-F) after gamma-irradiation of animals in the air or in a gas hypoxic mixture, containing 8% of O2 (GHM-8). Irradiation in GHM-8 was shown to increase the survival rate of CFU-F by 1.7 times (as compared to exposure in the air) as estimated by the total number of colonies that are formed in a culture; the radioprotective effect of GHM-8 was more pronounced for CFU-F which form dense colonies: DMF for dense and loose clones was 2.4 and 1.6 respectively.

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma with sarcomatous stroma in the nasal cavity of a dog.

    PubMed

    Bosward, K L; Kessell, A E; Lucy, R J

    2004-09-01

    This is a report of an unusual squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity of a dog. A 13-year-old Golden Retriever was presented with a unilateral nasal and ocular discharge. Although a nasal tumour was suspected, initial diagnostic investigations were unrewarding, and, with worsening clinical signs, the dog was euthanatized. Necropsy examination confirmed the presence of a nasal tumour that was composed histologically of both a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma component blending with a predominant spindle cell component. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-human keratin/cytokeratin (AE1/AE3, CAM 5.2 and broad spectrum cytokeratin), Vimentin, Desmin, smooth muscle actin and S-100 protein supported a diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma with (pseudo) sarcomatous stroma.

  11. Multifocal epithelial tumors and field cancerization: stroma as a primary determinant

    PubMed Central

    Dotto, G. Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that cancer results from altered organ homeostasis rather than from deregulated control of single cells or groups of cells. This applies especially to epithelial cancer, the most common form of human solid tumors and a major cause of cancer lethality. In the vast majority of cases, in situ epithelial cancer lesions do not progress into malignancy, even if they harbor many of the genetic changes found in invasive and metastatic tumors. While changes in tumor stroma are frequently viewed as secondary to changes in the epithelium, recent evidence indicates that they can play a primary role in both cancer progression and initiation. These processes may explain the phenomenon of field cancerization, i.e., the occurrence of multifocal and recurrent epithelial tumors that are preceded by and associated with widespread changes of surrounding tissue or organ “fields.” PMID:24691479

  12. Antigen archiving by lymph node stroma: a novel function for the lymphatic endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Kedl, Ross M.; Tamburini, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid stroma performs far more functions than simple structural support for lymphoid tissues, providing a host of soluble and membrane-bound cues to trafficking leukocytes during inflammation and homeostasis. More recently it has become clear that stromal cells can manipulate T cell responses, either through direct antigen-mediated stimulation of T cells or more indirectly through the retention and management of antigen after viral infection or vaccination. In light of recent data, this review provides an overview of stromal cell subsets and functions during the progression of an adaptive immune response with particular emphasis on antigen capture and retention by follicular dendritic cells (FDC) as well as the recently described “antigen archiving” function of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC). Given its impact on the maintenance of protective immune memory, we conclude by discussing the most pressing questions pertaining to LEC antigen capture, archiving and exchange with hematopoetically derived antigen-presenting cells. PMID:26278423

  13. Pten in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment: Modeling Tumor-Stroma Co-Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Julie A.; Li, Fu; Leone, Gustavo; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Solid human tumors and their surrounding microenvironment are hypothesized to co-evolve in a manner that promotes tumor growth, invasiveness and spread. Mouse models of cancer have focused on genetic changes in the epithelial tumor cells and therefore have not robustly tested this hypothesis. We have recently developed a murine breast cancer model that ablates the PTEN tumor suppressor pathway in stromal fibroblasts. Remarkably, the model resembles human breast tumors both at morphologic and molecular levels. We propose that such models reflect subtypes of tumor-stromal co-evolution relevant to human breast cancer, and will therefore be useful in defining the mechanisms that underpin tumor-stroma crosstalk. Additionally, these models should also aid in molecularly classifying human breast tumors based on both the microenvironment subtypes they contain as well as on the tumor subtype. PMID:21303970

  14. Preparation of High-Density Fibrillar Collagen Matrices that Mimic Desmoplastic Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    The stroma of invasive tumors becomes enriched in dense fibrillar collagen as a result of the desmoplastic reaction. This desmoplastic collagen exerts profound effects on tumor and normal cells. In view of these findings, it is important to develop novel in vitro cell systems that mimic this desmoplastic extracellular matrix in order to permit cell studies under in vivo-like conditions. This Unit provides a protocol and troubleshooting guide for the preparation of high density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrices that closely model the desmoplastic collagenous matrix of malignant tumors. It then describes the use of this HDFC matrix for in vitro cell studies of invadopodia formation and function in extracellular matrix invasion. In addition, this Unit also provides a detailed protocol for immuno-labeling of invadopodial proteins and detection of HDFC matrix degradation associated with invadopodia to permit invadopodia visualization using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26930554

  15. Thermal Transitions of Fibrillar Collagen Unveiled by Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy of Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Matteini, Paolo; Cicchi, Riccardo; Ratto, Fulvio; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Francesca; de Angelis, Marella; Pavone, Francesco S.; Pini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The thermal transitions of fibrillar collagen are investigated with second-harmonic generation polarization anisotropy microscopy. Second-harmonic generation images and polarization anisotropy profiles of corneal stroma heated in the 35–80°C range are analyzed by means of a theoretical model that is suitable to probe principal intramolecular and interfibrillar parameters of immediate physiological interest. Our results depict the tissue modification with temperature as the interplay of three destructuration stages at different hierarchical levels of collagen assembly including its tertiary structure and interfibrillar alignment, thus supporting and extending previous findings. This method holds the promise of a quantitative inspection of fundamental biophysical and biochemical processes and may find future applications in real-time and postsurgical functional imaging of collagen-rich tissues subjected to thermal treatments. PMID:22995490

  16. Depth-Dependent Transverse Shear Properties of the Human Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Petsche, Steven J.; Chernyak, Dimitri; Martiz, Jaime; Levenston, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To measure the transverse shear modulus of the human corneal stroma and its profile through the depth by mechanical testing, and to assess the validity of the hypothesis that the shear modulus will be greater in the anterior third due to increased interweaving of lamellae. Methods. Torsional rheometry was used to measure the transverse shear properties of 6 mm diameter buttons of matched human cadaver cornea pairs. One cornea from each pair was cut into thirds through the thickness with a femtosecond laser and each stromal third was tested individually. The remaining intact corneas were tested to measure full stroma shear modulus. The shear modulus from a 1% shear strain oscillatory test was measured at various levels of axial compression for all samples. Results. After controlling for axial compression, the transverse shear moduli of isolated anterior layers were significantly higher than central and posterior layers. Mean modulus values at 0% axial strain were 7.71 ± 6.34 kPa in the anterior, 1.99 ± 0.45 kPa in the center, 1.31 ± 1.01 kPa in the posterior, and 9.48 ± 2.92 kPa for full thickness samples. A mean equilibrium compressive modulus of 38.7 ± 8.6 kPa at 0% axial strain was calculated from axial compression measured during the shear tests. Conclusions. Transverse shear moduli are two to three orders of magnitude lower than tensile moduli reported in the literature. The profile of shear moduli through the depth displayed a significant increase from posterior to anterior. This gradient supports the hypothesis and corresponds to the gradient of interwoven lamellae seen in imaging of stromal cross-sections. PMID:22205608

  17. Ultrasound-enhanced penetration of topical riboflavin into the corneal stroma.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Ricardo; Chan, Elliot; Zhang, Hui; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Good, Sam D; Porco, Travis C; Diederich, Chris J; Stewart, Jay M

    2013-08-28

    To determine whether ultrasound treatment can promote the permeation of topical riboflavin into the corneal stroma. Fresh cadaveric rabbit eyes with intact epithelium were left for 45 minutes in riboflavin 0.1% solution and divided in the following groups: A--untreated, epithelium-on; B--ultrasound-treated (1 W/cm(2) at 880 kHz for 6 minutes) with epithelium-on; and C--epithelium-off (no ultrasound). Eyes were removed from the riboflavin solution, corneas were excised, and group B was divided into B1 (with epithelium maintained) and B2 (epithelium removed for the fluorescence analysis). Confocal microscopy was performed to quantify the fluorescence intensity in the cornea according to the distance from the surface (with epithelium in groups A and B1; without epithelium in groups B2 and C). The average fluorescence intensity of riboflavin at a depth of 100, 150, 200, and 250 μm was 69.97, 58.83, 49.23, and 41.72 arbitrary units (A.U.) in group A, respectively; 255.26, 206.01, 159.81, 124.20 A.U. in group B1; 218.90, 177.90, 141.43, 110.45 A.U. in group B2; and 677.64, 420.10, 250.72 and 145.07 A.U. in group C. The difference in fluorescence was statistically significant between groups A and B1 (P = 0.001) and groups B2 and C (P < 0.0001). Ultrasound treatment increased the entry of topical riboflavin into the corneal stroma despite the presence of a previously intact epithelial barrier. This approach may offer a means of achieving clinically useful concentrations of riboflavin within the cornea with minimum epithelial damage, thereby improving the risk profile of corneal cross-linking procedures.

  18. Ultrasound-Enhanced Penetration of Topical Riboflavin Into the Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Ricardo; Chan, Elliot; Zhang, Hui; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Good, Sam D.; Porco, Travis C.; Diederich, Chris J.; Stewart, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether ultrasound treatment can promote the permeation of topical riboflavin into the corneal stroma. Methods. Fresh cadaveric rabbit eyes with intact epithelium were left for 45 minutes in riboflavin 0.1% solution and divided in the following groups: A – untreated, epithelium-on; B – ultrasound-treated (1 W/cm2 at 880 kHz for 6 minutes) with epithelium-on; and C – epithelium-off (no ultrasound). Eyes were removed from the riboflavin solution, corneas were excised, and group B was divided into B1 (with epithelium maintained) and B2 (epithelium removed for the fluorescence analysis). Confocal microscopy was performed to quantify the fluorescence intensity in the cornea according to the distance from the surface (with epithelium in groups A and B1; without epithelium in groups B2 and C). Results. The average fluorescence intensity of riboflavin at a depth of 100, 150, 200, and 250 μm was 69.97, 58.83, 49.23, and 41.72 arbitrary units (A.U.) in group A, respectively; 255.26, 206.01, 159.81, 124.20 A.U. in group B1; 218.90, 177.90, 141.43, 110.45 A.U. in group B2; and 677.64, 420.10, 250.72 and 145.07 A.U. in group C. The difference in fluorescence was statistically significant between groups A and B1 (P = 0.001) and groups B2 and C (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Ultrasound treatment increased the entry of topical riboflavin into the corneal stroma despite the presence of a previously intact epithelial barrier. This approach may offer a means of achieving clinically useful concentrations of riboflavin within the cornea with minimum epithelial damage, thereby improving the risk profile of corneal cross-linking procedures. PMID:23920369

  19. Tumor stroma with senescence-associated secretory phenotype in steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee San; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Kim, Haeryoung; Rhee, Hyungjin; Koh, Myoung Ju; Nahm, Ji Hae; Choi, Jin Sub; Lee, Kee-Ho; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Senescence secretome was recently reported to promote liver cancer in an obese mouse model. Steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma (SH-HCC), a new variant of HCC, has been found in metabolic syndrome patients, and pericellular fibrosis, a characteristic feature of SH-HCC, suggests that alteration of the tumor stroma might play an important role in SH-HCC development. Clinicopathological characteristics and tumor stroma showing senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) were investigated in 21 SH-HCCs and 34 conventional HCCs (C-HCCs). The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), p21Waf1/Cif1, γ-H2AX, and IL-6 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. SH-HCCs were associated with older age, higher body mass index, and a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome, compared to C-HCC (P <0.05, all). The numbers of α-SMA-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) (P = 0.049) and α-SMA-positive CAFs co-expressing p21Waf1/Cif1 (P = 0.038), γ-H2AX (P = 0.065), and IL-6 (P = 0.048) were greater for SH-HCCs than C-HCCs. Additionally, non-tumoral liver from SH-HCCs showed a higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and a higher number of α-SMA-positive stellate cells expressing γ-H2AX and p21Waf1/Cif1 than that from C-HCCs (P <0.05, all). In conclusion, SH-HCCs are considered to occur more frequently in metabolic syndrome patients. Therein, senescent and damaged CAFs, as well as non-tumoral stellate cells, expressing SASP including IL-6 may contribute to the development of SH-HCC. PMID:28273155

  20. Biophysical interpretation and ex-vivo characterization of scattered light from tumor-associated breast stroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughney, Ashley; Krishnaswamy, Venkat; Schwab, Mary; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to extract scatter parameters related to tissue ultra-structures from freshly excised breast tissue and to assess whether evident changes in scatter across diagnostic categories is primarily influenced by variation in the composition of each tissues subtypes or by physical remodeling of the extra-cellular environment. Pathologists easily distinguish between epithelium, stroma and adipose tissues, so this classification was adopted for macroscopic subtype classification. Micro-sampling reflectance spectroscopy was used to characterize single-backscattered photons from fresh, excised tumors and normal reduction specimens with sub-millimeter resolution. Phase contrast microscopy (sub-micron resolution) was used to characterize forward-scattered light through frozen tissue from the DHMC Tissue Bank, representing normal, benign and malignant breast tissue, sectioned at 10 microns. The packing density and orientation of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with invasive, normal and benign epithelium was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the H&E stained tissues were identified for analysis, as outlined by a pathologist as the gold standard. We conclude that the scatter parameters associated with tumor specimens (Npatients=6, Nspecimens=13) significantly differs from that of normal reductions (Npatients=6, Nspecimens=10). Further, tissue subtypes may be identified by their scatter spectra at sub-micron resolution. Stromal tissue scatters significantly more than the epithelial cells embedded in its ECM and adipose tissue scatters much less. However, the scatter signature of the stroma at the sub-micron level is not particularly differentiating in terms of a diagnosis.

  1. Effect of culture medium on propagation and phenotype of corneal stroma-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sidney, Laura E; Branch, Matthew J; Dua, Harminder S; Hopkinson, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The limbal area of the corneal stroma has been identified as a source of mesenchymal-like stem cells, which have potential for exploitation as a cell therapy. However, the optimal culture conditions are disputed and few direct media comparisons have been performed. In this report, we evaluated several media types to identify the optimal for inducing an in vitro stem cell phenotype. Primary human corneal stroma-derived stem cells (CSSCs) were extracted from corneoscleral rims. Culture in seven different media types was compared: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS); M199 with 20% FBS; DMEM-F12 with 20% serum replacement, basic fibroblast growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor (SCM); endothelial growth medium (EGM); semi-solid MethoCult; serum-free keratinocyte medium (K-SFM); and StemPro-34. Effects on proliferation, morphology, protein and messenger RNA expression were evaluated. All media supported proliferation of CSSCs with the exception of K-SFM and StemPro-34. Morphology differed between media: DMEM produced large cells, whereas EGM produced very small cells. Culture in M199 produced a typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype with high expression of CD105, CD90 and CD73 but not CD34. Culture in SCM produced a phenotype more reminiscent of a progenitor cell type with expression of CD34, ABCG2, SSEA-4 and PAX6. Culture medium can significantly influence CSSC phenotype. SCM produced a cell phenotype closest to that of a pluripotent stem cell, and we consider it to be the most appropriate for development as a clinical-grade medium for the production of CSSC phenotypes suitable for cell therapy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunosuppressive therapy in bone marrow aplasia: the stroma functions normally to support hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, N; Jacobs, P

    1995-12-01

    In aplastic anemia (AA) patients responsive to antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) therapy, abnormalities in both stroma and progenitor cell (PC) pool have been described. The relevance of each pathophysiologic defect was characterized in 16 individuals, and data were compared to results from seven normal volunteers. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were split into two fractions. Stromal layers (SL) were prepared from the first, and a CD34+ enriched population was obtained by immunomagnetic selection from the second. In cross-culture experiments, 1 x 10(4) of the latter from patients or controls were seeded on preformed SL, and adhesive PC were scored for the formation of blast colonies (CFU-Bl) on day 5 of culture. Nonadherent progenitors were recovered and quantitated in a standard clonogenic assay (CFU-GM). There were significantly fewer CD34+ cells in the AA group (median 0.65%, SD 0.39%, vs. 1.62%, SD 1.4%; p = 0.002). No morphological or cytologic differences between normal and aplastic SL were detected. Both equally supported the growth of CFU-Bl from normal progenitors (mean 117, SD 20.4, and 103.1, SD 30.4), while this value was reduced for the aplastic PC (mean 41.06, SD 42.9; p = 0.0002, exact two-tailed test). Similarly, the AA nonadherent PC had a decreased CFU-GM growth (mean 142.6, SD 104.8, vs. mean 361.7; SD 91.3), with a lower total clonogenic output (p = 0.0009). We conclude that aplastic stroma appropriately supports the growth of normal progenitors, whereas the depressed clonogenicity of the corresponsing population derived from AA is unrelated to their attachment to SL but intrinsic to the CD34+ cells, whether adherent or not.

  3. Cryopreservation of an artificial human oral mucosa stroma. A viability and rheological study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Mario A; López-López, Modesto T; Durán, Juan D G; Alaminos, Miguel; Campos, Antonio; Rodriguez, Ismael A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability and biomechanical properties of artificial human oral mucosa stroma (HOMS) subjected to cryopreservation with different cryoprotectant solutions. Artificial HOMS based on a fibrin-agarose matrix with human gingival fibroblasts cultured 7 days in vitro were cryopreserved with three cryoprotectant solutions: (A) TC-199 Medium, DMSO 15%, albumin; (B) DMEM, FCS, DMSO 10%; (C) QC Medium, glycerol. As controls, artificial HOMS not subjected to cryopreservation (CF) and HOMS cryopreserved without cryoprotectant solution (CS) were used. Histological analysis by light microscopy showed that solutions A and B preserved a pattern of porosity similar to values in CF. Based on the number of intact cells in the fibrin-agarose matrix, substitutes preserved with solution B showed the best results. Cell proliferation detected with PCNA immunochemical methods showed that the cell proliferation index was highest in substitutes cryopreserved with solution B. The reculture method and cell viability analyses with Live & Dead(®) revealed increased number of viable in cells preserved with solution B. Artificial stroma substitutes in CS control samples showed the greatest alterations in microstructure and cell proliferation. Analysis of the biomechanical properties showed that substitutes cryopreserved with different solutions had adequate rheological parameters (yield stress, elastic modulus and viscous modulus) and were therefore suitable for use in regenerative medicine. These results establish effective methods of cryopreservation for all experimental situations and suggest that solution B (DMEM, FCS, DMSO 10%) was the best cryoprotectant for the cryopreservation of an artificial oral human mucosa substitute based on a fibrin-agarose matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A mammary repopulating cell population characterized in mammary anlagen reveals essential mammary stroma for morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiazhe; Xue, Kai; She, Ji; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Shangguan, Rulan; Dai, Yunping; Du, Liying; Li, Ning

    2014-09-10

    The cells with mammary repopulating capability can achieve mammary gland morphogenesis in a suitable cellular microenvironment. Using cell surface markers of CD24, CD29 and CD49f, mouse mammary repopulating unit (MRU) has been identified in adult mammary epithelium and late embryonic mammary bud epithelium. However, embryonic MRU remains to be fully characterized at earlier mammary anlagen stage. Here we isolated discrete populations of E14.5 mouse mammary anlagen cells. Only Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was predicted as E14.5 MRU by examining their capacities of forming mammosphere and repopulating cleared mammary fat pad in vivo. However, when we characterized gene expressions of this E14.5 cell population by comparing with adult mouse MRU (Lin(-)CD24(+)CD29(hi)), the gene profiling of these two cell populations exhibited great differences. Real-time PCR and immunostaining assays uncovered that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was a heterogeneous stroma-enriched cell population. Then, limiting dilutions and single-cell assays also confirmed that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population possessed low proportion of stem cells. In summary, heterogeneous Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population exhibited mammary repopulating ability in E14.5 mammary anlagen, implying that only suitable mammary stroma could enable mammary gland morphogenesis, which relied on the interaction between rare stem cells and microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of cooperative bicarbonate uptake into chloroplast stroma in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Takashi; Sato, Emi; Iguchi, Hiro; Fukuda, Yuri; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The supply of inorganic carbon (Ci; CO2 and HCO3–) is an environmental rate-limiting factor in aquatic photosynthetic organisms. To overcome the difficulty in acquiring Ci in limiting-CO2 conditions, an active Ci uptake system called the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is induced to increase CO2 concentrations in the chloroplast stroma. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, HLA3, and a formate/nitrite transporter homolog, LCIA, are reported to be associated with HCO3– uptake [Wang and Spalding (2014) Plant Physiol 166(4):2040–2050]. However, direct evidence of the route of HCO3– uptake from the outside of cells to the chloroplast stroma remains elusive owing to a lack of information on HLA3 localization and comparative analyses of the contribution of HLA3 and LCIA to the CCM. In this study, we revealed that HLA3 and LCIA are localized to the plasma membrane and chloroplast envelope, respectively. Insertion mutants of HLA3 and/or LCIA showed decreased Ci affinities/accumulation, especially in alkaline conditions where HCO3– is the predominant form of Ci. HLA3 and LCIA formed protein complexes independently, and the absence of LCIA decreased HLA3 mRNA accumulation, suggesting the presence of unidentified retrograde signals from the chloroplast to the nucleus to maintain HLA3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, although single overexpression of HLA3 or LCIA in high CO2 conditions did not affect Ci affinity, simultaneous overexpression of HLA3 with LCIA significantly increased Ci affinity/accumulation. These results highlight the HLA3/LCIA-driven cooperative uptake of HCO3– and a key role of LCIA in the maintenance of HLA3 stability as well as Ci affinity/accumulation in the CCM. PMID:26015566

  6. Fibromyxoma of the axis.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Casadei, Roberto; Gambarotti, Marco; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    Fibromyxoma of bone is a rare benign tumor of fibrous tissue origin. The typical location is the jaws. Sporadic extragnathic cases have been reported, but fibromyxoma of the spine has not been reported. The histological appearance of fibromyxoma is benign and includes abundant extracellular fibrous and myxoid stroma with varying amounts of calcification and ossification. Myxoid changes are usually extensive. Extragnathic fibromyxoma of bone should be distinguished from benign cartilage-forming bone tumors, such as chondromyxoid and myxoid chondrosarcoma and myxoma of bone. It has also been suggested that fibromyxoma is a variant of myxoid fibrous dysplasia, whereas other authors reported extragnathic fibromyxoma resulting from myxoid degeneration of bone tumors, such as chondrosarcoma or fibrosarcoma. The overtreatment of patients with fibromyxoma of bone due to an aggressive imaging appearance should be avoided; the prognosis is excellent compared with the jaw variant and depends on the location and extent of the tumor. This article describes a case of a 21-year-old woman with fibromyxoma of bone originating from the spinous process of the axis. Clinical examination showed a tender mass in the midline of the posterior aspect the neck and slight limitation of neck range of motion; neurologic examination was normal. Diagnosis was obtained with a preoperative biopsy. Marginal excision of the lesion with posterior laminectomy of the axis was performed. The facets were preserved, and no fusion was performed. At last follow-up 2 years after diagnosis and treatment, the patient was asymptomatic with no evidence of local recurrence.

  7. Bidirectional Signaling of Mammary Epithelium and Stroma: Implications for Breast Cancer—Preventive Actions of Dietary Factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mammary gland is composed of two major cellular compartments: a highly dynamic epithelium that undergoes cycles of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to local and endocrine signals and the underlying stroma comprised of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and adipocytes that c...

  8. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Matrix Metalloproteinases: Functional Interactions in Tumor Stroma-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor with several different roles in health and disease. In tumorigenesis, it may act as a protumorigenic factor and have a profound impact on the regulation of the immune system response. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family that comprises more than 25 members, which have recently been proposed as important regulators acting in tumor stroma by regulating the response of noncellular and cellular microenvironment. Tumor stroma consists of several types of resident cells and infiltrating cells derived from bone marrow, which together play crucial roles in the promotion of tumor growth and metastasis. In cancer cells, TGF-β regulates MMPs expression, while MMPs, produced by either cancer cells or residents' stroma cells, activate latent TGF-β in the extracellular matrix, together facilitating the enhancement of tumor progression. In this review we will focus on the compartment of myeloid stroma cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic and mast cells, which are potently regulated by TGF-β and produce large amounts of MMPs. Their interplay and mutual implications in the generation of pro-tumorigenic cancer microenvironment will be analyzed. PMID:24578639

  9. Simple test to confirm cleavage with air between Descemet's membrane and stroma during big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Luigi; Parente, Gabriella; Tassinari, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    We describe a simple test to confirm big-bubble formation in deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by observing the position and movements of small air bubbles injected into the anterior chamber through a limbal paracentesis. The test also allows evaluation of the extension of Descemet's membrane cleavage from the posterior stroma relative to the margins of the corneal trephination.

  10. Relationship between patient age and refractive index of the corneal stroma during refractive surgery assisted by femtosecond laser flap creation.

    PubMed

    Amparo, Francisco; Patel, Sudi; Alió, Jorge L; Rodriguez-Prats, Jose L; Moreno, Luis J

    2012-07-01

    To measure the refractive index (RI) of the human corneal stroma in vivo using an objective Abbé refractometer (VCH-1) and to determine if RI of the stroma is related to age. VCH-1 was used to measure RI at the central anterior stroma immediately after lifting the flap in neophyte patients preselected for laser in situ keratomileusis. Surgical procedures continued as preplanned after measuring the RI, and in binocular cases, measurements were taken from the right eye only. Corneal flaps were created using a femtosecond laser system. Mean RI (±SD, range) and age (±SD, range) values were 1.373 (±0.006, 1.358-1.385) and 36.55 (±12.26, 18-74). A significant linear correlation was found between age and RI. Least squares regression lines equating RI with age (x, years) were of the form: RI = 1.36911 + 0.000096x (r = +0.195; n = 115; P = 0.037). Mean RI (± SD) in the 2 age groups separated by the median age (≤34 and ≥35) were 1.371 (±0.007; n = 57) and 1.374 (±0.005; n = 58). The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.018). RI of the anterior stroma in vivo tends to be increased in older patients when the corneal flap is created using a femtosecond laser device.

  11. Residual corneal stroma in big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty: a histological study in eye-bank corneas.

    PubMed

    McKee, Hamish D; Irion, Luciane C D; Carley, Fiona M; Jhanji, Vishal; Brahma, Arun K

    2011-10-01

    To determine if residual corneal stroma remains on the recipient posterior lamella in big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK). Pneumodissection using the big-bubble technique was carried out on eye-bank corneas mounted on an artificial anterior chamber. Samples that had a successful big-bubble formation were sent for histological evaluation to determine if any residual stroma remained on the Descemet membrane (DM). Big-bubble formation was achieved in 32 donor corneas. Two distinct types of big-bubble were seen: the bubble had either a white margin (30 corneas) or a clear margin (two corneas). The posterior lamellae of all the white margin corneas showed residual stroma on DM with a mean central thickness of 7.0 μm (range 2.6-17.4 μm). The clear margin corneas showed no residual stroma on DM. It should no longer be assumed that big-bubble DALK, where the bubble has a white margin, routinely bares DM. True baring of DM may only occur with the less commonly seen clear margin bubble.

  12. Nuclear expression of FLT1 and its ligand PGF in FUS-DDIT3 carrying myxoid liposarcomas suggests the existence of an intracrine signaling loop.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mattias K; Göransson, Melker; Olofsson, Anita; Andersson, Carola; Aman, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The FUS-DDIT3 fusion oncogene encodes an abnormal transcription factor that has a causative role in the development of myxoid/round-cell liposarcomas (MLS/RCLS). We have previously identified FLT1 (VEGFR1) as a candidate downstream target gene of FUS-DDIT3. The aim of this study was to investigate expression of FLT1 and its ligands in MLS cells. HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells were transiently transfected with FUS-DDIT3-GFP variant constructs and FLT1 expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, FLT1, PGF, VEGFA and VEGFB expression was measured in MLS/RCLS cell lines, MLS/RCLS tumors and in normal adiopocytes. We analyzed nine cases of MLS/RCLS and one cell line xenografted in mice for FLT1 protein expression using immunohistochemistry. MLS/RCLS cell lines were also analyzed for FLT1 by immunofluorescence and western blot. MLS/RCLS cell lines were additionally treated with FLT1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and assayed for alterations in proliferation rate. FLT1 expression was dramatically increased in transfected cells stably expressing FUS-DDIT3 and present at high levels in cell lines derived from MLS. The FLT1 protein showed a strong nuclear expression in cells of MLS tissue as well as in cultured MLS cells, which was confirmed by cellular fractionation. Tissue array analysis showed a nuclear expression of the FLT1 protein also in several other tumor and normal cell types including normal adipocytes. The FLT1 ligand coding gene PGF was highly expressed in cultured MLS cells compared to normal adipocytes while the other ligand genes VEGFA and VEGFB were expressed to lower levels. A more heterogeneous expression pattern of these genes were observed in tumor samples. No changes in proliferation rate of MLS cells were detected at concentrations for which the kinase inhibitors have shown specific inhibition of FLT1. Our results imply that FLT1 is induced as an indirect downstream effect of FUS-DDIT3 expression in MLS. This could be a consequence

  13. Stroma Regulates Increased Epithelial Lateral Cell Adhesion in 3D Culture: A Role for Actin/Cadherin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Karen F.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Aziz, Naveed; O'Toole, Peter; Garrod, David; Lang, Shona H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cell shape and tissue architecture are controlled by changes to junctional proteins and the cytoskeleton. How tissues control the dynamics of adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is unclear. We have studied epithelial tissue architecture using 3D culture models and found that adult primary prostate epithelial cells grow into hollow acinus-like spheroids. Importantly, when co-cultured with stroma the epithelia show increased lateral cell adhesions. To investigate this mechanism further we aimed to: identify a cell line model to allow repeatable and robust experiments; determine whether or not epithelial adhesion molecules were affected by stromal culture; and determine which stromal signalling molecules may influence cell adhesion in 3D epithelial cell cultures. Methodology/Principal Findings The prostate cell line, BPH-1, showed increased lateral cell adhesion in response to stroma, when grown as 3D spheroids. Electron microscopy showed that 9.4% of lateral membranes were within 20 nm of each other and that this increased to 54% in the presence of stroma, after 7 days in culture. Stromal signalling did not influence E-cadherin or desmosome RNA or protein expression, but increased E-cadherin/actin co-localisation on the basolateral membranes, and decreased paracellular permeability. Microarray analysis identified several growth factors and pathways that were differentially expressed in stroma in response to 3D epithelial culture. The upregulated growth factors TGFβ2, CXCL12 and FGF10 were selected for further analysis because of previous associations with morphology. Small molecule inhibition of TGFβ2 signalling but not of CXCL12 and FGF10 signalling led to a decrease in actin and E-cadherin co-localisation and increased paracellular permeability. Conclusions/Significance In 3D culture models, paracrine stromal signals increase epithelial cell adhesion via adhesion/cytoskeleton interactions and TGFβ2-dependent mechanisms may play a key role. These

  14. The influence of age on the refractive index of the human corneal stroma resected using a mechanical microkeratome.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sudi; Alió, Jorge L; Amparo, Francisco; Rodriguez-Prats, Jose Luis

    2011-12-01

    To measure the refractive index (RI) of the human corneal stroma in vivo using an objective Abbé refractometer (VCH-1) and to determine if RI of the stroma is related to age. The VCH-1 was calibrated against a standard subjective Abbé refractometer using 7 randomly selected turbid semiliquid media. VCH-1 was used to measure RI at the central midstroma immediately after lifting the flap in neophyte patients preselected for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. Surgical procedures continued as preplanned after measuring the RI; in binocular cases, measurements were taken from the right eye only. Flaps were created using a mechanical microkeratome. The VCH-1 was capable of measuring the RIs of all 7 turbid semiliquid media. The average RMS difference between RI estimates according to the VCH-1 and standard subjective Abbé refractometer was 0.003. The mean RI (± SD) of the stroma was 1.369 (± 0.008; range, 1.356-1.390), and the mean age (± SD) of the subjects was 33.7 years (± 8.86; range, 18-56 years). A significant linear correlation was found between age and RI. Least squares regression lines equating RI with age (x, years) was of the form: RI = 1.35711 + 0.00034x (r = +0.383, n = 36, P = 0.011). RI of the stroma in vivo has a tendency to be increased in older patients when the stroma is resected using a mechanical microkeratome.

  15. Mechanoregulatory tumor-stroma crosstalk in pancreatic cancer: Measurements of the effects of extracellular matrix mechanics on tumor growth behavior, and vice-versa, to inform therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Jones, Dustin; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Cramer, Gwendolyn; Hanna, William; Caide, Andrew; Jafari, Seyedehrojin

    The rheological properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to play key roles in regulating tumor growth behavior through mechanotranduction pathways. The role of the mechanical microenvironment may be particularly important tumors of the pancreas, noted for an abundance of rigid fibrotic stroma, implicated in therapeutic resistance. At the same time, cancer cells and their stromal partners (e.g. tumor associated fibroblasts) continually alter the mechanical microenvironment in response to extracellular physical and biochemical cues as part of a two-way mechanoregulatory dialog. Here, we describe experimental studies using 3D pancreatic cell cultures with customized mechanical properties, combined with optical microrheology to provide insight into tumor-driven matrix remodeling. Quantitative microscopy provides measurements of phenotypic changes accompanying systematic variation of ECM composition in collagen and laminin-rich basement membrane admixtures, while analysis of the trajectories of passive tracer particles embedded in ECM report dynamic changes in heterogeneity, microstructure and local shear modulus accompanying both ECM stiffening (fibrosis) processes, and ECM degradation near invading cells. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Cancer Institute, R00CA155045 (PI: Celli).

  16. NSE abundance data

    SciTech Connect

    Odrzywolek, Andrzej

    2012-07-15

    A novel method of calculating nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is presented. Basic equations are carefully solved using arbitrary precision arithmetic. A special interpolation procedure is then used to retrieve all abundances using tabulated results for neutrons and protons, together with basic nuclear data. Proton and neutron abundance tables, basic nuclear data, and partition functions for nuclides used in the calculations are provided. A simple interpolation algorithm using pre-calculated p and n abundances tabulated as functions of kT, {rho} and Y{sub e} is outlined. Unique properties of this method are: (1) ability to pick up out of NSE selected nuclei only, (2) computational time scaling linearly with number of re-calculated abundances, (3) relatively small amount of stored data: only two large tables, (4) slightly faster than solving the NSE equations using traditional Newton-Raphson methods for small networks (few tens of species); superior for huge (800-3000) networks, (5) does not require initial guess; works well on random input, (6) can be tailored to specific application, (7) ability to use third-party NSE solvers to obtain fully compatible tables, and (8) encapsulation of the NSE code for bug-free calculations. A range of applications for this approach is possible: covering tests of traditional NSE Newton-Raphson codes, generating starting values, code-to-code verification, and possible replacement of the old legacy procedures in supernova simulations.

  17. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  18. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer or "battery-operated tumor growth": A simple solution to the autophagy paradox.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Chiavarina, Barbara; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casey, Trimmer; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Balliet, Renee; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Lin, Zhao; Caro, Jaime; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-11-01

    The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial. Both autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine) and autophagy promoters (rapamycin) block tumorigenesis by unknown mechanism(s). This is called the "Autophagy Paradox". We have recently reported a simple solution to this paradox. We demonstrated that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative stress to induce autophagy in the tumor microenvironment. As a consequence, the autophagic tumor stroma generates recycled nutrients that can then be used as chemical building blocks by anabolic epithelial cancer cells. This model results in a net energy transfer from the tumor stroma to epithelial cancer cells (an energy imbalance), thereby promoting tumor growth. This net energy transfer is both unilateral and vectorial, from the tumor stroma to the epithelial cancer cells, representing a true host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new paradigm "The Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Cell Metabolism" or "Battery-Operated Tumor Growth". In this sense, autophagy in the tumor stroma serves as a "battery" to fuel tumor growth, progression and metastasis, independently of angiogenesis. Using this model, the systemic induction of autophagy will prevent epithelial cancer cells from using recycled nutrients, while the systemic inhibiton of autophagy will prevent stromal cells from producing recycled nutrients-both effectively "starving" cancer cells. We discuss the idea that tumor cells could become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the upregulation of natural endogenous autophagy inhibitors in cancer cells. Alternatively, tumor cells could also become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the genetic silencing/deletion of pro-autophagic molecules, such as Beclin1. If autophagy resistance develops in cancer cells, then the systemic inhibition of autophagy would provide a therapeutic solution to this type of drug resistance, as it would still target autophagy in the tumor stroma. As such, an

  19. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Lan, L; Sennett, C; Giger, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  20. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymeric films as a corneal stroma substitute

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Sahar; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Barneh, Farnaz; Moshayedi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biodegradable elastomeric materials such as poly glycerol sebacate (PGS) have gained much current attention in the field of soft tissue engineering. The present study reports the synthesis of PGS with molar ratios of 1:1, 2:3, and 3:2 of glycerol and sebacic acid via polycondensation reaction and tests the effect of PGS on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells viability in vitro. Materials and Methods: PGS films were prepared by the casting method. We tried to fabricate PGS with different compositions and various properties as being a viable alternative to the corneal stroma in cornea tissue engineering. The chemical properties of the prepared polymer were investigated by means of attenuated total reflectance – Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis and the in vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by the Alamarblue method. Results: The functional groups observed in the PGS FTIR spectrums of PGS with various molar ratios were the same. However, the main difference was the time of completing the cross-linking reaction. The PGS prepared by 2:3 ratio as a molar ratio had the fastest and the 3:2 ratio had the lowest cross-linking rate because of the higher amount of sebacic acid. Results of the Alamarblue cytotoxicity test assay showed no deleterious effect on HCE cell viability and proliferation. Conclusions: PGS is a potentially good candidate material for corneal tissue engineering because of its lack of in vitro HCE cell toxicity. PMID:25625115

  2. Cancer stem cell niche models and contribution by mesenchymal stroma/stem cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; von der Ohe, Juliane; Lehnert, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Hass, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    The initiation and progression of malignant tumors is driven by distinct subsets of tumor-initiating or cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) which develop therapy/apoptosis resistance and self-renewal capacity. In order to be able to eradicate these CSCs with novel classes of anti-cancer therapeutics, a better understanding of their biology and clinically-relevant traits is mandatory. Several requirements and functions of a CSC niche physiology are combined with current concepts for CSC generation such as development in a hierarchical tumor model, by stochastic processes, or via a retrodifferentiation program. Moreover, progressive adaptation of endothelial cells and recruited immune and stromal cells to the tumor site substantially contribute to generate a tumor growth-permissive environment resembling a CSC niche. Particular emphasis is put on the pivotal role of multipotent mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSCs) in supporting CSC development by various kinds of interaction and cell fusion to form hybrid tumor cells. A better knowledge of CSC niche physiology may increase the chances that cancer stemness-depleting interventions ultimately result in arrest of tumor growth and metastasis.

  3. Radiation-enhanced therapeutic targeting of galectin-1 enriched malignant stroma in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jyoti, Amar; Johnson, Sara E.; Swindell, Elden P.; Napier, Dana; Sethi, Pallavi; Chan, Ryan; Feddock, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Heidi L.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Mark Evers, B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are no FDA approved targeted therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). Ongoing clinical trials for TNBC have focused primarily on targeting the epithelial cancer cells. However, targeted delivery of cytotoxic payloads to the non-transformed tumor associated-endothelium can prove to be an alternate approach that is currently unexplored. The present study is supported by recent findings on elevated expression of stromal galectin-1 in clinical samples of TNBC and our ongoing findings on stromal targeting of radiation induced galectin-1 by the anginex-conjugated arsenic-cisplatin loaded liposomes using a novel murine tumor model. We demonstrate inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in response to the multimodal nanotherapeutic strategy using a TNBC model with orthotopic tumors originating from 3D tumor tissue analogs (TTA) comprised of tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The ‘rigorous’ combined treatment regimen of radiation and targeted liposomes is also shown to be well tolerated. More importantly, the results presented provide a means to exploit clinically relevant radiation dose for concurrent receptor mediated enhanced delivery of chemotherapy while limiting overall toxicity. The proposed study is significant as it falls in line with developing combinatorial therapeutic approaches for stroma-directed tumor targeting using tumor models that have an appropriate representation of the TNBC microenvironment. PMID:27223428

  4. A morphometric study of the human endometrial stroma during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Dockery, P; Warren, M A; Li, T C; Rogers, A W; Cooke, I D; Mundy, J

    1990-02-01

    In this study we have examined the human endometrial stromal cell population in well-timed biopsies during the peri-implantation period, using traditional stereological techniques. This paper reports data obtained from 16 women of known fertility who underwent endometrial biopsies at known times after the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (four each at LH + 2, LH + 4, LH + 6 and LH + 8). The average stromal cell nuclear diameter increased in size throughout the period of study (P less than 0.01), with a significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in the nuclear profile axial ratio. This suggests that the nuclei were increasing in size and becoming more rounded. There was a dramatic increase (P less than 0.01) in the packing density between LH + 2 and LH + 6; this is likely to be due, at least in part, to the glands filling up with secretory products and so compressing the intervening stroma. A substantial decrease (P less than 0.01) was seen in the packing density between LH + 6 and LH + 8. This corresponds to the time when stromal oedema is thought to be maximal.

  5. A morphometric study of the human endometrial stroma during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Dockery, P; Warren, M A; Li, T C; Rogers, A W; Cooke, I D; Mundy, J

    1990-07-01

    In this study we have examined the human endometrial stromal cell population in well-timed biopsies during the peri-implantation period, using traditional stereological techniques. This paper reports data obtained from 16 women of known fertility who underwent endometrial biopsies at known times after the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (four each at LH + 2, LH + 4, LH + 6 and LH + 8). The average stromal cell nuclear diameter increased in size throughout the period of study (P less than 0.01), with a significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in the nuclear profile axial ratio. This suggests that the nuclei were increasing in size and becoming more rounded. There was a dramatic increase (P less than 0.01) in the rounded. There was a dramatic increase (P less than 0.01) in the packing density between LH + 2 and LH + 6; this is likely to be due, at least in part, to the glands filling up with secretory products and so compressing the intervening stroma. A substantial decrease (P less than 0.01) was seen in the packing density between LH + 6 and LH + 8. This corresponds to the time when stromal oedema is thought to be maximal.

  6. Cellular changes in the prostatic stroma of glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, D L; Rafacho, A; Bosqueiro, J R; Taboga, S R; Góes, R M

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) have been widely used for the treatment of prostate cancer because of their inhibitory property against tumour growth. However, their mechanism of action in the prostate has received little attention. Excess GCs can lead to peripheral insulin resistance resulting in hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. Insulin plays an important role as a cellular stimulant and high levels are related to low levels of androgens. Our objective has been to describe the effects of insulin resistance induced by dexamethasone treatment on the morphology of rat ventral prostate. Male adult Wistar rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone or saline for five consecutive days after which the rats were killed and the ventral prostate was removed, weighed and prepared for conventional and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dexamethasone treatment resulted in atrophy and decreased proliferative activity of prostatic epithelial cells. TEM analysis revealed changes in the epithelium-stroma interface, with some interruptions in the basement membrane. Fibroblasts showed a secretory phenotype with dilated endoplasmic reticulum. Smooth muscle cells exhibited a contractile pattern with 50% atrophy, an irregular membrane and twisted nuclei. Mitochondrial alterations, such as enlarged size and high electron density in the mitochondrial matrix, were also detected in smooth muscle cells. Insulin resistance induced by dexamethasone is thus associated with epithelial atrophy similar to that described for diabetic rats. However, GCs are responsible for morphological changes in the stromal cell population suggesting the activation of fibroblasts and atrophy of the smooth muscle cells.

  7. Stroma-derived HGF drives metabolic adaptation of colorectal cancer to angiogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mira, Alessia; Morello, Virginia; Céspedes, Maria Virtudes; Perera, Timothy; Comoglio, Paolo M; Mangues, Ramon; Michieli, Paolo

    2017-06-13

    The role of paracrine Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) in the resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors (AIs) is hidden in xenograft models because mouse HGF fails to fully activate human MET. To uncover it, we compared the efficacy of AIs in wild-type and human HGF knock-in SCID mice bearing orthotopic human colorectal tumors. Species-specific HGF/MET signaling dramatically impaired the response to anti-angiogenic agents and boosted metastatic dissemination. In cell-based assays mimicking the consequences of anti-angiogenic therapy, colorectal cancer cells were completely resistant to hypoxia but extremely sensitive to nutrient deprivation. Starvation-induced apoptosis could be prevented by HGF, which promoted GLUT1-mediated glucose uptake, sustained glycolysis and activated autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition of GLUT1 in the presence of glucose killed tumor cells as effectively as glucose deprivation, and this effect was antagonized by HGF. Concomitant targeting of GLUT1 and HGF potently suppressed growth and dissemination of AI-resistant human tumors in human HGF knock-in SCID mice without exacerbating tumor hypoxia. These data suggest that stroma-derived HGF protects CRC cells against glucose starvation-induced apoptosis, promoting resistance to both AIs and anti-glycolytic agents. Combined inhibition of glucose metabolism and HGF/MET signaling ('anti-METabolic therapy') may represent a more effective CRC treatment compared to utterly blocking tumor blood supply.

  8. Stroma-derived HGF drives metabolic adaptation of colorectal cancer to angiogenesis inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Alessia; Morello, Virginia; Céspedes, Maria Virtudes; Perera, Timothy; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Mangues, Ramon; Michieli, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The role of paracrine Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) in the resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors (AIs) is hidden in xenograft models because mouse HGF fails to fully activate human MET. To uncover it, we compared the efficacy of AIs in wild-type and human HGF knock-in SCID mice bearing orthotopic human colorectal tumors. Species-specific HGF/MET signaling dramatically impaired the response to anti-angiogenic agents and boosted metastatic dissemination. In cell-based assays mimicking the consequences of anti-angiogenic therapy, colorectal cancer cells were completely resistant to hypoxia but extremely sensitive to nutrient deprivation. Starvation-induced apoptosis could be prevented by HGF, which promoted GLUT1-mediated glucose uptake, sustained glycolysis and activated autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition of GLUT1 in the presence of glucose killed tumor cells as effectively as glucose deprivation, and this effect was antagonized by HGF. Concomitant targeting of GLUT1 and HGF potently suppressed growth and dissemination of AI-resistant human tumors in human HGF knock-in SCID mice without exacerbating tumor hypoxia. These data suggest that stroma-derived HGF protects CRC cells against glucose starvation-induced apoptosis, promoting resistance to both AIs and anti-glycolytic agents. Combined inhibition of glucose metabolism and HGF/MET signaling (‘anti-METabolic therapy’) may represent a more effective CRC treatment compared to utterly blocking tumor blood supply. PMID:28445144

  9. Hyaluronan in Peritumoral Stroma and Malignant Cells Associates with Breast Cancer Spreading and Predicts Survival

    PubMed Central

    Auvinen, Päivi; Tammi, Raija; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Tammi, Markku; Ågren, Ulla; Johansson, Risto; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Eskelinen, Matti; Kosma, Veli-Matti

    2000-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix polysaccharide that promotes cell migration through its cell surface receptors and by effecting changes in the physical environment. HA expression is frequently increased in malignant tumors, whereas its association with the invasive potential and patient outcome in breast cancer has not been reported. The localization and signal intensity of HA was analyzed in 143 paraffin-embedded tumor samples of human breast carcinoma using a biotinylated HA-specific probe. In the immediate peritumoral stroma, HA signal was moderately or strongly increased in 39% and 56% of the cases, respectively. Normal ductal epithelium showed no HA, whereas in 57% of the tumors at least some of the carcinoma cells were HA positive. The intensity of the stromal HA signal and the presence of cell-associated HA were both significantly related to poor differentiation of the tumors, axillary lymph node positivity, and short overall survival of the patients. In Cox’s multivariate analysis, both the intensity of stromal HA signal alone and that combined with the HA positivity in tumor cells were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. These results suggest that HA is directly involved in the spreading of breast cancer and may offer a potential target for new therapies. PMID:10666382

  10. Irreversible optical clearing of rabbit dermis for autogenic corneal stroma transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Shi, Dong; Kubota, Akira; Takano, Yoshimasa; Fuse, Nobuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Nishida, Kohji

    2011-10-01

    Tissue engineering and transplantation of autogenic grafts have been widely investigated for solving problems on current allograft treatments (i.g., donor shortage and rejection). However, it is difficult to obtain an autogenic corneal stromal replacement that is composed of transparent, tough, and thick collagen constructs by current cell culture-based tissue engineering. Aim of this study is to develop transparent dermis for an autogenic corneal stroma transplantation. This study examined dehydration at 4-8°C and carbodiimide cross-linking on cloudy rabbit dermis (approx. 1.8%-3.8% light transmittance at 550 nm) for dermis optical clearing. Transparency of dehydrated rabbit dermis was founded to be approx. 37.9%-41.4% at 550 nm. Additional cross-linking treatment on dehydrated dermis prevented from swelling and clouding in saline, and improved its transparency to be 56.9% at 550 nm. Rabbit corneal epithelium was found to regenerate on optically cleared dermis in vitro. Furthermore, no abnormal biological response (i.e., inflammation, vascularization, and the barrier defect of epithelia) or no optical functional change on optically cleared dermis was observed during its 4-week autogenic transplantation into rabbit corneal stromal pocket.

  11. Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy of thin films and ultrafast thermalization in corneal stroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, George Alexander

    2005-07-01

    The mid-IR spectral region is of great spectroscopic interest as it corresponds to the energy scales associated with vibrational absorption resonances in molecules. Using the ultrafast mid-IR laser sources at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center, we have pursued two distinct research projects. In one project, we have extended the techniques of cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), an ultrasensitive linear absorption spectroscopy technique, to the study of condensed matter systems, in the form of thin films. We have compared two different approaches to thin-film CRDS: normal incidence coupled-cavity CRDS and Brewster's angle CRDS. Additionally, we demonstrated the viability of thin film CRDS as a calibrated ultrasensitve absorption measurement technique. In order to overcome the absorption sensitivity limitations imposed by poor optical throughput in CRDS, we have developed and demonstrated two throughput enhancement techniques, cavity-enhancement and pulse-stacking. In the second project, we have developed a two-color mid-IR pump mid-IR probe technique for studying ultrafast temperature changes in the components of biological tissue. We have made measurements that establish the use of transient absorption as an ultrafast thermometer in both water and protein. We have used this method to measure the thermalization between the constituents of corneal stroma in order to examine the assumptions underlying the differential heating model of pulsed mid-IR ablation of soft tissue.

  12. Epithelialization of mouse ovarian tumor cells originating in the fallopian tube stroma

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Choi, Pui-Wah; Trachtenberg, Alexander J.; Ng, Allen C.; Kuo, Winston P.; Ng, Shu-Kay; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancer and is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. Recent studies have suggested that fallopian tube fimbriae can be the origin of cells for high-grade serous subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). A mouse HGSOC model with conditional Dicer-Pten double knockout (Dicer-Pten DKO) developed primary tumors, intriguingly, from the fallopian tube stroma. We examined the growth and epithelial phenotypes of the Dicer-Pten DKO mouse tumor cells contributable by each gene knockout. Unlike human ovarian epithelial cancer cells that expressed full-length E-cadherin, the Dicer-Pten DKO stromal tumor cells expressed cleaved E-cadherin fragments and metalloproteinase 2, a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Although the Dicer-Pten DKO tumor cells lost the expression of mature microRNAs as expected, they showed high levels of tRNA fragment expression and enhanced AKT activation due to the loss of PTEN function. Introduction of a Dicer1-expressing construct into the DKO mouse tumor cells significantly reduced DNA synthesis and the cell growth rate, with concurrent diminished adhesion and ZO1 epithelial staining. Hence, it is likely that the loss of Dicer promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition in fallopian tube stromal cells, and in conjunction with Pten loss, further promoted cell proliferation and epithelial-like tumorigenesis. PMID:27602775

  13. Human adipose derived stroma/stem cells grow in serum-free medium as floating spheres.

    PubMed

    Dromard, C; Bourin, P; André, M; De Barros, S; Casteilla, L; Planat-Benard, V

    2011-04-01

    With the goal of obtaining clinically safe human adipose-derived stroma/stem cells (ASC) and eliminating the use of serum, we have developed a new culture system that allows the expansion of ASC as spheres in a defined medium. These spheres can be passaged several times. They are not only aggregated cells but rather originate from single cells as clonal spheres can be obtained after seeding at very low density and reform clonal spheres after dissociation. These spheres can also revert to monolayer growth when plated in medium containing human plasma and even generate fibroblast-like colonies (CFU-f). Under several differentiation-specific media, spheres-derived ASC maintain their capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes. These results indicate that human ASC can be maintained in a serum-free 3D culture system, which is of great interest for the expansion in bioreactors of autologous ASC and their use in clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Local lymphocytes and nitric oxide synthase in the uterine cervical stroma of patients with grade III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cléber Sergioda da; Michelin, Marcia Antoniazi; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2010-06-01

    Precancerous and cancerous cells can trigger an immune response that may limit tumor development and can be used as a prognostic marker. The aims of the present study were to quantify the presence of B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the cervical stroma of women with grade III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN III) or in the intratumoral and peritumoral tissue of women with stage I invasive carcinoma. Cervical tissue specimens were obtained from 60 women (20 each from control tissues, CIN III and invasive carcinomas). The average ages in the control, CIN III and invasive groups were 43.9 (+/- 4.3), 35.5 (+/- 9.5), and 50 (+/- 11.2) years, respectively. The specimens were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to identify T lymphocytes (CD3), cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8), B lymphocytes (CD20), macrophages (CD68) and iNOS. We evaluated the markers in the stroma above the squamocolumnar junction (control), at the intraepithelial lesion (CIN cases), and in the infiltrating tumor. Two independent observers performed the immunohistochemical analysis. T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, macrophages and iNOS were present more frequently (P<0.05) in the stroma of peritumoral invasive tumors compared to the controls and intratumoral invasive cancer samples. CD3+ and CD20+ lymphocytes were present more frequently in CIN III patients compared to samples from patients with intratumoral invasive cancer (P<0.05). High numbers of T and B lymphocytes, macrophages and iNOS-expressing cells in the peritumoral stroma of the invasive tumors were observed. Cell migration appeared to be proportional to the progression of the lesion.

  15. Local Lymphocytes and Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Uterine Cervical Stroma of Patients with Grade III Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cléber Sergioda; Michelin, Marcia Antoniazi; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Precancerous and cancerous cells can trigger an immune response that may limit tumor development and can be used as a prognostic marker. The aims of the present study were to quantify the presence of B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the cervical stroma of women with grade III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN III) or in the intratumoral and peritumoral tissue of women with stage I invasive carcinoma. METHODS: Cervical tissue specimens were obtained from 60 women (20 each from control tissues, CIN III and invasive carcinomas). The average ages in the control, CIN III and invasive groups were 43.9 (± 4.3), 35.5 (± 9.5), and 50 (± 11.2) years, respectively. The specimens were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to identify T lymphocytes (CD3), cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8), B lymphocytes (CD20), macrophages (CD68) and iNOS. We evaluated the markers in the stroma above the squamocolumnar junction (control), at the intraepithelial lesion (CIN cases), and in the nfiltrating tumor. Two independent observers performed the immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, macrophages and iNOS were present more frequently (P<0.05) in the stroma of peritumoral invasive tumors compared to the controls and intratumoral invasive cancer samples. CD3+ and CD20+ lymphocytes were present more frequently in CIN III patients compared to samples from patients with intratumoral invasive cancer (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: High numbers of T and B lymphocytes, macrophages and iNOS-expressing cells in the peritumoral stroma of the invasive tumors were observed. Cell migration appeared to be proportional to the progression of the lesion. PMID:20613932

  16. The membrane proteome of stroma thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana studied by successive in-solution and in-gel digestion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lan; Vener, Alexander V; Spetea, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    From individual localization and large-scale proteomic studies, we know that stroma-exposed thylakoid membranes harbor part of the machinery performing the light-dependent photosynthetic reactions. The minor components of the stroma thylakoid proteome, regulating and maintaining the photosynthetic machinery, are in the process of being unraveled. In this study, we developed in-solution and in-gel proteolytic digestion methods, and used them to identify minor membrane proteins, e.g. transporters, in stroma thylakoids prepared from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Columbia-0 leaves. In-solution digestion with chymotrypsin yielded the largest number of peptides, but in combination with methanol extraction resulted in identification of the largest number of membrane proteins. Although less efficient in extracting peptides, in-gel digestion with trypsin and chymotrypsin led to identification of additional proteins. We identified a total of 58 proteins including 44 membrane proteins. Almost half are known thylakoid proteins with roles in photosynthetic light reactions, proteolysis and import. The other half, including many transporters, are not known as chloroplast proteins, because they have been either curated (manually assigned) to other cellular compartments or not curated at all at the plastid protein databases. Transporters include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, transporters for K(+) and other cations. Other proteins either have a role in processes probably linked to photosynthesis, namely translation, metabolism, stress and signaling or are contaminants. Our results indicate that all these proteins are present in stroma thylakoids; however, individual studies are required to validate their location and putative roles. This study also provides strategies complementary to traditional methods for identification of membrane proteins from other cellular compartments. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. Regulation of Leukocyte Infiltration into Ovarian Cancer by Tumour-Stroma Interactions: A Microarray View of Cancer Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    HEPPES, supplemented with Insulin, Transferin, Albumin, and Selenium from SIGMA®). After 48 hours, epithelial cells from 80% confluence are...microarray data from hundreds of tumor specimens ( Lamb et al., 2003). For this analysis we used the co-culture responsive gene list described in supplement...exclusive in the stroma of breast carcinomas. Nat Genet 32, 355-357. Lamb , J., Ramaswamy, S., Ford, H. L., Contreras, B., Martinez, R. V., Kittrell

  18. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  19. PD-L1/PD-1 check-point in gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma case report with immunochemical study.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, Anna; Taffon, Chiara; Donati, Michele; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Valeri, Sergio; Coppola, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma is an unusual type of gastric tumor associated with a better prognosis than typical gastric carcinomas. The hallmark of this cancer is a prominent lymphoid infiltration of the stroma that represents an intense host lymphocytic response. The programmed death 1-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) axis has recently emerged as a master immune checkpoint that controls antitumor immune responses against many neoplasms. We report the case of a male patient with gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma with a large mass infiltrating the gastric wall without nodal metastasis. He is alive without disease 10 months after surgery. We focused the study on factors that potentially modulate the prognosis. In this setting we demonstrate, for the first time in this type of tumor, by immunohistochemistry a strong PD-L1 expression in neoplastic cell and the presence of PD-1 positive infiltrating lymphocytes. The applied approach may contribute to the knowledge about host reaction in such tumor and it may also be used for tumor precise identification on the endoscopic biopsy time before excision surgery.

  20. Functional units in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri, Richardson) liver: III. Morphometric analysis of parenchyma, stroma, and component cell types.

    PubMed

    Hampton, J A; Lantz, R C; Hinton, D E

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic stroma and parenchyma with its component cell types were quantitatively described in adult male and female actively-spawning 5-year-old rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri, Richardson). Point-count morphometry of glycol methacrylate sections estimated volume compartments for stroma and parenchyma. Veins composed 85% of the stroma while arteries and bile ducts occupied approximately 6-7% each. Parenchyma accounted for 95% of hepatic volume. Point-count morphometry of transmission electron micrographs estimated volume compartments as well as numerical and surface density measurements for parenchymal components. Within the hepatic parenchymal compartment, hepatocytes occupied 85% and showed significant sex differences. Female hepatocytes were significantly more numerous but were smaller, only 60% of the volume of male hepatocytes. Since hepatocyte nuclear volume was equal in both sexes, differences were due to reduced cytoplasmic volume in females. Perisinusoidal macrophages of females occupied larger volumes of their respective parenchymal compartments, and their larger mean cytoplasmic volumes suggested activation. Biliary epithelial cells of preductules and ductules were numerous. Ratios of numerical density of hepatocytes to biliary epithelial cells were consistent with a tubular arrangement of hepatocytes. Factors possibly mediating the sexual dimorphism are discussed.

  1. PD-L1/PD-1 check-point in gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma case report with immunochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzi, Anna; Taffon, Chiara; Donati, Michele; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Valeri, Sergio; Coppola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma is an unusual type of gastric tumor associated with a better prognosis than typical gastric carcinomas. The hallmark of this cancer is a prominent lymphoid infiltration of the stroma that represents an intense host lymphocytic response. The programmed death 1–programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) axis has recently emerged as a master immune checkpoint that controls antitumor immune responses against many neoplasms. Patient's concerns case study and outcome: We report the case of a male patient with gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma with a large mass infiltrating the gastric wall without nodal metastasis. He is alive without disease 10 months after surgery. We focused the study on factors that potentially modulate the prognosis. In this setting we demonstrate, for the first time in this type of tumor, by immunohistochemistry a strong PD-L1 expression in neoplastic cell and the presence of PD-1 positive infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusion: The applied approach may contribute to the knowledge about host reaction in such tumor and it may also be used for tumor precise identification on the endoscopic biopsy time before excision surgery. PMID:28207501

  2. Micro-RNA-21 regulates TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation by targeting PDCD4 in tumor-stroma interaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qin; Cao, Siyu; Li, Chun; Mengesha, Asferd; Kong, Beihua; Wei, Mingqian

    2011-04-15

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) induces stromal fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transdifferentiation in the tumor-stroma interactive microenvironment via modulation of multiple phenotypic and functional genes, which plays a critical role in tumor progression. Up to now, the involvement of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and their roles in TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation in tumor-stroma interaction are unclear. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that the expression of micro-RNA-21 (miR-21) was upregulated in activated fibroblasts after treatment with TGF-β1 or conditioned medium from cancer cells. To determine the potential roles of miR-21 in TGF-β1-mediated gene regulation during myofibroblast conversion, we showed that miR-21 expression was downregulated by miR-21 inhibitor and upregulated by miR-21 mimic. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-21 with the inhibitor effectively inhibited TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation while upregulation of miR-21 with a mimic significantly promoted myofibroblast differentiation. We further demonstrated that MiR-21 directly targeted and downregulated programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) gene, which in turn acted as a negative regulator of several phenotypic and functional genes of myofibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggested that miR-21 participated in TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation in cancer stroma by targeting PDCD4.

  3. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  4. JNK1 stress signaling is hyper-activated in high breast density and the tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Michael P; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Pavlides, Stephanos; Reeves, Kimberley Jayne; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Chadwick, Amy L; Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Lamb, Rebecca; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica

    2014-01-01

    myofibroblasts and macrophages, to create and maintain a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment. Finally, comparisons between the HD fibroblast gene signature and breast cancer tumor stroma revealed that JNK1 stress signaling is the single most significant biological process that is shared between these 2 data sets (with P values between 5.40E-09 and 1.02E-14), and is specifically associated with tumor recurrence. These results implicate “stromal JNK1 signaling” in the pathogenesis of human breast cancers and the transition to malignancy. Augmented TGF-β signaling also emerged as a common feature linking high breast density with tumor stroma and breast cancer recurrence (P = 5.23E-05). Similarities between the HD fibroblast gene signature, wound healing, and the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype were also noted. Thus, this unbiased informatics analysis of high breast density provides a novel framework for additional experimental exploration and new hypothesis-driven breast cancer research, with a focus on cancer prevention and personalized medicine. PMID:24434780

  5. Stroma-conditioned media improve expansion of human primitive hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Breems, D A; Blokland, E A; Ploemacher, R E

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported that stroma-dependent cultures support proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In order to investigate the effect of soluble stromal factors, we developed short-term serum-low liquid cultures in which the effect of stroma-conditioned media (SCM) from the murine FBMD-1, and human L87/4 and L88/5 cell lines was studied on the maintenance and expansion of various human HSC subsets in CD34-positive selected mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from autologous transplants of lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients. The human cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay was employed to determine the frequencies of both the CAFC weeks 2 to 4 as tentative indicators of progenitor and transiently repopulating HSC, and the more primitive CAFC weeks 6 to 8 as indicators of long-term repopulating HSC. In 7-day liquid cultures containing interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF) and IL-6, we recovered 3.0-fold more colony-forming cells (CFC) and 1.7- to 1.9-fold more CAFC weeks 2 and 4. The absolute number of primitive CAFC weeks 6 and 8 were only maintained (1.1- to 1.4-fold) in these liquid cultures. This modest expansion was significantly improved by the addition of SCM from the FBMD-1, L87/4 or L88/5 cell lines. Output CFC numbers were 6.8-, 5.8- and 9.9-fold higher, respectively, than the input values, while absolute CAFC week 2 to 4 numbers were 4.5-, 10.2- and 10.2-fold expanded, respectively. The addition of SCM also improved expansion of the more primitive CAFC week 6 to 8 stem cell subsets by 2.2-, 4.5- and 4.9-fold, respectively. The addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), IL-1beta, IL-11 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha to cultures containing IL-3, SCF and IL-6 could not explain the SCM effect and in all these combinations SCM addition further increased the recovery of HSC subsets. Similarly, addition of anti-cytokine antibodies (ie alpha-G-CSF, alpha-GM-CSF, alpha

  6. Colon cancer molecular subtypes identified by expression profiling and associated to stroma, mucinous type and different clinical behavior

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colon cancer patients with the same stage show diverse clinical behavior due to tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to discover distinct classes of tumors based on microarray expression patterns, to analyze whether the molecular classification correlated with the histopathological stages or other clinical parameters and to study differences in the survival. Methods Hierarchical clustering was performed for class discovery in 88 colon tumors (stages I to IV). Pathways analysis and correlations between clinical parameters and our classification were analyzed. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the main subtype was generated using the 3-Nearest-Neighbor method. Coincidences with other prognostic predictors were assesed. Results Hierarchical clustering identified four robust tumor subtypes with biologically and clinically distinct behavior. Stromal components (p < 0.001), nuclear β-catenin (p = 0.021), mucinous histology (p = 0.001), microsatellite-instability (p = 0.039) and BRAF mutations (p < 0.001) were associated to this classification but it was independent of Dukes stages (p = 0.646). Molecular subtypes were established from stage I. High-stroma-subtype showed increased levels of genes and altered pathways distinctive of tumour-associated-stroma and components of the extracellular matrix in contrast to Low-stroma-subtype. Mucinous-subtype was reflected by the increased expression of trefoil factors and mucins as well as by a higher proportion of MSI and BRAF mutations. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the Low-stroma-subtype distinguished low risk patients from high risk patients in the external cohort (Dukes B and C:HR = 8.56(2.53-29.01); Dukes B,C and D:HR = 1.87(1.07-3.25)). Eight different reported survival gene signatures segregated our tumors into two groups the Low-stroma-subtype and

  7. Multi-parametric MR imaging of the anterior fibromuscular stroma and its differentiation from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward, Emily; Baad, Michael; Peng, Yahui; Yousuf, Ambereen; Wang, Shiyang; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-03-01

    To describe MP-MRI features of the normal anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFMS) and identify MR imaging findings that can differentiate it from anterior prostate cancer. We reviewed MP-MR images and histopathology of patients who underwent pre-operative MRI and prostatectomy between October 2012 and August 2014. Thirty-seven patients with anterior prostate cancer larger than 5 mm and 40 patients with no anterior cancer were included in this study. After correlation with histology and MR images, the size, symmetry, T2, DWI characteristics, and enhancement pattern of normal AFMS and anterior prostate cancer were compared. Normal AFMS was hypointense and symmetric on T2-weighted images (37/40, 93%), whereas anterior prostate cancers, while also hypointense on T2-weighted images, were predominantly asymmetric (6/37, 16%) (P < 0.001). On high b-value DWI, AFMS was predominantly hypointense (36/40, 90%), whereas anterior prostate cancers were predominantly hyperintense (30/37, 81%) compared to the normal peripheral zone (P < 0.001). The mean ADC and tenth percentile ADC values of anterior prostate cancers were lower than normal AFMS (7.14 vs. 8.33 (10(-4) mm(2)/s), P < 0.01) and (5.73 vs. 6.95 (10(-4) mm(2)/s), P < 0.01), respectively. On DCE-MR images, AFMS demonstrated a type 1 enhancement curve (35/39, 90%), whereas anterior prostate cancers demonstrated only either a type 3 (23/37, 62%) or type 2 enhancement curve (14/37, 38%) (P < 0.001). Symmetric T2 appearance, hypointense high b-value DWI signal, relatively higher ADC values, and Type 1 enhancement pattern of the AFMS can be helpful in its differentiation from anterior prostate cancers.

  8. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  9. Proteomic analysis of patient tissue reveals PSA protein in the stroma of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Katherine J.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E.; Parwani, Anil V.; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Graham, Lara; Hrebinko, Katherine; Acquafondata, Marie; Stewart, Nicolas A.; Nelson, Joel B.; Yoshimura, Naoki; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease frequently associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) that involves hyperplasia of both epithelial and stromal cells. Stromal fibrosis is a distinctive feature of BPH, but the exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. METHODS In the current study, proteomics analyses were utilized to identify proteins altered in the BPH stromal compartment from patients with symptomatic BPH. Stromal cells were isolated from histological nodules of BPH by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and subjected to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. RESULTS Proteins identified included several stromal-specific proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, focal adhesion and cellular junctions. Additionally, the proteomics array identified the presence of luminal epithelial secretory protein PSA. Immunostaining, ELISA, and in situ hybridization analyses of BPH tissues verified the presence of PSA protein but absence of PSA mRNA in the stromal compartment. E-cadherin was down-regulated in BPH epithelial cells compared to normal adjacent tissues, suggesting that alteration of cellular junctions could contribute to the presence of luminal epithelial secreted proteins PSA and KLK2 in the stromal compartment. CONCLUSIONS The above findings suggest that the presence of secreted proteins PSA and KLK2 from prostate luminal epithelial cells in BPH stroma is a hallmark of BPH nodules which could in part be due to alterations in cellular junction proteins and/or increased epithelial barrier permeability. Elucidating the cause and consequence of these secreted proteins in the stromal compartment of BPH may lead to new understanding of BPH pathogenesis as well as approaches to prevent and/or treat this common disease. PMID:24711254

  10. Unique metabolic features of pancreatic cancer stroma: relevance to the tumor compartment, prognosis, and invasive potential

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Erik S.; Balaji, Uthra; Freinkman, Elizaveta; McCue, Peter; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis. The aggressiveness and therapeutic recalcitrance of this malignancy has been attributed to multiple factors including the influence of an active desmoplastic stroma. How the stromal microenvironment of PDAC contributes to the fatal nature of this disease is not well defined. In the analysis of clinical specimens, we observed diverse expression of the hypoxic marker carbonic anhydrase IX and the lactate transporter MCT4 in the stromal compartment. These stromal features were associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype in PDAC tumor cells, and with shorter patient survival. Cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from primary PDAC exhibited a high basal level of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1α) that was both required and sufficient to modulate the expression of MCT4. This event was associated with increased transcription and protein synthesis of HIF1α in CAFs relative to PDAC cell lines, while surprisingly the protein turnover rate was equivalent. CAFs utilized glucose predominantly for glycolytic intermediates, whereas glutamine was the preferred metabolite for the TCA cycle. Unlike PDAC cell lines, CAFs were resistant to glucose withdrawal but sensitive to glutamine depletion. Consistent with the lack of reliance on glucose, CAFs could survive the acute depletion of MCT4. In co-culture and xenograft studies CAFs stimulated the invasive potential and metastatic spread of PDAC cell lines through a mechanism dependent on HIF1α and MCT4. Together, these data indicate that stromal metabolic features influence PDAC tumor cells to promote invasiveness and metastatic potential and associate with poor outcome in patients with PDAC. PMID:27623078

  11. Patient age, refractive index of the corneal stroma, and outcomes of uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sudi; Alió, Jorge L; Walewska, Anna; Amparo, Francisco; Artola, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    To determine the influence of age and the corneal stromal refractive index on the difference between the predicted and actual postoperative refractive error after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and whether the precision of outcomes could be improved by considering age and the refractive index. Vissum Instituto Oftalmologico de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. Case series. Flaps were created using a mechanical microkeratome. The stromal refractive index was measured using a VCH-1 refractometer after flap lifting. Refractive data were obtained 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Uneventful LASIK was performed in 133 eyes. The mean age, refractive index, and applied corrections were 33.4 years ± 9.49 (SD), 1.368 ± 0.006, and -2.43 ± 3.36 diopters (D), respectively. The difference between the predicted and actual postoperative refractive error = 2.315-0.021 age-1.106 refractive index (F = 3.647, r = 0.254, P=.029; n = 109) at 1 month and = 11.820-0.023 age-7.976 refractive index (F = 3.392, r = 0.261, P=.022, n = 106) at 3 months. A correlation between the actual and calculated postoperative refraction improved from r = -0.178 (P=.064; n = 75) to r = -0.418 (P<.001) after considering the true refractive index 6 months postoperatively. The predicted outcomes of LASIK can be improved by inputting the refractive index of the individual corneal stroma. Unexpected outcomes (>0.50 D) of LASIK could be avoided by considering patient age and the refractive index and by adjusting the applied correction accordingly. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis within Placental Villous Mesenchyme and Umbilical Cord Stroma Is Associated with Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Vanterpool, Sizzle F.; Been, Jasper V.; Houben, Michiel L.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.; Kramer, Boris W.; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Reyes, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a common oral pathobiont, is implicated in preterm birth. Our aim was to determine if the location of Pg within placental and/or umbilical cord sections was associated with a specific delivery diagnosis at preterm delivery (histologic chorioamnionitis, chorioamnionitis with funisitis, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia with HELLP-syndrome, small for gestational age). The prevalence and location of Pg within archived placental and umbilical cord specimens from preterm (25 to 32 weeks gestation) and term control cohorts were evaluated by immunofluorescent histology. Detection of Pg was performed blinded to pregnancy characteristics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate independent effects of gestational age, being small for gestational age, specific preterm delivery diagnosis, antenatal steroids, and delivery mode, on the odds of having Pg in the preterm tissue. Within the preterm cohort, 49 of 97 (51%) placentas and 40 of 97 (41%) umbilical cord specimens were positive for Pg. Pg within the placenta was significantly associated with shorter gestation lengths (OR 0.63 (95%CI: 0.48–0.85; p = 0.002) per week) and delivery via caesarean section (OR 4.02 (95%CI: 1.15–14.04; p = 0.03), but not with histological chorioamnionitis or preeclampsia. However, the presence of Pg in the umbilical cord was significantly associated with preeclampsia: OR 6.73 (95%CI: 1.31–36.67; p = 0.02). In the term cohort, 2 of 35 (6%) placentas and no umbilical cord term specimens were positive for Pg. The location of Pg within the placenta was different between preterm and term groups in that Pg within the villous mesenchyme was only detected in the preterm cohort, whereas Pg associated with syncytiotrophoblasts was found in both preterm and term placentas. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of Pg within the villous stroma or umbilical cord may be an important determinant in Pg-associated adverse pregnancy

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis within Placental Villous Mesenchyme and Umbilical Cord Stroma Is Associated with Adverse Pregnancy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Vanterpool, Sizzle F; Been, Jasper V; Houben, Michiel L; Nikkels, Peter G J; De Krijger, Ronald R; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Kramer, Boris W; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Reyes, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a common oral pathobiont, is implicated in preterm birth. Our aim was to determine if the location of Pg within placental and/or umbilical cord sections was associated with a specific delivery diagnosis at preterm delivery (histologic chorioamnionitis, chorioamnionitis with funisitis, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia with HELLP-syndrome, small for gestational age). The prevalence and location of Pg within archived placental and umbilical cord specimens from preterm (25 to 32 weeks gestation) and term control cohorts were evaluated by immunofluorescent histology. Detection of Pg was performed blinded to pregnancy characteristics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate independent effects of gestational age, being small for gestational age, specific preterm delivery diagnosis, antenatal steroids, and delivery mode, on the odds of having Pg in the preterm tissue. Within the preterm cohort, 49 of 97 (51%) placentas and 40 of 97 (41%) umbilical cord specimens were positive for Pg. Pg within the placenta was significantly associated with shorter gestation lengths (OR 0.63 (95%CI: 0.48-0.85; p = 0.002) per week) and delivery via caesarean section (OR 4.02 (95%CI: 1.15-14.04; p = 0.03), but not with histological chorioamnionitis or preeclampsia. However, the presence of Pg in the umbilical cord was significantly associated with preeclampsia: OR 6.73 (95%CI: 1.31-36.67; p = 0.02). In the term cohort, 2 of 35 (6%) placentas and no umbilical cord term specimens were positive for Pg. The location of Pg within the placenta was different between preterm and term groups in that Pg within the villous mesenchyme was only detected in the preterm cohort, whereas Pg associated with syncytiotrophoblasts was found in both preterm and term placentas. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of Pg within the villous stroma or umbilical cord may be an important determinant in Pg-associated adverse pregnancy

  14. Detecting thermal phase transitions in corneal stroma by fluorescence micro-imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, P.; Rossi, F.; Ratto, F.; Bruno, I.; Nesi, P.; Pini, R.

    2008-02-01

    Thermal modifications induced in corneal stroma were investigated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Freshly extracted porcine corneas were immersed for 5 minutes in a water bath at temperatures in the 35-90°C range and stored in formalin. The samples were then sliced in 200-μm-thick transversal sections and analyzed under a stereomicroscope to assess corneal shrinkage. Fluorescence images of the thermally treated corneal samples were acquired using a slow-scan cooled CCD camera, after staining the slices with Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescent dye which allowed to detect fluorescence signal from the whole tissue. All measurements were performed using an inverted epifluorescence microscope equipped with a mercury lamp. The thermally-induced modifications to the corneal specimens were evaluated by studying the grey level distribution in the fluorescence images. For each acquired image, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and entropy analyses were performed. The spatial distribution of DFT absolute value indicated the spatial orientation of the lamellar planes, while entropy was used to study the image texture, correlated to the stromal structural transitions. As a result, it was possible to indicate a temperature threshold value (62°C) for high thermal damage, resulting in a disorganization of the lamellar planes and in full agreement with the measured temperature for corneal shrinkage onset. Analysis of the image entropy evidenced five strong modifications in stromal architecture at temperatures of ~45°C, 53°C, 57°C, 66°C, 75°C. The proposed procedure proved to be an effective micro-imaging method capable of detecting subtle changes in corneal tissue subjected to thermal treatment.

  15. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  16. MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia stem cell interactions with bone marrow stroma promote survival and therapeutic resistance that can be overcome with CXCR4 antagonism.

    PubMed

    Sison, Edward Allan R; Rau, Rachel E; McIntyre, Emily; Li, Li; Small, Donald; Brown, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-R) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. While most patients achieve remission, approximately half of patients recur with a short latency to relapse. This suggests that chemotherapy-resistant leukaemia stem cells (LSCs) survive and can recapitulate the leukaemia. We hypothesized that interactions between LSCs and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate survival and chemotherapy resistance in MLL-R ALL. Using primary samples of infant MLL-R ALL, we studied the influence of bone marrow stroma on apoptosis, proliferation, and cytotoxicity induced by the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib. MLL-R ALL were differentially protected by stroma from spontaneous apoptosis compared to non-MLL-R ALL. Co-culture of bulk MLL-R ALL in direct contact with stroma or with stroma-produced soluble factors promoted proliferation and cell cycle entry. Stroma also protected bulk MLL-R ALL cells and MLL-R ALL LSCs from lestaurtinib-mediated cytotoxicity. Previous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 mediates bone marrow microenvironment signalling. Using a xenograft model of MLL-R ALL, we demonstrated that CXCR4 inhibition with AMD3100 (plerixafor) led to markedly enhanced efficacy of lestaurtinib. Therefore, the bone marrow microenvironment is a mediator of chemotherapy resistance in MLL-R ALL and targeting leukaemia-stroma interactions with CXCR4 inhibitors may prove useful in this high-risk subtype of paediatric ALL. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia stem cell interactions with bone marrow stroma promote survival and therapeutic resistance that can be overcome with CXCR4 antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Edward Allan R.; Rau, Rachel E.; McIntyre, Emily; Li, Li; Small, Donald; Brown, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-R) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. While most patients achieve remission, approximately half of patients recur with a short latency to relapse. This suggests that chemotherapy-resistant leukaemia stem cells (LSCs) survive and can recapitulate the leukaemia. We hypothesized that interactions between LSCs and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate survival and chemotherapy resistance in MLL-R ALL. Using primary samples of infant MLL-R ALL, we studied the influence of bone marrow stroma on apoptosis, proliferation, and cytotoxicity induced by the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib. MLL-R ALL were differentially protected by stroma from spontaneous apoptosis compared to non-MLL-R ALL. Co-culture of bulk MLL-R ALL in direct contact with stroma or with stroma-produced soluble factors promoted proliferation and cell cycle entry. Stroma also protected bulk MLL-R ALL cells and MLL-R ALL LSCs from lestaurtinib-mediated cytotoxicity. Previous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 mediates bone marrow microenvironment signalling. Using a xenograft model of MLL-R ALL, we demonstrated that CXCR4 inhibition with AMD3100 (plerixafor) led to markedly enhanced efficacy of lestaurtinib. Therefore, the bone marrow microenvironment is a mediator of chemotherapy resistance in MLL-R ALL and targeting leukaemia-stroma interactions with CXCR4 inhibitors may prove useful in this high-risk subtype of paediatric ALL. PMID:23294096

  18. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  19. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  20. Development of a Reactive Stroma Associated with Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia in EAF2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Ai, Junkui; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Wang, Yujuan; Wang, Dan; Eisermann, Kurtis; Rigatti, Lora H.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Ma, Hei M.; Wang, Xinhui; Dar, Javid A.; Parwani, Anil V.; Simons, Brian W.; Ittman, Michael M.; Li, Luyuan; Davies, Benjamin J.; Wang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-responsive tumor suppressor frequently deleted in advanced prostate cancer that functions as a transcription elongation factor of RNA Pol II through interaction with the ELL family proteins. EAF2 knockout mice on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background developed late-onset lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In order to further characterize the role of EAF2 in the development of prostatic defects, the effects of EAF2 loss were compared in different murine strains. In the current study, aged EAF2−/− mice on both the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ backgrounds exhibited mPIN lesions as previously reported on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background. In contrast to the 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J mixed genetic background, the mPIN lesions in C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ EAF2−/− mice were associated with stromal defects characteristic of a reactive stroma and a statistically significant increase in prostate microvessel density. Stromal inflammation and increased microvessel density was evident in EAF2-deficient mice on a pure C57BL/6J background at an early age and preceded the development of the histologic epithelial hyperplasia and neoplasia found in the prostates of older EAF2−/− animals. Mice deficient in EAF2 had an increased recovery rate and a decreased overall response to the effects of androgen deprivation. EAF2 expression in human cancer was significantly down-regulated and microvessel density was significantly increased compared to matched normal prostate tissue; furthermore EAF2 expression was negatively correlated with microvessel density. These results suggest that the EAF2 knockout mouse on the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ genetic backgrounds provides a model of PIN lesions associated with an altered prostate microvasculature and reactive stromal compartment corresponding to that reported in human prostate tumors. PMID:24260246

  1. Tectonic lamellar keratoplasty with acellular corneal stroma in high-risk corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Naiyang; Wang, Xiaoran; Wan, Pengxia; Huang, Minghai; Wu, Zheng; Liang, Xuanwei; Liu, Ying; Ge, Jian; Huang, Junqi; Wang, Zhichong

    2011-01-01

    Tectonic lamellar keratoplasty (TLKP) is a primary surgical procedure to improve the condition of the recipient bed in high-risk corneal transplantation. It is usually performed for a secondary optical penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). The present study was undertaken to explore a new strategy for TLKP using acellular corneal stroma (ACS) prepared by decellularization. ACS for TLKP was prepared from cat cornea by decellularization. The efficiency of the decellularization was examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and through DNA content analysis. Twenty-eight New Zealand white rabbits, as recipients, were assigned to one of two groups that had different material for their TLKP. The TLKP was combined with a central optical PKP as a single-stage procedure. Either ACS or fresh cat corneal lamella, 11.25 mm in diameter, was used for the TLKP in these two groups. After TLKP, a 6.5-mm full-thickness cat cornea was placed in the central cornea of each recipient rabbit for PKP. Clinical outcomes and the histology of the transplants were compared post-operatively. ACS for TLKP prolonged the survival of the transplants. The mean survival time of the transplants in the ACS group (36.4±4.3 days) was longer than for those in the control group (14.0±2.2 days, p<0.05). The ACS group showed a significantly smaller neovascularization area compared to the control group. The areas of corneal neovascularization were 5.3±1.1 mm² and 45.2±4.9 mm² (p<0.05), respectively, after two weeks, and 25.1±4.7 mm² and 105.3±12.4 mm² (p<0.05), respectively, after four weeks. Histology revealed that fewer inflammatory cells were infiltrating the transplants in the ACS group than those in the control group. The use of ACS for TLKP prolonged the survival of corneal transplants, reduced corneal neovascularization, and prevented from infiltration of inflammatory cells. It is a feasible and effective strategy to prolong the survival of transplants in high-risk corneal transplantation.

  2. Oxidative stress in cancer associated fibroblasts drives tumor-stroma co-evolution

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Balliet, Renee M; Rivadeneira, Dayana B; Chiavarina, Barbara; Pavlides, Stephanos; Wang, Chenguang; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Daumer, Kristin M; Lin, Zhao; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Knudsen, Erik S; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Loss of stromal fibroblast caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a powerful single independent predictor of poor prognosis in human breast cancer patients, and is associated with early tumor recurrence, lymph node metastasis and tamoxifen-resistance. We developed a novel co-culture system to understand the mechanism(s) by which a loss of stromal fibroblast Cav-1 induces a “lethal tumor microenvironment.” Here, we propose a new paradigm to explain the powerful prognostic value of stromal Cav-1. In this model, cancer cells induce oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which then acts as a “metabolic” and “mutagenic” motor to drive tumor-stroma co-evolution, DNA damage and aneuploidy in cancer cells. More specifically, we show that an acute loss of Cav-1 expression leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and aerobic glycolysis in cancer associated fibroblasts. Also, we propose that defective mitochondria are removed from cancer-associated fibroblasts by autophagy/mitophagy that is induced by oxidative stress. As a consequence, cancer associated fibroblasts provide nutrients (such as lactate) to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism in adjacent cancer cells (the “Reverse Warburg effect”). We provide evidence that oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts is sufficient to induce genomic instability in adjacent cancer cells, via a bystander effect, potentially increasing their aggressive behavior. Finally, we directly demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) over-production, secondary to Cav-1 loss, is the root cause for mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer associated fibroblasts. In support of this notion, treatment with anti-oxidants (such as N-acetyl-cysteine, metformin and quercetin) or NO inhibitors (L-NAME) was sufficient to reverse many of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotypes that we describe. Thus, cancer cells use “oxidative stress” in adjacent fibroblasts (1) as an “engine” to fuel their own

  3. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  4. Morphological studies on the role of the periductal stroma in the regression of the human male Müllerian duct.

    PubMed

    Wartenberg, H

    1985-01-01

    The regression of the male Müllerian duct has been studied in human embryos and fetuses by means of the semi-thin light microscopic technique and by electron microscopy. After completion of the duct's differentiation during week 7, a periductal stroma is formed by two types of mesenchymal-like cells: light, epitheloid cells originating from the coelomic epithelium and dark, fusiform cells of mesonephric origin. During week 9 these cells condense to a compact cuff in which the light cells occupy the inner core. The duct is entirely sealed by an epitheloid stratum of the periductal stroma. At the same time, the basal lamina thickens up to 300 nm by apposition of extracellular material. During weeks 10 to 12, the inner stromal core is invaded by dark fusiform cells from the peripheral stratum which intermingle with the light cells. The basal lamina dissolves, the epithelio-stromal interface becomes indistinct and finally disappears. During week 13 remnants of the Müllerian duct can be observed. They result from the complete merging of the ductal into the periductal compartment. Müllerian duct regression is divided into two functional steps: First the duct is prevented from growth by the epitheloid cells of the stromal cuff. This process lasts for 2 to 3 weeks. In the second place the basal lamina breaks up under the influence of the dark stromal component. This event launches the regression proper and lasts for another 2 to 3 weeks. Necrosis of cells or programmed cell death does not play a decisive role in the regression of the human Müllerian duct. In the upper, nonregressing part of the duct, light epitheloid cells are scarce and do not seal the duct. A periductal extracellular space is preserved during the entire period and the periductal stroma does not fuse with the duct's epithelium. The epithelio-stromal interface is maintained along this section.

  5. Patterns of PD-L1 expression and CD8 T cell infiltration in gastric adenocarcinomas and associated immune stroma

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elizabeth D; Zahurak, Marianna; Murphy, Adrian; Cornish, Toby; Cuka, Nathan; Abdelfatah, Eihab; Yang, Stephen; Duncan, Mark; Ahuja, Nita; Taube, Janis M; Anders, Robert A; Kelly, Ronan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent data supports a significant role for immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of solid tumours. Here, we evaluate gastric and gastrooesophageal junction (G/GEJ) adenocarcinomas for their expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), infiltration by CD8+ T cells and the relationship of both factors to patient survival. Design Thirty-four resections of primary invasive G/GEJ were stained by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 and CD8 and by DNA in situ hybridisation for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). CD8+ T cell densities both within tumours and at the tumour–stromal interface were analysed using whole slide digital imaging. Patient survival was evaluated according to PD-L1 status and CD8 density. Results 12% of resections showed tumour cell membranous PD-L1 expression and 44% showed expression within the immune stroma. Two cases (6%) were EBV positive, with one showing membranous PD-L1 positivity. Increasing CD8+ densities both within tumours and immune stroma was associated with increasing percentage of tumour (p=0.027) and stromal (p=0.005) PD-L1 expression. Both tumour and immune stromal PD-L1 expression and high intratumoral or stromal CD8+ T cell density (>500/mm2) were associated with worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Conclusions PD-L1 is expressed on both tumour cells and in the immune stroma across all stages and histologies of G/GEJ. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that increasing CD8 infiltration is correlated with impaired PFS and OS. Patients with higher CD8+ T cell densities also have higher PD-L1 expression, indicating an adaptive immune resistance mechanism may be occurring. Further characterisation of the G/GEJ immune microenvironment may highlight targets for immune-based therapy. PMID:26801886

  6. SPARC independent delivery of nab-paclitaxel without depleting tumor stroma in patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Harrison; Samuel, Sharon L.; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P.; Grizzle, William E.; Hidalgo, Manuel; Kovar, Joy; Oelschlager, Denise K.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Warram, Jason M.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The study goal was to examine the relationship between nab-paclitaxel delivery and SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) expression in pancreatic tumor xenografts and to determine the anti-stromal effect of nab-paclitaxel, which may affect tumor vascular perfusion. SPARC positive and negative mice bearing Panc02 tumor xenografts (n=5–6/group) were injected with IRDye 800CW (IR800)-labeled nab-paclitaxel. After 24 hours, tumors were collected and stained with DL650-labeled anti-SPARC antibody, and the correlation between nab-paclitaxel and SPARC distributions was examined. Eight groups of mice bearing either Panc039 or Panc198 patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) (4 groups/model, 5 animals/group) were untreated (served as control) or treated with gemcitabine (100 mg/kg BW, i.p., twice per week), nab-paclitaxel (30 mg/kg BW, i.v., for 5 consecutive days), and these agents in combination, respectively, for 3 weeks, and tumor volume and perfusion changes were assessed using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, respectively. All tumors were collected and stained with Masson’s Trichrome Stain, followed by a blinded comparative analysis of tumor stroma density. IR800-nab-paclitaxel was mainly distributed in tumor stromal tissue, but nab-paclitaxel and SPARC distributions were minimally correlated in either SPARC positive or negative animals. Nab-paclitaxel treatment did not decrease tumor stroma nor increase tumor vascular perfusion in either PDX model when compared to control groups. These data suggest that the specific tumor delivery of nab-paclitaxel is not directly related to SPARC expression, and nab-paclitaxel does not deplete tumor stroma in general. PMID:26832793

  7. Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein Partners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Associated Stroma from That of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S. Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  8. Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  9. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurement of ovarian stroma: A potential tool for the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samanci, C; Alis, D; Ustabasioglu, F E; Ozmen, E; Ucar, A K; Aslan, M; Habibi, H A; Bakan, S; Ozcabi, B; Evliyaoğlu, S O; Adaletli, I

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of ovarian stroma in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from each women. A total of 17 women (mean age, 22.2 years±5.1 [SD]; range, 16-33 years) with a diagnosis of PCOS according to the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society criteria and 18 healthy women (mean age, 22.8 years±5.2 [SD]; range, 16-31 years) who served as a control group were included in this prospective study. ADC values of the ovarian stroma during the early follicular phase were calculated by two observers in the two groups. Comparisons were performed using the Student t-test. The mean ADC value in woman with PCOS (1.29±0.27×10(-3) mm(2)/s; range: 0.59×10(-3) - 1.88×10(-3) mm(2)/s) was significantly lower than that in the control group (1.48±0.17×10(-3) mm(2)/s; range: 1.12×10(-3) - 1.86×10(-3) mm(2)/s) (P<0.001). The ADC cutoff value for the determination of PCOS with maximum accuracy was 1.38×10(-3) mm(2)/s (AUC: 0.720; 95% CI: 0.597, 0.843), yielding 78% sensitivity and 62.9% specificity. ADC values of ovarian stroma are lower in patients with PCOS than in control subjects. ADC measurement of ovarian stroma in women with PCOS might help improve the diagnosis of PCOS. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Biochemical characterization of nuclear receptors for vitamin D{sub 3} and glucocorticoids in prostate stroma cell microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Paredes, Roberto; Godoy, Alejandro S.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Tovar, Heribelt; Pantoja, Diego; Johnson, Candace; Trump, Donald; Onate, Sergio A.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Fibroblasts from benign and carcinoma-associated stroma were biochemically characterized for VDR and GR function as transcription factors in prostate stroma cell microenvironment. {yields} Decreased SRC-1/CBP coactivators recruitment to VDR and GR may result in hormone resistance to 1,25D{sub 3} in stromal cell microenvironment prostate cancer. {yields} 1a,25-Dyhidroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) and glucocorticoids, either alone or in combination, may not be an alternative for 'some' advanced prostate cancers that fails androgen therapies. -- Abstract: The disruption of stromal cell signals in prostate tissue microenvironment influences the development of prostate cancer to androgen independence. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) and glucocorticoids, either alone or in combination, have been investigated as alternatives for the treatment of advanced prostate cancers that fails androgen therapies. The effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Similarly, the effect of 1,25D{sub 3} is mediated by the 1,25D{sub 3} nuclear receptor (VDR). In this study, fibroblasts from benign- (BAS) and carcinoma-associated stroma (CAS) were isolated from human prostates to characterize VDR and GR function as transcription factors in prostate stroma. The VDR-mediated transcriptional activity assessed using the CYP24-luciferase reporter was limited to 3-fold induction by 1,25D{sub 3} in 9 out of 13 CAS (70%), as compared to >10-fold induction in the BAS clinical sample pair. Expression of His-tagged VDR (Ad-his-VDR) failed to recover the low transcriptional activity of the luciferase reporter in 7 out of 9 CAS. Interestingly, expression of Ad-his-VDR successfully recovered receptor-mediated induction in 2 out of the 9 CAS analyzed, suggesting that changes in the receptor protein itself was responsible for decreased response and resistance to 1,25D{sub 3} action. Conversely, VDR

  11. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  12. Measuring Solar Abundances with Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Gough, D.

    2009-12-01

    The revision of the photospheric abundances proferred by Asplund et al. (2005) has rendered opacity theory inconsistent with the seismologically determined opacity through the Sun. This highlights the need for a direct seismological measurement of solar abundances. Here we describe the technique used to measure abundances with seismology, examine our ability to detect differences between solar models using this technique, and discuss its application in the Sun.

  13. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  14. Sunspots, Starspots, and Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2017-07-01

    Element abundances in the solar photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona are key parameters for investigating sources of the solar wind and for estimating radiative losses in the quiet corona and in dynamical events such as solar flares. Abundances in the solar corona and photosphere differ from each other depending on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the element. Normally, abundances with FIP values less than about 10 eV are about 3-4 times more abundant in the corona than in the photosphere. However, recently, an inverse FIP effect was found in small regions near sunspots where elements with FIP less than 10 eV are less abundant relative to high FIP elements (≥slant 10 eV) than they are in the photosphere. This is similar to fully convective stars with large starspots. The inverse FIP effect is predicted to occur in the vicinity of sunspots/starspots. Up to now, the solar anomalous abundances have only been found in very spatially small areas. In this paper, we show that in the vicinity of sunspots there can be substantially larger areas with abundances that are between coronal and photospheric abundances and sometimes just photospheric abundances. In some cases, the FIP effect tends to shut down near sunspots. We examine several active regions with relatively large sunspots that were observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft in cycle 24.

  15. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  16. Genetic model of multi-step breast carcinogenesis involving the epithelium and stroma: clues to tumour-microenvironment interactions.

    PubMed

    Kurose, K; Hoshaw-Woodard, S; Adeyinka, A; Lemeshow, S; Watson, P H; Eng, C

    2001-09-01

    Although numerous studies have reported that high frequencies of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at various chromosomal arms have been identified in breast cancer, differential LOH in the neoplastic epithelial and surrounding stromal compartments has not been well examined. Using laser capture microdissection, which enables separation of neoplastic epithelium from surrounding stroma, we microdissected each compartment of 41 sporadic invasive adenocarcinomas of the breast. Frequent LOH was identified in both neoplastic epithelial and/or stromal compartments, ranging from 25 to 69% in the neoplastic epithelial cells, and from 17 to 61% in the surrounding stromal cells, respectively. The great majority of markers showed a higher frequency of LOH in the neoplastic epithelial compartment than in the stroma, suggesting that LOH in neoplastic epithelial cells might precede LOH in surrounding stromal cells. Furthermore, we sought to examine pair-wise associations of particular genetic alterations in either epithelial or stromal compartments. Seventeen pairs of markers showed statistically significant associations. We also propose a genetic model of multi-step carcinogenesis for the breast involving the epithelial and stromal compartments and note that genetic alterations occur in the epithelial compartments as the earlier steps followed by LOH in the stromal compartments. Our study strongly suggests that interactions between breast epithelial and stromal compartments might play a critical role in breast carcinogenesis and several genetic alterations in both epithelial and stromal compartments are required for breast tumour growth and progression.

  17. Targeted Disruption of Orchestration between Stroma and Tumor Cells in Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Li, Lei; Li, Zhaoshen; Xie, Keping

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with a prominent desmoplastic reaction as the defining hallmark of the disease. The past several decades have seen dramatic progress in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including the identification of precursor lesions, sequential transformation from normal pancreas to invasive pancreatic cancer and corresponding signature genetic events, and the biological impact of those alterations on malignant behaviors. However, the current therapeutic strategies for epithelial tumor cells, which have exhibited potent antitumor activity in cell culture and animal models, have failed to have significant effects in the clinic. The desmoplastic stroma surrounding pancreatic cancer cells, which accounts for about 90% of a tumor’s mass, clearly is not a passive scaffold for cancer cells but an active contributor to carcinogenesis. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and their stroma will be important to designing new, effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on the origination of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic tumors, their biological effects on pancreatic cancer cells, and the orchestration between these two components. PMID:22749856

  18. Human Cornea Proteome: Identification and Quantitation of the Proteins of the Three Main Layers Including Epithelium, Stroma, and Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of the cornea are common and refer to conditions like infections, injuries and genetic defects. Morphologically, many corneal diseases affect only certain layers of the cornea and separate analysis of the individual layers is therefore of interest to explore the basic molecular mechanisms involved in corneal health and disease. In this study, the three main layers including, the epithelium, stroma and endothelium of healthy human corneas were isolated. Prior to analysis by LC–MS/MS the proteins from the different layers were either (i) separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel trypsinization, (ii) in-solution digested without prior protein separation or, (iii) in-solution digested followed by cation exchange chromatography. A total of 3250 unique Swiss-Prot annotated proteins were identified in human corneas, 2737 in the epithelium, 1679 in the stroma, and 880 in the endothelial layer. Of these, 1787 proteins have not previously been identified in the human cornea by mass spectrometry. In total, 771 proteins were quantified, 157 based on in-solution digestion and 770 based on SDS-PAGE separation followed by in-gel digestion of excised gel pieces. Protein analysis showed that many of the identified proteins are plasma proteins involved in defense responses. PMID:22698189

  19. High expression of PDGFR-β in prostate cancer stroma is independently associated with clinical and biochemical prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Nordby, Yngve; Richardsen, Elin; Rakaee, Mehrdad; Ness, Nora; Donnem, Tom; Patel, Hiten R. H.; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M.; Andersen, Sigve

    2017-01-01

    Due to a lack of sufficient diagnostic tools to predict aggressive disease, there is a significant overtreatment of patients with prostate cancer. Platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment, and has been associated with unfavorable outcome in several other cancers. Herein, we aimed to investigate the prognostic impact of PDGFR-β and its ligands (PDGF-B and PDGF-D) in a multicenter prostatectomy cohort of 535 Norwegian patients. Using tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry, the expression of ligands PDGF-B and PDGF-D and their corresponding receptor, PDGFR-β, was assessed in neoplastic tissue and tumor-associated stroma. PDGFR-β was expressed in benign and tumor associated stroma, but not in epithelium. High stromal expression of PDGFR-β was independently associated with clinical relapse (HR = 2.17, p = 0.010) and biochemical failure (HR = 1.58, p = 0.002). This large study highlights the prognostic importance of PDGFR-β expression, implicating its involvement in prostate cancer progression even in early stage disease. Hence, analyses of PDGFR-β may help distinguish which patients will benefit from radical treatment, and since PDGFR-β is associated with relapse and shorter survival, it mandates a focus as a therapeutic target. PMID:28233816

  20. The role of angiogenesis, vascular maturation, regression and stroma infiltration in dormancy and growth of implanted MLS ovarian carcinoma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Assaf; Meir, Gila; Neeman, Michal

    2004-02-10

    MLS ovarian epithelial carcinoma multicellular spheroids xenografted subcutaneously in CD-1 nude mice displayed growth delay, or dormancy, of up to 52 days. In the study reported here, implanted MLS spheroids were used for testing the role of angiogenesis and vascular maturation in triggering the initiation of tumor progression. The kinetics and impact of neovascular maturation and functionality, in dormancy, and growth of MLS spheroid xenografts were studied noninvasively by BOLD contrast MRI. MR data were supported by histologic staining for biotinylated albumin as a blood pool marker and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as marker for perivascular mural cells. Although the tumor periphery showed higher levels of total and mature vasculature than normal skin, the fraction of mature out of the total vessels as detected by MRI vascular maturation index (VMI(MRI)) was significantly lower in the tumor both before and after tumor exit from dormancy. The neovasculature induced by the implanted spheroid was unstable and showed cycles of vessel growth and regression. Surprisingly, this instability was not restricted to the immature vessels, but rather included also regression of mature vessels. During dormancy, neovasculature was predominantly peripheral with no infiltration into the implanted spheroid. Infiltration of alpha-SMA positive stroma cells into the spheroid was associated with functional vascularization and tumor growth. Thus, stroma infiltration and vascular maturation are an important checkpoint linking the angiogenic switch with initiation of tumor progression. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Osterix-cre labeled progenitor cells contribute to the formation and maintenance of the bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma.

  2. Progressive deregulation of the cell cycle with higher tumor grade in the stroma of breast phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuijper, Arno; de Vos, Rob A I; Lagendijk, Jaap H; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J

    2005-05-01

    We studied cell cycle-regulating proteins in phyllodes tumor pathogenesis by immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67, cyclin A, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma protein (pRb), p53, p16INK4A, bcl-2, and p21waf1 in the epithelium and stroma of 40 primary (benign, 21; borderline, 8; malignant, 11) and 7 recurrent tumors of different grades. In most cases, the epithelium showed no altered expression of cell cycle regulators. Stromal overexpression of p16INK4A, p53, cyclin A, pRb, and p21waf1 correlated significantly with tumor grade. The number of altered proteins in stroma increased with higher grade and was accompanied by increased proliferation. Stromal cyclin A expression was the best separating marker between tumor grades. Correlations existed between stromal overexpression of p16NK4A and p21waf1, p16INK4A and p53, and p53 and pRb. No immunostaining differences were detected between primary tumors and recurrences. Four or more altered proteins and p53 expression in the stromal component were independent negative prognosticators for disease-free survival. The stromal component of mammary phyllodes tumors displays an increasing level of cell cycle deregulation with higher tumor grade; the epithelial compartment mostly remains inconspicuous. Several combinations of aberrantly expressed cell cycle proteins seem important in the stromal progression of phyllodes tumors. The number of stromal cell cycle aberrations and stromal p53 expression might predict clinical behavior.

  3. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  4. Osterix-Cre Labeled Progenitor Cells Contribute to the Formation and Maintenance of the Bone Marrow Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W.; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma. PMID:23951132

  5. Biocompatibility and Biomechanical Effect of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Implanted in the Corneal Stroma: A Proof of Concept Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandra E.; Rodriguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Gomez-Tejedor, Jose A.; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen M.; Bataille, Laurent; Alio, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    Corneal ectatic disorders are characterized by a progressive weakening of the tissue due to biomechanical alterations of the corneal collagen fibers. Carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, are nanomaterials that offer extraordinary mechanical properties and are used to increase the rigidity of different materials and biomolecules such as collagen fibers. We conducted an experimental investigation where New Zealand rabbits were treated with a composition of CNTs suspended in balanced saline solution which was applied in the corneal tissue. Biocompatibility of the composition was assessed by means of histopathology analysis and mechanical properties by stress-strain measurements. Histopathology samples stained with blue Alcian showed that there were no fibrous scaring and no alterations in the mucopolysaccharides of the stroma. It also showed that there were no signs of active inflammation. These were confirmed when Masson trichrome staining was performed. Biomechanical evaluation assessed by means of tensile test showed that there is a trend to obtain higher levels of rigidity in those corneas implanted with CNTs, although these changes are not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Implanting CNTs is biocompatible and safe procedure for the corneal stroma which can lead to an increase in the rigidity of the collagen fibers. PMID:28116139

  6. Expression of Autoactivated Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Glands of Transgenic Mice Leads to a Reactive Stroma During Early Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomasset, N.; Lochter, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Lund, L.R.; Williams, D.R.; Behrendtsen, O.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-04-24

    Extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases play a key role in interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme during mammary gland development and disease. In patients with breast cancer, the mammary mesenchyme undergoes a stromal reaction, the etiology of which is unknown. We previously showed that targeting of an autoactivating mutant of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 to mammary epithelia of transgenic mice resulted in reduced mammary function during pregnancy and development of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Here we examine the cascade of alterations before breast tumor formation in the mammary gland stroma once the expression of the stromelysin-1 transgene commences. Beginning in postpubertal virgin animals, low levels of transgene expression in mammary epithelia led to increased expression of endogenous stromelysin-1 in stromal fibroblasts and up-regulation of other matrix metalloproteinases, without basement membrane disruption. These changes were accompanied by the progressive development of a compensatory reactive stroma, characterized by increased collagen content and vascularization in glands from virgin mice. This remodeling of the gland affected epithelial-mesenchymal communication as indicated by inappropriate expression of tenascin-C starting by day 6 of pregnancy. This, together with increased transgene expression, led to basement membrane disruption starting by day 15 of pregnancy. We propose that the highly reactive stroma provides a prelude to breast epithelial tumors observed in these animals. Epithelial development depends on an exquisite series of inductive and instructive interactions between the differentiating epithelium and the mesenchymal (stromal) compartment. The epithelium, which consists of luminal and myoepithelial cells, is separated from the stroma by a basement membrane (BM), which plays a central role in mammary gland homeostasis and gene expression. In vivo, stromal

  7. Tumour-associated macrophages correlate with poor prognosis in myxoid liposarcoma and promote cell motility and invasion via the HB-EGF-EGFR-PI3K/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, A; Matsumoto, Y; Fukushi, J; Iura, K; Matsunobu, T; Endo, M; Fujiwara, T; Iida, K; Fujiwara, Y; Hatano, M; Yokoyama, N; Fukushima, S; Oda, Y; Iwamoto, Y

    2015-02-03

    Myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) is the second most common subtype of liposarcoma, and metastasis occurs in up to one-third of cases. However, the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis remain unclear. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have important roles in tumour invasion, metastasis, and/or poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TAMs and MLS. Using 78 primary MLS samples, the association between clinical prognosis and macrophage infiltration was evaluated by immunochemistry. The effects of macrophages on cell growth, cell motility, and invasion of MLS cell lines were investigated in vitro. In addition, clinicopathological factors were analysed to assess their prognostic implications in MLS. Higher levels of CD68-positive macrophages were associated with poorer overall survival in MLS samples. Macrophage-conditioned medium enhanced MLS cell motility and invasion by activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with the key ligand suggested to be heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway was mostly involved in HB-EGF-induced cell motility and invasion of MLS. The expression of phosphorylated EGFR in MLS clinical samples was associated with macrophage infiltration. In addition, more significant macrophage infiltration was associated with poor prognosis even in multivariate analysis. Macrophage infiltration in MLS predicts poor prognosis, and the relationship between TAMs and MLS may be a new candidate for therapeutic targets of MLS.

  8. Tumour-associated macrophages correlate with poor prognosis in myxoid liposarcoma and promote cell motility and invasion via the HB-EGF-EGFR-PI3K/Akt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nabeshima, A; Matsumoto, Y; Fukushi, J; Iura, K; Matsunobu, T; Endo, M; Fujiwara, T; Iida, K; Fujiwara, Y; Hatano, M; Yokoyama, N; Fukushima, S; Oda, Y; Iwamoto, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) is the second most common subtype of liposarcoma, and metastasis occurs in up to one-third of cases. However, the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis remain unclear. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have important roles in tumour invasion, metastasis, and/or poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TAMs and MLS. Methods: Using 78 primary MLS samples, the association between clinical prognosis and macrophage infiltration was evaluated by immunochemistry. The effects of macrophages on cell growth, cell motility, and invasion of MLS cell lines were investigated in vitro. In addition, clinicopathological factors were analysed to assess their prognostic implications in MLS. Results: Higher levels of CD68-positive macrophages were associated with poorer overall survival in MLS samples. Macrophage-conditioned medium enhanced MLS cell motility and invasion by activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with the key ligand suggested to be heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway was mostly involved in HB-EGF-induced cell motility and invasion of MLS. The expression of phosphorylated EGFR in MLS clinical samples was associated with macrophage infiltration. In addition, more significant macrophage infiltration was associated with poor prognosis even in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Macrophage infiltration in MLS predicts poor prognosis, and the relationship between TAMs and MLS may be a new candidate for therapeutic targets of MLS. PMID:25562433

  9. Patterns of PD-L1 expression and CD8 T cell infiltration in gastric adenocarcinomas and associated immune stroma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth D; Zahurak, Marianna; Murphy, Adrian; Cornish, Toby; Cuka, Nathan; Abdelfatah, Eihab; Yang, Stephen; Duncan, Mark; Ahuja, Nita; Taube, Janis M; Anders, Robert A; Kelly, Ronan J

    2017-05-01

    Recent data supports a significant role for immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of solid tumours. Here, we evaluate gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction (G/GEJ) adenocarcinomas for their expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), infiltration by CD8+ T cells and the relationship of both factors to patient survival. Thirty-four resections of primary invasive G/GEJ were stained by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 and CD8 and by DNA in situ hybridisation for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). CD8+ T cell densities both within tumours and at the tumour-stromal interface were analysed using whole slide digital imaging. Patient survival was evaluated according to PD-L1 status and CD8 density. 12% of resections showed tumour cell membranous PD-L1 expression and 44% showed expression within the immune stroma. Two cases (6%) were EBV positive, with one showing membranous PD-L1 positivity. Increasing CD8+ densities both within tumours and immune stroma was associated with increasing percentage of tumour (p=0.027) and stromal (p=0.005) PD-L1 expression. Both tumour and immune stromal PD-L1 expression and high intratumoral or stromal CD8+ T cell density (>500/mm(2)) were associated with worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PD-L1 is expressed on both tumour cells and in the immune stroma across all stages and histologies of G/GEJ. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that increasing CD8 infiltration is correlated with impaired PFS and OS. Patients with higher CD8+ T cell densities also have higher PD-L1 expression, indicating an adaptive immune resistance mechanism may be occurring. Further characterisation of the G/GEJ immune microenvironment may highlight targets for immune-based therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Self-renewal and differentiation of a novel bipotent myeloid progenitor clone in the stroma-dependent culture.

    PubMed

    Okubo, T; Yanai, N; Obinata, M

    2000-06-01

    To understand regulation of myeloid development, it is necessary to obtain the myeloid progenitor cell lines with self-renewal and differentiation capacities. Because prolonged hematopoiesis occurs with the production of myeloid cells at all stages of differentiation in the Dexter-type long-term bone marrow cultures, we tried to obtain stroma-dependent myeloid progenitor cells starting from the long-term bone marrow culture. Murine cobblestone areas generated in long-term bone marrow cultures were serially passaged every 10 days. After 4 months, the resultant hematopoietic cells, designated as DFC, were passaged on a monolayer of established spleen stromal cell line, MSS62. After 10-12 passages of DFC cells on MSS62, several clones were obtained by colony formation on MSS62 cell layer. Among these clones, DFC-a cells could be maintained for a long period by coculturing with the established stromal cell line, MSS62.DFC-a cells proliferated by forming cobblestones and contained blast cells, granulocytes, and macrophages. Cell sorting and coculture experiments indicated that the blast type cells exhibiting c-Kit(+) Gr-1(-) Mac-1(-), stroma-dependently self-renewed, and spontaneously differentiated toward granulocytes (c-Kit(+) Gr-1(+) Mac-1(+)) and macrophages (c-Kit(low/+) Gr-1(-) Mac-1(high)). Although most of DFC-a cells expressed c-Kit, SCF-c-Kit interaction was not always necessary for their growth. In the presence of stromal cells, growth and differentiation of DFC-a cells were stimulated by GM-CSF or IL-3. Without stromal cells, DFC-a was transiently expanded by GM-CSF or IL-3 but could not be maintained constantly by these cytokines. The present study demonstrated that DFC-a is a novel bipotent myeloid progenitor cell clone as a simple model system of stroma-dependent myeloid development. It may reflect distinct properties for the earliest myeloid progenitor cells in vivo. It is of interest to know what signals are provided by MSS62 stromal cells to maintain

  11. Efficient Generation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood in Stroma-Free Liquid Culture

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Maries; Nuvolone, Mario; Dannenmann, Stefanie; Stieger, Bruno; Rapold, Reto; Konrad, Daniel; Rubin, Arnold; Bertino, Joseph R.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Knuth, Alexander K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Haematopoiesis is sustained by haematopoietic (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). HSC are the precursors for blood cells, whereas marrow, stroma, bone, cartilage, muscle and connective tissues derive from MSC. The generation of MSC from umbilical cord blood (UCB) is possible, but with low and unpredictable success. Here we describe a novel, robust stroma-free dual cell culture system for long-term expansion of primitive UCB-derived MSC. Methods and Findings UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC) or selected CD34+ cells were grown in liquid culture in the presence of serum and cytokines. Out of 32 different culture conditions that have been tested for the efficient expansion of HSC, we identified one condition (DMEM, pooled human AB serum, Flt-3 ligand, SCF, MGDF and IL-6; further denoted as D7) which, besides supporting HSC expansion, successfully enabled long-term expansion of stromal/MSC from 8 out of 8 UCB units (5 MNC-derived and 3 CD34+ selected cells). Expanded MSC displayed a fibroblast-like morphology, expressed several stromal/MSC-related antigens (CD105, CD73, CD29, CD44, CD133 and Nestin) but were negative for haematopoietic cell markers (CD45, CD34 and CD14). MSC stemness phenotype and their differentiation capacity in vitro before and after high dilution were preserved throughout long-term culture. Even at passage 24 cells remained Nestin+, CD133+ and >95% were positive for CD105, CD73, CD29 and CD44 with the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. Similarly we show that UCB derived MSC express pluripotency stem cell markers despite differences in cell confluency and culture passages. Further, we generated MSC from peripheral blood (PB) MNC of 8 healthy volunteers. In all cases, the resulting MSC expressed MSC-related antigens and showed the capacity to form CFU-F colonies. Conclusions This novel stroma-free liquid culture overcomes the existing limitation in obtaining MSC from UCB and PB enabling so far unmet therapeutic

  12. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Zachary; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    We measured the chlorine abundance in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. High resolution L-Band spectra were obtained using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak National Observatory Mayall 4m telescope. Chlorine is thought to be primarily produced in explosive oxygen burning but stellar chlorine abundances are virtually unknown. We measured the 35Cl abundance from an HCl feature at 3.69 microns.Analysis of our full sample of giants and dwarfs found the HCl feature is only present in stars with temperatures below 3900K. The [Cl/Fe] abundances in stars with solar metallicity matches the abundance seen in the Sun. Measurements of the [Cl/O] ratio in our sample stars is also consistent with [Cl/O] ratios found in planetary nebulae and H II regions. Our measured abundances are all within one standard deviation, 0.3 dex on average, and are consistent with current chemical evolution models for chlorine in the solar neighborhood. A slight decrease in [Cl/Fe] abundance as [Fe/H] increases may be present and must be verified with future Cl abundances measurements in lower metallicity stars. The average [Cl/Fe] ratio in our sample is -0.07 with a standard deviation of 0.13. An upper limit to the 37Cl isotope abundance in the star RZ Ari, measured from a feature at 3.70 microns, puts a lower limit of 2.5 on the Cl 35/37 isotope ratio for this star. This ratio is consistent with the solar system value of 35/37=3.11.

  13. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-05-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  14. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  15. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  16. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  17. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  18. Periostin in the Cancer Stroma of Mycosis Fungoides Palmaris et Plantaris: A Case Report and Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanita, Kayo; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Furudate, Sadanori; Mizuashi, Masato; Watabe, Akiko; Aiba, Setsuya

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides palmaris et plantaris (MFPP) is a rare variant of mycosis fungoides limited to the palms and soles. Although little is known about the pathogenesis of MFPP, this variant of mycosis fungoides presents a relatively good prognosis. In this report, we describe an 85-year-old Japanese man with MFPP. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the dense deposition of periostin in the cancer stroma, as well as infiltration of CD163+CD206− tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which suggested the phenotypes of TAMs were not polarized to the M2 phenotype in the lesional skin of MFPP. Our present case might suggest one of the possible reasons for the good prognosis of MFPP. PMID:27293391

  19. Changing concepts about the distribution of Photosystems I and II between grana-appressed and stroma-exposed thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jan M

    2002-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes of higher plants and some green algae, which house the light-harvesting and energy transducing functions of the chloroplast, are structurally unique. The concept of the photosynthetic unit of the 1930s (Robert Emerson, William Arnold and Hans Gaffron), needing one reaction center per hundreds of antenna molecules, was modified by the discovery of the Enhancement effect in oxygen evolution in two different wavelengths of light (Robert Emerson and his coworkers) in the late 1950s, followed by the 1960 Z scheme of Robin Hill and Fay Bendall. It was realized that two light reactions and two pigment systems were needed for oxygenic photosynthesis. Changing ideas about the distribution of Photosystem II (PS II) and PS I between the green-appressed and stroma-exposed thylakoid membrane domains, which led to the concept of lateral heterogeneity, are discussed.

  20. Fine structure of the developing avian corneal stroma as revealed by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, M; Noske, W; Prenant, G; Renard, G

    1999-09-01

    Corneal transparency depends on the precise organization of the stromal extracellular matrix. The morphology of the extracellular matrix of the embryonic and adult avian secondary posterior cornea was studied in glutaraldehyde-fixed, quick-frozen, deep-etched replicas with the electron microscope. Although the collagen fibrils changed from a loose network to a more ordered parallel lamellar arrangement during development, their mean diameter remained constant between 30.3 and 31.2 nm. Besides collagen fibrils, other extracellular matrix components were observed: (i) straight or Y-shaped cross-bridging interfibrillar 8-10 nm filaments with 18-22 nm globules; (ii) relatively loose networks of 10-20 nm beaded filaments, with a mean periodicity of 107 nm, often running perpendicular to the collagen fibrils and adhering to the plasma membrane of stromal cells at early developmental stages; (iii) straight or curved 6-12 nm strands forming sheets within the stromal matrix that progressively disappeared, whereas similar structures persisted at the Descemet's membrane-stroma interface; (iv) dense networks of filaments with 6-8 nm filaments, sometimes polygonally arranged, and a substructure of 2-3 nm filaments with globular domains, which progressively disappeared with maturation but remained at the Descemet's membrane-stroma interface; (v) polygonal networks of 9-10 nm filaments with globular domains adherent to the surface of cell plasma membranes at early developmental stages. The temporal expression of deep-etched supramolecular structural assemblies is compatible with that of the so-called 'interstitial basement membrane components' previously described. The quick-freeze and deep-etching method can reveal important aspects of the in situ organization of the corneal extracellular matrix.

  1. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Hinkle, K.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H35Cl at 3.69851 μm. The high-resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [35Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with -0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [35Cl/Fe] = (-0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [35Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [35Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ˜0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H35Cl and H37Cl could be measured, a 35Cl/37Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  2. Lipoadenoma of the parathyroid gland - a rare cause of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bansal, R; Trivedi, P; Sarin, J; Parikh, B

    2012-01-01

    Lipoadenoma of parathyroid gland is an unusual morphologic variant of parathyroid adenoma in which the glandular elements are associated with abundant mature adipose tissue. The lesion has also been reported as parathyroid lipohyperplasia, parathyroid hamartoma, and parathyroid adenoma with myxoid stroma. Most cases are functioning and are associated with hyperparathyroidism. Lipoadenoma of parathyroid gland are difficult to diagnose as a cause of hyperparathyroidism because of rarity of these lesions and overlap with normal parathyroid tissue on microscopic evaluation. Only few cases have been documented in the literature so far. The lesion may be overlooked by both surgeon and pathologists alike, if they are not aware of this specific clinicopathologic entity.

  3. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression in tumor stroma influence the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like tumor budding phenotype in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galván, José A; Helbling, Melina; Koelzer, Viktor H; Tschan, Mario P; Berger, Martin D; Hädrich, Marion; Schnüriger, Beat; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-20

    Tumor budding in colorectal cancer is likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized predominantly by loss of E-cadherin and up-regulation of E-cadherin repressors like TWIST1 and TWIST2. Here we investigate a possible epigenetic link between TWIST proteins and the tumor budding phenotype. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression were investigated in six cell lines and further correlated with tumor budding in patient cohort 1 (n = 185). Patient cohort 2 (n = 112) was used to assess prognostic effects. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tumor epithelium and stroma from low- and high-grade budding cancers was performed. In colorectal cancers, TWIST1 and TWIST2 expression was essentially restricted to stromal cells. LCM results of a high-grade budding case show positive TWIST1 and TWIST2 stroma and no methylation, while the low-grade budding case was characterized by negative stroma and strong hypermethylation. TWIST1 stromal cell staining was associated with adverse features like more advanced pT (p = 0.0044), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0301), lymphatic vessel invasion (p = 0.0373), perineural invasion (p = 0.0109) and worse overall survival time (p = 0.0226). Stromal cells may influence tumor budding in colorectal cancers through expression of TWIST1. Hypermethylation of the tumor stroma may represent an alternative mechanism for regulation of TWIST1.

  4. Resistance of leukemia cells to cytarabine chemotherapy is mediated by bone marrow stroma, involves cell-surface equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 removal and correlates with patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Broekhuizen, Richard; González, Alfonso; Oyanadel, Claudia; Ernst, Daniel; García, Patricia; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Court, Felipe; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) with the bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) determines a protective environment that favors tumor development and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We showed that BMSCs secrete soluble factors that protect AML cells from Ara-C induced cytotoxicity. This leukemia chemoresistance is associated with a decrease in the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) activity by inducing removal of ENT1 from the cell surface. Reduction of cell proliferation was also observed with activation of AKT and mTOR-dependent cell survival pathways, which may also contribute to the tumor chemoprotection. Analysis of primary BMSC cultures has demonstrated that AML patients with stroma capable to confer Ara-C resistance in vitro compared to AML patients without this stroma capacity were associated with a worse prognosis. The two year overall survival rate was 0% versus 80% respectively (p=0.0001). This is the first report of a chemoprotection mechanism based on the removal of a drug transporter from the cell surface and most importantly the first time that a stroma phenotype has correlated with prognostic outcome in cancer. PMID:28160570

  5. Resistance of leukemia cells to cytarabine chemotherapy is mediated by bone marrow stroma, involves cell-surface equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 removal and correlates with patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Broekhuizen, Richard; González, Alfonso; Oyanadel, Claudia; Ernst, Daniel; García, Patricia; Montecinos, Viviana P; Court, Felipe; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) with the bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) determines a protective environment that favors tumor development and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We showed that BMSCs secrete soluble factors that protect AML cells from Ara-C induced cytotoxicity. This leukemia chemoresistance is associated with a decrease in the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) activity by inducing removal of ENT1 from the cell surface. Reduction of cell proliferation was also observed with activation of AKT and mTOR-dependent cell survival pathways, which may also contribute to the tumor chemoprotection. Analysis of primary BMSC cultures has demonstrated that AML patients with stroma capable to confer Ara-C resistance in vitro compared to AML patients without this stroma capacity were associated with a worse prognosis. The two year overall survival rate was 0% versus 80% respectively (p=0.0001). This is the first report of a chemoprotection mechanism based on the removal of a drug transporter from the cell surface and most importantly the first time that a stroma phenotype has correlated with prognostic outcome in cancer.

  6. Probing tumor-stroma interactions and response to photodynamic therapy in a 3D pancreatic cancer-fibroblast co-culture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glidden, Michael D.; Massodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal disease that is often unresectable by the time of diagnosis and is typically non-responsive to chemo- and radiotherapy, resulting in a five year survival of only 3%. Tumors of the pancreas are characterized by a dense fibrous stroma rich in extracellular matrix proteins, which is implicated in poor therapeutic response, though its precise roles remain poorly understood. Indeed, while the use of therapeutics that target the stroma is an emerging paradigm in the clinical management of this disease, the primary focus of such efforts is to enhance drug penetration through dense fibrous stroma and it is unclear to what extent the characteristically rigid stroma of pancreatic tumors imparts drug resistance by acting as a complex signaling partner, or merely as a physical barrier for drug delivery. Here we use 3D in vitro co-cultures of pancreatic cancer cells and normal human fibroblasts as a model system to study heterotypic interactions between these populations. Leveraging this in vitro model along with image-based methods for quantification of growth and therapeutic endpoints, we characterize these co-cultures and examine the role of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting tumor-fibroblast interactions in pancreatic tumors.

  7. Targeting of metastasis-promoting tumor-associated fibroblasts and modulation of pancreatic tumor-associated stroma with a carboxymethylcellulose-docetaxel nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Mark J; Hoang, Bryan; Lohse, Ines; Undzys, Elijus; Cao, Pinjiang; Do, Trevor; Gill, Bethany; Pintilie, Melania; Hedley, David; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-05-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterized by the desmoplastic reaction, a dense fibrous stroma that has been shown to be supportive of tumor cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, and has been associated with resistance to chemotherapy and reduced patient survival. Here, we investigated targeted depletion of stroma for pancreatic cancer therapy via taxane nanoparticles. Cellax-DTX polymer is a conjugate of docetaxel (DTX), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and acetylated carboxymethylcellulose, a construct which condenses into well-defined 120nm particles in an aqueous solution, and is suitable for intravenous injection. We examined Cellax-DTX treatment effects in highly stromal primary patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts and in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model of pancreatic cancer, focusing on specific cellular interactions in the stroma, pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. Greater than 90% of Cellax-DTX particles accumulate in smooth muscle actin (SMA) positive cancer-associated fibroblasts which results in long-term depletion of this stromal cell population, an effect not observed with Nab-paclitaxel (Nab-PTX). The reduction in stromal density leads to a >10-fold increase in tumor perfusion, reduced tumor weight and a reduction in metastasis. Consentingly, Cellax-DTX treatment increased survival when compared to treatment with gemcitabine or Nab-PTX in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model. Cellax-DTX nanoparticles interact with the tumor-associated stroma, selectively interacting with and depleting SMA positive cells and macrophage, effects of which are associated with significant changes in tumor progression and metastasis.

  8. Transcriptional evidence for the "Reverse Warburg Effect" in human breast cancer tumor stroma and metastasis: similarities with oxidative stress, inflammation, Alzheimer's disease, and "Neuron-Glia Metabolic Coupling".

    PubMed

    Pavlides, Stephanos; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Vera, Iset; Flomenberg, Neal; Frank, Philippe G; Casimiro, Mathew C; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-04-01

    Caveolin-1 (-/-) null stromal cells are a novel genetic model for cancer-associated fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Here, we used an unbiased informatics analysis of transcriptional gene profiling to show that Cav-1 (-/-) bone-marrow derived stromal cells bear a striking resemblance to the activated tumor stroma of human breast cancers. More specifically, the transcriptional profiles of Cav-1 (-/-) stromal cells were most closely related to the primary tumor stroma of breast cancer patients that had undergone lymph-node (LN) metastasis. This is consistent with previous morphological data demonstrating that a loss of stromal Cav-1 protein (by immuno-histochemical staining in the fibroblast compartment) is significantly associated with increased LN-metastasis. We also provide evidence that the tumor stroma of human breast cancers shows a transcriptional shift towards oxidative stress, DNA damage/repair, inflammation, hypoxia, and aerobic glycolysis, consistent with the "Reverse Warburg Effect". Finally, the tumor stroma of "metastasis-prone" breast cancer patients was most closely related to the transcriptional profiles derived from the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. This suggests that certain fundamental biological processes are common to both an activated tumor stroma and neuro-degenerative stress. These processes may include oxidative stress, NO over-production (peroxynitrite formation), inflammation, hypoxia, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which are thought to occur in Alzheimer?s disease pathology. Thus, a loss of Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated myofibroblasts may be a protein biomarker for oxidative stress, aerobic glycolysis, and inflammation, driving the "Reverse Warburg Effect" in the tumor micro-environment and cancer cell metastasis.

  9. Organized metabolic crime in prostate cancer: The coexpression of MCT1 in tumor and MCT4 in stroma is an independent prognosticator for biochemical failure.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sigve; Solstad, Ørjan; Moi, Line; Donnem, Tom; Eilertsen, Marte; Nordby, Yngve; Ness, Nora; Richardsen, Elin; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M

    2015-08-01

    Lactate import or export over cell membranes is facilitated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 4. Expression profiles can be markers of an oxidative or glycolytic phenotype. Descriptive studies and functional studies in neoplastic cells and fibroblasts in prostate cancer (PC) have suggested a distinct phenotype. We aimed to explore expression of MCT1 and MCT4 in PC cells and surrounding stroma in a large cohort. Additionally, we wanted to find out if distinct expression profiles were associated with biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS). Tissue microarrays were constructed from 535 patients with radical prostatectomies between January 1, 1995, and December 31, 2005. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression, and degrees of expression were evaluated semiquantitatively by 2 pathologists using light microscopy. For MCT1, there was only epithelial expression, whereas there was a low level of expression of MCT4 in tumor and stroma. A total of 172 patients had a low expression of MCT1 in tumor and MCT4 in stroma. There were 232 patients who had a high expression of MCT1 and a low expression of MCT4 in stroma. Only 11 patients had a low tumoral MCT1 expression and a high stromal MCT4 expression, and 26 patients (5%) had a high expression of both. Patients with a high-high combination had a significantly reduced BFFS (P = 0.011), and when adjusting for other factors, its effect was significant and independent (HR = 1.99, CI 95%: 1.09-3.62; P = 0.024). This study adds to the current understanding of the reversed Warburg effect to be a significant phenotype in PC. High coexpression of MCT1 in tumor and MCT4 in stroma is independently associated to a worse BFFS, and the strength of this association is as strong as having a Gleason score of ≥9. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. TβRIII Expression in Human Breast Cancer Stroma and the Role of Soluble TβRIII in Breast Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Bojana; Pickup, Michael W.; Chytil, Anna; Gorska, Agnieszka E.; Johnson, Kimberly C.; Moses, Harold L.; Owens, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The TGF-β pathway plays a major role in tumor progression through regulation of epithelial and stromal cell signaling. Dysfunction of the pathway can lead to carcinoma progression and metastasis. To gain insight into the stromal role of the TGF-β pathway in breast cancer, we performed laser capture microdissection (LCM) from breast cancer patients and reduction mammoplasty patients. Microdissected tumor stroma and normal breast stroma were examined for gene expression. Expression of the TGF-β type III receptor (TGFBR3) was greatly decreased in the tumor stroma compared to control healthy breast tissue. These results demonstrated a 44-fold decrease in TGFBR3 mRNA in tumor stroma in comparison to control tissue. We investigated publicly available databases, and have identified that TGFBR3 mRNA levels are decreased in tumor stroma. We next investigated fibroblast cell lines derived from cancerous and normal breast tissue and found that in addition to mRNA levels, TβRIII protein levels were significantly reduced. Having previously identified that cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete greater levels of tumor promoting cytokines, we investigated the consequences of soluble-TβRIII (sTβRIII) on fibroblasts. Fibroblast conditioned medium was analyzed for 102 human secreted cytokines and distinct changes in response to sTβRIII were observed. Next, we used the fibroblast-conditioned medium to stimulate human monocyte cell line THP-1. These results indicate a distinct transcriptional response depending on sTβRIII treatment and whether it was derived from normal or cancerous breast tissue. We conclude that the effect of TβRIII has distinct roles not only in cancer-associated fibroblasts but that sTβRIII has distinct paracrine functions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27827906

  11. Interstellar abundances - Gas and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, G. B.

    1974-01-01

    Data on abundances of interstellar atoms, ions and molecules in front of zeta Oph are assembled and analyzed. The gas-phase abundances of at least 11 heavy elements are significantly lower, relative to hydrogen, than in the solar system. The abundance deficiencies of certain elements correlate with the temperatures derived theoretically for particle condensation in stellar atmospheres or nebulae, suggesting that these elements have condensed into dust grains near stars. There is evidence that other elements have accreted onto such grains after their arrival in interstellar space. The extinction spectrum of zeta Oph can be explained qualitatively and, to a degree, quantitatively by dust grains composed of silicates, graphite, silicon carbide, and iron, with mantles composed of complex molecules of H, C, N, and O. This composition is consistent with the observed gas-phase deficiencies.

  12. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  13. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  14. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  15. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  16. Sunspots, Starspots, and Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, George A.; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The composition of plasma in solar and stellar atmospheres is not fixed, but varies from feature to feature. These variations are organized by the First Ionization Potential (FIP) of the element. Solar measurements often indicate that low FIP elements (< 10eV, such as Fe, Si, Mg) are enriched by factors of 3-4 in the corona relative to high FIP elements (>10 eV, such as C, N, O, Ar, He) compared to abundances in the photosphere. Stellar observations have also shown similar enrichments. An inverse FIP effect, where the low FIP elements are depleted, has been observed in stellar coronae of stars believed to have large starspots in their photospheres. The abundances are important for determining radiative loss rates in models, tracing the origin of the slow solar wind, and for understanding wave propagation in the chromosphere and corona. Recently, inverse FIP effects have been discovered in the Sun (Doschek, Warren, & Feldman 2015, ApJ, 808, L7) from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The inverse FIP regions seem always to be near sunspots and cover only a very small area (characteristic length = a few arcseconds). However, in pursuing the search for inverse FIP regions, we have found that in some sunspot groups the coronal abundance at a temperature of 3-4 MK can be near photospheric over much larger areas of the sun near the sunspots (e.g., 6,000 arcsec2). Also, sometimes the abundances at 3-4 MK are in between coronal and photospheric values. This can occur in small areas of an active region. It is predicted (Laming 2015, Sol. Phys., 12, 2) that the FIP effect should be highly variable in the corona. Several examples of coronal abundance variations are presented. Our work indicates that a comprehensive re-investigation of solar abundances is highly desirable. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  17. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    PubMed

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  18. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  19. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  20. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  1. Phosphorus Abundances in FGK Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Cescutti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We measured phosphorus abundances in 22 FGK dwarfs and giants that span -0.55 < [Fe/H] < 0.2 using spectra obtained with the Phoenix high-resolution infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak National Observatory Mayall 4 m telescope, the Gemini South Telescope, and the Arcturus spectral atlas. We fit synthetic spectra to the P i feature at 10581 Å to determine abundances for our sample. Our results are consistent with previously measured phosphorus abundances; the average [P/Fe] ratio measured in [Fe/H] bins of 0.2 dex for our stars are within ˜1σ compared to averages from other IR phosphorus studies. Our study provides more evidence that models of chemical evolution using the results of theoretical yields are underproducing phosphorus compared to the observed abundances. Our data better fit a chemical evolution model with phosphorus yields increased by a factor of 2.75 compared to models with unadjusted yields. We also found average [P/Si] = 0.02 ± 0.07 and [P/S] = 0.15 ± 0.15 for our sample, showing no significant deviations from the solar ratios for [P/Si] and [P/S] ratios.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of connective tissue known as myxoid stroma. Giant cell fibroblastoma, which is sometimes referred to as ... typically affects children and adolescents, is characterized by giant cells in the tumor. Rarely, the tumors involved ...

  3. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  4. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  5. Matrix architecture defines the preferential localization and migration of T cells into the stroma of human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Hélène; Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Damotte, Diane; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Validire, Pierre; Trautmann, Alain; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Donnadieu, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate localization and migration of T cells is a prerequisite for antitumor immune surveillance. Studies using fixed tumor samples from human patients have shown that T cells accumulate more efficiently in the stroma than in tumor islets, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. By combining immunostaining and real-time imaging in viable slices of human lung tumors, we revealed that the density and the orientation of the stromal extracellular matrix likely play key roles in controlling the migration of T cells. Active T cell motility, dependent on chemokines but not on β1 or β2 integrins, was observed in loose fibronectin and collagen regions, whereas T cells migrated poorly in dense matrix areas. Aligned fibers in perivascular regions and around tumor epithelial cell regions dictated the migratory trajectory of T cells and restricted them from entering tumor islets. Consistently, matrix reduction with collagenase increased the ability of T cells to contact cancer cells. Thus, the stromal extracellular matrix influences antitumor immunity by controlling the positioning and migration of T cells. Understanding the mechanisms by which this collagen network is generated has the potential to aid in the development of new therapeutics. PMID:22293174

  6. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  7. A loop of cancer-stroma-cancer interaction promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer via TNFα-TGFα-EGFR.

    PubMed

    Lau, T-S; Chan, L K-Y; Wong, E C-H; Hui, C W-C; Sneddon, K; Cheung, T-H; Yim, S-F; Lee, J H-S; Yeung, C S-Y; Chung, T K-H; Kwong, J

    2017-02-06

    Peritoneum is the most common site for ovarian cancer metastasis. Here we investigate how cancer epigenetics regulates reciprocal tumor-stromal interactions in peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer. Firstly, we find that omental stromal fibroblasts enhance colony formation of metastatic ovarian cancer cells, and de novo expression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) is induced in stromal fibroblasts co-cultured with ovarian cancer cells. We also observed an over-expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in ovarian cancer cells, which is regulated by promoter DNA hypomethylation as well as chromatin remodeling. Interestingly, this ovarian cancer-derived TNF-α induces TGF-α transcription in stromal fibroblasts through nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We further show that TGF-α secreted by stromal fibroblasts in turn promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Finally, we identify a TNFα-TGFα-EGFR interacting loop between tumor and stromal compartments of human omental metastases. Our results therefore demonstrate cancer epigenetics induces a loop of cancer-stroma-cancer interaction in omental microenvironment that promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer cells via TNFα-TGFα-EGFR.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 February 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.509.

  8. Role of Human Corneal Stroma-Derived Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells in Corneal Immunity and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Veréb, Zoltán; Póliska, Szilárd; Albert, Réka; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Boratkó, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Moe, Morten C.; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran

    2016-01-01

    Corneal tissue regeneration is of crucial importance for maintaining normal vision. We aimed to isolate and cultivate human corneal stroma-derived mesenchymal stem-like cells (CSMSCs) from the central part of cadaver corneas and study their phenotype, multipotency, role in immunity and wound healing. The isolated cells grew as monolayers in vitro, expressed mesenchymal- and stemness-related surface markers (CD73, CD90, CD105, CD140b), and were negative for hematopoietic markers as determined by flow cytometry. CSMSCs were able to differentiate in vitro into fat, bone and cartilage. Their gene expression profile was closer to bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) than to limbal epithelial stem cells (LESC) as determined by high-throughput screening. The immunosuppressive properties of CSMSCs were confirmed by a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), while they could inhibit proliferation of activated immune cells. Treatment of CSMSCs by pro-inflammatory cytokines and toll-like receptor ligands significantly increased the secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL-10) levels, as well as the cell surface adhesion molecules. CSMSCs were capable of closing a wound in vitro under different stimuli. These cells thus contribute to corneal tissue homeostasis and play an immunomodulatory and regenerative role with possible implications in future cell therapies for treating sight-threatening corneal diseases. PMID:27195722

  9. Proteome Analysis During Chondrocyte Differentiation in a New Chondrogenesis Model Using Human Umbilical Cord Stroma Mesenchymal Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J.; Arufe, Maria C.; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies. PMID:22008206

  10. Proteome analysis during chondrocyte differentiation in a new chondrogenesis model using human umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J; Arufe, Maria C; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies.

  11. Comparison of in vitro-cultivation of human mesenchymal stroma/stem cells derived from bone marrow and umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andrea; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Melzer, Catharina; Hass, Ralf

    2016-04-28

    Cell-mediated therapy is currently considered as a novel approach for many human diseases. Potential uses range from topic applications with the regeneration of confined tissue areas to systemic applications. Stem cells including mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSCs) represent a highly attractive option. Their potential to cure or alleviate human diseases is investigated in a number of clinical trials. A wide variety of methods has been established in the past years for isolation, cultivation and characterization of human MSCs as expansion is presently deemed a prerequisite for clinical application with high numbers of cells carrying reproducible properties. MSCs have been retrieved from various tissues and used in a multitude of settings whereby numerous experimental protocols are available for expansion of MSCs in vitro. Accordingly, different isolation, culture and upscaling techniques contribute to the heterogeneity of MSC characteristics and the, sometimes, controversial results. Therefore, this review discusses and summarizes certain experimental conditions for MSC in vitro culture focusing on adult bone marrow-derived and neonatal umbilical cord-derived MSCs in order to enhance our understanding for MSC tissue sources and to stratify different procedures. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313332

  13. Tumor Stroma Engraftment of Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Anti-Tumor Therapy against Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Shanna M.; Spaeth, Erika L.; Studeny, Matus; Zompetta, Claudia; Samudio, Ismael; Roby, Katherine; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Many ovarian cancers originate from ovarian surface epithelium, where they develop from cysts intermixed with stroma. The stromal layer is critical to the progression and survival of the neoplasm and consequently is recruited into the tumor microenvironment. Using both syngenic mouse tumors (ID8-R), and human xenograft (OVCAR3, SKOV3) tumor models, we first confirmed intraperitoneally-circulating MSC could target, preferentially engraft and differentiate into α-SMA+ myofibroblasts, suggesting their role as “reactive stroma” in ovarian carcinoma development and confirming their potential as a targeted delivery vehicle for the intratumoral production of interferon-beta (IFNβ). Then, mice with ovarian carcinomas received weekly IP injections of IFNβ expressing MSC, resulting in complete eradication of tumors in 70% of treated OVCAR3 mice (P = 0.004) and an increased survival of treated SKOV3 mice compared with controls (P = 0.01). Similar tumor growth control was observed using murine IFNβ delivered by murine MSC in ID8-R ovarian carcinoma. As a potential mechanism of tumor killing, MSC produced IFNβ induced caspase-dependent tumor cell apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that ovarian carcinoma engraft MSC to participate in myofibrovascular networks and that IFNβ produced by MSC intratumorally modulates tumor kinetics, resulting in prolonged survival. PMID:23260083

  14. Analysis of tumor- and stroma-supplied proteolytic networks reveals a brain metastasis-promoting role for cathepsin S

    PubMed Central

    Sevenich, Lisa; Bowman, Robert L.; Mason, Steven D.; Quail, Daniela F.; Rapaport, Franck; Elie, Benelita T.; Brogi, Edi; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Hahn, William C.; Holsinger, Leslie J.; Massagué, Joan; Leslie, Christina S.; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis remains the most common cause of death in most cancers, with limited therapies for combating disseminated disease. While the primary tumor microenvironment is an important regulator of cancer progression, it is less well understood how different tissue environments influence metastasis. We analyzed tumor-stroma interactions that modulate organ tropism of brain, bone and lung metastasis in xenograft models. We identified a number of potential modulators of site-specific metastasis, including cathepsin S as a regulator of breast-to-brain metastasis. High cathepsin S expression at the primary site correlated with decreased brain metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. Both macrophages and tumor cells produce cathepsin S, and only the combined depletion significantly reduced brain metastasis in vivo. Cathepsin S specifically mediates blood-brain barrier transmigration via proteolytic processing of the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B. Pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin S significantly reduced experimental brain metastasis, supporting its consideration as a therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:25086747

  15. Gluteal and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue depots as stroma cell source: gluteal cells display increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potentials.

    PubMed

    Iwen, Karl Alexander; Priewe, Anna-Christin; Winnefeld, Marc; Rose, Christian; Siemers, Frank; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Cakiroglu, Figen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schepky, Andreas; Klein, Johannes; Kramer, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Human adipose-derived stroma cells (ADSCs) have successfully been employed in explorative therapeutic studies. Current evidence suggests that ADSCs are unevenly distributed in subcutaneous adipose tissue; therefore, the anatomical origin of ADSCs may influence clinical outcomes. This study was designed to investigate proliferation and differentiation capacities of ADSCs from the gluteal and abdominal depot of 8 females. All had normal BMI (22.01 ± 0.39 kg/m(2) ) and waist circumference (81.13 ± 2.33 cm). Examination by physicians and analysis of 31 laboratory parameters did not reveal possibly confounding medical disorders. Gluteal and abdominal adipose tissue was sampled by en bloc resection on day 7 (±1) after the last menses. Histological examination did not reveal significant depot-specific differences. As assessed by BrdU assay, proliferation of cells from both depots was similar after 24 h and analysis of 15 cell surface markers by flow cytometry identified the isolated cells as ADSCs, again without depot-specific differences. ADSCs from both depots differentiated poorly to chondroblasts. Gluteal ADSCs displayed significantly higher adipogenic differentiation potential than abdominal cells. Osteogenic differentiation was most pronounced in gluteal cells, whereas differentiation of abdominal ADSCs was severely impaired. Our data demonstrate a depot-specific difference in ADSC differentiation potential with abdominal cells failing to meet the criteria of multipotent ADSCs. This finding should be taken into account in future explorations of ADSC-derived therapeutic strategies.

  16. Concentrative uptake of cyclic ADP-ribose generated by BST-1+ stroma stimulates proliferation of human hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Marina; Benvenuto, Federica; Pitto, Anna; Figari, Osvaldo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Bruzzone, Santina; Guida, Lucrezia; Franco, Luisa; Paleari, Laura; Bodrato, Nicoletta; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2005-02-18

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is an intracellular calcium mobilizer generated from NAD(+) by the ADP-ribosyl cyclases CD38 and BST-1. cADPR, both exogenously added and paracrinally produced by a CD38(+) feeder layer, has recently been demonstrated to stimulate the in vitro proliferation of human hemopoietic progenitors (HP) and also the in vivo expansion of hemopoietic stem cells. The low density of BST-1 expression on bone marrow (BM) stromal cells and the low specific activity of the enzyme made it unclear whether cADPR generation by a BST-1(+) stroma could stimulate HP proliferation in the BM microenvironment. We developed and characterized two BST-1(+) stromal cell lines, expressing an ectocellular cyclase activity similar to that of BST-1(+) human mesenchymal stem cells, the precursors of BM stromal cells. Long term co-culture of cord blood-derived HP over these BST-1(+) feeders determined their expansion. Influx of paracrinally generated cADPR into clonogenic HP was mediated by a concentrative, nitrobenzylthioinosine- and dipyridamole-inhibitable nucleoside transporter, this providing a possible explanation to the effectiveness of the hormone-like concentrations of the cyclic nucleotide measured in the medium conditioned by BST-1(+) feeders. These results suggest that the BST-1-catalyzed generation of extracellular cADPR, followed by the concentrative uptake of the cyclic nucleotide by HP, may be physiologically relevant in normal hemopoiesis.

  17. Of CARs and TRUCKs: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered with an inducible cytokine to modulate the tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Markus; Hombach, Andreas A; Abken, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy recently achieved impressive efficacy in early phase trials, in particular in hematologic malignancies, strongly supporting the notion that the immune system can control cancer. A current strategy of favor is based on ex vivo-engineered patient T cells, which are redirected by a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and recognize a predefined target by an antibody-derived binding domain. Such CAR T cells can substantially reduce the tumor burden as long as the targeted antigen is present on the cancer cells. However, given the tremendous phenotypic diversity in solid tumor lesions, a reasonable number of cancer cells are not recognized by a given CAR, considerably reducing the therapeutic success. This article reviews a recently described strategy for overcoming this shortcoming of the CAR T-cell therapy by modulating the tumor stroma by a CAR T-cell-secreted transgenic cytokine like interleukin-12 (IL-12). The basic process is that CAR T cells, when activated by their CAR, deposit IL-12 in the targeted tumor lesion, which in turn attracts an innate immune cell response toward those cancer cells that are invisible to CAR T cells. Such TRUCKs, T cells redirected for universal cytokine-mediated killing, exhibited remarkable efficacy against solid tumors with diverse cancer cell phenotypes, suggesting their evaluation in clinical trials.

  18. Abnormalities of Thymic Stroma may Contribute to Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Leaky Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Caraffi, Stefano; Paganini, Tiziana; Fontana, Elena; Giliani, Silvia; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Lymphostromal cross-talk in the thymus is essential to allow generation of a diversified repertoire of T lymphocytes and to prevent autoimmunity by self-reactive T cells. Hypomorphic mutations in genes that control T cell development have been associated with immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation both in humans and in mice. We have studied T cell development and thymic stroma architecture and maturation in two mouse models of leaky severe combined immune deficiency, carrying hypomorphic mutations in rag1 and lig4 genes. Defective T cell development was associated with abnormalities of thymic architecture that predominantly affect the thymic medulla, with reduction of the pool of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the ability of mTECs to express autoimmune regulator (Aire) is preserved in mutant mice, the frequency of mature mTECs expressing Aire and tissue-specific antigens is severely reduced. Similarly, the ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells is preserved in rag1 and lig4 mutant mice, but their number is greatly reduced. These data indicate that hypomorphic defects in T cell development may cause defective lymphostromal cross-talk and impinge on thymic stromal cells maturation, and thus favor immune dysregulation. PMID:21822418

  19. Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Elkarim, Rihab; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2014-08-01

    The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

  20. Analysis of differential gene expression in colorectal cancer and stroma using fluorescence-activated cell sorting purification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M J; Culhane, A C; Donovan, M; Coffey, J C; Barry, B D; Kelly, M A; Higgins, D G; Wang, J H; Kirwan, W O; Cotter, T G; Redmond, H P

    2009-01-01

    Tumour stroma gene expression in biopsy specimens may obscure the expression of tumour parenchyma, hampering the predictive power of microarrays. We aimed to assess the utility of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for generating cell populations for gene expression analysis and to compare the gene expression of FACS-purified tumour parenchyma to that of whole tumour biopsies. Single cell suspensions were generated from colorectal tumour biopsies and tumour parenchyma was separated using FACS. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting allowed reliable estimation and purification of cell populations, generating parenchymal purity above 90%. RNA from FACS-purified and corresponding whole tumour biopsies was hybridised to Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. Whole tumour and parenchymal samples demonstrated differential gene expression, with 289 genes significantly overexpressed in the whole tumour, many of which were consistent with stromal gene expression (e.g., COL6A3, COL1A2, POSTN, TIMP2). Genes characteristic of colorectal carcinoma were overexpressed in the FACS-purified cells (e.g., HOX2D and RHOB). We found FACS to be a robust method for generating samples for gene expression analysis, allowing simultaneous assessment of parenchymal and stromal compartments. Gross stromal contamination may affect the interpretation of cancer gene expression microarray experiments, with implications for hypotheses generation and the stability of expression signatures used for predicting clinical outcomes. PMID:19401702

  1. Analysis of differential gene expression in colorectal cancer and stroma using fluorescence-activated cell sorting purification.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J; Culhane, A C; Donovan, M; Coffey, J C; Barry, B D; Kelly, M A; Higgins, D G; Wang, J H; Kirwan, W O; Cotter, T G; Redmond, H P

    2009-05-05

    Tumour stroma gene expression in biopsy specimens may obscure the expression of tumour parenchyma, hampering the predictive power of microarrays. We aimed to assess the utility of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for generating cell populations for gene expression analysis and to compare the gene expression of FACS-purified tumour parenchyma to that of whole tumour biopsies. Single cell suspensions were generated from colorectal tumour biopsies and tumour parenchyma was separated using FACS. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting allowed reliable estimation and purification of cell populations, generating parenchymal purity above 90%. RNA from FACS-purified and corresponding whole tumour biopsies was hybridised to Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. Whole tumour and parenchymal samples demonstrated differential gene expression, with 289 genes significantly overexpressed in the whole tumour, many of which were consistent with stromal gene expression (e.g., COL6A3, COL1A2, POSTN, TIMP2). Genes characteristic of colorectal carcinoma were overexpressed in the FACS-purified cells (e.g., HOX2D and RHOB). We found FACS to be a robust method for generating samples for gene expression analysis, allowing simultaneous assessment of parenchymal and stromal compartments. Gross stromal contamination may affect the interpretation of cancer gene expression microarray experiments, with implications for hypotheses generation and the stability of expression signatures used for predicting clinical outcomes.

  2. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  3. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Valentina E.; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors. PMID:27611664

  4. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Carol Ann Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  5. Hematite Abundance on Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This figure shows the concentration of hematite measured by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument. The abundance of hematite is shown in red, with increasing brightness indicating increasing hematite abundance. The location and size of the individual TES observations on the surface are indicated by the individual squares. Black squares indicate observations with no detectable hematite. Data from 11 separate orbits acquired between Nov. 22, 1997 and April 25, 1998 are shown in this image. The TES data are superimposed on a Viking photomosaic for context. The image extends from 10 S to 10 N latitude and 350 W to 15 W longitude, covering an area 1500 km (940 miles) in longitude by 1200 km (750 miles) in latitude.

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. The MGS mission is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena CA.

  6. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  7. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  8. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  9. The CALIFA survey: Oxygen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Aff001

    We present here the last results we obtained on the spatial resolved analysis of the ionized gas of disk-dominated galaxies based on CALIFA data. CALIFA is an ongoing IFS survey of galaxies in the Local Univese (0.005 < z < 0.03) that has already obtained spectroscopic information up to ~2.5r e with a spatial resolution better than ~1 kpc for a total number of an statiscal sample of galaxies of different morphological types, covering the CM-diagram up to Mr<-18 mag. With nearly 2000 spectra obtained for each galaxy, CALIFA offer one of the best IFU data to study the starformation histories and chemical enrichment of galaxies. In this article we focus on the main results based on the analysis of the oxygen abundances based on the study of ionized gas in H ii regions and individual spaxels, and their relations with the global properties of galaxies. In summary we have found that: (1) the -Z relation does not present a secondary relation with the star-formation rate, when the abundance is measured at the effective radius; (2) the oxygen abundance present a strong correlation with the stellar surface density (Σ-Z relation); (3) the oxygen abundance profiles present three well defined regimes, (a) an overall negative radial gradient, between 0.5-2 r e , with a characteristic slope of α O/H ~-0.1 dex/r e , (b) an universal flatenning beyond >2r e and (c) an inner drop at <0.5r e which presence depends on the mass. All these results indicates that disk-galaxies present an overall inside-out growth, although with clear deviations from this simple scenario.

  10. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  11. Surface abundances of OC supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Foschino, S.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.; Howarth, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Some O and B stars show unusually strong or weak lines of carbon and/or nitrogen. These objects are classified as OBN or OBC stars. It has recently been shown that nitrogen enrichment and carbon depletion are the most likely explanations for the existence of the ON class. Aims: We investigate OC stars (all being supergiants) to check that surface abundances are responsible for the observed anomalous line strengths. Methods: We perform a spectroscopic analysis of three OC supergiants using atmosphere models. A fourth star was previously studied by us. Our sample thus comprises all OC stars known to date in the Galaxy. We determine the stellar parameters and He, C, N, and O surface abundances. Results: We show that all stars have effective temperatures and surface gravities fully consistent with morphologically normal O supergiants. However, OC stars show little, if any, nitrogen enrichment and carbon surface abundances consistent with the initial composition. OC supergiants are thus barely chemically evolved, unlike morphologically normal O supergiants. Based on observations obtained at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 089.D-0975.

  12. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  13. Loss of caveolin-1 in prostate cancer stroma correlates with reduced relapse-free survival and is functionally relevant to tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Gustavo; Morello, Matteo; Frolov, Anna; You, Sungyong; Li, Rile; Rosati, Fabiana; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Danza, Giovanna; Adam, Rosalyn M; Thompson, Timothy C; Lisanti, Michael P; Freeman, Michael R; Vizio, Dolores Di

    2013-09-01

    Levels of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in tumour epithelial cells increase during prostate cancer progression. Conversely, Cav-1 expression in the stroma can decline in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In a large cohort of 724 prostate cancers, we observed significantly decreased levels of stromal Cav-1 in concordance with increased Gleason score (p = 0.012). Importantly, reduced expression of Cav-1 in the stroma correlated with reduced relapse-free survival (p = 0.009), suggesting a role for stromal Cav-1 in inhibiting advanced disease. Silencing of Cav-1 by shRNA in WPMY-1 prostate fibroblasts resulted in up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation, and significantly altered expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis, including a > 2.5-fold increase in TGF-β1 and γ-synuclein (SNCG) gene expression. Moreover, silencing of Cav-1 induced migration of prostate cancer cells when stromal cells were used as attractants. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt caused down-regulation of TGF-β1 and SNCG, suggesting that loss of Cav-1 in the stroma can influence Akt-mediated signalling in the tumour microenvironment. Cav-1-depleted stromal cells exhibited increased levels of intracellular cholesterol, a precursor for androgen biosynthesis, steroidogenic enzymes, and testosterone. These findings suggest that loss of Cav-1 in the tumour microenvironment contributes to the metastatic behaviour of tumour cells by a mechanism that involves up-regulation of TGF-β1 and SNCG through Akt activation. They also suggest that intracrine production of androgens, a process relevant to castration resistance, may occur in the stroma. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Loss of caveolin-1 in prostate cancer stroma correlates with reduced relapse-free survival and is functionally relevant to tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Anna; You, Sungyong; Li, Rile; Rosati, Fabiana; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Danza, Giovanna; Adam, Rosalyn M; Thompson, Timothy C; Lisanti, Michael P; Freeman, Michael R; Vizio, Dolores Di

    2014-01-01

    Levels of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in tumour epithelial cells increase during prostate cancer progression. Conversely, Cav-1 expression in the stroma can decline in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In a large cohort of 724 prostate cancers, we observed significantly decreased levels of stromal Cav-1 in concordance with increased Gleason score (p = 0.012). Importantly, reduced expression of Cav-1 in the stroma correlated with reduced relapse-free survival (p = 0.009), suggesting a role for stromal Cav-1 in inhibiting advanced disease. Silencing of Cav-1 by shRNA in WPMY-1 prostate fibroblasts resulted in up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation, and significantly altered expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis, including a > 2.5-fold increase in TGF-β1 and γ-synuclein (SNCG) gene expression. Moreover, silencing of Cav-1 induced migration of prostate cancer cells when stromal cells were used as attractants. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt caused down-regulation of TGF-β1 and SNCG, suggesting that loss of Cav-1 in the stroma can influence Akt-mediated signalling in the tumour microenvironment. Cav-1-depleted stromal cells exhibited increased levels of intracellular cholesterol, a precursor for androgen biosynthesis, steroidogenic enzymes, and testosterone. These findings suggest that loss of Cav-1 in the tumour microenvironment contributes to the metastatic behaviour of tumour cells by a mechanism that involves up-regulation of TGF-β1 and SNCG through Akt activation. They also suggest that intracrine production of androgens, a process relevant to castration resistance, may occur in the stroma. PMID:23729330

  15. Prognostic value, localization and correlation of PD-1/PD-L1, CD8 and FOXP3 with the desmoplastic stroma in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Angela; Wang, Lai Mun; D'Costa, Zenobia; Allen, Paul; Azad, Abul; Silva, Michael A.; Soonawalla, Zahir; Liu, Stanley; McKenna, W. Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J.; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prognostic value of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1) together with CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and FOXP3+ Tregs in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) samples treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Whole-mount FFPE tissue sections from 145 pancreatectomies were immunohistochemically stained for PD-1, PD-L1, CD8 and FOXP3. Their expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics, and overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastases free-survival (DMFS), in the context of stroma density (haematoxylin-eosin) and activity (alpha-smooth muscle actin) and in regard to intratumoral lymphoid aggregates. The median OS was 21 months after a mean follow-up of 20 months (range, 2-69 months). In multivariate analysis, high PD-1+ TILs expression was associated with better OS (p = 0.049), LPFS (p = 0.017) and DMFS (p = 0.021). Similar findings were observed for CD8+ TILs, whereas FOXP3 and PD-L1 lacked prognostic significance. Although TIL distribution was heterogeneous, tumors of high stroma density had higher infiltration of CD8+ TILs than loose density stroma and vice versa (p < 0.001), whereas no correlation was found with stromal activity. Sixty (41.4%) tumors contained lymphoid aggregates and the presence of PD-1+ TILs was associated with better OS (p = 0.030), LPFS (p = 0.025) and DMFS (p = 0.033), whereas CD8+ TILs only correlated with superior LPFS (p = 0.039). PD-1+ and CD8+ TILs constitute independent prognostic markers in patients with PDAC treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Our study provides important insight on the role of PD-1/PD-L1 in the context of desmoplastic stroma and could help guide future immunotherapies in PDAC. PMID:27329602

  16. Multi-parametric profiling of renal cell, colorectal, and ovarian cancer identifies tumour-type-specific stroma phenotypes and a novel vascular biomarker.

    PubMed

    Corvigno, Sara; Frödin, Magnus; Wisman, G Bea A; Nijman, Hans W; Van der Zee, Ate Gj; Jirström, Karin; Nodin, Björn; Hrynchyk, Ina; Edler, David; Ragnhammar, Peter; Johansson, Martin; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Mezheyeuski, Artur; Östman, Arne

    2017-07-01

    A novel set of integrated procedures for quantification of fibroblast-rich stroma and vascular characteristics has recently been presented allowing discovery of novel perivascular and stromal biomarkers in colorectal, renal cell, and ovarian cancer. In the present study, data obtained through these procedures from clinically well-annotated collections of these three tumour types have been used to address two novel questions. First, data have been used to investigate if the three tumour types demonstrate significant differences regarding features such as vessel diameter, vessel density, and perivascular marker expression. Second, analyses of the cohorts have been used to explore the prognostic significance of a novel vascular metric, 'vessel distance inter-quartile range (IQR)' that describes intra-case heterogeneity regarding vessel distribution. The comparisons between the three tumour types demonstrated a set of significant differences. Vessel density of renal cell cancer was statistically significantly higher than in colorectal and ovarian cancer. Vessel diameter was statistically significantly higher in ovarian cancer. Concerning perivascular status, colorectal cancer displayed significantly higher levels of perivascular PDGFR-β expression than the other two tumour types. Intra-case heterogeneity of perivascular PDGFR-β expression was also higher in colorectal cancer. Notably, these fibroblast-dominated stroma phenotypes matched previously described experimental tumour stroma characteristics, which have been linked to differential sensitivity to anti-VEGF drugs. High 'vessel distance IQR' was significantly associated with poor survival in both renal cell cancer and colorectal cancer. In renal cell cancer, this characteristic also acted as an independent prognostic marker according to multivariate analyses including standard clinico-pathological characteristics. Explorative subset analyses indicated particularly strong prognostic significance of 'vessel

  17. Are disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and tumor-stroma ratio clinically applicable for patients undergoing surgical resection of primary colorectal cancer? The Leiden MRD study.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, F J; van Pelt, G W; van Leeuwen, A M; Willems, J M; Tollenaar, R A E M; Liefers, G J; Mesker, W E

    2016-12-01

    Current TNM staging does not appropriately identify high-risk colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and the presence of stroma in the primary tumor, i.e., the tumor-stroma ratio (TSR), in patients undergoing surgical resection of primary CRC provides information relevant for disease outcome. Patients with primary CRC (n = 125), consecutively admitted for curative resection between 2001 and 2007, were included in the study. All patients underwent BM aspiration before surgery. Detection of tumor cells was performed using immunocytochemical staining for cytokeratin (CK-ICC). The TSR was determined on diagnostic H&E stained sections of primary tumors. DTCs were detected in the BM of 23/125 patients (18 %). No association was found between BM status and overall survival (HR 0.97 (95 % CI 0.45-2.09), p = 0.93). Also, no significant difference was found in their 5-year survival rate (resp. 72 % and 68 % for BM-positive versus BM-negative patients). The TSR was found to be associated with a worse overall survival (HR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.02-4.57, p = 0.04) with 5-year survival rates of 84 % versus 62 % for stroma-low and stroma-high patients, respectively. No relation was found between the presence of DTCs and TSR. Our data indicate that the presence of DTCs in the BM of CRC patients is not associated with disease outcome. The TSR was, however, found to be associated with a worse overall survival, which indicates that for CRC the tumor microenvironment plays an important role in its behavior and prognosis.

  18. Elemental Abundances from Very Low Abundance HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Terlevich, Roberto J.; Terlevich, Elena

    1992-12-01

    In 1987 we initiated a program to mitigate the deficiency of known low metallicity galaxies. Following our discoveries of very low abundance H II regions in nearby dwarf galaxies (Skillman et al. 1988, 1989a,b), we used the IDS on the INT to to collect spectra of dwarf galaxies in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) of UV excess galaxies. Our survey of over 40 SBS galaxies was completed in January 1990 and we have identified roughly one dozen very low metallicity H II galaxies. Now, with a significant sample of these galaxies, several observational programs are possible; foremost of these is the measurement of the primordial helium abundance (eg., Pagel et al. 1992). We report here on observations from March 1991 and 1992 using the ISIS spectrograph on the WHT to obtain very high quality spectra of 8 of these newly discovered metal-poor galaxies. The ISIS double spectrograph allows simultaneous observations of the blue (3600 - 5100 Angstroms) and red (6300 - 6800 Angstroms). Thus, He, N, O, Ne and S abundances can be derived with relatively small observational uncertainties. We compare our new observations with those in the literature. Our preliminary analysis indicates a slightly larger scatter in He/H at low O/H than had been seen previously. The small scatter may have been due simply to the paucity of observations at low metallicity. References: Pagel, B.E.J., Simonson, E.A., Terlevich, R.J., & Edmunds, M.G. 1992, MNRAS, 255, 325 Skillman, E.D., Kennicutt, R.C., & Hodge, P.W. 1989a, ApJ, 347, 875 Skillman, E.D., Melnick, J., Terlevich, R., & Moles, M. 1988, A&A, 196, 31 Skillman, E.D., Terlevich, R., & Melnick, J. 1989b, MNRAS, 240, 563

  19. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  20. Prognostic value and clinicopathological features of PD-1/PD-L1 expression with mismatch repair status and desmoplastic stroma in Chinese patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Lin, Jiacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Liwei

    2017-02-07

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal cancer. Thus, the immune molecular markers which help to select PC patients are especially important. In this study, we aimed at systematically analyzing the expression of MLH1, MSH2, PD-L1 and PD-1, investigate their clinical significance and prognostic value. We found that high expression of PD-L1 on cancer cell membranes correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.033) and strongly correlated with poor-differentiation (P = 0.008); high expression of PD-1 on cell membranes of T-cells correlated with well-differentiation (P = 0.018) and strongly correlated with advanced T stage (P = 0.004); high PD-1 expression was associated with a significantly superior OS and was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.031). Then we found an inverse correlation between MSH2 expression and PD-L1 expression (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.295, P = 0.004). In subgroup analyses, we observed that PD-1 expression level was associated with OS only at low PD-L1 expression subgroup (P = 0.021). Finally, when we stratified the cases into four subgroups based on PD-1 expression and stroma density, we found that patients with high PD-1 expression and dense stroma had a better OS, while patients with low PD-1 expression and moderate stroma showed a worst outcome. Our result may provide more effective molecular markers for immunotherapeutic strategies of PC patients in clinical practice.

  1. CXCL12 and CXCR4, but not CXCR7, are primarily expressed by the stroma in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Clatot, Florian; Cornic, Marie; Berghian, Anca; Marchand, Vinciane; Choussy, Olivier; El Ouakif, Faissal; François, Arnaud; Ruminy, Philippe; Laberge-Le-Couteulx, Sophie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Jardin, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is involved in numerous models of metastatic dissemination, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We assessed the relative expressions of CXCL12, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in the stroma and the tumour of HNSCC, and evaluated the methylation status of the CXCL12 promoter.Snap-frozen, HPV negative HNSCC samples were micro-dissected to isolate the tumoural and stromal compartments. The expression levels of CXCL12, CXCR4 and CXCR7 were assessed by qRT-PCR, and the methylation level of the CXCL12 promoter was evaluated by pyrosequencing.In total, 23 matched tumour/stroma samples were analysed. Higher expressions of CXCR4 and CXCL12 were observed in the stroma (p = 0.012 and p < 0.0001, respectively). No significant difference in expression was observed for CXCR7. A high methylation level (>40%) of the CXCL12 promoter was observed in only a few tumoural samples (5/23) and was associated with a lower expression of the gene (p = 0.03).Stromal cells, rather than the tumour itself, are mainly responsible for the expression of both CXCL12 and CXCR4 expression in HNSCC. CXCR7 expression did not differ between the two compartments and was not related to CXCL12 or CXCR4 expression. Finally, the methylation of the CXCL12 promoter could only explain the low intra-tumoural expression of this gene in 20% of cases.

  2. Multicenter matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) identifies proteomic differences in breast-cancer-associated stroma.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Tim J A; Balluff, Benjamin D; Jones, Emrys A; Schöne, Cédrik D; Schmitt, Manfred; Aubele, Michaela; Kroep, Judith R; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Mesker, Wilma E; Walch, Axel; McDonnell, Liam A

    2014-11-07

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has rapidly established itself as a powerful biomarker discovery tool. To date, no formal investigation has assessed the center-to-center comparability of MALDI MSI experiments, an essential step for it to develop into a new diagnostic method. To test such capabilities, we have performed a multicenter study focused on biomarkers of stromal activation in breast cancer. MALDI MSI experiments were performed in two centers using independent tissue banks, infrastructure, methods, and practitioners. One of the data sets was used for discovery and the other for validation. Areas of intra- and extratumoral stroma were selected, and their protein signals were compared. Four protein signals were found to be significantly associated with tumor-associated stroma in the discovery data set measured in Munich. Three of these peaks were also detected in the independent validation data set measured in Leiden, all of which were also significantly associated with intratumoral stroma. Hierarchical clustering displayed 100% accuracy in the Munich MSI data set and 80.9% accuracy in the Leiden MSI data set. The association of one of the identified mass signals (PA28) with stromal activation was confirmed with immunohistochemistry performed on 20 breast tumors. Independent and international MALDI MSI investigations could identify validated biomarkers of stromal activation.

  3. Multipotent nestin-positive stem cells reside in the stroma of human eccrine and apocrine sweat glands and can be propagated robustly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Sabine; Rohr, Franziska; Weber, Caroline; Kier, Janina; Siemers, Frank; Kruse, Charli; Danner, Sandra; Brandenburger, Matthias; Matthiessen, Anna Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Human skin harbours multiple different stem cell populations. In contrast to the relatively well-characterized niches of epidermal and hair follicle stem cells, the localization and niches of stem cells in other human skin compartments are as yet insufficiently investigated. Previously, we had shown in a pilot study that human sweat gland stroma contains Nestin-positive stem cells. Isolated sweat gland stroma-derived stem cells (SGSCs) proliferated in vitro and expressed Nestin in 80% of the cells. In this study, we were able to determine the precise localization of Nestin-positive cells in both eccrine and apocrine sweat glands of human axillary skin. We established a reproducible isolation procedure and characterized the spontaneous, long-lasting multipotent differentiation capacity of SGSCs. Thereby, a pronounced ectodermal differentiation was observed. Moreover, the secretion of prominent cytokines demonstrated the immunological potential of SGSCs. The comparison to human adult epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) revealed differences in protein expression and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, we found a coexpression of the stem cell markers Nestin and Iα6 within SGSCs and human sweat gland stroma. In conclusion the initial results of the pilot study were confirmed, indicating that human sweat glands are a new source of unique stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential, high proliferation capacity and remarkable self renewal. With regard to the easy accessibility of skin tissue biopsies, an autologous application of SGSCs in clinical therapies appears promising.

  4. A clinically suitable ex vivo expansion culture system for LTC-IC and CFC using stroma-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, R; McGlave, P B; Miller, J S; Wissink, S; Lin, W N; Verfaillie, C M

    1997-08-01

    FACS-selected CD34+ HLA-DR- cells (DR- cells) may provide a source of benign stem cells suitable for autografting in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other hematological malignancies. However, DR- cell selection depletes the majority of committed hematopoietic progenitors, which may be important for early engraftment. Furthermore, only a small number of DR- cells may be selectable in certain patients. These impediments to the use of DR- cells for autografting may be overcome through the development of ex vivo culture systems that support expansion and initial differentiation of primitive progenitors. Because 2-week culture of DR- cells in a stroma "noncontact" system supplemented with interleukin-3 (IL-3) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP-1alpha) expands both long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) and colony-forming cells (CFCs), we adapted this system to a clinically applicable method for expanding LTC-ICs and CFCs ex vivo. In initial small-scale studies, DR cells were grown in stroma conditioned medium (SCM) supplemented with IL-3 with or without additional growth-promoting cytokines and the chemokines PF-4 and BB10010, all approved for clinical use. An IL-3 dose-dependent expansion of committed progenitors and LTC-ICs was observed when DR- cells were cultured in tissue culture plates in SCM+IL-3 for 2 weeks. Similar CFC expansion along with increased (5-fold) LTC-IC expansion was observed following addition of PF-4 to SCM+IL-3 cultures. The addition of stem cell factor (SCF), but not of IL-6, IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF, IL-1, and IL-7, increased CFC and LTC-IC expansion beyond the levels observed with SCM+IL-3 alone. We next evaluated the suitability of this culture system for scale-up. Culture of 2-6 x 10(5) DR- cells in gas-permeable bags with SCM+IL-3 resulted in similar CFC and LTC-IC expansion as seen in small-scale cultures. In addition, we observed that progenitors

  5. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  6. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  7. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  8. The Molecular Signature of the Stroma Response in Prostate Cancer-Induced Osteoblastic Bone Metastasis Highlights Expansion of Hematopoietic and Prostate Epithelial Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Secondini, Chiara; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Schwaninger, Ruth; Fleischmann, Achim; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; Delorenzi, Mauro; Temanni, Ramzi; Mills, Ian G.; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Thalmann, George N.; Cecchini, Marco G.

    2014-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between cancer cells and the tissue-specific stroma is critical for primary and metastatic tumor growth progression. Prostate cancer cells colonize preferentially bone (osteotropism), where they alter the physiological balance between osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, and elicit prevalently an osteoblastic response (osteoinduction). The molecular cues provided by osteoblasts for the survival and growth of bone metastatic prostate cancer cells are largely unknown. We exploited the sufficient divergence between human and mouse RNA sequences together with redefinition of highly species-specific gene arrays by computer-aided and experimental exclusion of cross-hybridizing oligonucleotide probes. This strategy allowed the dissection of the stroma (mouse) from the cancer cell (human) transcriptome in bone metastasis xenograft models of human osteoinductive prostate cancer cells (VCaP and C4-2B). As a result, we generated the osteoblastic bone metastasis-associated stroma transcriptome (OB-BMST). Subtraction of genes shared by inflammation, wound healing and desmoplastic responses, and by the tissue type-independent stroma responses to a variety of non-osteotropic and osteotropic primary cancers generated a curated gene signature (“Core” OB-BMST) putatively representing the bone marrow/bone-specific stroma response to prostate cancer-induced, osteoblastic bone metastasis. The expression pattern of three representative Core OB-BMST genes (PTN, EPHA3 and FSCN1) seems to confirm the bone specificity of this response. A robust induction of genes involved in osteogenesis and angiogenesis dominates both the OB-BMST and Core OB-BMST. This translates in an amplification of hematopoietic and, remarkably, prostate epithelial stem cell niche components that may function as a self-reinforcing bone metastatic niche providing a growth support specific for osteoinductive prostate cancer cells. The induction of this

  9. Reciprocal leukemia-stroma VCAM-1/VLA-4-dependent activation of NF-κB mediates chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacamo, Rodrigo; Chen, Ye; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Zhang, Min; Spaeth, Erika L.; Wang, Ying; Battula, Venkata L.; Mak, Po Yee; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ruvolo, Peter; Schober, Wendy D.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, Martin H.; Strunk, Dirk; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Konoplev, Sergej; Davis, R. Eric; Konopleva, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia cells are protected from chemotherapy-induced apoptosis by their interactions with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). Yet the underlying mechanisms associated with this protective effect remain unclear. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of BM-MSCs revealed that coculture with leukemia cells upregulated the transcription of genes associated with nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. Moreover, primary BM-MSCs from leukemia patients expressed NF-κB target genes at higher levels than their normal BM-MSC counterparts. The blockade of NF-κB activation via chemical agents or the overexpression of the mutant form of inhibitor κB-α (IκBα) in BM-MSCs markedly reduced the stromal-mediated drug resistance in leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. In particular, our unique in vivo model of human leukemia BM microenvironment illustrated a direct link between NF-κB activation and stromal-associated chemoprotection. Mechanistic in vitro studies revealed that the interaction between vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) played an integral role in the activation of NF-κB in the stromal and tumor cell compartments. Together, these results suggest that reciprocal NF-κB activation in BM-MSCs and leukemia cells is essential for promoting chemoresistance in the transformed cells, and targeting NF-κB or VLA-4/VCAM-1 signaling could be a clinically relevant mechanism to overcome stroma-mediated chemoresistance in BM-resident leukemia cells. PMID:24599548

  10. Two-wave nanotherapy to target the stroma and optimize gemcitabine delivery to a human pancreatic cancer model in mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Huan; Zhao, Yang; Dong, Juyao; Xue, Min; Lin, Yu-Shen; Ji, Zhaoxia; Mai, Wilson X; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre E

    2013-11-26

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) elicits a dense stromal response that blocks vascular access because of pericyte coverage of vascular fenestrations. In this way, the PDAC stroma contributes to chemotherapy resistance in addition to causing other problems. In order to improve the delivery of gemcitabine, a first-line chemotherapeutic agent, a PEGylated drug-carrying liposome was developed, using a transmembrane ammonium sulfate gradient to encapsulate the protonated drug up to 20% w/w. However, because the liposome was precluded from entering the xenograft site due to the stromal interference, we developed a first-wave nanocarrier that decreases pericyte coverage of the vasculature through interference in the pericyte recruiting TGF-β signaling pathway. This was accomplished using a polyethyleneimine (PEI)/polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNP) for molecular complexation to a small molecule TGF-β inhibitor, LY364947. LY364947 contains a nitrogen atom that attaches, through H-bonding, to PEI amines with a high rate of efficiency. The copolymer coating also facilitates systemic biodistribution and retention at the tumor site. Because of the high loading capacity and pH-dependent LY364947 release from the MSNPs, we achieved rapid entry of IV-injected liposomes and MSNPs at the PDAC tumor site. This two-wave approach provided effective shrinkage of the tumor xenografts beyond 25 days, compared to the treatment with free drug or gemcitabine-loaded liposomes only. Not only does this approach overcome stromal resistance to drug delivery in PDAC, but it also introduces the concept of using a stepwise engineered approach to address a range of biological impediments that interfere in nanocancer therapy in a spectrum of cancers.

  11. Concurrent PEDF deficiency and Kras mutation induce invasive pancreatic cancer and adipose-rich stroma in mice.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Paul J; Fitchev, Philip S; Bentrem, David J; Melstrom, Laleh G; Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Krantz, Seth B; Heiferman, Michael J; Chung, Chuhan; Adrian, Kevin; Cornwell, Mona L; Flesche, Jan B; Rao, Sambasiva M; Talamonti, Mark S; Munshi, Hidayatullah G; Crawford, Susan E

    2012-10-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a non-inhibitory SERPIN with potent antiangiogenic activity, has been recently implicated in metabolism and adipogenesis, both of which are known to influence pancreatic cancer progression. Increased pancreatic fat in human pancreatic tumour correlates with greater tumour dissemination while PEDF deficiency in mice promotes pancreatic hyperplasia and visceral obesity. Oncogenic Ras, the most common mutation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), has similarly been shown to promote adipogenesis and premalignant lesions. In order to determine whether concurrent loss of PEDF is sufficient to promote adipogenesis and tumorigenesis in the pancreas, the authors ablated PEDF in an EL-Kras(G12D) mouse model of non-invasive cystic papillary neoplasms. EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice developed invasive PDAC associated with enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and increased peripancreatic fat with adipocyte hypertrophy and intrapancreatic adipocyte infiltration (pancreatic steatosis). In support of increased adipogenesis, the stroma of the pancreas of EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice demonstrated higher tissue levels of two lipid droplet associated proteins, tail-interacting protein 47 (TIP47, perilipin 3) and adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, Pperilipin 2), while adipose triglyceride lipase, a key factor in lipolysis, was decreased. In patients with PDAC, both tissue and serum levels of PEDF were decreased, stromal TIP47 expression was higher and the tissue VEGF to PEDF ratio was increased (p<0.05). These data highlight the importance of lipid metabolism in the tumour microenvironment and identify PEDF as a critical negative regulator of both adiposity and tumour invasion in the pancreas.

  12. Tbx18 Regulates the Differentiation of Periductal Smooth Muscle Stroma and the Maintenance of Epithelial Integrity in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Zhang, Huimin; Troy, Joseph M.; Lu, Xiaochen; Kispert, Andreas; Evans, Sylvia M.; Stubbs, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX18 is essential to mesenchymal cell differentiation in several tissues and Tbx18 loss-of-function results in dramatic organ malformations and perinatal lethality. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Tbx18 is required for the normal development of periductal smooth muscle stromal cells in prostate, particularly in the anterior lobe, with a clear impact on prostate health in adult mice. Prostate abnormalities are only subtly apparent in Tbx18 mutants at birth; to examine postnatal prostate development we utilized a relatively long-lived hypomorphic mutant and a novel conditional Tbx18 allele. Similar to the ureter, cells that fail to express Tbx18 do not condense normally into smooth muscle cells of the periductal prostatic stroma. However, in contrast to ureter, the periductal stromal cells in mutant prostate assume a hypertrophic, myofibroblastic state and the adjacent epithelium becomes grossly disorganized. To identify molecular events preceding the onset of this pathology, we compared gene expression in the urogenital sinus (UGS), from which the prostate develops, in Tbx18-null and wild type littermates at two embryonic stages. Genes that regulate cell proliferation, smooth muscle differentiation, prostate epithelium development, and inflammatory response were significantly dysregulated in the mutant urogenital sinus around the time that Tbx18 is first expressed in the wild type UGS, suggesting a direct role in regulating those genes. Together, these results argue that Tbx18 is essential to the differentiation and maintenance of the prostate periurethral mesenchyme and that it indirectly regulates epithelial differentiation through control of stromal-epithelial signaling. PMID:27120339

  13. Analysis of the chondrogenic potential and secretome of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord stroma.

    PubMed

    Arufe, Maria C; De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesus; Fuentes, Isaac; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from umbilical cord stroma were isolated by plastic adherence and characterized by flow cytometry, looking for cells positive for OCT3/4 and SSEA-4 as well as the classic MSC markers CD44, CD73, CD90, Ki67, CD105, and CD106 and negative for CD34 and CD45. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the genes ALP, MEF2C, MyoD, LPL, FAB4, and AMP, characteristic for the differentiated lineages, were used to evaluate early and late differentiation of 3 germ lines. Direct chondrogenic differentiation was achieved through spheroid formation by MSCs in a chondrogenic medium and the presence of chondrogenic markers at 4, 7, 14, 28, and 46 days of culture was tested. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses were utilized to assess the expression of collagen type I, collagen type II, and collagen type X throughout the time studied. We found expression of all the markers as early as 4 days of chondrogenic differentiation culture, with their expression increasing with time, except for collagen type I, which decreased in expression in the formed spheroids after 4 days of differentiation. The signaling role of Wnt during chondrogenic differentiation was studied by western blot. We observed that β-catenin expression decreased during the chondrogenic process. Further, a secretome study to validate our model of differentiation in vitro was performed on spheroids formed during the chondrogenesis process. Our results indicate the multipotential capacity of this source of human cells; their chondrogenic capacity could be useful for future cell therapy in articular diseases.

  14. Successful nucleofection of rat adipose-derived stroma cells with Ambystoma mexicanum epidermal lipoxygenase (AmbLOXe).

    PubMed

    Fülbier, Angela; Schnabel, Reinhild; Michael, Stefanie; Vogt, Peter M; Strauß, Sarah; Reimers, Kerstin; Radtke, Christine

    2014-10-09

    Adipose-derived stroma cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for cell-based gene therapy but are generally difficult to transfect. Nucleofection has proven to be an efficient method for transfection of primary cells. Therefore, we used this technique to transfect ASCs with a vector encoding for Ambystoma mexicanum epidermal lipoxygenase (AmbLOXe) which is a promising bioactive enzyme in regenerative processes. Thereby, we thought to even further increase the large regenerative potential of the ASCs. ASCs were isolated from the inguinal fat pad of Lewis rats and were subsequently transfected in passage 1 using Nucleofector® 2b and the hMSC Nucleofector kit. Transfection efficiency was determined measuring co-transfected green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a flow cytometer and gene expression in transfected cells was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Moreover, cell migration was assessed using a scratch assay and results were tested for statistical significance with ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. High initial transfection rates were achieved with an average of 79.8 ± 2.82% of GFP positive cells although longer cultivation periods reduced the number of positive cells to below 5% after four passages. Although successful production of AmbLOXe transcript could be proven the gene product had no measureable effect on cell migration. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of ASCs to serve as a vehicle of AmbLOXe transport for gene therapeutic purposes in regenerative medicine. One potential field of applications could be peripheral nerve injuries.

  15. SCCOHT tumors acquire chemoresistance and protection by interacting mesenchymal stroma/stem cells within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Otte, Anna; Yang, Yuanyuan; von der Ohe, Juliane; Melzer, Catharina; Hillemanns, Peter; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Hass, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug testing of SCCOHT-1 and BIN-67 tumor cells revealed synergistic growth-inhibition of >95% in vitro with a combination of foretinib and FK228. Application of this drug combination in vivo in NODscid mice-induced SCCOHT-1GFP tumors was associated with ~6-fold reduction in tumor mass within 10 days, whereby synergistic effects of the two compounds remained undetectable compared to previous results with foretinib treatment alone. Histopathologic evaluation revealed a reduced vascularization and a lower amount of proliferating cells in the treated tumors. Surprisingly, a simultaneous significant accumulation of extracellular matrix structures with positive elastin-van Gieson staining was observed following foretinib/FK228 exposure. Expression analysis of treated animal tumors exhibited various changes including increased mouse transcript levels of elastin, laminin, and fibronectin. In parallel, markers for mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) including CD73 and CD90 were detectable in all mouse tumors suggesting a possible involvement of these cells in extracellular matrix restructure. Indeed, incubation of MSC with FK228 or foretinib/FK228 demonstrated morphologic alterations and enhanced expression of laminin and fibronectin. Moreover, a co-culture of MSC with lentiviral-labeled SCCOHT-1GFP cells contributed to protection of the tumor cells against FK228-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, explant cultures of SCCOHT-1GFP-induced tumors acquired an increased resistance to FK228 and a combination of foretinib/FK228 in contrast to foretinib alone. Together, these data suggested that FK228-mediated extracellular matrix protein expression by MSC contributes to increased protection and enhanced resistance of SCCOHT tumors which could represent a more general mechanism of MSC during drug-induced alterations of a tumor microenvironment.

  16. Human mesenchymal stroma/stem cells exchange membrane proteins and alter functionality during interaction with different tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Otte, Anna; Hass, Ralf

    2015-05-15

    To analyze effects of cellular interaction between human mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) and different cancer cells, direct co-cultures were performed and revealed significant growth stimulation of the tumor populations and a variety of protein exchanges. More than 90% of MCF-7 and primary human HBCEC699 breast cancer cells as well as NIH:OVCAR-3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells acquired CD90 proteins during MSC co-culture, respectively. Furthermore, SK-OV-3 ovarian cancer cells progressively elevated CD105 and CD90 proteins in co-culture with MSC. Primary small cell hypercalcemic ovarian carcinoma cells (SCCOHT-1) demonstrated undetectable levels of CD73 and CD105; however, both proteins were significantly increased in the presence of MSC. This co-culture-mediated protein induction was also observed at transcriptional levels and changed functionality of SCCOHT-1 cells by an acquired capability to metabolize 5'cAMP. Moreover, exchange between tumor cells and MSC worked bidirectional, as undetectable expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in MSC significantly increased after co-culture with SK-OV-3 or NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. In addition, a small population of chimeric/hybrid cells appeared in each MSC/tumor cell co-culture by spontaneous cell fusion. Immune fluorescence demonstrated nanotube structures and exosomes between MSC and tumor cells, whereas cytochalasin-D partially abolished the intercellular protein transfer. More detailed functional analysis of FACS-separated MSC and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells after co-culture revealed the acquisition of epithelial cell-specific properties by MSC, including increased gene expression for cytokeratins and epithelial-like differentiation factors. Vice versa, a variety of transcriptional regulatory genes were down-modulated in NIH:OVCAR-3 cells after co-culture with MSC. Together, these mutual cellular interactions contributed to functional alterations in MSC and tumor cells.

  17. A phenotype from tumor stroma based on the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors, associated with prognosis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eiró, Noemí; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Vázquez, Julio; del Casar, José M; González, Luis O; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact of the phenotype of both mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAFs) in early breast cancer patients, specifically assessed as to their expression of MMP/TIMP relative to their position within the tumor (i.e., localization at the tumor center or invasive front) and the occurrence of distant metastases.. An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)−1, −2, −7, −9, −11, −13 and −14, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)−1, −2 and −3, both at tumor center and at invasive front, in 107 patients with primary ductal invasive breast tumors. Data were analyzed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. Our results indicated that MMP-11 expression by MICs, and TIMP-2 expression by CAFs at either the tumor center or the invasive front, were the most potent independent prognostic factors for predicting the clinical outcome of patients. Using the unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we found well-defined clusters of cases identifying subgroups of tumors showing a high molecular profile of MMPs/TIMPs expression by stromal cells (CAFs and MICs), both at the tumor center and at the invasive front, which were strongly associated with a higher prevalence of distant metastasis. In addition, we found combinations of these clusters defining subpopulations of breast carcinomas differing widely in their clinical outcome. The results presented here identify biologic markers useful to categorize patients into different subgroups based on their tumor stroma, which may contribute to improved understanding of the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:26140253

  18. Glutamine fuels a vicious cycle of autophagy in the tumor stroma and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Flomenberg, Neal; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-01-01

    activity, driving a vicious cycle of catabolism in the tumor stroma and anabolic tumor cell expansion. PMID:22236876

  19. A developmental model of neuroblastoma: differentiating stroma-poor tumors' progress along an extra-adrenal chromaffin lineage.

    PubMed

    Hoehner, J C; Gestblom, C; Hedborg, F; Sandstedt, B; Olsen, L; Påhlman, S

    1996-11-01

    The prognosis of children with neuroblastoma (NB) is dependent upon the patient's age at diagnosis, the location of the primary tumor, and histologic tumor cell differentiation. These characteristics, as well as the presumption that NB results from clonal expansion of primitive cells involved in sympathetic nervous system (SNS) development, predict that a model of tumorigenesis based upon normal fetal SNS histogenesis might indicate tumor progenitor status and define biologic and clinical behavior. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to examine a panel of marker gene products predicted or shown to be expressed during SNS development in the normal human fetal SNS from 8 to 24 weeks' gestational age. A similar analysis was performed in a selection of clinical NB tumors, and the results were compared. In a subset of differentiating, often extra-adrenal NB tumors in patients who frequently had a favorable outcome; advancing morphologic tumor cell differentiation spatially paralleled an advancing fetal extra-adrenal chromaffin marker gene expression phenotype (ie, increasing TrkA, TrkC, TH, IGF-2, and neuron-specific enolase expression but a lack of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase expression). In these tumors, expression of gene products associated with normal fetal sympathetic ganglionic differentiation (ie, Bcl-2, HNK-1, and neuropeptide Y) was lost with morphologic tumor cell differentiation. In contrast, undifferentiated tumors, the majority of which were high stage, adrenal in origin, and prognostically unfavorable, displayed marker expression characteristics mirroring that of an early fetal ganglionic lineage. Thus, we show that morphologic differentiation in stroma-poor NB tumors, long held as an important prognostic feature in tumor grading systems, often corresponds to an extra-adrenal chromaffin rather than a ganglion cell or adrenal medullary chromaffin phenotype. Understanding the biology of extra-adrenal chromaffin tissues may

  20. Cancer/stroma interplay via cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase promotes breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Li, Chien-Feng; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Tsai, Kelvin K; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2014-07-25

    Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in primary breast cancer increases tumor growth and metastasis. However, the clinical significance of stromal IDO and the regulation of stromal IDO are unclear. Metabolomics and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to study the effect of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells on IDO expression in co-cultured human breast fibroblasts. Biochemical inhibitors and short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) were used to clarify how prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) upregulates IDO expression. Associations of stromal IDO with clinicopathologic parameters were tested in tumor specimens. An orthotopic animal model was used to examine the effect of COX-2 and IDO inhibitors on tumor growth. Kynurenine, the metabolite generated by IDO, increases in the supernatant of fibroblasts co-cultured with COX-2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. PGE2 released by cancer cells upregulates IDO expression in fibroblasts through an EP4/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway. Conversely, fibroblast-secreted kynurenine promotes the formation of the E-cadherin/Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)/S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) complex, resulting in degradation of E-cadherin to increase breast cancer invasiveness. The enhancement of motility of breast cancer cells induced by co-culture with fibroblasts is suppressed by the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-tryptophan. Pathological analysis demonstrates that upregulation of stromal IDO is a poor prognosis factor and is associated with of COX-2 overexpression. Co-expression of cancer COX-2 and stromal IDO predicts a worse disease-free and metastasis-free survival. Finally, COX-2 and IDO inhibitors inhibit tumor growth in vivo. Integration of metabolomics and molecular and pathological approaches reveals the interplay between cancer and stroma via COX-2, and IDO promotes tumor progression and predicts poor patient survival.

  1. Human Mesenchymal Stroma/Stem Cells Exchange Membrane Proteins and Alter Functionality During Interaction with Different Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Otte, Anna

    2015-01-01

    To analyze effects of cellular interaction between human mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) and different cancer cells, direct co-cultures were performed and revealed significant growth stimulation of the tumor populations and a variety of protein exchanges. More than 90% of MCF-7 and primary human HBCEC699 breast cancer cells as well as NIH:OVCAR-3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells acquired CD90 proteins during MSC co-culture, respectively. Furthermore, SK-OV-3 ovarian cancer cells progressively elevated CD105 and CD90 proteins in co-culture with MSC. Primary small cell hypercalcemic ovarian carcinoma cells (SCCOHT-1) demonstrated undetectable levels of CD73 and CD105; however, both proteins were significantly increased in the presence of MSC. This co-culture-mediated protein induction was also observed at transcriptional levels and changed functionality of SCCOHT-1 cells by an acquired capability to metabolize 5′cAMP. Moreover, exchange between tumor cells and MSC worked bidirectional, as undetectable expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in MSC significantly increased after co-culture with SK-OV-3 or NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. In addition, a small population of chimeric/hybrid cells appeared in each MSC/tumor cell co-culture by spontaneous cell fusion. Immune fluorescence demonstrated nanotube structures and exosomes between MSC and tumor cells, whereas cytochalasin-D partially abolished the intercellular protein transfer. More detailed functional analysis of FACS-separated MSC and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells after co-culture revealed the acquisition of epithelial cell-specific properties by MSC, including increased gene expression for cytokeratins and epithelial-like differentiation factors. Vice versa, a variety of transcriptional regulatory genes were down-modulated in NIH:OVCAR-3 cells after co-culture with MSC. Together, these mutual cellular interactions contributed to functional alterations in MSC and tumor cells. PMID:25525832

  2. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  3. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, Joseph (Technical Monitor); DeLuca, Edward

    2005-01-01

    During the final year of this program we concentrated on understanding the how to constrain the models with the best available observations. Work on developing accurate temperature and density diagnostics fkom TRACE and CDS together with constrained fits of non-potential force free fields will be extremely useful in the guiding the next generation of coronal models. The program has produced three fully operation numerical codes that model multi-species of ions in coronal loops: Static models and constant flow models. The time dependent numerical models have not been completed. We have extended the steady flow investigations to study the effect these flows have on coronal structure as observed with TRACE. Coronal observations derive from heavy-ion emission; thus, we focus on the extent to which flow may modify coronal abundances by examining the heavy-ion abundance stratification within long-lived loops. We discuss the magnitudes of the physical effects modeled and compare simulated results with TRACE observations. These results can have a profound effect on the interpretation of TRACE observations.

  4. Abundances in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  5. Solar-system abundances of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Ebihara, M.

    1982-01-01

    Elemental analyses of the Ogueil Cl meteorite and all previous Cl chondrite analyses were employed to develop a new solar system abundance table, including the standard deviation and number of analyses for each element. The table also comprises the abundances of radioactive and radiogenic nuclides at the present and 4.55 AE ago, as well as abundances by weight in a typical Cl chondrite. The new abundances were within 20% of those determined by Cameron (1982), except for 14 cases in the range 20-50%, and 5 over 50%. The solar abundances were compared with the Cl abundances, showing a total of only 7 disagreements. No significant discrepancies were detected in the major cosmochemical groups, and a smooth trend was found in the abundances of odd-A nuclides. The new set is interpreted as accurate to 10%, with the Cl chondrites matching the primordial solar system abundances to at most 10% deviation.

  6. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  7. Liposarcome myxoide sous cutané

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Asmâa; Benchekroune, Nadia; Bouchbika, Zineb; Taoufiq, Nezha; Jouhadi, Hassan; Sahraoui, Souha; Benider, Abdelatif

    2017-01-01

    Bien que les liposarcomes myxoïdes (LSM) soient la forme la plus fréquente des sarcomes des tissus mous chez l’adulte, leur localisation primaire superficielle est rare. Ainsi, on individualise deux formes de sarcomes: superficiel et profond qui sont distincts non seulement par leur siège et leur fréquence mais aussi par leur pronostic qui est relativement meilleur dans les sarcomes superficiels. Nous rapportons une observation d’un liposarcome sous cutané de la cuisse droite. Le diagnostic a été confirmé histologiquement après une année d’évolution de la symptomatologie clinique. La prise en charge a consisté en une exérèse large suivie d’une radiothérapie locorégionale. L’évolution a été marquée par une rémission complète maintenue après un recul de 32 mois. Nous soulignons, par la présente observation que la rareté des sarcomes superficiels peut être source de retard diagnostic, ce qui pourrait compromettre leur pronostic. PMID:28533883

  8. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  9. Expression of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa co-determines the prognosis of colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong-hai; Li, Jian-jun; Xie, Fang-wei; Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan-Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients' prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842.

  10. Clinicopathological implications to micropapillary bladder urothelial carcinoma of the presence of sialyl Lewis X-decorated mucin 1 in stroma-facing membranes.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tomochika; Hoshino, Hitomi; Taga, Minekatsu; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Osamu; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2017-06-27

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC) comprises more than 90% of all bladder cancers. Among several UC variants, micropapillary UC (MPUC) is a rare one with high potential for lymphovascular invasion and subsequent lymph node metastasis. Histologically, MPUC is characterized by the presence of small papillary carcinoma cell clusters surrounded by lacunar spaces. Immunohistochemically, the outer circumference of these clusters, that is, the stroma-facing membrane of carcinoma cells, is reportedly almost invariably positive for mucin 1 (MUC1) protein and to a lesser extent for sialyl Lewis X (sLeX) carbohydrates; however, the clinicopathological implications of these expression patterns have not been fully investigated. We performed immunohistochemical analysis of MPUC (n = 11) and conventional UC (n = 57) for MUC1 and sLeX to determine whether these factors immunolocalized. Dual immunofluorescence staining was also carried out to assess MUC1 and sLeX colocalization. We also performed Western blot analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells misexpressing both recombinant epitope-tagged MUC1 and glycosyltransferases enabling sLeX biosynthesis. MPUC samples preferentially exhibited both MUC1 protein and sLeX carbohydrate expression on the stroma-facing membrane of carcinoma cells. Based on univariate analysis, MUC1 expression in that pattern was positively correlated with tumor extension, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, disease stage, and relatively poor patient prognosis. A comparable sLeX expression pattern also correlated positively with tumor extension and nodal metastasis. Based on multivariate analysis, localization of MUC1 and sLeX on the stroma-facing side of the membrane was positively correlated with lymph node metastasis. Overall, our immunofluorescence findings as well as immunoprecipitation analyses of Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants strongly suggest that MUC1 is a potential scaffold protein for sLeX carbohydrates in MPUC. Both MUC1 and s

  11. Prognostic role and correlation of CA9, CD31, CD68 and CD20 with the desmoplastic stroma in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, Zenobia; Azad, Abul; Silva, Michael A.; Soonawalla, Zahir; Allen, Paul; Liu, Stanley; McKenna, W. Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J.; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic value of hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9; CA9), vessel density (CD31), with macrophages (CD68) and B cells (CD20) that can interact and lead to immune suppression and disease progression using scanning and histological mapping of whole-mount FFPE pancreatectomy tissue sections from 141 primarily resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) samples treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Their expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics, and overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastases free-survival (DMFS), also in the context of stroma density (haematoxylin-eosin) and activity (alpha-smooth muscle actin). The median OS was 21 months after a mean follow-up of 20 months (range, 2–69 months). The median tumor surface area positive for CA9 and CD31 was 7.8% and 8.1%, respectively. Although total expression of these markers lacked prognostic value in the entire cohort, nevertheless, high tumor compartment CD68 expression correlated with worse PFS (p = 0.033) and DMFS (p = 0.047). Also, high CD31 expression predicted for worse OS (p = 0.004), PFS (p = 0.008), LPFS (p = 0.014) and DMFS (p = 0.004) in patients with moderate density stroma. High stromal and peripheral compartment CD68 expression predicted for significantly worse outcome in patients with loose and moderate stroma density, respectively. Altogether, in contrast to the current notion, hypoxia levels in PDAC appear to be comparable to other malignancies. CD31 and CD68 constitute prognostic markers in patient subgroups that vary according to tumor compartment and stromal density. Our study provides important insight on the pathophysiology of PDAC and should be exploited for future treatments. PMID:27637082

  12. Combination of imatinib with CXCR4 antagonist BKT140 overcomes the protective effect of stroma and targets CML in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beider, Katia; Darash-Yahana, Merav; Blaier, Orly; Koren-Michowitz, Maya; Abraham, Michal; Wald, Hanna; Wald, Ori; Galun, Eithan; Eizenberg, Orly; Peled, Amnon; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-05-01

    Functional role of CXCR4 in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) progression was evaluated. Elevated CXCR4 significantly increased the in vitro survival and proliferation in response to CXCL12. CXCR4 stimulation resulted in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk)-1/2, Akt, S6K, STAT3, and STAT5 prosurvival signaling pathways. In accordance, we found that in vitro treatment with CXCR4 antagonist BKT140 directly inhibited the cell growth and induced cell death of CML cells. Combination of BKT140 with suboptimal concentrations of imatinib significantly increased the anti-CML effect. BKT140 induced apoptotic cell death, decreasing the levels of HSP70 and HSP90 chaperones and antiapoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-XL, subsequently promoting the release of mitochondrial factors cytochrome c and SMAC/Diablo. Bone marrow (BM) stromal cells (BMSC) markedly increased the proliferation of CML cells and protected them from imatinib-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, BMSCs elevated proto-oncogene BCL6 expression in the CML cells in response to imatinib treatment, suggesting the possible role of BCL6 in stroma-mediated TKI resistance. BKT140 reversed the protective effect of the stroma, effectively promoted apoptosis, and decreased BCL6 levels in CML cells cocultured with BMSCs. BKT140 administration in vivo effectively reduced the growth of subcutaneous K562-produced xenografts. Moreover, the combination of BKT140 with low-dose imatinib markedly inhibited tumor growth, achieving 95% suppression. Taken together, our data indicate the importance of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in CML growth and CML-BM stroma interaction. CXCR4 inhibition with BKT140 antagonist efficiently cooperated with imatinib in vitro and in vivo. These results provide the rational basis for CXCR4-targeted therapy in combination with TKI to override drug resistance and suppress residual disease.

  13. Expression of pim-1 in Tumors, Tumor Stroma and Tumor-Adjacent Mucosa Co-Determines the Prognosis of Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan–Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients’ prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. Clinical Trials Gov. Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842 PMID:24116137

  14. A role for stroma-derived annexin A1 as mediator in the control of genetic susceptibility to T-cell lymphoblastic malignancies through prostaglandin E2 secretion.

    PubMed

    Santos, Javier; González-Sánchez, Laura; Matabuena-Deyzaguirre, María; Villa-Morales, María; Cozar, Patricia; López-Nieva, Pilar; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Fresno, Manuel; Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Guenet, Jean-Louis; Montagutelli, Xavier; Fernández-Piqueras, José

    2009-03-15

    Cancer susceptibility is essentially attributable to multiple low-penetrance genes. Using interspecific consomic and congenic mice between the tumor-resistant SEG/Pas and the tumor-sensitive C57BL/6J strains, a region on chromosome 19 involved in the genetic resistance to gamma-irradiation-induced T-cell lymphomas (Tlyr1) has been identified. Through the development of nonoverlapping subcongenic strains, it has been further shown that Anxa1 may be a candidate resistance gene on the basis of its differential expression in thymus stroma cells after gamma-radiation exposure. In addition, thymus stroma cells of thymic lymphomas exhibited a significant reduction in the expression levels of Anxa1. Interestingly, the activity of Anxa1 relies on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) induction that brings about apoptosis in thymocytes. In fact, in vitro transfection experiments revealed that PGE(2) production was enhanced when HEK 293 cells were transfected with full-length cDNAs of Anxa1, with PGE(2) production in the cells transfected with the allele of the resistant strain (Anxa1(Tyr)) being higher than that in cells transfected with the allele of the susceptible strain (Anxa1(Phe)). Furthermore, the presence of this compound in the medium induced apoptosis of immature CD4(+)CD8(+)CD3(low) cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results improve our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms triggering T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development while highlighting the relevance of the stroma in controlling genetic susceptibility and the use of PGE(2) as a new therapeutic approach in T-cell hematologic malignancies.

  15. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A.; Pinilla, Mabel G.; Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Onate, Sergio A.

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  16. Supra-organization and optical anisotropies of the extracellular matrix in the amniotic membrane and limbal stroma before and after explant culture

    PubMed Central

    Valdetaro, Gisele P.; Aldrovani, Marcela; Padua, Ivan R. M.; Cristovam, Priscila C.; Gomes, José A. P.; Laus, José L.

    2016-01-01

    In this research we evaluated the supramolecular organizations and the optical anisotropical properties of the de-epithelialized human amniotic membrane and rabbit limbal stroma, before and after explant culture. Birefringence, monochromatic light spectral absorption and linear dichroism of the main extracellular matrix biopolymers, that is, the fibrillar collagens and proteoglycans, were investigated by polarized light microscopy combined with image analysis. Our results demonstrated that the culture procedure–induced stimuli altered the supra-organizational characteristics (in terms of collagens/proteoglycans spatial orientation and ordered-aggregational state) of the amniotic and limbal extracellular matrix, which led to changes in optical anisotropical properties. PMID:28018719

  17. Mineral Abundances in Martian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Using traditional geochemical calculations with in situ Martian cosmochemical data researchers Harry (Hap) McSween Jr. and Ian McGlynn (University of Tennessee) and Deanne Rogers (SUNY at Stony Brook) have developed a method for identifying the major and minor minerals in soils at the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landing sites. The team used information from the MER Athena instrument package operating on Mars since January, 2004. They created two models using MiniTES spectra, Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) data, and Mossbauer spectrometer data to calculate the mineralogy of average dark soils on the Gusev crater plains and on Meridiani Planum, located on opposite sides of Mars. Soils at both locations are similarly composed of minerals derived from the comminution of basalts (about three quarters by weight) and other minerals derived from rocks altered by chemical weathering (about one quarter by weight). This mixture of possibly unrelated materials (primary and altered) might mean that the alteration of soil did not occur in place and that the basaltic and alteration suites of minerals came from different sources. The nearly identical modal mineralogy at two widely-separated locations on the planet supports a previous hypothesis based on comparable chemical compositions that soils have been homogenized, if not globally then at least over large areas of the Martian surface. Yet, global maps of orbital remote sensing data have not shown surface abundances of alteration minerals as high as those in the Martian soils.

  18. Observing chemical abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic resonance lines of the major elements were observed in the atmospheres of a few comets, by using vacuum ultraviolet spectrographs on board rockets or orbiting observatories. Dust-to-gas ratios were also deduced for two comets through a Finson-Probstein's analysis of their dust-tail isophotes. The geometric albedo of the dust for the phase angle alpha of the observations is not accurately known but, the dust-to-gas ratio is not overly sensitive to the actual value of this albedo. Infrared observations of the dust head of some comets show that the bulk of cometary dust must be silicates, although a minor component (5-10 percent) of carbon compounds is rather likely, because of poor dielectric properties of the grains. This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that interplanetary dust probably of cometary origin, that was collected in the stratosphere by NASA-U2 Spacecraft, is chondritic in nature. Metal abundances in the head of a sungrazing comet support the chondritic hypothesis.

  19. Stardust Abundance Variations among Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar grain abundances reflect the degree of processing primitive materials have experienced. This is evidenced by the wide range of silicate stardust abundances among primitive meteorites (10 to 300 ppm) [1], attributable to parent body hydrothermal processing. Stardust abundance variations are also pronounced in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs), that have not experienced parent body processing (300 to > 10,000 ppm) [2-4]. The large range in stardust abundances among CP IDPs thus reflect nebular processing. Here we present results of a systematic search for stardust among cluster CP IDPs. Our goals are to establish mineralogical trends among IDPs with different stardust abundances. This may shed light into the nature of isotopically normal presolar grains (GEMS grains?; 5) if their abundances vary similarly to that of isotopically exotic stardust grains.

  20. Abundance scaling in stars, nebulae and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, David C.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Groves, Brent A.

    2017-04-01

    We present a new basis for scaling abundances with total metallicity in nebular photoionization models, based on extensive Milky Way stellar abundance data, to replace the uniform scaling normally used in the analysis of H II regions. Our goal is to provide a single scaling method and local abundance reference standard for use in nebular modelling and its key inputs, the stellar atmosphere and evolutionary track models. We introduce a parametric enrichment factor, ζ, to describe how atomic abundances scale with total abundance, which allows for a simple conversion between scales based on different reference elements (usually oxygen or iron). The models and parametric description provide a more physically realistic approach than simple uniform abundance scaling. With appropriate parameters, the methods described here may be applied to H II regions in the Milky Way, large and dwarf galaxies in the local Universe, active galactic nuclei, and to star-forming regions at high redshift.

  1. A Tumor-stroma Targeted Oncolytic Adenovirus Replicated in Human Ovary Cancer Samples and Inhibited Growth of Disseminated Solid Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 1010 v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15–40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression. PMID:22948673

  2. Defining lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer by the proportion of lymphocyte-rich stroma and its significance in routine histopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Haruo; Mori-Shiraishi, Kazuko; Nakajima, Morio; Ueki, Hamaichi

    2015-12-01

    Lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer (LPBC) defined by the density of stromal lymphocytes shows favorable behavior. However, considerable distribution heterogeneity of lymphocytes is a major problem. The present study defined LPBC by the proportion of lymphocyte-rich stroma with the cut-off values of 30, 50, and 75%, and clinicopathologically analyzed mainly LPBC (area > 30%) defined by the cut-off value of 30%. LPBCs (area > 30%), 39 cases in total, were composed mainly of triple-negative and HER2(+) /ER(-) subtypes, without any luminal A-like subtype. LPBCs were composed predominantly of histological grade 3 tumors, without any grade 1 lesions. Multivariate analyses on 477 consecutive tumors revealed that ER-negativity and grade 3 status associated significantly with LPBC. LPBC (area > 30%) showed better disease-free survival than grade-matched controls, and it was a good indicator of complete pathological remission after pre-operative chemotherapy. Patients with LPBC with the cut-off value of 50% and that of 75% showed 100% disease-free survival. These results demonstrated the validity of our definition of LPBC. Our data also suggest that de-differentiated cancers without TILs could be regarded as high-grade cancer without lymphocyte-mediated responses. In conclusion, the definition of LPBC by the proportion of lymphoid stroma is useful for prognostication of high grade breast cancer in routine diagnosis. © 2015 The Authors. Pathology International published by Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. In Vivo Adipogenesis in Rats Measured by Cell Kinetics in Adipocytes and Plastic-Adherent Stroma-Vascular Cells in Response to High-Fat Diet and Thiazolidinedione

    PubMed Central

    Tchoukalova, Yourka D.; Fitch, Mark; Rogers, Pamela M.; Covington, Jeffrey D.; Henagan, Tara M.; Ye, Jianping; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Ravussin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of adipogenesis contributes to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. The current in vitro approaches for its assessment represent crude estimates of the adipogenic potential because of the disruption of the in vivo microenvironment. A novel assessment of in vivo adipogenesis using the incorporation of the stable isotope deuterium (2H) into the DNA of isolated adipocytes and stroma-vascular fraction from adipose tissue has been developed. In the current study, we have refined this technique by purifying the adipocytes via a negative immune selection and sorting the plastic adherent stroma-vascular (aSV) subfraction (using 3 h culture) that contains mostly adipocyte progenitor cells and ∼10% of small adipocytes. Using a 3-week 8% 2H2O ingestion with a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD plus pioglitazone (HFD-P), we demonstrate that the fractions of new aSV cells (faSV) and immunopurified adipocytes (fAD) (the ratio of their 2H-enrichment of DNA to the maximal 2H-enrichment of DNA of bone marrow reference cells) recapitulate the known hyperplastic mechanism of weight gain with pioglitazone treatment. We conclude that faSV and fAD are reliable indices of in vivo adipogenesis. The proposed method represents a valuable tool for studying the effect of interventions (drugs, diets, and exercise) on in vivo adipogenesis. PMID:22124466

  4. Association of body mass index with ER, PR and 14-3-3σ expression in tumor and stroma of type I and type II endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Peevey, Joseph F.; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L.; Maniar, Kruti P.; Kim, J. Julie

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a prominent risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC) and can impede on surgical and hormonal treatments. Markers of EC, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), phospho(Ser473)-AKT (pAKT) and 14-3-3 sigma (14-3-3σ) were measured in EC tissues in both the tumor and stroma and grouped by body mass index (BMI). Immunohistochemical scoring of 82 cases of Type 1 and Type II EC tissues revealed a significantly increased tumor expression of ER, PR and 14-3-3σ in women with Type I (BMI < 40) as compared to Type II (BMI < 30) EC. With higher BMI, only PR and 14-3-3σ in the tumor epithelium was significantly higher in Type I than Type II. In particular, Type I EC exhibited significantly increased levels of only PR from patients with BMI > 40 compared to BMI < 40. Type II EC showed increased expression of ER in the stroma only between high and low BMI. Analysis of the TCGA RNA-Seq mRNA expression of ER, PR, PIK3CA, PTEN and SFN (gene for 14-3-3σ) confirmed increased PR expression in EC of obese women. In conclusion, ER, PR and 14-3-3σ are differentially regulated in Type I compared to Type II EC while PR is dysregulated in obese women with Type I EC. These findings have potential implications for efficacy of progestin treatment in obese women. PMID:28476021

  5. Ovarian steroids, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and/or aspartic proteinases cooperate to control endometrial remodeling by regulating gene expression in the stroma and glands.

    PubMed

    Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Lemoine, Pascale; Courtoy, Pierre J; Marbaix, Etienne; Henriet, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Explants from nonmenstrual endometria cultured in the absence of ovarian hormones undergo tissue breakdown. Addition of estradiol and progesterone (EP) prevents proteolysis. Explants include stromal and epithelial compartments which play different but complementary roles in endometrial physiology, including tissue remodeling and hormonal response. In order to characterize the cell type-specific contribution to regulation of tissue breakdown, we characterized the transcriptomes of microdissected stromal and glandular areas from endometrial explants cultured with or without EP. The datasets were also compared to other published endometrial transcriptomes. Finally, the contribution of proteolysis, hypoxia, and MAPKs to the regulation of selected genes was further investigated in explant culture. This analysis identified distinct gene expression profiles in stroma and glands, with differential response to EP, but functional clustering underlined convergence in biological processes, further indicating that endometrial remodeling requires cooperation between the two compartments through expression of cell type-specific genes. Only partial overlaps were observed between lists of genes involved in different occurrences of endometrial breakdown, pointing to a limited number of potentially crucial regulators but also to the requirement for additional mechanisms controlling tissue remodeling. We identified a group of genes differentially regulated by EP in stroma and glands among which some were sensitive to MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases and were not induced by hypoxia. In conclusion, MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases likely act in concert with EP to locally and specifically control differential expression of genes between degrading and preserved areas of the human endometrium.

  6. Photosynthesis under osmotic stress : Effect of high solute concentrations on the permeability properties of the chloroplast envelope and on activity of stroma enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, W M; Heber, U

    1981-12-01

    1. Increasing the sorbitol concentration in a suspension of intact chloroplasts induced a fast, transient and not very specific efflux of metabolites from chloroplasts to the medium. Stroma proteins were retained by the chloroplasts. 2. Within the first 30 s following hypertonic stress, the chloroplast volume decreased according to the Boyle-Mariotte relation. A subsequent and transient increase suggested some influx of external solute. 3. Dark reactions of intact chloroplasts such as starch degradation and formation of labelled 3-phosphoglycerate from dihydroxyacetone phosphate or ribose-5-phosphate and (14)CO2 were inhibited at low water potentials. After chloroplast rupture, the activity of stromal enzymes was decreased by high solute concentrations. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exhibited a decrease of Vmax, while KmCO 2 remained unaltered. With sorbitol, sucrose, glycerol or glycinebetaine, 50% inhibition of enzymes was observed at osmotic potentials between 40 and 50 bar, with ethyleneglycol at about 70 bar. With salts such as KCl, 50% inhibition was found at 15 to 20 bar. 4. A comparison between inhibition of photosynthesis in intact chloroplasts and inhibition of enzymes in stroma extracts by solutes supports the notion that inhibition of photosynthesis at high osmotic potentials is mainly a solute effect. Another factor contributing to inhibition of photosynthesis in isolated chloroplasts is the loss of intermediates and cofactors which occurs during rapid osmotic dehydration.

  7. Functional and molecular mapping of uncoupling between vascular permeability and loss of vascular maturation in ovarian carcinoma xenografts: the role of stroma cells in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Assaf A; Israely, Tomer; Dafni, Hagit; Meir, Gila; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2005-11-01

    Maintaining homogeneous perfusion in tissues undergoing remodeling and vascular expansion requires tight orchestration of the signals leading to endothelial sprouting and subsequent recruitment of perivascular contractile cells and vascular maturation. This regulation, however, is frequently disrupted in tumors. We previously demonstrated the role of tumor-associated myofibroblasts in vascularization and exit from dormancy of human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The aim of this work was to determine the contribution of stroma- and tumor cell-derived angiogenic growth factors to the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and maturation in MLS human ovarian carcinoma tumors. We show by RT-PCR and by in situ hybridization that VEGF was expressed by the tumor cells, while angiopoietin-1 and -2 were expressed only by the infiltrating host stroma cells. Vascular maturation was detected in vivo by vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, measured by BOLD contrast MRI and validated by immunostaining of histologic sections to alpha-smooth muscle actin. Vascular permeability was measured in vivo by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using albumin-based contrast material and validated in histologic sections by fluorescent staining of the biotinylated contrast material. MRI as well as histologic correlation maps between vascular maturation and vascular permeability revealed a wide range of vascular phenotypes, in which the distribution of vascular maturation and vasoreactivity did not overlap spatially with reduced permeability. The large heterogeneity in the degree of vascular maturation and permeability is consistent with the differential expression pattern of VEGF and angiopoietins during tumor angiogenesis.

  8. Versican G1 and G3 domains are upregulated and latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein-4 is downregulated in breast cancer stroma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuko; Kuwabara, Hiroko; Yoneda, Masahiko; Isogai, Zenzo; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Shibayama, Yuro

    2012-01-01

    Cancers are supported by a distinct type of stroma, and versican is overexpressed in the stroma of malignant tumors, including breast cancer. Versican interacts with hyaluronan and fibrillin-1 at its amino terminus (G1) and carboxyl terminus (G3), respectively. Fibrillin-1 also associates with latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein (LTBP)-1 and -4. The detailed alteration of these molecules in breast cancer tissues is still unclear. In 18 patients, alteration of versican, fibrillin-1 and LTBP-1 and 4 was elucidated in comparison with matched normal tissues, using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, slot blotting and immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the protein expression and clinicopathological features was also investigated. In breast cancer tissues, mRNAs for versican V1 and V0 were upregulated, and the extracted protein levels of the versican G1 and G3 domains were increased. Meanwhile, LTBP-4 was decreased, and fibrillin-1 and LTBP-1 remained unchanged. The immunohistochemical observations were consistent with the biochemical findings, and the molecules were localized in the stromal tissue rather than in the cancer cells themselves. The expression of versican G3 and G1 domains was positively related to the Ki67 index of carcinoma cells and tumor size, respectively. The stromal alterations of versican and LTBP-4 might influence the carcinogenesis and progression of breast tumor cells and modulate their biological phenotypes.

  9. Stroma-induced Jagged1 expression drives PC3 prostate cancer cell migration; disparate effects of RIP-generated proteolytic fragments on cell behaviour and Notch signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Delury, Craig; Hart, Claire; Brown, Mick; Clarke, Noel; Parkin, Edward

    2016-03-25

    The Notch ligand Jagged1 is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) which yields a soluble ectodomain (sJag) and a soluble Jagged1 intracellular domain (JICD). The full-length Jagged1 protein enhances prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation and is highly expressed in metastatic cells. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms by which Jagged1 or its RIP-generated fragments might promote PCa bone metastasis. In the current study we show that bone marrow stroma (BMS) induces Jagged1 expression in bone metastatic prostate cancer PC3 cells and that this enhanced expression is mechanistically linked to the promotion of cell migration. We also show that RIP-generated Jagged1 fragments exert disparate effects on PC3 cell behaviour and Notch signaling. In conclusion, the expression of both the full-length ligand and its RIP-generated fragments must be considered in tandem when attempting to regulate Jagged1 as a possible PCa therapy. - Highlights: • Bone marrow stroma induces Jagged1 expression in prostate cancer (PCa) PC3 cells. • This enhanced expression of full-length Jagged1 is required for PC3 cell migration. • Proteolytic fragments of Jagged1 exert disparate effects on PC3 cell behaviour. • Effects of fragments on cell behaviour do not correlate with Notch signaling. • Effects of Jagged1 and its fragments on PCa metastasis likely to be complex.

  10. A tumor-stroma targeted oncolytic adenovirus replicated in human ovary cancer samples and inhibited growth of disseminated solid tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-12-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 10(10) v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15-40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression.

  11. In vivo adipogenesis in rats measured by cell kinetics in adipocytes and plastic-adherent stroma-vascular cells in response to high-fat diet and thiazolidinedione.

    PubMed

    Tchoukalova, Yourka D; Fitch, Mark; Rogers, Pamela M; Covington, Jeffrey D; Henagan, Tara M; Ye, Jianping; Hellerstein, Marc K; Ravussin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of adipogenesis contributes to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. The current in vitro approaches for its assessment represent crude estimates of the adipogenic potential because of the disruption of the in vivo microenvironment. A novel assessment of in vivo adipogenesis using the incorporation of the stable isotope deuterium ((2)H) into the DNA of isolated adipocytes and stroma-vascular fraction from adipose tissue has been developed. In the current study, we have refined this technique by purifying the adipocytes via a negative immune selection and sorting the plastic adherent stroma-vascular (aSV) subfraction (using 3 h culture) that contains mostly adipocyte progenitor cells and ∼10% of small adipocytes. Using a 3-week 8% (2)H(2)O ingestion with a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD plus pioglitazone (HFD-P), we demonstrate that the fractions of new aSV cells (f(aSV)) and immunopurified adipocytes (f(AD)) (the ratio of their (2)H-enrichment of DNA to the maximal (2)H-enrichment of DNA of bone marrow reference cells) recapitulate the known hyperplastic mechanism of weight gain with pioglitazone treatment. We conclude that f(aSV) and f(AD) are reliable indices of in vivo adipogenesis. The proposed method represents a valuable tool for studying the effect of interventions (drugs, diets, and exercise) on in vivo adipogenesis.

  12. Prognostic Impact of CD163+ Macrophages in Tumor Stroma and CD8+ T-Cells in Cancer Cell Nests in Invasive Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takuya; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Hirai, Hideaki; Seino, Hiroko; Morohashi, Satoko; Wu, Yunyan; Wakiya, Taiichi; Kimura, Norihisa; Kudo, Daisuke; Ishido, Keinosuke; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Kijima, Hiroshi; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinicopathological influence of tumor-infiltrating cluster of differentiation (CD) 163(+) macrophages and CD8(+) T-cells, and to clarify the prognostic effects of these cells in patients with invasive extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EHBC). The numbers of CD8(+) T-cells in cancer cell nests and CD163(+) macrophages in tumor stroma were evaluated using immunohistochemistry in 101 resected EHBC specimens. Correlations with clinicopathological variables and overall survival were analyzed. Perihilar EHBC and perineural invasion were significantly associated with a low number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cells. Poorly- differentiated histology and nodal metastasis were significantly associated with a high number of tumor-infiltrating CD163(+) macrophages. A combination of high number of CD8(+) T-cells and low number of CD163(+) macrophages was independently related to better overall survival in the whole patient cohort (hazard ratio=0.127, p<0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio=0.139, p=0.021). Infiltrating CD163(+) macrophages in tumor stroma and CD8(+) T-cells in cancer cell nests have a prognostic impact in patients with EHBC following resection and also after adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhances maintenance of primitive human hematopoietic progenitors and skews them towards myeloid differentiation in a stroma-noncontact culture system.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anskar Y H; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) can be maintained in a cytokine-supplemented stroma-noncontact (SNC) system. Here, we tested if all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), known to improve expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells, would enhance human HPC maintenance in a SNC culture system. CD34+CD38-Lin- cells from UCB were cultured in transwells above AFT024 in the presence of Flt-3 ligand (FLT) and thrombopoietin (TPO), with or without ATRA. Total nucleated cells (TNC), colony-forming units (CFUs), long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs), myeloid-lymphoid initiating cells (ML-ICs) and SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) were evaluated 1 to 5 weeks after culture. All-trans retinoic acid (1 mumol/L) reduced expansion of CD34+CD38-Lin- TNC and CFUs after 2 to 5 weeks of culture. However, it significantly increased LTC-IC expansion after 1 to 3 and, even more so, 5 weeks of culture. ATRA also increased recovery of more primitive ML-ICs and SRCs. Increased HPC recovery appeared dependent on the presence of stromal cells, as LTC-IC expansion was significantly reduced when ATRA was added to stroma-free cultures. All-trans retinoic acid increases expansion of early HPCs in a stromal cell-dependent fashion.

  14. Primordial abundance of 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripada, V. S. Murty

    Primordial abundance of the isotope (40) Ar is still not known accurately. Recent results from Genesis could also not provide (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value of solar wind, due mainly to the overwhelming (40) Ar blank. A major part of (40) Ar is contributed by the radioactive decay of (40) K (half life = 1.25 Ga), even in the nebula, as the nebula grew old. Any attempt to determine this quantity needs a sample that satisfies the following criteria: A primitive mineral/phase that formed very early in the nebula, that can trap a large amount of noble gas (Ar); and a phase that acquires minimum amount (or total absence) of in situ produced components (cosmogenic and radiogenic) of Ar. Carbon phases in the ureilite meteorites and Phase Q from chondrites best fit this criteria. The minimum (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value so far observed in Phase Q is 0.2. Also, the relatively lower value of 1.035±±0.002 for trapped (129) Xe/ (132) Xe in ureilites, as compared to 1.042±±0.002 in Phase Q suggests that trapping of gases in ureilites might have predated that of Phase Q. If this interpretation is valid, ureilites are a better host of most primitive nebular Ar. Earlier attempts on ureilite studies in 1970s have yielded the lowest (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the meteorite Dayalpur, the major uncertainty for this value mostly coming from blank correction for (40) Ar/ (36) Ar. Recent developments in low blank extraction systems and more sensitive multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers, as compared to 1970s have prompted us to make a fresh attempt in measuring this important quantity. We have analysed a number of ureilite acid residues by stepwise temperature extraction, using both pyrolysis and combustion techniques, for Ar to ascertain the trapped (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the solar nebula. These acid residues are mostly made of C rich phases, with only trace amounts of K (radiogenic parent of (40) Ar) and target elements for the production of cosmogenic Ar component. They mostly contain

  15. Ammonia and nitrogen abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Comets consist of pristine material preserved from an earlier galactic epoch. Determination of the molecular, elemental, and isotopic abundances in the dust and volatile components of comet nuclei produce vital clues to the chemical evolution of both interstellar and solar nebula matter. Here the abundances of nitrogen-containing molecules in comets are considered. The molecular abundances of NH3 in four comets are summarized (Tegler 1990, Wyckoff, Tegler, and Engel, 1990). From an inventory of nitrogen-containing compounds (Wyckoff, Engel, and Tegler 1990, Wyckoff, Engel, Womack, Ferro, Tegler and Peterson, 1990), an estimate of the elemental N abundance is also presented.

  16. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities.

    PubMed

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L; MacDougall, Andrew S; Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E; Brown, Cynthia S; Knops, Johannes M H; Prober, Suzanne M; Pyke, David A; Farrell, Kelly A; Bakker, John D; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Adler, Peter B; Collins, Scott L; D'Antonio, Carla M; Crawley, Michael J; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Melbourne, Brett A; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W; Leakey, Andrew D B; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F; Stevens, Carly J; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D; Klein, Julia A; Fay, Philip A; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2011-03-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  17. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  18. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  19. On the Solar Nickel and Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Pat; Asplund, Martin; Grevesse, Nicolas; Sauval, A. Jacques

    2009-02-01

    Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on the neutral forbidden transition at 630 nm depend upon the nickel abundance, due to a Ni I blend. Here, we rederive the solar nickel abundance, using the same ab initio three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the solar photosphere employed in the recent revision of the abundances of C, N, O, and other elements. Using 17 weak, unblended lines of Ni I together with the most accurate atomic and observational data available, we find log epsilonNi = 6.17 ± 0.02(statistical) ± 0.05(systematic), a downward shift of 0.06-0.08 dex relative to previous abundances based on one-dimensional model atmospheres. We investigate the implications of the new nickel abundance for studies of the solar oxygen abundance based on the [O I] 630 nm line in the quiet Sun. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the oxygen abundance implied by the recent sunspot spectropolarimetric study of Centeno & Socas-Navarro needs to be revised downward from log epsilonO = 8.86 ± 0.07 to 8.71 ± 0.10. This revision is based on the new nickel abundance, the application of the best available gf value for the 630 nm forbidden oxygen line, and a more transparent treatment of CO formation. Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on forbidden lines now appear to converge around log epsilonO = 8.7.

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed