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Sample records for abundant natural biopolymer

  1. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  2. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  3. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are onemore » of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.« less

  4. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.

  5. Helium isotopic abundance variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The isotopic abundance of helium in nature has been reviewed. This atomic weight value is based on the value of helium in the atmosphere, which is invariant around the world and up to a distance of 100,000 feet. Helium does vary in natural gas, volcanic rocks and gases, ocean floor sediments, waters of various types and in radioactive minerals and ores due to {alpha} particle decay of radioactive nuclides.

  6. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  7. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted toward improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed. PMID:24790975

  8. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted toward improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed. PMID:24790975

  9. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-02-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed.

  10. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-01

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (Tm) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  11. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  12. Facile synthesis of palladium nanocatalyst using gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium): a natural biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Lori; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao; Kora, Aruna Jyothi

    2015-12-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were synthesised by using gum kondagogu (GK), a non-toxic ecofriendly biopolymer. GK acted as both reducing and stabilising agent for the synthesis of Pd NPs. Various reaction parameters, such as concentration of gum, Pd chloride and reaction pH were standardised for the stable synthesis of GK reduced stabilised Pd NPs (GK-Pd NPs). The nanoparticles have been characterised using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Physical characterisation revealed that the gum synthesised Pd NPs were in the size range of 6.5 ± 2.3 nm and crystallised in face centred cubic (FCC) symmetry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy implicated the role of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the synthesis. The synthesised Pd NPs were found to be highly stable in nature. The synthesised nanoparticles were found to function as an effective green catalyst (k = 0.182 min⁻¹) in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride, which was evident from the colour change of bright yellow (nitrophenolate; λ(max) - 400 nm) to colourless (4-AP; λ(max) - 294 nm) solution. The overall objectives of the current communication were: (i) to synthesize the Pd NPs using a green reducing/capping agent; GK and (ii) to determine the catalytic performance of the synthesised Pd NPs. PMID:26647812

  13. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  14. Nanoconfinement and the strength of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Giesa, Tristan; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    This review examines size effects observed in the mechanical strength of biopolymers that are organized in microstructures such as fibrils, layered composites, or particle nanocomposites. We review the most important aspects that connect nanoconfinement of basic material constituents at critical length scales to the mechanical performance of the entire material system: elastic modulus, strength, extensibility, and robustness. We outline theoretical and computational analysis as well as experimentation by emphasizing two strategies found in abundant natural materials: confined fibrils as part of fibers and confined mineral platelets that transfer load through a biopolymer interface in nanocomposites. We also discuss the application of confinement as a mechanism to tailor specific material properties in biological systems. PMID:23654307

  15. Chemical stability of biopolymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, S.G.; Calvert, R.; Clarke-Sturman, A.J.

    1983-10-01

    Biopolymers such as xanthan are being used increasingly in oilfield operations where the stability of the biopolymer is a prime consideration. The stability of xanthan depends on the brine salinity. Good viscosity retention over many months is observed in sea water at 90/sup 0/C. The successful application of xanthan at temperatures higher than 90/sup 0/C requires an understanding of the factors that limit stability. These factors include the nature of the polymer and the mechanisms of degradation. The stability features of a novel biopolymer are also described.

  16. Chemical stability of biopolymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, S.G.; Clarke-Sturman, A.J.; Calvert, R.; Nisbet, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Biopolymers such as xanthan are being used increasingly in oil field operations where the stability of the biopolymer is a prime consideration. The stability of xanthan depends on the brine salinity. Good viscosity retention over many months is observed in seawater at 90 C. The successful application of xanthan at temperatures higher than 90 C requires an understanding of the factors that limit stability. These factors include the nature of the polymer and the mechanisms of degradation. The stability features of a novel biopolymer are described also. 11 references.

  17. Biopolymers as a flexible resource for nanochemistry.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Zoe

    2013-01-21

    Biomass is an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules, including polysaccharides, polypeptides, and polyaromatics. Many of these biological polymers (biopolymers) are highly evolved for specific functions through optimized chain length, functionalization, and monomer sequence. As biopolymers are a chemical resource, much current effort is focused on the breakdown of these molecules into fuels or platform chemicals. However there is growing interest in using biopolymers directly to create functional materials. This Minireview uses recent examples to show how biopolymers are providing new directions in the synthesis of nanostructured materials. PMID:23239557

  18. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products. PMID:27181392

  19. Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, M; Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, M; Belosa, A D; Heraty, Jr., L J; Bohike, J K; Hatzinger, P B; Jackson, W A; Gu, B

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

  20. Biopolymer nano-particles and natural nano-carriers for nano-encapsulation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Faridi Esfanjani, Afshin; Jafari, Seid Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Phenolic compounds are major micronutrients in our diet,(1) and evidence for their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases is emerging. The easily destruction against environment stresses and low bioavailability of phenolics are main limitations of their application. Therefore, nano-encapsulated phenolics as a fine delivery system can solve their restrictions. Polymeric nanoparticles and natural nano-carriers are one of the most effective and industrial techniques which can be used for protection and delivery of phenolics. In this review, preparation, application and characterization of polymeric based nano-capsules and natural nano-carriers for phenolics have been considered and discussed including polymeric nanoparticles, polymeric complex nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, nano-caseins, nanocrystals, electrospun nano-fibers, electro-sprayed nano-particles, and nano-spray dried particles. Our main goal was to cover the relevant recent studies in the past few years. Although a number of different types of polymeric and natural based nano-scale delivery systems have been developed, there are relatively poor quantitative understanding of their in vivo absorption, permeation and release. Also, performing toxicity experiments, residual solvent analysis and studying their biological fate during digestion, absorption, and excretion of polymeric nanoparticle and natural nano-carriers containing phenolics should be considered in future researches. In addition, future investigations could focus on application of phenolic nano-scale delivery systems in pharmaceuticals and functional foods. PMID:27419648

  1. Carbon Microfibers with Hierarchical Porous Structure from Electrospun Fiber-Like Natural Biopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yeru; Wu, Dingcai; Fu, Ruowen

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning offers a powerful route for building one-dimensional (1D) micro/nanostructures, but a common requirement for toxic or corrosive organic solvents during the preparation of precursor solution has limited their large scale synthesis and broad applications. Here we report a facile and low-cost way to prepare 1D porous carbon microfibers by using an electrospun fiber-like natural product, i.e., silk cocoon, as precursor. We surprisingly found that by utilizing a simple carbonization treatment, the cocoon microfiber can be directly transformed into 1D carbon microfiber of ca. 6 μm diameter with a unique three-dimensional porous network structure composed of interconnected carbon nanoparticles of 10~40 nm diameter. We further showed that the as-prepared carbon product presents superior electrochemical performance as binder-free electrodes of supercapacitors and good adsorption property toward organic vapor. PMID:23350027

  2. Paper Thermoelectrics: Merging Nanotechnology with Naturally Abundant Fibrous Material.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengjun; Goharpey, Amir Hossein; Rai, Ayush; Zhang, Teng; Ko, Dong-Kyun

    2016-08-31

    The development of paper-based sensors, antennas, and energy-harvesting devices can transform the way electronic devices are manufactured and used. Herein we describe an approach to fabricate paper thermoelectric generators for the first time by directly impregnating naturally abundant cellulose materials with p- or n-type colloidal semiconductor quantum dots. We investigate Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivities as a function of temperature between 300 and 400 K as well as in-plane thermal conductivities using Angstrom's method. We further demonstrate equipment-free fabrication of flexible thermoelectric modules using p- and n-type paper strips. Leveraged by paper's inherently low thermal conductivity and high flexibility, these paper modules have the potential to efficiently utilize heat available in natural and man-made environments by maximizing the thermal contact to heat sources of arbitrary geometry. PMID:27505304

  3. Diagonal free homonuclear correlation using heteronuclei at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Baishya, Bikash

    2015-07-01

    Homonuclear correlated spectroscopy such as COSY and TOCSY provides crucial structural information. In all homonuclear correlation, the most intense peaks are represented by the diagonal. As a result, the useful cross peaks close to the diagonal get obscured by the huge tails of diagonal peaks. Herein, we show that by editing the proton magnetization by a 13C nucleus in natural abundance, it is possible to eliminate the inphase coherence or untransferred magnetization that leads to the diagonal peak while retaining the antiphase coherence or transferred magnetization required for creation of cross peak. After the coherence transfer step, the untransferred magnetization directly attached to 13C evolves under one bond heteronuclear coupling while the transferred transverse magnetization directly attached to remote 12C does not. As a result, the untransferred magnetization directly attached to 13C can be converted to an unobservable heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence leading to a diagonal free correlated spectrum with a sensitivity penalty of two orders of magnitude but comparable to HSQC kind of experiments at natural abundance. The method demonstrated for COSY and TOCSY allows all proton-proton correlations to be observed except the geminal proton-proton correlations. Further, protons directly attached to heteronuclei other than 13C must be scalar coupled to protons directly attached to 13C to have a detectable cross peak. PMID:26001137

  4. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production.

    PubMed

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures. PMID:26110895

  5. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures. PMID:26110895

  6. Diversity and abundance of phosphonate biosynthetic genes in nature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomin; Doroghazi, James R.; Janga, Sarath C.; Zhang, Jun Kai; Circello, Benjamin; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphonates, molecules containing direct carbon–phosphorus bonds, compose a structurally diverse class of natural products with interesting and useful biological properties. Although their synthesis in protozoa was discovered more than 50 y ago, the extent and diversity of phosphonate production in nature remains poorly characterized. The rearrangement of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme PEP mutase (PepM), is shared by the vast majority of known phosphonate biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the pepM gene can be used as a molecular marker to examine the occurrence and abundance of phosphonate-producing organisms. Based on the presence of this gene, phosphonate biosynthesis is common in microbes, with ∼5% of sequenced bacterial genomes and 7% of genome equivalents in metagenomic datasets carrying pepM homologs. Similarly, we detected the pepM gene in ∼5% of random actinomycete isolates. The pepM-containing gene neighborhoods from 25 of these isolates were cloned, sequenced, and compared with those found in sequenced genomes. PEP mutase sequence conservation is strongly correlated with conservation of other nearby genes, suggesting that the diversity of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways can be predicted by examining PEP mutase diversity. We used this approach to estimate the range of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways in nature, revealing dozens of discrete groups in pepM amplicons from local soils, whereas hundreds were observed in metagenomic datasets. Collectively, our analyses show that phosphonate biosynthesis is both diverse and relatively common in nature, suggesting that the role of phosphonate molecules in the biosphere may be more important than is often recognized. PMID:24297932

  7. 13 ENDOR studies of organic radicals in natural isotopic abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirste, Burkhard

    13C ENDOR studies of phenoxyls, galvinoxyls, triphenylmethyl radicals, nitroxides, and cyclosilane and semiquinone radical anions with natural isotopic distribution are reported. The method is described, and it is shown that 13C coupling constants can be measured precisely; in favorable cases even the determination of signs is possible by general TRIPLE resonance. Studies of the relaxation behavior of 13C ENDOR signals or measurements of hyperfine shifts in liquid-crystalline solutions yield information about dipolar hyperfine interactions and hence π spin populations which is of aid in assignments to molecular positions. Complete sets of 13C coupling constants have been determined for 2,4,6-tri- tert-butylphenoxyl and Coppinger's radical. For the central carbon atoms of tert-butyl groups, a Q parameter of Qτ-Bu C = -34 MHz is proposed, and for a 29Si atom in trimethylsilyl groups, QTMSSi = +49 MHz. Favorable conditions for natural-abundance 13C ENDOR experiments, e.g., small hyperfine anisotropies and use of deuterated compounds, and limitations of the method are discussed.

  8. Antimicrobial assays of natural extracts and their inhibitory effect against Listeria innocua and fish spoilage bacteria, after incorporation into biopolymer edible films.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, L; Olabarrieta, I; de Marañón, I Martínez

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve natural extracts was tested against two fish spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Aeromonas hydrophila/caviae) and Listeria innocua, in order to assess their potential utilization in the preservation and safety of minimally processed fish products. After a screening of the active extracts by agar diffusion and vapour diffusion methods, oregano and thyme essential oils and citrus extract were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the selected extracts was determined by disc diffusion method against target bacteria and at two temperatures: bacteria's optimal growth temperature (30 °C or 37 °C) and refrigeration temperature (4 °C). Due to its better solubility, lack of odour and greater inhibitory effect obtained against L. innocua at refrigerated temperature, citrus extract was selected and incorporated at 1% (v/v) into different biopolymer film forming solutions (gelatin, methyl cellulose and their blend 50:50 w/w). The antimicrobial activity of the developed films was then evaluated, just after preparation of the films and after one month of storage at 43±3% relative humidity and 24±3 °C. Regardless of the biopolymer matrix, all the developed films showed antimicrobial activity against the target bacteria. The most sensitive bacterium towards active films was L. innocua while P. fluorescens appeared as the most resistant one, in accordance with the previously performed antimicrobial tests for pure extracts. The differences in activity of the films between the tested two temperatures were not significant except for L. innocua, for which three times higher inhibition diameters were observed at refrigerated temperature. The inhibitory effectiveness of the films against the tested strains was maintained regardless of the biopolymer matrix for at least one month. Therefore, these edible films show potential for their future use in fresh fish fillets preservation. PMID:22824340

  9. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler(1) in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m(2)/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm(3)), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m(2)/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm(3)/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  10. Biopolymer colloids for controlling and templating inorganic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Biopolymers and biopolymer colloids can act as controlling agents and templates not only in many processes in nature, but also in a wide range of synthetic approaches. Inorganic materials can be either synthesized ex situ and later incorporated into a biopolymer structuring matrix or grown in situ in the presence of biopolymers. In this review, we focus mainly on the latter case and distinguish between the following possibilities: (i) biopolymers as controlling agents of nucleation and growth of inorganic materials; (ii) biopolymers as supports, either as molecular supports or as carrier particles acting as cores of core–shell structures; and (iii) so-called “soft templates”, which include on one hand stabilized droplets, micelles, and vesicles, and on the other hand continuous scaffolds generated by gelling biopolymers. PMID:25551041

  11. Diversity and abundance of phosphonate biosynthetic genes in nature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphonates, molecules containing direct C-P bonds, comprise a structurally diverse class of natural products with interesting and useful biological properties. Although their synthesis in protozoa was discovered more than fifty years ago, the extent and diversity of phosphonate production in natur...

  12. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry in the ocean: A study using stable isotope natural abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Desmarais, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Determining the biogeochemical pathways traveled by carbon and nitrogen in the ocean is fundamental to the understanding of how the ocean participates in the cycling of these elements within the biosphere. Because biological production, metabolism, and respiration can significantly alter the natural abundance of C-13 and N-15, these abundances can provide important information about the nature of these biological processes and their variability in the marine environment. The research initially seeks to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of stable isotope abundances in organic matter, and to relate these abundances to C and N biogeochemical processes within selected areas of the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  13. Transposases are the most abundant, most ubiquitous genes in nature

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Breitbart, Mya; Edwards, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Genes, like organisms, struggle for existence, and the most successful genes persist and widely disseminate in nature. The unbiased determination of the most successful genes requires access to sequence data from a wide range of phylogenetic taxa and ecosystems, which has finally become achievable thanks to the deluge of genomic and metagenomic sequences. Here, we analyzed 10 million protein-encoding genes and gene tags in sequenced bacterial, archaeal, eukaryotic and viral genomes and metagenomes, and our analysis demonstrates that genes encoding transposases are the most prevalent genes in nature. The finding that these genes, classically considered as selfish genes, outnumber essential or housekeeping genes suggests that they offer selective advantage to the genomes and ecosystems they inhabit, a hypothesis in agreement with an emerging body of literature. Their mobile nature not only promotes dissemination of transposable elements within and between genomes but also leads to mutations and rearrangements that can accelerate biological diversification and—consequently—evolution. By securing their own replication and dissemination, transposases guarantee to thrive so long as nucleic acid-based life forms exist. PMID:20215432

  14. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation. PMID:20709130

  15. APPLICATION OF FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES AND PROBES TO THE DETECTION OF BIOPOLYMER DEGRADATION IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS. (R825159)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The activities and substrate specificities of extracellular enzymes in natural systems are not well understood, despite their critical role in microbial remineralization of organic carbon. These enzymes initiate organic carbon degradation by selectively hydrolyzing high molecular...

  16. The Potential of Silk and Silk-Like Proteins as Natural Mucoadhesive Biopolymers for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Amanda E.

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery across mucus membranes is a particularly effective route of administration due to the large surface area. However, the unique environment present at the mucosa necessitates altered drug formulations designed to (1) deliver sensitive biologic molecules, (2) promote intimate contact between the mucosa and the drug, and (3) prolong the drug's local residence time. Thus, the pharmaceutical industry has an interest in drug delivery systems formulated around the use of mucoadhesive polymers. Mucoadhesive polymers, both synthetic and biological, have a history of use in local drug delivery. Prominently featured in the literature are chitosan, alginate, and cellulose derivatives. More recently, silk and silk-like derivatives have been explored for their potential as mucoadhesive polymers. Both silkworms and spiders produce sticky silk-like glue substances, sericin and aggregate silk respectively, that may prove an effective, natural matrix for drug delivery to the mucosa. This mini review will explore the potential of silk and silk-like derivatives as a biocompatible mucoadhesive polymer matrix for local controlled drug delivery. PMID:26636069

  17. The Potential of Silk and Silk-Like Proteins as Natural Mucoadhesive Biopolymers for Controlled Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery across mucus membranes is a particularly effective route of administration due to the large surface area. However, the unique environment present at the mucosa necessitates altered drug formulations designed to (1) deliver sensitive biologic molecules, (2) promote intimate contact between the mucosa and the drug, and (3) prolong the drug's local residence time. Thus, the pharmaceutical industry has an interest in drug delivery systems formulated around the use of mucoadhesive polymers. Mucoadhesive polymers, both synthetic and biological, have a history of use in local drug delivery. Prominently featured in the literature are chitosan, alginate, and cellulose derivatives. More recently, silk and silk-like derivatives have been explored for their potential as mucoadhesive polymers. Both silkworms and spiders produce sticky silk-like glue substances, sericin and aggregate silk respectively, that may prove an effective, natural matrix for drug delivery to the mucosa. This mini review will explore the potential of silk and silk-like derivatives as a biocompatible mucoadhesive polymer matrix for local controlled drug delivery. PMID:26636069

  18. The potential of silk and silk-like proteins as natural mucoadhesive biopolymers for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery across mucus membranes is a particularly effective route of administration due to the large surface area. However, the unique environment present at the mucosa necessitates altered drug formulations designed to (1) deliver sensitive biologic molecules, (2) promote intimate contact between the mucosa and the drug, and (3) prolong the drug’s local residence time. Thus, the pharmaceutical industry has an interest in drug delivery systems formulated around the use of mucoadhesive polymers. Mucoadhesive polymers, both synthetic and biological, have a history of use in local drug delivery. Prominently featured in the literature are chitosan, alginate, and cellulose derivatives. More recently, silk and silk-like derivatives have been explored for their potential as mucoadhesive polymers. Both silkworms and spiders produce sticky silk-like glue substances, sericin and aggregate silk respectively, that may prove an effective, natural matrix for drug delivery to the mucosa. This mini review will explore the potential of silk and silk-like derivatives as a biocompatible mucoadhesive polymer matrix for local controlled drug delivery.

  19. Determining carbon-carbon connectivities in natural abundance organic powders using dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Dekhil, Myriam; Mollica, Giulia; Bonniot, Tristan Texier; Ziarelli, Fabio; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2016-06-30

    We present a solid-state NMR methodology capable of investigating the carbon skeleton of natural abundance organic powders. The methodology is based on the (13)C-(13)C dipolar coupling interaction and allows carbon-carbon connectivities to be unambiguously established for a wide range of organic solids. This methodology is particularly suitable for disordered solids, such as natural or synthetic macromolecules, which cannot be studied using conventional diffraction or NMR techniques. PMID:27319808

  20. Hyperpolarized NMR of plant and cancer cell extracts at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Lalande-Martin, Julie; Tea, Illa; Yon, Maxime; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Frydman, Lucio; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra of biological extracts are recorded in a single scan provided that the samples are hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization combined with cross polarization. Heteronuclear 2D correlation spectra of hyperpolarized breast cancer cell extracts can also be obtained in a single scan. Hyperpolarized NMR of extracts opens many perspectives for metabolomics. PMID:26215673

  1. Coupled biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. M.; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton provides the cell with structural integrity and allows it to change shape to crawl along a surface, for example. The actin cytoskeleton can be modeled as a semiflexible biopolymer network that modifies its morphology in response to both external and internal stimuli. Just inside the inner nuclear membrane of a cell exists a network of filamentous lamin that presumably protects the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. Lamins are intermediate filaments that can also be modeled as semiflexible biopolymers. It turns out that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins that bridge the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the cytoskeletal network. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription, since DNA--yet another semiflexible polymer--contains lamin-binding domains, and, thus, widen the field of epigenetics.

  2. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore » of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  3. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L. Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Poulin, Gino B.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  4. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  5. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  6. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  7. Increased natural mortality at low abundance can generate an Allee effect in a marine fish

    PubMed Central

    Kuparinen, Anna; Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density-dependent regulation of population dynamics promotes population growth at low abundance and is therefore vital for recovery following depletion. Inversely, any process that reduces the compensatory density-dependence of population growth can negatively affect recovery. Here, we show that increased adult mortality at low abundance can reverse compensatory population dynamics into its opposite—a demographic Allee effect. Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks collapsed dramatically in the early 1990s and have since shown little sign of recovery. Many experienced dramatic increases in natural mortality, ostensibly attributable in some populations to increased predation by seals. Our findings show that increased natural mortality of a magnitude observed for overfished cod stocks has been more than sufficient to fundamentally alter the dynamics of density-dependent population regulation. The demographic Allee effect generated by these changes can slow down or even impede the recovery of depleted populations even in the absence of fishing. PMID:26064531

  8. Increased natural mortality at low abundance can generate an Allee effect in a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Negative density-dependent regulation of population dynamics promotes population growth at low abundance and is therefore vital for recovery following depletion. Inversely, any process that reduces the compensatory density-dependence of population growth can negatively affect recovery. Here, we show that increased adult mortality at low abundance can reverse compensatory population dynamics into its opposite-a demographic Allee effect. Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks collapsed dramatically in the early 1990s and have since shown little sign of recovery. Many experienced dramatic increases in natural mortality, ostensibly attributable in some populations to increased predation by seals. Our findings show that increased natural mortality of a magnitude observed for overfished cod stocks has been more than sufficient to fundamentally alter the dynamics of density-dependent population regulation. The demographic Allee effect generated by these changes can slow down or even impede the recovery of depleted populations even in the absence of fishing. PMID:26064531

  9. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. PMID:26363582

  10. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  11. Natural abundance 2H-ERETIC-NMR authentication of the origin of methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Flore; George, Gerard; Akoka, Serge

    2005-06-29

    Methyl salicylate is a compound currently used in the creation of many flavors. It can be obtained by synthesis or from two natural sources: essential oil of wintergreen and essential oil of sweet birch bark. Deuterium site-specific natural isotope abundance (A(i)) determination by NMR spectroscopy with the method of reference ERETIC ((2)H-ERETIC-NMR) has been applied to this compound. A(i) measurements have been performed on 19 samples of methyl salicylate from different origins, natural/synthetic and commercial/extracted. This study demonstrates that appropriate treatment performed on the data allows discrimination between synthetic and natural samples. Moreover, the representation of intramolecular ratios R(6/5) as a function of R(3/2) distinguishes between synthetics, wintergreen oils, and sweet birch bark oils. PMID:15969485

  12. Effect of Environmental Factors on Cyanobacterial Abundance and Cyanotoxins Production in Natural and Drinking Water, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Affan, Abu; Khomavis, Hisham S; Al-Harbi, Salim Marzoog; Haque, Mahfuzul; Khan, Saleha

    2015-02-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms commonly appear during the summer months in ponds, lakes and reservoirs in Bangladesh. In these areas, fish mortality, odorous water and fish and human skin irritation and eye inflammation have been reported. The influence of physicochemical factors on the occurrence of cyanobacteria and its toxin levels were evaluated in natural and drinking water in Bangladesh. A highly sensitive immunosorbent assay was used to detect microcystins (MCs). Cyanobacteria were found in 22 of 23 samples and the dominant species were Microcystis aeruginosa, followed by Microcystisflosaquae, Anabeana crassa and Aphanizomenon flosaquae. Cyanobacterial abundance varied from 39 to 1315 x 10(3) cells mL(-1) in natural water and 31 to 49 x 10(3) cells mL(-1) in tap water. MC concentrations were 25-82300 pg mL(-1) with the highest value measured in the fish research pond, followed by Ishakha Lake. In tap water, MC concentrations ranged from 30-32 pg mL(-1). The correlation between nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentration and cyanobacterial cell abundance was R2 = 0.62 while that between cyanobacterial abundance and MC concentration was R2 = 0.98. The increased NO3-N from fish feed, organic manure, poultry and dairy farm waste and fertilizer from agricultural land eutrophicated the water bodies and triggered cyanobacterial bloom formation. The increased amount of cyanobacteria produced MCs, subsequently reducing the water quality. PMID:26364354

  13. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  14. Rendered-protein hydrolysates for microbial synthesis of cyanophycin biopolymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyanophycin is a poly(arginyl-aspartate) biopolymer produced and stored intracellularly by bacteria. Cyanophycin has been proposed as a renewable replacement for petrochemical-based industrial products. An abundant source of amino acids and nitrogen such as in the form of protein hydrolysates is n...

  15. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  16. Production of novel microbial biopolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms are well known to produce a wide variety of biobased polymers. These biopolymers have found a wide range of commercial uses, including food, feed, and consumer and industrial products. The production and possible uses of several novel biopolymers from both bacteria and fungi will be d...

  17. Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

  18. High-resolution magic-angle spinning (13)C spectroscopy of brain tissue at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Chen, Lei; Gao, Hongchang; Zeng, Danlin; Yue, Yong; Liu, Maili; Lei, Hao; Deng, Feng; Ye, Chaohui

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (MAS) (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has recently been applied to study the metabolism in intact biological tissue samples. Because of the low natural abundance and the low gyromagnetic ratio of the (13)C nuclei, signal enhancement techniques such as cross-polarization (CP) and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) are often employed in MAS (13)C MRS to improve the detection sensitivity. In this study, several sensitivity enhancement techniques commonly used in liquid- and solid-state NMR, including CP, DEPT and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), were combined with MAS to acquire high-resolution (13)C spectra on intact rat brain tissue at natural abundance, and were compared for their performances. The results showed that different signal enhancement techniques are sensitive to different classes of molecules/metabolites, depending on their molecular weights and mobility. DEPT was found to enhance the signals of low-molecular weight metabolites exclusively, while the signals of lipids, which often are associated with membranes and have relatively lower mobility, were highly sensitive to CP enhancement. PMID:16477685

  19. Changes in protein abundance are observed in bacterial isolates from a natural host

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Megan A.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Coppel, Ross L.; Smith, Alexander I.; Kleifeld, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteomic studies frequently use strains cultured in synthetic liquid media over many generations. It is uncertain whether bacterial proteins expressed under these conditions will be the same as the repertoire found in natural environments, or when bacteria are infecting a host organism. Thus, genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteria derived from the host environment in comparison to reference strains grown in the lab, should aid understanding of pathogenesis. Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were obtained from the lymph nodes of three naturally infected sheep and compared to a laboratory reference strain using bottom-up proteomics, after whole genome sequencing of each of the field isolates. These comparisons were performed following growth in liquid media that allowed us to reach the required protein amount for proteomic analysis. Over 1350 proteins were identified in the isolated strains, from which unique proteome features were revealed. Several of the identified proteins demonstrated a significant abundance difference in the field isolates compared to the reference strain even though there were no obvious differences in the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene or in nearby non-coding DNA. Higher abundance in the field isolates was observed for proteins related to hypoxia and nutrient deficiency responses as well as to thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26528441

  20. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  1. Differences in the fractional abundances of carbohydrates of natural and recombinant human tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Krudysz-Amblo, Jolanta; Jennings, Mark E; Matthews, Dwight E; Mann, Kenneth G; Butenas, Saulius

    2011-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a single polypeptide integral membrane glycoprotein composed of 263 residues and is essential to life in its role as the initiator of blood coagulation. Objective Previously we have shown that the activity of the natural placental TF (pTF) and the recombinant TF (rTF) from Sf9 insect cells is different (Krudysz-Amblo, J. et al(2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 3371–3382). In this study, using mass spectrometry, we show by quantitative analysis that the extent of glycosylation varies on each protein. Results Fractional abundance, of each glycan composition at each of the three glycosylation sites, reveals the most pronounced difference to be at asparagine (Asn) 11. This residue is located in the region of extensive TFfactor VIIa (FVIIa) interaction. Carbohydrate fractional abundance at Asn11 revealed that glycosylation in the natural placental TF is much more prevalent (~76%) than in the recombinant protein (~20%). The extent of glycosylation on Asn124 and Asn137 is similar in the two proteins, despite the pronounced differences in the carbohydrate composition. Additionally, 77% of rTF exists as TF des-1, 2 (missing the first two amino acids from the N-terminus). In contrast, only 31% of pTF is found in the des-1, 2 form. Conclusion These observations may attribute to the difference in the ability of TF-FVIIa complex to activate factor X (FX). Structural and functional comparison of the recombinant and natural protein advances our understanding and knowledge on the biological activity of TF. PMID:21172408

  2. Polyanionic heteropolysaccharide biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gutnick, D.L.; Rosenberg, E.; Belsky, I.; Zinaida, Z.

    1983-07-26

    Growth of Acinetobacter Sp. ATCC 31012 on various substrates and under varying conditions is used to produce 2 classes of extra cellular, microbial protein-associated lipopolysaccharides (the emulsans) which possess characteristics that permit them to be used in cleaning oil- contaminated vessels, oil spill management, and enhanced oil recovery by chemical flooding. Emulsans and apoemulsans, both of which biopolymers are strongly anionic, exhibit a high degree of specificity in the emulsification of hydrocarbon substrates which contain both aliphatic and cyclic components. In addition, these polysaccharides as well as their O-deacylated and N-deacylated derivatives are adsorbed on and capable of flocculating aluminosilicate ion-exchangers, such as kaolin and bentonite. 10 claims.

  3. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  4. An unnatural biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.Y.; Moran, E.J.; Cherry, S.R.; Stephans, J.C.; Schultz, P.G. ); Fodor, S.P.A.; Adams, C.L.; Sundaram, A.; Jacobs, J.W. )

    1993-09-03

    A highly efficient method has been developed for the solid-phase synthesis of an [open quotes]unnatural biopolymer[close quotes] consisting of chiral aminocarbonate monomers linked via a carbamate backbone. Oligocarbamates were synthesized from N-protected p-nitrophenyl carbonate monomers, substituted with a variety of side chains, with greater than 99 percent overall coupling efficiencies per step. A spatially defined library of oligocarbamates was generated by using photochemical methods and screened for binding affinity to a monoclonal antibody. A number of high-affinity ligands were than synthesized and analyzed in solution with respect to their inhibition concentration values, water/octanol partitioning coefficients, and proteolytic stability. These and other unnatural polymers may provide new frameworks for drug development and for testing theories of protein and peptide folding and structure.

  5. Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Hocking, Daniel J; Conner, Christopher A; Earl, Julia E; Harper, Elizabeth B; Osbourn, Michael S; Peterman, William E; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-03-01

    Phenology often determines the outcome of interspecific interactions, where early-arriving species often dominate interactions over those arriving later. The effects of phenology on species interactions are especially pronounced in aquatic systems, but the evidence is largely derived from experimental studies. We examined whether differences in breeding phenology between two pond-breeding salamanders (Ambystoma annulatum and A. maculatum) affected metamorph recruitment and demographic traits within natural populations, with the expectation that the fall-breeding A. annulatum would negatively affect the spring-breeding A. maculatum. We monitored populations of each species at five ponds over 4 years using drift fences. Metamorph abundance and survival of A. annulatum were affected by intra- and interspecific processes, whereas metamorph size and date of emigration were primarily influenced by intraspecific effects. Metamorph abundance, snout-vent length, date of emigration and survival for A. maculatum were all predicted by combinations of intra- and interspecific effects, but often showed negative relationships with A. annulatum metamorph traits and abundance. Size and date of metamorphosis were strongly correlated within each species, but in opposite patterns (negative for A. annulatum and positive for A. maculatum), suggesting that the two species use alternative strategies to enhance terrestrial survival and that these factors may influence their interactions. Our results match predictions from experimental studies that suggest recruitment is influenced by intra- and interspecific processes which are determined by phenological differences between species. Incorporating spatiotemporal variability when modeling population dynamics is necessary to understand the importance of phenology in species interactions, especially as shifts in phenology occur under climate change. PMID:25413866

  6. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  7. [Neutrophil activation by sea hydrobiont biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S

    2003-01-01

    Biopolymers of sea hydrobionts such as mytilan, alpha-1,4;1,6-D-glycan isolated from the muntle of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus; translam, beta-1,3;1,6-D-glucan isolated from the seaweed Laminaria cichorioides; fucoidan, a sulfated polysccharide isolated from the algae Fucus evanescens; zosterin, a pectin isolated from sea grass of the family Zosteraceae were comparatively studied. The mechanisms of the phagocyte activation were investigated and the dose-dependent ability of the biopolymers to increase in vitro adhesion of the intact cells and to restore the neutrophil functions at cyclophosphamide-induced immunodepression was detected. The neutrophil activation by mytilan, zosterin and fucoidan linked with the adhesion potentiation was shown to be associated with their ability to increase the number of the adhesion receptors and in particular CD116b on the cell surface. The lower potential of the neutrophils preincubated in vitro with high doses of translam beta-glucan could be due to blockade of the beta-glucan receptors participating in the complex multicomponent adhesion process. The use of the biopolymers of the sea hydrobionts of the glycobiological nature for modulation of the immunity processes provided rather convenient in vivo management of intracellular processes through direct and competing carbohydrate specific interactions of the modifiers with the membrane receptors and formation of active and inactive lectin-glycoligand and carbohydrate-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:15002173

  8. On the nature of lithium-rich giant stars. Constraints from beryllium abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, C. H. F.; de Laverny, P.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.; Randich, S.; Do Nascimento, J. D., Jr.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances for 7 Li-rich giant (A(Li) > 1.5) stars and 10 other Li-normal giants with the aim of investigating the origin of the lithium in the Li-rich giants. In particular, we test the predictions of the engulfment scenario proposed by Siess & Livio (1999, MNRAS, 308, 1133), where the engulfment of a brown dwarf or one or more giant planets would lead to simultaneous enrichment of 7Li and 9Be. We show that regardless of their nature, none of the stars studied in this paper were found to have detectable beryllium. Using simple dilution arguments we show that engulfment of an external object as the sole source of Li enrichment is ruled out by the Li and Be abundance data. The present results favor the idea that Li has been produced in the interior of the stars by a Cameron-Fowler process and brought up to the surface by an extra mixing mechanism.

  9. Distribution and Abundance of Insertion Sequences among Natural Isolates of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Stanley A.; Dykhuizen, Daniel E.; DuBose, Robert F.; Green, Louis; Mutangadura-Mhlanga, T.; Wolczyk, David F.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01

    A reference collection of 71 natural isolates of Escherichia coli (the ECOR collection) has been studied with respect to the distribution and abundance of transposable insertion sequences using DNA hybridization. The data include 1173 occurrences of six unrelated insertion sequences (IS 1, IS2, IS3, IS4, IS5 and IS 30). The number of insertion elements per strain, and the sizes of DNA restriction fragments containing them, is highly variable and can be used to discriminate even among closely related strains. The occurrence and abundance of pairs of unrelated insertion sequences are apparently statistically independent, but significant correlations result from stratifications in the reference collection. However, there is a highly significant positive association among the insertion sequences considered in the aggregate. Nine branching process models, which differ in assumptions regarding the regulation of transposition and the effect of copy number on fitness, have been evaluated with regard to their fit of the observed distributions. No single model fits all copy number distributions. The best models incorporate no regulation of transposition and a moderate to strong decrease in fitness with increasing copy number for IS1 and IS5, strong regulation of transposition and a negligible to weak decrease in fitness with increasing copy number for IS3, and less than strong regulation of transposition for IS2, IS 4 and IS30. PMID:3030884

  10. Investigating microbial carbon cycling using natural abundance isotope analysis of PLFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. G.; Brady, A.; Cowie, B.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding microbial carbon sources and cycling is fundamental to our conceptualization of microbial ecosystems and their role in biogeochemical cycling in natural systems. Achieving this understanding requires application of a wide range of approaches. Natural abundance isotope analysis of individual compounds, particularly cellular components such as Phospholipids Fatty Acids (PLFA) can provide insights into the carbon sources and metabolic activities of the in situ microbial community from environmental samples. This is primarily because specific PLFA can be well resolved by gas chromatography even from complex matrices where confounding biological/organic compound abound. These PLFA can then be attributed to the viable microbial community, in some cases to specific components of this community and due to characteristic biosynthetic fractionations of stable isotope ratios, δ13C analysis of PLFA can: differentiate isotopically distinct primary carbon sources of heterotrophic communities; identify isotopic patterns characteristic of autotrophic versus heterotrophic processes; and elucidate microbial biosynthetic pathways. In cases where there δ13C cannot provide resolution of carbon sources, new approaches in Δ14C of PLFA can be applied. The vast range in Δ14C of ancient and modern carbon provides an easily traceable signal that can differentiate uptake and utilization of these carbon sources. This is particularly useful in cases such as contaminated sites where petroleum based contamination has occurred, or in natural systems where microbial communities may be utilizing geologic versus recently photosynthetically fixed carbon. This talk will present several examples demonstrating the utility of this approach.

  11. Natural abundant (17) O NMR in a 1.5-T Halbach magnet.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Morten K; Bakharev, Oleg N; Jensen, Ole; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-06-01

    We present mobile, low-field (17) O NMR as a means for monitoring oxygen in liquids. Whereas oxygen is one of the most important elements, oxygen NMR is limited by a poor sensitivity related to low natural abundance and gyro-magnetic ratio of the NMR active (17) O isotope. Here, we demonstrate (17) O NMR detection at a Larmor frequency of 8.74 MHz in a 1.5-T Halbach neodymium magnet with a home-built digital NMR instrument suitable for large-scale production and in-line monitoring applications. The proposed (17) O NMR sensor may be applied for direct, noninvasive measurements of water content in, for example, oil, manure, or food in automated quality or process control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25641664

  12. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  13. In Vivo Natural-Abundance 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Living Ectomycorrhizal Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis; Canet, Daniel; Marchal, Jean-Pierre; Brondeau, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study intact mycelia of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum graniforme (Ascomycetes) and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (Basidiomycetes). A number of sharp resonances are observed in living fungi. These signals primarily arise from fatty acyl chains and carbohydrate nuclei. The spectra are interpreted in terms of relative concentrations of the major fatty acids present in the fungal triglycerides. The small line width of fatty acids (mainly oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids) resonances and spin-lattice relaxation time are indicative of fast rotational reorientations and are consequently thought to arise from fatty acyl chains in fat droplets. We were able to locate the site of lipids accumulation within mycelia using light microscopy and histological staining. Many lipid droplets were observed in mycelia of both species. These results suggest that fatty acids droplets could be involved in carbon storage and metabolism from ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:16663561

  14. HCNMBC - A pulse sequence for H-(C)-N Multiple Bond Correlations at natural isotopic abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatham, Steve; Gierth, Peter; Bermel, Wolfgang; Kupče, Ēriks

    2014-10-01

    We propose a pulse sequence, HCNMBC for multiple-bond H-(C)-N correlation experiments via one-bond 1J(C,H) and one- or multiple bond nJ(N,C) coupling constants (typically n = 1-3) at the natural isotopic abundance. A new adiabatic refocussing sequence is introduced to provide accurate and robust refocussing of both chemical shift and J-evolution over wide ranges of C-13 and N-15 frequencies. It is demonstrated that the proposed pulse sequence provides high quality spectra even for sub-milligram samples. We show that when a 1.7 mm cryoprobe is available as little as 10 μg of glycine in D2O is sufficient to obtain the HCNMBC spectrum in ca. 12 h. The preliminary results indicate that the pulse sequence has a great potential in the structure determination of nitrogen heterocycles especially in cases where synthesis produces regioisomers.

  15. Solid biopolymer electrolytes came from renewable biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xingxiang; Qiao, Zhijun; Liu, Haihui

    2009-07-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have attracted many attentions as solid state ionic conductors, because of their advantages such as high energy density, electrochemical stability, and easy processing. SPEs obtained from starch have attracted many attentions in recent years because of its abundant, renewable, low price, biodegradable and biocompatible. In addition, the efficient utilization of biodegradable polymers came from renewable sources is becoming increasingly important due to diminishing resources of fossil fuels as well as white pollution caused by undegradable plastics based on petroleum. So N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) with certain concentration ranges of lithium chloride (LiCl) is used as plasticizers of cornstarch. Li+ can complexes with the carbonyl atoms of DMAc molecules to produce a macro-cation and leave the Cl- free to hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl or carbonyl of starch. This competitive hydrogen bond formation serves to disrupt the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding existed in starch. Therefore, melt extrusion process conditions are used to prepare conductive thermoplastic starch (TPS). The improvements of LiCl concentration increase the water absorption and conductance of TPS. The conductance of TPS containing 0.14 mol LiCl achieve to 10-0.5 S cm-1 with 18 wt% water content.

  16. On the nature of sn stars. I. A detailed abundance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffe, C.; Levato, H.

    2014-02-01

    The sn stars were first discoved by Abt & Levato when studying the spectral types in different open clusters. These stars present sharp Balmer lines, sharp metallic lines (C II, Si II, Ca II, Ti II, Fe II), and broad coreless He I lines. Some of the sn stars seem to be related to CP stars. Initially Abt & Levato proposed a shell-like nature to explain the sn stars, although this scenario was subsequently questioned. There is no general agreement about their origin. We aim to derive abundances for a sample of 9 stars, including sn and non-sn stars, to determine the possible relation between sn and CP stars and compare their chemical abundances. That most sn stars belong to open clusters allows us to search for a possible relation with fundamental parameters, including the age and rotation. We also study the possible contribution of different effects to the broad He I lines observed in these stars, such as Stark broadening and the possible He-stratification. Effective temperature and gravity were estimated by Strömgren photometry and then refined by requiring ionization and excitation equilibrium of Fe lines. We derived the abundances by fitting the observed spectra with synthetic spectra using an iterative procedure with the SYNTHE and ATLAS9 codes. We derived metallic abundances of 23 different chemical elements for 9 stars and obtained low projected rotational velocities for the sn stars in our sample (vsini up to 69 km s-1). We also compared 5 stars that belong to the same cluster (NGC 6475) and show that the sn characteristics appear in the 3 stars with the lower rotational velocity. However, the apparent preference of sn stars for objects with the lower vsini values should be taken with caution due to the small number of objects studied here. We analysed the photospheric chemical composition of sn stars and show that approximately ~40% of them display chemical peculiarities (such as He-weak and HgMn stars) within a range of temperature of 10 300 K-14 500 K

  17. Archaeal community diversity and abundance changes along a natural salinity gradient in estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Gordon; O'Sullivan, Louise A.; Meng, Yiyu; Williams, Angharad S.; Sass, Andrea M.; Watkins, Andrew J.; Parkes, R. John; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Archaea are widespread in marine sediments, but their occurrence and relationship with natural salinity gradients in estuarine sediments is not well understood. This study investigated the abundance and diversity of Archaea in sediments at three sites [Brightlingsea (BR), Alresford (AR) and Hythe (HY)] along the Colne Estuary, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes, DNA hybridization, Archaea 16S rRNA and mcrA gene phylogenetic analyses. Total archaeal 16S rRNA abundance in sediments were higher in the low-salinity brackish sediments from HY (2–8 × 107 16S rRNA gene copies cm−3) than the high-salinity marine sites from BR and AR (2 × 104–2 × 107 and 4 × 106–2 × 107 16S rRNA gene copies cm−3, respectively), although as a proportion of the total prokaryotes Archaea were higher at BR than at AR or HY. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the ‘Bathyarchaeota’ (MCG), Thaumarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota were the dominant groups of Archaea. The composition of Thaumarchaeota varied with salinity, as only ‘marine’ group I.1a was present in marine sediments (BR). Methanogen 16S rRNA genes from low-salinity sediments at HY were dominated by acetotrophic Methanosaeta and putatively hydrogentrophic Methanomicrobiales, whereas the marine site (BR) was dominated by mcrA genes belonging to methylotrophic Methanococcoides, versatile Methanosarcina and methanotrophic ANME-2a. Overall, the results indicate that salinity and associated factors play a role in controlling diversity and distribution of Archaea in estuarine sediments. PMID:25764553

  18. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  19. Biomedical Biopolymers, their Origin and Evolution in Biomedical Sciences: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Harsh; Shah, Veena Gowri; Shah, Gaurav; Dhaka, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers provide a plethora of applications in the pharmaceutical and medical applications. A material that can be used for biomedical applications like wound healing, drug delivery and tissue engineering should possess certain properties like biocompatibility, biodegradation to non-toxic products, low antigenicity, high bio-activity, processability to complicated shapes with appropriate porosity, ability to support cell growth and proliferation and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as maintaining mechanical strength. This paper reviews biodegradable biopolymers focusing on their potential in biomedical applications. Biopolymers most commonly used and most abundantly available have been described with focus on the properties relevant to biomedical importance. PMID:26501034

  20. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  1. Regional patterns of 15N natural abundance in forest ecosystems along a large transect in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Liu, Yingchun; Wang, Qiufeng; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Li

    2014-02-01

    The regional determining factors underlying inter- and intra-site variation of 15N natural abundance in foliage, O horizon and mineral soil were investigated in eastern China.15N natural abundance values for these forest ecosystems were in the middle of the range of values previously found for global forest ecosystems. In contrast to commonly reported global patterns, temperate forest ecosystems were significantly more15N-enriched than tropical forest ecosystems, and foliage δ15N was negatively correlated with increasing mean annual temperature and net soil N mineralisation in eastern China. Tight N cycling in forest ecosystems and the use of atmospheric N deposition by trees might underlie the δ15N distribution patterns in eastern China. The existence of mycorrhizal fungi and root distribution profiles in the soil may also influence the15N natural abundance patterns in forest ecosystems of eastern China.

  2. Natural abundance nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral studies on selected donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someswara Rao, N.; Babu Rao, G.; Murthy, B. N.; Das, M. Maria; Prabhakar, T.; Lalitha, M.

    2002-10-01

    The natural abundance 15N-NMR chemical shifts of selected aliphatic amines, 2-substituted pyridine type compounds, bialicyclic tertiary amines have been measured as a function of the nature of the solvent. In the case of cyclic aliphatic amines, like piperidine, morpholine, piperazine, thiomorpholine, the nitrogen is more shielded in concentrated solution compared to that in dilute solution whereas in the hydrogen bonding and protonating solvents there is a prominent deshielding. 2-Substituted pyridines studied can be further divided into four sub groups. The site of hydrogen bonding and protonation in 2-amino, 2-hydroxy and 2-mercapto pyridines have been conclusively proved from the 15N-NMR chemical shifts and the well-known tautomeric forms of the above compounds. Similarly in the case of 2-(2-thienyl)pyridine and 2-(3-thienyl)pyridine, the site of donation has been proved as the nitrogen of the pyridine ring in both the compounds. In a similar manner, the site of hydrogen bonding and protonation in two individual compounds 2-anilinopyridine and 2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazole have also been established. Among the bialicyclic amines, 1,2-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) behaved differently from the other two compounds. In both 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) and 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene (DBN), it was possible to show that N 1-nitrogen in both the compounds is the site of donation. The effect of the second donor site on the 15N-NMR chemical shift, the site of donation in the selected compounds and some typical compounds reported in literature have been presented and discussed.

  3. Characterization of Stratum Corneum Molecular Dynamics by Natural-Abundance 13C Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bouwstra, Joke A.; Sparr, Emma; Topgaard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous potential for pharmaceutical applications, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular details that can contribute to increased permeability of the stratum corneum (SC). To investigate the influence of hydration and heating on the SC, we record the natural-abundance 13C signal of SC using polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods. Resonance lines from all major SC components are assigned. Comparison of the signal intensities obtained with the INEPT and CP pulse sequences gives information on the molecular dynamics of SC components. The majority of the lipids are rigid at 32°C, and those lipids co-exist with a small pool of mobile lipids. The ratio between mobile and rigid lipids increases with hydration. An abrupt change of keratin filament dynamics occurs at RH = 80–85%, from completely rigid to a structure with rigid backbone and mobile protruding terminals. Heating has a strong effect on the lipid mobility, but only a weak influence on the keratin filaments. The results provide novel molecular insight into how the SC constituents are affected by hydration and heating, and improve the understanding of enhanced SC permeability, which is associated with elevated temperatures and SC hydration. PMID:23626744

  4. Natural abundance 17O nuclear magnetic resonance and computational modeling studies of lithium based liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  5. Probing surface hydrogen bonding and dynamics by natural abundance, multidimensional, 17O DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frederic A.; Chaudhary, Umesh; Slowing, Igor I.; Pruski, Marek

    2016-05-06

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly being used as a tool for the atomic-level characterization of surface sites. DNP surface-enhanced SSNMR spectroscopy of materials has, however, been limited to studying relatively receptive nuclei, and the particularly rare 17O nuclide, which is of great interest for materials science, has not been utilized. We demonstrate that advanced 17O SSNMR experiments can be performed on surface species at natural isotopic abundance using DNP. We use 17O DNP surface-enhanced 2D SSNMR to measure 17O{1H} HETCOR spectra as well as dipolar oscillations on a series of thermally treatedmore » mesoporous silica nanoparticle samples having different pore diameters. These experiments allow for a nonintrusive and unambiguous characterization of hydrogen bonding and dynamics at the surface of the material; no other single experiment can give such details about the interactions at the surface. Lastly, our data show that, upon drying, strongly hydrogen-bonded surface silanols, whose motions are greatly restricted by the interaction when compared to lone silanols, are selectively dehydroxylated.« less

  6. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  7. Natural abundance deuterium and 18-oxygen effects on the precision of the doubly labeled water method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvitz, M. A.; Schoeller, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The doubly labeled water method for measuring total energy expenditure is subject to error from natural variations in the background 2H and 18O in body water. There is disagreement as to whether the variations in background abundances of the two stable isotopes covary and what relative doses of 2H and 18O minimize the impact of variation on the precision of the method. We have performed two studies to investigate the amount and covariance of the background variations. These were a study of urine collected weekly from eight subjects who remained in the Madison, WI locale for 6 wk and frequent urine samples from 14 subjects during round-trip travel to a locale > or = 500 miles from Madison, WI. Background variation in excess of analytical error was detected in six of the eight nontravelers, and covariance was demonstrated in four subjects. Background variation was detected in all 14 travelers, and covariance was demonstrated in 11 subjects. The median slopes of the regression lines of delta2H vs. delta18O were 6 and 7, respectively. Modeling indicated that 2H and 18O doses yielding a 6:1 ratio of final enrichments should minimize this error introduced to the doubly labeled water method.

  8. Relation of desert pupfish abundance to selected environmental variables in natural and manmade habitats in the Salton Sea basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, B.A.; Saiki, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the relation between abundance of desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius, and selected biological and physicochemical variables in natural and manmade habitats within the Salton Sea Basin. Field sampling in a natural tributary, Salt Creek, and three agricultural drains captured eight species including pupfish (1.1% of the total catch), the only native species encountered. According to Bray-Curtis resemblance functions, fish species assemblages differed mostly between Salt Creek and the drains (i.e., the three drains had relatively similar species assemblages). Pupfish numbers and environmental variables varied among sites and sample periods. Canonical correlation showed that pupfish abundance was positively correlated with abundance of western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and negatively correlated with abundance of porthole livebearers, Poeciliopsis gracilis, tilapias (Sarotherodon mossambica and Tilapia zillii), longjaw mudsuckers, Gillichthys mirabilis, and mollies (Poecilia latipinnaandPoecilia mexicana). In addition, pupfish abundance was positively correlated with cover, pH, and salinity, and negatively correlated with sediment factor (a measure of sediment grain size) and dissolved oxygen. Pupfish abundance was generally highest in habitats where water quality extremes (especially high pH and salinity, and low dissolved oxygen) seemingly limited the occurrence of nonnative fishes. This study also documented evidence of predation by mudsuckers on pupfish. These findings support the contention of many resource managers that pupfish populations are adversely influenced by ecological interactions with nonnative fishes. ?? Springer 2005.

  9. Elevated Bacterial Abundance in Laboratory-Grown and Naturally Occurring Frost Flowers Under Late Winter Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J. S.; Deming, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Sea ice has been identified as an important microbial habitat, with bacteria and other microbes concentrated in the brine inclusions between ice crystals. Frost flowers, thought to draw brine from underlying sea ice, have not been characterized from a microbial standpoint. To test whether frost flowers serve as an upward vector of bacteria contained within sea ice brines we grew frost flowers in a freezer laboratory (air temperature of -21°C) from saline water spiked with the mesophilic (and thus passive under experimental conditions) bacterium Halomonas pacifica. Salinity of melted samples was measured and bacterial abundance determined by epifluorescent microscopy. Bacterial counts scaled to ice-melt volume averaged 2.82 x 106 ml-1 for frost flowers, compared to 9.47 x 105 ml-1 for underlying ice (3 x higher). Bacterial counts also correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value of 62.5 psu) for frost flowers, brine skim, and ice (df = 17, r = 0.59, p < 0.0001). Segregation coefficients were calculated to describe the efficiency of transport of both cells and salt from the starting solution into frost flowers. From these coefficients an enrichment index was calculated to test for bacterial concentration into frost flowers at a different rate than salt. Analysis with a Student’s T-test (df = 24, t = 0.306, p = .76) indicated that cells and salt were not transported into frost flowers with a significantly different efficiency. To test these findings in the field we then collected frost flowers (and related samples) from new sea ice near Barrow, Alaska in April 2009. Bacterial counts were significantly elevated (again, a 3-fold increase) in natural frost flowers (mean = 2.73 x 105 ml-1) compared to underlying sea ice (mean = 8.46 x 104 cells ml-1). For all field samples collected (frost flowers, underlying brine skim and sea ice, as well as snow), bacterial abundance correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value 124 psu, df = 40, r = 0.60, p < 0

  10. The Determination of the Natural Abundance of the Isotopes of Chlorine: An Introductory Experiment in Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Rebecca M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which introduces basic principles and experimental techniques of mass spectrometry for fourth year undergraduate (B.Sc.) students. Laboratory procedures, background information, and discussion of results are provided for the experiment in which the natural isotopic abundance of chlorine is determined. (Author/JN)

  11. Seasonal variation in natural abundance of 2H and 18O in urine samples from rural Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Lara R.; Brieger, William; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Alabi, Tunrayo; Schoeller, Dale A.; Luke, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The doubly labeled water (DLW) method is used to measure free-living energy expenditure in humans. Inherent to this technique is the assumption that natural abundances of stable isotopes 2H and 18O in body water remain constant over the course of the measurement period and after elimination of the loading dose of DLW will return to the same predose level. To determine variability in the natural abundances of 2H and 18O in humans living in a region with seasonal shifts in rain patterns and sources of drinking water, over the course of 12 mo we collected weekly urine samples from four individuals living in southwest Nigeria as well as samples of their drinking water. From ongoing regional studies of hypertension, obesity, and energy expenditure, we estimated average water turnover rate, urine volumes, and sodium and potassium excretion. Results suggest that 2H and 18O in urine, mean concentrations of urinary sodium and potassium, urine volume, and total body turnover differed significantly from dry to rainy season. Additionally, seasonal weather variables (mean monthly maximum temperatures, total monthly rainfall, and minimum relative humidity) were all significantly associated with natural abundances in urine. No seasonal difference was observed in drinking water samples. Findings suggest that natural abundances in urine may not remain constant as assumed, and studies incorporating DLW measurements across the transition of seasons should interpret results with caution unless appropriate doses of the tracers are used. PMID:25977450

  12. Natural abundance deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of the biosynthesis of monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance (D NMR-na) is a new technique for exploring the biosynthesis of small molecules such as monoterpenes. The analysis of relative site-specific deuterium integration values is an effective means of measuring isotope effects, and examining the regio- and stereochemistry of biosynthetic reactions. The deuterium integration values of linalyl acetate and limonene isolated from the same source were consistent and showed that proton abstraction from the postulated {alpha}-terpinyl cation intermediate to form limonene is regioselective from the methyl derived from the Cs methyl of the precursor, geranyl diphosphate. This regiochemistry was observed in limonene samples from different sources and the measured primary kinetic isotope effect ranged from 0.25 to in excess of 100 (no deuterium was removed within experimental error). Various {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene samples were isolated and D NMR-na analysis showed evidence of isotopically sensitive partitioning of the pinylcation in the formation of these products. This spectral analysis supported published radiolabeling studies but did not require synthesis of substrates or enzyme purification. The formation of 3-carene occurs without isomerization of the double bond which was previously postulated. The olefinic deuterium of the bicyclic compound was traced to the depleted deuterium at C{sub 2} of isopentyl diphosphate by D NMR-na data and this supported unpublished radiolabeling studies. Study of irregular monoterpenes, chrysanthemyl acetate and lyratyl acetate, showed partitioning of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) by chrysanthemyl cyclase. The {alpha}-secondary kinetic isotope effect of 1.06-1.12, obtained from relative deuterium integration values, suggested that S{sub N}1 ionization of one molecule of DMAPP is the first step in the condensation reaction.

  13. A robust method for ammonium nitrogen isotopic analysis in freshwater and seawater at natural abundance levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Altabet, M. A.; Wu, T.; Hadas, O.

    2006-12-01

    Natural ammonium N isotopic abundance has been increasingly used in studies of marine and freshwater biogeochemistry. However, current methods are time-consuming, subject to interference from DON, and not reliable at low concentrations. Our new method for determining the δ15N of ammonium overcomes these difficulties by employing the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite followed by conversion of nitrite to nitrous oxide. In the first step, ammonium is quantitatively oxidized by hypobromite at pH~12. After the addition of sodium arsenite to consume excess hypobromite, yield is verified by colorimetric NO2-measurement using sulfanilamide and naphthyl ethylenediamine (NED). Nitrite is further reduced to N2O by a 1:1 sodium azide and acetic acid buffer solution using previously established procedures. Buffer concentration can be varied according to sample matrix to ensure that a reaction pH between 2 and 4 is reached. The product nitrous oxide is then isotopically analyzed using a continuous flow purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Reliable δ15N values (±0.31‰) are obtained over a concentration range of 0.5 μM to 20 μM using 20 ml volumes of either fresh or seawater samples. Reagent blanks are very low, about 0.05 μM. There is no interference from any of the nitrogen containing compounds tested except short chain aliphatic amino acid (i.e. glycine) which typically are not present at sufficiently high environmental concentrations to pose a problem.

  14. Chemical method for nitrogen isotopic analysis of ammonium at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwei; Fang, Yunting; Tu, Ying; Pan, Yuepeng

    2014-04-15

    We report a new chemical method to determine the (15)N natural abundance (δ(15)N) for ammonium (NH4(+)) in freshwater (e.g., precipitation) and soil KCl extract. This method is based on the isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O). Ammonium is initially oxidized to nitrite (NO2(-)) by hypobromite (BrO(-)) using previously established procedures. NO2(-) is then quantitatively converted into N2O by hydroxylamine (NH2OH) under strongly acid conditions. The produced N2O is analyzed by a commercially available purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (PT-IRMS). On the basis of a typical analysis size of 4 mL, the standard deviation of δ(15)N measurements is less than 0.3‰ and often better than 0.1‰ (3 to 5 replicates). Compared to previous methods, the technique here has several advantages and the potential to be used as a routine method for (15)N/(14)N analysis of NH4(+): (1) substantially simplified preparation procedures and reduced preparation time particularly compared to the methods in which diffusion or distillation is involved since all reactions occur in the same vial and separation of NH4(+) from solution is not required; (2) more suitability for low volume samples including those with low N concentration, having a blank size of 0.6 to 2 nmol; (3) elimination of the use of extremely toxic reagents (e.g., HN3) and/or the use of specialized denitrifying bacterial cultures which may be impractical for many laboratories. PMID:24654992

  15. Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of histone and DNA dynamics in nucleosome cores.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, P R; Smith, R M; Rill, R L

    1986-05-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (67.9 MHz) were obtained for native nucleosome cores: cores dissociated in 2 M NaCl and 2 M NaCl, 6 M urea; and cores degraded with DNase I plus proteinase K. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of native and dissociated cores and core length DNA were also obtained at 60.7 MHz. The 31P resonance and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of DNA were only slightly affected by packaging in nucleosome cores, in agreement with other reports, but 13C resonances of DNA were essentially unobservable. The loss of DNA spectral intensity suggests that rapid internal motions of DNA sugar carbons in protein-free DNA previously demonstrated by 13C NMR methods are partly restricted in nucleosomes. The 13C spectrum of native cores contains many narrow intense resonances assigned to lysine side chain and alpha-carbons, glycine alpha-carbons, alanine alpha- and beta- carbons, and arginine side chain carbons. Several weaker resonances were also assigned. The narrow line widths, short T1 values, and non-minimal nuclear Overhauser enhancements of these resonances, including alpha- and beta-carbons, show that some terminal chain segments of histones in nucleosomes are as mobile as small random coil polypeptides. The mobile segments include about 9% of all histone residues and 25% of all lysines, but only 10% of all arginines. The compositions of these segments indicate that mobile regions are located in amino- or carboxyl-terminal sequences of two or more histones. In addition, high mobility was observed for side chain carbons of 45-50% of all lysines (delta and epsilon carbons) and about 25% of all arginines (zeta carbon) in histones (including those in mobile segments), suggesting that basic residues in terminal histone sequences are not strongly involved in nucleosome structure and may instead help stabilize higher order chromatin structure. PMID:3700380

  16. Critical evaluation of 13C natural abundance techniques to partition soil-surface CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, H.; Midwood, A. J.; Robinson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial store of carbon and the flux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere is estimated at around 98 Pg (98 billion tonnes) of carbon per year. The CO2 efflux from the soil surface is derived from plant root and rhizosphere respiration (autotrophically fuelled) and microbial degradation of soil organic matter (heterotrophic respiration). Heterotrophic respiration is a key determinant of an ecosystem's long-term C balance, but one that is difficult to measure in the field. One approach involves partitioning the total soil-surface CO2 efflux between heterotrophic and autotrophic components; this can be done using differences in the natural abundance stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 as the end-members of a simple mixing model. In most natural, temperate ecosystems, current and historical vegetation cover (and therefore also plant-derived soil organic matter) is produced from C3 photosynthesis so the difference in δ13C between the autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 sources is small. Successful partitioning therefore requires accurate and precise measurements of the δ13CO2 of the autotrophic and heterotrophic end-members (obtained by measuring the δ13CO2 of soil-free roots and root-free soil) and of total soil CO2 efflux. There is currently little consensus on the optimum measurement protocols. Here we systematically tested some of the most commonly used techniques to identify and minimise methodological errors. Using soil-surface chambers to sample total CO2 efflux and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measure δ13CO2 in a partitioning study on a Scottish moorland, we found that: using soil-penetrating collars leads to a more depleted chamber measurement of total soil δ13CO2 as a result of severing roots and fungal hyphae or equilibrating with δ13CO2 at depth or both; root incubations provide an accurate estimate of in-situ root respired δ13CO2 provided they are sampled within one hour; the δ13CO2 from root

  17. Chemical composition and molecular structure of polysaccharide-protein biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed: extraction and purification process

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The biological functions of natural biopolymers from plant sources depend on their chemical composition and molecular structure. In addition, the extraction and further processing conditions significantly influence the chemical and molecular structure of the plant biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to characterize the chemical and molecular structure of a natural biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed. A size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi angle laser light-scattering (SEC-MALS) was applied to analyze the molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), and polydispersity index (Mw/Mn). Results The most abundant monosaccharide in the carbohydrate composition of durian seed gum were galactose (48.6-59.9%), glucose (37.1-45.1%), arabinose (0.58-3.41%), and xylose (0.3-3.21%). The predominant fatty acid of the lipid fraction from the durian seed gum were palmitic acid (C16:0), palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and linolenic acid (C18:2). The most abundant amino acids of durian seed gum were: leucine (30.9-37.3%), lysine (6.04-8.36%), aspartic acid (6.10-7.19%), glycine (6.07-7.42%), alanine (5.24-6.14%), glutamic acid (5.57-7.09%), valine (4.5-5.50%), proline (3.87-4.81%), serine (4.39-5.18%), threonine (3.44-6.50%), isoleucine (3.30-4.07%), and phenylalanine (3.11-9.04%). Conclusion The presence of essential amino acids in the chemical structure of durian seed gum reinforces its nutritional value. PMID:23062269

  18. Interactions between natural-occurring landscape conditions and land use influencing the abundance of riverine smallmouth bass, micropterus dolomieu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Rabeni, C.F.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how interactions between natural landscape features and land use influenced the abundance of smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, in Missouri, USA, streams. Stream segments were placed into one of four groups based on natural-occurring watershed characteristics (soil texture and soil permeability) predicted to relate to smallmouth bass abundance. Within each group, stream segments were assigned forest (n = 3), pasture (n = 3), or urban (n = 3) designations based on the percentages of land use within each watershed. Analyses of variance indicated smallmouth bass densities differed between land use and natural conditions. Decision tree models indicated abundance was highest in forested stream segments and lowest in urban stream segments, regardless of group designation. Land use explained the most variation in decision tree models, but in-channel features of temperature, flow, and sediment also contributed significantly. These results are unique and indicate the importance of natural-occurring watershed conditions in defining the potential of populations and how finer-scale filters interact with land use to further alter population potential. Smallmouth bass has differing vulnerabilities to land-use attributes, and the better the natural watershed conditions are for population success, the more resilient these populations will be when land conversion occurs.

  19. Adhesion of pancreatic beta cells to biopolymer films.

    PubMed

    Williams, S Janette; Wang, Qun; Macgregor, Ronal R; Siahaan, Teruna J; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Berkland, Cory

    2009-08-01

    Dramatic reversal of Type 1 diabetes in patients receiving pancreatic islet transplants continues to prompt vigorous research concerning the basic mechanisms underlying patient turnaround. At the most fundamental level, transplanted islets must maintain viability and function in vitro and in vivo and should be protected from host immune rejection. Our previous reports showed enhancement of islet viability and insulin secretion per tissue mass for small islets (<125 mum) as compared with large islets (>125 mum), thus, demonstrating the effect of enhancing the mass transport of islets (i.e. increasing tissue surface area to volume ratio). Here, we report the facile dispersion of rat islets into individual cells that are layered onto the surface of a biopolymer film towards the ultimate goal of improving mass transport in islet tissue. The tightly packed structure of intact islets was disrupted by incubating in calcium-free media resulting in fragmented islets, which were further dispersed into individual or small groups of cells by using a low concentration of papain. The dispersed cells were screened for adhesion to a range of biopolymers and the nature of cell adhesion was characterized for selected groups by quantifying adherent cells, measuring the surface area coverage of the cells, and immunolabeling cells for adhesion proteins interacting with selected biopolymers. Finally, beta cells in suspension were centrifuged to form controlled numbers of cell layers on films for future work determining the mass transport limitations in the adhered tissue constructs. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 676-685, 2009.This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:19353639

  20. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  1. On the suppression of superconducting phase formation in YBCO materials by templated synthesis in the presence of a sulfated biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliott; Schnepp, Zoe; Wimbush, Stuart C.; Hall, Simon R.

    2008-11-01

    The use of biopolymers as templates to control superconductor crystallization is a recent phenomenon and is generating a lot of interest both from the superconductor community and in materials chemistry circles. This work represents a critical finding in the use of such biopolymers, in particular the contraindicatory nature of sulfur when attempting to affect a morphologically controlled synthesis. Synthesis of superconducting nanoparticles was attempted using carrageenan as a morphological template. Reactive sulfate groups on the biopolymer prevent this, producing instead significant quantities of barium sulfate nanotapes. By substituting the biopolymer for structurally analogous, non-sulfated agar, we show that superconducting nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized.

  2. Locust bean gum: a versatile biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2013-05-15

    Biopolymers or natural polymers are an attractive class of biodegradable polymers since they are derived from natural sources, easily available, relatively cheap and can be modified by suitable reagent. Locust bean gum is one of them that have a wide potentiality in drug formulations due to its extensive application as food additive and its recognized lack of toxicity. It can be tailored to suit its demands of applicants in both the pharmaceutical and biomedical areas. Locust bean gum has a wide application either in the field of novel drug delivery system as rate controlling excipients or in tissue engineering as scaffold formation. Through keen references of reported literature on locust bean gum, in this review, we have described critical aspects of locust bean gum, its manufacturing process, physicochemical properties and applications in various drug delivery systems. PMID:23544637

  3. The natural 13C abundance of plasma glucose is a useful biomarker of recent dietary caloric sweetener intake.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad M; Alvig, Amy L; Liu, Yu Qiu David; Schoeller, Dale A

    2010-02-01

    There is a need for objective biomarkers of dietary intake, because self-reporting is often subject to bias. We tested the validity of a biomarker for the fraction of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) from cane sugar and high fructose corn syrup (C(4) sugars) using natural (13)C abundance of plasma glucose. In a randomized, single-blinded, crossover design, 5 participants consumed 3 weight-maintaining diets for 7 d, with a 2-wk washout between diet periods. Diets differed in the fraction of total CHO energy from C(4) sugars (5, 16, or 32%). During each diet period, blood samples were drawn at hours 0800 and 1600 on d 1, 3, and 5 and at 0800, 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 on d 7. The delta(13)C abundance of plasma glucose was analyzed via GC- isotope ratio MS. Within each diet period, delta(13)C abundance of the 0800 fasting glucose did not change from baseline with increasing time during a diet period; however, there was a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.89) between delta(13)C abundance of the glucose concentration at 1000 on d 7 and the percent of breakfast CHO from C(4) sugars. Also, delta(13)C abundance of the combined plasma glucose samples on d 7 demonstrated a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.90) with the percent of total daily CHO from C(4) sugars. The natural delta(13)C abundance of postprandial plasma glucose relative to dietary C(4) CHO content was a valid biomarker for contributions of C(4) caloric sweeteners from the previous meal. PMID:20018804

  4. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurement of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.

  5. Is the Multicolored Asian Ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis, the Most Abundant Natural Enemy to Aphids in Agroecosystems?

    PubMed Central

    Vandereycken, Axel; Durieux, Delphine; Joie, Emilie; Sloggett, John J.; Haubruge, Eric; Verheggen, François J.

    2013-01-01

    The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), was introduced into Western Europe in the late 1990s. Since the late 2000s, this species has been commonly considered one of the most abundant aphid predators in most Western European countries. In spite of the large amount of research on H. axyridis, information concerning its relative abundance in agroecosystems is lacking. This study aims to evaluate the abundance of H. axyridis within the aphidophage community in four crops situated in southern Belgium: wheat, Triticum aestivum L. (Poales: Poaceae), corn, Zea mays, potato, Solanum tuberosum (Solanales: Solanaceae), and broad bean Vicia faba (Fabales: Fabaceae). In order to assess the species diversity, the collected data were analyzed by considering (1) the species richness and (2) the evenness according to the Shannon diversity index. Eleven aphidophages were observed in every inventoried agroecosystem, including five abundant species: three coccinellids, the seven-spotted ladybug, Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), the 14-spotted Ladybird, Propylea quatuordecimpunctata, and H. axyridis; one hoverfly, the marmalade hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus De Geer (Diptera: Syrphidae); and one lacewing, the common green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens sensu lato (= s.l.) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Harmonia axyridis has been observed to thrive, breed, and reproduce on the four studied crops. Harmonia axyridis is the most abundant predator of aphids in corn followed by C. septempunctata, which is the main aphid predator observed in the three other inventoried crops. In wheat and potato fields, H. axyridis occurs in low numbers compared to other aphidophage. These observations suggest that H. axyridis could be considered an invasive species of agrosystems, and that potato and wheat may intermittently act as refuges for other aphidophages vulnerable to intraguild predation by this invader. Harmonia axyridis

  6. Is the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis, the most abundant natural enemy to aphids in agroecosystems?

    PubMed

    Vandereycken, Axel; Durieux, Delphine; Joie, Emilie; Sloggett, John J; Haubruge, Eric; Verheggen, François J

    2013-01-01

    The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), was introduced into Western Europe in the late 1990s. Since the late 2000s, this species has been commonly considered one of the most abundant aphid predators in most Western European countries. In spite of the large amount of research on H. axyridis, information concerning its relative abundance in agroecosystems is lacking. This study aims to evaluate the abundance of H. axyridis within the aphidophage community in four crops situated in southern Belgium: wheat, Triticum aestivum L. (Poales: Poaceae), corn, Zea mays, potato, Solanum tuberosum (Solanales: Solanaceae), and broad bean Vicia faba (Fabales: Fabaceae). In order to assess the species diversity, the collected data were analyzed by considering (1) the species richness and (2) the evenness according to the Shannon diversity index. Eleven aphidophages were observed in every inventoried agroecosystem, including five abundant species: three coccinellids, the seven-spotted ladybug, Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), the 14-spotted Ladybird, Propylea quatuordecimpunctata, and H. axyridis; one hoverfly, the marmalade hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus De Geer (Diptera: Syrphidae); and one lacewing, the common green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens sensu lato (= s.l.) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Harmonia axyridis has been observed to thrive, breed, and reproduce on the four studied crops. Harmonia axyridis is the most abundant predator of aphids in corn followed by C. septempunctata, which is the main aphid predator observed in the three other inventoried crops. In wheat and potato fields, H. axyridis occurs in low numbers compared to other aphidophage. These observations suggest that H. axyridis could be considered an invasive species of agrosystems, and that potato and wheat may intermittently act as refuges for other aphidophages vulnerable to intraguild predation by this invader. Harmonia axyridis

  7. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2-3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  8. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F.; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S.; Ralph, Peter J.; Seymour, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2–3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2–3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  9. Assessment of the natural variation of low abundant metabolic proteins in soybean seeds using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we investigated the distribution of the low abundant proteins that are involved in soybean seed development in four wild and twelve cultivated soybean genotypes. We found proteomic variation of these proteins within and...

  10. Flow and habitat effects on juvenile fish abundance in natural and altered flow regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Bowen, Z.H.; Bovee, K.D.; Irwin, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    Conserving biological resources native to large river systems increasingly depends on how flow-regulated segments of these rivers are managed. Improving management will require a better understanding of linkages between river biota and temporal variability of flow and instream habitat. However, few studies have quantified responses of native fish populations to multiyear (>2 yr) patterns of hydrologic or habitat variability in flow-regulated systems. To provide these data, we quantified young-of-year (YOY) fish abundance during four years in relation to hydrologic and habitat variability in two segments of the Tallapoosa River in the southeastern United States. One segment had an unregulated flow regime, whereas the other was flow-regulated by a peak-load generating hydropower dam. We sampled fishes annually and explored how continuously recorded flow data and physical habitat simulation models (PHABSIM) for spring (April-June) and summer (July-August) preceding each sample explained fish abundances. Patterns of YOY abundance in relation to habitat availability (median area) and habitat persistence (longest period with habitat area continuously above the long-term median area) differed between unregulated and flow-regulated sites. At the unregulated site, YOY abundances were most frequently correlated with availability of shallow-slow habitat in summer (10 species) and persistence of shallow-slow and shallow-fast habitat in spring (nine species). Additionally, abundances were negatively correlated with 1-h maximum flow in summer (five species). At the flow-regulated site, YOY abundances were more frequently correlated with persistence of shallow-water habitats (four species in spring; six species in summer) than with habitat availability or magnitude of flow extremes. The associations of YOY with habitat persistence at the flow-regulated site corresponded to the effects of flow regulation on habitat patterns. Flow regulation reduced median flows during spring and

  11. Heteronuclear NMR of DNA with the heteronucleus in natural abundance: facilitated assignment and extraction of coupling constants.

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, P; Ippel, J H; van den Elst, H; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C; Kessler, H

    1992-01-01

    Two heteronuclear proton-carbon NMR experiments are applied to the DNA-octamer d(TTGGCCAA)2 with carbon in natural abundance. They lead to a complete assignment of the carbon resonances of the sugars and bases. In addition, several heteronuclear coupling constants, proton-carbon as well as proton-phosphorous and phosphorous-carbon, were determined. The information can be obtained in a reasonable measuring time and offers valuable information for a detailed picture of DNA structure. PMID:1408787

  12. Optical hyperpolarization and inductive readout of 31P donor nuclei in natural abundance single crystal 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Thomas; Haas, Holger; Deshpande, Rahul; Gumann, Patryk; Cory, David

    2016-05-01

    We optically polarize and inductively detect 31P donor nuclei in single crystal silicon at high magnetic fields (6 . 7T). Samples include both natural abundance 29Si and an isotopically purified 28Si sample. We observe dipolar order in the 29Si nuclear spins through a spin-locking measurement. This provides a means of characterizing spin transport in the vicinity of the 31P donors.

  13. Crosslinking biopolymers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Narendra; Reddy, Roopa; Jiang, Qiuran

    2015-06-01

    Biomaterials made from proteins, polysaccharides, and synthetic biopolymers are preferred but lack the mechanical properties and stability in aqueous environments necessary for medical applications. Crosslinking improves the properties of the biomaterials, but most crosslinkers either cause undesirable changes to the functionality of the biopolymers or result in cytotoxicity. Glutaraldehyde, the most widely used crosslinking agent, is difficult to handle and contradictory views have been presented on the cytotoxicity of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked materials. Recently, poly(carboxylic acids) that can crosslink in both dry and wet conditions have been shown to provide the desired improvements in tensile properties, increase in stability under aqueous conditions, and also promote cell attachment and proliferation. Green chemicals and newer crosslinking approaches are necessary to obtain biopolymeric materials with properties desired for medical applications. PMID:25887334

  14. Scleroglucan biopolymer enhances WMB performances

    SciTech Connect

    Gallino, G.; Guarneri, A.; Poli, O.G.

    1996-12-31

    Xanthan Gum is the most popular biopolymer used today to provide hole cleaning and suspension capabilities to water based drilling fluids but it presents some limitations as regards temperature sensitivity and tolerance to field contaminants. In this paper a Scleroglucan is proposed as a better alternative to Xanthan Gum for drilling fluid compositions. Superior benefits offered by Scleroglucan on hole cleaning, rate of penetration, temperature sensitivity and mud tolerance to shale have been demonstrated by successful field applications and by extensive laboratory studies.

  15. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, L.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-07-01

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell's adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  16. Unveiling the Nature of the "Green Pea" Galaxies: Oxygen and Nitrogen Chemical Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorín, R. O.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present recent results on the oxygen and nitrogen chemical abundances in the extremely compact, low-mass starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.1-0.3 usually referred to as "green pea" galaxies. We show that they are metal-poor galaxies (~1/5 solar) with lower oxygen abundances than star-forming galaxies of similar mass and N/O ratios unusually high for galaxies of the same metallicity. Recent, rapid, and massive inflows of cold gas, possibly coupled with enriched outflows from supernova winds, are used to explain the results. This is consistent with the known "pea" galaxy properties and suggest that these rare objects are experiencing a short and extreme phase in their evolution.

  17. Nature's starships. I. Observed abundances and relative frequencies of amino acids in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-10

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. These two trends (total abundance and relative frequencies) can be used to constrain formation parameters of amino acids within planetesimals. Our organization of the data supports an onion shell model for the temperature structure of planetesimals. The least altered meteorites (type 3) and their amino acids originated near cooler surface regions. The most active amino acid synthesis likely took place at intermediate depths (type 2). The most altered materials (type 1) originated furthest toward parent body cores. This region is likely too hot to either favor amino acid synthesis or for amino acids to be retained after synthesis.

  18. Biopolymers from Composted Biowaste as Stabilizers for the Synthesis of Spherical and Homogeneously Sized Silver Nanoparticles for Textile Applications on Natural Fibers.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, Roberto; Barrasso, Marco; Carrillo Le Roux, Galo Antonio; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Sousa, Walter; Malandrino, Mery; Magnacca, Giuliana

    2015-12-21

    The use of bio-based substances (BBS) obtained from composted biowaste as stabilizers for the production of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in substitution to citrate is investigated herein, evaluating the functionalization of natural fibers for textile antibacterial applications. The results obtained evidenced that BBS can substitute citrate as reducing/stabilizing agent in the synthesis, inducing a geometrical control (in shape and size) of the AgNPs. Two different substrates were selected (wool and cotton) and two dip-coating deposition techniques investigated. The release of AgNPs from the supports in water was evaluated under two different experimental conditions: 1) soaking (static conditions) for 7 and 15 days, simulating the contact with sweat, and 2) centrifugation (dynamic conditions), simulating a washing machine treatment. A wide physicochemical characterization was carried out to evaluate the effects of BBS on the morphology and stability of AgNPs suspensions as well as the functionalization effectiveness. PMID:26507571

  19. Dual production of biopolymers from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sukan, Artun; Roy, Ipsita; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2015-08-01

    Rapid depletion of natural resources with continued demands of an increasing population and high consumption rates of today's world will cause serious problems in the future. This, along with environmental concerns, has directed research towards finding alternatives in variety of sectors including sustainable and environmentally friendly consumer goods. Biopolymers of bacterial origin, with their vast range of applications, biodegradability and eco-friendly manufacturing processes, are one of the alternatives for a more sustainable future. However, the cost of their production is a drawback. Simultaneous production processes have always been an option for researchers in order to reduce cost, but the variable requirements of microorganisms to produce both different and valuable products are a hindering factor. This review will look at some examples and identify ideas towards developing a successful strategy for simultaneous production of bio-products. PMID:25933521

  20. Natural decay process affects the abundance and community structure of Bacteria and Archaea in Picea abies logs.

    PubMed

    Rinta-Kanto, J M; Sinkko, H; Rajala, T; Al-Soud, W A; Sørensen, S J; Tamminen, M V; Timonen, S

    2016-07-01

    Prokaryotes colonize decaying wood and contribute to the degradation process, but the dynamics of prokaryotic communities during wood decay is still poorly understood. We studied the abundance and community composition of Bacteria and Archaea inhabiting naturally decaying Picea abies logs and tested the hypothesis that the variations in archaeal and bacterial abundances and community composition are coupled with environmental parameters related to the decay process. The data set comprises >500 logs at different decay stages from five geographical locations in south and central Finland. The results show that Bacteria and Archaea are an integral and dynamic component of decaying wood biota. The abundances of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes increase as wood decay progresses. Changes in bacterial community composition are clearly linked to the loss of density of wood, while specific fungal-bacterial interactions may also affect the distribution of bacterial taxa in decaying wood. Thaumarchaeota were prominent members of the archaeal populations colonizing decaying wood, providing further evidence of the versatility and cosmopolitan nature of this phylum in the environment. The composition and dynamics of the prokaryotic community suggest that they are an active component of biota that are involved in processing substrates in decaying wood material. PMID:27127195

  1. The Impact of Invasive Earthworm Activity on Biopolymer Character of ýDecayed Litter ý

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T.; Crow, S.; Johnston, C.; McCormick, M.; Szlavecz, K.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last 400-500 years invasive European earthworm populations have ýmoved steadily into North American forests either previously devoid of ýearthworms or that contained their own native populations. This has profound ýimpacts upon litter decay and soil organic matter dynamics. To determine the ýimpact of earthworm activity on the biopolymer and stable isotope chemistry of ýlitter residues and the nature of organic carbon moved to the soil profile we ýanalyzed tulip poplar leaves from a multi-year addition experiment in open ýsurface decay litter and litter bag decay experiments, as well as the associated ýsoils among forest plots that varied in non-native earthworm density and ýbiomass. The chemical alteration of biopolymers was tracked with FTIR ýspectroscopy, 13C-TMAH thermochemolysis, alkaline CuO extraction, and stable ýisotope mass spectrometry. Earthworm activity resulted in residues and soil ýparticulate organic matter depleted in cuticular aliphatic components and ýpolyphenols but highly enriched in ether-linked lignin with respect to initial litter ýmaterial. Decay in low earthworm abundance plots, as well as all experiments ýwith earthworm-excluding litter bags, resulted in enrichment in cutin aliphatics ýand only minor increases in ether linked lignin phenols which was also reflected ýin the soils below the amendments. Additionally, the stable carbon and nitrogen ýisotope composition of tulip poplar residues became isotopically distinct. The ýresults from litter bag decays were only reflective of the chemistry at sites with ývery low earthworm abundances. ý

  2. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    PubMed

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  3. ASSESSING ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS IN NATURAL COMMUNITIES OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAS ALONG AN ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alpha diversity indices often fail to distinguish between natural populations that a more detailed investigation of the distribution of ramets among types would show are quite different. We studied the effectiveness of applying SHE analyses to morphotype classifications of ectom...

  4. Identification of Biodegradation Pathways in a Multi-Process Phytoremediation System (MPPS) Using Natural Abundance 14C Analysis of PLFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, B. R.; Greenberg, B. M.; Slater, G. F.

    2008-12-01

    Optimizing remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils requires thorough understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved in a proposed remediation system. In many engineered and natural attenuation systems, multiple degradation pathways may contribute to observed contaminant mass losses. In this study, biodegradation in the soil microbial community was identified as a major pathway for petroleum hydrocarbon removal in a Multi-Process Phytoremediation System (MPPS) using natural abundance 14C analysis of Phospholipid Fatty Acids (PLFA). In contaminated soils, PLFA were depleted in Δ14C to less than -800‰, directly demonstrating microbial uptake and utilization of petroleum derived carbon (Δ14C = -992‰) during bioremediation. Mass balance indicated that more than 80% of microbial carbon was derived from petroleum hydrocarbons and a maximum of 20% was produced from metabolism of modern carbon sources. In contrast, in a nearby uncontaminated control soil, the microbial community maintained a nearly modern 14C signature, suggesting preferential degradation of more labile, recent carbon. Mass balance using δ13C and Δ14C of soil CO2 demonstrated that mineralization of petroleum carbon contributed 60-65% of soil CO2 at the contaminated site. The remainder was derived from atmospheric (27-30%) and decomposition of non- petroleum natural organic carbon (5-10%). The clean control exhibited substantially lower CO2 concentrations that were derived from atmospheric (55%) and natural organic carbon (45%) sources. This study highlights the value of using multiple carbon isotopes to identify degradation pathways in petroleum- contaminated soils undergoing phytoremediation and the power of natural abundance 14C to detect petroleum metabolism in natural microbial communities.

  5. Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Yan; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of nitrate (NO−3), a major nitrogen (N) source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO−3 uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Due to abrupt application and short operation time, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO−3-use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO−3 can offer insights into the plant NO−3 sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO−3 utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO−3 in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and advantages of these parameters in interpreting NO−3 sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO−3 in plants, and discuss the implications of NO−3 concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO−3 and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO−3 variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO−3 in plants and discuss the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: δ18O and Δ17O); and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO−3 in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we offer a preliminary framework of intraplant δ18O-NO−3 variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO−3 parameters to interpret plant NO−3 utilization

  6. Interaction between polymer constituents and the structure of biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rein, R.

    1974-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of methods for calculating intermolecular interactions between biopolymer units. The nature of forces contributing to the various domains of intermolecular separations is investigated, and various approximations applicable in the respective regions are examined. The predictive value of current theory is tested by establishing a connection with macroscopic properties and comparing the theoretical predicted values with those derived from experimental data. This has led to the introduction of a statistical model describing DNA.

  7. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  8. Natural expansion and experimental manipulation of seagrass ( Zostera spp.) abundance and the response of infaunal invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Paul G.

    1987-06-01

    A study of an expanding seagrass bed on the south-west coast of British Columbia, Canada involved documentation and explanation of the pattern of expansion of the vegetation as well as documentation and experimental investigation of the accompanying changes in the distribution of infaunal invertebrates. Expansion followed a major environmental change, improved water clarity initiated in 1969 when a causeway blocked access to the site for silty Fraser River water. The original eelgrass ( Zostera marina) bed expanded landward over 30 m year -1, probably causing more and more water to be retained in the bed at low tide and thus improving its own habitat. More rapid expansion occurred from 1979-1983 after Z.japonica colonized at the landward edge of the eelgrass bed and in a separate intertidal area. Expansion ceased around 1983 coincident with, but probably independent of, further construction. Burrowing shrimp ( Callianassa californiensis) decreased in abundance between 1977 and 1984 in areas where the two seagrasses colonized. Short-term experiment over one summer and fall showed that removal of all shoots allowed adult shrimp and tube worms to colonize the sediment while addition of shoots of Z. japonica by transplanting caused temporary decreases in shrimp abundance. After a few weeks an established shrimp population destroyed the transplants. Among reasonable alternate hypotheses for the decline in Callianassa, the effect of sediment texture can be eliminated, but either direct negative effects of seagrass, i.e. inhibition of the burrowing of adult shrimp or of settlement of juveniles, or indirect effects, i.e. the harboring of more predators of shrimp in seagrass beds, deserve further study.

  9. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicomplex cellulase-xylanase enzyme system that hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose, and we have described this system in detail.

  10. Chirality and equilibrium biopolymer bundles.

    PubMed

    Grason, Gregory M; Bruinsma, Robijn F

    2007-08-31

    We use continuum theory to show that chirality is a key thermodynamic control parameter for the aggregation of biopolymers: chirality produces a stable disperse phase of hexagonal bundles under moderately poor solvent conditions, as has been observed in in vitro studies of F actin [O. Pelletier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 148102 (2003)]. The large characteristic radius of these chiral bundles is not determined by a mysterious long-range molecular interaction but by in-plane shear elastic stresses generated by the interplay between a chiral torque and an unusual, but universal, nonlinear gauge term in the strain tensor of ordered chains that is imposed by rotational invariance. PMID:17931038

  11. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  12. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  13. A thalium-doped sodium iodide well counter for radioactive tracer applications with naturally-abundant 40K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew J.; Boxall, Colin; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Schotanus, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The use of a thallium-doped sodium-iodide well-type scintillation detector for the assay of the low-activity radioisotope 40K, in open-source potassium chloride aqueous solutions, is described. The hazards, safety concerns and radiowaste generation associated with using open-source radioactive isotopes can present significant difficulties, the use of hot cells and escalated costs in radioanalytical laboratory research. A solution to this is the use of low-hazard alternatives that mimic the migration and dispersion characteristics of notable fission products (in this case 137Cs). The use of NaI(Tl) as a detection medium for naturally-abundant levels of 40K in a range of media is widespread, but the use of 40K as a radioactive tracer has not been reported. The use of such low-activity sources is often complicated by the ability to detect them efficiently. In this paper a scintillator detector designed to detect the naturally-abundant 40K present in potassium chloride in tracer applications is described. Examples of the use of potassium chloride as a tracer are given in the context of ion exchange and electrochemical migration studies, and comparisons in performance are drawn from literature with hyper pure germanium semiconductor detectors, which are more commonly utilised detectors in high-resolution counting applications.

  14. Natural 15N- and 13C-abundance as indicators of forest nitrogen status and soil carbon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Hanson, Paul J; Todd Jr, Donald E; Lu, Benwhea Bonnie; Brice, Deanne Jane

    2007-09-01

    This book highlights new and emerging uses of stable isotope analysis in a variety of ecological disciplines. While the use of natural abundance isotopes in ecological research is now relatively standard, new techniques and ways of interpreting patterns are developing rapidly. The second edition of this book provides a thorough, up-to-date examination of these methods of research. As part of the Ecological Methods and Concepts series which provides the latest information on experimental techniques in ecology, this book looks at a wide range of techniques that use natural abundance isotopes to: {sm_bullet} follow whole ecosystem element cycling {sm_bullet} understand processes of soil organic matter formation {sm_bullet} follow the movement of water in whole watersheds {sm_bullet} understand the effects of pollution in both terrestrial and aquatic environments {sm_bullet} study extreme systems such as hydrothermal vents {sm_bullet}follow migrating organisms In each case, the book explains the background to the methodology, looks at the underlying principles and assumptions, and outlines the potential limitations and pitfalls. Stable Isotopes in Ecology and Environmental Science is an ideal resource for both ecologists who are new to isotopic analysis, and more experienced isotope ecologists interested in innovative techniques and pioneering new uses.

  15. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. PMID:27285796

  16. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Enables the Analysis of Sn-Beta Zeolite Prepared with Natural Abundance 119Sn Precursors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of tin-containing zeolites, such as Sn-Beta, is critically dependent on the successful incorporation of the tin metal center into the zeolite framework. However, synchrotron-based techniques or solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) of samples enriched with 119Sn isotopes are the only reliable methods to verify framework incorporation. This work demonstrates, for the first time, the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR for characterizing zeolites containing ∼2 wt % of natural abundance Sn without the need for 119Sn isotopic enrichment. The biradicals TOTAPOL, bTbK, bCTbK, and SPIROPOL functioned effectively as polarizing sources, and the solvent enabled proper transfer of spin polarization from the radical’s unpaired electrons to the target nuclei. Using bCTbK led to an enhancement (ε) of 75, allowing the characterization of natural-abundance 119Sn-Beta with excellent signal-to-noise ratios in <24 h. Without DNP, no 119Sn resonances were detected after 10 days of continuous analysis. PMID:24697321

  17. Inferring the nature of anthropogenic threats from long-term abundance records.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Kevin T; Akçakaya, H Resit

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosing the processes that threaten species persistence is critical for recovery planning and risk forecasting. Dominant threats are typically inferred by experts on the basis of a patchwork of informal methods. Transparent, quantitative diagnostic tools would contribute much-needed consistency, objectivity, and rigor to the process of diagnosing anthropogenic threats. Long-term census records, available for an increasingly large and diverse set of taxa, may exhibit characteristic signatures of specific threatening processes and thereby provide information for threat diagnosis. We developed a flexible Bayesian framework for diagnosing threats on the basis of long-term census records and diverse ancillary sources of information. We tested this framework with simulated data from artificial populations subjected to varying degrees of exploitation and habitat loss and several real-world abundance time series for which threatening processes are relatively well understood: bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) (exploitation) and Red Grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) and Eurasian Skylark (Alauda arvensis) (habitat loss). Our method correctly identified the process driving population decline for over 90% of time series simulated under moderate to severe threat scenarios. Successful identification of threats approached 100% for severe exploitation and habitat loss scenarios. Our method identified threats less successfully when threatening processes were weak and when populations were simultaneously affected by multiple threats. Our method selected the presumed true threat model for all real-world case studies, although results were somewhat ambiguous in the case of the Eurasian Skylark. In the latter case, incorporation of an ancillary source of information (records of land-use change) increased the weight assigned to the presumed true model from 70% to 92%, illustrating the value of the proposed framework in bringing diverse sources of

  18. A New Method for Estimating Bacterial Abundances in Natural Samples using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert were heated to a temperature of 500 C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger and the amount of adenine released from the samples then determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approx. l0(exp 5) to l0(exp 9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI staining. The simplicity and robustness of the sublimation technique compared to the DAPI staining method makes this approach particularly attractive for use by spacecraft instrumentation. NASA is currently planning to send a lander to Mars in 2009 in order to assess whether or not organic compounds, especially those that might be associated with life, are present in Martian surface samples. Based on our analyses of the Atacama Desert soil samples, several million bacterial cells per gam of Martian soil should be detectable using this sublimation technique.

  19. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. In this dissertation, I explore the role of both thermal and active fluctuations within cross-linked polymer networks. The systems I study are in large part inspired by the amazing physics found within the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. I first predict and verify the existence of a thermal Casimir force between cross-linkers bound to a semi-flexible polymer. The calculation is complicated by the appearance of second order derivatives in the bending Hamiltonian for such polymers, which requires a careful evaluation of the the path integral formulation of the partition function in order to arrive at the physically correct continuum limit and properly address ultraviolet divergences. I find that cross linkers interact along a filament with an attractive logarithmic potential proportional to thermal energy. The proportionality constant depends on whether and how the cross linkers constrain the relative angle between the two filaments to which they are bound. The interaction has important implications for the synthesis of biopolymer bundles within cells. I model the cross-linkers as existing in two phases: bound to the bundle and free in solution. When the cross-linkers are bound, they behave as a one-dimensional gas of particles interacting with the Casimir force, while the free phase is a simple ideal gas. Demanding equilibrium between the two phases, I find a discontinuous transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous condensation transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. This work is supported by the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross-linkers. I

  20. Topology and geometry of biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Janse Van Rensburg, E.J.; Orlandini, E.; Tesi, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is concerned with some simple lattice models of the entanglement complexity of polymers in dilute solution, with special reference to biopolymers such as DNA. We review a number of rigorous results about the asymptotic behavior of the knot probability, the entanglement complexity and the writhe of a lattice polygon (as a model of a ring polymer) and discuss Monte Carlo results for intermediate length polygons. In addition we discuss how this model can be augmented to include the effect of solvent quality and ionic strength. We also describe a lattice ribbon model which is able to capture the main properties of an oriented ribbon-like molecule (such as duplex DNA). 47 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Natural landscape and stream segment attributes influencing the distribution and relative abundance of riverine smallmouth bass in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Rabeni, C.F.; Sowa, S.P.; Annis, G.

    2007-01-01

    Protecting and restoring fish populations on a regional basis are most effective if the multiscale factors responsible for the relative quality of a fishery are known. We spatially linked Missouri's statewide historical fish collections to environmental features in a geographic information system, which was used as a basis for modeling the importance of landscape and stream segment features in supporting a population of smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu. Decision tree analyses were used to develop probability-based models to predict statewide occurrence and within-range relative abundances. We were able to identify the range of smallmouth bass throughout Missouri and the probability of occurrence within that range by using a few broad landscape variables: the percentage of coarse-textured soils in the watershed, watershed relief, and the percentage of soils with low permeability in the watershed. The within-range relative abundance model included both landscape and stream segment variables. As with the statewide probability of occurrence model, soil permeability was particularly significant. The predicted relative abundance of smallmouth bass in stream segments containing low percentages of permeable soils was further influenced by channel gradient, stream size, spring-flow volume, and local slope. Assessment of model accuracy with an independent data set showed good concordance. A conceptual framework involving naturally occurring factors that affect smallmouth bass potential is presented as a comparative model for assessing transferability to other geographic areas and for studying potential land use and biotic effects. We also identify the benefits, caveats, and data requirements necessary to improve predictions and promote ecological understanding. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  2. Determining the isotopic abundance of a labeled compound by mass spectrometry and how correcting for natural abundance distribution using analogous data from the unlabeled compound leads to a systematic error.

    PubMed

    Schenk, David J; Lockley, William J S; Elmore, Charles S; Hesk, Dave; Roberts, Drew

    2016-04-01

    When the isotopic abundance or specific activity of a labeled compound is determined by mass spectrometry (MS), it is necessary to correct the raw MS data to eliminate ion intensity contributions, which arise from the presence of heavy isotopes at natural abundance (e.g., a typical carbon compound contains ~1.1% (13) C per carbon atom). The most common approach is to employ a correction in which the mass-to-charge distribution of the corresponding unlabeled compound is used to subtract the natural abundance contributions from the raw mass-to-charge distribution pattern of the labeled compound. Following this correction, the residual intensities should be due to the presence of the newly introduced labeled atoms only. However, this will only be the case when the natural abundance mass isotopomer distribution of the unlabeled compound is the same as that of the labeled species. Although this may be a good approximation, it cannot be accurate in all cases. The implications of this approximation for the determination of isotopic abundance and specific activity have been examined in practice. Isotopically mixed stable-atom labeled valine batches were produced, and both these and [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine were analyzed by MS to determine the extent of the error introduced by the approach. Our studies revealed that significant errors are possible for small highly-labeled compounds, such as valine, under some circumstances. In the case with [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine, the errors introduced were minor but could be significant for (14) C-labeled compounds with particular isotopic distributions. This source of systematic error can be minimized, although not eliminated, by the selection of an appropriate isotopic correction pattern or by the use of a program that varies the natural abundance distribution throughout the correction. PMID:26916110

  3. The natural abundance of 13C with different agricultural management by NIRS with fibre optic probe technology.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Mariela; González-Martín, Inmaculada; Hernández-Hierro, Jose Miguel; Hidalgo, Claudia; Govaerts, Bram; Etchevers, Jorge; Sayre, Ken D; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-06-30

    In the present study the natural abundance of (13)C is quantified in agricultural soils in Mexico which have been submitted to different agronomic practices, zero and conventional tillage, retention of crop residues (with and without) and rotation of crops (wheat and maize) for 17 years, which have influenced the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the soil. The natural abundance of C13 is quantified by near infrared spectra (NIRS) with a remote reflectance fibre optic probe, applying the probe directly to the soil samples. Discriminate partial least squares analysis of the near infrared spectra allowed to classify soils with and without residues, regardless of the type of tillage or rotation systems used with a prediction rate of 90% in the internal validation and 94% in the external validation. The NIRS calibration model using a modified partial least squares regression allowed to determine the delta(13)C in soils with or without residues, with multiple correlation coefficients 0.81 and standard error prediction 0.5 per thousand in soils with residues and 0.92 and 0.2 per thousand in soils without residues. The ratio performance deviation for the quantification of delta(13)C in soil was 2.5 in soil with residues and 3.8 without residues. This indicated that the model was adequate to determine the delta(13)C of unknown soils in the -16.2 per thousand to -20.4 per thousand range. The development of the NIR calibration permits analytic determinations of the values of delta(13)C in unknown agricultural soils in less time, employing a non-destructive method, by the application of the fibre optic probe of remote reflectance to the soil sample. PMID:19376340

  4. Use of succinoglycan biopolymer for gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, G.P.; Gunningham, M.C.; Samuel, A.J. . E P Lab.); Lau, H.C.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments and field trials on a polysaccharide biopolymer, succinoglycan, for use in gravel packing. This biopolymer causes minimal formation damage and has unique rheological properties that combine high shear-thinning behavior with temperature-induced viscosity breakback; thus, it can be used without breakers. A scouting study has been carried out at KSEPL to identify new viscosifiers with better rheological properties that cause minimal formation damage. Ideally, breakers should not be required and on-site polymer preparation procedures should be simple enough to give reliable, repeatable performances. For slurry-pack-type operations, the polysaccharide biopolymer succinoglycan was identified as the best candidate. The biopolymer was developed for EOR during 1980--83 at the Sittingbourne Research Centre, Shell Research Ltd., U.K., and is marketed by Shell Intl. Chemical Co. Ltd. as Shellflo-S.''

  5. Mixed biopolymer systems based on starch.

    PubMed

    Abd Elgadir, M; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque; Ferdosh, Sahena; Mehrnoush, Amid; Karim, Alias A; Noda, Takahiro; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam

    2012-01-01

    A binary mixture of starch-starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influence of their interaction on physicochemical and rheological properties of the starch-based foods. It is evident that the physicochemical and rheological characteristics of the biopolymers mixture are highly dependent on the type of starch and other biopolymers that make them up mixing ratios, mixing procedure and presence of other food ingredients in the mixture. Understanding these properties will lead to improve the formulation of starch-based foods and minimize the need to resort to chemically modified starch. PMID:22231495

  6. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    PubMed

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials. PMID:25658795

  7. Chemical Modeling of Acid-Base Properties of Soluble Biopolymers Derived from Municipal Waste Treatment Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Tafur Marinos, Janeth Alicia; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials. PMID:25658795

  8. System for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, V.

    1980-07-08

    A system is described for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising: a set of containers adapted for receiving aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers which are subsequently precipitated in said containers on particles of diatomite in the presence of a coprecipitator, then filtered, dissolved, and mixed with a scintillator; radioactivity measuring means including a detection chamber to which is fed the mixture produced in said set of containers; an electric drive for moving said set of containers in a stepwise manner; means for proportional feeding of said coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to said containers which contain the biological sample for forming an acid precipitation of biopolymers; means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers; precipitated biopolymer filtering means for successively filtering the precipitate, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers mixed with said scintillator for feeding of the mixture to said detection chamber; a system of pipelines interconnecting said above-recited means; and said means for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers including, a measuring cell arranged in a detection chamber and communicating with said means for filtering precipitated biopolymers through one pipeline of said system of pipelines; a program unit electrically connected to said electric drive, said means for acid precipatation of biopolymers, said means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers, said filtering means, and said radioactivity measuring device; said program unit adapted to periodically switch on and off the above-recited means and check the sequence of the radioactivity measuring operations; and a control unit for controlling the initiation of the system and for selecting programs.

  9. Effects of weed cover composition on insect pest and natural enemy abundance in a field of Dracaena marginata (Asparagales: Asparagaceae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sadof, Clifford S; Linkimer, Mildred; Hidalgo, Eduardo; Casanoves, Fernando; Gibson, Kevin; Benjamin, Tamara J

    2014-04-01

    Weeds and their influence on pest and natural enemy populations were studied on a commercial ornamental farm during 2009 in the Atlantic Zone of Costa Rica. A baseline survey of the entire production plot was conducted in February, along a 5 by 5 m grid to characterize and map initial weed communities of plants, cicadellids, katydids, and armored scales. In total, 50 plant species from 21 families were found. Seven weed treatments were established to determine how weed manipulations would affect communities of our targeted pests and natural enemies. These treatments were selected based on reported effects of specific weed cover on herbivorous insects and natural enemies, or by their use by growers as a cover crop. Treatments ranged from weed-free to being completely covered with endemic species of weeds. Although some weed treatments changed pest abundances, responses differed among arthropod pests, with the strongest effects observed for Caldwelliola and Empoasca leafhoppers. Removal of all weeds increased the abundance of Empoasca, whereas leaving mostly cyperacaeous weeds increased the abundance of Caldwelliola. Weed manipulations had no effect on the abundance of katydid and scale populations. No weed treatment reduced the abundance of all three of the target pests. Differential responses of the two leafhopper species to the same weed treatments support hypotheses, suggesting that noncrop plants can alter the abundance of pests through their effects on arthropod host finding and acceptance, as well as their impacts on natural enemies. PMID:24517852

  10. Combined analysis of C-18 unsaturated fatty acids using natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR spectroscopy in chiral oriented solvents.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Baillif, Vincent; Billault, Isabelle

    2008-04-15

    The quantitative determination of isotopic (2H/1H)i ratios at natural abundance using the SNIF-NMR protocol is a well-known method for understanding the enzymatic biosynthesis of metabolites. However, this approach is not always successful for analyzing large solutes and, specifically, is inadequate for prochiral molecules such as complete essential unsaturated fatty acids. To overcome these analytical limitations, we use the natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR (NAD 2D NMR) spectroscopy on solutes embedded in polypeptide chiral liquid crystals. This approach, recently explored for measuring (2H/1H)i ratios of small analytes (Lesot, P.; Aroulanda, C.; Billault, I. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 2827-2835), is a powerful way to separate the 2H signals of all nonequivalent enantioisotopomers on the basis both of the 2H quadrupolar interactions and of the 2H chemical shift. Two significant advances over our previous work are presented here and allow the complete isotopic analysis of four mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters: methyl oleate (1), methyl linoleate (2), methyl linolenate (3), and methyl vernoleate (4). The first consists of using NMR spectrometers operating at higher magnetic field strength (14.1 T) and equipped with a selective cryoprobe optimized for deuterium nuclei. The second is the development of Q-COSY Fz 2D NMR experiments able to produce phased 2H 2D maps after a double Fourier transformation. This combination of modern hardware and efficient NMR sequences provides a unique tool to analyze the (2H/1H)i ratios of large prochiral molecules (C-18) dissolved in organic solutions of poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) and requires smaller amounts of solute than previous study on fatty acids. For each compound (1-4), all 2H quadrupolar doublets visible in the 2D spectra have been assigned on the basis of 2H chemical shifts, isotopic data obtained from isotropic quantitative NAD NMR, and by an interspectral comparison of the anisotropic NAD spectra of four

  11. Nonlinear Mechanics of Athermal Branched Biopolymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Rens, R; Vahabi, M; Licup, A J; MacKintosh, F C; Sharma, A

    2016-07-01

    Naturally occurring biopolymers such as collagen and actin form branched fibrous networks. The average connectivity in branched networks is generally below the isostatic threshold at which central force interactions marginally stabilize the network. In the submarginal regime, for connectivity below this threshold, such networks are unstable toward small deformations unless stabilized by additional interactions such as bending. Here we perform a numerical study on the elastic behavior of such networks. We show that the nonlinear mechanics of branched networks is qualitatively similar to that of filamentous networks with freely hinged cross-links. In agreement with a recent theoretical study,1 we find that branched networks also exhibit nonlinear mechanics consistent with athermal critical phenomena controlled by strain. We obtain the critical exponents capturing the nonlinear elastic behavior near the critical point by performing scaling analysis of the stiffening curves. We find that the exponents evolve with the connectivity in the network. We show that the nonlinear mechanics of disordered networks, independent of the detailed microstructure, can be characterized by a strain-driven second-order phase transition, and that the primary quantitative differences among different architectures are in the critical exponents describing the transition. PMID:26901575

  12. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  13. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Christina M; O'Connor, Nancy J; Judge, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m(2) with 62 mm(2) mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1-15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m(-2) [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m(-2)). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  14. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure

    PubMed Central

    Lovely, Christina M.; Judge, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m2 with 62 mm2 mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1–15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m−2 [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m−2). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  15. Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR as a Tool for Exploring Calcium Biomineralization: Renal Stone Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2011-12-07

    Renal stone diseases are a global health issue with little effective therapeutic recourse aside from surgery and shock-wave lithotripsy, primarily because the fundamental chemical mechanisms behind calcium biomineralization are poorly understood. In this work, we show that natural abundance 43Ca NMR at 21.1 T is an effective means to probe the molecular-level Ca2+ structure in oxalate-based kidney stones. We find that the 43Ca NMR resonance of an authentic oxalate-based kidney stone cannot be explained by a single pure phase of any common Ca2+-bearing stone mineral. Combined with XRD results, our findings suggest an altered calcium oxalate monohydrate-like Ca2+ coordination environment for some fraction of Ca2+ in our sample. The evidence is consistent with existing literature hypothesizing that nonoxalate organic material interacts directly with Ca2+ at stone surfaces and is the primary driver of renal stone aggregation and growth. Our findings show that 43Ca NMR spectroscopy may provide unique and crucial insight into the fundamental chemistry of kidney stone formation, growth, and the role organic molecules play in these processes.

  16. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes. PMID:22385100

  17. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.

  18. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimensionmore » without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  19. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kuritz, Tanya

    2000-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  20. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kurtiz,Tanya

    1999-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  1. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.

    2002-04-30

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We proposed to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) was to be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  2. Separation of biopolymer from fermentation broths

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Application of recent developments in filtration separations have been applied to separation of biopolymers from fermentation broths. More economical production of biopolymers near the site of use would be especially attractive for use in micellar flood programs for enhanced oil recovery. Solutions of the organisms Sclerotium rolfsii producing scleroglucans were used for the tests because the organisms are genetically more stable than the organisms that produce xanthan gums and because their more acid broths are less apt to become contaminated. Three types of filtration, axial filtration, pleated ultrafiltration module, and microscreens were tested on the broth. Filtration results are reported for broths with various preparation histories. An economic comparison is presented for processing of a ton of biopolymer per day, and the microscreening process is shown to be the most efficient, but a polishing step would have to be added. (BLM)

  3. A review of experimental and modeling techniques to determine properties of biopolymer-based nanocomposites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nonbiodegradable and nonrenewable nature of plastic packaging has led to a renewed interest in packaging materials based on bio-nanocomposites (biopolymer matrix reinforced with nanoparticles such as layered silicates). One of the reasons for unique properties of bio-nanocomposites is the differ...

  4. Alignment and nonlinear elasticity in biopolymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jingchen; Levine, Herbert; Mao, Xiaoming; Sander, Leonard M.

    2015-04-01

    We present a Landau-type theory for the nonlinear elasticity of biopolymer gels with a part of the order parameter describing induced nematic order of fibers in the gel. We attribute the nonlinear elastic behavior of these materials to fiber alignment induced by strain. We suggest an application to contact guidance of cell motility in tissue. We compare our theory to simulation of a disordered lattice model for biopolymers. We treat homogeneous deformations such as simple shear, hydrostatic expansion, and simple extension, and obtain good agreement between theory and simulation. We also consider a localized perturbation which is a simple model for a contracting cell in a medium.

  5. Effect of different purification techniques on the characteristics of heteropolysaccharide-protein biopolymer from durian (Durio zibethinus) seed.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Natural biopolymers from plant sources contain many impurities (e.g., fat, protein, fiber, natural pigment and endogenous enzymes), therefore, an efficient purification process is recommended to minimize these impurities and consequently improve the functional properties of the biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of different purification techniques on the yield, protein content, solubility, water- and oil-holding capacity of a heteropolysaccharide-protein biopolymer obtained from durian seed. Four different purification methods using different chemicals and solvents (i.e., A (isopropanol and ethanol), B (isopropanol and acetone), C (saturated barium hydroxide), and D (Fehling solution)] to liberate the purified biopolymer from its crude form were compared. In most cases, the purification process significantly (p < 0.05) improved the physicochemical properties of heteropolysaccharide-protein biopolymer from durian fruit seed. The present work showed that the precipitation using isopropanol and acetone (Method B) resulted in the highest purification yield among all the tested purification techniques. The precipitation using saturated barium hydroxide (Method C) led to induce the highest solubility and relatively high capacity of water absorption. The current study reveals that the precipitation using Fehling solution (Method D) most efficiently eliminates the protein fraction, thus providing more pure biopolymer suitable for biological applications. PMID:22964503

  6. Natural-abundance stable carbon isotopes of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from Guaymas Basin (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Mendlovitz, H.; Albert, D.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) is a phylogenetically informative molecule found in all species. Because it is poorly preserved in most environments, it is a useful marker for active microbial populations. We are using the natural-abundance stable carbon isotopic composition of specific microbial groups to help identify the carbon substrates contributing to microbial biomass in a variety of marine environments. At Guaymas Basin, hydrothermal fluids interact with abundant sedimentary organic carbon to produce natural gas and petroleum. Where this reaches the sediment surface, it can support dense patches of seafloor life, including Beggiatoa mats. We report here on the stable carbon isotopic composition of SSU rRNA from a Beggiatoa mat transect, a cold background site, a warm site with high oil concentration, and a second Beggiatoa mat. The central part of the transect mat overlay the steepest temperature gradient, and was visually dominated by orange Beggiatoa. This was fringed by white Beggiatoa mat and bare, but still warm, sediment. Methane concentrations were saturating beneath the orange and white mats and at the oily site, lower beneath bare sediment, and below detection at the background site. Our initial hypotheses were that rRNA isotopic composition would be strongly influenced by methane supply, and that archaeal rRNA might be lighter than bacterial due to contributions from methanogens and anaerobic methane oxidizers. We used biotin-labeled oligonucleotides to capture Bacterial and Archaeal SSU rRNA for isotopic determination. Background-site rRNA was isotopically heaviest, and bacterial RNA from below 2 cm at the oily site was lightest, consistent with control by methane. Within the transect mat, however, the pattern was more complicated; at some sediment depths, rRNA from the mat periphery was isotopically lightest. Part of this may be due to the spatially and temporally variable paths followed by hydrothermal fluid, which can include horizontal

  7. Estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by black locust in short-rotation forests using natural 15N abundance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veste, M.; Böhm, C.; Quinckenstein, A.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of short rotation forests and agroforestry systems for woody biomass production for bioenergy will increase in Central Europe within the next decades. In this context, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) has a high growth potential especially at marginal, drought-susceptible sites such as occur in Brandenburg State (Eastern Germany). As a pioneer tree species black locust grows under a wide range of site conditions. The native range of black locust in Northern America is classified by a humid to sub-humid climate with a mean annual precipitation of 1020 to 1830 mm. In Central and Eastern Europe, this species is cultivated in a more continental climate with an annual precipitation often below 600 mm. Therefore, black locust is known to be relatively drought tolerant compared to other temperate, deciduous tree species. Because of its N2-fixation ability black locust plays generally an important role for the improvement of soil fertility. This effect is of particular interest at marginal sites in the post-mining landscapes. In order to estimate the N2-fixation potential of black locust at marginal sites leaf samples were taken from black locust trees in short rotation plantations planted between 1995 and 2007 in post-mining sites south of Cottbus (Brandenburg, NE Germany). The variation of the natural 15N abundance was measured to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation. The nitrogen derived from the atmosphere can be calculated using a two-pool model from the quotient of the natural 15N abundances of the N2-fixing plant and the plant available soil N. Because representatively determining the plant available soil N is difficult, a non-N2-fixing reference plant growing at the same site with a similar root system and temporal N uptake pattern to the N2-fixing plant is often used. In our case we used red oak (Quercus rubra) as a reference. The average nitrogen content in the leaves of black locust ranged from 3.1% (C/N 14.8) in 15 years old trees to 3

  8. Is there a field-theoretic explanation for precursor biopolymers?

    PubMed

    Rosen, Gerald

    2002-08-01

    A Hu-Barkana-Gruzinov cold dark matter scalar field phi may enter a weak isospin invariant derivative interaction that causes the flow of right-handed electrons to align parallel to (inverted delta phi). Hence, in the outer regions of galaxies where (inverted delta phi) is large, as in galactic halos, the derivative interaction may induce a chirality-imbued quantum chemistry. Such a chirality-imbued chemistry would in turn be conducive to the formation of abundant precursor biopolymers on interstellar dust grains, comets and meteors in galactic halo regions, with subsequent delivery to planets in the inner galactic regions where phi and (inverted delta phi) are concomitantly near zero and left-right symmetric terrestrial quantum chemistry prevails. PMID:12458734

  9. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA=Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the (1)H T1 values were calculated from data collected by (1)H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the (1)H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the (13)C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from (13)C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using (1)H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  10. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  11. Using natural abundance radiocarbon to trace the flux of petrocarbon to the seafloor following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Zhao, Tingting; Rosenheim, Brad E; Joye, Samantha; Bosman, Samantha; Brunner, Charlotte; Yeager, Kevin M; Diercks, Arne R; Hollander, David

    2015-01-20

    In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon accident released 4.6–6.0 × 10(11) grams or 4.1 to 4.6 million barrels of fossil petroleum derived carbon (petrocarbon) as oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Natural abundance radiocarbon measurements on surface sediment organic matter in a 2.4 × 10(10) m(2) deep-water region surrounding the spill site indicate the deposition of a fossil-carbon containing layer that included 1.6 to 2.6 × 10(10) grams of oil-derived carbon. This quantity represents between 0.5 to 9.1% of the released petrocarbon, with a best estimate of 3.0–4.9%. These values may be lower limit estimates of the fraction of the oil that was deposited on the seafloor because they focus on a limited mostly deep-water area of the Gulf, include a conservative estimate of thickness of the depositional layer, and use an average background or prespill radiocarbon value for sedimentary organic carbon that produces a conservative value. A similar approach using hopane tracer estimated that 4–31% of 2 million barrels of oil that stayed in the deep sea settled on the bottom. Converting that to a percentage of the total oil that entered into the environment (to which we normalized our estimate) converts this range to 1.8 to 14.4%. Although extrapolated over a larger area, our independent estimate produced similar values. PMID:25494527

  12. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  13. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  14. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  15. Evaluating microbial carbon sources in Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds using natural abundance stable and radiocarbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, J. M.; Pakdel, H.

    2013-12-01

    Natural abundance stable (δ13C) and radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopes of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to evaluate the carbon sources utilized by the active microbial populations in surface sediments from Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds. The absence of algal-specific PLFAs at three of the four sites investigated, in conjunction with δ13C signatures for PLFAs that were generally within ~3‰ of that reported for oil sands bitumen (~ -30‰), indicated that the microbial communities growing on petroleum constituents were dominated by aerobic heterotrophs. The Δ14C values of PLFAs ranged from -906 to -586‰ and pointed to a significant uptake of fossil carbon (up to ~90% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum), particularly in PLFAs (e.g., cy17:0 and cy19:0) often associated with petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The comparatively higher levels of 14C in other, less specific PLFAs (e.g., 16:0) indicated the preferential uptake of younger organic matter by the general microbial population (~50-80% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum). Since the main carbon pools in tailings sediment were essentially 'radiocarbon dead' (i.e., no detectable 14C), the principal source for this modern carbon is considered to be the Athabasca River, which provides the bulk of the water used in the bitumen extraction process. The preferential uptake of the minor amount of young and presumably more biodegradable material present in systems otherwise dominated by recalcitrant petroleum constituents has important implications for remediation strategies. On the one hand, it implies that mining-related organic contaminants could persist in the environment long after tailings pond reclamation has begun. Alternatively, it may be that the young, labile organic matter provided by the Athabasca River plays an important role in stimulating or supporting the microbial utilization of petroleum carbon in oil sands tailings ponds via co-metabolism or priming processes

  16. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes a new technology to produce biopolymer composites at room temperature. During the process, micrometer-scale raw material is coated with zein that has strong adhesive property, which is then compressed to form a rigid material. Since this technology does not require purificati...

  17. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes a new process, particle-bonding technology, to produce biopolymer composites from agricultural commodities. In this technology, matrix-protein complexes are formed by the interaction of micrometer-scale matrix material with an adhesive protein, zein. This spontaneous process m...

  18. Exploring Modifications of Cotton with Biopolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biopolymers including starch, alginate, and chitosan were grafted on to both nonwoven and woven cotton fabrics to examine their hemostatic and antimcrobial properties. The development of cotton-based health care fabrics that promote blood clotting and prevent microbial growth have wide applicability...

  19. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  20. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  1. Quantifying nitrate retention processes in a riparian buffer zone using the natural abundance of 15N in NO3-.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Karel; Boeckx, Pascal; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Hofman, Georges

    2003-01-01

    Quantifying the relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in riparian zones may lead to methods optimising the construction of riparian zones for water pollution control. The natural abundance of 15N in NO3- has been shown to be an interesting tool for providing insights into the NO3- retention processes occurring in riparian zones. In this study, 15N isotope fractionation (variation in delta15N of the residual NO3-) due to denitrification and due to plant uptake was measured in anaerobic soil slurries at different temperatures (5, 10 and 15 degrees C) and in hydroponic systems with different plant species (Lolium perenne L., Urtica dioica L. and Epilobium hirsutum L.). It was found that temperature had no significant effect on isotope fractionation during denitrification, which resulted in a 15N enrichment factor epsilonD of -22.5 +/- 0.6 per thousand. On the other hand, nitrate uptake by plants resulted in 15N isotope fractionation, but was independent of plant species, leading to a 15N enrichment factor epsilonP of -4.4 +/- 0.3 per thousand. By relating these two laboratory-defined enrichment factors to a field enrichment factor for groundwater nitrate retention during the growing season (epsilonR = -15.5 +/- 1.0 per thousand ), the contribution of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention could be calculated. The relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in the riparian buffer zone was 49 and 51% during spring, 53 and 47% during summer, and 75 and 25% during autumn. During wintertime, high micropore dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and low redox potentials due to decomposition of the highly productive riparian vegetation probably resulted in a higher denitrification rate and favoured other nitrate retention processes such as nitrate immobilisation or dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). This could have biased the 15N

  2. Studies of individual carbon sites of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by natural-abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ugurbil, K; Norton, R S; Allerhand, A; Bersohn, R

    1977-03-01

    The environments of the aromatic residues (and of the single arginine residue) of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are investigated by means of natural-abundance 13C Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy. In the case of the diamagnetic Cu(I) azurin, all 17 nonprotonated aromatic carbons (and Czota of Arg-79) yield narrow resonances. Furthermore, a single-carbon amide carbonyl resonance with an unusual chemical shift (peak chi) is observed. The pH dependence of chemical shifts is used to identify the resonances of Cgamma of titrating histidines, and of Cgamma and Czota of the two tyrosines. The resonances of Cgamma and Cdelta2 of the single tryptophan residue (and Czota of Arg-79) are also identified. The pKa values of the two tyrosines are different from each other and higher than typical values of "solvent-exposed" tyrosine residues. Two of the four histidine residues do not titrate (in the pH range 4 to 11). The resonance of Cgamma of one histidine exhibits a pH titration with fast proton exchange behavior and a pKa of 7.5 +/- 0.2. The direction of the titration shift indicates that the imidazole form of this histidine is the Ndelta1-H tautomer. The Cgamma resonance of the other titrating histidine exhibits slow exchange behavior with a pKa of about 7. The imidazole form of this histidine is the Nepsilon2-H tautomer. When going to the paramagnetic Cu(II) protein, only 11 of the 19 carbons mentioned above yield resonances that are narrow enough to be detected. Also, some of the observed resonances exhibit significant paramagnetic broadening. A comparison of spectra of fully reduced azurin, mixtures of reduced and oxidized azurin, and fully oxidized azurin yields the following information. (i) Peak chi arises from an amide group that probably is coordinated to the copper. (ii) The two nontitrating histidine residues are probably copper ligands, with Ndelta1 coordinated to the metal. (iii) The side chains of Arg-79 and the two tyrosine residues are not coordinated to

  3. Overview of biopolymers as carriers of antiphlogistic agents for treatment of diverse ocular inflammations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anil Kumar; Arya, Amit; Sahoo, Pravat Kumar; Majumdar, Dipak Kanti

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation of the eye is a usual clinical condition that can implicate any part of the eye. The nomenclature of variety of such inflammations is based on the ocular part involved. These diseases may jeopardize normal functioning of the eye on progression. In general, corticosteroids, antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat inflammatory diseases/disorders of the eye. There have been several attempts via different approaches of drug delivery to overcome the low ocular bioavailability resulting from shorter ocular residence time. The features like safety, ease of elimination and ability to sustain drug release have led to application of biopolymers in ocular therapeutics. Numerous polymers of natural origin such as gelatin, collagen, chitosan, albumin, hyaluronic acid, alginates etc. have been successfully employed for preparation of different ocular dosage forms. Chitosan is the most explored biopolymer amongst natural biopolymers because of its inherent characteristics. The emergence of synthetic biopolymers (like PVP, PACA, PCL, POE, polyanhydrides, PLA, PGA and PLGA) has also added new dimensions to the drug delivery strategies meant for treatment of ophthalmic inflammations. The current review is an endeavor to describe the utility of a variety of biomaterials/polymers based drug delivery systems as carrier for anti-inflammatory drugs in ophthalmic therapeutics. PMID:27287177

  4. Structure and Properties of Polysaccharide Based BioPolymer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K.

    2000-03-01

    Nature uses the pyranose ring as the basic building unit for a wideclass of biopolymers. Because of their biological origin these biopolymers naturally find application as food additives, rheology modifiers. These polymers range from being rigid skeletal material, such as cellulose that resist dissolution in water, to water soluble polymers, such as guar or carrageenan. The flexibility of the basic pyranose ring structure to provide materials with such a wide range of properties comes from the specific interactions that can be engineered by nature into the structure. We will present several examples of specific interactions for these systems: hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and specific ion interactions. The relationship between molecular interations and rheology will be emphasized. Hydrogen bonding mediated by steric interference is used to control of solubility of starch and the rheology of guar gels. A more interesting example is the hydrogen bonding induced by chemical modification in konjac glucomannan that results in a gel that melts upon cooling. Hydrogen bonding interactions in xanthan lead to gel formation at very low polymer concentrations which is a result of the fine tuning of the polymer persistence length and total contour length. Given the function of xanthan in nature its molecular architecture has been optimized. Hydrophobic interactions in methylcellulose show a reverse temperature dependence arising from solution entropy. Carrageenan gelation upon the addition of specific cations will be addressed to show the interplay of polymer secondary structure on chemical reactivity. And finally the cis-hydroxyls on galactomannans permit crosslinking by a variety of metal ions some of which lead to "living gels" and some of which lead to permanently crosslinked networks.

  5. Bacterial abundance and aerobic microbial activity across natural and oyster aquaculture habitats during summer conditions in a northeastern Pacific estuary.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured sediment properties and the abundance and functional diversity of microbes in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA, to test the response of sediment microbes to oyster aquaculture. Sites spanned the estuary gradient (salinity 24-30) and six different habitat types: eelgrass (Zostera marina), uns...

  6. Using PLFA Biomarkers and Natural Abundance Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes to Characterize the Microbial Ecology and Metabolism of Methane Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, C. T.; Mandernack, K. W.; Slater, G. F.; Dias, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Methane generated in the subsurface is a major source of atmospheric CH4, but its release is mitigated by CH4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Therefore, it is important to understand the ecology of methanotroph communities in various environments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses are a particularly useful method for characterizing these communities for two reasons: (1) Many type I and II methanotrophs produce specific PLFA biomarkers that can be used to estimate their populations, and (2) because CH4 is often very depleted in 13C and sometimes 14C, natural abundance δ13CPLFA and Δ14CPLFA values can be used to trace the flow of CH4- derived carbon through microbial ecosystems. We used these tools to evaluate the role of methanotrophs in carbon flow in three different environments: (1) a soil column overlying a coal bed methane (CBM) seep in southwest CO, and pristine, oligotrophic groundwaters within (2) sedimentary and (3) granitic host rocks in Japan. In the soil column impacted by CBM seepage, concentrations of the biomarker PLFAs for type I (16:1ω8cis) and type II (18:1ω8cis) methanotrophs were as high as 13 and 18 nmoles (g dry soil)-1, respectively. Depth profiles of methanotroph PLFA concentrations varied over different sampling dates indicating dynamic populations. δ13CPLFA values of the CBM soils (-25.1 to - 66.9‰) were substantially more negative than those for the control soil (-14.5 to -32.5‰) indicating that CBM is an important carbon source for the CBM-impacted soil microbial community. Δ14CPLFA values (-351 to -936‰) indicate the importance of 14C-dead CBM as a carbon source to the microbial communities, contributing 32 to 66% of total carbon in PLFA structures isolated from shallow soils and 67 to 97% for those isolated from deeper soils. The biomarker for type II methanotrophs, comprised 3 and 18% of total PLFAs in sedimentary and granitic groundwaters, respectively. The Δ14C values determined for type II methanotroph PLFAs

  7. Scleroglucan biopolymer production, properties, and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A. L.; Griffith, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Production and solution properties which may make scleroglucan polysaccharide economically advantageous for onsite production and use in tertiary oil recovery were investigated. Scleroglucan, which is similar in viscosity and shear thinning to xanthan, can be produced in a 3-day batch or 12 h continuous fermentation. Yield is nearly 50% based on input glucose. Gross biopolymer-biomass separation may be effected using microscreening, a low energy process, followed by polish filtration. Polymer flux may be improved by hydrolysis with an endolaminarinase from Rhizopus arrhizius QM 1032. Simple feedstock requirements and low growth pH, together with the difficulty of resuspending dried polymer, may encourage field biopolymer fermentation and use of purified culture broth.

  8. Spatially resolved electronic detection of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouthas, F.; Gentil, C.; Côte, D.; Zeck, G.; Straub, B.; Bockelmann, U.

    2004-09-01

    An integrated array of field-effect transistor structures is used to detect two oppositely charged biopolymers: poly(L-lysine) and DNA. Local deposition of polymer solutions on part of the array induces sizeable variations in the dc current-voltage characteristics of the transistors exposed to the molecular charge. The whole transistor array is measured in the presence of a common electrolyte. Differential signals are studied as a function of electrolyte salt and polymer concentrations. The measurements provide information on the interface electrostatic potentials of the (semiconductor/biopolymer/electrolyte) system and the experimental data are compared to an analytical model which accounts for screening of the adsorbed charge by mobile ions.

  9. Long-range charge transfer in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhova, T. Yu; Likhachev, V. N.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the charge transfer in biopolymers, namely, DNA and peptides, are presented. Conditions that ensure the efficient long-range charge transport (by several tens of nanometres) are considered. The known theoretical models of charge transfer mechanisms are discussed and the scopes of their application are analyzed. Attention is focused on the charge transport by the polaron mechanism. The bibliography includes 262 references.

  10. Biopolymer hairpin loops sustained by polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, B.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2012-08-01

    We show that polarons can sustain looplike configurations in flexible biopolymers and that the size of the loops depend on both the flexural rigidity of the polymer and the electron-phonon coupling constant. In particular we show that for single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and polyacetylene such loops can have as few as seven monomers. We also show that these configurations are very stable under thermal fluctuations and so could facilitate the formation of hairpin loops of ssDNA.

  11. Food Resources of Stream Macronivertebrates Determined by Natural-Abundance stable C and N Isotopes and a 15N Tracer Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N analyses and a {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment, we added {sup 15}NH{sub 4} to stream water over a 6-wk period in early spring, and measured {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios in different taxa and biomass compartments over distance and time. Samples collected from a station upstream from the {sup 15}N addition provided data on natural-abundance {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C and {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios. The natural-abundance {sup 15}N analysis proved to be of limited value in identifying food resources of macroinvertebrates because {sup 15}N values were not greatly different among food resources. In general, the natural-abundance stable isotope approach was most useful for determining whether epilithon or detritus were important food resources for organisms that may use both (e.g., the snail Elimia clavaeformis), and to provide corroborative evidence of food resources of taxa for which the {sup 15}N tracer results were not definitive. The {sup 15}N tracer results showed that the mayflies Stenonema spp. and Baetis spp. assimilated primarily epilithon, although Baetis appeared to assimilate a portion of the epilithon (e.g., algal cells) with more rapid N turnover than the bulk pool sampled. Although Elimia did not reach isotopic equilibrium during the tracer experiment, application of a N-turnover model to the field data suggested that it assimilated a combination of epilithon and detritus. The amphipod Gammarus minus appeared to depend mostly on fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), and the coleopteran Anchytarsus bicolor on epixylon. The caddisfly Diplectrona modesta appeared to assimilate primarily a fast N-turnover portion of the FBOM pool, and Simuliidae a fast N-turnover component of the suspended particulate organic matter pool rather than the bulk pool sampled. Together, the

  12. Molecular entanglement and electrospinnability of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingyan; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning is a fascinating technique to fabricate micro- to nano-scale fibers from a wide variety of materials. For biopolymers, molecular entanglement of the constituent polymers in the spinning dope was found to be an essential prerequisite for successful electrospinning. Rheology is a powerful tool to probe the molecular conformation and interaction of biopolymers. In this report, we demonstrate the protocol for utilizing rheology to evaluate the electrospinnability of two biopolymers, starch and pullulan, from their dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water dispersions. Well-formed starch and pullulan fibers with average diameters in the submicron to micron range were obtained. Electrospinnability was evaluated by visual and microscopic observation of the fibers formed. By correlating the rheological properties of the dispersions to their electrospinnability, we demonstrate that molecular conformation, molecular entanglement, and shear viscosity all affect electrospinning. Rheology is not only useful in solvent system selection and process optimization, but also in understanding the mechanism of fiber formation on a molecular level. PMID:25226274

  13. Repairability of cross-linked biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, M; Michel, K; Stelzig, J; Wöstmann, B

    2009-02-01

    Repair of biopolymers is a critical issue, especially with aged restorations. Obtaining a chemical bond to the repair surface might solve this problem. We hypothesized that certain repair liquids are suitable to establish a strong bond to an artificially aged dimethacrylate-based biopolymer for temporary restorations. Specimens made of a self-curing temporary crown-and-bridge material were prepared and thermocycled for 7 days (5000x, 5-55 degrees C). Cylinders made of light-curing composites (n=10) were bonded onto the specimen surface, either after grinding or after the application of 4 different experimental repair liquids (Bis-GMA:TEGDMA mixture=bonding, methylmethacrylate=MMA, bonding & acetone, bonding & MMA). A shear bond strength test was performed 24 hrs after repair. The highest bond strength was obtained with the bonding & acetone liquid (20.1+/-2.2 MPa). The use of MMA significantly affected the bond strength (6.8+/-1.9 MPa). MMA is inadequate as a repair liquid on aged composite-based biopolymers. PMID:19278987

  14. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:27304672

  15. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Sachiko Kaihara; Numata, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin), protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin). The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed. PMID:23344060

  16. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:27304672

  17. Stretching and bending in cross-linked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussinger, Claus; Frey, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The elastic response of cross-linked biopolymer networks is usually interpreted in terms of affine stretching models, adopted from the theory of rubber-elasticity valid for flexible polymer gels. Unlike flexible polymers, however, stiff polymers have a highly anisotropic elastic response, where the low-energy elastic excitations are actually of bending nature. As a consequence, similar to springs connected in series, one would expect the softer bending mode to dominate the elastic energy rather than the stiff stretching mode. We propose a theory that, unlike recent affine models, properly accounts for the soft bending response of stiff polymers. It allows calculating the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the (non-affine) deformation field. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in simple two-dimensional model networks, and can also be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  18. Hydrogels from biopolymer hybrid for biomedical, food, and functional food applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid hydrogels from biopolymers have been applied for various indications across a wide range of biomedical, pharmaceutical, and functional food industries. In particular, hybrid hydrogels synthesized from two biopolymers have attracted increasing attention. The inclusion of a second biopolymer st...

  19. Rheological and Tribological Properties of Complex Biopolymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca Reese

    2011-12-01

    little impact on the actual aggregation process. Additionally, the relationship between the rheology and tribology of the SFM was studied through a series of nanoscratch tests using a Hysitron nanoindenter. The nanoindenter has the ability to measure both normal and lateral forces simultaneously, which gives an indication of the lubricity of the solution. The coefficient of friction values for solutions of varying protein concentrations were determined by dividing the lateral force by the normal force. Tribological testing of the synovial fluid model and modified solutions were carried out on spin-cast polyethylene and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene sheets. At lower molecular weight substrates, the film thickness limited the validity of the generated data, and with higher molecular weight surfaces, surface roughness effects were found to dominate the tribological response. Finally, the addition of HCQ does not have a large impact on the tribological data, indicating that the anti-inflammatory drug does not significantly impact the lubrication properties within the synovial fluid model. Finally, additional rheological studies of biopolymer solutions were conducted in which solutions containing chitosan, a natural, bioactive polymer, were characterized to determine their fitness for the electropsinning process. Chitosan fibers are difficult to electrospin, and through these studies, the entanglement concentration, a critical parameter for electrospinning, was determined. The generated rheological data provided a means to predict the morphology of the resulting nanofibers, and aspects of the difficulty in electrospinning chitosan were revealed.

  20. Constraints on abundance, composition, and nature of X-ray amorphous components of soils and rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, Erwin; McLennan, Scott M.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Cousin, Agnès.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of the three samples analyzed by Curiosity's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument during the first year of the Mars Science Laboratory mission—the Rocknest sand, and the John Klein and Cumberland drill fines, both extracted from the Sheepbed mudstone—show evidence for a significant amorphous component of unclear origin. We developed a mass balance calculation program that determines the range of possible chemical compositions of the crystalline and amorphous components of these samples within the uncertainties of mineral abundances derived from CheMin data. In turn, the chemistry constrains the minimum abundance of amorphous component required to have realistic compositions (all oxides ≥ 0 wt %): 21-22 wt % for Rocknest and 15-20 wt % for Cumberland, in good agreement with estimates derived from the diffraction patterns (~27 and ~31 wt %, respectively). Despite obvious differences between the Rocknest sand and the Sheepbed mudstone, the amorphous components of the two sites are chemically very similar, having comparable concentrations of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Cr2O3, FeOT, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5. MgO tends to be lower in Rocknest, although it may also be comparable between the two samples depending on the exact composition of the smectite in Sheepbed. The only unambiguous difference is the SO3 content, which is always higher in Rocknest. The observed similarity suggests that the two amorphous components share a common origin or formation process. The individual phases possibly present within the amorphous components include: volcanic (or impact) glass, hisingerite (or silica + ferrihydrite), amorphous sulfates (or adsorbed SO42-), and nanophase ferric oxides.

  1. Final Technical Report for 'Investigations of the Role of Protozoa in Transformations of Marine Biopolymers using Phaeocytis Polymer Gels as a Model'

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Evelyn

    2003-04-01

    protists are able to use the polymer for nutrition and growth. This is the first demonstration of the ingestion and utilization of a natural marine biopolymer by protists. We also isolated three bacterial strains from our Phaeocystis cultures. All three bacterial strains were capable of growing solely on the polymer gels produced by Phaeocystis without added inorganic nitrogen sources. We used the bacterial and protist strains to investigate degradation and alterations (size, chemical composition) of Phaeocystis polymer gels by bacteria alone and in the presence of protists. In a typical experiment, bacterial abundance in the presence of protists was reduced to one third of that in the control due to grazing, but the degradation rate was about the same. This indicates either that grazing by the protist somehow enhanced the per cell rate of bacterial degradation and/or the protist was ingesting polymer directly. Residual polymer remained after weeks, but the mean the mean diameter of the polymers were shortened considerably to ca. 200 nm. These results, along with other lines of evidence, suggest that it may be the length of polymer that limits degradation, which has important implications for the large pool of refractory DOM in the oceans. Chemical analyses indicated that the polymers are carbohydrate-rich and that the nitrogen is not proteinaceous, but most likely in the form of low molecular weight compounds such as amino sugars or sialic acid, and that they had a surprisingly low C:N ratios (<9). Extracellular polymers may therefore provide a nutritional substrate for bacteria and protists without the need for other sources of nitrogen in nature.

  2. Biopolymer based nanocomposites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R.; Mistretta, M. C.; La Mantia, F. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, biopolymer based nanocomposites filled with graphene nanoplatelets (GnP) were prepared by melt compounding in a batch mixer. The polymer used as matrix was a commercial biodegradable polymer-blend of PLA and a copolyester (BioFlex®). The prepared materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), rheological and mechanical measurements. Moreover, the effect of the GnP amount on the investigated properties was evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of GnP increased the stiffness of the biopolymeric matrix.

  3. Monitoring Biopolymer Degradation by Taylor Dispersion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chamieh, Joseph; Biron, Jean Philippe; Cipelletti, Luca; Cottet, Hervé

    2015-12-14

    This work aims at demonstrating the interest of modern Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA), performed in narrow internal diameter capillary, for monitoring biopolymer degradations. Hydrolytic and enzymatic degradations of dendrigraft poly-l-lysine taken as model compounds have been performed and monitored by TDA at different degradation times. Different approaches for the data processing of the taylorgrams are compared, including simple integration of the taylorgram, curve fitting with a finite number of Gaussian peaks, cumulant-like method and Constrained Regularized Linear Inversion approach. Valuable information on the kinetics of the enzymatic/hydrolytic degradation reactions and on the degradation process can be obtained by TDA. PMID:26633075

  4. Seasonal variation in species composition and abundance of demersal fish and invertebrates in a Seagrass Natural Reserve on the eastern coast of the Shandong Peninsula, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Guo, Dong; Zhang, Peidong; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Wentao; Wu, Zhongxin

    2016-03-01

    Seagrass habitats are structurally complex ecosystems, which support high productivity and biodiversity. In temperate systems the density of seagrass may change seasonally, and this may influence the associated fish and invertebrate community. Little is known about the role of seagrass beds as possible nursery areas for fish and invertebrates in China. To study the functioning of a seagrass habitat in northern China, demersal fish and invertebrates were collected monthly using traps, from February 2009 to January 2010. The density, leaf length and biomass of the dominant seagrass Zostera marina and water temperature were also measured. The study was conducted in a Seagrass Natural Reserve (SNR) on the eastern coast of the Shandong Peninsula, China. A total of 22 fish species and five invertebrate species were recorded over the year. The dominant fish species were Synechogobius ommaturus, Sebastes schlegelii, Pholis fangi, Pagrus major and Hexagrammos otakii and these species accounted for 87% of the total number of fish. The dominant invertebrate species were Charybdis japonica and Octopus variabilis and these accounted for 98% of the total abundance of invertebrates. There was high temporal variation in species composition and abundance. The peak number of fish species occurred in August-October 2009, while the number of individual fish and biomass was highest during November 2009. Invertebrate numbers and biomass was highest in March, April, July and September 2009. Temporal changes in species abundance of fishes and invertebrates corresponded with changes in the shoot density and leaf length of the seagrass, Zostera marina.

  5. House and Stable Fly Seasonal Abundance, Larval Development Substrates, and Natural Parasitism on Small Equine Farms in Florida.

    PubMed

    Machtinger, E T; Leppla, N C; Hogsette, J A

    2016-08-01

    House flies, Musca domestica Linnaeus, and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), are common pests on horse farms. The successful use of pupal parasitoids for management of these pests requires knowledge of seasonal fluctuations and biology of the flies as well as natural parasitism levels. However, these dynamics have not been investigated on small equine farms. A 1-year field study began in July 2010, in north central Florida, to determine adult fly population levels and breeding areas on four small equine farms. Weekly surveillance showed that pest flies were present year-round, though there were differences in adult population levels among farms and seasons. Fly development was not confirmed on two of the four small farms, suggesting that subtle differences in husbandry may adversely affect the development of immature flies. In six substrates previously identified as the most common among the farms, stable fly puparia were found overwhelmingly in hay mixed with equine manure and house fly puparia were found in fresh pine shavings mixed with equine manure. Natural parasitism was minimal as expected, but greatest numbers of natural parasitoids collected were of the genus Spalangia. Differences in adult and immature fly numbers recovered emphasizes the need for farm owners to confirm on-site fly development prior to purchase and release of biological control agents. Additionally, due to the low natural parasitism levels and domination of parasitism by Spalangia cameroni, augmentative releases using this species may be the most effective. PMID:26902468

  6. Formation and abundance of doubly-substituted methane isotopologues ( 13CH 3D) in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qisheng; Wu, Sheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-11-01

    Formation of the Carbon-13 ( 13C) and deuterium (D) doubly-substituted methane isotopologues ( 13CH 3D) in natural gases is studied utilizing both first-principle quantum mechanism molecular calculation and direct FTIR laboratorial measurements of specifically synthesized high isotope concentration methane gas. For 13CH 3D, the symmetrically breathing mode A0 emerges as IR-detectable attributed to the molecular symmetry lowering to C3v from Td of the non-isotopic methane (CH 4), along with a large vibrational frequency shift from ˜3000 to ˜2250 cm -1. Our studies also indicate that the concentration of 13CH 3D is dependent on the environmental temperature through isotope exchanges among methane isotopologues; and the Gibbs' Free Energy difference due to Quantum Mechanics Zero-Point vibrational motions has the major contribution to this temperature dependency. Potential geologic applications of the 13CH 3D measurement to natural gas exploration and assessments are also discussed. In order to detect the 13CH 3D concentration change of each 50 °C in the natural gas system, a 10 -9 resolution is desirable. Such a measurement could provide important add-on information to distinguish natural gas origin and distribution.

  7. Load sharing in the growth of bundled biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruizhe; Carlsson, A E

    2014-11-01

    To elucidate the nature of load sharing in the growth of multiple biopolymers, we perform stochastic simulations of the growth of biopolymer bundles against obstacles under a broad range of conditions and varying assumptions. The obstacle motion due to thermal fluctuations is treated explicitly. We assume the "Perfect Brownian Ratchet" (PBR) model, in which the polymerization rate equals the free-filament rate as soon as the filament-obstacle distance exceeds the monomer size. Accurate closed-form formulas are obtained for the case of a rapidly moving obstacle. We find the following: (1) load sharing is usually sub-perfect in the sense that polymerization is slower than for a single filament carrying the same average force; (2) the sub-perfect behavior becomes significant at a total force proportional to the logarithm or the square root of the number of filaments, depending on the alignment of the filaments; (3) for the special case of slow barrier diffusion and low opposing force, an enhanced obstacle velocity for an increasing number of filaments is possible; (4) the obstacle velocity is very sensitive to the alignment of the filaments in the bundle, with a staggered alignment being an order of magnitude faster than an unstaggered one at forces of only 0.5 pN per filament for 20 filaments; (5) for large numbers of filaments, the power is maximized at a force well below 1 pN per filament; (6) for intermediate values of the obstacle diffusion coefficient, the shape of the force velocity relation is very similar to that for rapid obstacle diffusion. PMID:25489273

  8. USING BIOPOLYMERS TO REMOVE HEAVY METALS FROM SOIL AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical remediation of soils may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams and may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. his paper reviews the promise of benign reagents such as biopolymers to extract metals. he biopolymers...

  9. Using biopolymers to remove heavy metals from soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1993-11-19

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy metals. The biopolymers discussed are chitin and chitosan, modified starch, cellulose, and polymer-containing algae. (Copyright (c) Remediation 1994.)

  10. Fine Structure of Starch-Clay Composites as Biopolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midsol 50 wheat starch and 5% Cloisite clay with or without the addition of glycerin were used to prepare biopolymers in a twin-screw extruder. Early trials of sectioning the unembedded biopolymer resulted in the immediate absorption of water and subsequent dissolution of the sample due to the the ...

  11. A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junsong; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yunzhi; Yu, Cun; Huan, Yong; Zhao, Xinqing; Zheng, Yanjun; Xu, Huibin; Ren, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The design principles for naturally occurring biological materials have inspired us to develop next-generation engineering materials with remarkable performance. Nacre, commonly referred to as nature's armor, is renowned for its unusual combination of strength and toughness. Nature's wisdom in nacre resides in its elaborate structural design and the judicious placement of a unique organic biopolymer with intelligent deformation features. However, up to now, it is still a challenge to transcribe the biopolymer's deformation attributes into a stronger substitute in the design of new materials. In this study, we propose a new design strategy that employs shape memory alloy to transcribe the “J-curve” mechanical response and uniform molecular/atomic level deformation of the organic biopolymer in the design of high-performance hybrid materials. This design strategy is verified in a TiNi-Ti3Sn model material system. The model material demonstrates an exceptional combination of mechanical properties that are superior to other high-performance metal-based lamellar composites known to date. Our design strategy creates new opportunities for the development of high-performance bio-inspired materials. PMID:25665501

  12. A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junsong; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yunzhi; Yu, Cun; Huan, Yong; Zhao, Xinqing; Zheng, Yanjun; Xu, Huibin; Ren, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The design principles for naturally occurring biological materials have inspired us to develop next-generation engineering materials with remarkable performance. Nacre, commonly referred to as nature's armor, is renowned for its unusual combination of strength and toughness. Nature's wisdom in nacre resides in its elaborate structural design and the judicious placement of a unique organic biopolymer with intelligent deformation features. However, up to now, it is still a challenge to transcribe the biopolymer's deformation attributes into a stronger substitute in the design of new materials. In this study, we propose a new design strategy that employs shape memory alloy to transcribe the ``J-curve'' mechanical response and uniform molecular/atomic level deformation of the organic biopolymer in the design of high-performance hybrid materials. This design strategy is verified in a TiNi-Ti3Sn model material system. The model material demonstrates an exceptional combination of mechanical properties that are superior to other high-performance metal-based lamellar composites known to date. Our design strategy creates new opportunities for the development of high-performance bio-inspired materials.

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization NMR enables the analysis of Sn-Beta zeolite prepared with natural abundance ¹¹⁹Sn precursors.

    PubMed

    Gunther, William R; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Caporini, Marc A; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2014-04-30

    The catalytic activity of tin-containing zeolites, such as Sn-Beta, is critically dependent on the successful incorporation of the tin metal center into the zeolite framework. However, synchrotron-based techniques or solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) of samples enriched with (119)Sn isotopes are the only reliable methods to verify framework incorporation. This work demonstrates, for the first time, the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR for characterizing zeolites containing ~2 wt % of natural abundance Sn without the need for (119)Sn isotopic enrichment. The biradicals TOTAPOL, bTbK, bCTbK, and SPIROPOL functioned effectively as polarizing sources, and the solvent enabled proper transfer of spin polarization from the radical's unpaired electrons to the target nuclei. Using bCTbK led to an enhancement (ε) of 75, allowing the characterization of natural-abundance (119)Sn-Beta with excellent signal-to-noise ratios in <24 h. Without DNP, no (119)Sn resonances were detected after 10 days of continuous analysis. PMID:24697321

  14. Plant diversity moderates drought stress in grasslands: Implications from a large real-world study on (13)C natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Solly, Emily F; Hänsel, Falk; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2016-10-01

    Land-use change and intensification play a key role in the current biodiversity crisis. The resulting species loss can have severe effects on ecosystem functions and services, thereby increasing ecosystem vulnerability to climate change. We explored whether land-use intensification (i.e. fertilization intensity), plant diversity and other potentially confounding environmental factors may be significantly related to water use (i.e. drought stress) of grassland plants. Drought stress was assessed using δ(13)C abundances in aboveground plant biomass of 150 grassland plots across a gradient of land-use intensity. Under water shortage, plants are forced to increasingly take up the heavier (13)C due to closing stomata leading to an enrichment of (13)C in biomass. Plants were sampled at the community level and for single species, which belong to three different functional groups (one grass, one herb, two legumes). Results show that plant diversity was significantly related to the δ(13)C signal in community, grass and legume biomass indicating that drought stress was lower under higher diversity, although this relation was not significant for the herb species under study. Fertilization, in turn, mostly increased drought stress as indicated by more positive δ(13)C values. This effect was mostly indirect by decreasing plant diversity. In line with these results, we found similar patterns in the δ(13)C signal of the organic matter in the topsoil, indicating a long history of these processes. Our study provided strong indication for a positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship with reduced drought stress at higher plant diversity. However, it also underlined a negative reinforcing situation: as land-use intensification decreases plant diversity in grasslands, this might subsequently increases drought sensitivity. Vice-versa, enhancing plant diversity in species-poor agricultural grasslands may moderate negative effects of future climate change. PMID:27220098

  15. How new biopolymers can improve muds

    SciTech Connect

    Dino, D.; Lindblad, D.E.; Moorhouse, R. )

    1993-11-01

    Xantham gum was introduced as a drilling-fluid component in the mid-1960s, but its use has risen noticeably since 1970, as prevalence of inhibitive polymeric drilling fluids has increased. Xanthan is known for its ability to build viscosity in both fresh water and salt solutions, its exceptional shear-thinning properties, and its tolerance to pH, all without environmental problems. Although biopolymers like xanthan typically represent only 0.25--1.5 lb/bbl of a drilling fluid, they are critical in building rheology, from spudding to the special demands of angled drilling and well completion. They add properties to muds which expand their use across a variety of formations and over a wide temperature range. Beyond xanthan, another useful class of biopolymers are the guar gums. Just as muds incorporating xanthan have been in the mainstay in rheology building over the years for many muds, fluids incorporating guar have long been the backbone of fracturing fluids. Guar and its derivatives are extremely versatile as rheology modifiers, particularly when used in conjunction with xanthans. In fact, xanthan/guar combinations have already been enhancing the effectiveness of muds at drill sites in the US. This paper reviews the performance of mixed xantham/guar additives to obtain an even better mud control system.

  16. Determination of site-specific carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Caer, V; Trierweiler, M; Martin, G J; Martin, M L

    1991-10-15

    Site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by deuterium NMR (SNIF-NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful source of information on hydrogen pathways occurring in biosyntheses in natural conditions. The potential of the carbon counterpart of this method has been investigated and compared. Three typical molecular species, ethanol, acetic acid, and vanillin, have been considered. Taking into account the requirements of quantitative 13C NMR, appropriate experimental procedures have been defined and the repeatability and reproducibility of the isotope ratio determinations have been checked in different conditions. It is shown that the carbon version of the SNIF-NMR method is capable of detecting small differences in the carbon-13 content of the ethyl fragment of ethanols from different botanical or synthetic origins. These results are in agreement with mass spectrometry determinations of the overall carbon isotope ratios. Deviations with respect to a statistical distribution of 13C have been detected in the case of acetic acid and vanillin. However, since the method is very sensitive to several kinds of systematic error, only a relative significance can be attached at present to the internal parameters directly accessible. Isotope dilution experiments have also been carried out in order to check the consistency of the results. In the present state of experimental accuracy, the 13C NMR method is of more limited potential than 2H SNIF-NMR spectroscopy. However it may provide complementary information. Moreover it is particularly efficient for detecting and quantifying adulterations that aim to mimic the overall carbon-13 content of a natural compound by adding a selectivity enriched species to a less expensive substrate from a different origin. PMID:1759714

  17. Supportive breeding boosts natural population abundance with minimal negative impacts on fitness of a wild population of Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Hess, Maureen A; Rabe, Craig D; Vogel, Jason L; Stephenson, Jeff J; Nelson, Doug D; Narum, Shawn R

    2012-11-01

    While supportive breeding programmes strive to minimize negative genetic impacts to populations, case studies have found evidence for reduced fitness of artificially produced individuals when they reproduce in the wild. Pedigrees of two complete generations were tracked with molecular markers to investigate differences in reproductive success (RS) of wild and hatchery-reared Chinook salmon spawning in the natural environment to address questions regarding the demographic and genetic impacts of supplementation to a natural population. Results show a demographic boost to the population from supplementation. On average, fish taken into the hatchery produced 4.7 times more adult offspring, and 1.3 times more adult grand-offspring than naturally reproducing fish. Of the wild and hatchery fish that successfully reproduced, we found no significant differences in RS between any comparisons, but hatchery-reared males typically had lower RS values than wild males. Mean relative reproductive success (RRS) for hatchery F(1) females and males was 1.11 (P = 0.84) and 0.89 (P = 0.56), respectively. RRS of hatchery-reared fish (H) that mated in the wild with either hatchery or wild-origin (W) fish was generally equivalent to W × W matings. Mean RRS of H × W and H × H matings was 1.07 (P = 0.92) and 0.94 (P = 0.95), respectively. We conclude that fish chosen for hatchery rearing did not have a detectable negative impact on the fitness of wild fish by mating with them for a single generation. Results suggest that supplementation following similar management practices (e.g. 100% local, wild-origin brood stock) can successfully boost population size with minimal impacts on the fitness of salmon in the wild. PMID:23025818

  18. Seasonal Abundance and Natural Inoculativity of Insect Vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in Oklahoma Tree Nurseries and Vineyards.

    PubMed

    Overall, Lisa M; Rebek, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is the causative agent of diseases of perennial plants including peach, plum, elm, oak, pecan, and grape. This bacterial pathogen is transmitted by xylem-feeding insects. In recent years, Pierce's disease of grape has been detected in 10 counties in central and northeastern Oklahoma, prompting further investigation of the disease epidemiology in this state. We surveyed vineyards and tree nurseries in Oklahoma for potential insect vectors to determine species composition, infectivity, and natural inoculativity of commonly captured insect vectors. Yellow sticky cards were used to sample insect fauna at each location. Insects were removed from sticky cards and screened for X. fastidiosa using immunocapture-PCR to determine their infectivity. A second objective was to test the natural inoculativity of insect vectors that are found in vineyards. Graphocephala versuta (Say), Graphocephala coccinea (Forster), Paraulacizes irrorata (F.), Oncometopia orbona (F.), Cuerna costalis (F.), and Entylia carinata Germar were collected from vineyards and taken back to the lab to determine their natural inoculativity. Immunocapture-PCR was used to test plant and insect samples for presence of X. fastidiosa. The three most frequently captured species from vineyards and tree nurseries were G. versuta, Clastoptera xanthocephala Germar, and O. orbona. Of those insects screened for X. fastidiosa, 2.4% tested positive for the bacterium. Field-collected G. versuta were inoculative to both ragweed and alfalfa. Following a 7-d inoculation access period, a higher percentage of alfalfa became infected than ragweed. Results from this study provide insight into the epidemiology of X. fastidiosa in Oklahoma. PMID:26331482

  19. What's on the menu? Assessing microbial carbon sources and cycling in soils using natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Burns, L.; Mancini, S.; Fulthorpe, R.; Slater, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Organic matter in soils is composed of diverse materials in various stages of decomposition. Soil organic matter is not in a single pool but rather in multiple carbon pools with different intrinsic turnover times that can be on annual to decadal and even millennial timescales. Microorganisms can influence the total amount of carbon stored in soils and the turnover rates of these different pools. However, the links between microbes and their ability to utilize these various carbon pools are not well understood. Moreover, microbes have been shown to co-utilize a number of available carbon sources rather than a single carbon source under soil conditions which creates difficulties in identifying microbial carbon sources in the natural environment. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) has become a useful tool in elucidating microbial carbon sources in complex environments with multiple carbon sources. We investigated microbial carbon cycling at an industrial site in Ontario which included a variety of carbon sources including vegetation, PAHs and natural organic matter (NOM). Using this approach, the 14C content of microbial membrane lipids (which reflects their carbon source) can be compared to surrounding carbon sources in order to assess which carbon source they are metabolizing and incorporating into their lipids. In addition, we assessed microbial community structure and diversity by analyzing amplified bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal rDNA fragments with denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The Δ14C value for PLFAs ranged from +54 to -697% which indicates that microbial carbon sources across soils differ. The Δ14CPLFA for some soils is consistent with modern carbon sources while Δ14CPLFA for other soils is consistent with natural organic matter including older pools of carbon. The microbial communities at this site are not metabolizing PAHs but rather they are utilizing various pools of natural organic

  20. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  1. Strong, Thermally Superinsulating Biopolymer-Silica Aerogel Hybrids by Cogelation of Silicic Acid with Pectin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanyu; Malfait, Wim J; Demilecamps, Arnaud; Zhang, Yucheng; Brunner, Samuel; Huber, Lukas; Tingaut, Philippe; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-11-23

    Silica aerogels are excellent thermal insulators, but their brittle nature has prevented widespread application. To overcome these mechanical limitations, silica-biopolymer hybrids are a promising alternative. A one-pot process to monolithic, superinsulating pectin-silica hybrid aerogels is presented. Their structural and physical properties can be tuned by adjusting the gelation pH and pectin concentration. Hybrid aerogels made at pH 1.5 exhibit minimal dust release and vastly improved mechanical properties while remaining excellent thermal insulators. The change in the mechanical properties is directly linked to the observed "neck-free" nanoscale network structure with thicker struts. Such a design is superior to "neck-limited", classical inorganic aerogels. This new class of materials opens up new perspectives for novel silica-biopolymer nanocomposite aerogels. PMID:26447457

  2. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent. PMID:27571051

  3. Natural hybrids in Atlantic eels (Anguilla anguilla, A. rostrata): evidence for successful reproduction and fluctuating abundance in space and time.

    PubMed

    Albert, Vicky; Jónsson, Bjarni; Bernatchez, Louis

    2006-06-01

    The outcome of natural hybridization is highly variable and depends on the nonexclusive effects of both pre- and post-mating reproductive barriers. The objective of this study was to address three specific questions regarding the dynamics of hybridization between the American and European eels (Anguilla rostrata and Anguilla anguilla). Using 373 AFLP loci, 1127 eels were genotyped, representing different life stages from both continents, as well as multiple Icelandic locations. We first evaluated the extent of hybridization and tested for the occurrence of hybrids beyond the first generation. Second, we tested whether hybrids were randomly distributed across continents and among Icelandic sampling sites. Third, we tested for a difference in the proportion of hybrids between glass eel and yellow eel stages in Iceland. Our results provided evidence for (i) an overall hybrid proportion of 15.5% in Iceland, with values ranging from 6.7% to 100% depending on life stages and locations; (ii) the existence of hybrids beyond the first generation; (iii) a nonrandom geographic distribution of hybrids in the North Atlantic; and (iv) a higher proportion of first and later generation hybrids in yellow eels compared to glass eels, as well as a significant latitudinal gradient in the proportion of hybrids in Icelandic freshwater. We propose that the combined effect of both differential survival of hybrids and variation in hybridization rate through time best explain these patterns. We discuss the possibility that climate change, which is impacting many environmental features in the North Atlantic, may have a determinant effect on the outcome of natural hybridization in Atlantic eels. PMID:16689906

  4. Analysis of the structure of synthetic and natural melanins by solid-phase

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, G.A.; Roberts, J.E.; Foster, N.

    1988-09-06

    The structures of one synthetic and two natural melanins are examined by solid-state NMR using cross polarization, magic angle sample spinning, and high-power proton decoupling. The structural features of synthetic dopa malanin are compared to those of melanin from malignant melanoma cells grown in culture and sepia melanin from squid ink. Natural abundance /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N spectra show resonances consistent with known pyrrolic and indolic structures within the heterogeneous biopolymer; /sup 13/C spectra indicate the presence of aliphatic residues in all three materials. These solid-phase experiments illustrate the promise of solid-phase NMR for elucidating structural from insoluble biomaterials.

  5. The perils and promises of microbial abundance: novel natures and model ecosystems, from artisanal cheese to alien seas.

    PubMed

    Paxson, Heather; Helmreich, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Microbial life has been much in the news. From outbreaks of Escherichia coli to discussions of the benefits of raw and fermented foods to recent reports of life forms capable of living in extreme environments, the modest microbe has become a figure for thinking through the presents and possible futures of nature, writ large as well as small. Noting that dominant representations of microbial life have shifted from an idiom of peril to one of promise, we argue that microbes--especially when thriving as microbial communities--are being upheld as model ecosystems in a prescriptive sense, as tokens of how organisms and human ecological relations with them could, should, or might be. We do so in reference to two case studies: the regulatory politics of artisanal cheese and the speculative research of astrobiology. To think of and with microbial communities as model ecosystems offers a corrective to the scientific determinisms we detect in some recent calls to attend to the materiality of scientific objects. PMID:24941610

  6. Optical properties of DNA-CTMA biopolymers and applications in metal-biopolymer-metal photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Kim, Sung Jin; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Heckman, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Cartwright, Alexander N.

    2011-09-01

    The potential of using a DNA biopolymer in an electro-optic device is presented. A complex of DNA with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium-chloride (CTMA) was used to obtain an organic-soluble DNA material (DNA-CTMA). Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was added to the DNACTMA to increase the electrical conductivity of the biopolymer. The CW absorbance and time-resolved photoluminescence of the resulting DNA-CTMA and DNA-CTMA-PEDOT:PSS were investigated. Both DNA materials have absorbance peaks at ~260 nm and a broad, Stokes shifted, photoluminescence peak around 470nm. The photoluminescence lifetime of the materials was observed to decrease with increasing UV excitation. Specifically, excitation with a high power ultrafast (~150fs) UV (266nm) laser pulse resulted in a drastic decrease in the photoluminescence lifetime decreases after a few minutes. Moreover, the observed decrease was faster in an air ambient than in a nitrogen ambient. This is most likely due to photo-oxidation that degrades the polymer surface resulting in an increase in the non-radiative recombination. In order to investigate the photoconductivity of these two materials, metal-biopolymer-metal (MBM) ultraviolet photodetectors with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated and characterized. The photoresponsivity of these devices was limited by the transport dynamics within the film. The prospects for the use of these materials in optical devices will be discussed.

  7. 13C natural abundance in serum retinol acts as a biomarker for increases in dietary provitamin A.

    PubMed

    Howe, Julie A; Valentine, Ashley R; Hull, Angela K; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-02-01

    The natural isotopic composition of 13C and 12C in tissues is largely determined by the diet. Sources of provitamin A carotenoids (e.g., vegetables) typically have a lower 13C to 12C ratio (13C:12C) than preformed vitamin A sources (i.e., dairy and meat) from corn-fed animals, which are prevalent in the US. The 13C:12C of serum retinol (13C:12C-retinol) was evaluated as a biomarker for vegetable intake in a 3-mo dietary intervention designed to promote weight-loss by increased vegetable consumption or reduced calorie and fat intake. Subjects were 21-50 y of age with a BMI between 30-40 kg/m2 and were enrolled from one geographic area in the US. The high vegetable group (n=20) was encouraged to increase daily vegetable and fruit consumption to 0.95 liter vegetables and 0.24-0.35 liter fruits. The caloric reduction group (n=17) was encouraged to lower caloric intake by 500 kcal and consume

  8. Effect of petroleum products on the decomposition of soil organic matter as assessed by 13C natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmach, Wioleta; Szarlip, Paweł; Trembaczowski, Andrzej; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Petroleum products are common contaminants in soils due to human activities. They are toxic for microorganisms and threat their functions, including decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The direct estimation of altered SOM decomposition - based on the CO2 emission - is impossible after oil contamination, because oil decomposition also contributes to the CO2 release. We used the natural differences in the isotopic signature (δ13C) of SOM and of oil products to partition the total CO2 for both sources and to analyze the suppression of SOM decomposition. The dynamics of 13C fractionation during the mineralization of gasoline and diesel was measured during 42 days. The 13C fractionation varied between -8.8‰ and +3.6‰ within the first 10 days, and stabilized thereafter at about -5.3‰ for gasoline and +3.2‰ for diesel. These 13C fractionations and δ13C values of CO2 emitted from the soil were used for correct partitioning of the total CO2. Contamination with gasoline reduced the CO2 efflux from SOM decomposition by a factor of 25 (from 151 to 6 mg C-CO2 kg‑1 soil during 42 days). The negative effect of diesel was much lower: the CO2 efflux from SOM was decreased by less than a factor of 2. The strong effect of gasoline versus diesel reflects the lower absorption of gasoline to mineral particles and the development of a thin film on water surfaces, leading to toxicity for microorganisms. We conclude that the small differences of 13C of SOM and of organic pollutants can be used to partition CO2 fluxes and analyze pollutant effects on SOM decomposition.

  9. Biopolymer-protected CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bozanić, D K; Djoković, V; Bibić, N; Sreekumari Nair, P; Georges, M K; Radhakrishnan, T

    2009-11-23

    A synthetic procedure for the encapsulation of cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles in a sago starch matrix is introduced. The nanocomposite was investigated using structural, spectroscopic, and thermal methods. TEM micrographs of the nanocomposite showed spherical CdSe particles of 4-5 nm in size coated with a biopolymer layer. The absorption edges of both the aqueous solution and the thin film of the CdSe-starch nanocomposite were shifted toward lower wavelengths in comparison to the value of the bulk semiconductor. Infrared measurements revealed that the interaction of CdSe nanoparticles and starch chains takes place via OH groups. Although the onset of the temperature of decomposition of CdSe-starch nanocomposite is lower than that of the pure matrix, thermogravimetric analysis also showed that introduction of CdSe nanoparticles significantly reduced starch degradation rate leading to high residual mass at the end of the degradation process. PMID:19772959

  10. Evidence of 13C non-covalent isotope effects obtained by quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at natural abundance during normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Rojas, Jose Manuel Moreno; Guillou, Claude; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-16

    Quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR at natural abundance has been used to determine the site-by-site (13)C/(12)C ratios in vanillin and a number of related compounds eluted from silica gel chromatography columns under similar conditions. Head-to-tail isotope fractionation is observed in all compounds at the majority of carbon positions. Furthermore, the site-specific isotope deviations show signatures characteristic of the position and functionality of the substituents present. The observed effects are more complex than would be obtained by simply summing the individual effects. Such detail is hidden when only the global (13)C content is measured by mass spectrometry. In particular, carbon positions within the aromatic ring are found to show site-specific isotope fractionation between the solute and the stationary phase. These interactions, defined as non-covalent isotope effects, can be normal or inverse and vary with the substitution pattern present. PMID:19748628

  11. Application of (119)Sn CPMG MAS NMR for Fast Characterization of Sn Sites in Zeolites with Natural (119)Sn Isotope Abundance.

    PubMed

    Kolyagin, Yury G; Yakimov, Alexander V; Tolborg, Søren; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Ivanova, Irina I

    2016-04-01

    (119)Sn CPMG MAS NMR is demonstrated to be a fast and efficient method for characterization of Sn-sites in Sn-containing zeolites. Tuning of the CPMG echo-train sequence decreases the experimental time by a factor of 5-40 in the case of as-synthesized and hydrated Sn-BEA samples and by 3 orders of magnitude in the case of dehydrated Sn-BEA samples as compared to conventional methods. In the latter case, the reconstruction of the quantitative spectrum without the loss of sensitivity is shown to be possible. The method proposed allows obtaining (119)Sn MAS NMR spectra with improved resolution for Sn-BEA zeolites with natural (119)Sn isotope abundance using conventional MAS NMR equipment. PMID:26978430

  12. 13C Natural Abundance in Serum Retinol Acts as a Biomarker for Increases in Dietary Provitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Julie A; Valentine, Ashley R; Hull, Angela K; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-01-01

    The natural isotopic composition of 13C and 12C in tissues is largely determined by the diet. Sources of provitamin A carotenoids (e.g., vegetables) typically have a lower 13C to 12C ratio (13C:12C) than preformed vitamin A sources (i.e., dairy and meat) from corn-fed animals, which are prevalent in the US. The 13C:12C of serum retinol (13C:12C-retinol) was evaluated as a biomarker for vegetable intake in a 3-mo dietary intervention designed to promote weight-loss by increased vegetable consumption or reduced calorie and fat intake. Subjects were 21–50 y of age with a BMI between 30–40 kg/m2 and were enrolled from one geographic area in the US. The high vegetable group (n = 20) was encouraged to increase daily vegetable and fruit consumption to 0.95 liter vegetables and 0.24–0.35 liter fruits. The caloric reduction group (n = 17) was encouraged to lower caloric intake by 500 kcal and consume ≤25% kcal from fat daily. Provided meals supplied 75–100% vegetable and fruit goals and 50–67% kcal and fat g per day. Carotenoid supplementation was discontinued by subjects during the study. Serum retinol and provitamin A carotenoid concentrations; intake of preformed vitamin A, provitamin A, and fat; and body weight, fat mass, and lean mass were analyzed for correlations to 13C:12C-retinol. 13C:12C-Retinol decreased in the vegetable group after intervention (P = 0.050) and the correlation with provitamin A intake was approaching significance (P = 0.079). 13C:12C-Retinol did not change in the caloric reduction group (P = 0.43). 13C:12C-Retinol changes with the vitamin A source in the diet and can be used as a biomarker for increases in dietary provitamin A vegetable intake. PMID:19116317

  13. Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Guryanov, Ivan D.; Yendluri, Raghuvara; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2016-03-01

    Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur without changes in viability and cytoskeleton formation. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability evaluation in rats has confirmed that the scaffolds promote the formation of novel blood vessels around the implantation sites. The scaffolds show excellent resorption within six weeks after implantation in rats. Neo-vascularization observed in newly formed connective tissue placed near the scaffold allows for the complete restoration of blood flow. These phenomena indicate that the halloysite-doped scaffolds are biocompatible as demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The chitosan-gelatine-agarose doped clay nanotube nanocomposite scaffolds fabricated in this work are promising candidates for tissue engineering applications.Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur

  14. Changes in Natural Abundance Carbon Stable isotopes of Human Blood and Saliva After 24 Days of Controlled Carbohydrate Supplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, R. A.; Jahren, A. H.; Baer, D. J.; Caballero, B.

    2008-12-01

    the δ13C value of their blood and saliva relative to baseline: blood clot was enriched by 0.27‰; blood serum by 0.50‰ and saliva by 1.12‰. We believe this overall enrichment resulted from a 13C-enriched bulk diet (δ13C = - 20.42‰) relative to the subjects free-living diet. Evidence for this derives from inspection of foods within the bulk diet provided, compared to published profiles of the typical American diet. We will discuss possible complicating factors, such as differential absorption and metabolism of the supplements according to solubility and caloric value. These results are encouraging for the development of a δ13C blood serum biomarker that, in the company of other tests, could be used to indicate a change in carbohydrate intake. Bray, G.A., Nielsen, S.J. and Popkin, B.M., 2004. Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 79: 537-543. Havel, P.J., 2005. Dietary fructose: Implications for dysregulation of energy homeostasis and lipid/carbohydrate metabolism. Nutrition Reviews, 63(5): 133-157. Tilman D., 1998. The greening of the green revolution. Nature, 396:211-212.

  15. In-situ modification, regeneration, and application of keratin biopolymer for arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Muhammad A; Ullah, Aman

    2014-08-15

    Chemical modification of chicken feathers (CF) and their subsequent role in arsenic removal from water is presented in this paper. The ground CF were chemically treated with four selective dopants such as poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) diglycidyl ether, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), allyl alcohol (AA) and TrisilanolCyclohexyl POSS. After modification, the solubilized keratin was regenerated by precipitation at acidic pH. The structural changes and properties of modified biopolymer were compared with untreated CF and confirmed by different characterization techniques such as SEM, FTIR, XRD, and DSC. The TGA data was used to discuss thermal decomposition and kinetic behavior of modified biopolymer exhaustively. The modified biopolymers were further investigated as biosorbents for their application in As(III) removal from water. The AA and POSS supported biosorbents executed high removal capacity for As(III) up to 11.5 × 10(-2)and 11.0 × 10(-2)mg/g from 100ml arsenic polluted water solution respectively. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0) were also evaluated with the finding that overall sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Based on linear and non-linear regression analysis, Freundlich Isotherm model showed good fit for obtained sorption data apart from high linear regression values supporting Langmuir isotherm model in sorption of As(III). PMID:24996154

  16. Biolubricant induced phase inversion and superhydrophobicity in rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip; Loth, Eric; Robinson, Scott J.; Stevenson, Darren

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to fabricate rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposite coatings with highly water repellent surface wetting characteristics and strong adhesion to metal surfaces. The technique combines the principles of phase inversion and atomization of multicomponent polymer/organoclay suspensions containing a biolubricant as the nonsolvent. The biolubricant was a blend of cyclomethicone/dimethiconol oil with fruit kernel oils. The ternary system of cellulose nitrate/solvent/biolubricant was blended with rubber dispersed organoclay nanofluids. Natural, synthetic, and fluoroacrylic latex rubbers were used for the purpose. Self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings were obtained from synthetic and fluoroacrylic rubbers whereas natural rubber containing formulations resulted in sticky superhydrophobic coatings.

  17. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  18. End-of-life of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) model comparing the waste management options for starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymers including landfill, anaerobic digestion (AD), industrial composting and home composting. The ranking of biological treatment routes for starch-PVOH biopolymer wastes depended on their chemical compositions. AD represents the optimum choice for starch-PVOH biopolymer containing N and S elements in global warming potential (GWP(100)), acidification and eutrophication but not on the remaining impact categories, where home composting was shown to be a better option due to its low energy and resource inputs. For those starch-PVOH biopolymers with zero N and S contents home composting delivered the best environmental performance amongst biological treatment routes in most impact categories (except for GWP(100)). The landfill scenario performed generally well due largely to the 100-year time horizon and efficient energy recovery system modeled but this good performance is highly sensitive to assumptions adopted in landfill model. PMID:23131650

  19. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  20. Single Molecule Science for Personalized Nanomedicine: Atomic Force Microscopy of Biopolymer-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Carlin

    Nanotechnology has a unique and relatively untapped utility in the fields of medicine and dentistry at the level of single-biopolymer and -molecule diagnostics. In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest due to its ability to obtain atomic-resolution of molecular structures and probe biophysical behaviors of biopolymers and proteins in a variety of biologically significant environments. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the nanoscale manipulation and observation of biopolymers to develop an innovative technology for personalized medicine while understanding complex biological systems. These studies described here primarily use AFM to observe biopolymer interactions with proteins and its surroundings with unprecedented resolution, providing a better understanding of these systems and interactions at the nanoscale. Transcriptional profiling, the measure of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance in a single cell, is a powerful technique that detects "behavior" or "symptoms" at the tissue and cellular level. We have sought to develop an alternative approach, using our expertise in AFM and single molecule nanotechnology, to achieve a cost-effective high throughput method for sensitive detection and profiling of subtle changes in transcript abundance. The technique does not require amplification of the mRNA sample because the AFM provides three-dimensional views of molecules with unprecedented resolution, requires minimal sample preparation, and utilizes a simple tagging chemistry on cDNA molecules. AFM images showed collagen polymers in teeth and of Drebrin-A remodeling of filamentous actin structure and mechanics. AFM was used to image collagen on exposed dentine tubules and confirmed tubule occlusion with a desensitizing prophylaxis paste by Colgate-Palmolive. The AFM also superseded other microscopy tools in resolving F-actin helix remodeling and possible cooperative binding by a neuronal actin binding protein---Drebrin-A, an

  1. Role of Native and Exotic Earthworms in Plant Biopolymer Dynamics in Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Many forests within northern North America are experiencing the introduction of earthworms for the first time, presumably since before the last major glaciation. Forest dynamics are undergoing substantial changes because of the activity of the mainly European lumbricid species. Documented losses in litter layers, expansion of A-horizons, loss of the organic horizon, changes in fine root density, and shifts in microbial populations have all been documented in invaded zones. Two free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) forest experiments (aspen FACE at Rhinelander, Wisconsin and sweet gum FACE at Oak Ridge National Lab, Tennessee) lie within the zones of invasion and exhibit differences in amounts of exotic and native species as well as endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) and epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) types. Considerations of carbon accrual dynamics and relative input of above vs. below ground plant input in these young successional systems do not consider the potential impact of these ecosystem engineers. We investigated the impact of earthworm activity by tracking the relative abundance and stable carbon isotope compositions of lignin and substituted fatty acids extracted from isolated earthworms and their fecal pellets and from host soils. Indications of root vs leaf input to earthworm casts and fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical composition of cutin, suberin, and lignin. The isotopically depleted CO2 used in FACE and the resulting isotopically depleted plant organic matter afford an excellent opportunity to assess biopolymer-specific turnover dynamics. We find that endogeic species are proportionately more responsible for fine root cycling while some epigeic species are responsible for microaggregation of foliar cutin. CSIA of fecal pellet lignin and SFA indicates how these biopolymer pools can be derived from variable sources, roots, background soil, foliar tissue within one earthworm. Additionally, CSIA

  2. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  3. Bifunctional carbohydrate biopolymers entrapped lipase as catalyst for the two consecutive conversions of α-pinene to oxy-derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tudorache, Madalina; Gheorghe, Andreea; Negoi, Alina; Enache, Madalin; Maria, Gabriel-Mihai; Parvulescu, Vasile I

    2016-11-01

    Bifunctional catalysts designed as carbohydrate biopolymers entrapping lipase have been investigated for the biotransformation of a natural compound (α-pinene) to oxy-derivatives. Lipases assisted the epoxidation of α-pinene using H2O2 as oxidation reagent and ethyl acetate as both acetate-supplier and solvent affording α-pinene oxide as the main product. Further, the biopolymer promoted the isomerization of α-pinene oxide to campholenic aldehyde and trans-carenol. In this case, the biopolymers played double roles of the support and also active part of the bifunctional catalyst. Screening of enzymes and their entrapping in a biopolymeric matrix (e.g. Ca-alginate and κ-carrageenan) indicated the lipase extracted from Aspergillus niger as the most efficient. In addition, the presence of biopolymers enhanced the catalytic activity of the immobilized lipase (i.e. 13.39×10(3), 19.76×10(3)and 26.46×10(3) for the free lipase, lipase-carrageenan and lipase-alginate, respectively). The catalysts stability and reusability were confirmed in eight consecutively reaction runs. PMID:27516324

  4. Molecular Investigation of the Short-term Sequestration of Natural Abundance 13C -labelled Cow Dung in the Surface Horizons of a Temperate Grassland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; Evershed, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    An adequate understanding of the carbon (C) sequestration potential of grasslands requires that the quantity and residence times of C inputs be measured. Herbivore dung is largely comprised of plant cell wall material, a significant source of stable C in intensively grazed temperate grassland ecosystems that contributes to the soil carbon budget. Our work uses compound-specific isotope analysis to identify the pattern of input of dung-derived compounds from natural abundance 13C/-labelled cow dung into the surface horizons of a temperate grassland soil over one year. C4 dung (δ 13C \\-12.6 ‰ ) from maize fed cows was applied to a temperate grassland surface (δ 13C \\-29.95 ‰ ) at IGER-North Wyke (Devon, UK), and dung remains and soil cores beneath the treatments collected at ŧ = 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224 and 372 days. Bulk dung carbon present in the 0\\-1 cm and 1\\-5 cm surface horizons of a grassland soil over one year was estimated using Δ 13C between C4 dung and C3 dung, after Bol {\\et al.} (2000). The major biochemical components of dung were quantified using proximate forage fibre analyses, after Goering and Van Soest (1970) and identified using `wet' chemical and GC-MS methods. Plant cell wall polysaccharides and lignin were found to account for up to 67 {%} of dung dry matter. Hydrolysed polysaccharides were prepared as alditol acetates for analyses (after Docherty {\\et al.}, 2001), and a novel application of an off-line pyrolysis method applied to measure lignin-derived phenolic compounds (after Poole & van Bergen, 2002). This paper focuses on major events in the incorporation of dung carbon, estimated using natural abundance 13C&-slash;labelling technique. This revealed a major bulk input of dung carbon after a period of significant rainfall with a consequent decline in bulk soil δ 13C values until the end of the experiment (Dungait {\\et al.}, submitted). Findings will be presented revealing contribution of plant cell wall polysaccharides and

  5. Characterizing the changes in biopolymer composition in roots of photosynthetically divergent grasses exposed to future climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseela, V.; Tharayil, N.; Pendall, E.

    2014-12-01

    A majority of carbon in soil is derived from plant roots, yet roots remain remarkably less explored. Root tissues are abundant in heteropolymers such as suberin, lignin and tannins which are energetically demanding to depolymerize, thus facilitating the accrual of carbon in soil. Most biopolymers are operationally/functionally defined and their function is regulated by the identity of monomers and the linkages connecting these monomers. The structural chemistry of these biopolymers could vary with the environmental conditions experienced during their formative stage thus altering the potential for soil carbon sequestration. We examined the biopolymer composition in the roots of a C3 (Hesperostipa comata) and a C4 (Bouteloua gracilis) grass species exposed to a factorial combination of warming and elevated CO2 at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, Wyoming, USA. The grass roots were subjected to a sequential solvent extraction and base hydrolysis to delineate various operational fractions within the polydisperse matrix. The extracted fractions were analyzed using various chromatography mass spectrometry platforms. Warming and elevated CO2 increased the total suberin content and the amount of ω-hydroxy acids in C4 grass species while in C3 species there was a trend of increasing concentration of α,ω-dioic acids in roots exposed to elevated CO2 compared to ambient CO2 treatment. Our results highlight the effect of warming and elevated CO2 on the chemical composition of heteropolymers in roots that may potentially alter root function and rate of decomposition leading to changes in soil carbon in a future warmer world.

  6. Constitutive modelling of composite biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B; Kroon, M

    2016-04-21

    The mechanical behaviour of biopolymer networks is to a large extent determined at a microstructural level where the characteristics of individual filaments and the interactions between them determine the response at a macroscopic level. Phenomena such as viscoelasticity and strain-hardening followed by strain-softening are observed experimentally in these networks, often due to microstructural changes (such as filament sliding, rupture and cross-link debonding). Further, composite structures can also be formed with vastly different mechanical properties as compared to the individual networks. In this present paper, we present a constitutive model presented in a continuum framework aimed at capturing these effects. Special care is taken to formulate thermodynamically consistent evolution laws for dissipative effects. This model, incorporating possible anisotropic network properties, is based on a strain energy function, split into an isochoric and a volumetric part. Generalisation to three dimensions is performed by numerical integration over the unit sphere. Model predictions indicate that the constitutive model is well able to predict the elastic and viscoelastic response of biological networks, and to an extent also composite structures. PMID:26851172

  7. Formatting and ligating biopolymers using adjustable nanoconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Daniel J.; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, Francois; Henkin, Gil; Scott, Shane; Leslie, Sabrina

    2016-07-01

    Sensitive visualization and conformational control of long, delicate biopolymers present critical challenges to emerging biotechnologies and biophysical studies. Next-generation nanofluidic manipulation platforms strive to maintain the structural integrity of genomic DNA prior to analysis but can face challenges in device clogging, molecular breakage, and single-label detection. We address these challenges by integrating the Convex Lens-induced Confinement (CLiC) technique with a suite of nanotopographies embedded within thin-glass nanofluidic chambers. We gently load DNA polymers into open-face nanogrooves in linear, concentric circular, and ring array formats and perform imaging with single-fluorophore sensitivity. We use ring-shaped nanogrooves to access and visualize confinement-enhanced self-ligation of long DNA polymers. We use concentric circular nanogrooves to enable hour-long observations of polymers at constant confinement in a geometry which eliminates the confinement gradient which causes drift and can alter molecular conformations and interactions. Taken together, this work opens doors to myriad biophysical studies and biotechnologies which operate on the nanoscale.

  8. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T.; Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A.

    2010-07-07

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  9. Sporopollenin, the least known yet toughest natural biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Grahame; Boa, Andrew; Taboada, Alberto; Atkin, Stephen; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2015-10-01

    Sporopollenin is highly cross-linked polymer composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen that is extraordinarily stable and has been found chemically intact in sedimentary rocks some 500 million year old. It is the outer shell (exine) of plant spores and pollen and when extracted it is in the form of an empty exine or microcapsule. The exines resemble the spores and pollen from which they are extracted, in size and morphology. Also, from any one plant such characteristics are incredible uniform. The exines can be used is microcapsules or simply as micron-sized particles due to the variety of functional groups on their surfaces. The loading of the exine microcapsules into their cavities is via multi-directional nano-diameter sized channels. The exines can be filled with a variety of polar and non-polar materials. Such as enzymes can be encapsulated within the shells and still remain active. In vivo studies in humans have shown that an encapsulated active substance can have a substantially increased bioavailability than if it is taken alone. The sporopollenin exine surface possesses phenolic, alkane, alkene, ketone, lactone and carboxylic acid groups. Therefore it can be derivatised in a number of ways, which has given rise to its having been used for, such as, solid supported for peptide synthesis, catalysis and ion-exchange chromatography. Also, the presence of the phenolic groups on sporopollenin endows it with antioxidant activity.

  10. Investigation of Solute-Fiber Affinity and Orientational Ordering of Norbornadiene Interacting with Two-Polypeptide Chiral Liquid Crystalline Solvents by Natural Abundance Deuterium (NAD) NMR.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Lesot, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    A prochiral bridged compound of C2v symmetry, the norbornadiene (NBD), oriented in a chiral liquid crystal composed of various mixtures of poly-γ-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG) and poly-ε-carboxy-l-lysine (PCBLL), two chiral homopolypeptides, is investigated using natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) spectroscopy. In such chiral oriented solvents, enantiotopic directions are spectrally nonequivalent, and two distinct (2)H quadrupolar doublets associated with enantioisotopomeric pairs of NBD are detected. As the two homopolypeptides have the same absolute configuration but distinct chemical functions in their side chains, the variation of residual quadrupolar couplings (RQC's) allows the determination of the relative solute-fiber affinities toward the two polypeptides in these lyotropic bipolymeric systems. Besides the experimental measurement of RQC's and the determination of their signs at each inequivalent (2)H site, the elements of the second-rank order tensor, Sαβ, are calculated by assuming a modeled structure. The variations of RQC's and diagonalized order parameters, Sα'α', are followed versus the relative proportion of two polypeptides in the chiral oriented mixture. The influence of the solute mass fraction in the two-homopolypeptide oriented samples is also examined as well as the case of homogeneous and uniform achiral mesophases "PBG-PCBL" made of two pairs of mirror-image homopolypeptides (PBLG/PBDG and PCBLL/PCBDL). In the latter, the solute ordering is modulated by the proportion of each type of homopolypeptide (chemical nature and absolute configuration), leading to eliminate the enantiodiscrimination mechanisms on the average. In the frame of a model, new insights on the solute-homopolypeptide fiber interactions are discussed. PMID:27383731

  11. Natural abundance 17O, 6Li NMR and molecular modeling studies of the solvation structures of lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide/1,2-dimethoxyethane liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Borodin, Oleg; Qian, Jiangfeng; Qin, Zhaohai; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Natural abundance 17O and 6Li NMR experiments, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics studies were employed to investigate the solvation structures of Li+ at various concentrations of LiFSI in DME electrolytes. It was found that the chemical shifts of both 17O and 6Li changed with the concentration of LiFSI, indicating the changes of solvation structures with concentration. For the quantum chemistry calculations, the coordinated cluster LiFSI(DME)2 forms at first, and its relative ratio increases with increasing LiFSI concentration to 1 M. Then the solvation structure LiFSI(DME) become the dominant component. As a result, the coordination of forming contact ion pairs between Li+ and FSI- ion increases, but the association between Li+ and DME molecule decreases. Furthermore, at LiFSI concentration of 4 M the solvation structures associated with Li+(FSI-)2(DME), Li+2(FSI-)(DME)4 and (LiFSI)2(DME)3 become the dominant components. For the molecular dynamics simulation, with increasing concentration, the association between DME and Li+ decreases, and the coordinated number of FSI- increases, which is in perfect accord with the DFT results.

  12. Consistency of NMR and mass spectrometry determinations of natural-abundance site-specific carbon isotope ratios. The case of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Trierweiler, M; Jouitteau, C; Martin, G J

    1999-07-01

    Quantitative determinations of natural-abundance carbon isotope ratios by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) have been optimized by appropriate selection of the experimental conditions and by signal analysis based on a dedicated algorithm. To check the consistency of the isotopic values obtained by NMR and mass spectrometry (IRMS) the same glycerol samples have been investigated by both techniques. To have access to site-specific isotope ratios by IRMS, the products have been degraded and transformed into two derivatives, one of which contains carbons 1 and 3 and the other carbon 2 of glycerol. The sensitivity of the isotopic parameters determined by IRMS to fractionation effects possibly occurring in the course of the chemical transformations has been investigated, and the repeatability and reproducibility of both analytical chains have been estimated. The good agreement observed between the two series of isotopic results supports the reliability of the two different approaches. SNIF-NMR is therefore a very attractive tool for routine determination, in a single nondestructive experiment, of the carbon isotope distribution in glycerol, and the method can be applied to other compounds. Using this method, the isotopic distributions have been compared for glycerol samples, obtained from plant or animal oils, extracted from fermented media, or prepared by chemical synthesis. Typical behaviors are characterized. PMID:21662780

  13. A Computational Framework for High-Throughput Isotopic Natural Abundance Correction of Omics-Level Ultra-High Resolution FT-MS Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Carreer, William J.; Flight, Robert M.; Moseley, Hunter N. B.

    2013-01-01

    New metabolomics applications of ultra-high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry can provide thousands of detectable isotopologues, with the number of potentially detectable isotopologues increasing exponentially with the number of stable isotopes used in newer isotope tracing methods like stable isotope-resolved metabolomics (SIRM) experiments. This huge increase in usable data requires software capable of correcting the large number of isotopologue peaks resulting from SIRM experiments in a timely manner. We describe the design of a new algorithm and software system capable of handling these high volumes of data, while including quality control methods for maintaining data quality. We validate this new algorithm against a previous single isotope correction algorithm in a two-step cross-validation. Next, we demonstrate the algorithm and correct for the effects of natural abundance for both 13C and 15N isotopes on a set of raw isotopologue intensities of UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine derived from a 13C/15N-tracing experiment. Finally, we demonstrate the algorithm on a full omics-level dataset. PMID:24404440

  14. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N (δ15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  15. The physical state of osmoregulatory solutes in unicellular algae. A natural-abundance carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation study.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, R S; MacKay, M A; Borowitzka, L J

    1982-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C n.m.r. spin-lattice relaxation-time measurements have been carried out on intact cells of the unicellular blue--green alga Synechococcus sp. and the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina, with the aim of characterizing the environments of the organic osmoregulatory solutes in these salt-tolerant organisms. In Synechococcus sp., all of the major organic osmoregulatory solute, 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, is visible in spectra of intact cells. Its rotational motion in the cell is slower by a factor of approx. 2.4 than in aqueous solution, but the molecule is still freely mobile and therefore able to contribute to the osmotic balance. In D. salina, only about 60% of the osmoregulatory solute glycerol is visible in spectra of intact cells. The rotational mobility of this observable fraction is approximately half that found in aqueous solution, but the data also indicate that there is a significant concentration of some paramagnetic species in D. salina which contributes to the overall spin-lattice relaxation of the glycerol carbon atoms. The non-observable fraction, which must correspond to glycerol molecules that have very broad 13C resonances and that are in slow exchange with bulk glycerol, has not been properly characterized as yet, but may represent glycerol in the chloroplast. The implications of these findings in relation to the physical state of the cytoplasm and the mechanism of osmoregulation in these cells are discussed. PMID:6807296

  16. Nitrogen content, 15N natural abundance and biomass of the two pleurocarpous mosses Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. and Scleropodium purum (Hedw.) Limpr. in relation to atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Solga, A; Burkhardt, J; Zechmeister, H G; Frahm, J-P

    2005-04-01

    The suitability of the two pleurocarpous mosses Pleurozium schreberi and Scleropodium purum for assessing spatial variation in nitrogen deposition was investigated. Sampling was carried out at eight sites in the western part of Germany with bulk deposition rates ranging between 6.5 and 18.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). In addition to the effect of deposition on the nitrogen content of the two species, its influence on 15N natural abundance (delta15N values) and on productivity was examined. Annual increases of the mosses were used for all analyses. Significant relationships between bulk N deposition and nitrogen content were obtained for both species; delta15N-values reflected the ratio of NH4-N to NO3-N in deposition. A negative effect of nitrogen input on productivity, i.e. decreasing biomass per area with increasing N deposition due to a reduction of stem density, was particularly evident with P. schreberi. Monitoring of N deposition by means of mosses is considered an important supplement to existing monitoring programs. It makes possible an improved spatial resolution, and thus those areas that receive high loads of nitrogen are more easily discernible. PMID:15620592

  17. Studies of individual carbon sites of proteins in solution by natural abundance carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Strategies for assignments.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, E; Norton, R S; Allerhand, A

    1975-08-25

    Natural abundance 13C Fourier transform NMR spectra (at 15.18 MHz, in 20-mm sample tubes) of aqueous native proteins yield numerous narrow single carbon resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons. Techniques for the assignment of these resonances are presented. Each technique is applied to one or more of the following proteins: ferricytochrome c from horse heart and Candida krusei, ferrocytochrome c and cyanoferricytochrome c from horse heart, lysozyme from hen egg white, cyanoferrimyoglobins from horse and sperm whale skeletal muscle, and carbon monoxide myoglobin from horse. In all of the protein spectra we have examined, methine aromatic carbons give rise to broad bands. Studies of the narrow resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of proteins are facilitated by removal of these broad bands by means of the convolution-difference method, preferably from spectra recorded under conditions of noise-modulated off-resonance proton decoupling. We present a summary of the chemical shift ranges for the various types of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of amino acid residues and hemes of diamagnetic proteins, based on our results for hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart ferrocytochrome c, horse carbon monoxide myoglobin, and carbon monoxide hemoglobins from various species... PMID:169240

  18. The use of natural abundance carbon-13 to identify and quantify sources of emitted carbon dioxide in a calcareous southern Ontario Luvisolic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, Meaghan

    Three studies Were conducted at the Elora Research Station (ERS) on a Luvisolic soil to investigate the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) components contributing to the CO2 flux (FC) using natural 13C abundance. SIC contributed to the FC in intact soil incubations. Soil disruption exacerbated the release of CO2 from both pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates. Field and laboratory techniques to obtain the delta13C of respired CO2 (delta13CR) were compared. Short-term deployment of non flow-through non steady-state chambers and the use of the simple two-ended mass balance approach to derive delta 13CR were found acceptable to apply to the ERS site. The delta13CR from a corn field at ERS with a history of multiple C4 and C3 crop rotations was partitioned into SIC and SOC components using two approaches. Root respiration contributed 2% - 64% and carbonates contribute up to 20% to the FC.

  19. Natural (15)N Abundance in Key Amino Acids from Lamb Muscle: Exploring a New Horizon in Diet Authentication and Assessment of Feed Efficiency in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Gonzalo; Ortigues-Marty, Isabelle; Schiphorst, Anne-Marie; Robins, Richard J; Tea, Illa; Prache, Sophie

    2016-05-25

    Natural (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) varies between individual amino acids (AAs). We hypothesized that δ(15)N of nontransaminating and essential AAs ("source" AAs, such as phenylalanine) present in animal tissues could be used as a marker of dietary origin, whereas δ(15)N of transaminating AAs ("trophic" AAs, such as glutamic acid) could give more detailed insights into animal feed efficiency. Two diets based on dehydrated Lucerne pellets were tested in growing lambs, which promoted different feed efficiencies. No dietary effects were noted on δ(15)N of any AAs analyzed in lamb muscle. In addition, δ(15)N of phenylalanine was unexpectedly similar to that of glutamic acid, suggesting that δ(15)N of AAs is significantly derived from the metabolism of the rumen microbiota and, thus, are not suited for diet authentication in ruminants. In contrast, the δ(15)N of transaminating AAs facilitates an improved prediction of animal feed efficiency compared to the classical isotopic bulk N analysis. PMID:27148901

  20. A New Tool for NMR Crystallography: Complete (13)C/(15)N Assignment of Organic Molecules at Natural Isotopic Abundance Using DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Märker, Katharina; Pingret, Morgane; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gasparutto, Didier; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    NMR crystallography of organic molecules at natural isotopic abundance (NA) strongly relies on the comparison of assigned experimental and computed NMR chemical shifts. However, a broad applicability of this approach is often hampered by the still limited (1)H resolution and/or difficulties in assigning (13)C and (15)N resonances without the use of structure-based chemical shift calculations. As shown here, such difficulties can be overcome by (13)C-(13)C and for the first time (15)N-(13)C correlation experiments, recorded with the help of dynamic nuclear polarization. We present the complete de novo (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment at NA of a self-assembled 2'-deoxyguanosine derivative presenting two different molecules in the asymmetric crystallographic unit cell. This de novo assignment method is exclusively based on aforementioned correlation spectra and is an important addition to the NMR crystallography approach, rendering firstly (1)H assignment straightforward, and being secondly a prerequisite for distance measurements with solid-state NMR. PMID:26485326

  1. Conformon-driven biopolymer shape changes in cell modeling.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sungchul; Ciobanu, Gabriel

    2003-07-01

    Conceptual models of the atom preceded the mathematical model of the hydrogen atom in physics in the second decade of the 20th century. The computer modeling of the living cell in the 21st century may follow a similar course of development. A conceptual model of the cell called the Bhopalator was formulated in the mid-1980s, along with its twin theories known as the conformon theory of molecular machines and the cell language theory of biopolymer interactions [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 227 (1974) 211; BioSystems 44 (1997) 17; Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 870 (1999a) 411; BioSystems 54 (2000) 107; Semiotica 138 (1-4) (2002a) 15; Fundamenta Informaticae 49 (2002b) 147]. The conformon theory accounts for the reversible actions of individual biopolymers coupled to irreversible chemical reactions, while the cell language theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding the complex networks of dynamic interactions among biopolymers in the cell. These two theories are reviewed and further elaborated for the benefit of both computational biologists and computer scientists who are interested in modeling the living cell and its functions. One of the critical components of the mechanisms of cell communication and cell computing has been postulated to be space- and time-organized teleonomic (i.e. goal-directed) shape changes of biopolymers that are driven by exergonic (free energy-releasing) chemical reactions. The generalized Franck-Condon principle is suggested to be essential in resolving the apparent paradox arising when one attempts to couple endergonic (free energy-requiring) biopolymer shape changes to the exergonic chemical reactions that are catalyzed by biopolymer shape changes themselves. Conformons, defined as sequence-specific mechanical strains of biopolymers first invoked three decades ago to account for energy coupling in mitochondria, have been identified as shape changers, the agents that cause shape changes in biopolymers. Given a set of space- and time

  2. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus

  3. Monomers of cutin biopolymer: sorption and esterification on montmorillonite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2013-04-01

    One of the important precursors for soil organic matter is plant cuticle, a thin layer of predominantly lipids that cover all primary aerial surfaces of vascular plants. In most plant species cutin biopolymer is the major component of the cuticle (30-85% weight). Therefore cutin is the third most abundant plant biopolymer (after lignin and cellulose). Cutin is an insoluble, high molecular weight bio-polyester, which is constructed of inter-esterified cross linked hydroxy-fatty acids and hydroxyepoxy-fatty acids. The most common building blocks of the cutin are derivatives of palmitic acid, among them 9(10),16 dihydroxy palmitic acid (diHPA) is the main component. These fatty acids and their esters are commonly found in major organo-mineral soil fraction-humin. Hence, the complexes of cutin monomers with minerals may serve as model of humin. Both cutin and humin act as adsorption efficient domains for organic contaminants. However, only scarce information is available about the interactions of cutin with soil mineral surfaces, in particular with common soil mineral montmorillonite. The main hypothesize of the study is that adsorbed cutin monomers will be reconstituted on montmorillonite surface due to esterification and oligomerization, and that interactions of cutin monomers with montmorillonite will be affected by the type of exchangeable cation. Cutin monomers were obtained from the fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Adsorption of monomers was measured for crude Wyoming montmorillonites and montmorillonites saturated with Fe3+ and Ca2+. To understand the mechanism of monomer-clay interactions and to evaluate esterification on the clay surface, XRD and FTIR analyses of the montmorillonite-monomers complexes were performed. Our results demonstrated that the interactions of cutin monomers with montmorillonite are affected by the type of exchangeable cation. Isotherms of adsorption of cutin monomers on montmorillonites were fitted by a dual mode model of

  4. Nature, Strength, and Cooperativity of the Hydrogen-Bonding Network in α-Chitin.

    PubMed

    Deringer, Volker L; Englert, Ulli; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-14

    Chitin is an abundant biopolymer that stabilizes the exoskeleton of insects and gives structure to plants. Its macroscopic properties go back to an intricate network of hydrogen bonds that connect the polymer strands, and these intermolecular links have been under ongoing study. Here, we use atomistic simulations to explore hydrogen bonding in the most abundant form, α-chitin. The crystal structure exhibits disorder, and so discrete models are systematically derived as suitable approximants to the macroscopic material. These models then allow us to perform dispersion-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-D) simulations on the three-dimensional crystal network and on lower-dimensional fragments. Thereby, we rationalize the nature of hydrogen bonding and the role of crystallographic disorder for the stability of α-chitin, and complement previous, larger-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations as well as recent fiber-diffraction experiments. Our results provide new, atomic-level insight into one of Nature's most abundant building materials, and the techniques and concepts are likely transferable to other biopolymers. PMID:26828306

  5. Coupled actin-lamin biopolymer networks and protecting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming; Schwarz, J. M.

    The mechanical properties of cells are largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the cytoskeleton. Similarly, the mechanical properties of cell nuclei are also largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the nuclear cytoskeleton. In particular, a network of filamentous lamin sits just inside the inner nuclear membrane to presumably protect the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. It has been demonstrated over the past decade that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins bridging the outer and inner nuclear membranes, known as the LINC complex. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling in a model biopolymer network system via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the actin cytoskeletal network. We find, for example, that the force transmission across the coupled system can depend sensitively on the concentration of LINC complexes. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription since DNA couples to lamin via lamin-binding domains so that deformations in the lamin network may result in deformations in the DNA.

  6. Force spectroscopy of complex biopolymers with heterogeneous elasticity.

    PubMed

    Valdman, David; Lopez, Benjamin J; Valentine, Megan T; Atzberger, Paul J

    2013-01-21

    Cellular biopolymers can exhibit significant compositional heterogeneities as a result of the non-uniform binding of associated proteins, the formation of microstructural defects during filament assembly, or the imperfect bundling of filaments into composite structures of variable diameter. These can lead to significant variations in the local mechanical properties of biopolymers along their length. Existing spectral analysis methods assume filament homogeneity and therefore report only a single average stiffness for the entire filament. However, understanding how local effects modulate biopolymer mechanics in a spatially resolved manner is essential to understanding how binding and bundling proteins regulate biopolymer stiffness and function in cellular contexts. Here, we present a new method to determine the spatially varying material properties of individual complex biopolymers from the observation of passive thermal fluctuations of the filament conformation. We develop new statistical mechanics-based approaches for heterogeneous filaments that estimate local bending elasticities as a function of the filament arc-length. We validate this methodology using simulated polymers with known stiffness distributions, and find excellent agreement between derived and expected values. We then determine the bending elasticity of microtubule filaments of variable composition generated by repeated rounds of tubulin polymerization using either GTP or GMPCPP, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog. Again, we find excellent agreement between mechanical and compositional heterogeneities. PMID:24049545

  7. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  8. A comparative study of biopolymers and alum in the separation and recovery of pulp fibres from paper mill effluent by flocculation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumona; Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Pariatamby, Agamuthu; Ali Hashim, Mohd; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2014-09-01

    Recovery of cellulose fibres from paper mill effluent has been studied using common polysaccharides or biopolymers such as Guar gum, Xanthan gum and Locust bean gum as flocculent. Guar gum is commonly used in sizing paper and routinely used in paper making. The results have been compared with the performance of alum, which is a common coagulant and a key ingredient of the paper industry. Guar gum recovered about 3.86mg/L of fibre and was most effective among the biopolymers. Settling velocity distribution curves demonstrated that Guar gum was able to settle the fibres faster than the other biopolymers; however, alum displayed the highest particle removal rate than all the biopolymers at any of the settling velocities. Alum, Guar gum, Xanthan gum and Locust bean gum removed 97.46%, 94.68%, 92.39% and 92.46% turbidity of raw effluent at a settling velocity of 0.5cm/min, respectively. The conditions for obtaining the lowest sludge volume index such as pH, dose and mixing speed were optimised for guar gum which was the most effective among the biopolymers. Response surface methodology was used to design all experiments, and an optimum operational setting was proposed. The test results indicate similar performance of alum and Guar gum in terms of floc settling velocities and sludge volume index. Since Guar gum is a plant derived natural substance, it is environmentally benign and offers a green treatment option to the paper mills for pulp recycling. PMID:25193834

  9. Surface enhaced raman scattering (SERS) with biopolymer encapsulated silver nanosubstrates for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biopolymer encapsulated with silver nanoparticles was prepared using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution, silver nitrate, and trisodium citrate. Biopolymer based nanosubstrates were deposited on a mica sheet for SERS. Fresh cultures of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus a...

  10. Biopolymer-based thermoplastic mixture for producing solid biodegradable shaped bodies and its photo degradation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulong, Nurulsaidatulsyida; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biopolymers with controllable lifetimes have become increasingly important for many applications in the areas of agriculture, biomedical implants and drug release, forestry, wild life conservation and waste management. Natural oils are considered to be the most important class of renewable sources. They can be obtained from naturally occurring plants, such as sunflower, cotton, linseed and palm oil. In Malaysia, palm oil is an inexpensive and commodity material. Biopolymer produced from palm oil (Bio-VOP) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer and readily available from agriculture. For packaging use however, Bio-VOP is not thermoplastic and its granular form is unsuitable for most uses in the plastics industry, mainly due to processing difficulties during extrusion or injection moulding. Thus, research workers have developed several methods to blend Bio-VOP appropriately for industrial uses. In particular, injections moulding processes, graft copolymerisation, and preparation of blends with thermoplastic polymers have been studied to produce solid biodegradable shaped bodies. HDPE was chosen as commercial thermoplastic materials and was added with 10% Bio-VOP for the preparation of solid biodegradable shaped bodies named as HD-VOP. The UV light exposure of HD-VOP at 12 minutes upon gives the highest strength of this material that is 17.6 MPa. The morphological structure of HD-VOP shows dwi structure surface fracture which is brittle and ductile properties.

  11. Structurally colored biopolymer thin films for detection of dissolved metal ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathell, Matthew David

    Natural polymers, such as the polysaccharides alginate and chitosan, are noted sorbents of heavy metals. Their polymer backbone structures are rich in ligands that can interact with metal ions through chelation, electrostatics, ion exchange and nonspecific mechanisms. These water-soluble biopolymer materials can be processed into hydrogel thin films, creating high surface area interfaces ideal for binding and sequestering metal ions from solution. By virtue of their uniform nanoscale dimensions (with thicknesses smaller than wavelengths of visible light) polymer thin films exhibit structure-based coloration. This phenomenon, frequently observed in nature, causes the transparent and essentially colorless films to reflect light in a wide array of colors. The lamellar film structures act as one-dimensional photonic crystals, allowing selective reflection of certain wavelengths of light while minimizing other wavelengths by out-of-phase interference. The combination of metal-binding and reflective properties make alginate and chitosan thin films attractive candidates for analyte sensing. Interactions with metal ions can induce changes in film thicknesses and refractive indices, thus altering the path of light reflected through the film. Small changes in dimensional or optical properties can lead to shifts in film color that are perceivable by the unaided eye. These thin films offer the potential for optical sensing of toxic dissolved materials without the need for instrumentation, external power or scientific expertise. With the use of a spectroscopic ellipsometer and a fiber optic reflectance spectrometer, the physical and optical characteristics of biopolymer thin films have been characterized in response to 50 ppm metal ion solutions. It has been determined that metal interactions can lead to measurable changes in both film thicknesses and effective refractive indices. The intrinsic response behaviors of alginate and chitosan, as well as the responses of modified

  12. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties.. Annual report to be submitted to DOE Program Managers for posting on web page.

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, BH

    2001-06-15

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government.

  13. SOAX: A software for quantification of 3D biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Nie, Wei; Yusuf, Eddy; I-Ju Lee; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Huang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous biopolymer networks in cells and tissues are routinely imaged by confocal microscopy. Image analysis methods enable quantitative study of the properties of these curvilinear networks. However, software tools to quantify the geometry and topology of these often dense 3D networks and to localize network junctions are scarce. To fill this gap, we developed a new software tool called “SOAX”, which can accurately extract the centerlines of 3D biopolymer networks and identify network junctions using Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs). It provides an open-source, user-friendly platform for network centerline extraction, 2D/3D visualization, manual editing and quantitative analysis. We propose a method to quantify the performance of SOAX, which helps determine the optimal extraction parameter values. We quantify several different types of biopolymer networks to demonstrate SOAX's potential to help answer key questions in cell biology and biophysics from a quantitative viewpoint. PMID:25765313

  14. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-01

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  16. The effect of drought and interspecific interactions on depth of water uptake in deep- and shallow-rooting grassland species as determined by δ18O natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, N. J.; Finn, J. A.; Hofer, D.; Lüscher, A.

    2014-08-01

    Increased incidence of drought, as predicted under climate change, has the potential to negatively affect grassland production. Compared to monocultures, vertical belowground niche complementarity between shallow- and deep-rooting species may be an important mechanism resulting in higher yields and higher resistance to drought in grassland mixtures. However, very little is known about the belowground responses in grassland systems and increased insight into these processes may yield important information both to predict the effect of future climate change and better design agricultural systems to cope with this. This study assessed the effect of a 9-week experimental summer drought on the depth of water uptake of two shallow-rooting species (Lolium perenne L. and Trifolium repens L.) and two deep-rooting species (Cichorium intybus L. and Trifolium pratense L.) in grassland monocultures and four-species mixtures by using the natural abundance δ18O isotope method. We tested the following three hypotheses: (1) drought results in a shift of water uptake to deeper soil layers, (2) deep-rooting species take up a higher proportion of water from deeper soil layers relative to shallow-rooting species, and (3) as a result of interspecific interactions in mixtures, the water uptake of shallow-rooting species becomes shallower when grown together with deep-rooting species and vice versa, resulting in reduced niche overlap. The natural abundance δ18O technique provided novel insights into the depth of water uptake of deep- and shallow- rooting grassland species and revealed large shifts in depth of water uptake in response to drought and interspecific interactions. Compared to control conditions, drought reduced the proportional water uptake from 0-10 cm soil depth (PCWU0-10) of L. perenne, T. repens and C. intybus in monocultures by on average 54%. In contrast, the PCWU0-10 of T. pratense in monoculture increased by 44%, and only when grown in mixture did the PCWU0-10 of T

  17. Natural abundances of 15N and 13C in leaves of some N2-fixing and non-N2-fixing trees and shrubs in Syria.

    PubMed

    Kurdali, F; Al-Shamma'a, M

    2009-09-01

    A survey study was conducted on man-made plantations located at two different areas in the arid region of Syria to determine the variations in natural abundances of the (15)N and (13)C isotopes in leaves of several woody legume and non-legume species, and to better understand the consequence of such variations on nitrogen fixation and carbon assimilation. In the first study area (non-saline soil), the delta(15)N values in four legume species (Acacia cyanophylla,-1.73 per thousand Acacia farnesiana,-0.55 per thousand Prosopis juliflora,-1.64 per thousand; and Medicago arborea,+1.6 \\textperthousand) and one actinorhizal plant (Elaeagnus angustifolia,-0.46 to-2.1 per thousand) were found to be close to that of the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N(2) fixing in these species; whereas, delta(15)N values of the non-fixing plant species were highly positive. delta(13)C per thousand; in leaves of the C3 plants were found to be affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of-28.67 per thousand; to a maximum of-23 per thousand. However, they were relatively similar within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. In the second study area (salt affected soil), a higher carbon discrimination value (Delta(13)C per thousand) was exhibited by P. juliflora, indicating that the latter is a salt tolerant species; however, its delta(15)N was highly positive (+7.03 per thousand) suggesting a negligible contribution of the fixed N(2). Hence, it was concluded that the enhancement of N(2) fixation might be achieved by selection of salt-tolerant Rhizobium strains. PMID:20183233

  18. Core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles with assistant recognition polymer chains for effective recognition and enrichment of natural low-abundance protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dejing; Yang, Qian; Jin, Susu; Song, Yingying; Gao, Junfei; Wang, Ying; Mi, Huaifeng

    2014-02-01

    Core-shell molecular imprinting of nanomaterials overcomes difficulties with template transfer and achieves higher binding capacities for macromolecular imprinting, which are more important to the imprinting of natural low-abundance proteins from cell extracts. In the present study, a novel strategy of preparing core-shell nanostructured molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed that combined the core-shell approach with assistant recognition polymer chains (ARPCs). Vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles were used as support and ARPCs were used as additional functional monomers. Immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was chosen as the model protein. The cloned template protein BiP was selectively assembled with ARPCs from their library, which contained numerous limited-length polymer chains with randomly distributed recognition and immobilization sites. The resulting complex was copolymerized onto the surface of vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles under low concentrations of the monomers. After template removal, core-shell-structured nanoparticles with a thin imprinted polymer layer were produced. The particles demonstrated considerably high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption kinetics and selective binding affinities toward the template BiP. Furthermore, the synthesized MIP nanoparticles successfully isolated cloned protein BiP from protein mixtures and highly enriched BiP from an ER extract containing thousands of kinds of proteins. The enrichment reached 115-fold and the binding capacity was 5.4 μg g(-1), which were higher than those achieved by using traditional MIP microspheres. The advantageous properties of MIP nanoparticles hold promise for further practical applications in biology, such as protein analysis and purification. PMID:24140608

  19. A critical size and period hypothesis to explain natural regulation of salmon abundance and the linkage to climate and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, R. J.; Mahnken, Conrad

    We hypothesise that salmon year class strength is determined in two stages during the first year in the ocean. There is an early natural mortality that is mostly related to predation, which is followed by a physiologically-based mortality. Juvenile salmon that fail to reach a critical size by the end of their first marine summer do not survive the following winter. In this study we describe our initial tests of this critical size and critical period hypothesis using data from ocean surveys of juvenile salmon and from experimental feeding studies on coho. Conservative swept volume abundance estimates for juvenile coho, and possibly chinook, indicate that there is high mortality in fall and winter during their first year in the sea. Studies of otolith weight show that the length and otolith-weight relationship for young coho changes in the early fall of their first ocean year. Studies of growth and associated hormone levels in feeding studies show that slow growing juvenile coho are stunted and deficient in an insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Juvenile coho sampled in September had low IGF-I values, indicative of poor growth. The results of these studies provide evidence for the general hypothesis that growth-related mortality occurs late in the first marine year and may be important in determining the strength of the year class (brood year). The link between total mortality and climate could be operating via the availability of nutrients regulating the food supply and hence competition for food (i.e. bottom-up regulation).

  20. [Responses of Soil and Plant 15N Natural Abundance to Long-term N Addition in an N-Saturated Pinus massoniana Forest in Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-jing; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Jing; Duan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Increasing N deposition in China will possibly cause N saturation of forest ecosystem, further resulting in a series of serious environmental problems. In order to explore the response of forest ecosystem to N deposition in China, and further evaluate and predict the N status of ecosystem, the 15N natural abundance (delta 15N) of soil and plants was measured in a typical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest in southwest China to examine the potential use of delta 15N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) as an effective indicator of N status. Long-term high N addition could significantly increase delta 15N of soil and plants, which was suggested by an on-going N fertilizing experiment with NH4NO3 or NaNO3 for 7 years. Meanwhile, delta 15N of soil and plants under NH, deposition was significantly higher than that under NO- deposition, suggesting different responses of ecosystem to different N-forms of deposition. The "N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) had positive correlations with N deposition, N nitrification, and N leaching in the soil water. Linear correlation between "N enrichment factor and N deposition was found for all Masson pine forests investigated in this and previous studies in China, demonstrating that 15N enrichment factor could be used as an indicator of N status. The NH3 emission control should also be carried out accompanying with NOx emission control in the future, because NH4- deposition had significantly greater impact on the forest ecosystem than NO3- deposition with the same equivalence. PMID:26592030

  1. Carbon-13 natural abundance signatures of long-chain fatty acids to determinate sediment origin: A case study in northeast Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabit, Lionel; Gibbs, Max; Meusburger, Katrin; Toloza, Arsenio; Resch, Christian; Klik, Andreas; Swales, Andrew; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    - Several recently published information from scientific research have highlighted that compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) signatures of fatty acids (FAs) based on the measurement of carbon-13 natural abundance signatures showed great promises to identify sediment origin. The authors have used this innovative isotopic approach to investigate the sources of sediment in a three hectares Austrian sub-watershed (i.e. Mistelbach). Through a previous study using the Cs-137 technique, Mabit et al. (Geoderma, 2009) reported a local maximum sedimentation rate reaching 20 to 50 t/ha/yr in the lowest part of this watershed. However, this study did not identify the sources. Subsequently, the deposited sediment at its outlet (i.e. the sediment mixture) and representative soil samples from the four main agricultural fields - expected to be the source soils - of the site were investigated. The bulk delta carbon-13 of the samples and two long-chain FAs (i.e. C22:0 and C24:0) allowed the best statistical discrimination. Using two different mixing models (i.e. IsoSource and CSSIAR v1.00) and the organic carbon content of the soil sources and sediment mixture, the contribution of each source has been established. Results suggested that the grassed waterway contributed to at least 50% of the sediment deposited at the watershed outlet. This study, that will require further validation, highlights that CSSI and Cs-137 techniques are complementary as fingerprints and tracers for establishing land sediment redistribution and could provide meaningful information for optimized decision-making by land managers.

  2. Models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    Many biopolymers such as proteins, DNA, and RNA have been studied because they have important biomedical roles and may be good targets for therapeutic action in treating diseases. This report describes how plastic models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers were made. Computer files containing sets of triangles were calculated, then used on a stereolithography machine to make the models. Small (2 in.) models were made to test whether the computer calculations were done correctly. Also, files of the type (.stl) required by any ISO 9001 rapid prototyping machine were written onto a CD-ROM for distribution to American companies.

  3. Nonlinearities of biopolymer gels increase the range of force transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a model of biopolymer gels that includes two types of elastic nonlinearities, stiffening under extension and softening (due to buckling) under compression, to predict the elastic anisotropy induced by both external as well as internal (e.g., due to cell contractility) stresses in biopolymer gels. We show how the stretch-induced anisotropy and the strain-stiffening nonlinearity increase both the amplitude and power-law range of transmission of internal, contractile, cellular forces, and relate this to recent experiments.

  4. Nonlinearities of biopolymer gels increase the range of force transmission.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-09-01

    We present a model of biopolymer gels that includes two types of elastic nonlinearities, stiffening under extension and softening (due to buckling) under compression, to predict the elastic anisotropy induced by both external as well as internal (e.g., due to cell contractility) stresses in biopolymer gels. We show how the stretch-induced anisotropy and the strain-stiffening nonlinearity increase both the amplitude and power-law range of transmission of internal, contractile, cellular forces, and relate this to recent experiments. PMID:26465519

  5. Conducting and non-conducting biopolymer composites produced by particle bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this report, we introduce two types of processes for the production of biopolymer composites: one is fabricated by bonding biopolymers with corn protein or wheat protein and the other by bonding starch with a synthetic polymer. These two types of biopolymer composites make use of the strong bon...

  6. Rheology and interfacial tension of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.

    surfactants studied are commonly used amphiphilic biopolymers polyethylene oxide-co-polylactic acid (PEO-PLA) and polyethylene oxide-co-poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PEO-PCL), and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). A significant lowering of the interfacial tension was observed with all these surfactants with the greatest lowering in the presence of CTAB.

  7. Aliphatic and aromatic plant biopolymer dynamics in soil particles isolated from sequential density fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, B.; Filley, T.; Sollins, P.; Lajtha, K.; Swanston, C.; Kleber, M.; Kramer, M.

    2007-12-01

    A recent multi-layer-based soil organic matter-mineral interaction mechanistic model to describe the nature of soil organic matter-mineral surface mechanism for soil organic matter stabilization predicts that proteinaceous and aliphatic materials establish the core of strong binding-interactions upon which other organic matter is layered. A key methodology providing data underpinning this hypothesis is sequential density fractionation where soil is partitioned into particles of increasing density with the assumption that a partial control on organic matter distribution through density series is the thickness of its layering. Four soils of varying mineralogy and texture were investigated for their biopolymer, isotopic, and mineralogical properties. Light fractions (<1.8 g/cm3), although dominanted by organic detritus, did not always contain the highest concentration of lignin and substituted fatty acids from cutin and suberin while heavier fractions, 1.8-2.6 g/cm3, exhibited a progressive decrease in concentration in plant derived biopolymers with density. Extractable lignin phenols exhibited a progressive oxidation state with density. The concentration of biopolymers roughly mirrored the C:N ratio of soil particles which dropped consistently with increasing particle density. Although, in all soils, both lignin phenols and SFA concentration generally decreased with increasing density the ratio SFA/lignin varied with density and depending upon the soil. All soils, except the oxisol, exhibited an increase in SFA with respect to lignin suggesting a selective stabilization of those material with respect to lignin. In the oxisol, which showed little variation in its hematite dominated mineralogy across density, SFA/lignin remained constant, potentially indicating a greater capacity to stabilize lignin in that system. Interestingly, the lignin oxidation state increased with density in the oxisol. Given the variation in soil character, the consistency in these trends it

  8. Xanthomonas biopolymer for use in displacement of oil from partially depleted reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wernau, W.C.

    1982-10-05

    A mutant strain of the genus xanthomonas produces a pyruvatefree biopolymer. This biopolymer and the deacetylated form of this new biopolymer provide mobility control solutions which are especially useful for enhanced oil recovery where high brine applications are involved. The mobility control solutions of the present invention may be made from whole or filtered fermentation broth containing the pyrvuate-free biopolymer or its deacetylated form. Alternatively, the biopolymer or its deacetylated form may be recovered from the broth and the recovered product used to form the desired mobility control solutions.

  9. Development of correlations to predict biopolymer mobility in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hejri, S.; Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper describes the flow and rheological behavior of biopolymer solutions in sandpacks over a wide range of permeability and frontal advance rates. Empirical correlations were developed to estimate polymer mobility in porous media. The correlations are based on porous medium properties, polymer concentration, and rheological parameters for the polymer derived from steady-shear measurements.

  10. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. Production of Degradable Biopolymer Composites by Particle-bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventionally, polymer composites had been manufactured by mixing the component materials in the extruder at high temperature. Agricultural biopolymers are usually mixtures of many types of compounds; when used as raw materials, however, high-temperature process causes unwanted consequences such a...

  12. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  13. Biopolymers produced from gelatin and other sustainable resources using polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated the feasibility of producing biopolymers from the reaction of polyphenolics with gelatin in combination with other proteins (e.g. whey) or with carbohydrates (e.g. chitosan and pectin). These combinations would take advantage of the unique properties o...

  14. USING BIOPOLYMERS TO REMOVE HEAVY METALS FROM SOIL AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy me...

  15. Conformational study of C8 diazocine turn mimics using {sup 3}J{sub CH} coupling constants with {sup 13}C in natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, J.W.; Briand, J.; Burgess, J.L.; Callahan, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    The conformations of two diazocine turn mimics, which were later incorporated into GPIIb/IIIa peptide antagonists, were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The two compounds, methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosylguanidino-propyl)-4-methyl-octahydro-1,4-dazocin-1-yl)acetate (1) and methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosyl-guanidino-propyl)-octahydro-1,5-diazocin-1-yl)acetate (2), differ only in their substituent at the diazocine position 4 nitrogen, yet this substitution results in a marked difference in the affinity of the resulting analogs for the GPIIb/IIIa receptor. It was of interest to determine if the difference observed in the antagonistic potency between these analogs was related to constitutional or, perhaps, conformational differences. The backbone conformations of these two molecules can be determined by measuring vicinal coupling constants along the trimethylene portion of the C8 ring backbone and by measuring interproton NOE intensities between the diazocine methine proton and the protons of the trimethylene group. For compound 1, {sup 3}J{sub HH} values measured from a P.E.COSY spectrum and interproton distances calculated from ROESY buildup curves indicated the presence of a single C8 ring backbone conformation where the trimethylene bridge adopted a staggered conformation and the H{alpha}1 and H{gamma}1 protons of the trimethylene group were 2.2 A from the methine proton. For compound 2, however, partial overlap of the central H{beta}1 and H{beta}2 protons made it impossible to measure {sup 3}J{sub HH} values from the P.E.COSY spectrum. We therefore used a {sup 13}C-filtered TOCSY experiment to measure the {sup 3}J{sub CH} values in both compounds 1 and 2. These heteronuclear vicinal coupling constants measured with {sup 13}C in natural abundance in conjunction with measured interproton NOE intensities indicate that these compounds share a common C8 ring backbone conformation.

  16. Reevaluation of siderophile element abundances and ratios across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary: Implications for the nature of the projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderis, S.; Tagle, R.; Belza, J.; Smit, J.; Montanari, A.; Vanhaecke, F.; Erzinger, J.; Claeys, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    The discovery over 30 years ago at Gubbio (Italy) and Caravaca (Spain) of an enrichment in the concentrations of iridium (Ir) and the other platinum group elements (PGE) by up to four orders of magnitude (Irmax = 0.10-87 ng/g) compared to average continental crustal background levels remains one of the most important discoveries in the Earth sciences. Since then, similar anomalies have been detected in more than 120 Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary sites worldwide. Highly elevated Ir and other siderophile element abundances in roughly chondritic ratios are considered strong indicators for the presence of a meteoritic contribution in impact-related lithologies (melt rocks, impact ejecta material, etc.), delivered when an extraterrestrial object strikes Earth. The presented work adds 113 unpublished PGE analyses of 38 K-Pg sections worldwide to the existing literature. The analytical protocol relied on for this purpose consisted of a combination of a nickel-sulfide fire assay pre-concentration technique and subsequent trace metal determination via inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Through repeated determination of key siderophile elements (i.e., Cr, Co, Ni, and PGE), the importance of sampling, nugget effects, and analytical methodologies applied becomes more apparent. Even more critically, these analytical effects are superimposed by the local syn- and post-depositional conditions that have affected the pristine meteoritic signature of the K-Pg impactor, including potential fractionation during vaporization and condensation, dissimilar PGE carrier phases, terrestrial PGE input, sedimentation rate, reworking, diagenesis, bioturbation, and chemical diffusion. While chondrite-normalized PGE patterns of individual sites appear relatively flat (i.e., chondritic), strong variations in siderophile element content and inter-element ratios exist between K-Pg locations, inter-laboratory measurements, and replicate analyses, hampering a precise

  17. Quantifying remobilization of pre-existing nitrogen from cuttings to new growth of woody plants using 15N at natural abundance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For measurements of nitrogen isotope composition at natural abundance, carry-over of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to new plant growth can cause deviation of measured isotope composition (δ15N) from the δ15Nof newly acquired nitrogen. To account for this problem, a two-step approach was proposed to quantify and correct for remobilized nitrogen from vegetative cuttings of Populus balsamifera L. grown with either nitrate (δ15N = 58.5‰) or ammonium (δ15N = −0.96‰). First, the fraction of carry-over nitrogen remaining in the cutting was estimated by isotope mass balance. Then measured δ15N values were adjusted for the fraction of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to the plant. Results Mean plant δ15N prior to correction was 49‰ and −5.8‰ under nitrate and ammonium, respectively. Plant δ15N was non-linearly correlated to biomass (r2 = 0.331 and 0.249 for nitrate and ammonium, respectively; P < 0.05) where the δ15N of plants with low biomass approached the δ15N of the pre-existing nitrogen. Approximately 50% of cutting nitrogen was not remobilized, irrespective of size. The proportion of carry-over nitrogen in new growth was not different between sources but ranged from less than 1% to 21% and was dependent on plant biomass and, to a lesser degree, the size of the cutting. The δ15N of newly acquired nitrogen averaged 52.7‰ and −6.4‰ for nitrate and ammonium-grown plants, respectively; both lower than their source values, as expected. Since there was a greater difference in δ15N between the carried-over pre-existing and newly assimilated nitrogen where nitrate was the source, the difference between measured δ15N and adjusted δ15N was also greater. There was no significant relationship between biomass and plant δ15N with either ammonium or nitrate after adjusting for carry-over nitrogen. Conclusion Here, we provide evidence of remobilized pre-existing nitrogen influencing δ15N of new growth of P. balsamifera L

  18. Quantitation of metabolic compartmentation in hyperammonemic brain by natural abundance 13C-NMR detection of 13C-15N coupling patterns and isotopic shifts.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, A; Gopher, A

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, the removal of cerebral ammonia by glutamine synthetase (GS) and by reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of an amino donor group, was determined in hyperammonemic rabbit brains. The 15N enrichments of brain metabolite alpha-amino and amide positions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine were determined by the indirect detection of 15N-labeled compounds of the 13C-15N spin coupling patterns of natural abundance 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra of brain extracts were obtained from rabbits infused with 15NH4Cl with or without intraperitoneal infusion of the GS inhibitor, L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, in a reasonable acquisition time period. When 15NH4Cl was infused, [5-15N]glutamine and [2-15N]glutamine concentrations reached 5.2 mumol/100 mg protein and 3.6 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively, which indicates the relatively high activity of reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate in the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The low concentration of [2-15N]glutamate, which is about 30% of that of [2-15N]glutamine obtained in this study, suggests that very little glutamine serves as a precursor of neuronal glutamate. When GS was inhibited by L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, a flux of 15NH4+ via the residual activity of GS was accompanied by an apparent increase of [2-15N]glutamate and [15N]alanine concentrations (2.9 mumol/100 mg protein and 1.8 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively). These findings and those obtained from 13C-13C isotopomer analysis (Lapidot and Gopher, 1994b) suggest that astrocytic 2-oxoglutarate is partially utilized (together with an amino group donor) as a precursor for neuronal glutamate in the hyperammonemic brain when GS is inhibited. This process can partly replace GS activity in metabolizing ammonia in the hyperammonemic rabbit brain. PMID:9057821

  19. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  20. A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junsong; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yunzhi; Yu, Cun; Huan, Yong; Zhao, Xinqing; Zheng, Yanjun; Xu, Huibin; Ren, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-02-10

    The design principles for naturally occurring biological materials have inspired us to develop next-generation engineering materials with remarkable performance. Nacre, commonly referred to as nature’s armor, is renowned for its unusual combination of strength and toughness. Nature’s wisdom in nacre resides in its elaborate structural design and the judicious placement of a unique organic biopolymer with intelligent deformation features. However, up to now, it is still a challenge to transcribe the biopolymer’s deformation attributes into a stronger substitute in the design of new materials. In this study, we propose a new design strategy that employs shape memory alloy to transcribe the ‘‘J-curve’’ mechanical response and uniform molecular/atomic level deformation of the organic biopolymer in the design of high-performance hybrid materials. This design strategy is verified in a TiNi-Ti₃Sn model material system. The model material demonstrates an exceptional combination of mechanical properties that are superior to other high-performance metal-based lamellar composites known to date. Our design strategy creates new opportunities for the development of high-performance bio-inspired materials.

  1. A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Junsong; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yunzhi; Yu, Cun; et al

    2015-02-10

    The design principles for naturally occurring biological materials have inspired us to develop next-generation engineering materials with remarkable performance. Nacre, commonly referred to as nature’s armor, is renowned for its unusual combination of strength and toughness. Nature’s wisdom in nacre resides in its elaborate structural design and the judicious placement of a unique organic biopolymer with intelligent deformation features. However, up to now, it is still a challenge to transcribe the biopolymer’s deformation attributes into a stronger substitute in the design of new materials. In this study, we propose a new design strategy that employs shape memory alloy to transcribemore » the ‘‘J-curve’’ mechanical response and uniform molecular/atomic level deformation of the organic biopolymer in the design of high-performance hybrid materials. This design strategy is verified in a TiNi-Ti₃Sn model material system. The model material demonstrates an exceptional combination of mechanical properties that are superior to other high-performance metal-based lamellar composites known to date. Our design strategy creates new opportunities for the development of high-performance bio-inspired materials.« less

  2. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered. PMID:26497761

  3. Design of biomimetic super-lubricants by hydrogel-biopolymer aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Raymond; Dever, Rachel; Zhu, Yingxi

    2013-03-01

    Inspired by the superb lubricity of natural synovial fluids for moving articular cartilage joints, we investigate a biomimetic artificial lubricant based on a hydrogel-biopolymer mixture with optimized rheological properties at a microscopic level. Specifically, we examine the structure and rheological relationship of stimuli-responsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) hydrogel added with hyaluronic acid (HA) to simulate the complexes of HA with a globule protein, lubricin, which are credited as the two key lubricious constituents in natural synovial fluids. By combined microscopic structural characterization and rheology measurement, we tune the rheological and frictional behaviors of HA solutions by optimizing the content of added micron-sized PNIPAM hydrogel particles to form stable PNIPAM-HA network. In a recent work on using zwitterionic hydrogel particles instead of negatively charged PNIPAM, comparable structure and rheological properties of hydrogel-HA aggregates are observed, which may give insight to design new biocompatible lubricants and lubricious coatings for medical ramification.

  4. Engineered biosealant producing inorganic and organic biopolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has shown its potential in remediation of a wide range of structural damages including concrete cracks. MICCP involves sequential microbiological and chemical reactions, such as urea h...

  5. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  6. Film forming microbial biopolymers for commercial applications--a review.

    PubMed

    Vijayendra, S V N; Shamala, T R

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms synthesize intracellular, structural and extracellular polymers also referred to as biopolymers for their function and survival. These biopolymers play specific roles as energy reserve materials, protective agents, aid in cell functioning, the establishment of symbiosis, osmotic adaptation and support the microbial genera to function, adapt, multiply and survive efficiently under changing environmental conditions. Viscosifying, gelling and film forming properties of these have been exploited for specific significant applications in food and allied industries. Intensive research activities and recent achievements in relevant and important research fields of global interest regarding film forming microbial biopolymers is the subject of this review. Microbial polymers such as pullulan, kefiran, bacterial cellulose (BC), gellan and levan are placed under the category of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and have several other functional properties including film formation, which can be used for various applications in food and allied industries. In addition to EPS, innumerable bacterial genera are found to synthesis carbon energy reserves in their cells known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), microbial polyesters, which can be extruded into films with excellent moisture and oxygen barrier properties. Blow moldable biopolymers like PHA along with polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized chemically in vitro using lactic acid (LA), which is produced by LA bacteria through fermentation, are projected as biodegradable polymers of the future for packaging applications. Designing and creating of new property based on requirements through controlled synthesis can lead to improvement in properties of existing polysaccharides and create novel biopolymers of great commercial interest and value for wider applications. Incorporation of antimicrobials such as bacteriocins or silver and copper nanoparticles can enhance the functionality of polymer films especially in food packaging

  7. Informational biopolymer structure in early living forms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Mclaughlin, P. J.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1972-01-01

    Some studies devoted to the search in various organisms for 'relics' of the biochemical nature of ancient organisms, preserved by the conservative nature of the evolutionary process in all living species, are reviewed. Investigations of five families of informational molecules constituting such 'relics' in very diverse organisms are reported. They include: cytochrome c, ferredoxin, trypsin, transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA), and 5S ribosomal RNA. It is shown that, even from these few informational molecules, some interesting inferences about early living organisms can be drawn.

  8. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  9. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  10. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  11. Mucin biopolymers as broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Oliver; Lieleg, Corinna; Bloom, Jesse; Buck, Christopher B.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is a porous biopolymer matrix that coats all wet epithelia in the human body and serves as the first line of defense against many pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, under certain conditions viruses are able to penetrate this infection barrier, which compromises the protective function of native mucus. Here, we find that isolated porcine gastric mucin polymers, key structural components of native mucus, can protect an underlying cell layer from infection by small viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), or a strain of influenza A virus. Single particle analysis of virus mobility inside the mucin barrier reveals that this shielding effect is in part based on a retardation of virus diffusion inside the biopolymer matrix. Our findings suggest that purified mucins may be used as a broad-range antiviral supplement to personal hygiene products, baby formula or lubricants to support our immune system. PMID:22475261

  12. Removal of selenium and arsenic by animal biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sekine, Shiho; Miura, Noriko; Suyama, Kyozo; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    The animal biopolymers prepared from hen eggshell membrane and broiler chicken feathers, which are byproducts of the poultry-processing industry, were evaluated for the removal of the oxyanions selenium [Se(IV) and Se(VI)] and arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] from aqueous solutions. The biopolymers were found to be effective at removing Se(VI) from solution. Optimal Se(IV) and Se(VI) removal was achieved at pH 2.5-3.5. At an initial Se concentration of 100 mg/L (1.3 mM), the eggshell membrane removed approx 90% Se(VI) from the solution. Arsenic was removed less effectively than Se, but the chemical modification of biopolymer carboxyl groups dramatically enhanced the As(V) sorption capacity. Se(VI) and As(V) sorption isotherms were developed at optimal conditions and sorption equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum uptakes by the Langmuir model were about 37.0 mg/g and 20.7 mg/g of Se(VI) and 24.2 mg/g and 21.7 mg/g of As(V) for eggshell membrane and chicken feathers, respectively. PMID:15621933

  13. Disordered, stretched, and semiflexible biopolymers in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zicong; Joós, Béla

    2009-12-01

    We study the effects of intrinsic sequence-dependent curvature for a two-dimensional semiflexible biopolymer with short-range correlation in intrinsic curvatures. We show exactly that when not subjected to any external force, such a system is equivalent to a system with a well-defined intrinsic curvature and a proper renormalized persistence length. We find the exact expression for the distribution function of the equivalent system. However, we show that such an equivalent system does not always exist for the polymer subjected to an external force. We find that under an external force, the effect of sequence disorder depends upon the averaging order, the degree of disorder, and the experimental conditions, such as the boundary conditions. Furthermore, a short to moderate length biopolymer may be much softer or has a smaller apparent persistent length than what would be expected from the "equivalent system." Moreover, under a strong stretching force and for a long biopolymer, the sequence disorder is immaterial for elasticity. Finally, the effect of sequence disorder may depend upon the quantity considered. PMID:20365194

  14. Electrical, structural, thermal and electrochemical properties of corn starch-based biopolymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chiam-Wen; Ramesh, S

    2015-06-25

    Biopolymer electrolytes containing corn starch, lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) and ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) are prepared by solution casting technique. Temperature dependence-ionic conductivity studies reveal Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) relationship which is associated with free volume theory. Ionic liquid-based biopolymer electrolytes show lower glass transition temperature (Tg) than ionic liquid-free biopolymer electrolyte. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies demonstrate higher amorphous region of ionic liquid-added biopolymer electrolytes. In addition, the potential stability window of the biopolymer electrolyte becomes wider and stable up to 2.9V. Conclusively, the fabricated electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) shows improved electrochemical performance upon addition of ionic liquid into the biopolymer electrolyte. The specific capacitance of EDLC based on ionic liquid-added polymer electrolyte is relatively higher than that of ionic liquid-free polymer electrolyte as depicted in cyclic voltammogram. PMID:25839815

  15. Chitosan: a propitious biopolymer for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Duttagupta, Dibyangana S; Jadhav, Varsha M; Kadam, Vilasrao J

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have always been interested in the use of natural polymers for drug delivery. Chitosan, being a natural cationic polysaccharide has received a great deal of attention in the past few years. It is obtained by deacetylation of chitin and is regarded as the second most ubiquitous polymer subsequent to cellulose on earth. Unlike other natural polymers, the cationic charge possessed by chitosan is accountable for imparting interesting physical and chemical properties. Chitosan has been widely exploited for its mucoadhesive character, permeation enhancing properties and controlled release of drugs. Moreover it's non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable properties make it a good candidate for novel drug delivery system. This review provides an insight on various chitosan based formulations for drug delivery. Some of the current applications of chitosan in areas like ophthalmic, nasal, buccal, sublingual, gastro-retentive, pulmonary, transdermal, colon-specific and vaginal drug delivery have been discussed. In addition, active targeting of drugs to tumor cells using chitosan has been described. Lastly a brief section covering the safety aspects of chitosan has also been reviewed. PMID:25761010

  16. Fabrication and characterization of an inkjet-printed DNA biopolymer-based UV photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, J. P.; Aga, Roberto S.; Heckman, Emily M.; Bartsch, Carrie M.

    2015-10-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) photodetector utilizing an inkjet printable , UV photoconducting biopolymer was fabricated and the performance of the photodetector was characterized for varying thickness layers of the biopolymer. The biopolymer was formed of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the Clevios P formulation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTMA); this was then combined with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) to form the printable, UV photoconducting biopolymer. Using a 260-nm source, the highest measured responsivity of the photodetectors is 1.2 mA/W at 20 V bias.

  17. Abundance, Natural Infection with Trypanosomes, and Food Source of an Endemic Species of Triatomine, Panstrongylus howardi (Neiva 1911), on the Ecuadorian Central Coast

    PubMed Central

    Villacís, Anita G.; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Lascano, Mauricio S.; Yumiseva, César A.; Baus, Esteban G.; Grijalva, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    The elimination of domestic triatomines is the foundation of Chagas disease control. Regional initiatives are eliminating introduced triatomine species. In this scenario, endemic triatomines can occupy the ecological niches left open and become a threat to long-term Chagas disease control efforts. This study determined the abundance, colonization, and Trypanosoma cruzi infection rate of the endemic Panstrongylus howardi in 10 rural communities located in Ecuador's Manabí Province. In total, 518 individuals of P. howardi were collected. Infestation indices of 1.4% and 6.6% were found in the domestic and peridomestic environments, respectively. We determined a T. cruzi infection rate of 53.2% (N = 47) in this species. P. howardi has a high capacity to adapt to different habitats, especially in the peridomicile. This implies a considerable risk of transmission because of the frequency of intradomicile invasion. Therefore, this species needs to be taken into account in Chagas control and surveillance efforts in the region. PMID:25385867

  18. Abundance, natural infection with trypanosomes, and food source of an endemic species of triatomine, Panstrongylus howardi (Neiva 1911), on the Ecuadorian Central Coast.

    PubMed

    Villacís, Anita G; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Lascano, Mauricio S; Yumiseva, César A; Baus, Esteban G; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-01-01

    The elimination of domestic triatomines is the foundation of Chagas disease control. Regional initiatives are eliminating introduced triatomine species. In this scenario, endemic triatomines can occupy the ecological niches left open and become a threat to long-term Chagas disease control efforts. This study determined the abundance, colonization, and Trypanosoma cruzi infection rate of the endemic Panstrongylus howardi in 10 rural communities located in Ecuador's Manabí Province. In total, 518 individuals of P. howardi were collected. Infestation indices of 1.4% and 6.6% were found in the domestic and peridomestic environments, respectively. We determined a T. cruzi infection rate of 53.2% (N = 47) in this species. P. howardi has a high capacity to adapt to different habitats, especially in the peridomicile. This implies a considerable risk of transmission because of the frequency of intradomicile invasion. Therefore, this species needs to be taken into account in Chagas control and surveillance efforts in the region. PMID:25385867

  19. Introduction of soft X-ray spectromicroscopy as an advanced technique for plant biopolymers research.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed. PMID:25811457

  20. Introduction of Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy as an Advanced Technique for Plant Biopolymers Research

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R.; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M.; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed. PMID:25811457

  1. Biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Cha, Dong Su; Chinnan, Manjeet S

    2004-01-01

    The term antimicrobialpackaging encompasses any packaging technique(s) used to control microbial growth in a food product. These include packaging materials and edible films and coatings that contain antimicrobial agents and also techniques that modify the atmosphere within the package. In recent years, antimicrobial packaging has attracted much attention from the food industry because of the increase in consumer demand for minimally processed, preservative-free products. Reflecting this demand, the preservative agents must be applied to packaging in such away that only low levels of preservatives come into contact with the food. The film or coating technique is considered to be more effective, although more complicated to apply. New antimicrobial packaging materials are continually being developed. Many of them exploit natural agents to control common food-borne microorganisms. Current trends suggest that, in due course, packaging will generally incorporate antimicrobial agents, and the sealing systems will continue to improve. The focus of packaging in the past has been on the appearance, size, and integrity of the package. A greater emphasis on safety features associated with the addition of antimicrobial agents is perhaps the next area for development in packaging technology. PMID:15462127

  2. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  3. Amplified spontaneous emission in the spiropyran-biopolymer based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Sznitko, Lech; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Miniewicz, Andrzej; Essaidi, Zacaria; Kajzar, Francois; Sahraoui, Bouchta

    2009-06-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) phenomenon in the 6-nitro-1',3',3'-trimethylspiro[2H-1-benzopyran-2,2'-indolin] organic dye dispersed in a solid matrix has been observed. The biopolymer system deoxyribonucleic acid blended with cationic surfactant molecule cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride served as a matrix. ASE appeared under sample excitation by UV light pulses (λ =355 nm) coming from nanosecond or picosecond neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet lasers and has been reinforced with green (λ =532 nm) light excitation followed UV light pulse. The ASE characteristics in function of different excitation pulse energies as well as signal gain were measured.

  4. Mechanically Induced Helix-Coil Transition in Biopolymer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Courty, Sebastien; Gornall, Joanne L.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2006-01-01

    The quasi-equilibrium evolution of the helical fraction occurring in a biopolymer network (gelatin gel) under an applied stress has been investigated by observing modulation in its optical activity. Its variation with the imposed chain extension is distinctly nonmonotonic and corresponds to the transition of initially coiled strands to induced left-handed helices. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of helices induced on chain extension. This new effect of mechanically stimulated helix-coil transition has been studied further as a function of the elastic properties of the polymer network: crosslink density and network aging. PMID:16239334

  5. Peptide-based Biopolymers in Biomedicine and Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nunalee, Michelle L.; Lim, Dong Woo; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2008-01-01

    Peptides are emerging as a new class of biomaterials due to their unique chemical, physical, and biological properties. The development of peptide-based biomaterials is driven by the convergence of protein engineering and macromolecular self-assembly. This review covers the basic principles, applications, and prospects of peptide-based biomaterials. We focus on both chemically synthesized and genetically encoded peptides, including poly-amino acids, elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polymers and other biopolymers based on repetitive peptide motifs. Applications of these engineered biomolecules in protein purification, controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosurface engineering are discussed. PMID:19122836

  6. The complexity of the overlap method for sequencing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Gallant, J K

    1983-03-01

    The problem of trying to reconstruct the sequence of a biopolymer by using overlapping fragments obtained from cleaving agents is shown to be computationally intractable. This strongly suggests that any computer program for overlap sequencing, even though it may work well for a limited number of inputs, will not work sufficiently for all inputs. However, if the problem is restricted so that certain crucial fragments are known, called prime strings, a sequence can be found efficiently in all cases. Graph theory techniques for doing so can also be used to count the number of sequences consistent with the fragment data to determine whether a unique sequence has been obtained. PMID:6876820

  7. Enhanced brightness from all solution processable biopolymer LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Namboothiry, M. A. G.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Biopolymer light emitting diodes were fabricated by using all solution processable polymers incorporating biomaterials such as deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex as an electron blocking layer. Light emission is from a blend of fluorene based copolymers. The devices with electron blocking layer exhibited higher brightness and luminous efficiency. The increased luminance of the multilayer polymer LED is attributed to the contribution from DNA:CTMA as electron blocking layer and PFN, a derivative of polyfluorene, as electron injection layer. Our results show four fold increase in luminance values when DNA is used as electron blocking layer.

  8. Scaling Equations for a Biopolymer in Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Erik; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Horkay, Ferenc

    2007-12-01

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of monovalent and divalent cations on the thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions is an incompletely solved problem. In physiological conditions, combinations of these ions affect structure formation in biopolymer systems. Dynamic light scattering measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient D and the osmotic compressibility of semidilute hyaluronan solutions containing different ratios of sodium and calcium ions are compared with simple polyelectrolyte models. Scaling relationships are proposed in terms of polymer concentration and ionic strength J of the added salt. Differences in the effects of sodium and calcium ions are found to be expressed only through J.

  9. Evaluation of relative isotopic abundance measurements in a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for elemental composition determination of natural products in traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Huo, Jia-Li; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Li, Na; Fang, Dong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundance (RIA) measurement errors of a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instrument incorporating analog-to-digital converter detectors were systemically evaluated by stochastically collecting about 200 data in positive ion mass spectrometry (MS) mode. Errors varied with peak intensities at definite spectral acquisition rates but were very close, even if peak intensities changed sharply at different spectral acquisition rates with the same concentration. Intensity thresholds were systematically defined at 1 Hz of spectral acquisition rates. RIA measurement errors were also evaluated using peak area. It seemed that peak area was better adapted for the high-intensity ions while peak intensity was suited for very low-intensity ions. Several known compounds were selected for RIA measurements for product ions in tandem mass spectropmetry (MS/MS) mode. An extract of a representative traditional Chinese medicinal, Paederia scandens was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-QToF-MS/MS. The unique elemental compositions of some compounds could not be identified even with exact masses and MS/MS spectra of measured and reference compounds. RIA errors, especially of (M+2)M(-1), provided vital information for determining the elemental composition. PMID:24261081

  10. Micro-heterogeneity of Cellulosic Fiber Biopolymer Prepared from Corn Hulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Z-trim is a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim biopolymer were investigated by monitoring the thermally driven displacements of well-dispersed micro-spheres via video fluorescence microscopy named multiple-particle track...

  11. Micro-Heterogeneity of Cellulosic Fiber Biopolymer Prepared from Corn Hulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Z-trim is a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim biopolymer were investigated by monitoring the thermally driven displacements of well-dispersed micro-spheres via video fluorescence microscopy named multiple-particle track...

  12. Diterpenoid Biopolymers: New Directions for Renewable Materials Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hillwig, Matthew L.; Mann, Francis M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    Most types of ambers are naturally occurring, relatively hard, durable resinite polymers derived from the exudates of trees. This resource has been coveted for thousands of years due to its numerous useful properties in industrial processes, beauty, and purported medicinal properties. Labdane diterpenoid based ambers represent the most abundant and important resinites on earth. These resinites are a dwindling, non-renewable natural resource, so a new source of such materials needs to be established. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and biochemical engineering are rapidly accelerating the rate of identifying and assigning function to genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, as well as producing industrial-scale quantities of desired small-molecules in bacteria and yeast. This has provided new tools for engineering metabolic pathways capable of producing diterpenoid monomers that will enable the production of custom-tailored resinite-like polymers. Furthermore, this biosynthetic toolbox is continuously expanding, providing new possibilities for renewing dwindling stocks of naturally occurring resinite materials and engineering new materials for future applications. PMID:20857504

  13. Diterpenoid biopolymers: new directions for renewable materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Mann, Francis M; Peters, Reuben J

    2011-02-01

    Most types of ambers are naturally occurring, relatively hard, durable resinite polymers derived from the exudates of trees. This resource has been coveted for thousands of years due to its numerous useful properties in industrial processes, beauty, and purported medicinal properties. Labdane diterpenoid-based ambers represent the most abundant and important resinites on earth. These resinites are a dwindling nonrenewable natural resource, so a new source of such materials needs to be established. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and biochemical engineering are rapidly accelerating the rate of identifying and assigning function to genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, as well as producing industrial-scale quantities of desired small-molecules in bacteria and yeast. This has provided new tools for engineering metabolic pathways capable of producing diterpenoid monomers that will enable the production of custom-tailored resinite-like polymers. Furthermore, this biosynthetic toolbox is continuously expanding, providing new possibilities for renewing dwindling stocks of naturally occurring resinite materials and engineering new materials for future applications. PMID:20857504

  14. Biopolymer nanoparticles from heat-treated electrostatic protein-polysaccharide complexes: factors affecting particle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owen Griffith; McClements, David Julian

    2010-03-01

    Biopolymer nanoparticles can be formed by heating globular protein-ionic polysaccharide electrostatic complexes above the thermal denaturation temperature of the protein. This study examined how the size and concentration of biopolymer particles formed by heating beta-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes could be manipulated by controlling preparation conditions: pH, ionic strength, protein concentration, holding time, and holding temperature. Biopolymer particle size and concentration increased with increasing holding time (0 to 30 min), decreasing holding temperature (90 to 70 degrees C), increasing protein concentration (0 to 2 wt/wt%), increasing pH (4.5 to 5), and increasing salt concentration (0 to 50 mol/kg). The influence of these factors on biopolymer particle size was attributed to their impact on protein-polysaccharide interactions, and on the kinetics of nucleation and particle growth. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate the rational design of biopolymer particles with specific physicochemical and functional attributes. PMID:20492252

  15. Simulating microbiologically influenced corrosion by depositing extracellular biopolymers on mild steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, F.L.; Lewandowski, Z.; Funk, T.

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical properties of corroding mild steel (MS) surfaces were measured in real time using three closely spaced microelectrodes. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and ion currents were mapped simultaneously and noninvasively above a MS coupon partially coated with biopolymer gels. Calcium alginate (Ca-Alg [an extracellular biopolymer containing carboxylate functional groups]) and agarose (one without carboxylate functional groups) were tested. Corrosion occurred at approximately the same rate under the two biopolymer spots on the same coupon. Corrosion rates under these biopolymers were {approx} 4 mpy in a weak saline solution. Results suggested corrosion was not influenced by chemical properties of the biopolymer but possibly was controlled by oxygen reduction in noncoated regions of the coupon (i.e., a differential aeration cell).

  16. P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Dong-Hwa; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the P and S wave responses and permeability reduction during bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. Column experiments with fine sands, where the model bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides were stimulated to produce insoluble biopolymer, were conducted while monitoring changes in permeability and P and S wave responses. The bacterial biopolymer reduced the permeability by more than 1 order of magnitude, occupying ~10% pore volume after 38 days of growth. This substantial reduction was attributed to the bacterial biopolymer with complex internal structures accumulated at pore throats. S wave velocity (VS) increased by more than ~50% during biopolymer accumulation; this indicated that the bacterial biopolymer caused a certain level of stiffening effect on shear modulus of the unconsolidated sediment matrix at low confining stress conditions. Whereas replacing pore water by insoluble biopolymer was observed to cause minimal changes in P wave velocity (VP) due to the low elastic moduli of insoluble biopolymer. The spectral ratio analyses revealed that the biopolymer formation caused a ~50-80% increase in P wave attenuation (1/QP) at the both ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges, at hundreds of kHz and tens of kHz, respectively, and a ~50-60% increase in S wave attenuation (1/QS) in the frequency band of several kHz. Our results reveal that in situ biopolymer formation and the resulting permeability reduction can be effectively monitored by using P and S wave attenuation in the ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges. This suggests that field monitoring using seismic logging techniques, including time-lapse dipole sonic logging, may be possible.

  17. Inorganic polyphosphate in the microbial world. Emerging roles for a multifaceted biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) are linear polymers of tens to hundreds orthophosphate residues linked by phosphoanhydride bonds. These fairly abundant biopolymers occur in all extant forms of life, from prokaryotes to mammals, and could have played a relevant role in prebiotic evolution. Since the first identification of polyP deposits as metachromatic or volutin granules in yeasts in the nineteenth century, an increasing number of varied physiological functions have been reported. Due to their "high energy" bonds analogous to those in ATP and their properties as polyanions, polyP serve as microbial phosphagens for a variety of biochemical reactions, as a buffer against alkalis, as a storage of Ca(2+) and as a metal-chelating agent. In addition, recent studies have revealed polyP importance in signaling and regulatory processes, cell viability and proliferation, pathogen virulence, as a structural component and chemical chaperone, and as modulator of microbial stress response. This review summarizes the current status of knowledge and future perspectives of polyP functions and their related enzymes in the microbial world. PMID:26748804

  18. Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Johansson, Erik; Wågberg, Lars; Pettersson, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations. PMID:22924973

  19. Biopolymer solution viscosity stabilization-polymer degradation and antioxidant use

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, S.L.

    1983-12-01

    Dilute solutions of polymers used to provide mobility control for EOR often lose viscosity, especially at higher temperatures. This loss of viscosity with time brings into question the feasibility of using polymers as mobility control agents. A literature study of the many possible reaction mechanisms indicated that oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions involving free radicals probably caused polymer degradation and concomitant viscosity loss. A preliminary search for antioxidants known to retard free-radical reactions located several types and positive synergistic formulations that significantly retarded biopolymer solution viscosity loss during accelerated tests at high temperature. The most effective type formulation found contained (1) a radical transfer agent; (2) a sacrificial, easily oxidizable alcohol; (3) a compatible oxygen scavenger; and (4) sufficient brine concentration. Samples prepared with this technology have not lost viscosity after 1-year storage at 207/sup 0/F (97/sup 0/C). A high-surface-area effect (so-called ''wall effect''), known to retard radical propagation, was also found to operate in the presence of sandpacks; this should be beneficial in porous media. The variables and beneficial antioxidant formulations identified in this study allow tentative conclusions and recommendations regarding biopolymer mixing and handling procedures prior to injection.

  20. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  1. Nano-Fibrous Biopolymer Hydrogels via Biological Conjugation for Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huinan; Xing, Xiaodong; Jia, Yang; Mao, Jiahui; Zhang, Ziwei; Tan, Huaping

    2016-06-01

    Nanostructured biopolymer hydrogels have great potential in the field of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. In this work, a nano-fibrous (NF) biopolymer hydrogel was developed for cell growth factors (GFs) delivery and in vitro osteogenesis. The nano-fibrous hydrogel was produced via biological conjugation of streptavidin functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-Streptavidin) and biotin terminated star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-Biotin). In the present work, in vitro gelation, mechanical properties, degradation and equilibrium swelling of the NF hydrogel were examined. The potential application of this NF gel scaffold in bone tissue engineering was confirmed by encapsulation behavior of osteoblasts. Osteoblasts seeded directly in NF gel scaffold containing cell growth factor, e.g. bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), was to mimic the in vivo microenvironment in which cells interface biomaterials and interact with BMP-2. In combination with BMP-2, the NF hydrogel exhibited beneficial effects on osteoblast activity and differentiation, which suggested a promising future for local treatment of pathologies involving bone loss. PMID:27427597

  2. Effect of organic matter on estuarine flocculation: a laboratory study using montmorillonite, humic acid, xanthan gum, guar gum and natural estuarine flocs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Riverine particles undergo a rapid transformation when they reach estuaries. The rapid succession of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical regimes forces the particles to flocculate, settle and enter the sediment pool. The rates and magnitudes of flocculation depend on the nature of the particles which are primarily affected by the types and quantities of organic matter (OM). Meanwhile, the OM characteristics vary widely between environments, as well as within a single environment due to seasonal climate and land use variability. We investigated the effect of the OM types and quantities through laboratory experiments using natural estuarine particles from the Mississippi Sound and Atchafalaya Bay as well as model mixtures of montmorillonite and organic molecules (i.e., biopolymers (guar/xanthan gums) and humic acid). Results Biopolymers promote flocculation but the magnitude depends on the types and quantities. Nonionic guar gum yields much larger flocs than anionic xanthan gum, while both of them exhibit a nonlinear behavior in which the flocculation is the most pronounced at the intermediate OM loading. Moreover, the effect of guar gum is independent of salinity whereas the effect of xanthan gum is pronounced at higher salinity. Meanwhile, humic acid does not affect flocculation at all salinity values tested in this study. These results are echoed in the laboratory manipulation of the natural estuarine particles. Flocculation of the humic acid-rich Mississippi Sound particles is unaffected by the OM, whereas that of biopolymer-rich Atchafalaya Bay particles is enhanced by the OM. Conclusions Flocculation is positively influenced by the presence of biopolymers that are produced as the result of marine primary production. Meanwhile, humic acid, which is abundant in the rivers that drain the agricultural soils of Southeastern United States, has little influence on flocculation. Thus, it is expected that humic acid-poor riverine particles (e.g., Mississippi

  3. Distributions and Transformations of Natural Abundance 14C and 13C in Dissolved and Particulate Lipids in a Major Temperate Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Canuel, E. A.; McIntosh, H.; Barrett, A.; Ferer, E.; Hossler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Limited previous studies have shown major differences in the natural 14C and 13C isotopic signatures and radiocarbon ages of different biochemical classes (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipid, etc.) in river, estuarine and marine dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively). Of particular note are the much greater radiocarbon ages of lipophilic materials than other compound classes. Possible explanations for these findings include greater-than-expected inputs of fossil and highly aged lipid-containing organic matter to rivers and estuaries, extended sorptive-protection of lipophilic materials from degradation and/or lower overall reactivities of lipids vs. other major biochemical classes. We measured the Delta 14C and del 13C signatures and 14C ages of lipid classes in DOM and POM in a major temperate estuary, Delaware Bay (USA) over two years. Changes in DOM were also followed during large volume dark and light incubations to assess the microbial and photochemical reactivity and processing of DOM and lipids. Neutral lipids in DOM were among the most highly aged (> 30,000 yrs BP) of any materials measured in natural waters to date, and were significantly older than co-occurring polar lipids (~4,000-5,000 yrs BP). In general, DOM lipid ages were significantly greater than POM lipid ages across the river-estuary transect, arguing against sorptive protection as the major factor explaining greater ages of lipid than those of other compound classes. Both dark and light incubations of DOM resulted in losses of very highly aged material (30-50,000 y BP), with the remnant exported lipids being correspondingly younger. The microbial and photochemical alterations were most pronounced for lipids from freshwater reaches of the system (i.e., the Delaware River). These findings suggest that a) dissolved vs. particulate lipids have fundamentally different sources and/or physico-chemical partitioning, b) different lipid classes (e.g., neutral vs. polar

  4. Assessment of marine-derived nutrients in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, using natural abundance of the stable isotopes of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kline, Thomas C.; Woody, Carol Ann; Bishop, Mary Anne; Powers, Sean P.; Knudsen, E. Eric

    2007-01-01

    We performed nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon stable isotope analysis (SIA) on maturing and juvenile anadromous sockeye and coho salmon, and periphyton in two Copper River delta watersheds of Alaska to trace salmonderived nutrients during 2003–2004. Maturing salmon were isotopically enriched relative to alternate freshwater N, S, and C sources as expected, with differences consistent with species trophic level differences, and minor system, sex, and year-to-year differences, enabling use of SIA to trace these salmon-derived nutrients. Periphyton naturally colonized, incubated, and collected using Wildco Periphtyon Samplers in and near spawning sites was 34S- and 15N-enriched, as expected, and at all freshwater sites was 13C-depleted. At nonspawning and coho-only sites, periphyton 34S and 15N was generally low. However, 34S was low enough at some sites to be suggestive of sulfate reduction, complicating the use of S isotopes. Juvenile salmon SIA ranged in values consistent with using production derived from re-mineralization as well as direct utilization, but only by a minority fraction of coho salmon. Dependency on salmon-derived nutrients ranged from relatively high to relatively low, suggesting a space-limited system. No one particular isotope was found to be superior for determining the relative importance of salmon-derived nutrients.

  5. Natural 13C abundance reveals trophic status of fungi and host-origin of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi in mixed forests

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Peter; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Taylor, Andrew F. S.; Fransson, Petra M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fungi play crucial roles in the biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems, most notably as saprophytes decomposing organic matter and as mycorrhizal fungi enhancing plant nutrient uptake. However, a recurrent problem in fungal ecology is to establish the trophic status of species in the field. Our interpretations and conclusions are too often based on extrapolations from laboratory microcosm experiments or on anecdotal field evidence. Here, we used natural variations in stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) as an approach to distinguish between fungal decomposers and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungal species in the rich sporocarp flora (our sample contains 135 species) of temperate forests. We also demonstrated that host-specific mycorrhizal fungi that receive C from overstorey or understorey tree species differ in their δ13C. The many promiscuous mycorrhizal fungi, associated with and connecting several tree hosts, were calculated to receive 57–100% of their C from overstorey trees. Thus, overstorey trees also support, partly or wholly, the nutrient-absorbing mycelia of their alleged competitors, the understorey trees. PMID:10411910

  6. Dynamics of Biopolymer Turnover in Soil Physical Fractions Following Land-Cover yChange in a Subtropical Savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Gamblin, D.; Wang, Y.; Liao, J.; Boutton, T.; Jastrow, J.

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the apportionment of organic carbon and nitrogen among soil physical yfractions following land-cover shifts are of critical importance to the debate surrounding ythe capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to store or release greenhouse gases. For example, ythe difference between the mean residence times (MRTs) of light particulate organic ymatter (POM) vs. silts and clays is typically quite large, with silt and clay associated yorganic matter having the longest MRTs and the greatest likelihood to contribute to long yterm carbon storage. A few studies in agricultural and forest systems have demonstrated ythat biopolymer chemistry also varies along physical, as well as density, fractionation ygradients. We quantified changes in biopolymer (lignin, suberin and cutin, and yhydrolysable amino acids) chemistry of size and density fractionated soil from the Rio yGrande Plains of Texas where C4 grasslands (d13C = -14 %) have undergone succession yto subtropical thorn woodland dominated by C3 trees/shrubs (d13C = -27 %) over the ypast 150 years. This natural isotopic distinction was used to determine MRTs of free ylight organic matter (density less than 1.0 g/cc), macroaggregate (greater than 250 um), ymicroaggregate (53-250 um) and silt+clay (less than 53 um) fractions (see Liao et al., ythis session) which were then related to their specific biopolymer chemistries. Our yresults illustrate that lignin and aliphatic biopolymers (as measured by hydroxyl fatty yacids) are apportioned differently among size/density fractions and along the successional ychronosequence. Lignin is incorporated into all soil fractions soon after woody yencroachment, whereas aliphatic components are slow to be incorporated in the silt and yclay fractions. The lignin components that do become associated with silts and clays are, yin general, highly oxidized. Differences in foliar chemistry among the plant sources yindicate selective movement of leaf cutins into POM, macro- and microaggregate

  7. Proton-detected 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H-1H RFDR mixing on a natural abundant sample under ultrafast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we have demonstrated a proton detection-based approach on a natural abundant powdered L-Histidine HCl-H2O sample at ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) to accomplish 14N/14N correlation from a 3D 14N/14N/1H isotropic shift correlation experiment mediated through 1H finite-pulse radio frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR). Herein the heteronuclear magnetization transfer between 14N and 1H has been achieved by HMQC experiment, whereas 14N/14N correlation is attained through enhanced 1H-1H spin diffusion process due to 1H-1H dipolar recoupling during the RFDR mixing. While the use of ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) provides sensitivity enhancement through increased 1H transverse relaxation time (T2), the use of micro-coil probe which can withstand strong 14N radio frequency (RF) fields further improves the sensitivity per unit sample volume.

  8. 13C Natural Abundance of Serum Retinol Is a Novel Biomarker for Evaluating Provitamin A Carotenoid-Biofortified Maize Consumption in Male Mongolian Gerbils123

    PubMed Central

    Pungarcher, India; Mourao, Luciana; Davis, Christopher R; Simon, Philipp; Pixley, Kevin V; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crops such as maize, sorghum, and millet are being biofortified with provitamin A carotenoids to ensure adequate vitamin A (VA) intakes. VA assessment can be challenging because serum retinol concentrations are homeostatically controlled and more sensitive techniques are resource-intensive. Objectives: We investigated changes in serum retinol relative differences of isotope amount ratios of 13C/12C (δ13C) caused by natural 13C fractionation in C3 compared with C4 plants as a biomarker to detect provitamin A efficacy from biofortified (orange) maize and high-carotene carrots. Methods: The design was a 2 × 2 × 2 maize (orange compared with white) by carrot (orange compared with white) by a VA fortificant (VA+ compared with VA−) in weanling male Mongolian gerbils (n = 55), which included a 14-d VA depletion period and a 62-d treatment period (1 baseline and 8 treatment groups; n = 5−7/group). Liver VA and serum retinol were quantified, purified by HPLC, and analyzed by GC combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry for 13C. Results: Treatments affected liver VA concentrations (0.048 ± 0.039 to 0.79 ± 0.24 μmol/g; P < 0.0001) but not overall serum retinol concentrations (1.38 ± 0.22 μmol/L). Serum retinol and liver VA δ13C were significantly correlated (R2 = 0.92; P < 0.0001). Serum retinol δ13C differentiated control groups that consumed white maize and white carrots (−27.1 ± 1.2 δ13C‰) from treated groups that consumed orange maize and white carrots (−21.6 ± 1.4 δ13C‰ P < 0.0001) and white maize and orange carrots (−30.6 ± 0.7 δ13C‰ P < 0.0001). A prediction model demonstrated the relative contribution of orange maize to total dietary VA for groups that consumed VA from mixed sources. Conclusions: Provitamin A efficacy and quantitative estimation of the relative contribution to dietary VA were demonstrated with the use of serum retinol δ13C. This method could be used for maize efficacy or effectiveness studies and with

  9. Human and climate impact on ¹⁵N natural abundance of plants and soils in high-mountain ecosystems: a short review and two examples from the Eastern Pamirs and Mt. Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bimüller, Carolin; Hemp, Andreas; Samimi, Cyrus; Broesike, Christina; Hörold, Claudia; Zech, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    Population pressure increasingly endangers high-mountain ecosystems such as the pastures in the Eastern Pamirs and the mountain forests on Mt. Kilimanjaro. At the same time, these ecosystems constitute the economic basis for millions of people living there. In our study, we, therefore, aimed at characterising the land-use effects on soil degradation and N-cycling by determining the natural abundance of (15)N. A short review displays that δ(15)N of plant-soil systems may often serve as an integrated indicator of N-cycles with more positive δ(15)N values pointing towards N-losses. Results for the high-mountain pastures in the Eastern Pamirs show that intensively grazed pastures are significantly enriched in (15)N compared to the less-exploited pastures by 3.5 ‰, on average. This can be attributed to soil organic matter degradation, volatile nitrogen losses, nitrogen leaching and a general opening of the N-cycle. Similarly, the intensively degraded savanna soils, the cultivated soils and the soils under disturbed forests on the foothill of Mt. Kilimanjaro reveal very positive δ(15)N values around 6.5 ‰. In contrast, the undisturbed forest soils in the montane zone are more depleted in (15)N, indicating that here the N-cycle is relatively closed. However, significantly higher δ(15)N values characterise the upper montane forest zone at the transition to the subalpine zone. We suggest that this reflects N-losses by the recently monitored and climate change and antropogenically induced increasing fire frequency pushing the upper montane rainforest boundary rapidly downhill. Overall, we conclude that the analysis of the (15)N natural abundance in high-mountain ecosystems is a purposeful tool for detecting land-use- or climate change-induced soil degradation and N-cycle opening. PMID:21745030

  10. Sulfated biopolymers for use in recovering petroleum from a subterranean formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, T.N.

    1982-03-09

    Disclosed is a novel sulfated biopolymer, a method for synthesizing the sulfated biopolymer and an oil recovery method employing an aqueous fluid containing the material. The sulfated biopolymer is made by reacting polysaccharides with sulfuric acid in the presence of an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature of from 350 to 750 F, in order to avoid degradation of the polymer by the sulfuric acid. The polymer produces a viscous solution which is less prone to increasing viscosities as shear rate is decreased, which makes it especially suitable for use as a viscosifying polymer in a polymer flooding enhanced oil recovery process.

  11. Biopolymer immobilization during the crystalline growth of layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Fabrice; Gachon, Julien; Besse, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Alginic acid, a biopolymer produced by brown seaweed, is incorporated between the sheets of a layered double hydroxide (LDH) via direct coprecipitation. The growth of the inorganic crystalline seeds over the polymer gives rise to a lamellar structure. The obtained nanocomposite presents a basal spacing in agreement with the ideal picture of the polymer lying perpendicularly to the inorganic sheets. A study using FTIR and 13C CP-MAS spectroscopies suggests that the interaction between the organic guest and the inorganic framework is weak. However, the polymer has a stabilizing effect in temperature, since ZnO is observed at 350°C, whereas it appears at 200°C for the chloride LDH pristine material.

  12. Biopolymers Confined in Surface-Modified Silicon Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pfohl, T.; Yasa, M.; Safinya, C. R.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Wen, Z.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed surface modification techniques for control of wettability and surface charge in lithographically fabricated Si microfluidic channels. Surface microstructures (patterns) with contrasting wetting properties were created using a combination of microcontact printing and polyelectrolyte adsorption. The selective control of the surface property enabled us to devise various techniques for loading and processing biomaterials in the channels. Using fluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we studied the structure of biopolymers including DNA, F-Actin and microtubules confined in the surface-modified microchannels. The polymers were observed to align linearly along the channels, which suggests that the channel arrays can be used as effective substrates for aligning filamentous proteins for structural characterization by x-ray diffraction. (Work supported by NSF-DMR-9972246, NSF-DMR-0076357, ONR-N00014-00-1-0214, UC-Biotech 99-14, and CULAR 99-216)

  13. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Penev, Evgeni S.; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces. PMID:27503635

  14. LassoProt: server to analyze biopolymers with lassos

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Niemyska, Wanda; Pasznik, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2016-01-01

    The LassoProt server, http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, enables analysis of biopolymers with entangled configurations called lassos. The server offers various ways of visualizing lasso configurations, as well as their time trajectories, with all the results and plots downloadable. Broad spectrum of applications makes LassoProt a useful tool for biologists, biophysicists, chemists, polymer physicists and mathematicians. The server and our methods have been validated on the whole PDB, and the results constitute the database of proteins with complex lassos, supported with basic biological data. This database can serve as a source of information about protein geometry and entanglement-function correlations, as a reference set in protein modeling, and for many other purposes. PMID:27131383

  15. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  16. Biopolymer capped silver nanoparticles with potential for multifaceted applications.

    PubMed

    Vanamudan, Ageetha; Sudhakar, P Padmaja

    2016-05-01

    A sustainable, green and low cost method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed using guargum as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles (GAg) were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, EDS, Raman, XRD and TEM. The interaction of the functional groups present in the biopolymer Guargum (G) with the silver nanoparticles (GAg) were responsible for the nanoparticle surface to function as active substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic (SERS) detection of cationic and anionic dyes. The catalytic degradation of a copper phthalocyanine based dye- Reactive blue - 21(RB-21), an azo dye- Reactive red 141(RR-141) and a xanthene dye- Rhodamine - 6G(Rh-6G) as well as binary mixtures of the three dyes was evaluated using the synthesized nanoparticles. The catalyst also caused a significant reduction in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) suggesting the formation of smaller degraded products. PMID:26800899

  17. [Binding of Volatile Organic Compounds to Edible Biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Medvedeva, I B

    2016-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatography was used to study the influence of the composition and structure of different edible polymers (polysaccharides, vegetable fibers, and animal protein gelatin) on the binding of essential oil components. The retention of volatile organic compounds on biopolymers was shown to depend on their molecule structure and the presence, type, and position of a functional group. The maximum extent of the binding was observed for nonpolar terpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and the minimum extent was observed for alcohols. The components of essential oils were adsorbed due mostly to hydrophobic interactions. It was shown that the composition and structure of a compound, its physico-chemical state, and the presence of functional groups influence the binding. Gum arabic and guar gum were found to bind nonpolar compounds to a maximum and minimum extent, respectively. It was demonstrated the minimum adsorption ability of locust bean gum with respect to all studied compounds. PMID:27266255

  18. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepička, P.; Juřík, P.; Malinský, P.; Macková, A.; Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Švorčík, V.

    2014-08-01

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar+ ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  19. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    SciTech Connect

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P.

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  20. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Sithara S; Penev, Evgeni S; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L; Yakobson, Boris I; Tour, James M; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces. PMID:27503635

  1. Interpretation of fluorescence correlation spectra of biopolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Phillies, George D J

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is regularly used to study diffusion in non-dilute "crowded" biopolymer solutions, including the interior of living cells. For fluorophores in dilute solution, the relationship between the FCS spectrum G(t) and the diffusion coefficient D is well-established. However, the dilute-solution relationship between G(t) and D has sometimes been used to interpret FCS spectra of fluorophores in non-dilute solutions. Unfortunately, the relationship used to interpret FCS spectra in dilute solutions relies on an assumption that is not always correct in non-dilute solutions. This paper obtains the correct form for interpreting FCS spectra of non-dilute solutions, writing G(t) in terms of the statistical properties of the fluorophore motions. Approaches for applying this form are discussed. PMID:26756528

  2. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    PubMed

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices. PMID:24659540

  3. Fabrication of Biopolymer Nanofibers of Hyaluronic Acid via Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Denice; Queen, Hailey; Krause, Wendy

    2006-03-01

    Electrospinning is a novel technology that uses an electric field to form fibrous materials from a polymer solution. Unlike traditional spinning techniques, electrospinning can produce fibers on the order of 100 nm that can be utilized in applications where nanoscale fibers are necessary for successful implementation, including tissue engineering. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a widely used biopolymer found in the extracellular matrix and currently marketed in medical applications for joint lubrications and tissue engineering. The high viscosity and surface tension of HA make it an unlikely candidate for electrospinning processes as viscosity is an important parameter in successful electrospinning. To promote HA fiber formation by electrospinning, the effects of salt (NaCl), which is used to reduce the viscosity of aqueous HA solutions; molecular weight of the HA; and an additional biocompatible polymer (e.g., PEO) are under investigation.

  4. LassoProt: server to analyze biopolymers with lassos.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Niemyska, Wanda; Pasznik, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I

    2016-07-01

    The LassoProt server, http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, enables analysis of biopolymers with entangled configurations called lassos. The server offers various ways of visualizing lasso configurations, as well as their time trajectories, with all the results and plots downloadable. Broad spectrum of applications makes LassoProt a useful tool for biologists, biophysicists, chemists, polymer physicists and mathematicians. The server and our methods have been validated on the whole PDB, and the results constitute the database of proteins with complex lassos, supported with basic biological data. This database can serve as a source of information about protein geometry and entanglement-function correlations, as a reference set in protein modeling, and for many other purposes. PMID:27131383

  5. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Penev, Evgeni S.; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces.

  6. Gold Nanoparticle-Polymer/Biopolymer Complexes for Protein Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Daniel F.; Rana, Subinoy; Bunz, Uwe H. F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based sensor arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of biomolecular targets through pattern recognition. Such biosensors require selective receptors that generate a unique response pattern for each analyte. The tunable surface properties of gold nanoparticles make these systems excellent candidates for the recognition process. Likewise, the metallic core makes these particles fluorescence superquenchers, facilitating transduction of the binding event. In this report we analyze the role of gold nanoparticles as receptors in differentiating a diversity of important human proteins different, and the role of the polymer/biopolymer fluorescent probes for transducing the binding event. A structure-activity relationship analysis of both the probes and the nanoparticles is presented, providing direction for the engineering of future sensor systems. PMID:22455037

  7. Functional finishing of aminated polyester using biopolymer-based polyelectrolyte microgels.

    PubMed

    Glampedaki, Pelagia; Dutschk, Victoria; Jocic, Dragan; Warmoeskerken, Marijn M C G

    2011-10-01

    This study focuses on a microgel-based functionalization method applicable to polyester textiles for improving their hydrophilicity and/or moisture-management properties, eventually enhancing wear comfort. The method proposed aims at achieving pH-/temperature-controlled wettability of polyester within a physiological pH/temperature range. First, primary amine groups are created on polyester surfaces using ethylenediamine; second, biopolymer-based polyelectrolyte microgels are incorporated using the natural cross-linker genipin. The microgels consist of the pH-responsive natural polysaccharide chitosan and pH/thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microparticles. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the microgel presence on polyester surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed nitrogen concentration, supporting increased microscopy results. Electrokinetic analysis showed that functionalized polyester surfaces have a zero-charge point at pH 6.5, close to the microgel isoelectric point. Dynamic wetting measurements revealed that functionalized polyester has shorter total water absorption time than the reference. This absorption time is also pH dependent, based on dynamic contact angle and micro-roughness measurements, which indicated microgel swelling at different pH values. Furthermore, at 40 °C functionalized polyester has higher vapor transmission rates than the reference, even at high relative humidity. This was attributed to the microgel thermoresponsiveness, which was confirmed through the almost 50% decrease in microparticle size between 20 and 40 °C, as determined by dynamic light scattering measurements. PMID:21751392

  8. Relevant insight of surface characterization techniques to study covalent grafting of a biopolymer to titanium implant and its acidic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, Mélanie; Amalric, Julien; Brunon, Céline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Toury, Bérangère

    2015-02-01

    Peri-implant bacterial infections are the main cause of complications in dentistry. Our group has previously proposed the attachment of chitosan on titanium implants via a covalent bond to improve its antibacterial properties while maintaining its biocompatibility. A better knowledge of the coating preparation process allows a better understanding of the bioactive coating in biological conditions. In this work, several relevant characterization techniques were used to assess an implant device during its production phase and its resistance in natural media at different pH. The titanium surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by grafting of an organic coupling agent; succinic anhydride, able to form two covalent links, with the substrate through a Ti-O-Si bond and the biopolymer through a peptide bond. Each step of the coating synthesis as well as the presence confirmation of the biopolymer on titanium after saliva immersion was followed by FTIR-ATR, SEM, EDS, 3D profilometry, XPS and ToF-SIMS analyses. Results allowed to highlight the efficiency of each step of the process, and to propose a mechanism occurring during the chitosan coating degradation in saliva media at pH 5 and at pH 3.

  9. Solid-State (13)C NMR Delineates the Architectural Design of Biopolymers in Native and Genetically Altered Tomato Fruit Cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Matas, Antonio J; Isaacson, Tal; Kehlet, Cindie; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Stark, Ruth E

    2016-01-11

    Plant cuticles on outer fruit and leaf surfaces are natural macromolecular composites of waxes and polyesters that ensure mechanical integrity and mitigate environmental challenges. They also provide renewable raw materials for cosmetics, packaging, and coatings. To delineate the structural framework and flexibility underlying the versatile functions of cutin biopolymers associated with polysaccharide-rich cell-wall matrices, solid-state NMR spectra and spin relaxation times were measured in a tomato fruit model system, including different developmental stages and surface phenotypes. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of the cutin ensures compatibility with the underlying polysaccharide cell walls; the hydroxy fatty acid structures of outer epidermal cutin also support deposition of hydrophobic waxes and aromatic moieties while promoting the formation of cell-wall cross-links that rigidify and strengthen the cuticle composite during fruit development. Fruit cutin-deficient tomato mutants with compromised microbial resistance exhibit less efficient local and collective biopolymer motions, stiffening their cuticular surfaces and increasing their susceptibility to fracture. PMID:26652188

  10. Xanthan Exopolysaccharide: Cu(2+) Complexes Affected from the pH-Dependent Conformational State; Implications for Environmentally Relevant Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Causse, Benjamin; Spadini, Lorenzo; Sarret, Géraldine; Faure, Adeline; Travelet, Christophe; Madern, Dominique; Delolme, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    The conformational impact of environmental biopolymers on metal sorption was studied through Cu sorption on xanthan. The apparent Cu(2+) complexation constant (logK; Cu(2+) + L(-) ↔ CuL(+)) decreased from 2.9 ± 0.1 at pH 3.5 to 2.5 ± 0.1 at pH 5.5 (ionic strength I = 0.1). This behavior is in apparent contradiction with basic thermodynamics, as usually the higher the pH the more cations bind. Our combined titration, circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering study indicated that the change observed in Cu bond strength relates to a conformational change of the structure of xanthan, which generates more chelating sites at pH 3.5 than at pH 5.5. This hypothesis was validated by the fact that the Cu sorption constants on xanthan were always higher than those measured on a mixture of pyruvic and glucuronic acids (logK = 2.2), which are the two constitutive ligands present in the xanthan monomer. This study shows the role of the structural conformation of natural biopolymers in metal bond strength. This finding may help to better predict the fate of Cu and other metals in acidic environmental settings such as aquatic media affected by acid mine drainage, as well as peats and acidic soils, and to better define optimal conditions for bioremediation processes. PMID:26824427

  11. A facile method for processing lignin reinforced chitosan biopolymer microfibres: optimising the fibre mechanical properties through lignin type and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Loo, L. S.; Goh, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    A chitosan biopolymer microfibre—reinforced by lignin—has been processed by a wet-spinning method. To optimise the fibre mechanical and structural properties two types of lignin, with molecular weights 28 000 g mol-1 and 60 000 g mol-1, were examined and the chitosan fibre was blended with the respective lignin type at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 wt% lignin concentrations. The main effects of lignin type and concentration, as well as the interaction between the two parameters, on the fibre tensile stiffness, extensibility, strength and toughness were evaluated using the two-factor analysis of variance. Significant variations in the respective mechanical properties were observed with varying lignin concentrations (P < 0.05). The magnitude of the respective mechanical properties is low at 1 wt% but peaks at 3 wt% before decreasing steadily with increasing lignin concentration. Except for extensibility, significant variations in the strength and toughness were observed with respect to lignin type (P < 0.05) variations in the stiffness were masked by interactions between lignin type and concentration. These results were related to the dispersion of lignin in the fibre and the nature of the bonds between lignin and chitosan, based on findings from scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This new method for the fabrication of chitosan biopolymer microfibre is inexpensive and versatile and could lend itself to the production of high performance biocomposite structures.

  12. FINAL REPORT. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating bio...

  13. Photoluminescence intensity enhancement in SWNT aqueous suspensions due to reducing agent doping: Influence of adsorbed biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Lytvyn, O. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of biopolymer wrapped around nanotube on the enhancement of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence (PL) in aqueous suspension which increases due to the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) doping effect was revealed. The greatest enhancement of PL was observed for SWNTs covered with double- or single stranded DNA (above 170%) and DTT weak influence was revealed for SWNTs:polyC suspension (∼45%). The magnitude of the PL enhancement depends also on nanotube chirality and sample aging. The behavior of PL from SWNTs covered with various polymers is explained by the different biopolymers ordering on the nanotube surface. The ordered polymer conformation on the nanotube weakens the reducing agent doping effect. The method of reducing agent doping of nanotube:biopolymer aqueous suspension can serve as a sensitive luminescent probe of the biopolymer ordering on the carbon nanotube and can be used to increase the sensitivity of luminescent biosensors.

  14. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal- chelating bio...

  15. Binary and Ternary Mixtures of Biopolymers and Water: Viscosity, Refractive Index, and Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Bárbara Louise L. D.; Costa, Bernardo S.; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E.

    2016-08-01

    Biopolymers have been the focus of intense research because of their wide applicability. The thermophysical properties of solutions containing biopolymers have fundamental importance for engineering calculations, as well as for thermal load calculations, energy expenditure, and development of new products. In this work, the thermophysical properties of binary and ternary solutions of carboxymethylcellulose and/or high methoxylation pectin and water at different temperatures have been investigated taking into consideration different biopolymer concentrations. The experimental data related to the thermophysical properties were correlated to obtain empirical models that can describe the temperature-concentration combined effect on the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity. From data obtained from the experiments, the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity increase with increasing biopolymer concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The polynomial models showed a good fit to the experimental data and high correlation coefficients (R2ge 0.98) for each studied system.

  16. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymer packaging: biodegradability and environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Trzcinski, A P; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2011-12-01

    The digestibility of a starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymer insulated cardboard coolbox was investigated under a defined anaerobic digestion (AD) system with key parameters characterized. Laboratory results were combined with industrial operational data to develop a site-specific life cycle assessment (LCA) model. Inoculated with active bacterial trophic groups, the anaerobic biodegradability of three starch-PVOH biopolymers achieved 58-62%. The LCA modeling showed that the environmental burdens of the starch-PVOH biopolymer packaging under AD conditions on acidification, eutrophication, global warming and photochemical oxidation potential were dominated by atmospheric emissions released from substrate degradation and fuel combustion, whereas energy consumption and infrastructure requirements were the causes of abiotic depletion, ozone depletion and toxic impacts. Nevertheless, for this bio-packaging, AD of the starch-PVOH biopolymer combined with recycling of the cardboard emerged as the environmentally superior option and optimization of the energy utilization system could bring further environmental benefits to the AD process. PMID:22001054

  18. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  19. Natural melanin: a potential pH-responsive drug release device.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marco; Viveiros, Raquel; Correia, Tiago R; Correia, Ilídio J; Bonifácio, Vasco D B; Casimiro, Teresa; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2014-07-20

    This work proposes melanin as a new nanocarrier for pH-responsive drug release. Melanin is an abundant natural polymer that can be easily extracted from cuttlefish as nanoparticles with a suitable size range for drug delivery. However, despite its high potentiality, the application of this biopolymer in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields is yet to be explored. Herein, melanin nanoparticles were impregnated with metronidazole, chosen as model antibiotic drug, using supercritical carbon dioxide. The drug release profile was investigated at acidic and physiologic pH, and the dominant mechanism was found to follow a non-Fickian transport. Drug release from melanin shows a strong pH dependency, which allied to its biocompatibility and lack of cytotoxicity envisages its potential application as nanocarrier in formulations for colon and intestine targeted drug delivery. PMID:24768404

  20. Design of polymer-biopolymer-hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Through molecular control of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Devendra

    In this dissertation, novel biomaterials are designed for bone biomaterials and bone tissue engineering applications. Novel biomaterials of hydroxyapatite with synthetic and natural polymers have been fabricated using a combination of processing routes. Initially, we investigated hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone-polyacrylic acid composites and observed that minimal interfacial interactions between polymer and mineral led to inadequate improvement in the mechanical properties. Bioactivity experiments on these composites showed that the presence of functional groups, such as carboxylate groups, influence bioactivity of the composites. We have developed and investigated composites of hydroxyapatite with chitosan and polygalacturonic acid (PgA). Chitosan and PgA are biocompatible, biodegradable, and also electrostatically complementary to each other. This strategy led to significant improvement in mechanical properties of new composites. The nanostructure analysis using atomic force microscopy revealed a multilevel organization in these composites. Enhancement in mechanical response was attributed to stronger interfaces due to strong electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged chitosan and PgA. Further analysis using the Rietveld method showed that biopolymers have marked impact on hydroxyapatite crystal growth and also on its crystal structure. Significant changes were observed in the lattice parameters of hydroxyapatite synthesized by following biomineralization method (organics mediated mineralization). For scaffold preparation, chitosan and PgA were mixed first, and then, nano-hydroxyapatite was added. Oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as chitosan and PgA, spontaneously form complex upon mixing. The poly-electrolyte complex exists as nano-sized particles. Chitosan/PgA scaffolds with and without hydroxyapatite were prepared by the freeze drying method. By controlling the rate of cooling and concentration, we have produced both fibrous and sheet

  1. Modeling the dynamics of one laser pulse surface nanofoaming of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, S.; Bonneau, R.; Gaspard, S.; Oujja, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.; Sionkowska, A.

    2009-03-01

    Self standing films of biopolymers like gelatine, collagen, and chitosan irradiated with single nanosecond or femtosecond laser pulse easily yield on their surface, a nanofoam layer, formed by a cavitation and bubble growth mechanism. The laser foams have interesting properties that challenge the molecular features of the natural extracellular matrix and which make them good candidates for fabrication of artificial matrix (having nanoscopic fibers, large availability of cell adhesion sites, permeability to fluids due to the open cell structure). As part of the mechanistic study, the dynamics of the process has been measured in the nanosecond timescale by recording the optical transmission of the films at 632.8 nm during and after the foaming laser pulse. A rapid drop 100→0% taking place within the first 100 ns supports the cavitation mechanism as described by the previous negative pressure wave model. As modeled a strong pressure rise (˜several thousands of bar) first takes place in the absorption volume due to pressure confinement and finite sound velocity, and then upon relaxation after some delay equal to the pressure transit time gives rise to a rarefaction wave (negative pressure) in which nucleation and bubble growth are very fast.

  2. Fractional Generalizations of Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt Models for Biopolymer Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwiak, Bertrand; Orczykowska, Magdalena; Dziubiński, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a fractional generalization of the Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt rheological models for a description of dynamic behavior of biopolymer materials. It was found that the rheological models of Maxwell-type do not work in the case of modeling of viscoelastic solids, and the model which significantly better describes the nature of changes in rheological properties of such media is the modified fractional Kelvin-Voigt model with two built-in springpots (MFKVM2). The proposed model was used to describe the experimental data from the oscillatory and creep tests of 3% (w/v) kuzu starch pastes, and to determine the values of their rheological parameters as a function of pasting time. These parameters provide a lot of additional information about structure and viscoelastic properties of the medium in comparison to the classical analysis of dynamic curves G’ and G” and shear creep compliance J(t). It allowed for a comprehensive description of a wide range of properties of kuzu starch pastes, depending on the conditions of pasting process. PMID:26599756

  3. Adsorption studies of Cu(II) onto biopolymer chitosan and its nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan.

    PubMed

    Moussout, Hamou; Ahlafi, Hammou; Aazza, Mustapha; Zegaoui, Omar; El Akili, Charaf

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) and nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan (5%Bt/CS) prepared from the natural biopolymer CS were tested to remove Cu(II) ions using a batch adsorption experiment at various temperatures (25, 35 and 45°C). X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were used in CS and the nanocomposite characterisation. This confirmed the exfoliation of bentonite (Bt) to form the nanocomposite. The adsorption kinetics of copper on both solids was found to follow a pseudo-second-order law at each studied temperature. The Cu(II) adsorption capacity increased as the temperature increased from 25 to 45°C for nanocomposite adsorbent but slightly increased for CS. The data were confronted to the nonlinear Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. It was found that the experimental data fitted very well the Langmuir isotherm over the whole temperature and concentration ranges. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for the Cu(II) was 404-422 mg/g for CS and 282-337 mg/g for 5%Bt/CS at 25-45°C. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The complexation of Cu(II) with NH(2) and C = O groups as active sites was found to be the main mechanism in the adsorption processes. PMID:27148722

  4. Fractional Generalizations of Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt Models for Biopolymer Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Bertrand; Orczykowska, Magdalena; Dziubiński, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a fractional generalization of the Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt rheological models for a description of dynamic behavior of biopolymer materials. It was found that the rheological models of Maxwell-type do not work in the case of modeling of viscoelastic solids, and the model which significantly better describes the nature of changes in rheological properties of such media is the modified fractional Kelvin-Voigt model with two built-in springpots (MFKVM2). The proposed model was used to describe the experimental data from the oscillatory and creep tests of 3% (w/v) kuzu starch pastes, and to determine the values of their rheological parameters as a function of pasting time. These parameters provide a lot of additional information about structure and viscoelastic properties of the medium in comparison to the classical analysis of dynamic curves G' and G" and shear creep compliance J(t). It allowed for a comprehensive description of a wide range of properties of kuzu starch pastes, depending on the conditions of pasting process. PMID:26599756

  5. Tailored topography control of biopolymer surfaces by ultrafast lasers for cell-substrate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, L.; Cazan, M.; Mustaciosu, C.; Filipescu, M.; Sandel, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, the culture surfaces used for in vitro testing must be capable of possessing an improved interface for cell interactions and adhesion. For this reason, the materials used need to have an appropriate chemistry and architecture of its surface, resembling to the extracellular matrix. Within this context, in this work we combined the advantages of natural biopolymer characteristics (chitosan) with the flexibility in surface texturing by ultrafast laser for creating functional microstructured surfaces for cell-substrate in vitro studies. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser irradiation (λ = 775 nm and 387 nm) was used for tailoring surface morphological characteristics of chitosan based films (i.e. polymer “bubbles”, “fingertips” and “sponge-like” structures). These structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The morphology of the structures obtained was correlated with the response of oligodendrocytes cells line. In vitro tests on the patterned surface showed that early cell growth was conditioned by the microtopography and indicate possible uses of the structures in biomedical applications.

  6. Development and in vitro evaluation of biopolymers as a delivery system against periodontopathogen microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Galan-Wong, Luis J; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are considered key pathogens in periodontitis. The treatment consists of oral hygiene education, instrumentation for removal of calculus (scaling), chemotherapy and periodontal surgery. Several agents are commercially available; these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicine and the use of biomaterials are considered good alternatives. Chitosan and pullulan are polymers that have been proposed due to their favorable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and adhesion ability. They can be used as local delivery systems of active principles of plant extracts. Thymus vulgaris, Matricaria chamomilla, Croton lechleri, Calendula officinalis L. and Juliana adstringens Schl. are known to have medicinal activity, and they are used in Mexican traditional medicine. Their extracts were tested in vitro for antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, using agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The antimicrobial activity of films from biopolymers with plant extracts was evaluated by measuring the zones of inhibition against the tested organisms. The aim of this study was to develop bioadhesive films from chitosan and pullulan with added plant extracts and determine the antimicrobial activity of films against periodontal pathogens. PMID:21053691

  7. Dispersion of cellulose nanofibers in biopolymer based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bei

    The focus of this work was to understand the fundamental dispersion mechanism of cellulose based nanofibers in bionanocomposites. The cellulose nanofibers were extracted from soybean pod and hemp fibers by chemo-mechanical treatments. These are bundles of cellulose nanofibers with a diameter ranging between 50 to 100 nm and lengths of thousands of nanometers which results in very high aspect ratio. In combination with a suitable matrix polymer, cellulose nanofiber networks show considerable potential as an effective reinforcement for high quality specialty applications of bio-based nanocomposites. Cellulose fibrils have a high density of --OH groups on the surface, which have a tendency to form hydrogen bonds with adjacent fibrils, reducing interaction with the surrounding matrix. The use of nanofibers has been mostly restricted to water soluble polymers. This thesis is focused on synthesizing the nanocomposite using a solid phase matrix polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE) by hot compression and poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in an aqueous phase by film casting. The mechanical properties of nanofiber reinforced PVA film demonstrated a 4-5 fold increase in tensile strength, as compared to the untreated fiber-blend-PVA film. It is necessary to reduce the entanglement of the fibrils and improve their dispersion in the matrix by surface modification of fibers without deteriorating their reinforcing capability. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to explore how various surface treatments would change the dispersion component of surface energy and acid-base character of cellulose nanofibers and the effect of the incorporation of these modified nanofibers into a biopolymer matrix on the properties of their nano-composites. Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based nanocomposites using cellulose nanofibers were prepared by extrusion, injection molding and hot compression. The IGC results indicated that styrene maleic anhydride coated and ethylene

  8. Macrophage-stimulating activity of exo-biopolymer from cultured rice bran with Monascus pilosus.

    PubMed

    Yu, K W; Kim, Y S; Shin, K S; Kim, J M; Suh, H J

    2005-07-01

    To find a new use of rice bran, five fungi were examined for the production of exo-biopolymer with macrophage-stimulating activity from rice bran. Among the exo-biopolymers produced from the cultures, Monascus pilosus had the most potent macrophage stimulating activity in a liquid culture rather than in a solid culture. In order to improve the yield of exo-biopolymer with macrophage-stimulating activity, a suitable medium for exo-biopolymer was tested in submerged culture of M. pilosus. The highest amount of exo-biopolymer (13.9 mg/mL) was obtained in a medium containing rice bran as an only carbon source followed by media with additional maltose and sucrose (13.8 and 13.7 mg/mL, respectively). The addition of peptone resulted in the production of high amount of exo-biopolymer (15.1 mg/mL), meanwhile the addition of ammonium chloride resulted in 264.0 microg/mL of glucosamine content. Among eight different kinds of inorganic salts tested, potassium phosphate (0.1%) was the most effective inorganic salt for the mycelial growth and exo-biopolymer production. Therefore the optimal medium composition was as follows (g/L): 20 g of rice bran, 5 g of peptone, and 1 g of KH2PO4. The optimal culture pH and time for mycelial growth and exo-biopolymer production was pH 5.0 and 25 degrees C, respectively. The maximum exo-biopolymer (20.1 mg/mL) was observed at the fourth day of cultivation. Exo-biopolymer, a crude polysaccharide fraction, mainly contained neutral sugar (81.8%) with considerable amounts of uronic acid (18.2%). Component sugar analysis showed that the active fraction consisted mainly of arabinose, galactose, glucose, which was digested from starch of rice bran during cultivation, and uronic acid (molar ratio; 0.8:1.0:0.7:0.8). PMID:16014997

  9. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  10. Heatless synthesis of well dispersible Au nanoparticles using pectin biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanan B; Zahran, M K; Emam, Hossam E

    2016-10-01

    Due to its potency to utilize in enormous applications, preparation of nanogold is of interest. Moreover, getting of highly dispersed nanogold with small size is extremely needful in specific fields. Herein, Au nanocolloid was prepared using alkali catalyzed pectin biopolymer. Pectin was concurrently used as reductant for Au ions and stabilizer for the produced Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reducing sugars were evaluated in the colloidal solution reflecting the role alkali in catalytic degradation of pectin to produce much powerful reducing moieties. The obtained Au nanocolloid was monitored via changing in color, UV-visible spectral and transmission electron microscopy. Using of NaOH as strong alkali achieving rapid rate of degradation reaction, resulted in 0.45g/L reducing sugars from 0.2g/L pectin which produced AuNPs with mean size of 6.5nm. In case of Na2CO3 which attained slow degradation rate led to, slightly low reducing sugar content (0.41g/L), fabricated comparatively size of AuNPs (7.5nm). In both cases, well distributed AuNPs was obtained with suitable stabilization up to 5 months and Na2CO3 exhibited higher stability. The current successful method used to produce small sized AuNPs with high dispersion is an innovative, one-step, easily, costless, energy saving and eco-friendly method. PMID:27212212

  11. Nonlinear and heterogeneous elasticity of multiply-crosslinked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amuasi, H. E.; Heussinger, C.; Vink, R. L. C.; Zippelius, A.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate randomly crosslinked networks of biopolymers, characterizing linear and nonlinear elasticity under different loading conditions (uniaxial extension, simple shear, and pure shear). Under uniaxial extension, and upon entering the nonlinear regime, the network switches from a dilatant to contractile response. Analogously, under isochoric conditions (pure shear), the normal stresses change their sign. Both effects are readily explained with a generic weakly nonlinear elasticity theory. The elastic moduli display an intermediate super-stiffening regime, where moduli increase much stronger with applied stress σ than predicted by the force-extension relation of a single wormlike-chain ({G}{wlc}∼ {σ }3/2). We interpret this super-stiffening regime in terms of the reorientation of filaments with the maximum tensile direction of the deformation field. A simple model for the reorientation response gives an exponential stiffening, G∼ {{{e}}}σ , in qualitative agreement with our data. The heterogeneous, anisotropic structure of the network is reflected in correspondingly heterogeneous and anisotropic elastic properties. We provide a coarse-graining scheme to quantify the local anisotropy, the fluctuations of the elastic moduli, and the local stresses as a function of coarse-graining length. Heterogeneities of the elastic moduli are strongly correlated with the local density and increase with applied strain.

  12. Confined semiflexible biopolymers suppress fluctuations of soft membrane tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Mirzaeifard, Sina

    Membrane nanotubes are tubular membrane structures that contain actin and connect cells over long distances. Disrupting the actin cytoskeleton abrogates membrane nanotubes, making them an interesting model system for studying membrane-biopolymer interactions. In this study, we use Monte Carlo computer simulations to investigate tubular, elastic membrane structures with and without semiflexible polymers confined inside. At small values of membrane bending rigidity, fluid membranes adopt irregular, highly fluctuating shapes while non-fluid membranes maintain extended tube-like structures. With increasing bending rigidity, fluid membranes exhibit a local maximum in specific heat that is coincident with a transition to extended tube-like structures. We further find that confining a semiflexible polymer within a fluid membrane tube suppresses membrane shape fluctuations and reduces the specific heat of the membrane. Polymers with a sufficiently large persistence length can significantly deform the membrane tube, leading to localized bulges in the membrane that accommodate regions in which the polymer forms loops. Analytical calculations of the energies of idealized polymer-membrane configurations provide additional insight into the formation of polymer-induced membrane deformations.

  13. Dynamic light scattering of xanthan gum biopolymer in colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Rahdar, Abbas; Almasi-Kashi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The dynamical properties of nanogels of xanthan gum (XG) with hydrodynamic radius controlled in a size range from 5 nm to 35 nm, were studied at the different XG concentrations in water/sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl-sulfosuccinate (AOT)/decane reverse micelles (RMs) vs. mass fraction of nano-droplet (MFD) at W = 40, using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The diffusion study of nanometer-sized droplets by DLS technique indicated that enhancing concentration of the XG polysaccharide resulted in exchanging the attractive interaction between nano-gels to repulsive interaction, as the mass fraction of nano-droplets increased. The reorientation time (τr ) of water nanodroplets decreased with MFD for water-in-oil AOT micro-emulsion comprising high concentration (0.0000625) of XG. On the other hand, decreasing concentration of biopolymer led to increasing the rotational correlation time of water nanodroplets with MFD. In conclusion, a single relaxation curve was observed for AOT inverse microemulsions containing different XG concentrations. Furthermore, the interaction between nanogels was changed from attractive to repulsive versus concentration of XG in the AOT RMs. PMID:27489730

  14. Inorganic polymers: morphogenic inorganic biopolymers for rapid prototyping chain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been achieved towards the development of customized scaffold materials, in particular for bone tissue engineering and repair, by the introduction of rapid prototyping or solid freeform fabrication techniques. These new fabrication techniques allow to overcome many problems associated with conventional bone implants, such as inadequate external morphology and internal architecture, porosity and interconnectivity, and low reproducibility. However, the applicability of these new techniques is still hampered by the fact that high processing temperature or a postsintering is often required to increase the mechanical stability of the generated scaffold, as well as a post-processing, i.e., surface modification/functionalization to enhance the biocompatibility of the scaffold or to bind some bioactive component. A solution might be provided by the introduction of novel inorganic biopolymers, biosilica and polyphosphate, which resist harsh conditions applied in the RP chain and are morphogenetically active and do not need supplementation by growth factors/cytokines to stimulate the growth and the differentiation of bone-forming cells. PMID:24420716

  15. New Guar Biopolymer Silver Nanocomposites for Wound Healing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Md Farooque; Das, Suvadra; Roy, Partha; Datta, Sriparna; Mukherjee, Arup

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is an innate physiological response that helps restore cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Selective biodegradable and biocompatible polymer materials have provided useful scaffolds for wound healing and assisted cellular messaging. In the present study, guar gum, a polymeric galactomannan, was intrinsically modified to a new cationic biopolymer guar gum alkylamine (GGAA) for wound healing applications. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agnp) were further impregnated in GGAA for extended evaluations in punch wound models in rodents. SEM studies showed silver nanoparticles well dispersed in the new guar matrix with a particle size of ~18 nm. In wound healing experiments, faster healing and improved cosmetic appearance were observed in the new nanobiomaterial treated group compared to commercially available silver alginate cream. The total protein, DNA, and hydroxyproline contents of the wound tissues were also significantly higher in the treated group as compared with the silver alginate cream (P < 0.05). Silver nanoparticles exerted positive effects because of their antimicrobial properties. The nanobiomaterial was observed to promote wound closure by inducing proliferation and migration of the keratinocytes at the wound site. The derivatized guar gum matrix additionally provided a hydrated surface necessary for cell proliferation. PMID:24175306

  16. Injectable biopolymer based hydrogels for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Atta, Sadia; Khaliq, Shaista; Islam, Atif; Javeria, Irtaza; Jamil, Tahir; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof; Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymer based pH-sensitive hydrogels were prepared using chitosan (CS) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of different molecular weights in the presence of silane crosslinker. The incorporated components remain undissolved in different swelling media as they are connected by siloxane linkage which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The swelling in water was enhanced by the addition of higher molecular weight PEG. The swelling behaviour of the hydrogels against pH showed high swelling in acidic and basic pH, whereas, low swelling was examined at pH 6 and 7. This characteristic pH responsive behaviour at neutral pH made them suitable for injectable controlled drug delivery. The controlled release analysis of Cefixime (CFX) (model drug) loaded CS/PEG hydrogel exhibited that the entire drug was released in 30 min in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) while in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), 85% of drug was released in controlled manner within 80 min. This inferred that the developed hydrogels can be an attractive biomaterial for injectable drug delivery with physiological pH and other biomedical applications. PMID:26118484

  17. Phase Segregation in Individually Dried Particles Composed of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Marine; Sloth, Jakob; Bergenstahl, Björn; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna

    2015-10-13

    Mixing of two biopolymers can results in phase separation due to their thermodynamically incompatibility under certain conditions. This phenomenon was first reported when the solution was allowed to equilibrate, but it has later been observed also as a consequence of drying. The challenges of this study were to observe phase segregation by confocal Raman microscopy and LV-SEM on dried film, individually dried particles, and spray dried particles. The influence of the solid content and the phase ratio (composition) of a HPMC/maltodextrin mixture on the localization of the ingredients in the individually dried particles was investigated. We observed that phase segregation of HPMC and maltodextrin is induced by solvent evaporation in film drying, single particle drying, as well as spray drying. The phase ratio is an important parameter that influences the localization of the HPMC-enriched phase and maltodextrin-enriched phase, i.e., to the particle surface, to the core, or in a more or less bicontinuous pattern. The drying time, affected by the solids content, was found to control the level of advancement of the phase segregation. PMID:26397315

  18. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  19. Structural damages of maxillofacial biopolymers under solar aging.

    PubMed

    Eleni, P N; Krokida, M K; Frangou, M J; Polyzois, G L; Maroulis, Z B; Marinos-Kouris, D

    2007-09-01

    Additional types of silicone biopolymers are widely used in maxillofacial prosthetics. Therefore, the knowledge of the solar radiation's effect on their structural stability is highly important. Four different industrially synthesized biomaterials were examined, called Episil Europe 1, Europe 2, Europe 3 and Africa 3, which were exposed to solar radiation (UVA, UVB) for eight different time periods (from 8 to 168 h). Structural damages due to irradiation exposure were investigated by mechanical tests (compression) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Simple mathematical models were developed, containing parameters with physical meaning such as maximum stress (sigma(max)), maximum strain (epsilon), elasticity parameter (E), and viscoelastic parameter (p), for the compression test, and melting temperature (T (m)) and Enthalpy in melting point (Heat) for DSC. With increasing irradiation time their maximum stress and strain decreased significantly, and the materials lost their elasticity and molecular stability. A decrement in their melting points and heats was observed as irradiation time was increasing. Finally, experimental results demonstrated that solar radiation has a severe effect on the structural stability of the examined biomaterials. PMID:17483904

  20. Submicro foaming in biopolymers by UV pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Gaspard, Solenne; Abrusci, Concepción; Catalina, Fernando; Lazare, Sylvain; Castillejo, Marta

    2006-05-01

    Microstructuring of polymers and biopolymers is of application in medical technology and biotechnology. Using different fabrication techniques three-dimensionally shaped and micro structured constructs can be developed for drug release and tissue engineering. As an alternative method, laser microstructuring offers a series of advantages including high resolution capability, low heat deposition in the substrate and high level of flexibility. In this work we present evidence of laser microfoam formation in collagen and gelatine by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in the UV at 248 and 266 nm. Irradiation at 355 nm produces melting followed by resolidification of the substrate, whereas irradiation at 532 and 1064 nm induces the formation of craters of irregular contours. Single pulse irradiation of a collagen film with an homogenized KrF microbeam yields a 20 μm thick expanded layer, which displays the interesting features of a nanofibrous 3-dimensional network with open cells. In gelatine, irradiation at 248 and 266 nm produces similar morphological modifications. The effect of the structural properties of the substrate on the laser induced microfoam is studied by comparing gelatines differing in gel strength (Bloom values 225 and 75) and in crosslinking degree. While results are discussed on the basis of thermal and photomechanical mechanisms and of the role played by the water content of the substrates, it is thought that such structures could have a biomimic function in future 3D cell culture devices for research.

  1. Dynamic light-scattering monitoring of a transient biopolymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, A. F.; Chen, T.; Payne, G. F.; Anisimov, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    We performed dynamic light-scattering (DLS) monitoring and a rheological study to characterize the formation and destruction of a transient (limited lifetime) gel formed from the biopolymers chitosan and gelatin. Gel formation, initiated by the enzyme tyrosinase, is followed by spontaneous gel breakage. Our DLS results demonstrate that this material passes through five stages in which the gel forms, consolidates, “lives”, softens, and eventually breaks. We speculate that the existence of the transient gel is caused by a competition between two processes: a fast-rate chemical reaction leading to formation of a branched-copolymer network and a slow-rate diffusion-like rearrangement of the gelatin branches resulting in eventual gel breakage. Despite a dramatic difference in the characteristic times of the gel formation ( tg) and gel breakage ( tb)-the ratio tb/ tg is of the order 10 3-DLS has revealed an intrinsic monitoring-time symmetry in the formation and destruction of the gel provided that a proper physical choice of the reduced temporal scale is used. In this scale the slow-mode relaxation time for both sides of the process, gel formation and gel destruction, exhibits a power law in the spirit of percolation theory.

  2. Abundances of Natural Radionuclides (40K, 238U, 232Th) in Hanford and Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge Site Sediments and the Application to the Estimation of Grain Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, K.; Ward, A. L.; Yabusaki, S.; Murray, C. J.; Greenwood, J.

    2009-12-01

    The distribution and geometry of lithofacies impact groundwater flow and solute spreading but are difficult to characterize at the scale controlling transport. We hypothesize that differences in γ-ray activity resulting from the natural distribution of 40K, 238U, and 232Th (K, U, T) are due to hydraulic separation and sorting and can be used to infer grain-size distributions at the scale of borehole γ-ray logs. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using γ-ray spectra to detect differences in grain size distributions as a means of characterizing small-scale variations in flow and reactive transport properties. The γ-ray spectra of whole and fractionated sediments from the Hanford and Old Rifle IFRC sites were characterized along with their grain size distributions. In the Hanford sediments, the abundance of K, U, and T was strongly correlated with the extent of weathering and with mean grain size. Hanford clay showed concentrations of 4%, 5.5 ppm, and 6.5 ppm for K, U, and T respectively. An increase in geometric mean diameter from 0.02 mm (clay) to 45.25 mm (very coarse gravel) showed increases in concentrations of 70% for K, 76% for U, and 83% for T. Old Rifle sediments showed no correlation between grain size and K, but there was an 81% increase in U and a 73 % increase in T. Cross plots of Th/U and Th/K also show strong correlations with grain size. The enrichment of natural isotopes with decreasing grain size is likely due to the increase in specific surface area. Thus, borehole γ-ray spectra could have a much wider application in characterizing grain separation and sorting and ultimately flow and reactive transport properties.

  3. Recent advances in the analysis of the site-specific isotopic fractionation of metabolites such as fatty acids using anisotropic natural-abundance 2H NMR spectroscopy: application to conjugated linolenic methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Billault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The full elucidation of the enzymatic mechanisms leading to polyunsaturated ω-3 to ω-5 fatty acids (PUFAs) occurring in plants or microorganisms by analyzing their site-specific isotopic fractionation profiles is a challenging task. Isotropic SNIF-NMR® method is an historical, powerful tool for the determination of ((2)H/(1)H) ratios. However, the absence of accessible isotopic data on the enantiotopic hydrogen sites (CH(2) groups) prevents the study of the enzymatic reaction stereoselectivity. Natural-abundance deuterium (NAD) 2D NMR experiment using chiral liquid crystals (CLC) as solvent is a new tool in this field, overcoming this limitation. In this work, we have explored various possibilities for optimizing the enantio-discrimination properties of CLC by changing the nature of the polypeptide and/or increasing the polarity of the organic co-solvents. We report also the first applications of TMU as co-solvent for preparing enantio-discriminating, homogenous polypeptide mesophases. The various experimental NAD NMR results recorded at an optimal sample temperature are discussed and compared in terms of number of discriminated (2)H sites and magnitude of spectral separation for different PUFAs such as the linoleic and linolenic acids. The comparison of all NMR results shows that optimal results are obtained when CLC mixtures made of poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) and high polarity co-solvents are used. As new challenging examples of applications, we report the preliminary analytical results obtained from two ω-5 conjugated linolenic acids: the α-eleostearic acid (9Z, 11E, 13E) and the punicic acid (9Z, 11E, 13Z). NMR data are discussed in terms of molecular orientational ordering parameters and isotopic distribution. PMID:21107978

  4. Application of Natural Isotopic Abundance ¹H-¹³C- and ¹H-¹⁵N-Correlated Two-Dimensional NMR for Evaluation of the Structure of Protein Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Luke W; Brinson, Robert G; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Methods for characterizing the higher-order structure of protein therapeutics are in great demand for establishing consistency in drug manufacturing, for detecting drug product variations resulting from modifications in the manufacturing process, and for comparing a biosimilar to an innovator reference product. In principle, solution NMR can provide a robust approach for characterization of the conformation(s) of protein therapeutics in formulation at atomic resolution. However, molecular weight limitations and the perceived need for stable isotope labeling have to date limited its practical applications in the biopharmaceutical industry. Advances in NMR magnet and console technologies, cryogenically cooled probes, and new rapid acquisition methodologies, particularly selective optimized flip-angle short transient pulse schemes and nonuniform sampling, have greatly ameliorated these limitations. Here, we describe experimental methods for the collection and analysis of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra applied to protein drug products at natural isotopic abundance, including representatives from the rapidly growing class of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Practical aspects of experimental setup and data acquisition for both standard and rapid acquisition NMR techniques are described. Furthermore, strategies for the statistical comparison of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra are detailed. PMID:26791974

  5. Economic assessment of flash co-pyrolysis of short rotation coppice and biopolymer waste streams.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, T; Cornelissen, T; Carleer, R; Yperman, J; Schreurs, S; Jans, M; Thewys, T

    2010-12-01

    The disposal problem associated with phytoextraction of farmland polluted with heavy metals by means of willow requires a biomass conversion technique which meets both ecological and economical needs. Combustion and gasification of willow require special and costly flue gas treatment to avoid re-emission of the metals in the atmosphere, whereas flash pyrolysis mainly results in the production of (almost) metal free bio-oil with a relatively high water content. Flash co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste of biopolymers synergistically improves the characteristics of the pyrolysis process: e.g. reduction of the water content of the bio-oil, more bio-oil and less char production and an increase of the HHV of the oil. This research paper investigates the economic consequences of the synergistic effects of flash co-pyrolysis of 1:1 w/w ratio blends of willow and different biopolymer waste streams via cost-benefit analysis and Monte Carlo simulations taking into account uncertainties. In all cases economic opportunities of flash co-pyrolysis of biomass with biopolymer waste are improved compared to flash pyrolysis of pure willow. Of all the biopolymers under investigation, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is the most promising, followed by Eastar, Biopearls, potato starch, polylactic acid (PLA), corn starch and Solanyl in order of decreasing profits. Taking into account uncertainties, flash co-pyrolysis is expected to be cheaper than composting biopolymer waste streams, except for corn starch. If uncertainty increases, composting also becomes more interesting than flash co-pyrolysis for waste of Solanyl. If the investment expenditure is 15% higher in practice than estimated, the preference for flash co-pyrolysis compared to composting biopolymer waste becomes less clear. Only when the system of green current certificates is dismissed, composting clearly is a much cheaper processing technique for disposing of biopolymer waste. PMID:20724061

  6. In vitro assessment of biopolymer-modified porous silicon microparticles for wound healing applications.

    PubMed

    Mori, Michela; Almeida, Patrick V; Cola, Michela; Anselmi, Giulia; Mäkilä, Ermei; Correia, Alexandra; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Caramella, Carla; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-11-01

    The wound healing stands as very complex and dynamic process, aiming the re-establishment of the damaged tissue's integrity and functionality. Thus, there is an emerging need for developing biopolymer-based composites capable of actively promoting cellular proliferation and reconstituting the extracellular matrix. The aims of the present work were to prepare and characterize biopolymer-functionalized porous silicon (PSi) microparticles, resulting in the development of drug delivery microsystems for future applications in wound healing. Thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (THCPSi) microparticles were coated with both chitosan and a mixture of chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronic acid, and subsequently loaded with two antibacterial model drugs, vancomycin and resveratrol. The biopolymer coating, drug loading degree and drug release behavior of the modified PSi microparticles were evaluated in vitro. The results showed that both the biopolymer coating and drug loading of the THCPSi microparticles were successfully achieved. In addition, a sustained release was observed for both the drugs tested. The viability and proliferation profiles of a fibroblast cell line exposed to the modified THCPSi microparticles and the subsequent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were also evaluated. The cytotoxicity and proliferation results demonstrated less toxicity for the biopolymer-coated THCPSi microparticles at different concentrations and time points comparatively to the uncoated counterparts. The ROS production by the fibroblasts exposed to both uncoated and biopolymer-coated PSi microparticles showed that the modified PSi microparticles did not induce significant ROS production at the concentrations tested. Overall, the biopolymer-based PSi microparticles developed in this study are promising platforms for wound healing applications. PMID:25305585

  7. Raman and Theoretical Study of M2(dmp)4 [M = Cr (natural abundance Cr, 50Cr, and 54Cr) and Mo; dmp = 2,6-dimethoxyphenyl]. The Nature of Bonding in Complexes Containing ‘Supershort’ Metal-Metal Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Da Re, Ryan E.; Eglin, Judith L.; Carlson, Christin N.; John, Kevin D.; Morris, David E.; Woodruff, William H.; Bailey, James A.; Batista, Enrique; Martin, Richard L.; Cotton, F. Albert; Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Murillo, Carlos A.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Donohoe, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    We report an investigation of complexes of the type M2(dmp)4 (M = Mo, Cr; dmp = 2,6-dimethoxyphenyl) using resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, Cr isotopic substitution, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Assignment of the Mo-Mo stretching vibration in the Mo2 species is straightforward as evidenced by a single resonance-enhanced band at 424 cm-1, consistent with an essentially unmixed metal-metal stretch, and overtones of this vibration. On the other hand, the Cr2 congener has no obvious metal-metal stretching mode near 650 - 700 cm-1, where empirical predictions based on the Cr-Cr distance as well as DFT calculations suggest that this vibration should appear if unmixed. Instead, three bands are observed at 345, 363, and 387 cm-1 that (a) have relative RR intensities that are sensitive to the Raman excitation frequency (b) exhibit overtones and combinations in the RR spectra, and (c) shift in frequency upon isotopic substitution (50Cr and 54Cr). DFT calculations are used to model the vibrational data for the Mo2 and Cr2 systems. Both the DFT results and empirical predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations in the Mo2 complex but both, while mutually consistent, differ radically from experiment in the Cr2 complex. Our experimental and theoretical results, especially the Cr isotope shifts, clearly demonstrate that the potential energy of the Cr-Cr stretching coordinate is distributed among several normal modes having both Cr-Cr and Cr-ligand character. The general significance of these results in interpreting spectroscopic observations in terms of the nature of metal-metal multiple bonding is discussed. PMID:20092271

  8. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  9. Species Abundance Patterns in Complex Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Kei

    2004-10-01

    An analytic theory of species abundance patterns (SAPs) in biological networks is presented. The theory is based on multispecies replicator dynamics equivalent to the Lotka-Volterra equation, with diverse interspecies interactions. Various SAPs observed in nature are derived from a single parameter. The abundance distribution is formed like a widely observed left-skewed lognormal distribution. As the model has a general form, the result can be applied to similar patterns in other complex biological networks, e.g., gene expression.

  10. Encapsulation of lead from hazardous CRT glass wastes using biopolymer cross-linked concrete systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daeik; Quinlan, Michael; Yen, Teh Fu

    2009-01-15

    Discarded computer monitors and television sets are identified as hazardous materials due to the high content of lead in their cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Over 98% of lead is found in CRT glass. More than 75% of obsolete electronics including TV and CRT monitors are in storage because appropriate e-waste management and remediation technologies are insufficient. Already an e-waste tsunami is starting to roll across the US and the whole world. Thus, a new technology was developed as an alternative to current disposal methods; this method uses a concrete composite crosslinked with minute amounts of biopolymers and a crosslinking agent. Commercially available microbial biopolymers of xanthan gum and guar gum were used to encapsulate CRT wastes, reducing Pb leachability as measured by standard USEPA methods. In this investigation, the synergistic effect of the crosslinking reaction was observed through blending two different biopolymers or adding a crosslinking agent in biopolymer solution. This CRT-biopolymer-concrete (CBC) composite showed higher compressive strength than the standard concrete and a considerable decrease in lead leachability.

  11. Influence of different treatment condition on biopolymer yield production for coagulation-flocculation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisyah, I. S.; Murshed, M. F.; Norli, I.

    2016-06-01

    Two different agro wastes (banana pseudostem and rice straw) were utilized in order to extract biopolymer (pectin) known as coagulant aid in water and wastewater treatment. Factors such as pH, temperature and time were chosen due to the critical role in hot acid extraction process. The yield of biopolymer extraction from banana pseudostem was found to be higher at 28% meanwhile only 18% from rice straw was manage to produce from the dry weight 10 g, respectively. It was found that extraction temperature and extraction time were the most important factors influencing the biopolymer yield which increased with temperature and time or decreasing pH. Based on two level factorial design, the same condition of pH 1.5, temperature 90 oC and 4 hours extraction time can produce high amount of extracted biopolymer. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to detect the existence of functional group which helps in the coagulation-flocculation process. Result indicates a similar functional group of biopolymer were detected for both difference agro wastes.

  12. Interactions between Chitosan and Alginate Dialdehyde Biopolymers and Their Layer-by-Layer Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Aston, Robyn; Wimalaratne, Medini; Brock, Aidan; Lawrie, Gwendolyn; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2015-06-01

    Biopolymers are researched extensively for their applications in biomaterials science and drug delivery including structures and complexes of more than one polymer. Chemical characterization of complexes formed between chitosan (CHI) and alginate dialdehyde (ADA) biopolymers established that while electrostatic interactions dominate (as determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) covalent cross-linking between these biopolymers also contribute to their stability (evidenced from immersion in salt solution). It was furthermore found that imine bond formation could not be directly detected by any of the techniques XPS, FTIR, (1)H NMR, or fluorescence. The layer-by-layer assemblies of the biopolymers formed on silica colloids, glass slides, and alginate hydrogel beads were evaluated using XPS, as well as zeta potential measurements for the silica colloids and changes to hydration properties for the hydrogels. It was found that the degree of oxidation of ADA affected the LbL assemblies in terms of a greater degree of CHI penetration observed when using the more conformationally flexible biopolymer ADA (higher degree of oxidation). PMID:25970641

  13. Natural biopolimers in organic food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczynska, Justyna; Cavoski, Ivana; Chami, Ziad Al; Mondelli, Donato; Di Donato, Paola; Di Terlizzi, Biagio

    2014-05-01

    Concerns on environmental and waste problems caused by use of non-biodegradable and non-renewable based plastic packaging have caused an increase interest in developing biodegradable packaging using renewable natural biopolymers. Recently, different types of biopolymers like starch, cellulose, chitosan, casein, whey protein, collagen, egg white, soybean protein, corn zein, gelatin and wheat gluten have attracted considerable attention as potential food packaging materials. Recyclable or biodegradable packaging material in organic processing standards is preferable where possible but specific principles of packaging are not precisely defined and standards have to be assessed. There is evidence that consumers of organic products have specific expectations not only with respect to quality characteristics of processed food but also in social and environmental aspects of food production. Growing consumer sophistication is leading to a proliferation in food eco-label like carbon footprint. Biopolymers based packaging for organic products can help to create a green industry. Moreover, biopolymers can be appropriate materials for the development of an active surfaces designed to deliver incorporated natural antimicrobials into environment surrounding packaged food. Active packaging is an innovative mode of packaging in which the product and the environment interact to prolong shelf life or enhance safety or sensory properties, while maintaining the quality of the product. The work will discuss the various techniques that have been used for development of an active antimicrobial biodegradable packaging materials focusing on a recent findings in research studies. With the current focus on exploring a new generation of biopolymer-based food packaging materials with possible applications in organic food packaging. Keywords: organic food, active packaging, biopolymers , green technology

  14. pH-induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, R. D.; Insana, M. F.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This paper focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time-domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced; however, the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability.

  15. The effect of drought and interspecific interactions on the depth of water uptake in deep- and shallow-rooting grassland species as determined by δ18O natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, N. J.; Finn, J. A.; Lüscher, A.

    2014-03-01

    Increased incidence of weather drought, as predicted under climate change, has the potential to negatively affect grassland production. Compared to monocultures, vertical belowground niche complementarity between shallow- and deep-rooting species may be an important mechanism resulting in higher yields and higher resistance to drought in grassland mixtures. However, very little is known about the belowground responses in grassland systems and increased insight into these processes may yield important information both to predict the effect of future climate change and better design agricultural systems to cope with this. This study assessed the effect of a 10-week experimental summer drought on the depth of water uptake of two shallow-rooting species (Lolium perenne L. and Trifolium repens L.) and two deep-rooting species (Chicorium intybus L. and Trifolium pratense L.) in grassland monocultures and four-species-mixtures by using the natural abundance δ18O isotope method. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) drought results in a shift of water uptake to deeper soil layers, (2) deep-rooting species take up a higher proportion of water from deeper soil layers relative to shallow-rooting species, (3) as a result of interspecific interactions in mixtures, the water uptake of shallow-rooting species become shallower when grown together with deep-rooting species and vice versa, resulting in reduced niche overlap. The natural abundance δ18O technique provided novel insights into the depth of water uptake of deep- and shallow- rooting grassland species and revealed large shifts in response to drought and interspecific interactions. Compared to control conditions, drought reduced the proportional water uptake from 0-10 cm soil depth (PCWU0-10) of L. perenne, T. repens and C. intybus in monocultures by on average 54%. In contrast, the PCWU0-10 of T. pratense in monoculture increased by 44%, and only when grown in mixture did the PCWU0-10 of T. pratense decrease under

  16. Low threshold amplified spontaneous emission from dye-doped DNA biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Yu-Chueh; Su, Che-Hsuan; Huang, Hsien-Wen

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties and conduct a comparative study for two kinds of dye-doped deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymers. The system consists of optical films made of DNA modified by two types of surfactants and doped with a common laser dye rhodamine 6G (Rh6G). The ASE properties of the optical films were characterized by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The results show that low threshold of DNA biopolymer can be achieved by the employment of suitable surfactant in the system, resulting from an efficient energy transfer process. Coupled with the fluorescence enhancement exhibited in DNA, this effect can further advance biopolymers toward highly efficient media for lasing applications and organic solid-state lasers.

  17. Cytokine loaded biopolymers as a novel strategy to study stem cells during wound-healing processes.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Annalisa; Banfi, Serena; Vizioli, Jacopo; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Noonan, Douglas M; de Eguileor, Magda

    2011-08-11

    The biopolymer matrigel loaded with cytokine can be used for the recruitment in vivo of specific cell populations and as a vector for the preparation of cell cultures. Data demonstrate that the injection of the matrigel biopolymer supplemented with interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the leech Hirudo medicinalis can be used to purify cell populations showing the same morphofunctional and molecular mechanisms of specific populations of vertebrate hematopoietic precursor cells involved in tissue repair. These cells spontaneously differentiated into myofibroblasts. This approach highlights how the innovative use of a cytokine-loaded biopolymer for an in vivo cell sorting method, applied to a simple invertebrate model, can be a tool for studying myofibroblast cell biology and its regulation, step by step. PMID:21400659

  18. Nanostructured Materials Utilized in Biopolymer-based Plastics for Food Packaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, Babak; Oleyaei, Seyed Amir; Almasi, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Most materials currently used for food packaging are nondegradable, generating environmental problems. Several biopolymers have been exploited to develop materials for ecofriendly food packaging. However, the use of biopolymers has been limited because of their usually poor mechanical and barrier properties, which may be improved by adding reinforcing compounds (fillers), forming composites. Most reinforced materials present poor matrix-filler interactions, which tend to improve with decreasing filler dimensions. The use of fillers with at least one nanoscale dimension (nanoparticles) produces nanocomposites. Nanoparticles have proportionally larger surface area than their microscale counterparts, which favors the filler-matrix interactions and the performance of the resulting material. Besides nanoreinforcements, nanoparticles can have other functions when added to a polymer, such as antimicrobial activity, etc. in this review paper, the structure and properties of main kinds of nanostructured materials which have been studied to use as nanofiller in biopolymer matrices are overviewed, as well as their effects and applications. PMID:24798951

  19. Microbial Flocculant for Nature Soda

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Peiyong; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Cuixian

    2004-03-31

    Microbial flocculant for nature soda has been studied. Lactobacillus TRJ21, which was able to produce an excellent biopolymer flocculant for nature soda, was obtained in our lab. The microbial flocculant was mainly produced when the bacteria laid in stationary growth phase. Fructose or glucose, as carbon sources, were more favorable for the bacterial growth and flocculant production. The bacteria was able to use ammonium sulfate or Urea as nitrogen to produce flocculant, but was not able to use peptone effectively. High C/N ratio was more favorable to Lactobacillus TRJ21 growth and flocculant production than low C/N ratio. The biopolymer flocculant was mainly composed of polysaccharide and protein with a molecular weight 1.38x106 by gel permeation chromatography. It was able to be easily purified from the culture medium by acetone. Protein in the flocculant was tested for the flocculating activity ingredient by heating the flocculant.

  20. Flavobacterium johnsoniae as a Model Organism for Characterizing Biopolymer Utilization in Oligotrophic Freshwater Environments ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Eveline L. W.; van der Wielen, Paul W. J. J.; van der Kooij, Dick

    2011-01-01

    Biopolymers are important substrates for heterotrophic bacteria in oligotrophic freshwater environments, but information on bacterial growth kinetics with biopolymers is scarce. The objective of this study was to characterize bacterial biopolymer utilization in these environments by assessing the growth kinetics of Flavobacterium johnsoniae strain A3, which is specialized in utilizing biopolymers at μg liter−1 levels. Growth of strain A3 with amylopectin, xyloglucan, gelatin, maltose, or fructose at 0 to 200 μg C liter−1 in tap water followed Monod or Teissier kinetics, whereas growth with laminarin followed Teissier kinetics. Classification of the specific affinity of strain A3 for the tested substrates resulted in the following affinity order: laminarin (7.9 × 10−2 liter·μg−1 of C·h−1) ≫ maltose > amylopectin ≈ gelatin ≈ xyloglucan > fructose (0.69 × 10−2 liter·μg−1 of C·h−1). No specific affinity could be determined for proline, but it appeared to be high. Extracellular degradation controlled growth with amylopectin, xyloglucan, or gelatin but not with laminarin, which could explain the higher affinity for laminarin. The main degradation products were oligosaccharides or oligopeptides, because only some individual monosaccharides and amino acids promoted growth. A higher yield and a lower ATP cell−1 level was achieved at ≤10 μg C liter−1 than at >10 μg C liter−1 with every substrate except gelatin. The high specific affinities of strain A3 for different biopolymers confirm that some representatives of the classes Cytophagia-Flavobacteria are highly adapted to growth with these compounds at μg liter−1 levels and support the hypothesis that Cytophagia-Flavobacteria play an important role in biopolymer degradation in (ultra)oligotrophic freshwater environments. PMID:21803894

  1. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  2. Polymeric waveguide electro-optic beam-steering device with DNA biopolymer conductive cladding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Roberto S.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian A.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Lombardi, Jack; Grote, James; Heckman, Emily M.

    2012-11-01

    A polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide beam-steering device with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer conductive cladding layers and a core layer of the commercially available EO polymer SEO100 is demonstrated with 100% relative poling efficiency. This demonstration device exhibits a deflection efficiency of 99 mrad/kV with a corresponding in-device EO coefficient r33 of 124 pm/V at 1550 nm. When the DNA biopolymer bottom cladding layer is replaced by the commonly used cladding polymer UV15, the deflection efficiency and in-device r33 drop to 34 mrad/kV and 43 pm/V, respectively.

  3. The battle for the "green" polymer. Different approaches for biopolymer synthesis: bioadvantaged vs. bioreplacement.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Nacú; Williams, R Christopher; Cochran, Eric W

    2014-05-14

    Biopolymers have been used throughout history; however, in the last two centuries they have seen a decrease in their utilization as the proliferation of inexpensive and mass-produced materials from petrochemical feedstocks quickly became better-suited to meeting society's needs. In recent years, high petroleum prices and the concern of society to adopt greener and cleaner products has led to an increased interest in biorenewable polymers and the use of sustainable technologies to produce them. Industrial and academic researchers alike have targeted several routes for producing these renewable materials. In this perspective, we compare and contrast two distinct approaches to the economical realization of these materials. One mentality that has emerged we term "bioreplacement", in which the fields of synthetic biology and catalysis collaborate to coax petrochemical monomers from sugars and lignocellulosic feedstocks that can subsequently be used in precisely the same ways to produce precisely the same polymers as we know today. For example, the metabolic engineering of bacteria is currently being explored as a viable route to common monomers such as butadiene, isoprene, styrene, acrylic acid, and sebacic acid, amongst others. Another motif that has recently gained traction may be referred to as the "bioadvantage" strategy, where the multifunctional "monomers" given to us by nature are combined in novel ways using novel chemistries to yield new polymers with new properties; for these materials to compete with their petroleum-based counterparts, they must add some advantage, for example less cost. For instance, acrylated epoxidized soybean oil readily undergoes polymerization to thermosets and recently, thermoplastic rubbers. Additionally, many plants produce pre-polymeric or polymeric materials that require little or no post modification to extract and make use of these compounds. PMID:24687118

  4. In vitro adsorption of aluminum by an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Yesudoss Christu; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing Huei

    2014-05-21

    Accumulation of aluminum in human has been reported to be associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) for aluminum removal efficiency under in vitro conditions as affected by pH, contact time, aluminum concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and essential metals in both aqueous aluminum solution and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (GIF). A low aluminum adsorption occurred at pH 1.5-2.5, followed by a maximum adsorption at pH 3.0-4.0 and precipitating thereafter as aluminum hydroxide at pH > 4. Adsorption was extremely fast with 81-96% of total adsorption being attained within 1 min, reaching equilibrium in 5-10 min. Kinetic data at low (10 mg/L) and high (50 mg/L) concentrations were well described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models, respectively. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were precisely fitted by both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models with the maximum adsorption capacities at 25, 37, and 50 °C being 35.85, 38.68, and 44.23 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations suggested endothermic and spontaneous nature of aluminum adsorption by γ-PGA with increased randomness at the solid/solution interface. Variation in ionic strengths did not alter the adsorption capacity, however, the incorporation of essential metals significantly reduced the aluminum adsorption by following the order copper > iron > zinc > calcium > potassium. Compared to aqueous solution, the aluminum adsorption from simulated GIF was high at all studied pH (1-4) with Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity being 49.43 mg/g at 37 °C and pH 4. The outcome of this study suggests that γ-PGA could be used as a safe detoxifying agent for aluminum. PMID:24799126

  5. Biopolymers produced from gelatin and chitosan using polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitin, and its derivative chitosan, is an abundant waste product derived from crustaceans (e.g. crab). It has unique properties which enable its use in, but not limited to, cosmetic, medical, and food applications. Chitosan has recently been studied, in conjunction with other waste carbohydrates ...

  6. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  7. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  8. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  9. Abundances of Elements in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Interest in stellar coronal abundances was piqued several years ago by the launch of satellites that were able to study the compositions of coronae on stars other than the sun. Motivated by the possibility that other stellar coronae might share the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect solar abundance anomaly, we have in recent years been attempting to determine coronal element abundances in other stars. I will review these results, together with similar results reported in the literature, from a critical perspective of understanding the true uncertainties involved in the measurements. The importance of element abundances for coronal physics will be highlighted, and it will be shown that the differences in the chemical compositions of active stars allow us to draw new conclusions regarding the nature of stellar coronae and coronal heating.

  10. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  11. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  12. Origin of cosmic chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Umberto; Tescari, Edoardo

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, D, D+, H2, H_2^+, HD, HeH+), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman α absorbers at redshift z ≳ 2. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below ˜ 104 K, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/H] at redshifts z ˜ 2-7. Correlations between H I and H2 abundances show temporal and local variations and large spreads as a result of the increasing cosmic star formation activity from z ˜ 6 to 3. The scatter we find in the abundance ratios is compatible with the observational data and is explained by simultaneous enrichment by sources from different stellar phases or belonging to different stellar populations. Simulated synthetic spectra support the existence of metal-poor cold clumps with large optical depth at z ˜ 6 that could be potential Population III sites at low or intermediate redshift. The expected dust content is in line with recent determinations.

  13. Network and Nakamura tridiagonal computational simulation of electrically-conducting biopolymer micro-morphic transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Anwar Bég, O; Zueco, J; Norouzi, M; Davoodi, M; Joneidi, A A; Elsayed, Assma F

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been shown to achieve excellent fabrication control and manipulation of conductive bio-polymer characteristics. To simulate magnetohydrodynamic effects on non-Newtonian electro-conductive bio-polymers (ECBPs) we present herein a theoretical and numerical simulation of free convection magneto-micropolar biopolymer flow over a horizontal circular cylinder (an "enrobing" problem). Eringen's robust micropolar model (a special case of the more general micro-morphic or "microfluid" model) is implemented. The transformed partial differential conservation equations are solved numerically with a powerful and new code based on NSM (Network Simulation Method) i.e. PSPICE. An extensive range of Hartmann numbers, Grashof numbers, micropolar parameters and Prandtl numbers are considered. Excellent validation is also achieved with earlier non-magnetic studies. Furthermore the present PSPICE code is also benchmarked with an implicit tridiagonal solver based on Nakamura's method (BIONAK) again achieving close correlation. The study highlights the excellent potential of both numerical methods described in simulating nonlinear biopolymer micro-structural flows. PMID:24377688

  14. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure–process–property relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gronau, Greta; Krishnaji, Sreevidhya T.; Kinahan, Michelle E.; Giesa, Tristan; Wong, Joyce Y.; Kaplan, David L.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Tailored biomaterials with tunable functional properties are desirable for many applications ranging from drug delivery to regenerative medicine. To improve the predictability of biopolymer materials functionality, multiple design parameters need to be considered, along with appropriate models. In this article we review the state of the art of synthesis and processing related to the design of biopolymers, with an emphasis on the integration of bottom-up computational modeling in the design process. We consider three prominent examples of well-studied biopolymer materials – elastin, silk, and collagen – and assess their hierarchical structure, intriguing functional properties and categorize existing approaches to study these materials. We find that an integrated design approach in which both experiments and computational modeling are used has rarely been applied for these materials due to difficulties in relating insights gained on different length- and time-scales. In this context, multiscale engineering offers a powerful means to accelerate the biomaterials design process for the development of tailored materials that suit the needs posed by the various applications. The combined use of experimental and computational tools has a very broad applicability not only in the field of biopolymers, but can be exploited to tailor the properties of other polymers and composite materials in general. PMID:22938765

  15. FERMENTATION-BASED PROCESSES FOR THE CONVERSION OF FATS, OILS AND DERIVATIVES INTO BIOPOLYMERS AND BIOSURFACTANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal fats and oils, along with the coproducts and waste streams generated in their processing and utilization, are renewable feedstocks useful for the fermentative production of biobased products, such as biopolymers, biosurfactants and oleochemical intermediates. In this paper, we present an ove...

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering with silver nanostructures generated in situ in a sporopollenin biopolymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Virginia; Schulte, Franziska; Rooch, Heidemarie; Feldmann, Ines; Dörfel, Ilona; Österle, Werner; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    2011-03-21

    Silver nanoparticles were generated based on citrate reduction in the ultrastructure of the sporopollenin biopolymer of Ambrosia artemisiifolia (ragweed) and Secale cereale (rye). The nanoparticles enable the acquisition of SERS spectra and thereby a vibrational characterization of the local molecular structure of sporopollenin. PMID:21267489

  17. Stable silver/biopolymer hybrid plasmonic nanostructures for high performance surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silver/biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by adding 100 mg silver nitrate to 2% polyvinyl alcohol solution and reduced the silver nitrate into silver ion using 2 % trisodium citrate for high performance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. Optical properties of nanoparticle were ...

  18. Micro-heterogeneity of corn hulls cellulosic fiber biopolymer studied by multiple-particle tracking (MPT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel technique named multiple-particle tracking (MPT) was used to investigate the micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim, a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The principle of MPT technique is to monitor the thermally driven motion of inert micro-spheres, which...

  19. Single walled carbon nanotubes with functionally adsorbed biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T

    2013-12-17

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA or RNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  20. Micro-heterogeneity of corn hulls cellulosic fiber biopolymer studied by multiple-particle tracking (MPT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel technique named multiple-particle tracking (MPT) was used to investigate the micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim, a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The Multiple-Particle Tracking (MPT) method was used in this study, which was originally described by ...

  1. MOLECULAR TRACERS FOR SMOKE FROM CHARRING/BURNING OF CHITIN BIOPOLYMER. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose are the major organic components of smoke particles emitted to the atmosphere from biomass burning. In urban areas a related biopolymer, chitin, may contribute markers to smoke from grilling/charring o...

  2. Evaluation of biopolymer-modified concrete systems for disposal of cathode ray tube glass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeik; Petrisor, loana G; Yen, Teh Fu

    2005-07-01

    Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) from computer monitors and television sets, which contain significantly high percentage of lead (Pb) by weight, represent an enormous and growing hazardous waste problem in the United States and worldwide. As a result, new technologies are needed to cope with current CRT waste stream and increased hazard and build new markets for its recycled components, developing commercially viable concrete composites, as well as minimizing CRT disposal problems. In this study, commercially available biopolymers, such as xanthan gum, guar gum, and chitosan, were used to encapsulate CRT glass waste, reducing the Pb leachability. The biopolymers utilized contain a number of useful functional groups, such as carboxyl (xanthan), hydroxyl (guar), and amino groups (chitosan), which play important roles in binding and stabilizing Pb onto concrete structures. The use of biopolymers in concrete systems can create a stable interpenetrating cross-linking composite that will last for many years. Results from these new composites show 30% higher compressive strength than standard concrete and a sharp decrease in lead leachability from several thousand milligrams per liter initially to an amount of three-tenths milligrams per liter or lower values (much lower than the U.S. Environment Protection Agency standard for hazardous waste of 5 mg/L by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test), and for some of the composites leachability is below even the standard for drinking water. This efficient and cost-effective CRT-biopolymer-concrete composite is a new class of biopolymer-modified material that can potentially perform a significant role in relieving the current CRT issue. PMID:16111135

  3. Biocompatibility of a Synthetic Biopolymer for the Treatment of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarfare, Shanta; Dacquay, Yann; Askari, Syed; Nusinowitz, Steven; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the retinal safety and toxicity of a novel synthetic biopolymer to be used as a patch to treat rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Methods Thirty one adult wild type albino mice were divided in 2 groups. In Group A (n=9) 0.2 μl balanced salt solution (BSS) and in Group B (n=22), 0.2 μl biopolymer was injected in the subretinal space. Trans-scleral subretinal injection was performed in one eye and the fellow eye was used as control. In both groups, in vivo color fundus photography, electroretinogram (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed before injection and at days 7 and 14 post-intervention. Histological analysis was performed following euthanization at days 1, 7 and 21 post-injection. Results The biopolymer was visualized in the subretinal space in vivo by SD-OCT and post-life by histology up to 1 week after the injection. There were no significant differences in ERG parameters between the two groups at 1 and 2 weeks post-injection. Minimal inflammatory response and loss of photoreceptor cells was only observed in the immediate proximity of the site of scleral perforation, which was similar in both groups. Overall integrity of the outer, inner retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layers was unaffected by the presence of the biopolymer in the subretinal space. Conclusions Functional and histological evaluation suggests that the synthetic biopolymer is non-inflammatory and non-toxic to the eye. It may represent a safe therapeutic agent in the future, for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. PMID:26744635

  4. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  5. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  6. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  7. Effect of plasticizers (water and glycerol) on the diffusion of a small molecule in iota-carrageenan biopolymer films for edible coating application.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Hervet, Hubert; Léger, Liliane; Champion, Dominique; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Voilley, Andrée

    2006-06-01

    Translational diffusion of a fluorescein probe has been measured in iota-carrageenan edible films containing different amounts of glycerol (0, 15, 30, and 45%), using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. The effects of this plasticizer as well as the plasticizing effect of water on the diffusion of fluorescein have been studied in this edible coating mainly composed of natural biopolymer. Diffusion coefficients of about 10(-13) m2 s(-1) have been measured in these films for water activity (aw) lower than 0.7. Above this water content threshold, fluorescein translational diffusion coefficient increases up to 10(-12) m2 s(-1). Another interesting information obtained from FRAP experiments on this system is the ratio of the diffusing molecules which are immobilized in the carrageenan matrix at aw lower than 0.98. Moreover, films containing more than 30% glycerol (w/w carrageenan) present a huge increase of the diffusion coefficient of fluorescein at high water activity (about 2 orders of magnitude), this effect being less pronounced at low water activity. The increase of diffusion seems to be only related to the water content, and glycerol only acts through the enhancement of water adsorption. Therefore, in biopolymer films containing polyol plasticizers, the gain in mobility could be devoted to the effect of the ubiquitous plasticizing molecule, water, whose adsorption is increased by the plasticizer. PMID:16768427

  8. Nature's amazing biopolymer: basic mechanical and hydrological properties of soil affected by plant exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Roose, Tiina; Raffan, Annette; George, Timothy; Bengough, Glyn; Brown, Lawrie; Keyes, Sam; Daly, Keith; Hallett, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Plant exudates are known to have a very large impact on soil physical properties through changes in mechanical and hydrological processes driven by long-chain polysaccharides and surface active compounds. Whilst these impacts are well known, the basic physical properties of these exudates have only been reported in a small number of studies. We present data for exudates obtained from barley roots and chia seeds, incorporating treatments examining biological decomposition of the exudates. When these exudates were added to a sandy loam soil, contact angle and drop penetration time increased exponentially with increasing exudate concentration. These wetting properties were strongly correlated with both exudate density and zero-shear viscosity, but not with exudate surface tension. Water holding capacity and water repellency of exudate mixed soil tremendously increased with exudate concentration, however they were significantly reduced on decomposition when measured after 14 days of incubation at 16C. Mechanical stability greatly increased with increasing exudate amendment to soils, which was assessed using a rheological amplitude sweep test near saturation, at -50 cm matric potential (field capacity) using indentation test, and at air-dry condition using the Brazilian test. This reflects that exudates not only attenuate plant water stress but also impart mechanical stability to the rhizosphere. These data are highly relevant to the understanding and modelling of rhizosphere development, which is the next phase of our research.

  9. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  10. A CRADLE TO GATE LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE BIOPOLYMER POLYLACTIC ACID: LOOKING BEYOND GLOBAL WARMING AND FOSSIL FUEL USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derived from corn, the biopolymer polylactic acid (PLA) has recently emerged in the marketplace and is advertised as a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Research into the environmental implications of biobased production has focused primarily on global warming...

  11. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  12. Natural Rubber Biosynthesis and a Profitable Guayule Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is a biopolymer apparently synthesized in plants by a membrane-bound rubber transferase protein complex. The kinetic features of rubber transfereases make them a distinct class of cis-prenyl transferases. The structure of the particular allylic pyrophosphate in...

  13. PALS: A unique probe for the molecular organisation of biopolymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussenova, M.; Alam, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    This short review aims to illustrate the versatility of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) when utilized for the characterization of biopolymers (e.g.: starch, fractionated maltooligomers, gelatin and cellulose derivatives) commonly used for the formulation of pharmaceutical encapsulants. By showing examples from a number of recent PALS studies, we illustrate that this technique can be used to probe the changes in thermodynamic state and molecular packing for a wide range of biopolymer matrices as a function of temperature, matrix composition and water content. This provides a basis for establishing composition-structure-property relationships for these materials, which would eventually enable the rational control of their macroscopic properties and the design of optimal encapsulating matrices and intelligent drug delivery systems.

  14. A new biopolymer for high-temperature profile control. Part 1; Laboratory testing

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.T.; Paul, J.M.; Phelps, C.H.; Sampath, K. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on an extracellular polysaccharide produced by Alcaligenes bacteria that has been crosslinked to form firm gels that are stable for long periods at elevated temperatures. The biopolymer can be gelled with multivalent ions such as Cr{sup +3}; it can also be gelled at the 2,000-to-4,000-ppm level without Cr{sup 3+} in high-salinity ({approximately}20% total dissolved solids (TDS)) brines. Gel samples have been stable for 2 years at 74 and 90{degrees} C. Gels could be formed over a wide pH range, but best long-term stability was achieved in the pH range of 7 to 8. A flow test of Alcaligenes biopolymer gel in Berea sandstone at 74{degrees} C showed that the gel gave a brine permeability reduction factor of 320.

  15. Development of Budesonide Loaded Biopolymer Based Dry Powder Inhaler: Optimization, In Vitro Deposition, and Cytotoxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Ashwin J.; Pawar, Atmaram P.; Purohit, Ravindra N.

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of DPI technology has boosted the use of sensitive drug molecules for lung diseases. However, delivery of these molecules from conventional DPI to the active site still poses a challenge with respect to deposition efficiency in the lung. At same time, serious systemic side effects of drugs have become a cause for concern. The developed budesonide loaded biopolymer based controlled release DPI had shown maximum in vitro lung deposition with least toxicity. The subject of present study, lactose-free budesonide loaded biopolymer based DPI, further corroborates the great potential of antiasthmatic drugs. This technology is expected to revolutionize the approaches towards enhanced therapeutic delivery of prospective drugs. PMID:26556201

  16. High-throughput biopolymer desalting by solid-phase extraction prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gilar, M; Belenky, A; Wang, B H

    2001-06-29

    In the last 10 years mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important method for analysis of peptides, proteins and DNA. It was recently utilized for accurate high-throughput protein identification, sequencing and DNA genotyping. The presence of non-volatile buffers compromises sensitivity and accuracy of MS biopolymer analysis; it is essential to remove sample contaminants prior to analysis. We have developed a fast and efficient method for desalting of DNA oligonucleotides and peptides using 96-well solid-phase extraction plates packed with 5 mg of Waters Oasis HLB sorbent (Waters, Milford, MA, USA). This reversed-phase sorbent retains the biopolymer analytes, while non-retained inorganic ions are washed out with pure deionized water. DNA oligonucleotides or peptides are eluted using a small amount (20-100 microl) of acetonitrile-water (70:30, v/v) solution. The SPE desalting performance meets the requirements for MS applications such as protein digest analysis and DNA genotyping. PMID:11461010

  17. Pulsed laser induced birefringence switching in a biopolymer matrix containing azo-dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Ziemienczuk, Marta; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2011-07-01

    All optical switching has been studied using the Optical Kerr Effect (OKE) configuration in a biopolymer matrix containing an azo-dye: the Disperse Orange 3 (DO3). The biopolymer system consisted of a deoxyribonucleic acid blended with cationic surfactant molecule cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride is suitable for optical quality thin film fabrication. The excitation beams inducing birefringence were delivered from a continuous wave laser at 532 nm and another nanosecond pulsed Nd: YAG laser. The birefringence was instantaneously monitored under crossed polarizer system by a weak non-absorbed light from a cw He-Ne laser working at 632.8 nm. Fast all optical switching process (in the range of microseconds) and excellent reversibility have been observed.

  18. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  19. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses. PMID:21619017

  20. Biopolymers production with carbon source from the wastes of a beer brewery industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Phoeby Ai Ling

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the potential and feasibility of malt wastes, and other food wastes, such as soy wastes, ice-cream wastes, confectionery wastes, vinegar wastes, milk waste and sesame oil, in the induction of biosynthesis of PHA, in the cellular assembly of novel PHA with improved physical and chemical properties, and in the reduction of the cost of PHA production. In the first part of the experiments, a specific culture of Alcaligenes latus DSM 1124 was selected to ferment several types of food wastes as carbon sources into biopolymers. In addition, the biopolymer production, by way of using malt waste, of microorganisms from municipal activated sludge was also investigated. In the second part, the experiments focused on the synthesis of biopolymer with a higher molecular mass via the bacterial strain, which was selected and isolated from sesame oil, identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis . Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of PHB were studied by GPC. Molecular weight of PHB produced from various types of food wastes by Alcaligenes latus was higher than using synthetic sucrose medium as nutrient, however, it resulted in the reverse by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thermal properties of biopolymers were studied by DSC and TG. Using malt wastes as nutrients by Alcaligenes latus gave a higher melting temperature. Using sucrose, confectionery and sesame oil as nutrients by Staphylococcus epidermidis gave higher melting temperature. Optimization was carried out for the recovery of microbial PHB from Alcaligenes latus. Results showed that molecular weight can be controlled by changing the hypochlorite concentration, the ratio of chloroform to hypochlorite solution and the extraction time. In addition, the determination of PHB content by thermogravimetric analysis method with wet cell was the first report in our study. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. The features of infrared spectrum of bio-polymer and its theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-12-01

    We have here an insight into the features of molecular structures of bio-polymers with α-helix structure using infrared spectrum and elucidated theoretically, its relationship with bio-functions. In this case, we analyzed first the features of molecular structure of collagen and collected further the infrared spectrum of absorption of collagen and bovine serum albumin containing α-helix conformation in 400-4000 cm-1 as well as their changes of strength of infrared absorption with varying temperatures using Fourier Transform-Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers in the region of 15-95°C. The results show that there is a new band of 1650 cm-1 close to the amide-I band of 1666 cm-1 or 1670 cm-1 in these bio-polymers, its strength decreases exponentially with increasing temperature of the systems, which can be expressed by exp[-(0.437 + 8.987 × 10-6 T2)], but 1666 cm-1 band increases linearly with increasing temperature. We calculated the energy spectrum of the protein molecules with α-helix conformation using the Soliton Theory of bio-energy transport, which are basically same with the experimental results measured by us. From these results and soliton theory we can conclude that the nonlinear soliton excitation, corresponding to 1650 cm-1 band and the exciton excitation, is related to 1666 cm-1 band, exists in the collagen and bovine serum albumin. In the meanwhile, these results also verified that the soliton theory of bio-energy transport along α-helix bio-polymers is appropriate to the protein molecules with α-helix conformation. Therefore, the studied results are helpful to elucidate the relationship between the molecular structure and bio-function of these bio-polymers.

  2. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  3. Composite biodegradable biopolymer coatings of silk fibroin - Poly(3-hydroxybutyric-acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric-acid) for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroiu, Floralice Marimona; Stefan, Nicolaie; Visan, Anita Ioana; Nita, Cristina; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Rasoga, Oana; Socol, Marcela; Zgura, Irina; Cristescu, Rodica; Craciun, Doina; Socol, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Composite silk fibroin-poly(3-hydroxybutyric-acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric-acid) (SF-PHBV) biodegradable coatings were grown by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation on titanium substrates. Their physico-chemical properties and particularly the degradation behavior in simulated body fluid at 37 °C were studied as first step of applicability in local controlled release for tissue regeneration applications. SF and PHBV, natural biopolymers with excellent biocompatibility, but different biodegradability and tensile strength properties, were combined in a composite to improve their properties as coatings for biomedical uses. FTIR analyses showed the stoichiometric transfer from targets to coatings by the presence in the spectra of the main absorption maxima characteristic of both polymers. XRD investigations confirmed the FTIR results showing differences in crystallization behavior with respect to the SF and PHBV content. Contact angle values obtained through wettability measurements indicated the MAPLE deposited coatings were highly hydrophilic; surfaces turning hydrophobic with the increase of the PHBV component. Degradation assays proved that higher PHBV contents resulted in enhanced resistance and a slower degradation rate of composite coatings in SBF. Distinct drug-release schemes could be obtained by adjusting the SF:PHBV ratio to controllably tuning the coatings degradation rate, from rapid-release formulas, where SF predominates, to prolonged sustained ones, for larger PHBV content.

  4. Formation of multilayered biopolymer microcapsules and microparticles in a multiphase microfluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Elisabeth; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a scalable continuous microfluidic-based method for the preparation of multilayered biopolymer microcapsules and microparticles, with a size range of 1 to 100 μm, in a single-layered polydimethylsiloxane-based device. This new approach has been utilised to produce polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based microparticles, layered with subsequent stage wise coatings of polylactide-based block copolymers and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The production process was shown to allow for on-chip encapsulation of protein and vitamin molecules in the biopolymer micro particles, without any further handling after collection from the device. We have studied the release profiles in the case of model molecules of distinctive molecular weights, namely, vitronectin, horse radish peroxidase, and vitamin B(12). We compared the release properties of the microparticles to those from macro-gels of the same materials prepared off-chip. The results indicated that the microparticles have definitively different molecular weight cut-off characteristics, likely due to a denser microstructure within the microparticles compared to the bulk hydrogels. This difference suggests that significant benefits may exist in the use of this method to produce layered biopolymer microparticles in achieving improved controlled release and encapsulation. PMID:22712036

  5. Bioactivity of noble metal nanoparticles decorated with biopolymers and their application in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-30

    The unique properties of nanomaterials can be applied to solve different problems including new ways of drug delivery. Noble metal nanoparticles are most promising because they have been used for medicinal purposes since ancient time. It is evident from the past studies that the metallic nanoparticles are much more effective against various microorganisms when compared to their conventional counterparts. However, decoration of such nanoparticles with biomaterials add more advantages to their antimicrobial activity. Decoration of metal nanoparticles with biopolymers is a quite new area of research. Studies performed hitherto shown that nanoparticles of noble metals like silver, gold and platinum demonstrated better antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities when conjugated with biopolymers. The development of such technology has potential to develop materials that are more effective in the field of health science. Considering the importance and uniqueness of this concept, the present review aims to discuss the use of biopolymer-decorated metal nanoparticles for combating various diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Moreover, the nanotoxicity aspect has also been discussed. PMID:26520406

  6. Nanoencapsulation of the Bioactive Compounds of Spirulina with a Microalgal Biopolymer Coating.

    PubMed

    Greque de Morais, Michele; Greque de Morais, Etiele; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; Gonçalves, Carolina Ferrer; Lisboa, Cristiane; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae have been studied in biotechnological processes due to the various biocompounds that can be obtained from their biomasses, including pigments, proteins, antioxidants, biopeptides, fatty acids and biopolymers. Microalgae biopolymers are biodegradable materials that present similar characteristics to traditional polymers, with the advantage of being rapidly degraded when discarded. In addition, nanoencapsulation is capable of increasing the availability of bioactive compounds by allowing the release of these biocompounds to occur slowly over time. The use of polymers in the nanoencapsulation of active ingredients can mask the undesired physicochemical properties of the compounds to be encapsulated, thereby enhancing consumer acceptability. This covering also acts as a barrier against several foreign substances that can react with bioactive compounds and reduce their activity. Studies of the development of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) nanocapsules from microbial sources are little explored; this review addresses the use of nanotechnology to obtain bioactive compounds coated with biopolymer nanocapsules, both obtained from Spirulina biomasses. These microalgae are Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) certified, which guarantees that the biomass can be used to obtain high added value biocompounds, which can be used in human and animal supplementation. PMID:27398435

  7. Impact of Anodic Respiration on Biopolymer Production and Consequent Membrane Fouling.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Terada, Kotaro; Miyake, Hiroshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently been integrated with membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment and energy recovery. However, the impact of integration of the two reactors on membrane fouling of MBR has not been reported yet. In this study, MFCs equipped with different external resistances (1-10 000 ohm) were operated, and membrane-fouling potentials of the MFC anode effluents were directly measured to study the impact of anodic respiration by exoelectrogens on membrane fouling. It was found that although the COD removal efficiency was comparable, the fouling potential was significantly reduced due to less production of biopolymer (a major foulant) in MFCs equipped with lower external resistance (i.e., with higher current generation) as compared with aerobic respiration. Furthermore, it was confirmed that Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA, a dominant exoelectrogen in anode biofilms of MFCs in this study, produced less biopolymer under anodic respiration condition than fumarate (anaerobic) respiration condition, resulting in lower membrane-fouling potential. Taken together, anodic respiration can mitigate membrane fouling of MBR due to lower biopolymer production, suggesting that development of an electrode-assisted MBR (e-MBR) without aeration is feasible. PMID:27427998

  8. Microstructural design of biopolymer blends and related elasticity with imperfect interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Belhabib, Sofiane; Guessasma, Sofiane; Haddadi, Halim

    2016-03-15

    The underlined microstructure of biopolymer blends reflects complexity of mass and heat transfer during processing. In the present work, such complexity is apprehended using simple and intuitive way to generate typical microstructures resulting from thermomoulding processing. The starting point is a simple generation scheme of the feed powder approximated as circular heat sources. Finite element computation of a transient thermal analysis is performed and the resulting nodal fields are again converted into 2D microstructures. The final microstructures prove to be similar in all geometrical characteristics starch-zein blends. Elasticity response of these blends is explored using finite element computation. Sensitivity analysis is performed to derive the effect of perfect and imperfect interface properties on the mechanical performance of the biopolymer blend. Predictions show a significant role of interfaces which trigger the elasticity properties of the biopolymer blends much larger than the contrast in phase properties. This study demonstrates that nonlinear interface effect on elasticity behaviour is related to geometrical percolation that occurs at specific phase content. PMID:26794767

  9. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10 -5 s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R1ρ = 1/ T1ρ appears over a range of easily accessible B1 values. Measurements of T1ρ at constant temperature and different B1 values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R1 = 1/ T1. The T1ρ dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme).

  10. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10(-5)s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R(1)(ρ)=1/T(1)(ρ) appears over a range of easily accessible B(1) values. Measurements of T(1)(ρ) at constant temperature and different B(1) values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R(1)=1/T(1). The T(1)(ρ) dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme). PMID:20961779

  11. Selective recovery of uranium and thorium ions from dilute aqueous solutions by animal biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Suyama, Kyozo; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    Selective actinide ion recovery from dilute, aqueous, multication waste streams is an important problem. The recovery of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) by various animal biopolymers was examined. Of four species of biopolymers tested, a high uptake of uranium and thorium was found in hen eggshell membrane (ESM) and silk proteins, with the maximum uranium and thorium recovery exceeding 98% and 79%, respectively. The uptake of U and Th was significantly affected by the pH of the solution. The optimum pH values were 6 and 3 for the uptake of U and Th, respectively. The effect of temperature differed with the metal. The uptake of U decreased with increasing temperature (30-50 degrees C), whereas the Th uptake increased with increasing temperature. Selective recovery of U and Th from dilute aqueous binary and multimetal solutions was also examined. ESM and silk proteins tested were effective and selective for removing each metal by controlling the pH and temperature of the solution. In multimetal systems, the order of sorption of ESM proteins was preferential: U > Cu > Cd > Mn > Pb > Th > Ni > Co > Zn at pH 6 and Th > U > Cu > Pb > Cd > Mn > Co > Ni = Zn at pH 3. These biopolymers appear to have potential for use in a commercial process for actinide recovery from actinide-containing wastewater. PMID:12019520

  12. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Collins, A. M.; Mann, S.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C5H5- ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm-1 and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm-1. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm-1 and 1709 cm-1 respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the {-110}, {001}, {-201}, {-111}, {200}, {-211}, {210}, {120} and {111} according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  13. Biological Effects of Spirulina (Arthrospira) Biopolymers and Biomass in the Development of Nanostructured Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina is produced from pure cultures of the photosynthetic prokaryotic cyanobacteria Arthrospira. For many years research centers throughout the world have studied its application in various scientific fields, especially in foods and medicine. The biomass produced from Spirulina cultivation contains a variety of biocompounds, including biopeptides, biopolymers, carbohydrates, essential fatty acids, minerals, oligoelements, and sterols. Some of these compounds are bioactive and have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant, and antifungal properties. These compounds can be used in tissue engineering, the interdisciplinary field that combines techniques from cell science, engineering, and materials science and which has grown in importance over the past few decades. Spirulina biomass can be used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), biopolymers that can substitute synthetic polymers in the construction of engineered extracellular matrices (scaffolds) for use in tissue cultures or bioactive molecule construction. This review describes the development of nanostructured scaffolds based on biopolymers extracted from microalgae and biomass from Spirulina production. These scaffolds have the potential to encourage cell growth while reducing the risk of organ or tissue rejection. PMID:25157367

  14. The physicochemical properties of a spray dried glutinous rice starch biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Laovachirasuwan, Pornpun; Peerapattana, Jomjai; Srijesdaruk, Voranuch; Chitropas, Padungkwan; Otsuka, Makoto

    2010-06-15

    Glutinous rice starch (GRS) is a biopolymer used widely in the food industry but not at all in the pharmaceutical industry. There are several ways to modify this biopolymer. Physical modification is simple and cheap because it requires no chemicals or biological agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the physicochemical properties of a spray dried glutinous rice starch (SGRS) produced from pregelatinized GRS. The surface morphology changed from an irregular to concave spherical shape as revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SGRS was almost amorphous as determined by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The water molecules became linked through hydrogen bonds to the exposed hydroxyl group of amorphous SGRS as determined by Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Then, SGRS formed a colloid gel matrix with water and developed a highly viscous gelatinous form as determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and a stress control type rheometer. In addition, SGRS can swell and produce a gelatinous surface barrier like a hydrophilic matrix biopolymer which controls drug release. Therefore, a novel application of SGRS is as a sustained release modifier for direct compression tablets in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20307959

  15. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cell with buffer layer of DNA-CTMA biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Won-Ho; Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Choi, Sie-Young

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of nip-type a-Si:H thin film solar cells based on DNA-CTMA biopolymer was investigated. The DNA-CTMA was used as the buffer layer in nip-type a-Si:H solar cell. The Eopt of the DNA-CTMA biopolymer was measured with UV-VIS spectrometer. The Eopt of DNA-CTMA was determined as 3.96 eV by the plot of (Ahν)2 versus hν. All films of amorphous materials were deposited by PECVD method. The solar cell with a simple structure of glass/ITO/n-a-Si:H/i-a-Si:H/p-a-Si:H/DNA-CTMA/Al was fabricated. The various values of Voc, Jsc, FF, and conversion efficiency η were measured under 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5) solar simulator irradiation. Consequently, the resulting in solar cell showed an enhancement in conversion efficiency η compared to conventional nip-type a-Si:H solar cell without buffer layer of DNA-CTMA biopolymer.

  16. Biological effects of Spirulina (Arthrospira) biopolymers and biomass in the development of nanostructured scaffolds.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina is produced from pure cultures of the photosynthetic prokaryotic cyanobacteria Arthrospira. For many years research centers throughout the world have studied its application in various scientific fields, especially in foods and medicine. The biomass produced from Spirulina cultivation contains a variety of biocompounds, including biopeptides, biopolymers, carbohydrates, essential fatty acids, minerals, oligoelements, and sterols. Some of these compounds are bioactive and have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant, and antifungal properties. These compounds can be used in tissue engineering, the interdisciplinary field that combines techniques from cell science, engineering, and materials science and which has grown in importance over the past few decades. Spirulina biomass can be used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), biopolymers that can substitute synthetic polymers in the construction of engineered extracellular matrices (scaffolds) for use in tissue cultures or bioactive molecule construction. This review describes the development of nanostructured scaffolds based on biopolymers extracted from microalgae and biomass from Spirulina production. These scaffolds have the potential to encourage cell growth while reducing the risk of organ or tissue rejection. PMID:25157367

  17. Applications of free-electron lasers to measurements of energy transfer in biopolymers and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn S.; Johnson, J. B.; Kozub, John A.; Tribble, Jerri A.; Wagner, Katrina

    1992-08-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) provide tunable, pulsed radiation in the infrared. Using the FEL as a pump beam, we are investigating the mechanisms for energy transfer between localized vibrational modes and between vibrational modes and lattice or phonon modes. Either a laser-Raman system or a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer will serve as the probe beam, with the attribute of placing the burden of detection on two conventional spectroscopic techniques that circumvent the limited response of infrared detectors. More specifically, the Raman effect inelastically shifts an exciting laser line, typically a visible frequency, by the energy of the vibrational mode; however, the shifted Raman lines also lie in the visible, allowing for detection with highly efficient visible detectors. With regards to FTIR spectroscopy, the multiplex advantage yields a distinct benefit for infrared detector response. Our group is investigating intramolecular and intermolecular energy transfer processes in both biopolymers and more traditional materials. For example, alkali halides contain a number of defect types that effectively transfer energy in an intermolecular process. Similarly, the functioning of biopolymers depends on efficient intramolecular energy transfer. Understanding these mechanisms will enhance our ability to modify biopolymers and materials with applications to biology, medecine, and materials science.

  18. Biopolymer-Lipid Bilayer Interaction Modulates the Physical Properties of Liposomes: Mechanism and Structure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Wenshui; Xia, Shuqin

    2015-08-19

    This study was conducted to elucidate the conformational dependence of the modulating ability of chitosan, a positively charged biopolymer, on a new type of liposome composed of mixed lipids including egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) and nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). Analysis of the dynamic and structure of bilayer membrane upon interaction with chitosan by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques demonstrated that, in addition to providing a physical barrier for the membrane surface, the adsorption of chitosan extended and crimped chains rigidified the lipid membrane. However, the decrease in relative microviscosity and order parameter suggested that the presence of chitosan coils disturbed the membrane organization. It was also noted that the increase of fluidity in the lipid bilayer center was not pronounced, indicating the shallow penetration of coils into the hydrophobic interior of bilayer. Microscopic observations revealed that chitosan adsorption not only affected the morphology of liposomes but also modulated the particle aggregation and fusion. Especially, a number of very heterogeneous particles were visualized, which tended to confirm the role of chitosan coils as a "polymeric surfactant". In addition to particle deformation, the membrane permeability was also tuned. These findings may provide a new perspective to understand the physiological functionality of biopolymer and design biopolymer-liposome composite structures as delivery systems for bioactive components. PMID:26173584

  19. Using Small-Angle Scattering Techniques to Understand Mechanical Properties of Biopolymer-Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.

    2013-01-01

    The design and engineering of innovative biopolymer-based biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications should be based on the understanding of the relationship between their nanoscale structure and mechanical properties. Down the road, such understanding could be fundamental to tune the properties of engineered tissues, extracellular matrices for cell delivery and proliferation/differentiation, etc. In this tutorial review, we attempt to show in what way biomaterial structural data can help to understand the bulk material properties. We begin with some background on common types of biopolymers used in biomaterials research, discuss some typical mechanical testing techniques and then review how others in the field of biomaterials have utilized small-angle scattering for material characterization. Detailed examples are then used to show the full range of possible characterization techniques available for biopolymer-based biomaterials. Future developments in the area of material characterization by small-angle scattering will undoubtedly facilitate the use of structural data to control the kinetics of assembly and final properties of prospective biomaterials. PMID:24273590

  20. A differential vapor-pressure equipment for investigations of biopolymer interactions.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim B; Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The design and performance of an equipment for the measurement of vapor pressures over liquid or solid samples is presented. The equilibrium pressure difference, DeltaP, between a sample and a reference of known vapor pressure is recorded as a function of composition and/or temperature. Through the use of high-accuracy capacitance manometers and a leak-tight system of stainless steel pipes, below-sealed valves and metal-gasket fittings, DeltaP can be measured with a resolution of about 0.5 micro bar (0.05 Pa) in some applications. This sensitivity level, along with other features of the equipment, particularly a "gas-phase titration" routine for changing the cell composition, makes it effective for the investigations of several types of biopolymer interactions. These include isothermal studies of net affinities such as the adsorption of water to proteins or membranes, the preferential interaction of biopolymers with the components of a mixed solvent, the partitioning of solutes between a membrane and the aqueous bulk and the weak, specific binding of ligands to macromolecules. Furthermore, a temperature-scanning mode allows real-time elucidation of such interactions at thermally induced conformational changes in biopolymers. Selected examples of these applications are presented and discussed. PMID:11741714

  1. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water.

    PubMed

    Vila, M; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Cicuéndez, M; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-08-15

    3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 μmol/g in the case of Pb(2+), 378 μmol/g of Cu(2+) and 316 μmol/g of Cd(2+). These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. PMID:21616595

  2. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  3. Native Silk Feedstock as a Model Biopolymer: A Rheological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Laity, Peter R; Holland, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Variability in silk's rheology is often regarded as an impediment to understanding or successfully copying the natural spinning process. We have previously reported such variability in unspun native silk extracted straight from the gland of the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori and discounted classical explanations such as differences in molecular weight and concentration. We now report that variability in oscillatory measurements can be reduced onto a simple master-curve through normalizing with respect to the crossover. This remarkable result suggests that differences between silk feedstocks are rheologically simple and not as complex as originally thought. By comparison, solutions of poly(ethylene-oxide) and hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose showed similar normalization behavior; however, the resulting curves were broader than for silk, suggesting greater polydispersity in the (semi)synthetic materials. Thus, we conclude Nature may in fact produce polymer feedstocks that are more consistent than typical man-made counterparts as a model for future rheological investigations. PMID:27315508

  4. 2013-2014 Production of guayule natural rubber in Arizona, U.S.A.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber is a unique biopolymer whose physical properties cannot be replicated in synthetic alternatives; therefore, it is required for production of tires (passenger, truck, and aircraft) and thousands of consumer and medical products. While demand for natural rubber is expected to increase ...

  5. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  6. Transformation of amyloid-like fibers, formed from an elastin-based biopolymer, into a hydrogel: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Flamia, R; Salvi, A M; D'Alessio, L; Castle, J E; Tamburro, A M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the propensity of elastin-based biopolymers to form amyloid-like fibers when dissolved in water. These are of interest when considered as "ancestral units" of elastin in which they represent the simplest sequences in the hydrophobic regions of the general type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu). We normally refer to these biopolymers based on elastin or related to elastin units as "elastin-like polypeptides". The requirement of water for the formation of amyloids seems quite interesting and deserves investigation, the water representing the natural transport medium in human cells. As a matter of fact, the "natural" supramolecular organization of elastin is in the form of beaded-string-like filaments and not in the form of amyloids whose "in vivo" deposition is associated with some important human diseases. Our work is directed, therefore, to understanding the mechanism by which such hydrophobic sequences form amyloids and any conditions by which they might regress to a non-amyloid filament. The elastin-like sequence here under investigation is the ValGlyGlyValGly pentapeptide that has been previously analyzed both in its monomer and polymer form. In particular, we have focused our investigation on the apparent stability of amyloids formed from poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), and we have observed these fibers evolving to a hydrogel after prolonged aging in water. We will show how atomic force microscopy can be combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to gain an insight into the spontaneous organization of an elastin-like polypeptide driven by interfacial interactions. The results are discussed also in light of fractal-like assembly and their implications from a biomedical point of view. PMID:17206798

  7. Zwitterionic Hydrogel-Biopolymer Assembly towards Biomimetic Superlubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Raymond; Zhu, Elaine

    2014-03-01

    One superlubricant in nature is the synovial fluid (SF), comprising of a high molecular weight polysaccharide, hyaluronic acid (HA), and a globule protein, lubricin. In this bio-inspired materials research, we have explored hydrogel particles to mimic lubricin as a ``ball-bearing'' and control their interaction with the viscoelastic HA matrix. Biocompatible poly(N-[2-(Methacyloyloxy)ethyl]dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (PMSA) hydrogel particles are synthesized to examine the electrostatic induced assembly of PMSA-HA supramolecular complexes in aqueous solutions. Fluorescence microscopy and rheology experiments have characterized the tunable network structure and viscoelastic properties of PMSA-HA aggregates by HA concentration and ionic conditions in aqueous solution. When being grafted to a solid surface, the PMSA-HA composite thin film exhibits superior low biofouling and friction performance, suggesting great promises as artificial superlubricants.

  8. Application of electron beam plasma for biopolymers modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilieva, T. M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of the Electron Beam Plasma treatment on natural polysaccharide chitosan were studied experimentally. Low molecular water-soluble products of chitosan and chitooligosaccharides were obtained by treating the original polymers in the Electron Beam Plasma of oxygen and water vapor. The molecular mass of the products varied from 18 kDa to monomeric fragments. The degradation of the original polymers was due to the action of active oxygen particles (atomic and singlet oxygen) and the particles of the water plasmolysis (hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxides). The 95% yield of low molecular weight chitosans was attained by optimizing the treatment conditions. The studies of the antimicrobial activity of low molecular products showed that they strongly inhibit the multiplication of colon bacillus, aurococcus and yeast-like fungi. The EBP-stimulated degradation of polysaccharides and proteins were found to result from breaking β-1,4 glycosidic bounds and peptide bonds, respectively.

  9. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  10. Biopolymer-induced calcium phosphate scaling in membrane-based water treatment systems: Langmuir model films studies.

    PubMed

    Dahdal, Yara N; Oren, Yoram; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Herzberg, Moshe; Ying, Wang; Kasher, Roni; Rapaport, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Biofouling and scaling on reverse osmosis (RO) or nanofiltration (NF) membranes during desalination of secondary and tertiary effluents pose an obstacle that limits the reuse of wastewater. In this study we explored the mineral scaling induced by biopolymers originated from bacterial biofilms: bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen, lysozyme and alginic acid, as well as an extracts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from bio-fouled RO membranes from wastewater treatment facility. Mineralization studies were performed on Langmuir films of the biopolymers deposited at the interface of a solution simulating RO desalination of secondary-treated wastewater effluents. All studied biopolymers and EPS induced heterogeneous mineralization of mainly calcium phosphate. Using IR spectroscopy coupled with systematic quantitative analysis of the surface pressure versus molecular-area isotherms, we determined the mineralization tendencies of the biopolymers to be in the order of: fibrinogen>lysozyme>BSA>alginic acid. The biopolymers and EPS studied here were found to be accelerators of calcium-phosphate mineralization. This study demonstrates the utilization of Langmuir surface-pressure area isotherms and a model solution in quantitatively assessing the mineralization tendencies of various molecular components of EPS in context of membrane-based water treatment systems. PMID:27015648

  11. Covalently-crosslinked mucin biopolymer hydrogels for sustained drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Connor V; David, Laurent; Crouzier, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The sustained delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs from hydrogels has remained a challenge requiring the design and scalable production of complex multifunctional synthetic polymers. Here, we demonstrate that mucin glycoproteins, the gel-forming constituents of native mucus, are suitable for assembly into robust hydrogels capable of facilitating the sustained release of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Covalently-crosslinked mucin hydrogels were generated via exposure of methacrylated mucin to ultraviolet light in the presence of a free radical photoinitiator. The hydrogels exhibited an elastic modulus similar to that of soft mammalian tissue and were sensitive to proteolytic degradation by pronase. Paclitaxel, a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, and polymyxin B, a positively-charged hydrophilic antibacterial drug, were retained in the hydrogels and released linearly with time over seven days. After four weeks of drug release, the hydrogels continued to release sufficient amounts of active paclitaxel to reduce HeLa cell viability and sufficient amounts of active polymyxin B to prevent bacterial proliferation. Along with previously-established anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and hydrocarbon-solubilizing properties of mucin, the results of this study establish mucin as a readily-available, chemically-versatile, naturally-biocompatible alternative to complex multifunctional synthetic polymers as building blocks in the design of biomaterials for sustained drug delivery. PMID:25818947

  12. Robust and tailored wet adhesion in biopolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Torbjörn; Pendergraph, Samuel A; Utsel, Simon; Marais, Andrew; Gustafsson, Emil; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Model layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were fabricated in order to study their wet adhesive behavior. The film characteristics were investigated to understand the inherent structures during the assembly process. Subsequently, the adhesion of these systems was evaluated to understand the correlation between the structure of the film and the energy required to separate these LbL assemblies. We describe how the conditions of the LbL fabrication can be utilized to control the adhesion between films. The characteristics of the film formation are examined in the absence and presence of salt during the film formation. The dependence on contact time and LbL film thickness on the critical pull-off force and work of adhesion are discussed. Specifically, by introducing sodium chloride (NaCl) in the assembly process, the pull-off forces can be increased by a factor of 10 and the work of adhesion by 2 orders of magnitude. Adjusting both the contact time and the film thickness enables control of the adhesive properties within these limits. Based on these results, we discuss how the fabrication procedure can create tailored adhesive interfaces with properties surpassing analogous systems found in nature. PMID:25333327

  13. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; DenHartog, E. A.; Collier, Jason; Dodge, Homer L.

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy the progenitors of the halo stars responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

  14. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Collins, A. M.; Mann, S.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{sup −} ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm{sup −1} and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm{sup −1}. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm{sup −1} and 1709 cm{sup −1} respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the (−110), (001), (−201), (−111), (200), (−211), (210), (120) and (111) according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, H.D.; Miller, A.

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  16. Biopolymer deuteration for neutron scattering and other isotope-sensitive techniques.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert A; Garvey, Christopher J; Darwish, Tamim A; Foster, L John R; Holden, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The use of microbial biosynthesis to produced deuterated recombinant proteins is a well-established practice in investigations of the relationship between molecular structure and function using neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, there have been few reports of using microbial synthetic capacity to produce labeled native biopolymers. Here, we describe methods for the production of deuterated polyhydroxyalkanoate biopolyesters in bacteria, the polysaccharide chitosan in the yeast Pichia pastoris, and cellulose in the bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The resulting molecules offer not only multiple options in creating structural contrast in polymer blends and composites in structural studies but also insight into the biosynthetic pathways themselves. PMID:26577729

  17. Control of microbiological corrosion on carbon steel with sodium hypochlorite and biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara H; Lima, Maria Alice G A; França, Francisca P; Vieira, Magda R S; Silva, Pulkra; Urtiga Filho, Severino L

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the interaction of a mixture of a biocide, sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and a biopolymer, xanthan, with carbon steel coupons exposed to seawater in a turbulent flow regime was studied. The cell concentrations, corrosion rates, biomasses, and exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced on the coupon surfaces with the various treatments were quantified. The corrosion products were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surfaces of steels were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that xanthan and the hypochlorite-xanthan mixture reduced the corrosion rate of steel. PMID:26997238

  18. Interfacial structuring in a phase-separating mixed biopolymer solution containing colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Hassan; Murray, Brent S; Dickinson, Eric

    2009-02-01

    We report confocal microscopy observations of the spatial distribution of monodisperse charge-stabilized colloidal particles (amphoteric polystyrene latex) incorporated within a spinodal-type phase-separating system of mixed biopolymers (gelatin + oxidized starch). Images from samples aged at 40 degrees C demonstrate a strong tendency for the added particles to accumulate at the liquid-liquid interface and to influence the rate of coarsening of the complex bicontinuous microstructure. Large variations in the local curvature of particle-rich interfacial regions are suggestive of a liquid-liquid boundary that is substantially viscoelastic. PMID:19138064

  19. Engineered biosealant strains producing inorganic and organic biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bergdale, Terran E; Pinkelman, Rebecca J; Hughes, Stephen R; Zambelli, Barbara; Ciurli, Stefano; Bang, Sookie S

    2012-10-31

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has shown its potential in remediation of a wide range of structural damages including concrete cracks. In this study, genetically engineered microorganisms, capable of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) as well as inducing MICCP, were developed based on the assumption that the complex of inorganic CaCO(3) and organic EPS would provide a stronger matrix than MICCP alone as biosealant. In order to develop a recombinant biosealant microorganism, the entire Sporosarcina pasteurii urease gene sequences including ureA, ureB, ureC, ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG from plasmid pBU11 were sub-cloned into the shuttle vector, pUCP18. The newly constructed plasmid, pUBU1, was transformed into two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, 8821 and PAO1, to develop recombinants capable of inducing calcite precipitation in addition to their own ability to produce EPS. Nickel-dependent urease activities were expressed from the recombinant P. aeruginosa 8821 (pUBU1) and P. aeruginosa PAO1 (pUBU1), at 99.4% and 60.9% of the S. pasteurii urease activity, respectively, in a medium containing 2mM NiCl(2). No urease activities were detected from the wild type P. aeruginosa 8821 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 under the same growth conditions. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains induced CaCO(3) precipitation at a comparable rate as S. pasteurii and scanning electron microscopy evidenced the complex of CaCO(3) crystals and EPS layers surrounding the cells. The engineered strains produced in this study are expected to serve as a valuable reference to future biosealants that could be applied in the environment. However, the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa, used here only as a model system to show the proof of principle, prevents the use of this recombinant organism as a biosealant. In practical applications, other recombinant organisms should be used. PMID:22789480

  20. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain. PMID:26758452